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Sample records for bcl-1 gene rearrangement

  1. Multiplex PCR for the detection of BCL-1/IGH and BCL-2/IGH gene rearrangements--clinical validation in a prospective study of blood and bone marrow in 258 patients with or suspected of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvold, Charlotte G; Bendix, Knud; Brandsborg, Margrethe

    2007-01-01

    prospectively been evaluated. Eleven patients (4%) were found t(11;14)+ and 37 patients (14%) t(14;18)+. Comparing these results to standard diagnostic methods of PB and/or BM identified PCR+ samples that were normal by morphology (BCL-1/IGH: 1/11; BCL-2/IGH: 17/37). Equally important, patients who were......We have designed a multiplex PCR, which allows for fast and high throughput demonstration of the BCL-1/IGH and BCL-2/IGH fusion DNA observed primarily in mantle cell- and follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Blood (PB) and/or bone marrow (BM) from 258 patients suspected of NHL have...... not clonal in PB and/or BM by flow cytometry were identified as PCR+ (BCL-1/IGH: 3/11; BCL-2/IGH: 23/37). We conclude that this multiplex approach allows for easy and sensitive molecular determination of molecular lesions in NHL, which have diagnostic and prognostic importance. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-null...

  2. Gene activation by induced DNA rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnipper, L.E.; Chan, V.; Sedivy, J.; Jat, P.; Sharp, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    A murine cell line (EN/NIH) containing the retroviral vector ZIPNeoSV(x)1 that was modified by deletion of the enhancer elements in the viral long terminal repeats has been used as an assay system to detect induced DNA rearrangements that result in activation of a transcriptionally silent reporter gene encoded by the viral genome. The spontaneous frequency of G418 resistance is less than 10(-7), whereas exposure to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or the combination of UV irradiation plus TPA resulted in the emergence of drug resistant cell lines at a frequency of 5 per 10(6) and 67 per 10(6) cells, respectively. In several of the cell lines that were analyzed a low level of amplification of one of the two parental retroviral integrants was observed, whereas in others no alteration in the region of the viral genome was detected. To determine the effect of the SV40 large T antigen on induced DNA rearrangements, EN/NIH cells were transfected with a temperature sensitive (ts) mutant of SV40 T. Transfectants were maintained at the permissive temperature (33 degrees C) for varying periods of time (1-5 days) in order to vary SV40 T antigen exposure, after which they were shifted to 39.5 degrees C for selection in G418. The frequency of emergence of drug resistant cell clones increased with duration of exposure to large T antigen (9-52 per 10(6) cells over 1-5 days, respectively), and all cell lines analyzed demonstrated DNA rearrangements in the region of the neo gene. A novel 18-kilobase pair XbaI fragment was cloned from one cell line which revealed the presence of a 2.0-kilobase pair EcoRI segment containing an inverted duplication which hybridized to neo sequences. It is likely that the observed rearrangement was initiated by the specific binding of large T antigen to the SV40 origin of replication encoded within the viral genome

  3. Divergence of gene regulation through chromosomal rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messing Joachim

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms that modify genome structures to give birth and death to alleles are still not well understood. To investigate the causative chromosomal rearrangements, we took advantage of the allelic diversity of the duplicated p1 and p2 genes in maize. Both genes encode a transcription factor involved in maysin synthesis, which confers resistance to corn earworm. However, p1 also controls accumulation of reddish pigments in floral tissues and has therefore acquired a new function after gene duplication. p1 alleles vary in their tissue-specific expression, which is indicated in their allele designation: the first suffix refers to red or white pericarp pigmentation and the second to red or white glume pigmentation. Results Comparing chromosomal regions comprising p1-ww[4Co63], P1-rw1077 and P1-rr4B2 alleles with that of the reference genome, P1-wr[B73], enabled us to reconstruct additive events of transposition, chromosome breaks and repairs, and recombination that resulted in phenotypic variation and chimeric regulatory signals. The p1-ww[4Co63] null allele is probably derived from P1-wr[B73] by unequal crossover between large flanking sequences. A transposon insertion in a P1-wr-like allele and NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining could have resulted in the formation of the P1-rw1077 allele. A second NHEJ event, followed by unequal crossover, probably led to the duplication of an enhancer region, creating the P1-rr4B2 allele. Moreover, a rather dynamic picture emerged in the use of polyadenylation signals by different p1 alleles. Interestingly, p1 alleles can be placed on both sides of a large retrotransposon cluster through recombination, while functional p2 alleles have only been found proximal to the cluster. Conclusions Allelic diversity of the p locus exemplifies how gene duplications promote phenotypic variability through composite regulatory signals. Transposition events increase the level of genomic complexity

  4. Sterile DJH rearrangements reveal that distance between gene segments on the human Ig H chain locus influences their ability to rearrange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina Østergaard; Lange, Anders Blaabjerg; Barington, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Rearrangement of the Ig locus occurs in two steps. First, a JH gene is rearranged to a D gene followed by a VH gene rearranging to the DJH rearrangement. By next generation sequencing, we analyzed 9969 unique DJH rearrangements and 5919 unique VHDJH rearrangements obtained from peripheral blood B...... cells from 110 healthy adult donors. We found that DJH rearrangements and nonproductive VHDJH rearrangements share many features but differ significantly in their use of D genes and propensity for somatic hypermutation. In D to JH gene rearrangements, the D genes proximal to the JH locus are used more...... frequently than JH locus distal D genes, whereas VH locus proximal D genes were observed more frequently in nonproductive VHDJH rearrangements. We further demonstrate that the distance between VH, D, and JH gene segments influence their ability to rearrange within the human Ig locus....

  5. Complete nucleotide sequence and gene rearrangement of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 93; Issue 3. Complete nucleotide sequence and gene rearrangement of the mitochondrial genome of Occidozyga martensii. En Li Xiaoqiang Li Xiaobing Wu Ge Feng Man Zhang Haitao Shi Lijun Wang Jianping Jiang. Research Article Volume 93 Issue 3 December 2014 pp 631-641 ...

  6. Detection of the gene rearrangement in chronic myelogenous leukemia with biotinylated gene probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilzer, L.L.; Concepcion, E.G.

    1989-01-01

    The breakpoint cluster region gene rearrangement associated with chronic myelogenous leukemia is becoming important in the diagnosis and management of the disease. At this time, the ability to demonstrate the gene rearrangement is limited to a few research laboratories. The problem results partially from unfamiliarity of medical laboratory personnel with DNA technology, but more because of the restricted use of radiolabeled phosphorus in hospital laboratories. With the introduction of biotinylated deoxynucleotides, nucleic acid hybridization procedures can now be performed without the use of radioisotopically labeled gene probes. This article describes the use of biotin-labeled gene probes to detect the gene rearrangement of the breakpoint cluster region of chromosome 22 in chronic myelogenous leukemia. The techniques are reproducible, sensitive, and safe. With the procedures described in this article, the assay can become more available to medical laboratories interested in offering this diagnostic and decision-making tool

  7. Recurrent RET Gene Rearrangements in Intraductal Carcinomas of Salivary Gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, Ilan; Bishop, Justin A; Chiosea, Simion I; Seethala, Raja R; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Assaad, Adel; Oliai, Bahram R; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2018-04-01

    Intraductal carcinoma (IC) is the World Health Organization designation for lesions previously called low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma. The relationship of IC to salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) is controversial, but currently these are considered distinct entities. It is hypothesized that IC and SDC should have different genomic signatures that may be identifiable by next-generation sequencing. A total of 23 ICs were identified: 14 pure IC and 9 invasive carcinomas with an intraductal component. Five invasive carcinomas were subjected to next-generation paired-end RNA sequencing. Data analysis was performed using FusionSeq and Mutation detection algorithms (MuTect and VarScan) for variant callers. Gene fusion candidates were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and mutations by Sanger sequencing. Among the 9 invasive carcinomas, all except 1 were apocrine SDCs with an intraductal component. The remaining case showed typical intercalated duct type IC with invasive adenocarcinoma. The 14 pure ICs had typical intercalated duct features (2 showed hybrid intercalated/apocrine features). RNA sequencing predicted a NCOA4-RET fusion, confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, in the intercalated duct type IC invasive component. Six additional cases of pure IC showed RET rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization (7/15=47%). No apocrine carcinomas showed RET rearrangement. RNA sequencing and Sanger sequencing identified PIK3CA (p.E545K/p.H1047R) and/or HRAS (p.Q61R) hotspot mutations in 6 of 8 (75%) apocrine carcinomas. In conclusion, 2 distinctive types of intraductal lesions are emerging based on molecular analysis. Classic intercalated type ICs commonly harbor fusions involving RET and rarely show widespread invasion. Apocrine intraductal lesions are typically associated with widespread invasion with no pure examples and show similar PIK3CA and HRAS mutations to SDC.

  8. Human heavy-chain variable region gene family nonrandomly rearranged in familial chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, A.; Humphries, C.; Tucker, P.; Blattner, F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have identified a family of human immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable-region (V/sub H/) genes, one member of which is rearranged in two affected members of a family in which the father and four of five siblings developed chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Cloning and sequencing of the rearranged V/sub H/ genes from leukemic lymphocytes of three affected siblings showed that two siblings had rearranged V/sub H/ genes (V/sub H/TS1 and V/sub H/WS1) that were 90% homologous. The corresponding germ-line gene, V/sub H/251, was found to part of a small (four gene) V/sub H/ gene family, which they term V/sub H/V. The DNA sequence homology to V/sub H/WS1 (95%) and V/sub H/TS1 (88%) and identical restriction sites on the 5' side of V/sub H/ confirm that rearrangement of V/sub H/251 followed by somatic mutation produced the identical V/sub H/ gene rearrangements in the two siblings. V/sub H/TS1 is not a functional V/sub H/ gene; a functional V/sub H/ rearrangement was found on the other chromosome of this patient. The other two siblings had different V/sub H/ gene rearrangements. All used different diversity genes. Mechanisms proposed for nonrandom selection of a single V/sub H/ gene include developmental regulation of this V/sub H/ gene rearrangement or selection of a subpopulation of B cells in which this V/sub H/ has been rearranged

  9. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangements and the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez, David; van der Burg, Mirjam; Garcia-Sanz, Ramon; Fenton, James A.; Langerak, Anton W.; Gonzalez, Marcos; van Dongen, Jacques J. M.; Miguel, Jesus F. San; Morgan, Gareth J.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to rearrange the germ-line DNA to generate antibody diversity is an essential prerequisite for the production of a functional repertoire. While this is essential to prevent infections, it also represents the "Achilles heal" of the B-cell lineage, occasionally leading to malignant

  10. Marfan syndrome with a complex chromosomal rearrangement including deletion of the FBN1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colovati Mileny ES

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of Marfan syndrome (MFS cases is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1, mapped to chromosome 15q21.1. Only few reports on deletions including the whole FBN1 gene, detected by molecular cytogenetic techniques, were found in literature. Results We report here on a female patient with clinical symptoms of the MFS spectrum plus craniostenosis, hypothyroidism and intellectual deficiency who presents a 1.9 Mb deletion, including the FBN1 gene and a complex rearrangement with eight breakpoints involving chromosomes 6, 12 and 15. Discussion This is the first report of MFS with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving a deletion of FBN1 and contiguous genes. In addition to the typical clinical findings of the Marfan syndrome due to FBN1 gene haploinsufficiency, the patient presents features which may be due to the other gene deletions and possibly to the complex chromosome rearrangement.

  11. Family expansion and gene rearrangements contributed to the functional specialization of PRDM genes in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcalay Myriam

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progressive diversification of paralogs after gene expansion is essential to increase their functional specialization. However, mode and tempo of this divergence remain mostly unclear. Here we report the comparative analysis of PRDM genes, a family of putative transcriptional regulators involved in human tumorigenesis. Results Our analysis assessed that the PRDM genes originated in metazoans, expanded in vertebrates and further duplicated in primates. We experimentally showed that fast-evolving paralogs are poorly expressed, and that the most recent duplicates, such as primate-specific PRDM7, acquire tissue-specificity. PRDM7 underwent major structural rearrangements that decreased the number of encoded Zn-Fingers and modified gene splicing. Through internal duplication and activation of a non-canonical splice site (GC-AG, PRDM7 can acquire a novel intron. We also detected an alternative isoform that can retain the intron in the mature transcript and that is predominantly expressed in human melanocytes. Conclusion Our findings show that (a molecular evolution of paralogs correlates with their expression pattern; (b gene diversification is obtained through massive genomic rearrangements; and (c splicing modification contributes to the functional specialization of novel genes.

  12. Diverse, Biologically Relevant, and Targetable Gene Rearrangements in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer and Other Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Timothy M; Lehmann, Brian D; Beeler, J Scott; Li, Chung-I; Li, Zhu; Jin, Hailing; Stricker, Thomas P; Shyr, Yu; Pietenpol, Jennifer A

    2016-08-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and other molecularly heterogeneous malignancies present a significant clinical challenge due to a lack of high-frequency "driver" alterations amenable to therapeutic intervention. These cancers often exhibit genomic instability, resulting in chromosomal rearrangements that affect the structure and expression of protein-coding genes. However, identification of these rearrangements remains technically challenging. Using a newly developed approach that quantitatively predicts gene rearrangements in tumor-derived genetic material, we identified and characterized a novel oncogenic fusion involving the MER proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (MERTK) and discovered a clinical occurrence and cell line model of the targetable FGFR3-TACC3 fusion in TNBC. Expanding our analysis to other malignancies, we identified a diverse array of novel and known hybrid transcripts, including rearrangements between noncoding regions and clinically relevant genes such as ALK, CSF1R, and CD274/PD-L1 The over 1,000 genetic alterations we identified highlight the importance of considering noncoding gene rearrangement partners, and the targetable gene fusions identified in TNBC demonstrate the need to advance gene fusion detection for molecularly heterogeneous cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4850-60. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Processes of fungal proteome evolution and gain of function: gene duplication and domain rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen-Gihon, Inbar; Nussinov, Ruth; Sharan, Roded

    2011-01-01

    During evolution, organisms have gained functional complexity mainly by modifying and improving existing functioning systems rather than creating new ones ab initio. Here we explore the interplay between two processes which during evolution have had major roles in the acquisition of new functions: gene duplication and protein domain rearrangements. We consider four possible evolutionary scenarios: gene families that have undergone none of these event types; only gene duplication; only domain rearrangement, or both events. We characterize each of the four evolutionary scenarios by functional attributes. Our analysis of ten fungal genomes indicates that at least for the fungi clade, species significantly appear to gain complexity by gene duplication accompanied by the expansion of existing domain architectures via rearrangements. We show that paralogs gaining new domain architectures via duplication tend to adopt new functions compared to paralogs that preserve their domain architectures. We conclude that evolution of protein families through gene duplication and domain rearrangement is correlated with their functional properties. We suggest that in general, new functions are acquired via the integration of gene duplication and domain rearrangements rather than each process acting independently

  14. Aberrant immunoglobulin and c-myc gene rearrangements in patients with nonmalignant monoclonal cryoglobulinemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, A.; Wang, N.; Williams, J.M.; Hunt, M.J.; Rosenfeld, S.I.; Condemi, J.J.; Packman, C.H.; Abraham, G.N.

    1987-01-01

    The status of the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes was investigated in patients with idiopathic nonmalignant monoclonal IgG cryoglobulinemia (NCG). In NCG, monoclonal antibodies are synthesized at an accelerated rate by nonmalignant B lymphocytes. In order to determine whether this high production rate is related to a clonal B cell expansion, the rearrangement of the Ig genes was investigated by Southern blot analysis of genomic, 32 P-labelled, DNA extracted from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of four NCG patients. In three of four (VI, BR, and CH) clonal expansion of B cells was detected using probes specific for the genes. BamHI digestion of DNA from VI and BR produced three rearranged fragments which cohybridized with two of the probes. This finding suggested the presence of additional nonsecretory B cell clones and/or disruption of the gene segments spanned by and detected with the probes. In addition, the possibility of aberrant gene rearrangements was supported by noting the alteration of the c-myc gene locus in genomic DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of VI and CH. Northern blot analysis of RNA isolated from peripheral blood B cells of VI and CH demonstrated aberrant transcripts of the c-myc gene, showing an active role of the altered c-myc locus. Detection of c-myc rearrangement in NCG patients clearly shows that this event may not be a final step in malignant B cell transformation

  15. Characterization of breakpoint sequences of five rearrangements in L1CAM and ABCD1 (ALD) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsche, Kerstin; Ressler, Bernadette; Katzera, Heide-Gertrude; Orth, Ulrike; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Morlot, Susanne; Schwinger, Eberhard; Gal, Andreas

    2002-05-01

    Mutations in L1CAM are responsible for X-linked hydrocephalus, whereas those in the ALD gene (ABCD1) cause adrenoleukodystrophy. In both genes, most of the mutations reported so far are short-length mutations and only a few patients with larger rearrangements have been documented. We have characterized three intragenic deletions of the ALD gene at the molecular level and describe here the first two L1CAM rearrangements resulting in deletion of several exons in one case and about 50 kb, including the entire gene, in the second case. At both breakpoints of an ALD deletion, Alu repeats have been found and, additionally, a short Alu region of approximately 130 bp was inserted, suggesting that this rearrangement is the result of a more complex non-allelic homologous recombination event. Only one Alu element was present at the breakpoint of the second ALD rearrangement, including a 26-bp Alu core sequence that was suggested to be a recombinogenic hot spot. These data suggest the involvement of an Alu core sequence-stimulated non-homologous recombination as a possible cause for this rearrangement. Short direct repeats were identified at all putative mispaired sequences in the L1CAM breakpoints and at both breakpoints of the third ALD deletion characterized, suggesting non-homologous (illegitimate) recombination as the molecular mechanism by which these latter deletions occurred. In conclusion, our results indicate that highly repetitive elements as well as short direct repeats are frequently involved in the formation of ALD and L1CAM gene rearrangements. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Immunoglobulin gene expression and regulation of rearrangement in kappa transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    Transgenic mice were produced by microinjection of the functionally rearranged immunoglobulin kappa gene from the myeloma MOPC-21 into the male pronucleus of fertilized mouse eggs, and implantation of the microinjected embryos into foster mothers. Mice that integrated the injected gene were detected by hybridizing tail DNA dots with radioactively labelled pBR322 plasmid DNA, which detects pBR322 sequences left as a tag on the microinjected DNA. Mice that integrated the injected gene (six males) were mated and the DNA, RNA and serum kappa chains of their offspring were analyzed. A rabbit anti-mouse kappa chain antiserum was also produced for use in detection of mouse kappa chains on protein blots. Hybridomas were produced from the spleen cells of these kappa transgenic mice to immortalize representative B cells and to investigate expression of the transgenic kappa gene, its effect on allelic exclusion, and its effect on the control of light chain gene rearrangement and expression. The results show that the microinjected DNA is integrated as concatamers in unique single or, rarely, two separate sites in the genome. The concatamers are composed of several copies (16 to 64) of injected DNA arranged in a head to tail fashion. The transgene is expressed into protein normally and in a tissue specific fashion. For the first time in these transgenic mice, all tissues contain a functionally rearranged and potentially expressible immunoglobulin gene. The transgene is expressed only in B cells and not in hepatocytes, for example. This indicates that rearrangement of immunoglobulin genes is necessary but not sufficient for the tissue specific expression of these genes by B cells

  17. The effects of chromosome rearrangements on the expression of heterochromatic genes in chromosome 2L of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakimoto, B.T.; Hearn, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    The light (lt) gene of Drosophila melanogaster is located at the base of the left arm of chromosome 2, within or very near centromeric heterochromatin (2Lh). Chromosome rearrangements that move the lt + gene from its normal proximal position and place the gene in distal euchromatin result in mosaic or variegated expression of the gene. The cytogenetic and genetic properties of 17 lt-variegated rearrangements induced by X radiation are described in this report. The authors show that five of the heterochromatic genes adjacent to lt are subject to inactivation by these rearrangements and that the euchromatic loci in proximal 2L are not detectably affected. The properties of the rearrangements suggest that proximity to heterochromatin is an important regulatory requirement for at least six 2Lh genes. They discuss how the properties of the position effects on heterochromatic genes relate to other proximity-dependent phenomena such as transvection

  18. Diagnostic value of immunoglobulin κ light chain gene rearrangement analysis in B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokovic, Ira; Jezersek Novakovic, Barbara; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of the immunoglobulin κ light chain (IGK) gene is an alternative method for B-cell clonality assessment in the diagnosis of mature B-cell proliferations in which the detection of clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangements fails. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the added value of standardized BIOMED-2 assay for the detection of clonal IGK gene rearrangements in the diagnostic setting of suspected B-cell lymphomas. With this purpose, 92 specimens from 80 patients with the final diagnosis of mature B-cell lymphoma (37 specimens), mature T-cell lymphoma (26 specimens) and reactive lymphoid proliferation (29 specimens) were analyzed for B-cell clonality. B-cell clonality analysis was performed using the BIOMED-2 IGH and IGK gene clonality assays. The determined sensitivity of the IGK assay was 67.6%, while the determined sensitivity of the IGH assay was 75.7%. The sensitivity of combined IGH+IGK assay was 81.1%. The determined specificity of the IGK assay was 96.2% in the group of T-cell lymphomas and 96.6% in the group of reactive lesions. The determined specificity of the IGH assay was 84.6% in the group of lymphomas and 86.2% in the group of reactive lesions. The comparison of GeneScan (GS) and heteroduplex pretreatment-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (HD-PAGE) methods for the analysis of IGK gene rearrangements showed a higher efficacy of GS analysis in a series of 27 B-cell lymphomas analyzed by both methods. In the present study, we demonstrated that by applying the combined IGH+IGK clonality assay the overall detection rate of B-cell clonality was increased by 5.4%. Thus, we confirmed the added value of the standardized BIOMED-2 IGK assay for assessment of B-cell clonality in suspected B-cell lymphomas with inconclusive clinical and cyto/histological diagnosis.

  19. Large genomic rearrangement of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in familial breast cancer patients in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ja Young; Cho, Dae-Yeon; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Choi, Su-Youn; Shin, Inkyung; Park, Hyun Gyu; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Hee Jeong; Yu, Jong Han; Ko, Beom Seok; Ku, Bo Kyung; Son, Byung Ho

    2014-06-01

    We screened large genomic rearrangements of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in Korean, familial breast cancer patients. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay was used to identify BRCA1 and BRCA2 genomic rearrangements in 226 Korean familial breast cancer patients with risk factors for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, who previously tested negative for point mutations in the two genes. We identified only one large deletion (c.4186-1593_4676-1465del) in BRCA1. No large rearrangements were found in BRCA2. Our result indicates that large genomic rearrangement in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes does not seem like a major determinant of breast cancer susceptibility in the Korean population. A large-scale study needs to validate our result in Korea.

  20. Comparative Mitogenomics of the Genus Odontobutis (Perciformes: Gobioidei: Odontobutidae) Revealed Conserved Gene Rearrangement and High Sequence Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhihong; Yang, Xuefen; Bercsenyi, Miklos; Wu, Junjie; Yu, Yongyao; Wei, Kaijian; Fan, Qixue; Yang, Ruibin

    2015-01-01

    To understand the molecular evolution of mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) in the genus Odontobutis, the mitogenome of Odontobutis yaluensis was sequenced and compared with those of another four Odontobutis species. Our results displayed similar mitogenome features among species in genome organization, base composition, codon usage, and gene rearrangement. The identical gene rearrangement of trnS-trnL-trnH tRNA cluster observed in mitogenomes of these five closely related freshwater sleepers suggests that this unique gene order is conserved within Odontobutis. Additionally, the present gene order and the positions of associated intergenic spacers of these Odontobutis mitogenomes indicate that this unusual gene rearrangement results from tandem duplication and random loss of large-scale gene regions. Moreover, these mitogenomes exhibit a high level of sequence variation, mainly due to the differences of corresponding intergenic sequences in gene rearrangement regions and the heterogeneity of tandem repeats in the control regions. Phylogenetic analyses support Odontobutis species with shared gene rearrangement forming a monophyletic group, and the interspecific phylogenetic relationships are associated with structural differences among their mitogenomes. The present study contributes to understanding the evolutionary patterns of Odontobutidae species. PMID:26492246

  1. Recurrent Rearrangements of Human Amylase Genes Create Multiple Independent CNV Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwan, Nzar A A; Louzada, Sandra; Yang, Fengtang; Armour, John A L

    2017-05-01

    The human amylase gene cluster includes the human salivary (AMY1) and pancreatic amylase genes (AMY2A and AMY2B), and is a highly variable and dynamic region of the genome. Copy number variation (CNV) of AMY1 has been implicated in human dietary adaptation, and in population association with obesity, but neither of these findings has been independently replicated. Despite these functional implications, the structural genomic basis of CNV has only been defined in detail very recently. In this work, we use high-resolution analysis of copy number, and analysis of segregation in trios, to define new, independent allelic series of amylase CNVs in sub-Saharan Africans, including a series of higher-order expansions of a unit consisting of one copy each of AMY1, AMY2A, and AMY2B. We use fiber-FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) to define unexpected complexity in the accompanying rearrangements. These findings demonstrate recurrent involvement of the amylase gene region in genomic instability, involving at least five independent rearrangements of the pancreatic amylase genes (AMY2A and AMY2B). Structural features shared by fundamentally distinct lineages strongly suggest that the common ancestral state for the human amylase cluster contained more than one, and probably three, copies of AMY1. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  2. Automation of ALK gene rearrangement testing with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Merkle, Dennis; Cabillic, Florian; Berg, Erica; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Grazioli, Vittorio; Herelle, Olga; Hummel, Michael; Le Calve, Michele; Lenze, Dido; Mende, Stefanie; Pauwels, Patrick; Quilichini, Benoit; Repetti, Elena

    2015-02-01

    In the past several years we have observed a significant increase in our understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive lung cancer. Specifically in the non-small cell lung cancer sub-types, ALK gene rearrangements represent a sub-group of tumors that are targetable by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Crizotinib, resulting in significant reductions in tumor burden. Phase II and III clinical trials were performed using an ALK break-apart FISH probe kit, making FISH the gold standard for identifying ALK rearrangements in patients. FISH is often considered a labor and cost intensive molecular technique, and in this study we aimed to demonstrate feasibility for automation of ALK FISH testing, to improve laboratory workflow and ease of testing. This involved automation of the pre-treatment steps of the ALK assay using various protocols on the VP 2000 instrument, and facilitating automated scanning of the fluorescent FISH specimens for simplified enumeration on various backend scanning and analysis systems. The results indicated that ALK FISH can be automated. Significantly, both the Ikoniscope and BioView system of automated FISH scanning and analysis systems provided a robust analysis algorithm to define ALK rearrangements. In addition, the BioView system facilitated consultation of difficult cases via the internet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dissecting the structure and mechanism of a complex duplication-triplication rearrangement in the DMD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishmukhametova, Aliya; Chen, Jian-Min; Bernard, Rafaëlle; de Massy, Bernard; Baudat, Frédéric; Boyer, Amandine; Méchin, Déborah; Thorel, Delphine; Chabrol, Brigitte; Vincent, Marie-Claire; Khau Van Kien, Philippe; Claustres, Mireille; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie

    2013-08-01

    Pathogenic complex genomic rearrangements are being increasingly characterized at the nucleotide level, providing unprecedented opportunities to evaluate the complexities of mutational mechanisms. Here, we report the molecular characterization of a complex duplication-triplication rearrangement involving exons 45-60 of the DMD gene. Inverted repeats facilitated this complex rearrangement, which shares common genomic organization with the recently described duplication-inverted triplication-duplication (DUP-TRP/INV-DUP) events; specifically, a 690-kb region comprising DMD exons from 45 to 60 was duplicated in tandem, and another 46-kb segment containing exon 51 was inserted inversely in between them. Taking into consideration (1) the presence of a predicted PRDM9 binding site in the near vicinity of the junction involving two inverted L1 elements and (2) the inherent properties of X-Y chromosome recombination during male meiosis, we proposed an alternative two-step model for the generation of this X-linked DMD DUP-TRP/INV-DUP event. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  4. Human ETS2 gene on chromosome 21 is not rearranged in Alzheimer disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacchi, N.; Nalbantoglu, J.; Sergovich, F.R.; Papas, T.S. (National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD (USA))

    1988-10-01

    The human ETS2 gene, a member of the ETS gene family, with sequence homology with the retroviral ets sequence of the avian erythroblastosis retrovirus E26 is located on chromosome 21. Molecular genetic analysis of Down syndrome (DS) patients with partial trisomy 21 allowed us to reinforce the supposition that ETS2 may be a gene of the minimal DS genetic region. It was originally proposed that a duplication of a portion of the DS region represents the genetic basis of Alzheimer disease, a condition associated also with DS. No evidence of either rearrangements or duplications of ETS2 could be detected in DNA from fibroblasts and brain tissue of Alzheimer disease patients with either the sporadic or the familiar form of the disease. Thus, an altered ETS2 gene dosage does not seem to be a genetic cause or component of Alzheimer disease.

  5. Human ETS2 gene on chromosome 21 is not rearranged in Alzheimer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacchi, N.; Nalbantoglu, J.; Sergovich, F.R.; Papas, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    The human ETS2 gene, a member of the ETS gene family, with sequence homology with the retroviral ets sequence of the avian erythroblastosis retrovirus E26 is located on chromosome 21. Molecular genetic analysis of Down syndrome (DS) patients with partial trisomy 21 allowed us to reinforce the supposition that ETS2 may be a gene of the minimal DS genetic region. It was originally proposed that a duplication of a portion of the DS region represents the genetic basis of Alzheimer disease, a condition associated also with DS. No evidence of either rearrangements or duplications of ETS2 could be detected in DNA from fibroblasts and brain tissue of Alzheimer disease patients with either the sporadic or the familiar form of the disease. Thus, an altered ETS2 gene dosage does not seem to be a genetic cause or component of Alzheimer disease

  6. progressiveMauve: multiple genome alignment with gene gain, loss and rearrangement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E Darling

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple genome alignment remains a challenging problem. Effects of recombination including rearrangement, segmental duplication, gain, and loss can create a mosaic pattern of homology even among closely related organisms.We describe a new method to align two or more genomes that have undergone rearrangements due to recombination and substantial amounts of segmental gain and loss (flux. We demonstrate that the new method can accurately align regions conserved in some, but not all, of the genomes, an important case not handled by our previous work. The method uses a novel alignment objective score called a sum-of-pairs breakpoint score, which facilitates accurate detection of rearrangement breakpoints when genomes have unequal gene content. We also apply a probabilistic alignment filtering method to remove erroneous alignments of unrelated sequences, which are commonly observed in other genome alignment methods. We describe new metrics for quantifying genome alignment accuracy which measure the quality of rearrangement breakpoint predictions and indel predictions. The new genome alignment algorithm demonstrates high accuracy in situations where genomes have undergone biologically feasible amounts of genome rearrangement, segmental gain and loss. We apply the new algorithm to a set of 23 genomes from the genera Escherichia, Shigella, and Salmonella. Analysis of whole-genome multiple alignments allows us to extend the previously defined concepts of core- and pan-genomes to include not only annotated genes, but also non-coding regions with potential regulatory roles. The 23 enterobacteria have an estimated core-genome of 2.46Mbp conserved among all taxa and a pan-genome of 15.2Mbp. We document substantial population-level variability among these organisms driven by segmental gain and loss. Interestingly, much variability lies in intergenic regions, suggesting that the Enterobacteriacae may exhibit regulatory divergence.The multiple genome alignments

  7. [Application of Combined Detection of Fusion Gene and BIOMED-2 Standardized Ig Gene Rearrangement System in Childhood B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Xin-Rong; Zheng, Ying-Chun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Li, Qing-Hua

    2016-04-01

    To explore the application of combined detection of fusion gene and BIOMED-2 standardized immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangement system in diagnosis and treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Multiplex-PCR amplifications and RQ-PCR of RNA/DNA were performed using ALL fusion gene detection kit and BIOMED-2 primer. The Ig gene rearrangements were analyzed by using PCR fragment analysis system. Out of 251 children with B-ALL, 77 cases were TEL-AML1(+) , 28 cases were E2A-PBX1(+) , 10 cases were MLL-AF4(+) , 11 cases were BCR-ABL(+) , the total positive rate was 50.2%, 82.5% showed IgH VH-JH rearrangement, 53.4% showed IgK rearrangement. The positive rate of combined detection of fusion gene and gene rearrangement was 99%. E2A-PBX1(+) and MLL-AF4(+) with IgK(+) gene rearrangement group was compared with negative control group, the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001 or P = 0.005); 105 ALL fusion gene positive cases had been detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) simultaneously, the accordance rate of fusion gene and FISH was more than 94%. The combined detection of ALL fusion gene and BIOMED-2 standardized clonality analysis system can improve the positive detected rate of B-ALL dramatically, and make the grouping of disease prognosis more accurately; this combined detection is a more faster and sensitive method than FISH.

  8. The mitochondrial genome of Iberobaenia (Coleoptera: Iberobaeniidae): first rearrangement of protein-coding genes in the beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andujar, Carmelo; Arribas, Paula; Linard, Benjamin; Kundrata, Robin; Bocak, Ladislav; Vogler, Alfried P

    2017-03-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the recently discovered beetle family Iberobaeniidae is described and compared with known coleopteran mitogenomes. The mitochondrial sequence was obtained by shotgun metagenomic sequencing using the Illumina Miseq technology and resulted in an average coverage of 130 × and a minimum coverage of 35×. The mitochondrial genome of Iberobaeniidae includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs genes, and 1 putative control region, and showed a unique rearrangement of protein-coding genes. This is the first rearrangement affecting the relative position of protein-coding and ribosomal genes reported for the order Coleoptera.

  9. TCRgamma gene rearrangement analysis in skin samples and peripheral blood of mycosis fungoides patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandolf Sekulović, L; Cikota, B; Stojadinović, O; Basanović, J; Skiljević, D; Medenica, Lj; Pavlović, M; Magić, Z

    2007-12-01

    Diagnosing mycosis fungoides (MF) can be challenging in the early stage of the disease because histopathological features may simulate a variety of benign inflammatory skin diseases. Assessment of T-cell clonality was found to be useful in diagnosis and follow-up of patients. In this study, PCR-based TCRgamma gene rearrangement analysis was performed in skin and peripheral blood samples of patients with MF treated at the two largest referral centers in Serbia, and the results obtained were correlated with clinical and follow-up data. Skin and peripheral blood samples were obtained with informed consent from 37 patients treated at the Department of Dermatology of the Military Medical Academy and the Medical Center of Serbia from 2001 to 2006. The median time of follow-up was 4 years. Multiplex PCR was used for TCRgamma gene rearrangement analysis in skin and peripheral blood samples. Clonality results were correlated with the clinical data and disease course data. Monoclonality was detected in skin samples of 30/37 patients (81%), in 2/5 patients with large-plaque parapsoriasis (LPP), in 28/32 (88%) patients with histologically proven MF, and in 1/16 (6%) patients with benign inflammatory dermatoses. A monoclonal pattern in both skin and peripheral blood was detected in 7/16 (44%) patients in the late stage of the disease, and in 1/7 (14%) patients in the early stage of the disease. A dominant clone was found in both skin and peripheral blood in 1/4 patients in remission, 2/5 with a stable disease, and 4/9 (44%) with disease progression. TCR-gamma gene rearrangement analysis can be regarded as a useful adjunct to diagnosis of epidermotropic lymphoproliferative disorders. The presence of a dominant clone in both the skin and peripheral blood was more frequently detected in late stages and in patients with disease progression, confirming the usefulness of clonality detection by TCR-gamma gene rearrangement analysis in follow-up of patients with primary cutaneous T

  10. Sessile snails, dynamic genomes: gene rearrangements within the mitochondrial genome of a family of caenogastropod molluscs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Widespread sampling of vertebrates, which comprise the majority of published animal mitochondrial genomes, has led to the view that mitochondrial gene rearrangements are relatively rare, and that gene orders are typically stable across major taxonomic groups. In contrast, more limited sampling within the Phylum Mollusca has revealed an unusually high number of gene order arrangements. Here we provide evidence that the lability of the molluscan mitochondrial genome extends to the family level by describing extensive gene order changes that have occurred within the Vermetidae, a family of sessile marine gastropods that radiated from a basal caenogastropod stock during the Cenozoic Era. Results Major mitochondrial gene rearrangements have occurred within this family at a scale unexpected for such an evolutionarily young group and unprecedented for any caenogastropod examined to date. We determined the complete mitochondrial genomes of four species (Dendropoma maximum, D. gregarium, Eualetes tulipa, and Thylacodes squamigerus) and the partial mitochondrial genomes of two others (Vermetus erectus and Thylaeodus sp.). Each of the six vermetid gastropods assayed possessed a unique gene order. In addition to the typical mitochondrial genome complement of 37 genes, additional tRNA genes were evident in D. gregarium (trnK) and Thylacodes squamigerus (trnV, trnLUUR). Three pseudogenes and additional tRNAs found within the genome of Thylacodes squamigerus provide evidence of a past duplication event in this taxon. Likewise, high sequence similarities between isoaccepting leucine tRNAs in Thylacodes, Eualetes, and Thylaeodus suggest that tRNA remolding has been rife within this family. While vermetids exhibit gene arrangements diagnostic of this family, they also share arrangements with littorinimorph caenogastropods, with which they have been linked based on sperm morphology and primary sequence-based phylogenies. Conclusions We have uncovered major changes in gene

  11. Analysis of TCRAD gene recombination: radio-induct rearrangement and signal joint structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touvrey, C.

    2005-09-01

    We have shown that irradiation of pre-TCR-deficient CD3ε -/- mice restores thymocyte differentiation, by a p53-dependent and by a p53-independent pathway. Events normally associated during normal thymocyte development are dissociated in response to radiation exposure. Both of these pathways require LAT expression. Therefore, radiation exposure activates pre-TCR-like signals. TCRA gene rearrangement is induced following radiation exposure. The signal joints resulting from TCRA gene rearrangement have the same structure than those found in wild type mice. All signal joint analyzed in un-manipulated wild type mice do exhibit junctional diversity. This diversity results mainly from TdT activity. We present evidences that proteins involved in DNA repair and genomic stability participated in SJ formation. We propose that signal joint diversity is not an aberrant process but is a key feature of V(D)J recombination. All our work increases our understanding of molecular events associated with V(D)J recombination. (author)

  12. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient ``wasted`` mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{sm_bullet} mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{sm_bullet} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of Sesarmops sinensis reveals gene rearrangements and phylogenetic relationships in Brachyura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo-Ping; Xin, Zhao-Zhe; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Dai-Zhen; Wang, Zheng-Fei; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Chai, Xin-Yue; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Liu, Qiu-Ning

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) is very important to understand molecular evolution and phylogenetics. Herein, in this study, the complete mitogenome of Sesarmops sinensis was reported. The mitogenome was 15,905 bp in size, and contained 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and a control region (CR). The AT skew and the GC skew are both negative in the mitogenomes of S. sinensis. The nucleotide composition of the S. sinensis mitogenome was also biased toward A + T nucleotides (75.7%). All tRNA genes displayed a typical mitochondrial tRNA cloverleaf structure, except for the trnS1 gene, which lacked a dihydroxyuridine arm. S. sinensis exhibits a novel rearrangement compared with the Pancrustacean ground pattern and other Brachyura species. Based on the 13 PCGs, the phylogenetic analysis showed that S. sinensis and Sesarma neglectum were clustered on one branch with high nodal support values, indicating that S. sinensis and S. neglectum have a sister group relationship. The group (S. sinensis + S. neglectum) was sister to (Parasesarmops tripectinis + Metopaulias depressus), suggesting that S. sinensis belongs to Grapsoidea, Sesarmidae. Phylogenetic trees based on amino acid sequences and nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial 13 PCGs using BI and ML respectively indicate that section Eubrachyura consists of four groups clearly. The resulting phylogeny supports the establishment of a separate subsection Potamoida. These four groups correspond to four subsections of Raninoida, Heterotremata, Potamoida, and Thoracotremata.

  14. Rearrangement of RAG-1 recombinase gene in radiation-sensitive ''wasted'' mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.

    1994-01-01

    The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (RAG- 1/RAG-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice (wst). Our results revealed expression of RAG-1 mRNA was detected in spinal cord or brain from wst/wst mice or their normal littermates (wst/sm-bullet mice). In thymus tissue, a small RAG-1 transcript was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/lg-bullet mice, a two-fold increase in RAG-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. RAG-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/sm-bullet and not from wst;/wst or parental control BCF 1 mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement/deletion within the RAG-1 gene of affected wasted mice, not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the RAG-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage

  15. Molecular Analysis of Gene Rearrangements and Mutations in Acute Leukemias and Myeloid Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholl, Lynette M; Longtine, Janina; Kuo, Frank C

    2017-01-11

    A subset of acute leukemias and other myeloid neoplasms contains specific genetic alterations, many of which are associated with unique clinical and pathologic features. These alterations include chromosomal rearrangements leading to oncogenic fusion proteins or alteration of gene expression by juxtaposing oncogenes to enhancer elements, as well as mutations leading to aberrant activation of a variety of proteins critical to hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. Molecular analysis is central to diagnosis and clinical management of leukemias, permitting genetic confirmation of a clinical and histologic impression, providing prognostic and predictive information, and facilitating detection of minimal residual disease. This unit will outline approaches to the molecular diagnosis of the most frequent and clinically relevant genetic alterations in acute leukemias and myeloid neoplasms. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Rearranged Biosynthetic Gene Cluster and Synthesis of Hassallidin E in Planktothrix serta PCC 8927.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancrace, Claire; Jokela, Jouni; Sassoon, Nathalie; Ganneau, Christelle; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Wahlsten, Matti; Humisto, Anu; Calteau, Alexandra; Bay, Sylvie; Fewer, David P; Sivonen, Kaarina; Gugger, Muriel

    2017-07-21

    Cyanobacteria produce a wide range of natural products with antifungal bioactivity. The cyclic glycosylated lipopeptides of the hassallidin family have potent antifungal activity and display a great degree of chemical diversity. Here, we report the discovery of a hassallidin biosynthetic gene cluster from the filamentous cyanobacterium Planktothrix serta PCC 8927. The hassallidin gene cluster showed heavy rearrangement and marks of genomic plasticity. Nucleotide bias, differences in GC content, and phylogenetic incongruence suggested the acquisition of the hassallidin biosynthetic gene cluster in Planktothrix serta PCC 8927 by horizontal gene transfer. Chemical analyses by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry demonstrated that this strain produced hassallidin E, a new glycosylated hassallidin variant. Hassallidin E was the only structural variant produced by Planktothrix serta PCC 8927 in all tested conditions. Further evaluated on human pathogenic fungi, hassallidin E showed an antifungal bioactivity. Hassallidin production levels correlated with nitrogen availability, in the only nitrogen-fixing Planktothrix described so far. Our results provide insights into the distribution and chemical diversity of cyanobacterial antifungal compounds as well as raise questions on their ecological relevance.

  17. Epigenetic aspects of lymphocyte antigen receptor gene rearrangement or ‘when stochasticity completes randomness’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Sébastien; Fernandez, Bastien; Ferrier, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    To perform their specific functional role, B and T lymphocytes, cells of the adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates, need to express one (and, preferably, only one) form of antigen receptor, i.e. the immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor (TCR), respectively. This end goal depends initially on a series of DNA cis-rearrangement events between randomly chosen units from separate clusters of V, D (at some immunoglobulin and TCR loci) and J gene segments, a biomolecular process collectively referred to as V(D)J recombination. V(D)J recombination takes place in immature T and B cells and relies on the so-called RAG nuclease, a site-specific DNA cleavage apparatus that corresponds to the lymphoid-specific moiety of the VDJ recombinase. At the genome level, this recombinase's mission presents substantial biochemical challenges. These relate to the huge distance between (some of) the gene segments that it eventually rearranges and the need to achieve cell-lineage-restricted and developmentally ordered routines with at times, mono-allelic versus bi-allelic discrimination. The entire process must be completed without any recombination errors, instigators of chromosome instability, translocation and, potentially, tumorigenesis. As expected, such a precisely choreographed and yet potentially risky process demands sophisticated controls; epigenetics demonstrates what is possible when calling upon its many facets. In this vignette, we will recall the evidence that almost from the start appeared to link the two topics, V(D)J recombination and epigenetics, before reviewing the latest advances in our knowledge of this joint venture. PMID:23278765

  18. Large Genomic Rearrangements of Desmosomal Genes in Italian Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilichou, Kalliopi; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Rigato, Ilaria; Celeghin, Rudy; De Bortoli, Marzia; Perazzolo Marra, Marina; Cason, Marco; Jongbloed, Jan; Calore, Martina; Rizzo, Stefania; Regazzo, Daniela; Poloni, Giulia; Iliceto, Sabino; Daliento, Luciano; Delise, Pietro; Corrado, Domenico; Van Tintelen, J Peter; Thiene, Gaetano; Rampazzo, Alessandra; Basso, Cristina; Bauce, Barbara; Lorenzon, Alessandra; Occhi, Gianluca

    2017-10-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is an inherited heart muscle disease associated with point mutations in genes encoding for cardiac desmosome proteins. Conventional mutation screening is positive in ≈50% of probands. Copy number variations (CNVs) have recently been linked to AC pointing to the need to determine the prevalence of CNVs in desmosomal genes and to evaluate disease penetrance by cosegregation analysis in family members. A total of 160 AC genotype-negative probands for 5 AC desmosomal genes by conventional mutation screening underwent multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Nine heterozygous CNVs were identified in 11 (6.9%) of the 160 probands. Five carried a deletion of the entire plakophilin-2 ( PKP2 ) gene, 2 a deletion of only PKP2 exon 4, 1 a deletion of the PKP2 exons 6 to 11, 1 a PKP2 duplication of 5' untranslated region till exon 1, 1 the desmocollin-2 ( DSC2 ) duplication of exons 7 to 9, and 1 a large deletion of chromosome 18 comprising both DSC2 and desmoglein-2 genes. All probands were affected by moderate-severe forms of the disease, whereas 10 (32%) of the 31 family members carrying one of these deletions fulfilled the diagnostic criteria. Genomic rearrangements were detected in ≈7% of AC probands negative for pathogenic point mutations in desmosomal genes, highlighting the potential of CNVs analysis to substantially increase the diagnostic yield of genetic testing. Genotype-phenotype correlation demonstrated the presence of the disease in about one third of family members carrying the CNV, underlying the role of other factors in the development and progression of the disease. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Rearrangement of RAG-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient ``wasted`` mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P. [Loyola Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` wst display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (RAG-l/RAG-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed expression of RAG-1 mRNA in spinal cord (but not brain) of control mice; no expression of RAG-1 mRNA was detected in spinal cord or brain from wst/wst mice or their normal littermates (wst/{center_dot}mice). In thymus tissue, a small RAG-1 transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{center_dot}mice, a two-fold increase in RAG-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. RAG-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{center_dot} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF{sub 1} mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement/deletion within the RAG-1 gene of affected wasted mice, not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the RAG-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  20. Rearrangement of RAG-1 recombinase gene in radiation-sensitive ``wasted`` mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States); Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P. [Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States); Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (RAG-1/RAG-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed expression of RAG-1 mRNA in spinal cord (but not brain) of control mice; no expression of RAG-1 mRNA was detected in spinal cord or brain from wst/wst mice or their normal littermates (wst/{center_dot} mice). In thymus tissue, a small RAG-1 transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{center_dot} mice, a two-fold increase in RAG-1 MRNA was evident in thymus tissue. RAG-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{center_dot} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF{sub 1} mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement/deletion within the RAG-1 gene of affected wasted mice, not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the RAG-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  1. Rearrangement of RAG-1 recombinase gene in radiation-sensitive ''wasted'' mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ''wasted'' (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (RAG-1/RAG-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed expression of RAG-1 mRNA in spinal cord (but not brain) of control mice; no expression of RAG-1 mRNA was detected in spinal cord or brain from wst/wst mice or their normal littermates (wst/· mice). In thymus tissue, a small RAG-1 transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/· mice, a two-fold increase in RAG-1 MRNA was evident in thymus tissue. RAG-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/· and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF 1 mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement/deletion within the RAG-1 gene of affected wasted mice, not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the RAG-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage

  2. Inhibition of RORγT Skews TCRα Gene Rearrangement and Limits T Cell Repertoire Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxia Guo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have elucidated the molecular mechanism of RORγT transcriptional regulation of Th17 differentiation and function. RORγT was initially identified as a transcription factor required for thymopoiesis by maintaining survival of CD4+CD8+ (DP thymocytes. While RORγ antagonists are currently being developed to treat autoimmunity, it remains unclear how RORγT inhibition may impact thymocyte development. In this study, we show that in addition to regulating DP thymocytes survival, RORγT also controls genes that regulate thymocyte migration, proliferation, and T cell receptor (TCRα selection. Strikingly, pharmacological inhibition of RORγ skews TCRα gene rearrangement, limits T cell repertoire diversity, and inhibits development of autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Thus, targeting RORγT not only inhibits Th17 cell development and function but also fundamentally alters thymic-emigrant recognition of self and foreign antigens. The analysis of RORγ inhibitors has allowed us to gain a broader perspective of the diverse function of RORγT and its impact on T cell biology.

  3. Fusion gene transcripts and Ig/TCR gene rearrangements are complementary but infrequent targets for PCR-based detection of minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckx, N.; M.J. Willemse; T. Szczepanski (Tomasz); V.H.J. van der Velden (Vincent); A.W. Langerak (Anton); P. Vandekerckhove (Philippe); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPCR-based monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute leukemias can be achieved via detection of fusion gene transcripts of chromosome aberrations or detection of immunoglobulin (lg) and T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements. We wished to assess whether both PCR targets are

  4. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements in radiation-related human papillary thyroid carcinoma after the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Annette; Steinestel, Konrad; Rump, Alexis; Sroya, Manveer; Bogdanova, Tetiana; Kovgan, Leonila; Port, Matthias; Abend, Michael; Eder, Stefan

    2018-04-06

    Childhood radiation exposure has been associated with increased papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) risk. The role of ALK gene rearrangements in radiation-related PTC remains unclear, but STRN-ALK fusions have recently been detected in PTCs from radiation-exposed persons after Chernobyl using targeted next-generation sequencing and RNA-seq. We investigated ALK and RET gene rearrangements as well as known driver point mutations in PTCs from 77 radiation-exposed patients (mean age at surgery 22.4 years) and PTCs from 19 non-exposed individuals after the Chernobyl accident. ALK rearrangements were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and confirmed with immunohistochemistry (IHC); point mutations in the BRAF and RAS genes were detected by FISH and DNA pyrosequencing, respectively. Among the 77 tumours from exposed persons, we identified 7 ALK rearrangements and none in the unexposed group. When combining ALK and RET rearrangements, we found 10 in the exposed (31.2%) compared to two (10.5%) in the unexposed group. Odds ratios increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner up to 6.2 (95%CI: 1.1, 34.7; p=0.039) at Iodine-131 thyroid doses >500 mGy. In total, 27 cases carried point mutations of BRAF or RAS genes, yet logistic regression analysis failed to identify significant dose association. To our knowledge we are the first to describe ALK rearrangements in post-Chernobyl PTC samples using routine methods such as FISH and IHC. Our findings further support the hypothesis that gene rearrangements, but not oncogenic driver mutations, are associated with ionizing radiation-related tumour risk. IHC may represent an effective method for ALK-screening in PTCs with known radiation aetiology, which is of clinical value since ALK fusions might represent a valuable target for small molecule inhibitors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 The Authors The Journal of Pathology: Clinical Research published by The Pathological Society

  5. A 45 X male patient with 7q distal deletion and rearrangement with SRY gene translocation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, S; Okten, A; Karaguzel, G; Ikbal, M; Aslan, Y

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a male newborn with multiple congenital anomalies who also has an extremely rare form of testicular disorder of sex development (DSD). His karyotype was 45X, without any mosaicism. SRY gene was positive by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and rearranged on distal part of the 7th chromosome by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. SRY, normally located on the Y chromosome, is the most important gene that plays a role in the development of male sex. SRY gen may be translocated onto another chromosome, mostly X chromosome in the XX testicular DSD. On the other hand very few cases of 45 X testicular DSD were published to date. Other clinical manifestations of our patient were compatible with distal 7 q deletion syndrome. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case of 45 X testicular DSD with SRY gene rearranged on the 7th autosomal chromosome.

  6. Complete nucleotide sequence and gene rearrangement of the mitochondrial genome of the Japanese pond frog Rana nigromaculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, M; Kanamori, Y; Kaneda, H; Kato, Y; Nishioka, M; Hasegawa, M; Yonekawa, H

    2001-10-01

    In this study, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the Japanese pond frog Rana nigromaculata. The length of the sequence of the frog was 17,804 bp, though this was not absolute due to length variation caused by differing numbers of repetitive units in the control regions of individual frogs. The gene content, base composition, and codon usage of the Japanese pond frog conformed to those of typical vertebrate patterns. However, the comparison of gene organization between three amphibian species (Rana, Xenopus and caecilian) provided evidence that the gene arrangement of Rana differs by four tRNA gene positions from that of Xenopus or caecilian, a common gene arrangement in vertebrates. These gene rearrangements are presumed to have occurred by the tandem duplication of a gene region followed by multiple deletions of redundant genes. It is probable that the rearrangements start and end at tRNA genes involved in the initial production of a tandemly duplicated gene region. Putative secondary structures for the 22 tRNAs and the origin of the L-strand replication (OL) are described. Evolutionary relationships were estimated from the concatenated sequences of the 12 proteins encoded in the H-strand of mtDNA among 37 vertebrate species. A quartet-puzzling tree showed that three amphibian species form a monophyletic clade and that the caecilian is a sister group of the monophyletic Anura.

  7. Detection of clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements by the polymerase chain reaction and capillary gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongxin; Robetorye, Ryan S

    2013-01-01

    Although well-established diagnostic criteria exist for mature B-cell neoplasms, a definitive diagnosis of a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder cannot always be obtained using more conventional techniques such as flow cytometric immunophenotyping, conventional cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization, or immunohistochemistry. However, because B-cell malignancies contain identically rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain genes, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be a fast, convenient, and dependable option to identify clonal B-cell processes. This chapter describes the use of PCR and capillary electrophoresis to identify clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) variable and joining region (VH-JH) gene rearrangements (IGH VH-JH PCR) using a commercially available method employing multiple multiplex PCR tubes that was originally developed as the result of a large European BIOMED-2 collaborative study (Invivoscribe Technologies). The core protocol involves the use of three separate master mix tubes that target the conserved framework (FR1, FR2, and FR3) and joining (J) regions of the IGH gene. Analysis of these three framework regions can detect approximately 88% of clonal IGH gene rearrangements.

  8. MYC Gene Rearrangements Are Closely Associated with Poor Survival of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Hepatitis B Virus Infection

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    Zhihe Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify clinical adverse prognostic factors affecting overall survival (OS of diffuse large B cell (DLBCL patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. In this study, 30 DLBCL patients with HBV infection and 51 DLBCL patients with HBV-free were reviewed retrospectively. As of July 2016, the median follow-up period was 26.4 months (3.0~65.0 months. The median OS of patients in HBV infection group was 38.6 months, while that of patients in HBV-free group was not reached (P=0.042; the median progression-free survival (PFS of patients in HBV infection group was worse than that in HBV-free group, 18.5 months and 38.5 months (P=0.118, respectively. The rate of MYC and BCL2 gene rearrangements in HBV infection group was significantly higher than that in HBV-free group, 20.0% versus 3.9% (P=0.019 and 23.3% versus 5.9% (P=0.021, respectively. Multivariable analysis indicated that IPI (P=0.002, chemotherapy regimens (P=0.017, and MYC gene rearrangements (P=0.004 were independent adverse prognostic factors for all DLBCL patients in this study. Results demonstrated that the poor survival of DLBCL patients with HBV infection was closely involved in chemotherapy regimens, IPI, and MYC gene rearrangements.

  9. MYBL1 rearrangements and MYB amplification in breast adenoid cystic carcinomas lacking the MYB-NFIB fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jisun; Geyer, Felipe C; Martelotto, Luciano G; Ng, Charlotte Ky; Lim, Raymond S; Selenica, Pier; Li, Anqi; Pareja, Fresia; Fusco, Nicola; Edelweiss, Marcia; Kumar, Rahul; Gularte-Merida, Rodrigo; Forbes, Andre N; Khurana, Ekta; Mariani, Odette; Badve, Sunil; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Norton, Larry; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Weigelt, Britta

    2018-02-01

    Breast adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC), a rare type of triple-negative breast cancer, has been shown to be driven by MYB pathway activation, most often underpinned by the MYB-NFIB fusion gene. Alternative genetic mechanisms, such as MYBL1 rearrangements, have been reported in MYB-NFIB-negative salivary gland AdCCs. Here we report on the molecular characterization by massively parallel sequencing of four breast AdCCs lacking the MYB-NFIB fusion gene. In two cases, we identified MYBL1 rearrangements (MYBL1-ACTN1 and MYBL1-NFIB), which were associated with MYBL1 overexpression. A third AdCC harboured a high-level MYB amplification, which resulted in MYB overexpression at the mRNA and protein levels. RNA-sequencing and whole-genome sequencing revealed no definite alternative driver in the fourth AdCC studied, despite high levels of MYB expression and the activation of pathways similar to those activated in MYB-NFIB-positive AdCCs. In this case, a deletion encompassing the last intron and part of exon 15 of MYB, including the binding site of ERG-1, a transcription factor that may downregulate MYB, and the exon 15 splice site, was detected. In conclusion, we demonstrate that MYBL1 rearrangements and MYB amplification probably constitute alternative genetic drivers of breast AdCCs, functioning through MYBL1 or MYB overexpression. These observations emphasize that breast AdCCs probably constitute a convergent phenotype, whereby activation of MYB and MYBL1 and their downstream targets can be driven by the MYB-NFIB fusion gene, MYBL1 rearrangements, MYB amplification, or other yet to be identified mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. DNA rearrangement in human follicular lymphoma can involve the 5' or the 3' region of the bcl-2 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Y.; Bashir, M.M.; Givol, I.; Cossman, J.; Jaffe, E.; Croce, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    In most human lymphomas, the chromosome translocation t(14;18) occurs within two breakpoint clustering regions on chromosome 18, the major one at the 3' untranslated region of the bcl-2 gene and the minor one at 3' of the gene. Analysis of a panel of follicular lymphoma DNAs using probes for the first exon of the bcl-2 gene indicates that DNA rearrangements may also occur 5' to the involved bcl-2 gene. In this case the IgH locus and the bcl-2 gene are found in an order suggesting that an inversion also occurred during the translocation process. The coding region of the bcl-2 gene, however, are left intact in all cases of follicular lymphoma studied to date

  11. ROS1 gene rearrangement and expression of splice isoforms in lung cancer, diagnosed by a novel quantitative RT-PCR assay

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    Kalla C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Successful treatment of lung cancer (NSCLC patients with ROS1 inhibitors depends on the accurate diagnosis of ROS1 gene rearrangements. The approved FISH tests are low-throughput assays difficult to use in daily diagnostic practice. Immunohistochemistry is currently discussed as screening test. We aimed to devise an alternative, sensitive diagnostic test for the rearrangement of ROS1 and to investigate upregulated ROS1 gene expression as potential target in NSCLC. We developed a qRT-PCR assay adapted to RNA isolated from FFPE material and applied it to 695 NSCLC specimens. The reliability to detect ROS1 rearrangements was evidenced by comparison with FISH and immunohistochemistry. qRT-PCR analysis detected unbalanced ROS1 expression indicative of gene rearrangement in 5 (0.7% and expression of non-rearranged ROS1 transcripts in 65 (9.6% of 680 interpretable tumors. In comparison with FISH, qRT-PCR accurately typed 99% of 5 rearranged and 121 non-rearranged tumors. Immunohistochemistry detected ROS1 protein expression in 7/8 tumors with gene fusions and 6/35 NSCLC with transcriptional upregulation. To elucidate RNA processing, 12 NSCLC were examined by systematic RT-PCR and sequence analysis. In all 12 NSCLC analyzed, up-regulated gene expression independent of translocation was associated with aberrant expression of fetal transcript isoforms identified here. We conclude that our qRT-PCR assay reliably diagnoses and distinguishes ROS1 rearrangements and expression of non-rearranged transcripts. Immunostaining is a suitable screening tool, but re-examination of ROS1 protein expressing cases by qRT-PCR/FISH is compulsory. The expression of ROS1 splice isoforms – shown here for the first time - may be relevant for ROS1 inhibitor therapy in NSCLC.

  12. Gene mutations and genomic rearrangements in the mouse as a result of transposon mobilization from chromosomal concatemers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron M Geurts

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposon system, as an insertional mutagen in the germline of mice, have used reverse genetic approaches. These studies have led to its proposed use for regional saturation mutagenesis by taking a forward-genetic approach. Thus, we used the SB system to mutate a region of mouse Chromosome 11 in a forward-genetic screen for recessive lethal and viable phenotypes. This work represents the first reported use of an insertional mutagen in a phenotype-driven approach. The phenotype-driven approach was successful in both recovering visible and behavioral mutants, including dominant limb and recessive behavioral phenotypes, and allowing for the rapid identification of candidate gene disruptions. In addition, a high frequency of recessive lethal mutations arose as a result of genomic rearrangements near the site of transposition, resulting from transposon mobilization. The results suggest that the SB system could be used in a forward-genetic approach to recover interesting phenotypes, but that local chromosomal rearrangements should be anticipated in conjunction with single-copy, local transposon insertions in chromosomes. Additionally, these mice may serve as a model for chromosome rearrangements caused by transposable elements during the evolution of vertebrate genomes.

  13. Rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene found for the first time in adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer cases among atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamatani, K.; Mukai, M.; Takahashi, K.; Nakachi, K.; Kusunoki, Y. [Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Hayashi, Y. [Geriatric Health Service Facility Hidamari, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Full text of the publication follows: Thyroid cancer is one of the malignancies most strongly associated with ionizing radiation in humans. Epidemiology studies of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors have indicated that excess relative risk of papillary thyroid cancer per Gy was remarkably high in the survivors. We therefore aim to clarify mechanisms linking A-bomb radiation exposure and development of papillary thyroid cancer. Toward this end, we intend to clarify characteristics of gene alterations occurring in radiation-associated adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer from the Life Span Study cohort of A-bomb survivors. We have thus far found that with increased radiation dose, papillary thyroid cancer cases with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC rearrangements) significantly increased and papillary thyroid cancer cases with point mutations (mainly BRAF-V600E) significantly decreased. Papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations that carried no mutations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF or RAS genes tended to increase with increased radiation dose. In addition, we found that relative frequency of these papillary thyroid cancer cases significantly decreased with time elapsed since exposure. Through analysis of papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations, we recently discovered a new type of rearrangement for the first time in papillary thyroid cancer, i.e., rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene, although identification of any partner gene(s) is needed. Specifically, rearrangement of ALK was found in 10 of 19 exposed papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations but not in any of the six non-exposed papillary thyroid cancer cases. Furthermore, papillary thyroid cancer with ALK rearrangement was frequently found in the cases with high radiation dose or with short time elapsed since A-bomb exposure. These results suggest that chromosomal rearrangement, typically of RET and ALK, may play an important

  14. Rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene found for the first time in adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer cases among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamatani, K.; Mukai, M.; Takahashi, K.; Nakachi, K.; Kusunoki, Y.; Hayashi, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full text of the publication follows: Thyroid cancer is one of the malignancies most strongly associated with ionizing radiation in humans. Epidemiology studies of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors have indicated that excess relative risk of papillary thyroid cancer per Gy was remarkably high in the survivors. We therefore aim to clarify mechanisms linking A-bomb radiation exposure and development of papillary thyroid cancer. Toward this end, we intend to clarify characteristics of gene alterations occurring in radiation-associated adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer from the Life Span Study cohort of A-bomb survivors. We have thus far found that with increased radiation dose, papillary thyroid cancer cases with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC rearrangements) significantly increased and papillary thyroid cancer cases with point mutations (mainly BRAF-V600E) significantly decreased. Papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations that carried no mutations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF or RAS genes tended to increase with increased radiation dose. In addition, we found that relative frequency of these papillary thyroid cancer cases significantly decreased with time elapsed since exposure. Through analysis of papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations, we recently discovered a new type of rearrangement for the first time in papillary thyroid cancer, i.e., rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene, although identification of any partner gene(s) is needed. Specifically, rearrangement of ALK was found in 10 of 19 exposed papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations but not in any of the six non-exposed papillary thyroid cancer cases. Furthermore, papillary thyroid cancer with ALK rearrangement was frequently found in the cases with high radiation dose or with short time elapsed since A-bomb exposure. These results suggest that chromosomal rearrangement, typically of RET and ALK, may play an important

  15. Pattern of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor-δ/γ gene rearrangements in Iranian children with B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poopak, Behzad; Saki, Najmaldin; Purfatholah, Ali Akbar; Najmabadi, Hossein; Mortazavi, Yosef; Arzanian, Mohammad T; Khosravipour, Gelareh; Haghnejad, Fariba; Salari, Fatemeh; Shahjahani, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells have unique rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH), immunoglobulin light chain (IgK), and T-cell receptor (TCR) genes, which can be used as markers for clonality assay and evaluation of minimal residual disease. In this study, we have evaluated the pattern of IgH, IgK chains, and TCRG/D gene rearrangements in precursor-B ALL. In our prospective study, hyper-variable regions (CDRI and III) of IgH, TCRD (Vδ2-Dδ3 and Dδ2-Dδ3), TCRG (Vγ, VγI, and VγII), and IgK (Vκ-Kde) were studied in 126 cases with diagnosis of B-precursor ALL. One hundred and fourteen (90.5%) out of 126 patients had clonal rearrangements of IgH using consensus primers for CDRI and/or CDRIII regions. Monoclonal, biclonal, and oligoclonal patterns were observed in 63 (57.8%), 38 (34.9%), and 6 (5.5%) patients with IgH (CDRIII) rearrangements, respectively. Clonal rearrangements of TCRG (Vγ) and VγI/II were present in 79.3 and 64.9% of patients, respectively, and only 5% of cases showed biclonal pattern. The VγII rearrangement was the most common (46.8%) type in TCRG. Vδ2-Dδ3 and Dδ2-Dδ3 partial gene rearrangements were observed in 47 (45.2%; n = 104) and 11 (16.6%; n = 66) patients, respectively. Biclonal/oligoclonal patterns were present in 13 (27.7%) and 2 (4.3%) cases with Vδ2-Dδ3 rearrangement, respectively. Only one patient had biclonal Dδ2-Dδ3 rearrangement. Clonal pattern of IgK-Kde was detected in 59 cases (67%; n = 88). Our findings showed that clonal rearrangements of IgH and TCRD (Vδ2-Dδ3 and Dδ2-Dδ3) genes had similar patterns to other studies. Frequency of TCRG (VγI and VγII) and IgK rearrangements was found to be slightly higher than previous reports. Among the IgK rearrangements, VKI (25%) was the most common.

  16. Combined mutation and rearrangement screening by quantitative PCR high-resolution melting: is it relevant for hereditary recurrent Fever genes?

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    Nathalie Pallares-Ruiz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent identification of genes implicated in hereditary recurrent fevers has allowed their specific diagnosis. So far however, only punctual mutations have been identified and a significant number of patients remain with no genetic confirmation of their disease after routine molecular approaches such as sequencing. The possible involvement of sequence rearrangements in these patients has only been examined in familial Mediterranean fever and was found to be unlikely. To assess the existence of larger genetic alterations in 3 other concerned genes, MVK (Mevalonate kinase, NLRP3 (Nod like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 and TNFRSF1A (TNF receptor superfamily 1A, we adapted the qPCR-HRM method to study possible intragenic deletions and duplications. This single-tube approach, combining both qualitative (mutations and quantitative (rearrangement screening, has proven effective in Lynch syndrome diagnosis. Using this approach, we studied 113 unselected (prospective group and 88 selected (retrospective group patients and identified no intragenic rearrangements in the 3 genes. Only qualitative alterations were found with a sensitivity similar to that obtained using classical molecular techniques for screening punctual mutations. Our results support that deleterious copy number alterations in MVK, NLRP3 and TNFRSF1A are rare or absent from the mutational spectrum of hereditary recurrent fevers, and demonstrate that a routine combined method such as qPCR-HRM provides no further help in genetic diagnosis. However, quantitative approaches such as qPCR or SQF-PCR did prove to be quick and effective and could still be useful after non contributory punctual mutation screening in the presence of clinically evocative signs.

  17. Pseudoscorpion mitochondria show rearranged genes and genome-wide reductions of RNA gene sizes and inferred structures, yet typical nucleotide composition bias

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    Ovchinnikov Sergey

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudoscorpions are chelicerates and have historically been viewed as being most closely related to solifuges, harvestmen, and scorpions. No mitochondrial genomes of pseudoscorpions have been published, but the mitochondrial genomes of some lineages of Chelicerata possess unusual features, including short rRNA genes and tRNA genes that lack sequence to encode arms of the canonical cloverleaf-shaped tRNA. Additionally, some chelicerates possess an atypical guanine-thymine nucleotide bias on the major coding strand of their mitochondrial genomes. Results We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of two divergent taxa from the chelicerate order Pseudoscorpiones. We find that these genomes possess unusually short tRNA genes that do not encode cloverleaf-shaped tRNA structures. Indeed, in one genome, all 22 tRNA genes lack sequence to encode canonical cloverleaf structures. We also find that the large ribosomal RNA genes are substantially shorter than those of most arthropods. We inferred secondary structures of the LSU rRNAs from both pseudoscorpions, and find that they have lost multiple helices. Based on comparisons with the crystal structure of the bacterial ribosome, two of these helices were likely contact points with tRNA T-arms or D-arms as they pass through the ribosome during protein synthesis. The mitochondrial gene arrangements of both pseudoscorpions differ from the ancestral chelicerate gene arrangement. One genome is rearranged with respect to the location of protein-coding genes, the small rRNA gene, and at least 8 tRNA genes. The other genome contains 6 tRNA genes in novel locations. Most chelicerates with rearranged mitochondrial genes show a genome-wide reversal of the CA nucleotide bias typical for arthropods on their major coding strand, and instead possess a GT bias. Yet despite their extensive rearrangement, these pseudoscorpion mitochondrial genomes possess a CA bias on the major coding strand. Phylogenetic

  18. Balanced gene losses, duplications and intensive rearrangements led to an unusual regularly sized genome in Arbutus unedo chloroplasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Martínez-Alberola

    Full Text Available Completely sequenced plastomes provide a valuable source of information about the duplication, loss, and transfer events of chloroplast genes and phylogenetic data for resolving relationships among major groups of plants. Moreover, they can also be useful for exploiting chloroplast genetic engineering technology. Ericales account for approximately six per cent of eudicot diversity with 11,545 species from which only three complete plastome sequences are currently available. With the aim of increasing the number of ericalean complete plastome sequences, and to open new perspectives in understanding Mediterranean plant adaptations, a genomic study on the basis of the complete chloroplast genome sequencing of Arbutus unedo and an updated phylogenomic analysis of Asteridae was implemented. The chloroplast genome of A. unedo shows extensive rearrangements but a medium size (150,897 nt in comparison to most of angiosperms. A number of remarkable distinct features characterize the plastome of A. unedo: five-fold dismissing of the SSC region in relation to most angiosperms; complete loss or pseudogenization of a number of essential genes; duplication of the ndhH-D operon and its location within the two IRs; presence of large tandem repeats located near highly re-arranged regions and pseudogenes. All these features outline the primary evolutionary split between Ericaceae and other ericalean families. The newly sequenced plastome of A. unedo with the available asterid sequences allowed the resolution of some uncertainties in previous phylogenies of Asteridae.

  19. Flexibility and symmetry of prokaryotic genome rearrangement reveal lineage-associated core-gene-defined genome organizational frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yu; Gu, Chaohao; Yuan, Lina; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Yanmin; Li, Xinna; Luo, Qibin; Xiao, Jingfa; Jiang, Daquan; Qian, Minping; Ahmed Khan, Aftab; Chen, Fei; Zhang, Zhang; Yu, Jun

    2014-11-25

    The prokaryotic pangenome partitions genes into core and dispensable genes. The order of core genes, albeit assumed to be stable under selection in general, is frequently interrupted by horizontal gene transfer and rearrangement, but how a core-gene-defined genome maintains its stability or flexibility remains to be investigated. Based on data from 30 species, including 425 genomes from six phyla, we grouped core genes into syntenic blocks in the context of a pangenome according to their stability across multiple isolates. A subset of the core genes, often species specific and lineage associated, formed a core-gene-defined genome organizational framework (cGOF). Such cGOFs are either single segmental (one-third of the species analyzed) or multisegmental (the rest). Multisegment cGOFs were further classified into symmetric or asymmetric according to segment orientations toward the origin-terminus axis. The cGOFs in Gram-positive species are exclusively symmetric and often reversible in orientation, as opposed to those of the Gram-negative bacteria, which are all asymmetric and irreversible. Meanwhile, all species showing strong strand-biased gene distribution contain symmetric cGOFs and often specific DnaE (α subunit of DNA polymerase III) isoforms. Furthermore, functional evaluations revealed that cGOF genes are hub associated with regard to cellular activities, and the stability of cGOF provides efficient indexes for scaffold orientation as demonstrated by assembling virtual and empirical genome drafts. cGOFs show species specificity, and the symmetry of multisegmental cGOFs is conserved among taxa and constrained by DNA polymerase-centric strand-biased gene distribution. The definition of species-specific cGOFs provides powerful guidance for genome assembly and other structure-based analysis. Prokaryotic genomes are frequently interrupted by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and rearrangement. To know whether there is a set of genes not only conserved in position

  20. Partial loss of heterozygosity events at the mutated gene in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 large genomic rearrangement carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavodna, Katarina; Krivulcik, Tomas; Bujalkova, Maria Gerykova; Slamka, Tomas; Martinicky, David; Ilencikova, Denisa; Bartosova, Zdena

    2009-01-01

    Depending on the population studied, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes constitute various proportions of the germline mutations that predispose to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). It has been reported that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the LGR region occurs through a gene conversion mechanism in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 deletion carriers; however, the converted tracts were delineated only by extragenic microsatellite markers. We sought to determine the frequency of LGRs in Slovak HNPCC patients and to study LOH in tumors from LGR carriers at the LGR region, as well as at other heterozygous markers within the gene to more precisely define conversion tracts. The main MMR genes responsible for HNPCC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, were analyzed by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) in a total of 37 unrelated HNPCC-suspected patients whose MLH1/MSH2 genes gave negative results in previous sequencing experiments. An LOH study was performed on six tumors from LGR carriers by combining MLPA to assess LOH at LGR regions and sequencing to examine LOH at 28 SNP markers from the MLH1 and MSH2 genes. We found six rearrangements in the MSH2 gene (five deletions and dup5-6), and one aberration in the MLH1 gene (del5-6). The MSH2 deletions were of three types (del1, del1-3, del1-7). We detected LOH at the LGR region in the single MLH1 case, which was determined in a previous study to be LOH-negative in the intragenic D3S1611 marker. Three tumors displayed LOH of at least one SNP marker, including two cases that were LOH-negative at the LGR region. LGRs accounted for 25% of germline MMR mutations identified in 28 Slovakian HNPCC families. A high frequency of LGRs among the MSH2 mutations provides a rationale for a MLPA screening of the Slovakian HNPCC families prior scanning by DNA sequencing. LOH at part of the informative loci confined to the MLH1 or MSH2 gene (heterozygous LGR region, SNP, or

  1. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient wasted'' mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Libertin, C.R. (Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene wasted'' (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/[sm bullet] mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/[sm bullet] and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  2. Rapid analysis of rearranged kappa light chain genes of circulating polysaccharide-specific B lymphocytes by means of immunomagnetic beads and the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougs, L; Barington, T; Madsen, HO

    1993-01-01

    -secreting cells. Examples of rearranged kappa genes used by HibCP-specific antibody-secreting cells from 4 adult vaccinees are given, representing the 3 largest of the 4 kappa variable region families. This method is a new tool for the investigation of vaccine-induced antibody responses with special reference...... of the B lymphocytes activated in vivo. Here, we present a method for rapid analysis of the rearranged kappa light chain genes used by human circulating antigen-specific B lymphocytes. After vaccination with Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) conjugated with protein, the Hib...

  3. Analysis of translocations that involve the NUP98 gene in patients with 11p15 chromosomal rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobzev, Yuri N; Martinez-Climent, Jose; Lee, Sanggyu; Chen, Jianjun; Rowley, Janet D

    2004-12-01

    The NUP98 gene has been reported to be fused with at least 15 partner genes in leukemias with 11p15 translocations. We report the results of screening of cases with cytogenetically documented rearrangements of 11p15 and the subsequent identification of involvement of NUP98 and its partner genes. We identified 49 samples from 46 hematology patients with 11p15 (including a few with 11p14) abnormalities, and using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we found that NUP98 was disrupted in 7 cases. With the use of gene-specific FISH probes, in 6 cases, we identified the partner genes, which were PRRX1 (PMX1; in 2 cases), HOXD13, RAP1GDS1, HOXC13, and TOP1. In the 3 cases for which RNA was available, RT-PCR was performed, which confirmed the FISH results and identified the location of the breakpoints in patient cDNA. Our data confirm the previous findings that NUP98 is a recurrent target in various types of leukemia. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Expression of immunoglobulin gene with classical V-(D)-J rearrangement in mouse testis and epididymis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Zhang, Li; Ma, Teng; Zhang, Pei; Qiu, Xiaoyan

    2009-04-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) molecules have thus far been found only to be produced by differentiated B lymphocytes. As we know, immune privilege in the normal adult mouse testis exists to make these privileged sites generally free of patrolling immune cells and Igs. However, in this study, the expression of Ig in normal adult mouse testis and epididymis was detected. First, by IHC, a strong pattern of Ig expression was detected in the spermatogenic cells of adult mouse testis at different development stages. Second, by Western blot analysis, different strong bands of Igs in mouse testicular spermatogenic cells and epididymal epithelial cell extract were recognized using specific antibodies against IgG. More importantly, by ISH and cell sorting-related RT-PCR, rearranged Ig gamma chain and kappa chain transcripts were expressed in testicular spermatogenic cells and epididymal epithelial cells. These results suggested that Ig in testis and epididymis was mainly produced by adult mouse testicular spermatogenic cells and epididymal epithelial cells.

  5. Imperfect conformation of experimental and epidemiological data for frequency of RET/РТС gene rearrangements in papillary thyroid carcinoma for the Chernobyl accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ushenkova L.N.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In an overview and analytical study of the epidemiological data on the frequency of RET/РТС gene rearrangements in sporadic and radiogenic (patients after radiotherapy, residents of contaminated after the Chernobyl disaster areas, victims after the atomic bombings, etc. carcinomas of the thyroid gland were examined. In general, the observed epidemiological laws were confirmed in radiobiology experiments by irradiation of different cultures of thyroid cells and ex vivo with the exception of Chernobyl cohorts. Induction of RET/РТС gene rearrangements by 131l exposure in children carcinomas of Chernobyl residents in mice did not observe too. It is concluded that the situation with the frequency of RET/РТС rearrangements in thyroid carcinoma in Chernobyl cohorts once again confirms the multifactorial nature of the induction and development of these tumors with a contribution of radiation and non-radiation factors (iodine deficiency and different stresses.

  6. PCR-based clonality analysis of B-cell lymphomas in paraffin-embedded tissues: diagnostic value of immunoglobulin kappa and lambda light chain gene rearrangement investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Khaled; Trimeche, Mounir; Ziadi, Sonia; Sriha, Badreddine; Mokni, Moncef; Korbi, Sadok

    2006-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analysis, employed for detecting immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene rearrangements, has become a diagnostic tool widely used in the investigation of B-cell lymphomas, but the overall sensitivity of these methods does not exceed 80%, notably in germinal center (GC) and post-GC B-cell origin lymphomas. Many PCR strategies devised for detecting immunoglobulin light chain (IgL) gene rearrangements have been developed to enhance the clonality detection rates. However, the feasibility of these methods in routine clinical diagnosis using paraffin-embedded tissues has not yet been investigated sufficiently. We studied a large series of 108 cases of B-cell lymphomas, as well as 20 reactive lymphoid tissues using degenerate primers to amplify immunoglobulin kappa (Igkappa) and lambda (Iglambda) light chain genes. B-cell clonality was further investigated using semi-nested PCR for IgH gene rearrangements. B-cell clonality was detected in 74%, 56.5%, and 43.5% of cases using IgH, Igkappa, and Iglambda PCR, respectively. By combining these methods, the clonality detection rate increased to 93.5%. Only polyclonal patterns were noted in reactive lymphoid samples. We concluded that in addition to the established methods for IgH analysis, a PCR-based approach for IgL gene rearrangements analysis improves the clonality detection rate in over 90% of B-cell lymphoma cases using routine histological specimens with poor preservation of the genomic DNA.

  7. Comparative investigations of T cell receptor gamma gene rearrangements in frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin wax-embedded tissues by capillary electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M; Funder, A D; Bendix, K

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To compare clonal T cell receptor gamma (TCRgamma) gene rearrangements in frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin wax-embedded (FFPE) tissue, using capillary electrophoresis for use in diagnostics, as T cell lymphomas may be difficult to diagnose by conventional methods. METHODS: The DNA for PCR...

  8. BRD4 Promotes DNA Repair and Mediates the Formation of TMPRSS2-ERG Gene Rearrangements in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangyi; Baek, GuemHee; Ramanand, Susmita G; Sharp, Adam; Gao, Yunpeng; Yuan, Wei; Welti, Jon; Rodrigues, Daniel N; Dolling, David; Figueiredo, Ines; Sumanasuriya, Semini; Crespo, Mateus; Aslam, Adam; Li, Rui; Yin, Yi; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Kanchwala, Mohammed; Hughes, Ashley M; Halsey, Wendy S; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Xing, Chao; Raj, Ganesh V; Burma, Sandeep; de Bono, Johann; Mani, Ram S

    2018-01-16

    BRD4 belongs to the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family of chromatin reader proteins that bind acetylated histones and regulate gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of BRD4 by BET inhibitors (BETi) has indicated antitumor activity against multiple cancer types. We show that BRD4 is essential for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and mediates the formation of oncogenic gene rearrangements by engaging the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. Mechanistically, genome-wide DNA breaks are associated with enhanced acetylation of histone H4, leading to BRD4 recruitment, and stable establishment of the DNA repair complex. In support of this, we also show that, in clinical tumor samples, BRD4 protein levels are negatively associated with outcome after prostate cancer (PCa) radiation therapy. Thus, in addition to regulating gene expression, BRD4 is also a central player in the repair of DNA DSBs, with significant implications for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Detection of monoclonal immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement (FR3 in Thai malignant lymphoma by High Resolution Melting curve analysis

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    Pongpruttipan Tawatchai

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malignant lymphoma, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma, is one of the most common hematologic malignancies in Thailand. The diagnosis of malignant lymphoma is often problematic, especially in early stages of the disease. Detection of antigen receptor gene rearrangement including T cell receptor (TCR and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH by polymerase chain reaction followed by heteroduplex has currently become standard whereas fluorescent fragment analysis (GeneScan has been used for confirmation test. In this study, three techniques had been compared: thermocycler polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by heteroduplex and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, GeneScan analysis, and real time PCR with High Resolution Melting curve analysis (HRM. The comparison was carried out with DNA extracted from paraffin embedded tissues diagnosed as B- cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Specific PCR primers sequences for IgH gene variable region 3, including fluorescence labeled IgH primers were used and results were compared with HRM. In conclusion, the detection IgH gene rearrangement by HRM in the LightCycler System showed potential for distinguishing monoclonality from polyclonality in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Introduction Malignant lymphoma, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma, is one of the most common hematologic malignancies in Thailand. The incidence rate as reported by Ministry of Public Health is 3.1 per 100,000 population in female whereas the rate in male is 4.5 per 100,000 population 1. At Siriraj Hospital, the new cases diagnosed as malignant lymphoma were 214.6 cases/year 2. The diagnosis of malignant lymphoma is often problematic, especially in early stages of the disease. Therefore, detection of antigen receptor gene rearrangement including T cell receptor (TCR and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH by polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay has recently become a standard laboratory test for discrimination of reactive from malignant clonal

  10. Significance of clonal rearrangements of lymphocyte antigen receptor genes on the prognosis of chronic enteropathy in 22 Shiba dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmi, Aki; Ohno, Koichi; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Tomiyasu, Hirotaka; Kanemoto, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2017-09-29

    Shiba dogs are predisposed to chronic enteropathy (CE) and have poorer prognosis than other dog breeds. The objective of this study was to investigate the significance of polymerase chain reaction for antigen receptor rearrangement (PARR) results on clinical findings and prognosis of Shiba dogs with CE. We retrospectively collected data on 22 Shiba dogs diagnosed as having CE. Fifty-nine percent of the dogs had clonality-positive results on PARR analysis. Furthermore, on histopathology, epitheliotropic behavior of small lymphocytes of the intestinal mucosa was observed significantly more frequently in dogs with clonal rearrangement of antigen receptor genes (P=0.027). The median overall survival time of clonality-positive dogs was 48 days (range, 4-239 days), compared to 271 days (range, 45-1,316+ days) in clonality-negative dogs. The median overall survival time of epitheliotropism-positive dogs was 76 days (range, 30-349 days) compared to 239 days (range, 4-1,316+ days) for epitheliotropism-negative dogs. Statistical analysis revealed that the clonality-positive result was associated with significantly shorter survival time (P=0.036). In contrast, presence or absence of epitheliotropism had no statistically significant effect on survival time (P=0.223). These cases might appropriately be diagnosed as small T-cell intestinal lymphoma; there are some common clinical and pathogenic features with human enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma type 2. The pathogenesis and poor prognosis for Shiba dogs with CE seem to be associated with this type of lymphoma, although further investigation is warranted.

  11. Complete mitochondrial genomes of two gelechioids, Mesophleps albilinella and Dichomeris ustalella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), with a description of gene rearrangement in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Sun; Kim, Min Jee; Jeong, Su Yeon; Kim, Sung Soo; Kim, Iksoo

    2016-11-01

    We sequenced the entire mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of two gelechioids, Mesophleps albilinella and Dichomeris ustalella, and compared their genome organization and sequence composition to those of available gelechioid mitogenomes for an enhanced understanding of Gelechioidea genomic characteristics. We compared all available lepidopteran mitogenome arrangements, including that of M. albilinella, which is unique in Gelechioidea, to comprehend the extensiveness and mechanisms of gene rearrangement in Lepidoptera. The genomes of M. albilinella and D. ustalella are 15,274 and 15,410 bp in size, respectively, with the typical sets of mitochondrial (mt) genes. The COI gene begins with CGA (arginine) in all sequenced gelechioids, including M. albilinella and D. ustalella, reinforcing the feature as a synapomorphic trait, at least in the Gelechioidea. Each 353- and 321-bp long A + T-rich region of M. albilinella and D. ustalella contains one (D. ustalella) or two (M. albilinella) tRNA-like structures. The M. albilinella mitogenome has a unique gene arrangement among the Gelechioidea: ARNESF (the underline signifies an inverted gene) at the ND3 and ND5 junction, as opposed to the ARNSEF that is found in ancestral insects. An extensive search of available lepidopteran mitogenomes, including that of M. albilinella, turned up six rearrangements that differ from those of ancestral insects. Most of the rearrangements can be explained by the tandem duplication-random loss model, but inversion, which requires recombination, is also found in two cases, including M. albilinella. Excluding the MIQ rearrangement at the A + T-rich region and ND2 junction, which is found in nearly all Ditrysia, most of the remaining rearrangements found in Lepidoptera appear to be independently derived in that they are automorphic at several taxonomic scales, although current mitogenomic data are limited, particularly for congeneric data.

  12. Rearrangements of the beta-globin gene cluster in apparently typical betaS haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, M A; Silva, W A; Gualandro, S; Yokomizu, I K; Araujo, A G; Tavela, M H; Gerard, N; Krishnamoorthy, R; Elion, J

    2001-02-01

    The majority of the chromosomes with the betaS gene have one of the five common haplotypes, designated as Benin, Bantu, Senegal, Cameroon, and Arab-Indian haplotypes. However, 5-10% of the chromosomes have less common haplotypes, usually referred to as atypical haplotypes. We have demonstrated that most atypical haplotypes are generated by recombinations. The present study was carried out in order to explore whether recombination also occurs in chromosomes with the common (or typical) haplotypes. We screened the HS-2 region of the beta-globin gene locus control region (LCR) in 244 sickle cell patients who had typical restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-defined haplotypes of the betaS-gene cluster. For 14 cases in which the expected and the observed LCR repeat-sequence sizes were discrepant, the analysis was extended to other unexplored polymorphic markers of the bS-globin gene cluster, i.e.: pre-Ggamma framework, pre-Ggamma 6-bp deletion, HS-2 LCR (AT)xR(AT)y and pre-beta(AT)xTy repeats, and the intragenic beta-globin gene framework. In all 14 cases (15 chromosomes) in which the LCR repeat-sequence sizes were discrepant, a recombination involving a typical 3' segment of the betaS globin gene cluster was demonstrated. In most of the cases, the recombination site was located between the beta-globin gene and the betaLCR. Nine cases involving recombination were detected among 156 Brazilian HbS homozygotes and five among 88 African patients homozygotes for the Benin haplotype. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS. Thus, 3.1% of apparently typical haplotypes linked to the sickle cell gene involve recombinations similar to those that generate the atypical haplotypes, a finding that reinforces the picture of the beta-globin gene cluster as highly dynamic.

  13. Digging deeper: new gene order rearrangements and distinct patterns of codons usage in mitochondrial genomes among shrimps from the Axiidea, Gebiidea and Caridea (Crustacea: Decapoda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun Hua Tan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Whole mitochondrial DNA is being increasingly utilized for comparative genomic and phylogenetic studies at deep and shallow evolutionary levels for a range of taxonomic groups. Although mitogenome sequences are deposited at an increasing rate into public databases, their taxonomic representation is unequal across major taxonomic groups. In the case of decapod crustaceans, several infraorders, including Axiidea (ghost shrimps, sponge shrimps, and mud lobsters and Caridea (true shrimps are still under-represented, limiting comprehensive phylogenetic studies that utilize mitogenomic information. Methods Sequence reads from partial genome scans were generated using the Illumina MiSeq platform and mitogenome sequences were assembled from these low coverage reads. In addition to examining phylogenetic relationships within the three infraorders, Axiidea, Gebiidea, and Caridea, we also investigated the diversity and frequency of codon usage bias and mitogenome gene order rearrangements. Results We present new mitogenome sequences for five shrimp species from Australia that includes two ghost shrimps, Callianassa ceramica and Trypaea australiensis, along with three caridean shrimps, Macrobrachium bullatum, Alpheus lobidens, and Caridina cf. nilotica. Strong differences in codon usage were discovered among the three infraorders and significant gene order rearrangements were observed. While the gene order rearrangements are congruent with the inferred phylogenetic relationships and consistent with taxonomic classification, they are unevenly distributed within and among the three infraorders. Discussion Our findings suggest potential for mitogenome rearrangements to be useful phylogenetic markers for decapod crustaceans and at the same time raise important questions concerning the drivers of mitogenome evolution in different decapod crustacean lineages.

  14. Large Genomic Rearrangements of Desmosomal Genes in Italian Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilichou, Kalliopi; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Rigato, Ilaria; Celeghin, Rudy; De Bortoli, Marzia; Marra, Marina Perazzolo; Cason, Marco; Jongbloed, Jan; Calore, Martina; Rizzo, Stefania; Regazzo, Daniela; Poloni, Giulia; Iliceto, Sabino; Daliento, Luciano; Delise, Pietro; Corrado, Domenico; Van Tintelen, J. Peter; Thiene, Gaetano; Rampazzo, Alessandra; Basso, Cristina; Bauce, Barbara; Lorenzon, Alessandra; Occhi, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is an inherited heart muscle disease associated with point mutations in genes encoding for cardiac desmosome proteins. Conventional mutation screening is positive in approximate to 50% of probands. Copy number variations (CNVs) have recently been linked

  15. Generation of antigenic diversity in Plasmodium falciparum by structured rearrangement of Var genes during mitosis.

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    Antoine Claessens

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The most polymorphic gene family in P. falciparum is the ∼60 var genes distributed across parasite chromosomes, both in the subtelomeres and in internal regions. They encode hypervariable surface proteins known as P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1 that are critical for pathogenesis and immune evasion in Plasmodium falciparum. How var gene sequence diversity is generated is not currently completely understood. To address this, we constructed large clone trees and performed whole genome sequence analysis to study the generation of novel var gene sequences in asexually replicating parasites. While single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were scattered across the genome, structural variants (deletions, duplications, translocations were focused in and around var genes, with considerable variation in frequency between strains. Analysis of more than 100 recombination events involving var exon 1 revealed that the average nucleotide sequence identity of two recombining exons was only 63% (range: 52.7-72.4% yet the crossovers were error-free and occurred in such a way that the resulting sequence was in frame and domain architecture was preserved. Var exon 1, which encodes the immunologically exposed part of the protein, recombined in up to 0.2% of infected erythrocytes in vitro per life cycle. The high rate of var exon 1 recombination indicates that millions of new antigenic structures could potentially be generated each day in a single infected individual. We propose a model whereby var gene sequence polymorphism is mainly generated during the asexual part of the life cycle.

  16. Generation of antigenic diversity in Plasmodium falciparum by structured rearrangement of Var genes during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Antoine; Hamilton, William L; Kekre, Mihir; Otto, Thomas D; Faizullabhoy, Adnan; Rayner, Julian C; Kwiatkowski, Dominic

    2014-12-01

    The most polymorphic gene family in P. falciparum is the ∼60 var genes distributed across parasite chromosomes, both in the subtelomeres and in internal regions. They encode hypervariable surface proteins known as P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) that are critical for pathogenesis and immune evasion in Plasmodium falciparum. How var gene sequence diversity is generated is not currently completely understood. To address this, we constructed large clone trees and performed whole genome sequence analysis to study the generation of novel var gene sequences in asexually replicating parasites. While single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were scattered across the genome, structural variants (deletions, duplications, translocations) were focused in and around var genes, with considerable variation in frequency between strains. Analysis of more than 100 recombination events involving var exon 1 revealed that the average nucleotide sequence identity of two recombining exons was only 63% (range: 52.7-72.4%) yet the crossovers were error-free and occurred in such a way that the resulting sequence was in frame and domain architecture was preserved. Var exon 1, which encodes the immunologically exposed part of the protein, recombined in up to 0.2% of infected erythrocytes in vitro per life cycle. The high rate of var exon 1 recombination indicates that millions of new antigenic structures could potentially be generated each day in a single infected individual. We propose a model whereby var gene sequence polymorphism is mainly generated during the asexual part of the life cycle.

  17. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  18. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Carolina Bekker-Méndez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child’s diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7% patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4% patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1% patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8% patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4% patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children.

  19. A split and rearranged nuclear gene encoding the iron-sulfur subunit of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase in Euglenozoa

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    Gray Michael W

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analyses based on phylogenetic and ultrastructural data have suggested that euglenids (such as Euglena gracilis, trypanosomatids and diplonemids are members of a monophyletic lineage termed Euglenozoa. However, many uncertainties are associated with phylogenetic reconstructions for ancient and rapidly evolving groups; thus, rare genomic characters become increasingly important in reinforcing inferred phylogenetic relationships. Findings We discovered that the iron-sulfur subunit (SdhB of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase is encoded by a split and rearranged nuclear gene in Euglena gracilis and trypanosomatids, an example of a rare genomic character. The two subgenic modules are transcribed independently and the resulting mRNAs appear to be independently translated, with the two protein products imported into mitochondria, based on the presence of predicted mitochondrial targeting peptides. Although the inferred protein sequences are in general very divergent from those of other organisms, all of the required iron-sulfur cluster-coordinating residues are present. Moreover, the discontinuity in the euglenozoan SdhB sequence occurs between the two domains of a typical, covalently continuous SdhB, consistent with the inference that the euglenozoan 'half' proteins are functional. Conclusion The discovery of this unique molecular marker provides evidence for the monophyly of Euglenozoa that is independent of evolutionary models. Our results pose questions about the origin and timing of this novel gene arrangement and the structure and function of euglenozoan SdhB.

  20. Detection of clonal T-cell receptor beta and gamma chain gene rearrangement by polymerase chain reaction and capillary gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongxin; Robetorye, Ryan S

    2013-01-01

    Although established diagnostic criteria exist for mature T-cell neoplasms, a definitive diagnosis of a T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder cannot always be obtained using more conventional techniques such as flow cytometric immunophenotyping, conventional cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization, or immunohistochemistry. However, because T-cell malignancies contain identically rearranged T-cell receptor gamma (TCRG) and/or beta (TCRB) genes, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be a fast, convenient, and dependable option to identify clonal T-cell processes. This chapter describes the use of PCR and capillary electrophoresis to identify clonal TCRB and TCRG gene rearrangements (TCRB and TCRG PCR) using a commercially available method employing multiple multiplex PCR tubes that was originally developed as the result of a large European BIOMED-2 collaborative study (Invivoscribe Technologies). The core protocol for the TCRB assay involves the use of three separate multiplex master mix tubes. Tubes A and B target the framework regions within the variable and joining regions of the TCRB gene, and Tube C targets the diversity and joining regions of the TCRB gene. The core protocol for the TCRG assay utilizes two multiplex master mix tubes (Tubes A and B) that target the variable and joining regions of the TCRG gene. Use of the five BIOMED-2 TCRB and TCRG PCR multiplex tubes in parallel can detect approximately 94% of clonal TCR gene rearrangements.

  1. Rearrangements of MYC gene facilitate risk stratification in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with rituximab-CHOP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzankov, Alexandar; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Gerhard, Marc

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the debatable prognostic role of MYC rearrangements in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, we evaluated MYC rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 563 cases using br...

  2. Large Genomic Rearrangements of Desmosomal Genes in Italian Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilichou, Kalliopi; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Rigato, Ilaria; Celeghin, Rudy; de Bortoli, Marzia; Perazzolo Marra, Marina; Cason, Marco; Jongbloed, Jan; Calore, Martina; Rizzo, Stefania; Regazzo, Daniela; Poloni, Giulia; Iliceto, Sabino; Daliento, Luciano; Delise, Pietro; Corrado, Domenico; van Tintelen, J. Peter; Thiene, Gaetano; Rampazzo, Alessandra; Basso, Cristina; Bauce, Barbara; Lorenzon, Alessandra; Occhi, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is an inherited heart muscle disease associated with point mutations in genes encoding for cardiac desmosome proteins. Conventional mutation screening is positive in ≈50% of probands. Copy number variations (CNVs) have recently been linked to AC pointing to the

  3. The physical map of wheat chromosome 5DS revealed gene duplications and small rearrangements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Akpinar, B.A.; Magni, F.; Yuce, M.; Lucas, S. J.; Šimková, Hana; Šafář, Jan; Vautrin, S.; Berges, H.; Cattonaro, F.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Budak, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, JUN 13 (2015) ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Triticum aestivum * 5DS * Hexaploid wheat Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.867, year: 2015

  4. Detection of ALK gene rearrangement in non-small cell lung cancer: a comparison of fluorescence in situ hybridization and chromogenic in situ hybridization with correlation of ALK protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyojin; Yoo, Seol-Bong; Choe, Ji-Young; Paik, Jin Ho; Xu, Xianhua; Nitta, Hiroaki; Zhang, Wenjun; Grogan, Thomas M; Lee, Choon-Taek; Jheon, Sanghoon; Chung, Jin-Haeng

    2011-08-01

    Accurate determination of ALK rearrangement is important in lung cancer patients, especially in determining their eligibility for crizotinib therapy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been regarded as the gold standard method for detecting ALK rearrangement. However, FISH requires a fluorescence microscope, and the signals are labile and rapidly fade over time. This study evaluates the concordance between ALK gene rearrangement in non-small cell lung cancer assessed by ALK FISH and a newly developed ALK chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and correlates the results with ALK protein expression assessed by immunohistochemistry. A total of 465 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded non-small cell lung cancer samples were analyzed by ALK FISH (PathVysion, Vysis, Abbott) and ALK CISH. For comparison, all specimens were stained by immunohistochemistry (clone 5A4, Novocastra) and interobserver reproducibility was assessed. We found that agreement between the pathologists on the CISH-determined ALK status was achieved in 449 patients (96.6%), and ALK rearrangement was identified in 18 patients (4.0%) in CISH method. Among these cases, 443 cases (95.3%) had results matching the corresponding FISH results: 17 rearranged, 425 wild types, and 1 discordant case. There was high concordance in the assessment of ALK gene rearrangement between FISH and CISH techniques (κ = 0.92) and between observers (κ = 0.97). In addition, there was high concordance in the ALK gene status and ALK protein expression between CISH and IHC tests (κ = 0.82). CISH is a highly reproducible and practical method to detect ALK gene rearrangement and correlated well with ALK protein expression. Here, we present a diagnostic algorithm (Chung's SNUBH ALK protocol) to detect lung cancer with ALK rearrangements using IHC, FISH and CISH. Because CISH allows a concurrent analysis of histological features of the tumors and gene rearrangement, it appears to be a useful method in determining ALK gene

  5. Aberrant Expression of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Ovarian Carcinoma Independent of Gene Rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shaoxian; Yang, Fei; Du, Xiang; Lu, Yongming; Zhang, Ling; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies. The oncogenic role of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is well characterized in many hematopoietic and solid tumors. ALK expression in ovarian carcinoma has been reported but the exact status of ALK protein and its association with clinicopathologic features requires further investigation. ALK expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in 110 primary ovarian carcinomas, including 85 cases of serous carcinoma and 25 cases of mucinous carcinoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used for evaluating ALK translocation in ALK-positive ovarian carcinomas. Among 110 ovarian carcinomas, 23 (20.9%) cases were ALK positive by immunohistochemistry. All ALK-positive cases were ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma. ALK expression was detected in 23/85 (27.1%) ovarian serous carcinoma and 0/25 (0%) in ovarian mucinous carcinoma. None of the 23 ALK IHC-positive cases harbored ALK gene translocations by FISH or RT-PCR. ALK protein expression was associated with patient age, tumor stage, and histologic type. Specifically, the probability of ALK protein expression was significantly higher in high-grade serous carcinomas in older patients (above 50 y) with advanced disease (FIGO stage III and IV) compared with the low-grade serous and mucinous carcinomas in younger patients with relatively early disease. In conclusion, aberrant ALK expression is observed in ovarian serous carcinoma but not in mucinous carcinoma, is independent of gene translocation, and might be associated with progression and prognosis.

  6. Rapid analysis of rearranged kappa light chain genes of circulating polysaccharide-specific B lymphocytes by means of immunomagnetic beads and the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougs, L; Barington, T; Madsen, HO

    1993-01-01

    of the B lymphocytes activated in vivo. Here, we present a method for rapid analysis of the rearranged kappa light chain genes used by human circulating antigen-specific B lymphocytes. After vaccination with Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) conjugated with protein, the Hib......Analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin genes used by B lymphocytes of known specificity is an important tool for the study of diversity and selection of B lymphocytes. Usually hybridoma cell lines are used for such analyses, but they are difficult to obtain from humans and may not be representative......CP-specific B lymphocytes were isolated by antigen-coated immunomagnetic beads. After the purification, at least 98% of the immunoglobulin-secreting recovered cells were HibCP specific. The RNA was isolated and amplified by cDNA synthesis using a kappa constant region primer followed by polymerase chain...

  7. Comparative investigations of T cell receptor gamma gene rearrangements in frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin wax-embedded tissues by capillary electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M; Funder, A D; Bendix, K

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To compare clonal T cell receptor gamma (TCRgamma) gene rearrangements in frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin wax-embedded (FFPE) tissue, using capillary electrophoresis for use in diagnostics, as T cell lymphomas may be difficult to diagnose by conventional methods.METHODS: The DNA for PCR...... was extracted from frozen and FFPE tissue, cell lines and blood. PCR primers Vgamma1-8, Vgamma9, Vgamma10 or Vgamma11 (5' end labelled) combined with a mixture of JgammaP1/JgammaP/JgammaP2/Jgamma2 (unlabelled) were used. Monoclonal cases were sequenced and clonality, reproducibility, sensitivity and specificity......% for patient specimens and the specificity 100%. The junctional region between the Vgamma and Jgamma segments was specific for each patient.CONCLUSIONS: Capillary electrophoresis of PCR products from frozen and FFPE tissue is suitable for detecting clonal TCRgamma gene rearrangements. It is important, however...

  8. Putative interchromosomal rearrangements in the hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotype 'Chinese Spring' revealed by gene locations on homoeologous chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ma, J.; Stiller, J.; Zheng, Z.; Wei, Y.M.; Zheng, Y.L.; Yan, G.J.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Liu, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, MAR 11 2015 (2015) ISSN 1471-2148 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Interchromosomal rearrangements * Wheat genome * Translocation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.406, year: 2015

  9. Systematic characterisation of disease associated balanced chromosome rearrangements by FISH: cytogenetically and genetically anchored YACs identify microdeletions and candidate regions for mental retardation genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirth, J; Nothwang, H G; van der Maarel, S

    1999-01-01

    Disease associated balanced chromosome rearrangements (DBCRs) have been instrumental in the isolation of many disease genes. To facilitate the molecular cytogenetic characterisation of DBCRs, we have generated a set of >1200 non-chimeric, cytogenetically and genetically anchored CEPH YACs...... the Mendelian Cytogenetics Network (MCN), a collaborative effort of, at present, 270 cytogenetic laboratories throughout the world. In this pilot study, we have characterised 10 different MR associated chromosome regions delineating candidate regions for MR. Five of these regions are narrowed to breakpoint...

  10. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thys, Ryan G.; Lehman, Christine E.; Pierce, Levi C.T.; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Environmental/chemotherapeutic agents cause DNA breakage in MLL and CBFB in HSPCs. • Diethylnitrosamine-induced DNA breakage at MLL and CBFB shown for the first time. • Chemical-induced DNA breakage occurs at topoisomerase II cleavage sites. • Chemical-induced DNA breaks display a pattern similar to those in leukemia patients. • Long-term exposures suggested to generate DNA breakage at leukemia-related genes. - Abstract: Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The

  11. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thys, Ryan G., E-mail: rthys@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1016 (United States); Lehman, Christine E., E-mail: clehman@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1016 (United States); Pierce, Levi C.T., E-mail: Levipierce@gmail.com [Human Longevity, Inc., San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Wang, Yuh-Hwa, E-mail: yw4b@virginia.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0733 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Environmental/chemotherapeutic agents cause DNA breakage in MLL and CBFB in HSPCs. • Diethylnitrosamine-induced DNA breakage at MLL and CBFB shown for the first time. • Chemical-induced DNA breakage occurs at topoisomerase II cleavage sites. • Chemical-induced DNA breaks display a pattern similar to those in leukemia patients. • Long-term exposures suggested to generate DNA breakage at leukemia-related genes. - Abstract: Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The

  12. Evaluation of ALK gene rearrangement in central nervous system metastases of non-small-cell lung cancer using two-step RT-PCR technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoś, M; Krawczyk, P; Wojas-Krawczyk, K; Bożyk, A; Jarosz, B; Sawicki, M; Trojanowski, T; Milanowski, J

    2017-12-01

    RT-PCR technique has showed a promising value as pre-screening method for detection of mRNA containing abnormal ALK sequences, but its sensitivity and specificity is still discussable. Previously, we determined the incidence of ALK rearrangement in CNS metastases of NSCLC using IHC and FISH methods. We evaluated ALK gene rearrangement using two-step RT-PCR method with EML4-ALK Fusion Gene Detection Kit (Entrogen, USA). The studied group included 145 patients (45 females, 100 males) with CNS metastases of NSCLC and was heterogeneous in terms of histology and smoking status. 21% of CNS metastases of NSCLC (30/145) showed presence of mRNA containing abnormal ALK sequences. FISH and IHC tests confirmed the presence of ALK gene rearrangement and expression of ALK abnormal protein in seven patients with positive result of RT-PCR analysis (4.8% of all patients, 20% of RT-PCR positive patients). RT-PCR method compared to FISH analysis achieved 100% of sensitivity and only 82.7% of specificity. IHC method compared to FISH method indicated 100% of sensitivity and 97.8% of specificity. In comparison to IHC, RT-PCR showed identical sensitivity with high number of false positive results. Utility of RT-PCR technique in screening of ALK abnormalities and in qualification patients for molecularly targeted therapies needs further validation.

  13. High-resolution array-CGH in patients with oculocutaneous albinism identifies new deletions of the TYR, OCA2, and SLC45A2 genes and a complex rearrangement of the OCA2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morice-Picard, Fanny; Lasseaux, Eulalie; Cailley, Dorothée; Gros, Audrey; Toutain, Jérome; Plaisant, Claudio; Simon, Delphine; François, Stéphane; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Kaplan, Josseline; Rooryck, Caroline; Lacombe, Didier; Arveiler, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is caused by mutations in six different genes, and their molecular diagnosis encompasses the search for point mutations and intragenic rearrangements. Here, we used high-resolution array-comparative genome hybridization (CGH) to search for rearrangements across exons, introns and regulatory sequences of four OCA genes: TYR, OCA2, TYRP1, and SLC45A2. We identified a total of ten new deletions in TYR, OCA2, and SLC45A2. A complex rearrangement of OCA2 was found in two unrelated patients. Whole-genome sequencing showed deletion of a 184-kb fragment (identical to a deletion previously found in Polish patients), whereby a large portion of the deleted sequence was re-inserted after severe reshuffling into intron 1 of OCA2. The high-resolution array-CGH presented here is a powerful tool to detect gene rearrangements. Finally, we review all known deletions of the OCA1-4 genes reported so far in the literature and show that deletions or duplications account for 5.6% of all mutations identified in the OCA1-4 genes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Characterization of novel non-clonal intrachromosomal rearrangements between the H4 and PTEN genes (H4/PTEN) in human thyroid cell lines and papillary thyroid cancer specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puxeddu, Efisio; Zhao Guisheng; Stringer, James R.; Medvedovic, Mario; Moretti, Sonia; Fagin, James A.

    2005-01-01

    The two main forms of RET rearrangement in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC) arise from intrachromosomal inversions fusing the tyrosine kinase domain of RET with either the H4 (RET/PTC1) or the ELE1/RFG genes (RET/PTC3). PTEN codes for a dual-specificity phosphatase and maps to chromosome 10q22-23. Germline mutations confer susceptibility to Cowden syndrome whereas somatic mutations or deletions are common in several sporadic human tumors. Decreased PTEN expression has been implicated in thyroid cancer development. We report the characterization of a new chromosome 10 rearrangement involving H4 and PTEN. The initial H4/PTEN rearrangement was discovered as a non-specific product of RT-PCR for RET/PTC1 in irradiated thyroid cell lines. Sequencing revealed a transcript consisting of exon 1 and 2 of H4 fused with exons 3-6 of PTEN. Nested RT-PCR with specific primers bracketing the breakpoints confirmed the H4/PTEN rearrangements in irradiated KAT-1 and KAT-50 cells. Additional H4/PTEN variants, generated by recombination of either exon 1 or exon 2 of H4 with exon 6 of PTEN, were found in non-irradiated KAK-1, KAT-50, ARO and NPA cells. Their origin through chromosomal recombination was confirmed by detection of the reciprocal PTEN/H4 product. H4/PTEN recombination was not a clonal event in any of the cell lines, as Southern blots with appropriate probes failed to demonstrate aberrant bands, and multicolor FISH of KAK1 cells with BAC probes for H4 and PTEN did not show a signal overlap in all cells. Based on PCR of serially diluted samples, the minimal frequency of spontaneous recombination between these loci was estimated to be approximately 1/10 6 cells. H4/PTEN products were found by nested RT-PCR in 4/14 normal thyroid tissues (28%) and 14/18 PTC (78%) (P < 0.01). H4/PTEN is another example of recombination involving the H4 locus, and points to the high susceptibility of thyroid cells to intrachromosomal gene rearrangements. As this also represents a plausible

  15. Ph1 chromosomes and bcr gene rearrangements in chronic myelocytic leukemia patients developed from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Takechi, Miho; Shigeta, Chiharu; Sakatani, Keiko; Oguma, Nobuo; Kamada, Nanao; Takimoto, Yasuo; Kuramoto, Atsushi

    1989-01-01

    This study compared findings of chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) in A-bomb survivors (n=8) developing CML within 10 years after the bombing and in non-exposed CML patients (n=14). Both Ph 1 chromosomes and bcr rearrangement were observed in all patients in both exposed and non-exposed groups. There was no significant difference in distribution sites of bcr rearrangement between the groups. These results suggest that bcr-abl chimera mRNA and chimera protein associated with Ph 1 chromosomes have an important role in the development of CML among A-bomb survivors, as well as among non-exposed patients. (N.K.)

  16. The role of molecular analysis of immunoglobulin and T cell receptor gene rearrangements in the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langerak, AW; van Krieken, JHJM; Wolvers-Tettero, ILM; Kerkhof, E; Mulder, AH; Vrints, LWMA; Coebergh, JW; Schuuring, E; Kluin, PM; van Dongen, JJM

    Aims-To investigate whether the analysis of immunoglobulin (Ig)/T cell receptor (TCR) rearrangements is useful in the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders. Methods-In a series of 107 consecutive cases with initial suspicion of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), Southern blot (SB) analysis of Ig/TCR

  17. Validation of BIOMED-2 multiplex PCR tubes for detection of TCRB gene rearrangements in T-cell malignancies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droese, J.; Langerak, A.W.; Groenen, P.J.T.A.; Bruggemann, M.; Neumann, P.; Wolvers-Tettero, I.L.M.; Altena, M.C. van; Kneba, M.; Dongen, J.J.M. van

    2004-01-01

    The BIOMED-2 Concerted Action BMH4-CT98-3936 on 'Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based clonality studies for early diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders' developed standardized PCR protocols for detection of immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) rearrangements, including TCR beta

  18. Detection of 11q13 rearrangements in hematologic neoplasias by double-color fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coignet, L J; Schuuring, E; Kibbelaar, R E; Raap, T; Kleiverda, K K; Bertheas, M F; Wiegant, J; Beverstock, G; Kluin, P M

    1996-01-01

    Rearrangements within the chromosome 11q13 region are frequent in hematologic malignancies. 50% of 75% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) carry a translocation t(11;14) (q13;q32). Using Southern blot analysis, a BCL1 breakpoint can be detected in approximately 50% of MCLs. It is not known whether other

  19. Nearly complete mitogenome of hairy sawfly, Corynis lateralis (Brullé, 1832) (Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae): rearrangements in the IQM and ARNS1EF gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Özgül; Korkmaz, E Mahir

    2017-10-01

    The Cimbicidae is a small family of the primitive and relatively less diverse suborder Symphyta (Hymenoptera). Here, nearly complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of hairy sawfly, Corynis lateralis (Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae) was sequenced using next generation sequencing and comparatively analysed with the mitogenome of Trichiosoma anthracinum. The sequenced length of C. lateralis mitogenome was 14,899 bp with an A+T content of 80.60%. All protein coding genes (PCGs) are initiated by ATN codons and all are terminated with TAR or T- stop codon. All tRNA genes preferred usual anticodons. Compared with the inferred insect ancestral mitogenome, two tRNA rearrangements were observed in the IQM and ARNS1EF gene clusters, representing a new event not previously reported in Symphyta. An illicit priming of replication and/or intra/inter-mitochondrial recombination and TDRL seem to be responsible mechanisms for the rearrangement events in these gene clusters. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the position of Corynis within Cimbicidae and recovered a relationship of Tenthredinoidea + (Cephoidea + Orussoidea) in Symphyta.

  20. Sequencing and characterisation of rearrangements in three S. pastorianus strains reveals the presence of chimeric genes and gives evidence of breakpoint reuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Hewitt

    Full Text Available Gross chromosomal rearrangements have the potential to be evolutionarily advantageous to an adapting organism. The generation of a hybrid species increases opportunity for recombination by bringing together two homologous genomes. We sought to define the location of genomic rearrangements in three strains of Saccharomyces pastorianus, a natural lager-brewing yeast hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces eubayanus, using whole genome shotgun sequencing. Each strain of S. pastorianus has lost species-specific portions of its genome and has undergone extensive recombination, producing chimeric chromosomes. We predicted 30 breakpoints that we confirmed at the single nucleotide level by designing species-specific primers that flank each breakpoint, and then sequencing the PCR product. These rearrangements are the result of recombination between areas of homology between the two subgenomes, rather than repetitive elements such as transposons or tRNAs. Interestingly, 28/30 S. cerevisiae-S. eubayanus recombination breakpoints are located within genic regions, generating chimeric genes. Furthermore we show evidence for the reuse of two breakpoints, located in HSP82 and KEM1, in strains of proposed independent origin.

  1. Evaluation diagnostic usefulness of immunoglobulin light chains (Igκ, Igλ) and incomplete IGH D-J clonal gene rearrangements in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas using BIOMED-2 protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbian, S; Jahanzad, I; Javadi, G R; Sakhinia, E

    2014-11-01

    Evaluation diagnostic usefulness of immunoglobulin light chains (Igκ, Igλ) and incomplete IGH D-J clonal gene rearrangements in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue of patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHL). This study was performed on samples from 70 patients with B-NHL, including two cases of follicular lymphoma (FL), 20 cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), one case of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), and 47 cases of B-cell neoplasm (non-classified), which had been previously assessed for complete IGH clonality, and failure to clarify gene rearrangements. We used a gold standard multiplex PCR protocol provided by European Biomedicine and Health (BIOMED-2) Concerted Action Project BMH4-CT98-3936 for improvement of diagnosis and analysis of clonality gene rearrangement in lymphoma malignancies. Our results revealed a total positive monoclonality of 89 % (62/70) in Igκ, Igλ, and 11.4 % (8/70) polyclonality in gene rearrangements assay. The samples with positive clonality consisting (Igκ: 45 %, Igλ: 55 %) in DLBCL, (Igκ: 100 %) in FL, (Igλ: 100 %) in MCL, and (Igκ: 47 %, Igλ: 36 %) in B-cell neoplasm non-classified. None of the incomplete IGH D-J immunoglobulin gene families (0 %) showed monoclonality, and all samples demonstrated polyclonality pattern. Our findings on FFPE tissue revealed that immunoglobulin light chains clonality gene rearrangements assays using BIOMED-2 protocol, could be considered a valuable and reliable method for clonality detection, particularly in cases of failure of complete IGH gene rearrangements analysis. Clonal Ig gene rearrangements assay is applicable for routine diagnostic testing of lymphoproliferative disorders and as a reliable method for differentiating between malignant and benign lymphoma disorders.

  2. Destaining of Diff-Quik stained cytologic smears is not necessary for the detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene rearrangement in lung adenocarcinoma by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weisheng Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK gene rearrangement analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH is one of the standard molecular tests for targeted therapy of lung adenocarcinoma. However, insufficient cell block cellularity may impede molecular testing. A recent study showed that Diff-Quik (DQ stained cytology smear is suitable for ALK by FISH. Aims: The aim of our study was to observe the impact of destaining intervals on the quality of FISH signals and determine if DQ smears without destaining would allow FISH analysis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five DQ smears from 27 cases of lung adenocarcinoma were analyzed for ALK gene rearrangement by FISH. Twenty three DQ smears were destained for different intervals, including 30 s (13 cases, 1 min (6 cases, or 2 min (4 cases. Twelve DQ smears were not subjected to destaining. For further validation, FISH signals in 8 smears and 6 cell blocks were compared with the paired destained DQ smears. The signal quality was semi-quantified and analyzed with Chi-squared test. Results: Of the total 27 selected cases, three (11% were positive for ALK gene rearrangement, whereas 24 (89% were negative. FISH signal was satisfactory in all DQ smears. There was no significant difference in the quality of signal among smears with different destaining intervals (P = 0.55 or between smears with and without destaining (P = 0.41. DQ smears without destaining showed identical FISH results and similar or better signals as compared with paired destained smears and cell blocks in all cases. Conclusions: Duration of destaining intervals does not impact the quality of FISH signal on DQ smears. Destaining of DQ smears is not necessary for ALK by FISH.

  3. Rearreglos de genes de cadenas pesadas de las inmunoglobulinas en las gammapatías monoclonales Immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements in the monoclonal gammopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bosaleh

    2005-06-01

    gammopathies of unknown significance (MGUS. MGUS present a monoclonal component with no signs of multiple myeloma, Waldenström macroglobulinemia, primary amyloidosis or other disorders. Pathological, radiological and clinical features are required for the diagnosis. Approximately 25% of patients with MGUS will become multiple myeloma, primary amiloidosis, macroglobulinemia, or other lymphoproliferative disease, which would be a premyelomatous condition. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical implications of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and of the detection of clonality by molecular biology. A total of 32 patients were studied. Seven of them were diagnosed with multiple myeloma, and 25 with monoclonal gammopathy under study. These 32 patients were divided into four groups, based on their clinical data and flow cytometry outcome. In patients with non-diagnostic flow cytometry detection of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements by PCR was performed, and monoclonality was found in 59% of the cases. The study of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements by molecular biology allows a more sensitive detection of clonality.

  4. ETV6 Gene Rearrangements Characterize a Morphologically Distinct Subset of Sinonasal Low-grade Non-intestinal-type Adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Simon; Skálová, Alena; Agaimy, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    eosinophilic tumor cells with basally located nuclei arranged in tubular and tubulotrabecular patterns. Immunohistochemically, CK7, DOG1, GCDFP-15, and SOX10 were positive in all cases, and vimentin was positive in 2 cases. Scattered single cells or small groups of tumor cells were S-100 positive. Only one...... of a specific disease. Although translocation-associated adenocarcinomas in the sinonasal tract have previously been described exclusively as salivary-type carcinomas, we present the first type of carcinoma characterized by recurrent genetic rearrangements and distinct phenotype occurring exclusively...

  5. Localization of preferential sites of rearrangement within the BCR gene in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denny, C.T.; Shah, N.P.; Ogden, S.; Willman, C.; McConnell, T.; Crist, W.; Carroll, A.; Witte, O.N.

    1989-01-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been linked to a hybrid BCR/ABL protein product that differs from that found in chronic myelogenous leukemia. This implies that the molecular structures of the two chromosomal translocations also differ. Localization of translocation breakpoints in Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL has been impeded due to the only partial characterization of the BCR locus. The authors have isolated the entire 130-kilobase BCR genomic locus from a human cosmid library. They have demonstrated that these breakpoints are all located at the 3' end of the intron around an unusual restriction fragment length polymorphism caused by deletion of a 1-kilobase fragment containing Alu family reiterated sequences. This clustering is unexpected in light of previous theories of rearrangement in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia that would have predicted a random dispersion of breakpoints in the first intron in Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL. The proximity of the translocation breakpoints to this constitutive deletion may indicate shared mechanisms of rearrangement or that such polymorphisms mark areas of the genome prone to recombination

  6. [Detection of subtelomeric rearrangements due to MLPA in paediatric patients with refractory epilepsy in Colombia: the role of the CHL1 gene in pharmacoresistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradei-Anaya, Silvia J; Espinosa, Eugenia; Izquierdo, Álvaro; Velasco-Parra, Harvy M

    2013-11-16

    INTRODUCTION. Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterised by a predisposition to the recurrence of seizures of distinct causation and with variable clinical manifestations. Up to 40% of patients do not manage to control their seizures with the first anticonvulsive drug and the addition of a second pharmaceutical affords control in only another 11%. Given the aetiological heterogeneity of pharmacoresistance, it has been suggested that the presence of genomic disorders in patients with refractoriness could be elements worthy of analysis when it comes to estimating the alteration in the pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic profiles of these patients. AIM. To detect the presence of subtelomeric rearrangements in Colombian paediatric patients with refractory epilepsy. PATIENTS AND METHODS. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique was used to evaluate the presence of cytogenetically non-visible chromosome aberrations in subtelomeric regions of 113 patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy from three national referral centres in Colombia. RESULTS. Subtelomeric chromosome aberrations were detected in 0.9% of patients corresponding to a duplication of locus 3p26.3 in gene CHL1. CONCLUSIONS. This study suggests the use of the MLPA methodology to detect subtelomeric rearrangements that may be associated with phenotypes of refractoriness in epileptic patients.

  7. The clinical impact of chromosomal rearrangements with breakpoints upstream of the SOX9 gene: two novel de novo balanced translocations associated with acampomelic campomelic dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Ana Carolina S; Bonaldi, Adriano; Bertola, Débora R; Kim, Chong A; Otto, Paulo A; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M

    2013-05-07

    The association of balanced rearrangements with breakpoints near SOX9 [SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9] with skeletal abnormalities has been ascribed to the presumptive altering of SOX9 expression by the direct disruption of regulatory elements, their separation from SOX9 or the effect of juxtaposed sequences. We report on two sporadic apparently balanced translocations, t(7;17)(p13;q24) and t(17;20)(q24.3;q11.2), whose carriers have skeletal abnormalities that led to the diagnosis of acampomelic campomelic dysplasia (ACD; MIM 114290). No pathogenic chromosomal imbalances were detected by a-CGH. The chromosome 17 breakpoints were mapped, respectively, 917-855 kb and 601-585 kb upstream of the SOX9 gene. A distal cluster of balanced rearrangements breakpoints on chromosome 17 associated with SOX9-related skeletal disorders has been mapped to a segment 932-789 kb upstream of SOX9. In this cluster, the breakpoint of the herein described t(17;20) is the most telomeric to SOX9, thus allowing the redefining of the telomeric boundary of the distal breakpoint cluster region related to skeletal disorders to 601-585 kb upstream of SOX9. Although both patients have skeletal abnormalities, the t(7;17) carrier presents with relatively mild clinical features, whereas the t(17;20) was detected in a boy with severe broncheomalacia, depending on mechanical ventilation. Balanced and unbalanced rearrangements associated with disorders of sex determination led to the mapping of a regulatory region of SOX9 function on testicular differentiation to a 517-595 kb interval upstream of SOX9, in addition to TESCO (Testis-specific enhancer of SOX9 core). As the carrier of t(17;20) has an XY sex-chromosome constitution and normal male development for his age, the segment of chromosome 17 distal to the translocation breakpoint should contain the regulatory elements for normal testis development. These two novel translocations illustrate the clinical variability in carriers of balanced

  8. Large genomic rearrangements of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes: review of the literature and report of a novel BRCA1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluiter, Michelle D; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J

    2011-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 increase the risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer. Previously, the techniques available allowed only for the identification of small genomic alterations, but the dawn of new technology now allows for the rapid detection of large genomic rearrangements (LGRs). LGRs in BRCA1 are responsible for between 0 and 27% of all BRCA1 disease-causing mutations identified in numerous populations. Such alterations are far less common in the BRCA2 gene. To determine the impact of BRCA1 and BRCA2 LGRs in South Africa, 52 hereditary breast and/or ovarian South African families (36 were Afrikaners) were screened for BRCA1 and BRCA2 LGRs using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. These patients were previously shown to be BRCA1 and BRCA2 small mutation negative. One LGR was detected in BRCA1 in a South African family with Greek ancestry. This is a novel deletion of both exons 23 and 24 (NG_005905.2:g.169527_180579del). This first study of BRCA rearrangements in South Africa reveals that LGRs comprise ~3% of identified BRCA1 mutations, a low rate in comparison to other populations. In addition, we have reviewed all 98 previously characterized BRCA1/2 LGRs and re-named them according to the recommended HGVS nomenclature, using the recently released RefSeqGene records, NG_005905.2 and NG_012772.1 for BRCA1 and BRCA2. A standardized resource is now provided which will assist researchers in determining whether their LGRs are novel. Furthermore, we have clarified some of the previously misunderstood rules of nomenclature, which will make uniform reporting of BRCA1/2 easier in the future.

  9. E2A proteins are required for proper B cell development and initiation of immunoglobulin gene rearrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bain, G.; Maandag, E. C.; Izon, D. J.; Amsen, D.; Kruisbeek, A. M.; Weintraub, B. C.; Krop, I.; Schlissel, M. S.; Feeney, A. J.; van Roon, M.

    1994-01-01

    E12 and E47 are two helix-loop-helix transcription factors that arise by alternative splicing of the E2A gene. Both have been implicated in the regulation of immunoglobulin gene expression. We have now generated E2A (-/-) mice by gene targeting. E2A-null mutant mice fail to generate mature B cells.

  10. A balanced t(5;17 (p15;q22-23 in chondroblastoma: frequency of the re-arrangement and analysis of the candidate genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wijers-Koster Pauline

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chondroblastoma is a benign cartilaginous tumour of bone that predominantly affects the epiphysis of long bones in young males. No recurrent chromosomal re-arrangements have so far been observed. Methods: We identified an index case with a balanced translocation by Combined Binary Ratio-Fluorescent in situ Hybridisation (COBRA-FISH karyotyping followed by breakpoint FISH mapping and array-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (aCGH. Candidate region re-arrangement and candidate gene expression were subsequently investigated by interphase FISH and immunohistochemistry in another 14 cases. Results A balanced t(5;17(p15;q22-23 was identified. In the index case, interphase FISH showed that the translocation was present only in mononucleated cells and was absent in the characteristic multinucleated giant cells. The t(5;17 translocation was not observed in the other cases studied. The breakpoint in 5p15 occurred close to the steroid reductase 5α1 (SRD5A1 gene. Expression of the protein was found in all cases tested. Similar expression was found for the sex steroid signalling-related molecules oestrogen receptor alpha and aromatase, while androgen receptors were only found in isolated cells in a few cases. The breakpoint in 17q22-23 was upstream of the carbonic anhydrase × (CA10 gene region and possibly involved gene-regulatory elements, which was indicated by the lack of CA10 protein expression in the index case. All other cases showed variable levels of CA10 expression, with low expression in three cases. Conclusion We report a novel t(5;17(p15;q22-23 translocation in chondroblastoma without involvement of any of the two chromosomal regions in other cases studied. Our results indicate that the characteristic multinucleated giant cells in chondroblastoma do not have the same clonal origin as the mononuclear population, as they do not harbour the same translocation. We therefore hypothesise that they might be either reactive or

  11. Evaluation of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis versus multiplex polymerase chain reaction assays in the detection of dystrophin gene rearrangements in an Iranian population subset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayereh Nouri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD gene is located in the short arm of the X chromosome (Xp21. It spans 2.4 Mb of the human genomic DNA and is composed of 79 exons. Mutations in the Dystrophin gene result in DMD and Becker muscular dystrophy. In this study, the efficiency of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA over multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays in an Iranian population was investigated. Materials and Methods: Multiplex PCR assays and MLPA analysis were carried out in 74 patients affected with DMD. Results: Multiplex PCR detected deletions in 51% of the patients with DMD. MLPA analysis could determine all the deletions detected by the multiplex PCR. Additionally, MLPA was able to identify one more deletion and duplication in patients without detectable mutations by multiplex PCR. Moreover, MLPA precisely determined the exact size of the deletions. Conclusion: Although MLPA analysis is more sensitive for detection of deletions and duplications in the dystrophin gene, multiplex PCR might be used for the initial analysis of the boys affected with DMD in the Iranian population as it was able to detect 95% of the rearrangements in patients with DMD.

  12. Association of a Chromosomal Rearrangement Event with Mouse Posterior Polymorphous Corneal Dystrophy and Alterations in Csrp2bp, Dzank1, and Ovol2 Gene Expression.

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    Anna L Shen

    Full Text Available We have previously described a mouse model of human posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy (PPCD and localized the causative mutation to a 6.2 Mbp region of chromosome 2, termed Ppcd1. We now show that the gene rearrangement linked to mouse Ppcd1 is a 3.9 Mbp chromosomal inversion flanked by 81 Kbp and 542 bp deletions. This recombination event leads to deletion of Csrp2bp Exons 8 through 11, Dzank1 Exons 20 and 21, and the pseudogene Znf133. In addition, we identified translocation of novel downstream sequences to positions adjacent to Csrp2bp Exon 7 and Dzank1 Exon 20. Twelve novel fusion transcripts involving Csrp2bp or Dzank1 linked to downstream sequences have been identified. Eight are expressed at detectable levels in PPCD1 but not wildtype eyes. Upregulation of two Csrp2bp fusion transcripts, as well as upregulation of the adjacent gene, Ovol2, was observed. Absence of the PPCD1 phenotype in animals haploinsufficient for Csrp2bp or both Csrp2bp and Dzank1 rules out haploinsufficiency of these genes as a cause of mouse PPCD1. Complementation experiments confirm that PPCD1 embryonic lethality is due to disruption of Csrp2bp expression. The ocular expression pattern of Csrp2bp is consistent with a role for this protein in corneal development and pathogenesis of PPCD1.

  13. N-terminal truncated human RAG1 proteins can direct T-cell receptor but not immunoglobulin gene rearrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Noordzij; N.S. Verkaik (Nicole); N.G. Hartwig (Nico); R. de Groot (Ronald); D.C. van Gent (Dik); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe proteins encoded by RAG1 and RAG2 can initiate gene recombination by site-specific cleavage of DNA in immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor (TCR) loci. We identified a new homozygous RAG1 gene mutation (631delT) that leads to a premature stop codon in the

  14. Minimal residual disease (MRD detection with translocations and T-cell receptor and immunoglobulin gene rearrangements in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muge Sayitoglu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Monitoring minimal residual disease has become increasingly important in clinical practice of ALL management. Break-point fusion regions of leukaemia related chromosomal aberrations and rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig and T cell-receptor (TCR genes are used as leukaemia specific markers in genetic studies of MRD.Material and Methods: A total of 31 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed ALL were screened for eligibility criteria. Of those 26 were included in the study. One patient with partial response following induction therapy and four patients who were lost to follow-up after induction were excluded from the study; thus 21 patients were evaluated for MRD by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR, heteroduplex analysis, sequencing and quantitative real time PCR techniques. Results: Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 5 (24% of the patients and were used for MRD monitoring. Three patients had t(9;22 translocation, the other 2 had t(4;11 and t(1;19. MRD-based risk stratification of the16 patients analysed for Ig/TCR rearrangements revealed 3 low-risk, 11 intermediate-risk and 2 high-risk patients.Conclusion: MRD monitoring is progressively getting to be a more important predictive factor in adult ALL patients. As reported by others confirmed by our limited data there is a good correlation between MRD status and clinical outcome in patients receiving chemotherapy. The pilot-study presented here is the first that systematically and consecutively performs a molecular MRD monitoring of ALL patients in Turkey.

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of Pseudocellus pearsei (Chelicerata: Ricinulei and a comparison of mitochondrial gene rearrangements in Arachnida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braband Anke

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial genomes are widely utilized for phylogenetic and population genetic analyses among animals. In addition to sequence data the mitochondrial gene order and RNA secondary structure data are used in phylogenetic analyses. Arachnid phylogeny is still highly debated and there is a lack of sufficient sequence data for many taxa. Ricinulei (hooded tickspiders are a morphologically distinct clade of arachnids with uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Results The first complete mitochondrial DNA genome of a member of the Ricinulei, Pseudocellus pearsei (Arachnida: Ricinulei was sequenced using a PCR-based approach. The mitochondrial genome is a typical circular duplex DNA molecule with a size of 15,099 bp, showing the complete set of genes usually present in bilaterian mitochondrial genomes. Five tRNA genes (trnW, trnY, trnN, trnL(CUN, trnV show different relative positions compared to other Chelicerata (e.g. Limulus polyphemus, Ixodes spp.. We propose that two events led to this derived gene order: (1 a tandem duplication followed by random deletion and (2 an independent translocation of trnN. Most of the inferred tRNA secondary structures show the common cloverleaf pattern except tRNA-Glu where the TψC-arm is missing. In phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, Bayesian inference using concatenated amino acid and nucleotide sequences of protein-coding genes the basal relationships of arachnid orders remain unresolved. Conclusion Phylogenetic analyses (ML, MP, BI of arachnid mitochondrial genomes fail to resolve interordinal relationships of Arachnida and remain in a preliminary stage because there is still a lack of mitogenomic data from important taxa such as Opiliones and Pseudoscorpiones. Gene order varies considerably within Arachnida – only eight out of 23 species have retained the putative arthropod ground pattern. Some gene order changes are valuable characters in phylogenetic analysis of

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome of Clistocoeloma sinensis (Brachyura: Grapsoidea): Gene rearrangements and higher-level phylogeny of the Brachyura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zhao-Zhe; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Dai-Zhen; Chai, Xin-Yue; Wang, Zheng-Fei; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Tang, Bo-Ping; Liu, Qiu-Ning

    2017-06-23

    Deciphering the animal mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) is very important to understand their molecular evolution and phylogenetic relationships. In this study, the complete mitogenome of Clistocoeloma sinensis was determined. The mitogenome of C. sinensis was 15,706 bp long, and its A+T content was 75.7%. The A+T skew of the mitogenome of C. sinensis was slightly negative (-0.020). All the transfer RNA genes had the typical cloverleaf structure, except for the trnS1 gene, which lacked a dihydroxyuridine arm. The two ribosomal RNA genes had 80.2% A+T content. The A+T-rich region spanned 684 bp. The gene order within the complete mitogenome of C. sinensis was identical to the pancrustacean ground pattern except for the translocation of trnH. Additionally, the gene order of trnI-trnQ-trnM in the pancrustacean ground pattern becomes trnQ-trnI-trnM in C. sinensis. Our phylogenetic analysis showed that C. sinensis and Sesarmops sinensis cluster together with high nodal support values, indicating that C. sinensis and S. sinensis have a sister group relationship. The results support that C. sinensis belongs to Grapsoidea, Sesarmidae. Our findings also indicate that Varunidae and Sesarmidae species share close relationships. Thus, mitogenomes are likely to be valuable tools for systematics in other groups of Crustacea.

  17. Detection of SYT and EWS gene rearrangements by dual-color break-apart CISH in liquid-based cytology samples of synovial sarcoma and Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arisa; Motoi, Toru; Tsuji, Kaori; Imamura, Tetsuo; Fukusato, Toshio

    2010-08-01

    To improve cytologic diagnostic accuracy for translocation-associated sarcomas, we explored dual-color break-apart (dc) chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) on liquid-based cytology (LBC) samples of 2 prototypic sarcomas: synovial sarcoma (SS) and Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (ES/PNET). LBC samples of 10 cases of SS and 9 cases of ES/PNET were subjected to dc-CISH using probes for the specifically rearranged genes in each tumor entity: SYT in SS and EWS in ES/PNET. Rearranged SYT was successfully detected in all SSs but not in any ES/PNETs. In contrast, EWS rearrangement was identified in all ES/PNETs but not in any SSs. These results were validated by dc-fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. dc-CISH on LBC samples is a reliable modality to detect gene rearrangements in sarcomas. This system has a clear advantage over other methods, enabling simultaneous visualization of the genetic abnormality and well-preserved, nonoverlapping cytomorphologic features with clear background under bright-field microscope.

  18. Rearrangements and amplification of the ABL1 gene as an example of kinase activation in T-cell acute lymphoblastic

    OpenAIRE

    Graux, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a neoplastic disorder that develops from a single hematopoietic T-cell precursor that acquired oncogenic anomalies. T-ALL is a heterogeneous disease comprising several clinico-biological entities characterized by distinct underlying genetic defects. In the first part of this work, we attempted to correlate those numerous anomalies with the role of the corresponding non mutated genes or pathways in normal T-cell development. Mutations targeting se...

  19. In vivo therapy of a murine B cell tumor (BCL1) using antibody-ricin A chain immunotoxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolick, K.A.; Uhr, J.W.; Slavin, S.; Vitetta, E.S.

    1982-01-01

    Prolonged remissions were induced in mice bearing advanced BCL1 tumors by the combined approach of nonspecific cytoreductive therapy and administration of a tumor-reactive immunotoxin. Thus, the vast majority of the tumor cells (approximately 95%) were first killed by nonspecific cytoreductive therapy using total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and splenectomy. The residual tumor cells were then eliminated by intravenous administration of an anti-delta immunotoxin. In three of four experiments, all animals treated in the above fashion appeared tumor free 12-16 wk later. In one experiment, blood cells from the mice in remission were transferred to normal BALB/c recipients, and the latter animals have not developed detectable tumor for the 6 mo of observation. Because 1-10 adoptively transferred BCL1 cells will cause tumor in normal BALB/c mice by 12 wk, the inability to transfer tumor to recipients might indicate that the donor animals were tumor free. In the remainder of the animals treated with the tumor-reactive immunotoxin there was a substantial remission in all animals, but the disease eventually reappeared. In contrast, all mice treated with the control immunotoxin or antibody alone relapsed significantly earlier

  20. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  1. Ab-origin: an enhanced tool to identify the sourcing gene segments in germline for rearranged antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Jing

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the adaptive immune system, variable regions of immunoglobulin (IG are encoded by random recombination of variable (V, diversity (D, and joining (J gene segments in the germline. Partitioning the functional antibody sequences to their sourcing germline gene segments is vital not only for understanding antibody maturation but also for promoting the potential engineering of the therapeutic antibodies. To date, several tools have been developed to perform such "trace-back" calculations. Yet, the predicting ability and processing volume of those tools vary significantly for different sets of data. Moreover, none of them give a confidence for immunoglobulin heavy diversity (IGHD identification. Developing fast, efficient and enhanced tools is always needed with the booming of immunological data. Results Here, a program named Ab-origin is presented. It is designed by batch query against germline databases based on empirical knowledge, optimized scoring scheme and appropriate parameters. Special efforts have been paid to improve the identification accuracy of the short and volatile region, IGHD. In particular, a threshold score for certain sensitivity and specificity is provided to give the confidence level of the IGHD identification. Conclusion When evaluated using different sets of both simulated data and experimental data, Ab-origin outperformed all the other five popular tools in terms of prediction accuracy. The features of batch query and confidence indication of IGHD identification would provide extra help to users. The program is freely available at http://mpsq.biosino.org/ab-origin/supplementary.html.

  2. Genomic regulatory landscapes and chromosomal rearrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard, Elisabete L Engenheiro

    2008-01-01

    and mental retardation-AUTS2), where the breakpoints in all cases mutated the known disease-causing protein-coding genes. In two rearrangements with breakpoints within putative regulatory landscapes of genes where human phenotypes are unknown (HMX2/HMX3 and FOXP1), the functional characterization of CNEs...

  3. Identification of IgH gene rearrangement and immunophenotype in an animal model of Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Peng, Xueqin; Tang, Yunlian; Gan, Xiaoning; Wang, Chengkun; Xie, Lu; Xie, Xiaoli; Gan, Runliang; Wu, Yimou

    2016-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human oncogenic herpesvirus associated with lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Because the susceptible hosts of EB virus are limited to human and cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus), there have been no appropriate animal models until the lymphoma model induced by EBV in human peripheral blood lymphocyte (hu-PBL)/SCID chimeric mice was reported. However, it is still controversial whether the EBV-associated lymphoma induced in hu-PBL/SCID mice is a monoclonal tumor. In this study, we transplanted normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hu-PBL) from six donors infected with EBV into SCID mice to construct hu-PBL/SCID chimeric mice. The induced tumors were found in the mediastinum or abdominal cavity of SCID mice. Microscopic observation exhibited tumor cells that were large and had a plasmablastic, centroblastic or immunoblastic-like appearance. Immunophenotyping assays showed the induced tumors were LCA-positive, CD20/CD79a-positive (markers of B cells), and CD3/CD45RO-negative (markers of T cells). A human-specific Alu sequence could be amplified by Alu-PCR. This confirmed that induced tumors were B-cell lymphomas originating from the transplanted human lymphocytes rather than mouse cells. EBER in situ hybridization detected positive signals in the nuclei of the tumor cells. Expression of EBV-encoded LMP1, EBNA-1, and EBNA-2 in the tumors was significantly positive. PCR-based capillary electrophoresis analysis of IgH gene rearrangement revealed a monoclonal peak and single amplification product in all six cases of induced tumors. This indicated that EBV can induce monoclonal proliferation of human B lymphocytes and promotes the development of lymphoma. J. Med. Virol. 88:1804-1813, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Two promoter rearrangements in a drug efflux transporter gene are responsible for the appearance and spread of multidrug resistance phenotype MDR2 in Botrytis cinerea isolates in French and German vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernke, D; Dahm, S; Walker, A-S; Lalève, A; Fillinger, S; Leroch, M; Hahn, M

    2011-10-01

    In French and German vineyards, Botrytis cinerea isolates with multiple fungicide resistance phenotypes have been observed with increasing frequencies. Multidrug resistance (MDR) results from mutations that lead to constitutive overexpression of genes encoding drug efflux transporters. In MDR2 and MDR3 strains, overexpression of the major facilitator superfamily transporter gene mfsM2 has been found to result from a rearrangement in the mfsM2 promoter (type A), caused by insertion of a retroelement (RE)-derived sequence. Here, we report the discovery of another, similar RE-induced rearrangement of the mfsM2 promoter (type B) in a subpopulation of French MDR2 isolates. MDR2 isolates harboring either type A or type B mutations in mfsM2 show the same resistance phenotypes and similar levels of mfsM2 overexpression. RE sequences similar to those in mfsM2 were found in low copy numbers in other but not all B. cinerea strains analyzed, including non-MDR2 strains. Population genetic analyses support the hypothesis that the two rearrangement mutations have only occurred once, and are responsible for the appearance and subsequent spread of all known MDR2 and MDR3 strains in French and German wine-growing regions.

  5. Chromosomal rearrangements in Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Debes, Nanette Mol; Hjermind, Lena E

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset complex neurobiological disorder characterized by a combination of persistent motor and vocal tics and frequent presence of other neuropsychiatric comorbidities. TS shares the fate of other complex disorders, where the genetic etiology is largely unknown...... been an efficient tool for the cloning of disease genes in several Mendelian disorders and in a number of complex disorders. Through cytogenetic investigation of 205 TS patients, we identified three possibly disease-associated chromosome rearrangements rendering this approach relevant in chasing TS...

  6. Programmed Rearrangement in Ciliates: Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betermier, Mireille; Duharcourt, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    Programmed genome rearrangements in the ciliate Paramecium provide a nice illustration of the impact of transposons on genome evolution and plasticity. During the sexual cycle, development of the somatic macronucleus involves elimination of ∼30% of the germline genome, including repeated DNA (e.g., transposons) and ∼45,000 single-copy internal eliminated sequences (IES). IES excision is a precise cut-and-close process, in which double-stranded DNA cleavage at IES ends depends on PiggyMac, a domesticated piggyBac transposase. Genome-wide analysis has revealed that at least a fraction of IESs originate from Tc/mariner transposons unrelated to piggyBac. Moreover, genomic sequences with no transposon origin, such as gene promoters, can be excised reproducibly as IESs, indicating that genome rearrangements contribute to the control of gene expression. How the system has evolved to allow elimination of DNA sequences with no recognizable conserved motif has been the subject of extensive research during the past two decades. Increasing evidence has accumulated for the participation of noncoding RNAs in epigenetic control of elimination for a subset of IESs, and in trans-generational inheritance of alternative rearrangement patterns. This chapter summarizes our current knowledge of the structure of the germline and somatic genomes for the model species Paramecium tetraurelia, and describes the DNA cleavage and repair factors that constitute the IES excision machinery. We present an overview of the role of specialized RNA interference machineries and their associated noncoding RNAs in the control of DNA elimination. Finally, we discuss how RNA-dependent modification and/or remodeling of chromatin may guide PiggyMac to its cognate cleavage sites.

  7. Chromosomal rearrangements do not seem to affect the gene flow in hybrid zones between karyotypic races of the common shrew (Sorex araneus)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horn, A.; Basset, P.; Yannic, G.; Banaszek, A.; Borodin, P. M.; Bulatova, N. S.; Jadwiszczak, K.; Jones, R. M.; Polyakov, A. V.; Ratkiewicz, M.; Searle, J. B.; Shchipanov, N. A.; Zima, Jan; Hausser, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 3 (2012), s. 882-889 ISSN 0014-3820 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : genetic structure * microsatellites * Robertsonian rearrangements * Sorex araneus * speciation Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 4.864, year: 2012

  8. Cryptic Rearrangements of Human Chromosomes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Křivánková, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disabilities characterized by antisociality and atypical behavioral patterns. Its etiology is very complex, autism is usually formed by combining many factors. One of the causes may be genetic (gene mutation). It is known about 450 candidate genes for ASD so far. Minority of these genes occur in loci which are affected by cryptic rearrangements. These rearrangements significantly contribute to manifestation of this ...

  9. Identification of duplicated and stress-inducible Aox2b gene co-expressed with Aox1 in species of the Medicago genus reveals a regulation linked to gene rearrangement in leguminous genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, João Henrique Frota; Oliveira, Georgia Mesquita; Saraiva, Kátia Daniella da Cruz; Torquato, José Pedro Pires; Maia, Ivan G; de Melo, Dirce Fernandes; Costa, José Hélio

    2013-12-15

    In flowering plants, alternative oxidase (Aox) is encoded by 3-5 genes distributed in 2 subfamilies (Aox1 and Aox2). In several species only Aox1 is reported as a stress-responsive gene, but in the leguminous Vigna unguiculata Aox2b is also induced by stress. In this work we investigated the Aox genes from two leguminous species of the Medicago genus (Medicago sativa and Medicago truncatula) which present one Aox1, one Aox2a and an Aox2b duplication (named here Aox2b1 and Aox2b2). Expression analyses by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in M. sativa revealed that Aox1, Aox2b1 and Aox2b2 transcripts increased during seed germination. Similar analyses in leaves and roots under different treatments (SA, PEG, H2O2 and cysteine) revealed that these genes are also induced by stress, but with peculiar spatio-temporal differences. Aox1 and Aox2b1 showed basal levels of expression under control conditions and were induced by stress in leaves and roots. Aox2b2 presented a dual behavior, i.e., it was expressed only under stress conditions in leaves, and showed basal expression levels in roots that were induced by stress. Moreover, Aox2a was expressed at higher levels in leaves and during seed germination than in roots and appeared to be not responsive to stress. The Aox expression profiles obtained from a M. truncatula microarray dataset also revealed a stress-induced co-expression of Aox1, Aox2b1 and Aox2b2 in leaves and roots. These results reinforce the stress-inducible co-expression of Aox1/Aox2b in some leguminous plants. Comparative genomic analysis indicates that this regulation is linked to Aox1/Aox2b proximity in the genome as a result of the gene rearrangement that occurred in some leguminous plants during evolution. The differential expression of Aox2b1/2b2 suggests that a second gene has been originated by recent gene duplication with neofunctionalization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterisation of a large complex intragenic re-arrangement in the FVII gene (F7) avoiding misdiagnosis in inherited factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansily-Blaizot, Muriel; Thorel, Delphine; Khau Van Kien, Philippe; Behar, Catherine; Romey, Marie-Catherine; Mugneret, Francine; Schved, Jean-François; Claustres, Mireille

    2007-08-01

    Inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder mostly caused by point mutations. Large genomic re-arrangements at F7 locus could account for a fraction of mutant alleles that remain unidentified after DNA sequencing, because they escape conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques. We report the first systematic screening of F7 for large re-arrangements, by semi-quantitative multiplex PCR of fluorescent fragments targeting the 9 exons and the promoter region. A well-characterised cohort of 43 unrelated patients either apparently homozygous for a F7 point mutation or carrying at least one unidentified F7 mutant allele participated in this study. Two large F7 re-arrangements were identified in two FVII-deficient pedigrees, including a discontinuous deletion involving two distinct portions of F7 whose proximal and distal end junctions were characterised. A simple and efficient method for the routine detection of gross alterations of F7, which accounted for 2.3% of mutant alleles in our sample, is now available in inherited FVII deficiency. This test should complement conventional PCR-based techniques not only in unsolved cases, but also where inheritance pattern analysis is not achievable.

  11. Analysis of gene rearrangements using a fluorescence in situ hybridization method in Mexican patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: experience at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Salas, Consuelo; Montero-Ruiz, Oreth; Frías, Sara; Dehesa, Gloria; Jarquín, Berenice; Rivera-Luna, Roberto

    2008-07-15

    We evaluated the prevalence of BCR/ABL, MLL, and ETV6/RUNX1 rearrangements as well as CDKN2A (alias p16) deletion in a group of Mexican children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) to determine whether the changes coexist, and to compare the incidences found with other reports in the literature. To increase the detection of these abnormalities, we combined conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Bone marrow samples were obtained from 59 consecutive children with ALL. FISH detected a total of 63 abnormalities with the selected probes, 34 of which were related to the conventional cytogenetic results. The most common abnormality was the p16 deletion (22.8%), followed by MLL and ETV6/RUNX1 rearrangements (8.7%), and the BCR/ABL fusion was the least frequent (2.7%). The coexistence of two recurrent abnormalities with specific prognostic significance in the same patient was not found. A lesser proportion of the p16 deletion in T-ALL patients was observed, probably related to the low prevalence of this subtype in our population. In addition, we confirmed the low frequency of the ETV6/RUNX1 fusion observed in Hispanics. Due to the different prevalence of these abnormalities in the Mexican population, similar studies should be conducted analyzing new rearrangements, to improve the adequate classification of the abnormalities and the stratification in prognostic groups.

  12. Rearrangements in ground and excited states

    CERN Document Server

    de Mayo, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Rearrangements in Ground and Excited States, Volume 3 presents essays on the chemical generation of excited states; the cis-trans isomerization of olefins; and the photochemical rearrangements in trienes. The book also includes essays on the zimmerman rearrangements; the photochemical rearrangements of enones; the photochemical rearrangements of conjugated cyclic dienones; and the rearrangements of the benzene ring. Essays on the photo rearrangements via biradicals of simple carbonyl compounds; the photochemical rearrangements involving three-membered rings or five-membered ring heterocycles;

  13. Rearrangements in ground and excited states

    CERN Document Server

    de Mayo, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Rearrangements in Ground and Excited States, Volume 2 covers essays on the theoretical approach of rearrangements; the rearrangements involving boron; and the molecular rearrangements of organosilicon compounds. The book also includes essays on the polytopal rearrangement at phosphorus; the rearrangement in coordination complexes; and the reversible thermal intramolecular rearrangements of metal carbonyls. Chemists and people involved in the study of rearrangements will find the book invaluable.

  14. Screening of ROS1 rearrangements in lung adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry and comparison with ALK rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Jin Cha

    Full Text Available ROS1 rearrangement is a predictive biomarker for response to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, crizotinib. We investigated the usefulness of ROS1 immunohistochemistry (IHC for the detection of patients who harbor ROS1 rearrangements in two separate cohorts. We also compared ROS1 IHC with ALK IHC in terms of diagnostic performance to predict each gene rearrangement. In a retrospective cohort, IHC was performed in 219 cases of lung adenocarcinoma with already known genetic alterations. In a prospective cohort, we performed IHC for 111 consecutive cases of lung adenocarcinoma and confirmed the results by subsequent FISH. In the retrospective cohort, all 8 ROS1-rearranged tumors were immunoreactive, and 14 of 211 ROS1-wild cases were immunoreactive (sensitivity 100% and specificity 93.4%. In the prospective cohort, all IHC-negative cases were FISH-negative, and 5 of 34 ROS1 immunoreactive cases were ROS1-rearranged (sensitivity 100% and specificity 72.6%. In ROS1-wild tumors, ROS1 protein was more expressed in the tumors of ever-smokers than in those of never-smokers (p = 0.003. ALK IHC showed 100% sensitivity and 98.1 to 100% specificity in both patient cohorts. In conclusion, ROS1 IHC is highly sensitive, but less specific compared with ALK IHC for detection of the corresponding rearrangement. ROS1 IHC-reactive tumors, especially when the tumor is stained with moderate to strong intensity or a diffuse pattern, are recommended to undergo FISH to confirm the gene rearrangement.

  15. VDJ-Seq: Deep Sequencing Analysis of Rearranged Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Gene to Reveal Clonal Evolution Patterns of B Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanwen; Nie, Kui; Redmond, David; Melnick, Ari M; Tam, Wayne; Elemento, Olivier

    2015-12-28

    Understanding tumor clonality is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis and disease progression. In addition, understanding the clonal composition changes that occur within a tumor in response to certain micro-environment or treatments may lead to the design of more sophisticated and effective approaches to eradicate tumor cells. However, tracking tumor clonal sub-populations has been challenging due to the lack of distinguishable markers. To address this problem, a VDJ-seq protocol was created to trace the clonal evolution patterns of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) relapse by exploiting VDJ recombination and somatic hypermutation (SHM), two unique features of B cell lymphomas. In this protocol, Next-Generation sequencing (NGS) libraries with indexing potential were constructed from amplified rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) VDJ region from pairs of primary diagnosis and relapse DLBCL samples. On average more than half million VDJ sequences per sample were obtained after sequencing, which contain both VDJ rearrangement and SHM information. In addition, customized bioinformatics pipelines were developed to fully utilize sequence information for the characterization of IgH-VDJ repertoire within these samples. Furthermore, the pipeline allows the reconstruction and comparison of the clonal architecture of individual tumors, which enables the examination of the clonal heterogeneity within the diagnosis tumors and deduction of clonal evolution patterns between diagnosis and relapse tumor pairs. When applying this analysis to several diagnosis-relapse pairs, we uncovered key evidence that multiple distinctive tumor evolutionary patterns could lead to DLBCL relapse. Additionally, this approach can be expanded into other clinical aspects, such as identification of minimal residual disease, monitoring relapse progress and treatment response, and investigation of immune repertoires in non-lymphoma contexts.

  16. Rearrangement moves on rooted phylogenetic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambette, Philippe; van Iersel, Leo; Jones, Mark; Scornavacca, Celine

    2017-01-01

    Phylogenetic tree reconstruction is usually done by local search heuristics that explore the space of the possible tree topologies via simple rearrangements of their structure. Tree rearrangement heuristics have been used in combination with practically all optimization criteria in use, from maximum likelihood and parsimony to distance-based principles, and in a Bayesian context. Their basic components are rearrangement moves that specify all possible ways of generating alternative phylogenies from a given one, and whose fundamental property is to be able to transform, by repeated application, any phylogeny into any other phylogeny. Despite their long tradition in tree-based phylogenetics, very little research has gone into studying similar rearrangement operations for phylogenetic network—that is, phylogenies explicitly representing scenarios that include reticulate events such as hybridization, horizontal gene transfer, population admixture, and recombination. To fill this gap, we propose “horizontal” moves that ensure that every network of a certain complexity can be reached from any other network of the same complexity, and “vertical” moves that ensure reachability between networks of different complexities. When applied to phylogenetic trees, our horizontal moves—named rNNI and rSPR—reduce to the best-known moves on rooted phylogenetic trees, nearest-neighbor interchange and rooted subtree pruning and regrafting. Besides a number of reachability results—separating the contributions of horizontal and vertical moves—we prove that rNNI moves are local versions of rSPR moves, and provide bounds on the sizes of the rNNI neighborhoods. The paper focuses on the most biologically meaningful versions of phylogenetic networks, where edges are oriented and reticulation events clearly identified. Moreover, our rearrangement moves are robust to the fact that networks with higher complexity usually allow a better fit with the data. Our goal is to provide a

  17. Rearrangement moves on rooted phylogenetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambette, Philippe; van Iersel, Leo; Jones, Mark; Lafond, Manuel; Pardi, Fabio; Scornavacca, Celine

    2017-08-01

    Phylogenetic tree reconstruction is usually done by local search heuristics that explore the space of the possible tree topologies via simple rearrangements of their structure. Tree rearrangement heuristics have been used in combination with practically all optimization criteria in use, from maximum likelihood and parsimony to distance-based principles, and in a Bayesian context. Their basic components are rearrangement moves that specify all possible ways of generating alternative phylogenies from a given one, and whose fundamental property is to be able to transform, by repeated application, any phylogeny into any other phylogeny. Despite their long tradition in tree-based phylogenetics, very little research has gone into studying similar rearrangement operations for phylogenetic network-that is, phylogenies explicitly representing scenarios that include reticulate events such as hybridization, horizontal gene transfer, population admixture, and recombination. To fill this gap, we propose "horizontal" moves that ensure that every network of a certain complexity can be reached from any other network of the same complexity, and "vertical" moves that ensure reachability between networks of different complexities. When applied to phylogenetic trees, our horizontal moves-named rNNI and rSPR-reduce to the best-known moves on rooted phylogenetic trees, nearest-neighbor interchange and rooted subtree pruning and regrafting. Besides a number of reachability results-separating the contributions of horizontal and vertical moves-we prove that rNNI moves are local versions of rSPR moves, and provide bounds on the sizes of the rNNI neighborhoods. The paper focuses on the most biologically meaningful versions of phylogenetic networks, where edges are oriented and reticulation events clearly identified. Moreover, our rearrangement moves are robust to the fact that networks with higher complexity usually allow a better fit with the data. Our goal is to provide a solid basis for

  18. Rearrangement moves on rooted phylogenetic networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Gambette

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic tree reconstruction is usually done by local search heuristics that explore the space of the possible tree topologies via simple rearrangements of their structure. Tree rearrangement heuristics have been used in combination with practically all optimization criteria in use, from maximum likelihood and parsimony to distance-based principles, and in a Bayesian context. Their basic components are rearrangement moves that specify all possible ways of generating alternative phylogenies from a given one, and whose fundamental property is to be able to transform, by repeated application, any phylogeny into any other phylogeny. Despite their long tradition in tree-based phylogenetics, very little research has gone into studying similar rearrangement operations for phylogenetic network-that is, phylogenies explicitly representing scenarios that include reticulate events such as hybridization, horizontal gene transfer, population admixture, and recombination. To fill this gap, we propose "horizontal" moves that ensure that every network of a certain complexity can be reached from any other network of the same complexity, and "vertical" moves that ensure reachability between networks of different complexities. When applied to phylogenetic trees, our horizontal moves-named rNNI and rSPR-reduce to the best-known moves on rooted phylogenetic trees, nearest-neighbor interchange and rooted subtree pruning and regrafting. Besides a number of reachability results-separating the contributions of horizontal and vertical moves-we prove that rNNI moves are local versions of rSPR moves, and provide bounds on the sizes of the rNNI neighborhoods. The paper focuses on the most biologically meaningful versions of phylogenetic networks, where edges are oriented and reticulation events clearly identified. Moreover, our rearrangement moves are robust to the fact that networks with higher complexity usually allow a better fit with the data. Our goal is to provide

  19. Complete mtDNA sequences of two millipedes suggest a new model for mitochondrial gene rearrangements: Duplication and non-random loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, Dennis V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Brown, Wesley M.

    2001-11-08

    We determined the complete mtDNA sequences of the millipedes Narceus annularus and Thyropygus sp. (Arthropoda: Diplopoda) and identified in both genomes all 37 genes typical for metazoan mtDNA. The arrangement of these genes is identical in the two millipedes, but differs from that inferred to be ancestral for arthropods by the location of four genes/gene clusters. This novel gene arrangement is unusual for animal mtDNA, in that genes with opposite transcriptional polarities are clustered in the genome and the two clusters are separated by two non-coding regions. The only exception to this pattern is the gene for cysteine tRNA, which is located in the part of the genome that otherwise contains all genes with the opposite transcriptional polarity. We suggest that a mechanism involving complete mtDNA duplication followed by the loss of genes, predetermined by their transcriptional polarity and location in the genome, could generate this gene arrangement from the one ancestral for arthropods. The proposed mechanism has important implications for phylogenetic inferences that are drawn on the basis of gene arrangement comparisons.

  20. Comparative analysis between RQ-PCR and digital droplet PCR of BCL2/IGH gene rearrangement in the peripheral blood and bone marrow of early stage follicular lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Marzia; De Novi, Lucia Anna; Della Starza, Irene; Cappelli, Luca Vincenzo; Nunes, Vittorio; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Del Giudice, Ilaria; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin

    2017-05-01

    BCL2/IGH rearrangements were analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at diagnosis in paired peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) samples from 67 patients with stage I/II follicular lymphoma (FL). Real time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) and digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) were performed in cases with a major breakpoint region (MBR+) at diagnosis and after localized radiotherapy and rituximab administration in order to investigate the applicability of ddPCR. The overall ddPCR/RQ-PCR concordance was 81·9% (113/138 samples) and 97·5% in the 40/138 with quantifiable disease (RQ-PCR≥10 -5 ). At baseline, ddPCR allowed the recovery of a MBR+ marker in 8/18 (44·4%) samples that resulted MBR-negative/minor cluster region-negative/minor BCL2-negative by qualitative PCR. Moreover, the tumour burden at diagnosis significantly predicted progression-free survival (PSF) only when quantified by ddPCR. Paired PB and BM samples analysis demonstrated a high concordance in the detection of BCL2/IGH+ cells by qualitative and quantitative methods; in particular, 40/62 samples were positive by ddPCR (25 PB+/BM+; 9 PB+/BM-; 6 PB-/BM+), with 34/40 (85%) identified by the study of PB only. In conclusion, in localized FL, ddPCR is a promising tool for monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD) that is at least comparable to RQ-PCR and potentially more accurate. PB is a suitable source for serial BCL2/IGH MRD assessments, regardless of the methodology utilized. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Analysis of gene order data supports vertical inheritance of the leukotoxin operon and genome rearrangements in the 5' flanking region in genus Mannheimia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper; Kuhnert, Peter; Frey, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    examined the gene order in the 5' flanking region of the leukotoxin operon and found that the 5' flanking gene strings, hslVU-lapB-artJ-lktC and xylAB-lktC, are peculiar to M. haemolytica + M. glucosida and M. granulomatis, respectively, whereas the gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC is present in M. ruminalis...... than the hslVU-lapB-artJ-lktC and xylAB-lktC gene strings. The presence of (remnants of) the ancient gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC among any subclades within genus Mannheimia supports that it has been vertically inherited from the last common ancestor of genus Mannheimia to any ancestor of the diverging......, the supposed sister group of M. haemolytica + M. glucosida, and in the most ancient subclade M. varigena. In M. granulomatis, we found remnants of the gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC in the xylB-lktC intergenic region. CONCLUSIONS: These observations indicate that the gene string hslVU-lapB-lktC is more ancient...

  2. The heterogeneity of pediatric MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgobind, B V; Zwaan, C M; Pieters, R; Van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M

    2011-08-01

    Translocations involving the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene, localized at 11q23, comprise 15 to 20% of all pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases. This review summarizes current knowledge about the etiology, biology, clinical characteristics and differences in outcome in MLL-rearranged pediatric AML. Furthermore, we discuss the role of cooperating events in MLL-rearranged pediatric AML, and future therapeutic strategies to improve outcome. We conclude that MLL-rearranged pediatric AML is a heterogeneous disease, and prognosis depends on various factors, for example, translocation partner, age, WBC and additional cytogenetic aberrations. The relationship of outcome with specific translocation partners requires that they be searched for in the diagnostic work-up of AML. To achieve further improvements in outcome, unraveling the biology of MLL-rearranged pediatric AML is warranted.

  3. Polymer Cancerostatics Targeted with an Antibody Fragment Bound via a Coiled Coil Motif: In Vivo Therapeutic Efficacy against Murine BCL1 Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechar, Michal; Pola, Robert; Janoušková, Olga; Sieglová, Irena; Král, Vlastimil; Fábry, Milan; Tomalová, Barbora; Kovář, Marek

    2018-01-01

    A BCL1 leukemia-cell-targeted polymer-drug conjugate with a narrow molecular weight distribution consisting of an N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer carrier and the anticancer drug pirarubicin is prepared by controlled radical copolymerization followed by metal-free click chemistry. A targeting recombinant single chain antibody fragment (scFv) derived from a B1 monoclonal antibody is attached noncovalently to the polymer carrier via a coiled coil interaction between two complementary peptides. Two pairs of coiled coil forming peptides (abbreviated KEK/EKE and KSK/ESE) are used as linkers between the polymer-pirarubicin conjugate and the targeting protein. The targeted polymer conjugate with the coiled coil linker KSK/ESE exhibits 4× better cell binding activity and 2× higher cytotoxicity in vitro compared with the other conjugate. Treatment of mice with established BCL1 leukemia using the scFv-targeted polymer conjugate leads to a markedly prolonged survival time of the experimental animals compared with the treatment using the free drug and the nontargeted polymer-pirarubicin conjugate. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Insights into the evolutionary history of tubercle bacilli as disclosed by genetic rearrangements within a PE_PGRS duplicated gene pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurepina Natalia

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly homologous PE_PGRS (Proline-glutamic acid_polymorphic GC-rich repetitive sequence genes are members of the PE multigene family which is found only in mycobacteria. PE genes are particularly abundant within the genomes of pathogenic mycobacteria where they seem to have expanded as a result of gene duplication events. PE_PGRS genes are characterized by their high GC content and extensive repetitive sequences, making them prone to recombination events and genetic variability. Results Comparative sequence analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes PE_PGRS17 (Rv0978c and PE_PGRS18 (Rv0980c revealed a striking genetic variation associated with this typical tandem duplicate. In comparison to the M. tuberculosis reference strain H37Rv, the variation (named the 12/40 polymorphism consists of an in-frame 12-bp insertion invariably accompanied by a set of 40 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that occurs either in PE_PGRS17 or in both genes. Sequence analysis of the paralogous genes in a representative set of worldwide distributed tubercle bacilli isolates revealed data which supported previously proposed evolutionary scenarios for the M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC and confirmed the very ancient origin of "M. canettii" and other smooth tubercle bacilli. Strikingly, the identified polymorphism appears to be coincident with the emergence of the post-bottleneck successful clone from which the MTBC expanded. Furthermore, the findings provide direct and clear evidence for the natural occurrence of gene conversion in mycobacteria, which appears to be restricted to modern M. tuberculosis strains. Conclusion This study provides a new perspective to explore the molecular events that accompanied the evolution, clonal expansion, and recent diversification of tubercle bacilli.

  5. Claisen thermally rearranged (CTR) polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena, Alberto; Rangou, Sofia; Shishatskiy, Sergey; Filiz, Volkan; Abetz, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Thermally rearranged (TR) polymers, which are considered the next-generation of membrane materials because of their excellent transport properties and high thermal and chemical stability, are proven to have significant drawbacks because of the high temperature required for the rearrangement and low degree of conversion during this process. We demonstrate that using a [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement, the temperature required for the rearrangement of a solid glassy polymer was reduced by 200°C. Conversions of functionalized polyimide to polybenzoxazole of more than 97% were achieved. These highly mechanically stable polymers were almost five times more permeable and had more than two times higher degrees of conversion than the reference polymer treated under the same conditions. Properties of these second-generation TR polymers provide the possibility of preparing efficient polymer membranes in a form of, for example, thin-film composite membranes for various gas and liquid membrane separation applications. PMID:27482538

  6. A rearrangement of the Z chromosome topology influences the sex-linked gene display in the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sex determination system of Lepidoptera is comprised of heterogametic females (ZW) and homogametic males (ZZ), where voltinism (Volt) and the male pheromone response traits (Resp) are controlled by genes housed on the Z-chromosome. Volt and Resp determine traits that lead to ecotype differentia...

  7. The translocation (6;9) (p23;q34) shows consistent rearrangement of two genes and defines a myeloproliferative disorder with specific clinical features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soekarman, D.; von Lindern, M.; Daenen, S.; de Jong, B.; Fonatsch, C.; Heinze, B.; Bartram, C.; Hagemeijer, A.; Grosveld, G.

    1992-01-01

    Translocation (6;9)(p23;q34) is a cytogenetic aberration that can be found in specific subtypes of both acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). This translocation is associated with an unfavourable prognosis. Recently, the genes involved in the t(6;9) were isolated and

  8. Competitive PCR-High Resolution Melting Analysis (C-PCR-HRMA) for large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) detection: A new approach to assess quantitative status of BRCA1 gene in a reference laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minucci, Angelo; De Paolis, Elisa; Concolino, Paola; De Bonis, Maria; Rizza, Roberta; Canu, Giulia; Scaglione, Giovanni Luca; Mignone, Flavio; Scambia, Giovanni; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2017-07-01

    Evaluation of copy number variation (CNV) in BRCA1/2 genes, due to large genomic rearrangements (LGRs), is a mandatory analysis in hereditary breast and ovarian cancers families, if no pathogenic variants are found by sequencing. LGRs cannot be detected by conventional methods and several alternative methods have been developed. Since these approaches are expensive and time consuming, identification of alternative screening methods for LGRs detection is needed in order to reduce and optimize the diagnostic procedure. The aim of this study was to investigate a Competitive PCR-High Resolution Melting Analysis (C-PCR-HRMA) as molecular tool to detect recurrent BRCA1 LGRs. C-PCR-HRMA was performed on exons 3, 14, 18, 19, 20 and 21 of the BRCA1 gene; exons 4, 6 and 7 of the ALB gene were used as reference fragments. This study showed that it is possible to identify recurrent BRCA1 LGRs, by melting peak height ratio between target (BRCA1) and reference (ALB) fragments. Furthermore, we underline that a peculiar amplicon-melting profile is associated to a specific BRCA1 LGR. All C-PCR-HRMA results were confirmed by Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. C-PCR-HRMA has proved to be an innovative, efficient and fast method for BRCA1 LGRs detection. Given the sensitivity, specificity and ease of use, c-PCR-HRMA can be considered an attractive and powerful alternative to other methods for BRCA1 CNVs screening, improving molecular strategies for BRCA testing in the context of Massive Parallel Sequencing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. t(8;14) chromosome translocation of the Burkitt lymphoma cell line Daudi occurred during immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and involved the heavy chain diversity region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haluska, F.G.; Tsujimoto, Y.; Croce, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Recent molecular analyses of Burkitt lymphomas carrying the t(8;14) chromosome translocation have indicated that a dichotomy exists regarding the molecular mechanisms by which the translocations occur. Most sporadic Burkitt tumors carry translocations that apparently arise due to mistakes in the immunoglobulin isotype-switching process. In contrast, there is evidence that the translocations of most endemic Burkitt lymphomas occur as a consequence of aberrant V-D-J recombination of variable, diversity, and joining gene segments, catalyzed by the recombinase enzymes. This phenomenon was first noted in follicular lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukemias of the B-cell lineage and has been described in T-cell malignancies as well. In each of these cases, analysis of the nucleotide sequence at chromosome breakpoints demonstrated the involvement of immunoglobulin heavy chain J/sub H/ or T-cell-receptor α-chain Jα gene segments in the translocation. The authors now have cloned and sequenced both the 8q- and 14q+ translocation breakpoints deriving from the t(8;14) translocation of the endemic Burkitt lymphoma line Daudi. The data show that the translocation resulted from a reciprocal exchange between the D/sub H/ region on chromosome 14 and sequences far 5' of the MYC protooncogene on chromosome 8. Features of the nucleotide sequences surrounding the breakpoint further implicate the V-D-J joining machinery in the genesis of chromosome translocation in endemic Burkitt lymphomas and, more generally, in other lymphoid malignancies as well

  10. Chloroplast DNA rearrangements in Campanulaceae: phylogenetic utility of highly rearranged genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Robert K

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Campanulaceae (the "hare bell" or "bellflower" family is a derived angiosperm family comprised of about 600 species treated in 35 to 55 genera. Taxonomic treatments vary widely and little phylogenetic work has been done in the family. Gene order in the chloroplast genome usually varies little among vascular plants. However, chloroplast genomes of Campanulaceae represent an exception and phylogenetic analyses solely based on chloroplast rearrangement characters support a reasonably well-resolved tree. Results Chloroplast DNA physical maps were constructed for eighteen representatives of the family. So many gene order changes have occurred among the genomes that characterizing individual mutational events was not always possible. Therefore, we examined different, novel scoring methods to prepare data matrices for cladistic analysis. These approaches yielded largely congruent results but varied in amounts of resolution and homoplasy. The strongly supported nodes were common to all gene order analyses as well as to parallel analyses based on ITS and rbcL sequence data. The results suggest some interesting and unexpected intrafamilial relationships. For example fifteen of the taxa form a derived clade; whereas the remaining three taxa – Platycodon, Codonopsis, and Cyananthus – form the basal clade. This major subdivision of the family corresponds to the distribution of pollen morphology characteristics but is not compatible with previous taxonomic treatments. Conclusions Our use of gene order data in the Campanulaceae provides the most highly resolved phylogeny as yet developed for a plant family using only cpDNA rearrangements. The gene order data showed markedly less homoplasy than sequence data for the same taxa but did not resolve quite as many nodes. The rearrangement characters, though relatively few in number, support robust and meaningful phylogenetic hypotheses and provide new insights into evolutionary

  11. Screening for genomic rearrangements at BRCA1 locus in Iranian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    account for a substantial proportion of breast-cancer-causing mutations with a wide range of frequencies among differ- ent populations (Ewald et al. 2009). We assessed the pres- ence of BRCA1 gene rearrangements in Iranian breast can- cer patients using multiplex ligation-dependent probe ampli- fication (MLPA). Among ...

  12. Recurrent DNA inversion rearrangements in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores, Margarita; Morales, Lucía; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that reiterated sequences in the human genome are targets for nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR), which facilitates genomic rearrangements. We have used a PCR-based approach to identify breakpoint regions of rearranged structures in the human genome...... to human genomic variation is discussed........ In particular, we have identified intrachromosomal identical repeats that are located in reverse orientation, which may lead to chromosomal inversions. A bioinformatic workflow pathway to select appropriate regions for analysis was developed. Three such regions overlapping with known human genes, located...

  13. Chromosomal rearrangements occurred repeatedly and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, molecular and/or chromosomal data indicate that Paroedura is a monophyletic genus, in which chromosome rearrangements occurred repeatedly and independently during the specific diversification. Moreover both P. bastardi and P. gracilis in current definitions are paraphyletic assemblages of several ...

  14. Structure of the Escherichia coli Antitoxin MqsA (YgiT/b3021) Bound to Its Gene Promoter Reveals Extensive Domain Rearrangements and the Specificity of Transcriptional Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B Brown; T Wood; W Peti; R Page

    2011-12-31

    Bacterial cultures, especially biofilms, produce a small number of persister cells, a genetically identical subpopulation of wild type cells that are metabolically dormant, exhibit multidrug tolerance, and are highly enriched in bacterial toxins. The gene most highly up-regulated in Escherichia coli persisters is mqsR, a ribonuclease toxin that, along with mqsA, forms a novel toxin-antitoxin (TA) system. Like all known TA systems, both the MqsR-MqsA complex and MqsA alone regulate their own transcription. Despite the importance of TA systems in persistence and biofilms, very little is known about how TA modules, and antitoxins in particular, bind and recognize DNA at a molecular level. Here, we report the crystal structure of MqsA bound to a 26-bp fragment from the mqsRA promoter. We show that MqsA binds DNA predominantly via its C-terminal helix-turn-helix domain, with direct binding of recognition helix residues Asn{sup 97} and Arg{sup 010} to the DNA major groove. Unexpectedly, the structure also revealed that the MqsA N-terminal domain interacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. This results in a more than 105{sup o} rotation of the N-terminal domains between the free and complexed states, an unprecedented rearrangement for an antitoxin. The structure also shows that MqsA bends the DNA by more than 55{sup o} in order to achieve symmetrical binding. Finally, using a combination of biochemical and NMR studies, we show that the DNA sequence specificity of MqsA is mediated by direct readout.

  15. Genome rearrangements and phylogeny reconstruction in Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkareva, Olga O; Dranenko, Natalia O; Ocheredko, Elena S; Kanevsky, German M; Lozinsky, Yaroslav N; Khalaycheva, Vera A; Artamonova, Irena I; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2018-01-01

    Genome rearrangements have played an important role in the evolution of Yersinia pestis from its progenitor Yersinia pseudotuberculosis . Traditional phylogenetic trees for Y. pestis based on sequence comparison have short internal branches and low bootstrap supports as only a small number of nucleotide substitutions have occurred. On the other hand, even a small number of genome rearrangements may resolve topological ambiguities in a phylogenetic tree. We reconstructed phylogenetic trees based on genome rearrangements using several popular approaches such as Maximum likelihood for Gene Order and the Bayesian model of genome rearrangements by inversions. We also reconciled phylogenetic trees for each of the three CRISPR loci to obtain an integrated scenario of the CRISPR cassette evolution. Analysis of contradictions between the obtained evolutionary trees yielded numerous parallel inversions and gain/loss events. Our data indicate that an integrated analysis of sequence-based and inversion-based trees enhances the resolution of phylogenetic reconstruction. In contrast, reconstructions of strain relationships based on solely CRISPR loci may not be reliable, as the history is obscured by large deletions, obliterating the order of spacer gains. Similarly, numerous parallel gene losses preclude reconstruction of phylogeny based on gene content.

  16. MLL-rearranged B lymphoblastic leukemias selectively express the immunoregulatory carbohydrate-binding protein galectin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczynski, Przemyslaw; Rodig, Scott J; Ouyang, Jing; O'Donnell, Evan; Takeyama, Kunihiko; Mlynarski, Wojciech; Mycko, Katarzyna; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Gaworczyk, Anna; Krivtsov, Andrei; Faber, Joerg; Sinha, Amit U; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Armstrong, Scott A; Kutok, Jeffery L; Shipp, Margaret A

    2010-04-01

    Patients with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged B-lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALL) have an unfavorable prognosis and require intensified treatment. Multiple MLL fusion partners have been identified, complicating the diagnostic evaluation of MLL rearrangements. We analyzed molecular markers of MLL rearrangement for use in rapid diagnostic assays and found the immunomodulatory protein, Galectin-1 (Gal-1), to be selectively expressed in MLL-rearranged B-ALL. Transcriptional profiling of ALL subtypes revealed selective overexpression of Gal-1 in MLL-rearranged ALLs. For this reason, we analyzed Gal-1 protein expression in MLL-germline and MLL-rearranged adult and infant pediatric B-ALLs and cell lines by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and intracellular flow cytometry of viable tumor cell suspensions. Because deregulated gene expression in MLL-rearranged leukemias may be related to the altered histone methyltransferase activity of the MLL fusion protein complex, we also analyzed histone H3 lysine 79 (H3K79) dimethylation in the LGALS1 promoter region using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Gal-1 transcripts were significantly more abundant in MLL-rearranged B-ALLs. All 32 primary MLL-rearranged B-ALLs exhibited abundant Gal-1 immunostaining, regardless of the translocation partner, whereas only 2 of 81 germline-MLL B-ALLs expressed Gal-1. In addition, Gal-1 was selectively detected in newly diagnosed MLL-rearranged B-ALLs by intracellular flow cytometry. The LGALS1 promoter H3K79 was significantly hypermethylated in MLL-rearranged B-ALLs compared with MLL-germline B-ALLs and normal pre-B cells. In B-ALL, Gal-1 is a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of MLL rearrangement that is likely induced by a MLL-dependent epigenetic modification. Copyright 2010 AACR.

  17. Detection and Tracking of NY-ESO-1-Specific CD8+ T Cells by High-Throughput T Cell Receptor β (TCRB) Gene Rearrangements Sequencing in a Peptide-Vaccinated Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyai, Manami; Eikawa, Shingo; Hosoi, Akihiro; Iino, Tamaki; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Isobe, Midori; Uenaka, Akiko; Udono, Heiichiro; Nakajima, Jun; Nakayama, Eiichi; Kakimi, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive immunological evaluation is crucial for monitoring patients undergoing antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy. The identification and quantification of T cell responses is most important for the further development of such therapies. Using well-characterized clinical samples from a high responder patient (TK-f01) in an NY-ESO-1f peptide vaccine study, we performed high-throughput T cell receptor β-chain (TCRB) gene next generation sequencing (NGS) to monitor the frequency of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells. We compared these results with those of conventional immunological assays, such as IFN-γ capture, tetramer binding and limiting dilution clonality assays. We sequenced human TCRB complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) rearrangements of two NY-ESO-1f-specific CD8+ T cell clones, 6-8L and 2F6, as well as PBMCs over the course of peptide vaccination. Clone 6-8L possessed the TCRB CDR3 gene TCRBV11-03*01 and BJ02-01*01 with amino acid sequence CASSLRGNEQFF, whereas 2F6 possessed TCRBV05-08*01 and BJ02-04*01 (CASSLVGTNIQYF). Using these two sequences as models, we evaluated the frequency of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells in PBMCs ex vivo. The 6-8L CDR3 sequence was the second most frequent in PBMC and was present at high frequency (0.7133%) even prior to vaccination, and sustained over the course of vaccination. Despite a marked expansion of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells detected from the first through 6th vaccination by tetramer staining and IFN-γ capture assays, as evaluated by CDR3 sequencing the frequency did not increase with increasing rounds of peptide vaccination. By clonal analysis using 12 day in vitro stimulation, the frequency of B*52:01-restricted NY-ESO-1f peptide-specific CD8+ T cells in PBMCs was estimated as only 0.0023%, far below the 0.7133% by NGS sequencing. Thus, assays requiring in vitro stimulation might be underestimating the frequency of clones with lower proliferation potential. High-throughput TCRB sequencing using NGS

  18. DNA rearrangements from γ-irradiated normal human fibroblasts preferentially occur in transcribed regions of the genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, H.B.; Radford, I.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: DNA rearrangement events leading to chromosomal aberrations are central to ionizing radiation-induced cell death. Although DNA double-strand breaks are probably the lesion that initiates formation of chromosomal aberrations, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms that generate and modulate DNA rearrangement. Examination of the sequences that flank sites of DNA rearrangement may provide information regarding the processes and enzymes involved in rearrangement events. Accordingly, we developed a method using inverse PCR that allows the detection and sequencing of putative radiation-induced DNA rearrangements in defined regions of the human genome. The method can detect single copies of a rearrangement event that has occurred in a particular region of the genome and, therefore, DNA rearrangement detection does not require survival and continued multiplication of the affected cell. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA rearrangements were detected in several different regions of the genome of human fibroblast cells that were exposed to 30 Gy of γ-irradiation and then incubated for 24 hours at 37 deg C. There was a 3- to 5-fold increase in the number of products amplified from irradiated as compared with control cells in the target regions 5' to the C-MYC, CDKN1A, RB1, and FGFR2 genes. Sequences were examined from 121 DNA rearrangements. Approximately half of the PCR products were derived from possible inter-chromosomal rearrangements and the remainder were from intra-chromosomal events. A high proportion of the sequences that rearranged with target regions were located in genes, suggesting that rearrangements may occur preferentially in transcribed regions. Eighty-four percent of the sequences examined by reverse transcriptase PCR were from transcribed sequences in IMR-90 cells. The distribution of DNA rearrangements within the target regions is non-random and homology occurs between the sequences involved in rearrangements in some cases but is not

  19. Deciphering the Code of the Cancer Genome: Mechanisms of Chromosome Rearrangement

    OpenAIRE

    Willis, Nicholas A.; Rass, Emilie; Scully, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangement plays a causal role in tumorigenesis by contributing to the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, the dysregulated expression or amplification of oncogenes and the generation of novel gene fusions. Chromosome breaks are important intermediates in this process. How, when and where these breaks arise and the specific mechanisms engaged in their repair strongly influence the resulting patterns of chromosome rearrangement. Here, we review recent progress in understandin...

  20. MLL rearrangements in pediatric acute lymphoblastic and myeloblastic leukemias: MLL specific and lineage specific signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    te Kronnie Geertruy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of MLL rearrangements in acute leukemia results in a complex number of biological modifications that still remain largely unexplained. Armstrong et al. proposed MLL rearrangement positive ALL as a distinct subgroup, separated from acute lymphoblastic (ALL and myeloblastic leukemia (AML, with a specific gene expression profile. Here we show that MLL, from both ALL and AML origin, share a signature identified by a small set of genes suggesting a common genetic disregulation that could be at the basis of mixed lineage leukemia in both phenotypes. Methods Using Affymetrix® HG-U133 Plus 2.0 platform, gene expression data from 140 (training set + 78 (test set ALL and AML patients with (24+13 and without (116+65 MLL rearrangements have been investigated performing class comparison (SAM and class prediction (PAM analyses. Results We identified a MLL translocation-specific (379 probes signature and a phenotype-specific (622 probes signature which have been tested using unsupervised methods. A final subset of 14 genes grants the characterization of acute leukemia patients with and without MLL rearrangements. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that a small subset of genes identifies MLL-specific rearrangements and clearly separates acute leukemia samples according to lineage origin. The subset included well-known genes and newly discovered markers that identified ALL and AML subgroups, with and without MLL rearrangements.

  1. Telomerase activation by genomic rearrangements in high-risk neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peifer, Martin; Hertwig, Falk; Roels, Frederik; Dreidax, Daniel; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Menon, Roopika; Krämer, Andrea; Roncaioli, Justin L.; Sand, Frederik; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Ikram, Fakhera; Schmidt, Rene; Ackermann, Sandra; Engesser, Anne; Kahlert, Yvonne; Vogel, Wenzel; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Mariappan, Aruljothi; Heynck, Stefanie; Mariotti, Erika; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Glöckner, Christian; Bosco, Graziella; Leuschner, Ivo; Schweiger, Michal R.; Savelyeva, Larissa; Watkins, Simon C.; Shao, Chunxuan; Bell, Emma; Höfer, Thomas; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Theissen, Jessica; Volland, Ruth; Saadati, Maral; Eggert, Angelika; de Wilde, Bram; Berthold, Frank; Peng, Zhiyu; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Leming; Ortmann, Monika; Büttner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven; Hero, Barbara; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H.; Herrmann, Carl; O’Sullivan, Roderick J.; Westermann, Frank; Thomas, Roman K.; Fischer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant paediatric tumour of the sympathetic nervous system1. Roughly half of these tumours regress spontaneously or are cured by limited therapy. By contrast, high-risk neuroblastomas have an unfavourable clinical course despite intensive multimodal treatment, and their molecular basis has remained largely elusive2–4. Here we have performed whole-genome sequencing of 56 neuroblastomas (high-risk, n = 39; low-risk, n = 17) and discovered recurrent genomic rearrangements affecting a chromosomal region at 5p15.33 proximal of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). These rearrangements occurred only in high-risk neuroblastomas (12/39, 31%) in a mutually exclusive fashion with MYCN amplifications and ATRX mutations, which are known genetic events in this tumour type1,2,5. In an extended case series (n = 217), TERT rearrangements defined a subgroup of high-risk tumours with particularly poor outcome. Despite a large structural diversity of these rearrangements, they all induced massive transcriptional upregulation of TERT. In the remaining high-risk tumours, TERT expression was also elevated in MYCN-amplified tumours, whereas alternative lengthening of telomeres was present in neuroblastomas without TERT or MYCN alterations, suggesting that telomere lengthening represents a central mechanism defining this subtype. The 5p15.33 rearrangements juxtapose the TERT coding sequence to strong enhancer elements, resulting in massive chromatin remodelling and DNA methylation of the affected region. Supporting a functional role of TERT, neuroblastoma cell lines bearing rearrangements or amplified MYCN exhibited both upregulated TERT expression and enzymatic telomerase activity. In summary, our findings show that remodelling of the genomic context abrogates transcriptional silencing of TERT in high-risk neuroblastoma and places telomerase activation in the centre of transformation in a large fraction of these tumours. PMID:26466568

  2. Detection of RET (rearranged during transfection) variants and their downstream signal molecules in RET rearranged lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Oh; Shin, Jung-Young; Kim, Min Young; Son, Kyoung Hwa; Jung, Chan Kwon; Kim, Tae-Jung; Kim, Su Young; Park, Jae Kil; Sung, Sook Whan; Bae, Sang Ju; Min, Hyun Jung; Kang, Jin-Hyoung

    2018-03-01

    We screened resected tumor tissues from patients with lung cancer for EGFR mutations, ALK rearrangements, and rearranged during transfection (RET) gene variants (including RET rearrangements and the Kinesin Family Member 5B (KIF5B)-RET fusion gene) using various methods including reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), transcript assays, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also examined the protein expression of associated downstream signaling molecules to assess the effect of these variants on patient outcome. We constructed a tissue microarray (TMA) comprising 581 resected tumor tissues from patients with lung adenocarcinoma and analyzed the microarray by both FISH (using RET break-apart and KIF5B-RET SY translocation probes) and a commercial RET transcript assay. We evaluated the expression of RET and RET-related signaling molecules, including p-AKT and p-ERK, by TMA -based IHC staining. Among the 581 specimens, 51 (8.8%) specimens harbored RET rearrangements, including 12 cases (2.1%) carrying a KIF5B-RET fusion gene. Surprisingly, RET expression was lower in KIF5B-RET fusion gene-positive than in RET wild-type specimens. We detected activating EGFR mutations in 11 (21.6%) of the 51 RET variant-positive specimens. Among the KIF5B-RET fusion gene-positive specimens, p-ERK expression was significantly lower in the EGFR mutation subgroup showing RET expression than in the EGFR mutation subgroup that did not express RET. Similarly, the RET rearrangement group showed significant variation in the expression level of p-AKT (P = 0.028) and p-ERK, whose expression remarkably increased in specimens not expressing RET. The expression of p-ERK markedly increased in the RET rearrangement group regardless of RET expression. This result suggests that a combination of RET and ERK inhibitors may be an effective treatment strategy for lung adenocarcinoma patients harboring RET variants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier

  3. Detection of genomic rearrangements in cucumber using genomecmp software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulawik, Maciej; Pawełkowicz, Magdalena Ewa; Wojcieszek, Michał; PlÄ der, Wojciech; Nowak, Robert M.

    2017-08-01

    Comparative genomic by increasing information about the genomes sequences available in the databases is a rapidly evolving science. A simple comparison of the general features of genomes such as genome size, number of genes, and chromosome number presents an entry point into comparative genomic analysis. Here we present the utility of the new tool genomecmp for finding rearrangements across the compared sequences and applications in plant comparative genomics.

  4. Phenotypic reversion in fas mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana by reintroduction of FAS genes: variable recovery of telomeres with major spatial rearrangements and transcriptional reprogramming of 45S rDNA genes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlištová, V.; Dvořáčková, Martina; Jež, M.; Mozgová, I.; Mokroš, P.; Fajkus, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 3 (2016), s. 411-424 ISSN 0960-7412 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : chromatin assembly factor-1 * ribosomal-rna genes * dosage control Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.901, year: 2016

  5. Synthesis of a tricyclic lactam via Beckmann rearrangement and ring-rearrangement metathesis as key steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasivarao Kotha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A tricyclic lactam is reported in a four step synthesis sequence via Beckmann rearrangement and ring-rearrangement metathesis as key steps. Here, we used a simple starting material such as dicyclopentadiene.

  6. Highly variable rates of genome rearrangements between hemiascomycetous yeast lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemiascomycete yeasts cover an evolutionary span comparable to that of the entire phylum of chordates. Since this group currently contains the largest number of complete genome sequences it presents unique opportunities to understand the evolution of genome organization in eukaryotes. We inferred rates of genome instability on all branches of a phylogenetic tree for 11 species and calculated species-specific rates of genome rearrangements. We characterized all inversion events that occurred within synteny blocks between six representatives of the different lineages. We show that the rates of macro- and microrearrangements of gene order are correlated within individual lineages but are highly variable across different lineages. The most unstable genomes correspond to the pathogenic yeasts Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Chromosomal maps have been intensively shuffled by numerous interchromosomal rearrangements, even between species that have retained a very high physical fraction of their genomes within small synteny blocks. Despite this intensive reshuffling of gene positions, essential genes, which cluster in low recombination regions in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, tend to remain syntenic during evolution. This work reveals that the high plasticity of eukaryotic genomes results from rearrangement rates that vary between lineages but also at different evolutionary times of a given lineage.

  7. Kinesthetic compensation for sensorimotor rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Stephen R; Adelstein, Bernard D

    2009-11-01

    The authors report a new sensorimotor phenomenon in which participants use hand-sensed kinesthetic information to compensate for rotational sensorimotor rearrangements. This compensation benefits from conscious awareness and is related to hand posture. The technique can reduce control inefficiency with some misalignments by as much as 64%. The results support Y. Guiard's (1987) suggestion that in bimanual tasks one hand provides an operational frame of reference for the other hand as in a closed kinematic chain. Results with right-handed participants show that the right and left hands are equally effective at providing such a cue. A constant-angular-targeting-error model, similar to that used for hand movements by H. Cunningham and I. Vardi (1990) and for walking by S. K. Rushton, J. M. Harris, M. R. Lloyd, and J. P. Wann (1998), is used to model the trajectories of targeting hand movements demonstrating the phenomenon. The model provides a natural parameter of the error.

  8. Kinetics of T cell receptor β, γ, and δ rearrangements during adult thymic development: T cell receptor rearrangements are present in CD44+CD25+ Pro-T thymocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Myriam; Hockett, Richard D.; Zlotnik, Albert

    1998-01-01

    We performed a comprehensive analysis of T cell receptor (TCR) γ rearrangements in T cell precursors of the mouse adult thymus. Using a sensitive quantitative PCR method, we show that TCRγ rearrangements are present in CD44+CD25+ Pro-T thymocytes much earlier than expected. TCRγ rearrangements increase significantly from the Pro-T to the CD44−CD25+ Pre-T cell transition, and follow different patterns depending on each Vγ gene segment, suggesting that ordered waves of TCRγ rearrangement exist in the adult mouse thymus as has been described in the fetal mouse thymus. Recombinations of TCRγ genes occur concurrently with TCRδ and D-Jβ rearrangements, but before Vβ gene assembly. Productive TCRγ rearrangements do not increase significantly before the Pre-T cell stage and are depleted in CD4+CD8+ double-positive cells from normal mice. In contrast, double-positive thymocytes from TCRδ−/− mice display random proportions of TCRγ rearranged alleles, supporting a role for functional TCRγ/δ rearrangements in the γδ divergence process. PMID:9770518

  9. Stereochemistry and rearrangement reactions of hydroxylignanolactones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaelli, Barbara; Pohjoispää, Monika; Hase, Tapio; Cardin, Christine J; Gan, Yu; Wähälä, Kristiina

    2008-07-21

    Various conflicting data on the rearrangement and absolute stereochemistry of hydroxylignano-9,7'-lactones are resolved using 18O labeled compounds, also confirmed by an X-ray analysis of a pure lignano-9,7'-lactone enantiomer, obtained for the first time. Under NaH/DMF rearrangement conditions a silyl protected hydroxylignano-9,9'-lactone underwent an unexpected silyl migration.

  10. Linked read sequencing resolves complex genomic rearrangements in gastric cancer metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Stephanie U; Nadauld, Lincoln D; Lau, Billy T; Chen, Jiamin; Wood-Bouwens, Christina; Ford, James M; Kuo, Calvin J; Ji, Hanlee P

    2017-06-19

    Genome rearrangements are critical oncogenic driver events in many malignancies. However, the identification and resolution of the structure of cancer genomic rearrangements remain challenging even with whole genome sequencing. To identify oncogenic genomic rearrangements and resolve their structure, we analyzed linked read sequencing. This approach relies on a microfluidic droplet technology to produce libraries derived from single, high molecular weight DNA molecules, 50 kb in size or greater. After sequencing, the barcoded sequence reads provide long range genomic information, identify individual high molecular weight DNA molecules, determine the haplotype context of genetic variants that occur across contiguous megabase-length segments of the genome and delineate the structure of complex rearrangements. We applied linked read sequencing of whole genomes to the analysis of a set of synchronous metastatic diffuse gastric cancers that occurred in the same individual. When comparing metastatic sites, our analysis implicated a complex somatic rearrangement that was present in the metastatic tumor. The oncogenic event associated with the identified complex rearrangement resulted in an amplification of the known cancer driver gene FGFR2. With further investigation using these linked read data, the FGFR2 copy number alteration was determined to be a deletion-inversion motif that underwent tandem duplication, with unique breakpoints in each metastasis. Using a three-dimensional organoid tissue model, we functionally validated the metastatic potential of an FGFR2 amplification in gastric cancer. Our study demonstrates that linked read sequencing is useful in characterizing oncogenic rearrangements in cancer metastasis.

  11. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra ePesko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wildtype gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense nonsegmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales have specific genome architecture: 3′ UTR – core protein genes – envelope protein genes – RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase gene – 5′ UTR. To test how genome architecture affects RNA virus evolution, we examined vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV variants with the nucleocapsid (N gene moved sequentially downstream in the genome. Because RNA polymerase stuttering in VSV replication causes greater mRNA production in upstream genes, N-gene translocation towards the 5’ end leads to stepwise decreases in N transcription, viral replication and progeny production, and also impacts the activation of type 1 interferon mediated antiviral responses. We evolved VSV gene-order variants in two prostate cancer cell lines: LNCap cells deficient in innate immune response to viral infection, and PC3 cells that mount an IFN stimulated anti-viral response to infection. We observed that gene order affects phenotypic adaptability (reproductive growth; viral suppression of immune function, especially on PC3 cells that strongly select against virus infection. Overall, populations derived from the least-fit ancestor (most-altered N position architecture adapted fastest, consistent with theory predicting populations with low initial fitness should improve faster in evolutionary time. Also, we observed correlated responses to selection, where viruses improved across both hosts, rather than suffer fitness trade-offs on unselected hosts. Whole genomics revealed multiple mutations in evolved variants, some of which were conserved across selective

  12. Characterization of apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements from the developmental genome anatomy project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Anne W; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Bosco, Amy F; Brown, Kerry K; Bruns, Gail A P; Donovan, Diana J; Eisenman, Robert; Fan, Yanli; Farra, Chantal G; Ferguson, Heather L; Gusella, James F; Harris, David J; Herrick, Steven R; Kelly, Chantal; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Kishikawa, Shotaro; Korf, Bruce R; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Lally, Eric; Leach, Natalia T; Lemyre, Emma; Lewis, Janine; Ligon, Azra H; Lu, Weining; Maas, Richard L; MacDonald, Marcy E; Moore, Steven D P; Peters, Roxanna E; Quade, Bradley J; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Saadi, Irfan; Shen, Yiping; Shendure, Jay; Williamson, Robin E; Morton, Cynthia C

    2008-03-01

    Apparently balanced chromosomal rearrangements in individuals with major congenital anomalies represent natural experiments of gene disruption and dysregulation. These individuals can be studied to identify novel genes critical in human development and to annotate further the function of known genes. Identification and characterization of these genes is the goal of the Developmental Genome Anatomy Project (DGAP). DGAP is a multidisciplinary effort that leverages the recent advances resulting from the Human Genome Project to increase our understanding of birth defects and the process of human development. Clinically significant phenotypes of individuals enrolled in DGAP are varied and, in most cases, involve multiple organ systems. Study of these individuals' chromosomal rearrangements has resulted in the mapping of 77 breakpoints from 40 chromosomal rearrangements by FISH with BACs and fosmids, array CGH, Southern-blot hybridization, MLPA, RT-PCR, and suppression PCR. Eighteen chromosomal breakpoints have been cloned and sequenced. Unsuspected genomic imbalances and cryptic rearrangements were detected, but less frequently than has been reported previously. Chromosomal rearrangements, both balanced and unbalanced, in individuals with multiple congenital anomalies continue to be a valuable resource for gene discovery and annotation.

  13. Chromosomal rearrangement segregating with adrenoleukodystrophy: A molecular analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sack, G.H. Jr.; Morrell, J.C.; Chen, G.; Chen, W.; Moser, H.W. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Alpern, M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Webster, T.; Caskey, C.T. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Houston, TX (United States) Baylore College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Feil, R.P. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale Unite Associatee, Strasbourg (France))

    1993-10-15

    The relationship between X chromosome-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and the red/green color pigment gene cluster on Xq28 was investigated in a large kindred. The DNA in a hemizygous male showed altered restriction fragment sizes compatible with at least a deletion extending from the 5[prime] end of the color pigment genes. Segregation analysis using a DNA probe within the color pigment gene cluster showed significant linkage with adrenoleukodystrophy (logarithm of odds score of 3.19 at [theta] = 0.0). These data demonstrate linkage, rather than association, between a unique molecular rearrangement in the color pigment gene cluster and adrenoleukodystrophy. The DNA changes in this region are thus likely to be helpful for determining the location and identity of the responsible gene. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Interphase FISH detection of BCL2 rearrangement in follicular lymphoma using breakpoint-flanking probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaandrager, J W; Schuuring, E; Raap, T; Philippo, K; Kleiverda, K; Kluin, P

    Rearrangement of the BCL2 gene is an important parameter for the differential diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Although a relatively large proportion of breakpoints is clustered, many are missed by standard PCR. A FISH assay is therefore desired. Up to now, a lack of probes flanking the BCL2 gene

  15. Delineating Rearrangements in Single Yeast Artificial Chromosomes by Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wu, Jenny; Duell, Thomas

    2009-09-18

    Cloning of large chunks of human genomic DNA in recombinant systems such as yeast or bacterial artificial chromosomes has greatly facilitated the construction of physical maps, the positional cloning of disease genes or the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes for diagnostic purposes. For this process to work efficiently, the DNA cloning process and subsequent clone propagation need to maintain stable inserts that are neither deleted nor otherwise rearranged. Some regions of the human genome; however, appear to have a higher propensity than others to rearrange in any host system. Thus, techniques to detect and accurately characterize such rearrangements need to be developed. We developed a technique termed 'Quantitative DNA Fiber Mapping (QDFM)' that allows accurate tagging of sequence elements of interest with near kilobase accuracy and optimized it for delineation of rearrangements in recombinant DNA clones. This paper demonstrates the power of this microscopic approach by investigating YAC rearrangements. In our examples, high-resolution physical maps for regions within the immunoglobulin lambda variant gene cluster were constructed for three different YAC clones carrying deletions of 95 kb and more. Rearrangements within YACs could be demonstrated unambiguously by pairwise mapping of cosmids along YAC DNA molecules. When coverage by YAC clones was not available, distances between cosmid clones were estimated by hybridization of cosmids onto DNA fibers prepared from human genomic DNA. In addition, the QDFM technology provides essential information about clone stability facilitating closure of the maps of the human genome as well as those of model organisms.

  16. Clonal T cell receptor gamma-chain gene rearrangement by PCR-based GeneScan analysis in the skin and blood of patients with parapsoriasis and early-stage mycosis fungoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemke, Claus-Detlev; Dippel, Edgar; Dembinski, Antje; Pönitz, Nina; Assaf, Chalid; Hummel, Michael; Stein, Harald; Goerdt, Sergij

    2002-07-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) and reactive T cell skin diseases represent opposite ends of a spectrum of diseases ranging from overtly malignant to persistently benign. Within this spectrum, the parapsoriasis group is not clearly defined regarding malignant potential. In contrast to consistent findings in advanced-stage CTCL, clonality analysis of parapsoriasis has produced conflicting results in previous studies. As T cell receptor gamma-chain polymerase chain reaction GeneScan analysis (TCR-gamma-PCR-GSA) stands out by its sensitivity, its accuracy in size determination of PCR products, its capacity to identify false positives by repeated analysis and its easy applicability, this approach was used to analyse the clonality status of 41 patients with borderline T cell lymphoproliferative skin diseases, including parapsoriasis (n=27) and early-stage mycosis fungoides (MF) (n=14). A monoclonal T cell infiltrate was demonstrated by repeated TCR-gamma-PCR-GSA in lesional skin specimens in 19.2% of parapsoriasis patients and in 66.6% of early-stage MF cases (p=0.013). In peripheral blood, a monoclonal T cell population was found in a similar percentage of parapsoriasis and of early-stage MF patients (26.7% versus 12.5%; p=0.611). A detailed analysis of parapsoriasis subentities, namely small and large plaque parapsoriasis, and parapsoriasis lichenoides, revealed monoclonality in 2(6)/2(5), 3(14)/2(8) and 0(6)/0/(3) of the skin and peripheral blood specimens, respectively. The high detection rate of false positive cases by repeated analysis (20-37.5%) provides a corrected perspective for the high rates of dominant T cell clones found by others in the peripheral blood of such patients. From the results obtained, three major conclusions can be drawn: firstly, CTCL is clearly associated with detection of monoclonality, even in its early stages; secondly, monoclonality is not a prerequisite for potential CTCL precursor entities; and thirdly, recirculating malignant T

  17. ISCN rules for listing chromosomal rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    It contains the standard system for numbering human chromosomes and constitutional rearrangements and the banding pattern for normal chromosomes at 400-, 550-, and 850-band levels of resolution. ISCN 1995 also contains guidelines for cancer cytogenetics and for in situ hybridization. The complete ISCN 1995 also contains nomenclature for human meiotic chromosomes (not included here). The guidelines presented herein are recommended for use when reporting karyotypes, designating chromosome rearrangements and aberrations, and indicating regions of the genome where DNA sequences are located. It contains the standard system for numbering human chromosomes and constitutional rearrangements and the banding pattern for.

  18. Overcoming immunoescape mechanisms of BCL1 leukemia and induction of CD8+ T-cell-mediated BCK1-specific resistance in mice cured by targeted polymer-bound doxorubicin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovář, Marek; Tomala, Jakub; Chmelová, Helena; Kovář, Lubomír; Mrkvan, Tomáš; Josková, Radka; Zákostelská, Zuzana; Etrych, Tomáš; Strohalm, Jiří; Ulbrich, Karel; Šírová, Milada; Říhová, Blanka

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 23 (2008), s. 9875-9883 ISSN 0008-5472 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505; GA ČR GP301/07/P192; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA AV ČR IAAX00500803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : tumor * bcl1 leukemia * doxorubicin Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 7.514, year: 2008

  19. MYC Immunohistochemistry Predicts MYC Rearrangements by FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwanze, Julum; Siddiqui, Momin T; Stevens, Keith A; Saxe, Debra; Cohen, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    MYC is the proto-oncogene classically associated with Burkitt lymphoma (BL) located at chromosomal locus 8q24. Rearrangements of MYC are seen in nearly 100% of BL but have been reported in 3-16% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs). Rearrangements of MYC are tested for by flourescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In this study, we compared immunohistochemistry (IHC) using a monoclonal antibody directed against the human Myc protein to the current method, FISH. 31 cases were identified that had been tested for MYC rearrangements by FISH over 27 months with heterogeneity in the diagnoses: 5 BL; 10 DLBCL; 3 B-cell lymphoma unclassifiable between DLBCL and BL; 5 B-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified; 1 EBV-related B-cell lymphoma; 1 composite CLL/SLL-large cell lymphoma; and 6 designated as high-grade or aggressive B-cell lymphoma. Analysis by FISH was performed as part of the clinical workup, where a MYC rearrangement is defined as a split fusion signal in at least 5.7% of cells. Myc-IHC was interpreted as a qualitative positive (overexpressed) or negative (not overexpressed) result. 12 cases (39%) were positive for MYC rearrangements by FISH. Overall, 13 cases (42%) showed Myc overexpression by IHC, 11 of which harbored a MYC rearrangement by FISH. There were two false positives and one false negative. Thus, Myc-IHC predicted a MYC rearrangement by FISH with 92% sensitivity and 89% specificity. We can thus conclude that Myc-IHC should be a potentially useful screening tool for identifying lymphomas that may harbor a MYC rearrangement.

  20. Complementary activities of DOT1L and Menin inhibitors in MLL-rearranged leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafflon, C; Craig, V J; Méreau, H; Gräsel, J; Schacher Engstler, B; Hoffman, G; Nigsch, F; Gaulis, S; Barys, L; Ito, M; Aguadé-Gorgorió, J; Bornhauser, B; Bourquin, J-P; Proske, A; Stork-Fux, C; Murakami, M; Sellers, W R; Hofmann, F; Schwaller, J; Tiedt, R

    2017-06-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL/KMT2A) gene leading to oncogenic MLL-fusion proteins occur in ~10% of acute leukemias and are associated with poor clinical outcomes, emphasizing the need for new treatment modalities. Inhibition of the DOT1-like histone H3K79 methyltransferase (DOT1L) is a specific therapeutic approach for such leukemias that is currently being tested in clinical trials. However, in most MLL-rearranged leukemia models responses to DOT1L inhibitors are limited. Here, we performed deep-coverage short hairpin RNA sensitizer screens in DOT1L inhibitor-treated MLL-rearranged leukemia cell lines and discovered that targeting additional nodes of MLL complexes concomitantly with DOT1L inhibition bears great potential for superior therapeutic results. Most notably, combination of a DOT1L inhibitor with an inhibitor of the MLL-Menin interaction markedly enhanced induction of differentiation and cell killing in various MLL disease models including primary leukemia cells, while sparing normal hematopoiesis and leukemias without MLL rearrangements. Gene expression analysis on human and murine leukemic cells revealed that target genes of MLL-fusion proteins and MYC were suppressed more profoundly upon combination treatment. Our findings provide a strong rationale for a novel targeted combination therapy that is expected to improve therapeutic outcomes in patients with MLL-rearranged leukemia.

  1. Chromosomal Rainbows detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H.; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2010-08-19

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'-end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners. We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabase-pair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding

  2. Contribution of Large Genomic Rearrangements in Italian Lynch Syndrome Patients: Characterization of a Novel Alu-Mediated Deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Duraturo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is associated with germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes, mainly MLH1 and MSH2. Most of the mutations reported in these genes to date are point mutations, small deletions, and insertions. Large genomic rearrangements in the MMR genes predisposing to Lynch syndrome also occur, but the frequency varies depending on the population studied on average from 5 to 20%. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of large rearrangements in the MLH1 and MSH2 genes in a well-characterised series of 63 unrelated Southern Italian Lynch syndrome patients who were negative for pathogenic point mutations in the MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 genes. We identified a large novel deletion in the MSH2 gene, including exon 6 in one of the patients analysed (1.6% frequency. This deletion was confirmed and localised by long-range PCR. The breakpoints of this rearrangement were characterised by sequencing. Further analysis of the breakpoints revealed that this rearrangement was a product of Alu-mediated recombination. Our findings identified a novel Alu-mediated rearrangement within MSH2 gene and showed that large deletions or duplications in MLH1 and MSH2 genes are low-frequency mutational events in Southern Italian patients with an inherited predisposition to colon cancer.

  3. Clinical and Translational Implications of RET Rearrangements in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Roberto; Auger, Nathalie; Auclin, Edouard; Besse, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    Since the discovery in 2012 of rearranged during transfection proto-oncogene gene (RET) rearrangements in NSCLC, at least 12 different fusion variants have been identified, with kinesin family member 5B gene (KIF5B)-RET being the most frequent and the best characterized. Unlike ALK receptor tyrosine kinase gene (ALK) and ROS1 rearrangements, RET fusion genes cannot be adequately detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC), although fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction are fully complementary diagnostic tools. In large retrospective studies, RET rearrangements correlate with adenocarcinoma histologic subtype, never-smoking status, younger age, more advanced disease stage, potentially higher chemosensitivity (in particular, to pemetrexed-based regimens), and coexistence of other genomic alterations. To date, several preclinical models, clinical trials, and retrospective studies have investigated multitarget inhibitors with anti-rearranged during transfection proto-oncogene (RET) activity in patients with RET-rearranged lung cancer. In the clinical setting, the benefit in terms of response (16%-47%) and progression-free survival (2-7 months) is clearly not comparable to that seen with other targeted agents in oncogene-addicted NSCLC. Furthermore, multikinase agents showed high rates of severe toxicities, leading to frequent dose reduction and drug discontinuation. To date, no definitive conclusions about a potentially different impact of anti-RET therapies according to RET fusion variants have been drawn on account of discordant data coming mostly from small subgroup analyses. Importantly, the absence of a striking clinical benefit in RET oncogene-addicted NSCLC underscores the clear need for development of more selective and potent RET inhibitors and for better characterization of concomitant genomic alterations and mechanisms of resistance to RET inhibition in patients with lung cancer. Copyright © 2017 International

  4. Immunoglobulin kappa deleting element rearrangements in precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia are stable targets for detection of minimal residual disease by real-time quantitative PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, V. H. J.; Willemse, M. J.; van der Schoot, C. E.; Hählen, K.; van Wering, E. R.; van Dongen, J. J. M.

    2002-01-01

    Immunoglobulin gene rearrangements are used as PCR targets for detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We Investigated the occurrence of monoclonal immunoglobulin kappa-deleting element (IGK-Kde) rearrangements by Southern blotting and PCR/heteroduplex

  5. Clinical features, tumor biology, and prognosis associated with MYC rearrangement and Myc overexpression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with rituximab-CHOP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu-Monette, Z.Y.; Dabaja, B.S.; Wang, X.; Tu, M.; Manyam, G.C.; Tzankov, A.; Xia, Y.; Zhang, L.; Sun, R.; Visco, C.; Dybkaer, K.; Yin, L.; Chiu, A.; Orazi, A.; Zu, Y.; Bhagat, G.; Richards, K.L.; Hsi, E.D.; Choi, W.W.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Huh, J.; Ponzoni, M.; Ferreri, A.J.; Moller, M.B.; Parsons, B.M.; Zhao, X.; Winter, J.N.; Piris, M.A.; McDonnell, T.J.; Miranda, R.N.; Li, Y.; Medeiros, L.J.; Young, K.H.

    2015-01-01

    MYC dysregulation, including MYC gene rearrangement and Myc protein overexpression, is of increasing clinical importance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, the roles of MYC and the relative importance of rearrangement vs overexpression remain to be refined. Gaining knowledge about

  6. Aniridia-associated cytogenetic rearrangements suggest that a position effect may cause the mutant phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fantes, J.; Redeker, B.; Breen, M.; Boyle, S.; Brown, J.; Fletcher, J.; Jones, S.; Bickmore, W.; Fukushima, Y.; Mannens, M.

    1995-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that aniridia (absence of iris) is caused by loss of function of one copy of the PAX6 gene, which maps to 11p13. We present the further characterisation of two aniridia pedigrees in which the disease segregates with chromosomal rearrangements which involve 11p13 but do not

  7. A single oncogenic enhancer rearrangement causes concomitant EVI1 and GATA2 deregulation in leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gröschel, Stefan; Sanders, Mathijs A; Hoogenboezem, Remco; de Wit, Elzo; Bouwman, Britta A M; Erpelinck, Claudia; van der Velden, Vincent H J; Havermans, Marije; Avellino, Roberto; van Lom, Kirsten; Rombouts, Elwin J; van Duin, Mark; Döhner, Konstanze; Beverloo, H Berna; Bradner, James E; Döhner, Hartmut; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J M; Bindels, Eric M J; de Laat, Wouter; Delwel, Ruud

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements without gene fusions have been implicated in leukemogenesis by causing deregulation of proto-oncogenes via relocation of cryptic regulatory DNA elements. AML with inv(3)/t(3;3) is associated with aberrant expression of the stem-cell regulator EVI1. Applying functional

  8. High level of chromosomal instability in circulating tumor cells of ROS1-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pailler, E.; Auger, N.; Lindsay, C. R.; Vielh, P.; Islas-Morris-Hernandez, A.; Borget, I.; Ngo-Camus, M.; Planchard, D.; Soria, J.-C.; Besse, B.; Farace, F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic aberrations affecting the c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1) tyrosine kinase gene have been reported in a small subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We evaluated whether ROS1-chromosomal rearrangements could be detected in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and examined tumor heterogeneity of CTCs and tumor biopsies in ROS1-rearranged NSCLC patients. Patients and methods Using isolation by size of epithelial tumor cells (ISET) filtration and filter-adapted-fluoresce...

  9. Recent Developments in the Reformatsky-Claisen Rearrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumi Hatakeyama

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The rearrangement of allyl a-bromoacetates with Zn dust is known as the Reformatsky-Claisen rearrangement. Whereas the Ireland-Claisen rearrangement has been widely used in the synthesis of a diverse range of natural products, the Zn-mediated Reformatsky-Claisen rearrangement has not been utilized so often. In this article, we will provide an overview of recent advances in the Reformatsky-Claisen rearrangement field, including the In-mediated Reformatsky-Claisen rearrangement we have recently developed.

  10. Highly rearranged mitochondrial genome in Nycteria parasites (Haemosporidia) from bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadjian, Gregory; Hassanin, Alexandre; Saintpierre, Benjamin; Gembu Tungaluna, Guy-Crispin; Ariey, Frederic; Ayala, Francisco J; Landau, Irene; Duval, Linda

    2016-08-30

    Haemosporidia parasites have mostly and abundantly been described using mitochondrial genes, and in particular cytochrome b (cytb). Failure to amplify the mitochondrial cytb gene of Nycteria parasites isolated from Nycteridae bats has been recently reported. Bats are hosts to a diverse and profuse array of Haemosporidia parasites that remain largely unstudied. There is a need to obtain more molecular data from chiropteran parasites. Such data would help to better understand the evolutionary history of Haemosporidia, which notably include the Plasmodium parasites, malaria's agents. We use next-generation sequencing to obtain the complete mitochondrial genome of Nycteria parasites from African Nycteris grandis (Nycteridae) and Rhinolophus alcyone (Rhinolophidae) and Asian Megaderma spasma (Megadermatidae). We report four complete mitochondrial genomes, including two rearranged mitochondrial genomes within Haemosporidia. Our results open outlooks into potentially undiscovered Haemosporidian diversity.

  11. Mutations and Rearrangements in the Genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redder, P.; Garrett, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    of different types of mutation and possible rearrangements that can occur in the genome, the pyrEF locus was examined for mutations that were isolated after selection with 5-fluoroorotic acid. About two-thirds of the 130 mutations resulted from insertions of mobile elements, including insertion sequence (IS...... deletions, insertions, and a duplication, were observed, and about one-fifth of the mutations occurred elsewhere in the genome, possibly in an orotate transporter gene. One mutant exhibited a 5-kb genomic rearrangement at the pyrEF locus involving a two-step IS element-dependent reaction, and its boundaries...

  12. Generalization of the quark rearrangement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, T.; Chen, C.K.

    1976-01-01

    An extension and generalization of the quark rearrangement model of baryon annihilation is described which can be applied to all annihilation reactions and which incorporates some of the features of the highly successful quark parton model. Some p anti-p interactions are discussed

  13. P chromosomes involved in intergenomic rearrangements of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-08

    Apr 8, 2014 ... Beijing, People's Republic of China. 2Institute of Special Wild Economic Animals ... altitude in nine populations of Kengyilia thoroldiana (Wang et al. 2012). To investigate the effects of ... Identification of rearrangements among St, P, and Y genomes in population. Z2538. Red colour indicates fragments of P ...

  14. P chromosomes involved in intergenomic rearrangements of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-08

    Apr 8, 2014 ... Total genomic DNA were extracted from young leaves of. Pseudoroegneria spicata (2n = 2x ... ments of Y chromosomes for GISH (a); pAs1 repetitive DNA probe signal is green,. pHvG39 repetitive DNA probe ... 2010). Compared to the other P chromosomes, it is easier to exchange and rearrange for the.

  15. Dynamics of genome rearrangement in bacterial populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E Darling

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome structure variation has profound impacts on phenotype in organisms ranging from microbes to humans, yet little is known about how natural selection acts on genome arrangement. Pathogenic bacteria such as Yersinia pestis, which causes bubonic and pneumonic plague, often exhibit a high degree of genomic rearrangement. The recent availability of several Yersinia genomes offers an unprecedented opportunity to study the evolution of genome structure and arrangement. We introduce a set of statistical methods to study patterns of rearrangement in circular chromosomes and apply them to the Yersinia. We constructed a multiple alignment of eight Yersinia genomes using Mauve software to identify 78 conserved segments that are internally free from genome rearrangement. Based on the alignment, we applied Bayesian statistical methods to infer the phylogenetic inversion history of Yersinia. The sampling of genome arrangement reconstructions contains seven parsimonious tree topologies, each having different histories of 79 inversions. Topologies with a greater number of inversions also exist, but were sampled less frequently. The inversion phylogenies agree with results suggested by SNP patterns. We then analyzed reconstructed inversion histories to identify patterns of rearrangement. We confirm an over-representation of "symmetric inversions"-inversions with endpoints that are equally distant from the origin of chromosomal replication. Ancestral genome arrangements demonstrate moderate preference for replichore balance in Yersinia. We found that all inversions are shorter than expected under a neutral model, whereas inversions acting within a single replichore are much shorter than expected. We also found evidence for a canonical configuration of the origin and terminus of replication. Finally, breakpoint reuse analysis reveals that inversions with endpoints proximal to the origin of DNA replication are nearly three times more frequent. Our findings

  16. Comparative analysis of clinicoradiologic characteristics of lung adenocarcinomas with ALK rearrangements or EGFR mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, J.Y.; Zheng, J.; Chen, X.; Zhou, J.Y. [Zhejiang University, Department of Respiratory Disease, Thoracic Disease Center, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Yu, Z.F.; Xiao, W.B.; Jiang, L.N. [Zhejiang University, Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Hangzhou (China); Zhao, J.; Sun, K.; Wang, B.; Ding, W. [Zhejiang University, Department of Pathology, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Hangzhou (China)

    2015-05-01

    To compare the clinicoradiologic features of tumours with echinoderm anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, or wild type (WT) for both genes in a cohort of patients with lung adenocarcinoma to identify useful characteristics of different gene statuses. In 346 lung adenocarcinoma patients, ALK rearrangements were confirmed with fluorescence in situ hybridisation, and EGFR mutations were determined by pyrosequencing assay. Patients were divided into three groups: ALK rearrangement (ALK+ group, n = 48), EGFR mutation (EGFR+ group, n = 166), and WT for both genes (WT group, n = 132). Chest computed tomography (CT) examinations were performed in all patients. The percentages of ground-glass opacity volume (pGGO) and tumour shadow disappearance rate (TDR) were measured using semi-automated nodule assessment software. The pGGO was significantly lower in the ALK+ group (25.1 % ± 24.3) than in the EGFR+ group (37.2 % ± 25.7, p < 0.001) and the WT group (36.1 % ± 24.6, p = 0.001). The TDR in the ALK+ group (17.3 % ± 25.1) was significantly lower than in the EGFR+ group (26.8 % ± 24.9, p = 0.002) and the WT group (25.7 % ± 24.6, p = 0.003). Solid pattern with lower incidence of lobulated border, finely spiculated margins, pleural retraction, and bubble-like lucency on CT imaging are the main characteristics of ALK rearrangement tumours. (orig.)

  17. Transposon domestication versus mutualism in ciliate genome rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vogt

    Full Text Available Ciliated protists rearrange their genomes dramatically during nuclear development via chromosome fragmentation and DNA deletion to produce a trimmer and highly reorganized somatic genome. The deleted portion of the genome includes potentially active transposons or transposon-like sequences that reside in the germline. Three independent studies recently showed that transposase proteins of the DDE/DDD superfamily are indispensible for DNA processing in three distantly related ciliates. In the spirotrich Oxytricha trifallax, high copy-number germline-limited transposons mediate their own excision from the somatic genome but also contribute to programmed genome rearrangement through a remarkable transposon mutualism with the host. By contrast, the genomes of two oligohymenophorean ciliates, Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium tetraurelia, encode homologous PiggyBac-like transposases as single-copy genes in both their germline and somatic genomes. These domesticated transposases are essential for deletion of thousands of different internal sequences in these species. This review contrasts the events underlying somatic genome reduction in three different ciliates and considers their evolutionary origins and the relationships among their distinct mechanisms for genome remodeling.

  18. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) screening for exon copy number variation in the calcium sensing receptor gene: no large rearrangements identified in patients with calcium metabolic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Peter H; Christensen, Signe E; Wallace, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    . Patients and methods. The study included 257 patient samples referred to our laboratory for molecular genetic analysis of the CASR gene. A total of 245 were patients suspected to have FHH, while the remaining 12 samples represent patients with a phenotype of idiopathic hypocalcaemia/hypoparathyroidism. All...

  19. First case of B ALL with KMT2A-MAML2 rearrangement: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menu, Estelle; Beaufils, Nathalie; Usseglio, Fabrice; Balducci, Estelle; Lafage Pochitaloff, Marina; Costello, Regis; Gabert, Jean

    2017-05-23

    A large number of chromosomal translocations of the human KMT2A gene, better known as the MLL gene, have so far been characterized. Genetic rearrangements involving KMT2A gene are frequently involved in lymphoid, myeloid and mixed lineage leukemia. One of its rare fusion partners, the mastermind like 2 (MAML2) gene has been reported in four cases of myeloid neoplasms after chemotherapy so far: two acute myeloid leukemias (AML) and two myelodysplasic syndrome (MDS), and two cases of secondary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here we report the case of a KMT2A - MAML2 fusion discovered by Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) analysis in front of an inv11 (q21q23) present in a 47-year-old female previously treated for a sarcoma in 2014, who had a B acute lymphoid leukemia (B ALL). It is, to our knowledge, the first case of B acute lymphoblastic leukemia with this fusion gene. At the molecular level, two rearrangements were detected using RNA sequencing juxtaposing exon 7 to exon 2 and exon 9 to intron 1-2 of the KMT2A and MAML2 genes respectively, and one rearrangement using Sanger sequencing juxtaposing exon 8 and exon 2.

  20. Reciprocal hybrid joints demonstrate successive V-J rearrangements on the same chromosome in the human TCR gamma locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexandre, D.; Chuchana, P.; Roncarolo, M. G.; Yssel, H.; Spits, H.; Lefranc, G.; Lefranc, M. P.

    1991-01-01

    Novel variable (V)--joining (J) gene rearrangements are described in the human T cell receptor gamma locus, in which, on the one hand, the V3 variable gene is joined to the heptamer--nonamer recombination signals of the J1 segment and, on the other hand, the J1 segment is joined to the V3

  1. Basic helix-loop-helix proteins E2A and HEB induce immature T-cell receptor rearrangements in nonlymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. Langerak (Anton); I.L. Wolvers-Tettero; E.J. van Gastel-Mol (Ellen); M.E. Oud; J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractT-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements are mediated via V(D)J recombination, which is strictly regulated during lymphoid differentiation, most probably through the action of specific transcription factors. Investigated was whether cotransfection of RAG1 and

  2. Rearrangement of micelle structures during polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatjaroenporn, K.; Baker, R.; FitzGerald, P.; Warr, G.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), we studied the shape transition of micelles of 11(methacryloyloxy)undecyltrimethylammonium bromide (MUTAB) as this tail-polymerisable cationic surfactant polymerized. Previous studies of such systems have suggested kinetic 'locking' of the micelle structure during polymerization. However, we found a transition from spheres (unpolymerised) to rods (at intermediate conversions) back to spheres (fully polymerized), see Figure 1. By comparing these results to the micelle shapes formed by the mixtures of 100% polymerized and unpolymerised MUTAB, we show that the shape transitions observed during polymerization are due to equilibrium structures that undergo rearrangement as the composition changes. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that besides the monolayer of unpolymerised MUTAB, the rearranged structures of this surfmer in bulk, when polymerization proceeded, retained their shapes after adsorbing at mica/solution interface, providing potential for the manipulating of thin film structures. This understanding assists design of templating or encapsulating nanostructured materials.

  3. RET/PTC rearrangements preferentially occurred in papillary thyroid cancer among atomic bomb survivors exposed to high radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamatani, Kiyohiro; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Ito, Reiko; Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Taga, Masataka; Imai, Kazue; Cologne, John; Soda, Midori; Arihiro, Koji; Fujihara, Megumu; Abe, Kuniko; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Nakashima, Masahiro; Sekine, Ichiro; Yasui, Wataru; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei

    2008-09-01

    A major early event in papillary thyroid carcinogenesis is constitutive activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway caused by alterations of a single gene, typically rearrangements of the RET and NTRK1 genes or point mutations in the BRAF and RAS genes. In childhood papillary thyroid cancer, regardless of history of radiation exposure, RET/PTC rearrangements are a major event. Conversely, in adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer among the general population, the most common molecular event is BRAF(V600E) point mutation, not RET/PTC rearrangements. To clarify which gene alteration, chromosome aberration, or point mutation preferentially occurs in radiation-associated adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer, we have performed molecular analyses on RET/PTC rearrangements and BRAF(V600E) mutation in 71 papillary thyroid cancer cases among atomic bomb survivors (including 21 cases not exposed to atomic bomb radiation), in relation to radiation dose as well as time elapsed since atomic bomb radiation exposure. RET/PTC rearrangements showed significantly increased frequency with increased radiation dose (P(trend) = 0.002). In contrast, BRAF(V600E) mutation was less frequent in cases exposed to higher radiation dose (P(trend) < 0.001). Papillary thyroid cancer subjects harboring RET/PTC rearrangements developed this cancer earlier than did cases with BRAF(V600E) mutation (P = 0.03). These findings were confirmed by multivariate logistic regression analysis. These results suggest that RET/PTC rearrangements play an important role in radiation-associated thyroid carcinogenesis.

  4. Enantioselective catalytic fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov-Michailidis, Fedor; Pupier, Marion; Besnard, Céline; Bürgi, Thomas; Alexakis, Alexandre

    2014-10-03

    An efficient and highly stereoselective fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement is described. The catalytic reaction requires use of Selectfluor in combination with the chiral, enantiopure phosphate anion derived from acid L3. Under optimized conditions, cyclopropylamines A were transformed into β-fluoro cyclobutylimines B in good yields and high levels of diastereo- and enantiocontrol. Furthermore, the optically active cyclobutylimines were reduced diastereoselectively with L-Selectride in the corresponding fluorinated amines C, compounds of significant interest in the pharmacological industry.

  5. Screening for NUP98 rearrangements in hematopoietic malignancies by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebral, Karin; König, Margit; Schmidt, Helmut H; Lutz, Dieter; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Kalwak, Krzysztof; Brugger, Stefan; Dworzak, Michael N; Haas, Oskar A; Strehl, Sabine

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of rearrangements of NUP98 (the gene coding for nucleoporin 98kDa protein) in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and selected patients with 11p13-15 rearrangements. This aim was achieved using a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay that allows the detection of NUP98 aberrations independently of the partner gene involved. Screening of 59 consecutive patients enrolled in the Austrian AML-BFM93 clinical trial was performed by dual-color FISH. In addition, 14 selected cases with various hematologic malignancies and 11p13-15 aberrations were analyzed. NUP98-positive cases were further investigated by fusion gene-specific FISH and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays. Among the 59 AML patients, one NUP98-NSD1 positive case (1.7%) was detected. Among the 14 selected patients, five new NUP98 positive cases were determined. Two cases showed an inv(11)(p15q22)/NUP98-DDX10 fusion, one each displayed a t(5;11)(q35;p15)/NUP98-NSD1 and a t(11;20)(p15;q12)/NUP98-TOP1 fusion, and one case with a putative new fusion partner gene at 3p24 was identified. The observed frequency of 1.7% confirmed the low incidence of NUP98 rearrangements in childhood AML. The low occurrence of NUP98 rearrangements in selected samples with 11p13-15 alterations suggests the existence of variable chromosomal breakpoints and affected genes in this region. The identification of a new NUP98 fusion partner region confirms the evident promiscuity of NUP98. Thus, analysis of NUP98 aberrations by FISH seems to be the method of choice for determining the presence of these genetic lesions in unselected patients, and to confirm the involvement of NUP98 in cases with 11p15 aberrations.

  6. Chromosomal rearrangements formed by rrn recombination do not improve replichore balance in host-specific Salmonella enterica serovars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T David Matthews

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of the ∼2,600 serovars of Salmonella enterica have a broad host range as well as a conserved gene order. In contrast, some Salmonella serovars are host-specific and frequently exhibit large chromosomal rearrangements from recombination between rrn operons. One hypothesis explaining these rearrangements suggests that replichore imbalance introduced from horizontal transfer of pathogenicity islands and prophages drives chromosomal rearrangements in an attempt to improve balance.This hypothesis was directly tested by comparing the naturally-occurring chromosomal arrangement types to the theoretically possible arrangement types, and estimating their replichore balance using a calculator. In addition to previously characterized strains belonging to host-specific serovars, the arrangement types of 22 serovar Gallinarum strains was also determined. Only 48 out of 1,440 possible arrangement types were identified in 212 host-specific strains. While the replichores of most naturally-occurring arrangement types were well-balanced, most theoretical arrangement types had imbalanced replichores. Furthermore, the most common types of rearrangements did not change replichore balance.The results did not support the hypothesis that replichore imbalance causes these rearrangements, and suggest that the rearrangements could be explained by aspects of a host-specific lifestyle.

  7. The rearranged mitochondrial genome of Leptopilina boulardi (Hymenoptera: Figitidae, a parasitoid wasp of Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract The partial mitochondrial genome sequence of Leptopilina boulardi (Hymenoptera: Figitidae was characterized. Illumina sequencing was used yielding 35,999,679 reads, from which 102,482 were utilized in the assembly. The length of the sequenced region of this partial mitochondrial genome is 15,417 bp, consisting of 13 protein-coding, two rRNA, and 21tRNA genes (the trnaM failed to be sequenced and a partial A+T-rich region. All protein-coding genes start with ATN codons. Eleven protein-coding genes presented TAA stop codons, whereas ND6 and COII that presented TA, and T nucleotides, respectively. The gene pattern revealed extensive rearrangements compared to the typical pattern generally observed in insects. These rearrangements involve two protein-coding and two ribosomal genes, along with the 16 tRNA genes. This gene order is different from the pattern described for Ibalia leucospoides (Ibaliidae, Cynipoidea, suggesting that this particular gene order can be variable among Cynipoidea superfamily members. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis of the main groups of Apocrita was performed using amino acid sequence of 13 protein-coding genes, showing monophyly for the Cynipoidea superfamily within the Hymenoptera phylogeny.

  8. ETV6-RUNX1 Rearrangement in Tunisian Pediatric B-Lineage Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Gmidène

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Forty-one out of fifty-seven Tunisian children with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL, and without cytogenetically detectable recurrent abnormalities at the time of the diagnosis, were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH for the t(12;21. This translocation leads ETV6-RUNX1 (previously TEL-AML1 fusion gene. 16 patients (28% had ETV6-RUNX1 rearrangement. In addition to this rearrangement, two cases showed a loss of the normal ETV6 allele, and three others showed an extra signal of the RUNX1 gene. Seven patients without ETV6-RUNX1 rearrangement showed extra signals of the RUNX1 gene. One out of the 7 patients was also associated with a t(3;12 identified by FISH. This is the first Tunisian study in which we report the incidence of t(12;21 among childhood B-lineage ALL and in which we have found multiple copies of RUNX1. Finally, our findings confirm that additional or secondary genetic changes are commonly encountered in pediatric B-lineage ALL with ETV6-RUNX1 gene fusion which is envisaged to play a pivotal role in disease progression.

  9. NUP98 is rearranged in 3.8% of pediatric AML forming a clinical and molecular homogenous group with a poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struski, S; Lagarde, S; Bories, P; Puiseux, C; Prade, N; Cuccuini, W; Pages, M-P; Bidet, A; Gervais, C; Lafage-Pochitaloff, M; Roche-Lestienne, C; Barin, C; Penther, D; Nadal, N; Radford-Weiss, I; Collonge-Rame, M-A; Gaillard, B; Mugneret, F; Lefebvre, C; Bart-Delabesse, E; Petit, A; Leverger, G; Broccardo, C; Luquet, I; Pasquet, M; Delabesse, E

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare disease whose prognosis is highly variable according to factors such as chromosomal abnormalities. Recurrent genomic rearrangements are detected in half of pediatric AML by karyotype. NUcleoPorin 98 (NUP98) gene is rearranged with 31 different fusion partner genes. These rearrangements are frequently undetected by conventional cytogenetics, as the NUP98 gene is located at the end of the chromosome 11 short arm (11p15). By screening a series of 574 pediatric AML, we detected a NUP98 rearrangement in 22 cases (3.8%), a frequency similar to CBFB-MYH11 fusion gene (4.0%). The most frequent NUP98 fusion gene partner is NSD1. These cases are homogeneous regarding their biological and clinical characteristics, and associated with bad prognosis only improved by bone marrow transplantation. We detailed the biological characteristics of these AML by exome sequencing which demonstrated few recurrent mutations (FLT3 ITD, WT1, CEBPA, NBPF14, BCR and ODF1). The analysis of the clonal structure in these cases suggests that the mutation order in the NUP98-rearranged pediatric AML begins with the NUP98 rearrangement leading to epigenetic dysregulations then followed by mutations of critical hematopoietic transcription factors and finally, activation of the FLT3 signaling pathway.

  10. Use of nonradioactive labeling to detect large gene rearrangements in 21-hydroxylase deficiency Uso de marcação não radiativa para identificação de grandes rearranjos gênicos na deficiência da 21-hidroxilase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Cukier

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To establish the Southern blotting technique using hybridization with a nonradioactive probe to detect large rearrangements of CYP21A2 in a Brazilian cohort with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (CAH-21OH. METHOD: We studied 42 patients, 2 of them related, comprising 80 non-related alleles. DNA samples were obtained from peripheral blood, digested by restriction enzyme Taq I, submitted to Southern blotting and hybridized with biotin-labeled probes. RESULTS: This method was shown to be reliable with results similar to the radioactive-labeling method. We found CYP21A2 deletion (2.5%, large gene conversion (8.8%, CYP21AP deletion (3.8%, and CYP21A1P duplication (6.3%. These frequencies were similar to those found in our previous study in which a large number of cases were studied. Good hybridization patterns were achieved with a smaller amount of DNA (5 mug, and fragment signs were observed after 5 minutes to 1 hour of exposure. CONCLUSIONS: We established a non-radioactive (biotin Southern blot/hybridization methodology for CYP21A2 large rearrangements with good results. Despite being more arduous, this technique is faster, requires a smaller amount of DNA, and most importantly, avoids problems with the use of radioactivity.OBJETIVO: Padronizar a técnica de Southern blotting usando hibridização com material não radioativo para detectar grandes rearranjos no gene CYP21A2 em uma amostra da população brasileira com hiperplasia adrenal congênita. MÉTODO: Foram estudados 42 pacientes, 2 dos quais aparentados, totalizando 80 alelos não relacionados. As amostras de DNA foram obtidas de sangue periférico, digeridas com enzima de restrição Taq I, realizado Southern blotting e hibridizadas com sonda marcada com biotina. RESULTADOS: O método se mostrou eficaz, com resultados similares aos encontrados ao utilizar a metodologia com material radioativo. Foram encontradas 2,5% de deleção do CYP21A2, 8,8% de

  11. Adiabatic Rearrangement of Hollow PV Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Hendricks

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabatic heating from deep moist convection in the hurricane eyewall produces a towering annular structure of elevated potential vorticity (PV. This structure has been referred to as a hollow PV tower. The sign reversal of the radial gradient of PV satisfies the Charney-Stern necessary condition for combined barotropic-baroclinic instability. For thin enough annular structures, small perturbations grow exponentially, extract energy from the mean flow, and lead to hollow tower breakdown, with significant vortex structural and intensity change. The three-dimensional adiabatic rearrangements of two prototypical hurricane-like hollow PV towers (one thick and one thin are examined in an idealized framework. For both hollow towers, dynamic instability causes air parcels with high PV to be mixed into the eye preferentially at lower levels, where unstable PV wave growth rates are the largest. Little or no mixing is found to occur at upper levels. The mixing at lower and middle levels is most rapid for the breakdown of the thin hollow tower, consistent with previous barotropic results. For both hollow towers, this advective rearrangement of PV affects the tropical cyclone structure and intensity in a number of ways. First, the minimum central pressure and maximum azimuthal mean velocity simultaneously decrease, consistent with previous barotropic results. Secondly, isosurfaces of absolute angular momentum preferentially shift inward at low levels, implying an adiabatic mechanism by which hurricane eyewall tilt can form. Thirdly, a PV bridge, similar to that previously found in full-physics hurricane simulations, develops as a result of mixing at the isentropic levels where unstable PV waves grow most rapidly. Finally, the balanced mass field resulting from the PV rearrangement is warmer in the eye between 900 and 700 hPa. The location of this warming is consistent with observed warm anomalies in the eye, indicating that in certain instances the hurricane

  12. TGIF1 is a negative regulator of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willer, Anton; Jakobsen, Janus Schou; Ohlsson, E

    2015-01-01

    influence the clinical outcome. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE family members can act both positively and negatively on transcriptional programs responsible for leukemic maintenance and provide novel insights into the regulatory gene expression circuitries in MLL-rearranged AML.Leukemia......Members of the TALE (three-amino-acid loop extension) family of atypical homeodomain-containing transcription factors are important downstream effectors of oncogenic fusion proteins involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. A well-characterized member of this protein family is MEIS1, which...... orchestrates a transcriptional program required for the maintenance of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia (AML). TGIF1/TGIF2 are relatively uncharacterized TALE transcription factors, which, in contrast to the remaining family, have been shown to act as transcriptional repressors. Given the general...

  13. The Stereochemical Course of the α-Hydroxyphosphonate–Phosphate Rearrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallitsch, Katharina; Roller, Alexander; Hammerschmidt, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    The phosphonate–phosphate rearrangement is an isomerisation of α-hydroxyphosphonates bearing electron-withdrawing substituents at the α-carbon atom. We studied the stereochemical course of this rearrangement with respect to phosphorus. A set of four diastereomeric α-hydroxyphosphonates was prepared by a Pudovik reaction from two diastereomeric cyclic phosphites. The hydroxyphosphonates were separated and rearranged with Et3N as base. In analogy to trichlorphon, which was the first reported compound undergoing this rearrangement. All four hydroxyphosphonates could be rearranged to 2,2-dichlorovinyl phosphates. Single-crystal X-ray structure analyses of the α-hydroxyphosphonates and the corresponding phosphates allowed us to show that the rearrangement proceeds with retention of configuration on the phosphorus atom. PMID:26059025

  14. The Stereochemical Course of the ?-Hydroxyphosphonate?Phosphate Rearrangement

    OpenAIRE

    Pallitsch, Katharina; Roller, Alexander; Hammerschmidt, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    The phosphonate?phosphate rearrangement is an isomerisation of ?-hydroxyphosphonates bearing electron-withdrawing substituents at the ?-carbon atom. We studied the stereochemical course of this rearrangement with respect to phosphorus. A set of four diastereomeric ?-hydroxyphosphonates was prepared by a Pudovik reaction from two diastereomeric cyclic phosphites. The hydroxyphosphonates were separated and rearranged with Et3N as base. In analogy to trichlorphon, which was the first reported co...

  15. Kinase Expression and Chromosomal Rearrangements in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Tissues: Investigations at the Molecular and Microscopic Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich; Kwan, Johnson; Lu, Chun-Mei; Ito, Yuko; Wang, Mei; Baumgartner, Adolf; Hayward, Simon W.; Weier, Jingly F.; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.

    2009-07-07

    Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC), for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes, ret or the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1) by intra- or interchromosomal rearrangements have been suggested as a cause of the disease. The 1986 accident at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl, USSR, led to the uncontrolled release of high levels of radioisotopes. Ten years later, the incidence of childhood papillary thyroid cancer (chPTC) near Chernobyl had risen by two orders of magnitude. Tumors removed from some of these patients showed aberrant expression of the ret RTK gene due to a ret/PTC1 or ret/PTC3 rearrangement involving chromosome 10. However, many cultured chPTC cells show a normal G-banded karyotype and no ret rearrangement. We hypothesize that the 'ret-negative' tumors inappropriately express a different oncogene or have lost function of a tumor suppressor as a result of chromosomal rearrangements, and decided to apply molecular and cytogenetic methods to search for potentially oncogenic chromosomal rearrangements in Chernobyl chPTC cases. Knowledge of the kind of genetic alterations may facilitate the early detection and staging of chPTC as well as provide guidance for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Kinase Expression and Chromosomal Rearrangements in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Tissues: Investigations at the Molecular and Microscopic Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich; Kwan, Johnson; Lu, Chun-Mei; Ito, Yuko; Wang, Mei; Baumgartner, Adolf; Hayward, Simon W.; Weier, Jingly F.; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.

    2009-01-01

    Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC), for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes, ret or the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1) by intra- or interchromosomal rearrangements have been suggested as a cause of the disease. The 1986 accident at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl, USSR, led to the uncontrolled release of high levels of radioisotopes. Ten years later, the incidence of childhood papillary thyroid cancer (chPTC) near Chernobyl had risen by two orders of magnitude. Tumors removed from some of these patients showed aberrant expression of the ret RTK gene due to a ret/PTC1 or ret/PTC3 rearrangement involving chromosome 10. However, many cultured chPTC cells show a normal G-banded karyotype and no ret rearrangement. We hypothesize that the 'ret-negative' tumors inappropriately express a different oncogene or have lost function of a tumor suppressor as a result of chromosomal rearrangements, and decided to apply molecular and cytogenetic methods to search for potentially oncogenic chromosomal rearrangements in Chernobyl chPTC cases. Knowledge of the kind of genetic alterations may facilitate the early detection and staging of chPTC as well as provide guidance for therapeutic intervention.

  17. MLL-Rearranged Leukemias-An Update on Science and Clinical Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Amanda C; Bernt, Kathrin M

    2017-01-01

    The mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) gene (now renamed Lysine [K]-specific MethylTransferase 2A or KMT2A ) on chromosome 11q23 is disrupted in a unique group of acute leukemias. More than 80 different partner genes in these fusions have been described, although the majority of leukemias result from MLL1 fusions with one of about six common partner genes. Approximately 10% of all leukemias harbor MLL1 translocations. Of these, two patient populations comprise the majority of cases: patients younger than 1 year of age at diagnosis (primarily acute lymphoblastic leukemias) and young- to-middle-aged adults (primarily acute myeloid leukemias). A much rarer subgroup of patients with MLL1 rearrangements develop leukemia that is attributable to prior treatment with certain chemotherapeutic agents-so-called therapy-related leukemias. In general, outcomes for all of these patients remain poor when compared to patients with non- MLL1 rearranged leukemias. In this review, we will discuss the normal biological roles of MLL1 and its fusion partners, how these roles are hypothesized to be dysregulated in the context of MLL1 rearrangements, and the clinical manifestations of this group of leukemias. We will go on to discuss the progress in clinical management and promising new avenues of research, which may lead to more effective targeted therapies for affected patients.

  18. MLL-Rearranged Leukemias—An Update on Science and Clinical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Amanda C.; Bernt, Kathrin M.

    2017-01-01

    The mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) gene (now renamed Lysine [K]-specific MethylTransferase 2A or KMT2A) on chromosome 11q23 is disrupted in a unique group of acute leukemias. More than 80 different partner genes in these fusions have been described, although the majority of leukemias result from MLL1 fusions with one of about six common partner genes. Approximately 10% of all leukemias harbor MLL1 translocations. Of these, two patient populations comprise the majority of cases: patients younger than 1 year of age at diagnosis (primarily acute lymphoblastic leukemias) and young- to-middle-aged adults (primarily acute myeloid leukemias). A much rarer subgroup of patients with MLL1 rearrangements develop leukemia that is attributable to prior treatment with certain chemotherapeutic agents—so-called therapy-related leukemias. In general, outcomes for all of these patients remain poor when compared to patients with non-MLL1 rearranged leukemias. In this review, we will discuss the normal biological roles of MLL1 and its fusion partners, how these roles are hypothesized to be dysregulated in the context of MLL1 rearrangements, and the clinical manifestations of this group of leukemias. We will go on to discuss the progress in clinical management and promising new avenues of research, which may lead to more effective targeted therapies for affected patients. PMID:28232907

  19. Clinical features, tumor biology, and prognosis associated with MYC rearrangement and Myc overexpression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with rituximab-CHOP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Dabaja, Bouthaina S; Wang, Xiaoxiao

    2015-01-01

    MYC dysregulation, including MYC gene rearrangement and Myc protein overexpression, is of increasing clinical importance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, the roles of MYC and the relative importance of rearrangement vs overexpression remain to be refined. Gaining knowledge about...... the tumor biology associated with MYC dysregulation is important to understand the roles of MYC and MYC-associated biology in lymphomagenesis. In this study, we determined MYC rearrangement status (n=344) and Myc expression (n=535) in a well-characterized DLBCL cohort, individually assessed the clinical...... and pathobiological features of patients with MYC rearrangement and Myc protein overexpression, and analyzed the prognosis and gene expression profiling signatures associated with these MYC abnormalities in germinal center B-cell-like and activated B-cell-like DLBCL. Our results showed that the prognostic importance...

  20. REARRANGEMENT IN THE B-GENOME FROM DIPLOID PROGENITOR TO WHEAT ALLOPOLYPOLID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salina E.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Three key periods that were accompanied by considerable rearrangements in the B genome of wheat and its progenitor can be considered. The first period covers the period from the divergence of diploid Triticum and Aegilops species from their common progenitor (2.5–6 million years ago to formation of the tetraploid T. diccocoides (about 500 thousand years ago. Significant genomic rearrangements in the diploid progenitor of the B genome, Ae. speltoides (SS genome, involved a considerable amplification of repeated DNA sequences, which led to an increase in the number of heterochromatin blocks on chromosomes relative to other diploid Aegilops and Triticum species. Our analysis has demonstrated that during this period the Spelt1 repeats intensively amplified as well as several mobile elements proliferated, in particular, the genome-specific gypsy LTR-retrotransposon Fatima and CACTA DNA-transposon Caspar. The second period in the B-genome evolution was associated with the emergence of tetraploid (BBAA genome and its subsequent evolution. The third most important event leading to the next rearrangement of the B genome took place relatively recently, 7000–9500 years ago, being associated with the emergence of hexaploid wheat with the genomic formula BBAADD. The evolution of the B/S genome involved intergenomic and intragenomic translocations and chromosome inversions. So far, five rearrangements in the B-genome chromosomes of polyploid wheats has been observed and described; the majority of them took place during the formation and evolution of tetraploid species. The mapping of the S-genome chromosomes and comparison with the B-genome chromosome maps have demonstrated that individual rearrangements pre-existed in Ae. speltoides; moreover, Ae. speltoides is polymorphic for these rearrangements.Chromosome 5B is nearly 870 Mbp (5BL = 580 Mbp and 5BS = 290 Mbp and is known to carry important genes controlling the key aspects of wheat biology, in

  1. Bootstrapping phylogenies inferred from rearrangement data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale sequencing of genomes has enabled the inference of phylogenies based on the evolution of genomic architecture, under such events as rearrangements, duplications, and losses. Many evolutionary models and associated algorithms have been designed over the last few years and have found use in comparative genomics and phylogenetic inference. However, the assessment of phylogenies built from such data has not been properly addressed to date. The standard method used in sequence-based phylogenetic inference is the bootstrap, but it relies on a large number of homologous characters that can be resampled; yet in the case of rearrangements, the entire genome is a single character. Alternatives such as the jackknife suffer from the same problem, while likelihood tests cannot be applied in the absence of well established probabilistic models. Results We present a new approach to the assessment of distance-based phylogenetic inference from whole-genome data; our approach combines features of the jackknife and the bootstrap and remains nonparametric. For each feature of our method, we give an equivalent feature in the sequence-based framework; we also present the results of extensive experimental testing, in both sequence-based and genome-based frameworks. Through the feature-by-feature comparison and the experimental results, we show that our bootstrapping approach is on par with the classic phylogenetic bootstrap used in sequence-based reconstruction, and we establish the clear superiority of the classic bootstrap for sequence data and of our corresponding new approach for rearrangement data over proposed variants. Finally, we test our approach on a small dataset of mammalian genomes, verifying that the support values match current thinking about the respective branches. Conclusions Our method is the first to provide a standard of assessment to match that of the classic phylogenetic bootstrap for aligned sequences. Its

  2. Bootstrapping phylogenies inferred from rearrangement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu; Rajan, Vaibhav; Moret, Bernard Me

    2012-08-29

    Large-scale sequencing of genomes has enabled the inference of phylogenies based on the evolution of genomic architecture, under such events as rearrangements, duplications, and losses. Many evolutionary models and associated algorithms have been designed over the last few years and have found use in comparative genomics and phylogenetic inference. However, the assessment of phylogenies built from such data has not been properly addressed to date. The standard method used in sequence-based phylogenetic inference is the bootstrap, but it relies on a large number of homologous characters that can be resampled; yet in the case of rearrangements, the entire genome is a single character. Alternatives such as the jackknife suffer from the same problem, while likelihood tests cannot be applied in the absence of well established probabilistic models. We present a new approach to the assessment of distance-based phylogenetic inference from whole-genome data; our approach combines features of the jackknife and the bootstrap and remains nonparametric. For each feature of our method, we give an equivalent feature in the sequence-based framework; we also present the results of extensive experimental testing, in both sequence-based and genome-based frameworks. Through the feature-by-feature comparison and the experimental results, we show that our bootstrapping approach is on par with the classic phylogenetic bootstrap used in sequence-based reconstruction, and we establish the clear superiority of the classic bootstrap for sequence data and of our corresponding new approach for rearrangement data over proposed variants. Finally, we test our approach on a small dataset of mammalian genomes, verifying that the support values match current thinking about the respective branches. Our method is the first to provide a standard of assessment to match that of the classic phylogenetic bootstrap for aligned sequences. Its support values follow a similar scale and its receiver

  3. The prevalence of ALK rearrangement in pulmonary adenocarcinomas in an unselected Caucasian population from a defined catchment area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Birgit G; Clementsen, Paul; Larsen, Klaus R

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the prevalence of EML4-ALK rearrangement gene measured by immunohistochemistry in an unselected population-based consecutive cohort of patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung (ACL), and the correlation with smoking history, thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF1), gender and age...

  4. Detection of ROS1 rearrangement in non-small cell lung cancer: current and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi G

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Giulio Rossi,1 Genny Jocollé,2 Antonia Conti,3 Marcello Tiseo,4 Federica Zito Marino,5,6 Giovanni Donati,7 Renato Franco,5,6 Francesca Bono,8 Francesca Barbisan,9 Francesco Facchinetti4,10 1Pathology Unit, 2Oncology Unit, Azienda USL Valle d’Aosta, Regional Hospital “Parini”, Aosta, 3Medical Illustrator, Riccione, 4Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Parma, 5Pathology Unit, Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione G. Pascale, 6Pathology Unit, Luigi Vanvitelli University of Campania, Naples, 7Unit of Thoracic and Senology Surgery, Azienda USL Valle d’Aosta, Regional Hospital “Parini”, Aosta, 8Unit of Pathologic Anatomy, San Gerardo Hospital, IRCCS, Monza, 9Pathology Unit, University Hospital, Azienda Ospedali Riuniti, Ancona, Italy; 10INSERM, U981, Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus, Villejuif, France Abstract: ROS1 rearrangement characterizes a small subset (1%–2% of non-small cell lung cancer and is associated with slight/never smoking patients and adenocarcinoma histology. Identification of ROS1 rearrangement is mandatory to permit targeted therapy with specific inhibitors, demonstrating a significantly better survival when compared with conventional chemotherapy. Detection of ROS1 rearrangement is based on in situ (immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization and extractive non-in situ assays. While fluorescence in situ hybridization still represents the gold standard in clinical trials, this technique may fail to recognize rearrangements of ROS1 with some gene fusion partner. On the other hand, immunohistochemistry is the most cost-effective screening technique, but it seems to be characterized by low specificity. Extractive molecular assays are expensive and laborious methods, but they specifically recognize almost all ROS1 fusions using a limited amount of mRNA even from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissues. This review is a discussion on the present and futuristic diagnostic scenario of ROS1

  5. Gestalt Theory Rearranged: Back to Wertheimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberman, Shelia

    2017-01-01

    Wertheimer's seminal paper of 1923 was of gerat influence in psychology and other sciences. Wertheimer also emphasized the weaknesses of the newborn Gestalt theory: too many basic laws, and the ambiguity of definitions. At the same time, the paper contained potential solutions to these problems, in the form of a number of very important ideas, some of which were presented implicitly: perception through imitation, communicative nature of linear drawings and writings, transfer from the visual domain to motor domain, linguistic interpretation of the Gestalt. In this paper it will be shown that based on these ideas the Gestalt theory can be rearranged so that the main notions can be well defined, and the general principle of Gestalt perception, which overarches all known laws and unifies different Gestalt phenomena (the imitation principle) can be introduced. The presented model of Gestalt perception is supported by fundamental neurophysiological data-the mirror neurons phenomenon and simulation theory.

  6. Gestalt Theory Rearranged: Back to Wertheimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelia Guberman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wertheimer's seminal paper of 1923 was of gerat influence in psychology and other sciences. Wertheimer also emphasized the weaknesses of the newborn Gestalt theory: too many basic laws, and the ambiguity of definitions. At the same time, the paper contained potential solutions to these problems, in the form of a number of very important ideas, some of which were presented implicitly: perception through imitation, communicative nature of linear drawings and writings, transfer from the visual domain to motor domain, linguistic interpretation of the Gestalt. In this paper it will be shown that based on these ideas the Gestalt theory can be rearranged so that the main notions can be well defined, and the general principle of Gestalt perception, which overarches all known laws and unifies different Gestalt phenomena (the imitation principle can be introduced. The presented model of Gestalt perception is supported by fundamental neurophysiological data—the mirror neurons phenomenon and simulation theory.

  7. Example of an irreversible Smiles rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbarskii, V.L.; Goncharuk, A.P.; Orlova, E.Yu.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have found that N-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-N'-nitroethylenediamine is formed during the nitration of N-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)ethylenediamine with a sulfuric-nitric acid mixture. Since a primary aliphatic amino group is not usually nitrated under these conditions, the authors assumed that the N-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-N-nitroethylenediamine formed as a result of the reaction undergoes a Smiles rearrangement. In order to obtain evidence for the formation of the intermediate the authors dissolved the reagent in a mixture deuterosulfuric acid and nitrogen pentoxide and recorded the PMR spectrum of this solutions. The signal for the aromatic protons has a chemical shift typical of N,2,4,6-tetranitro-N-methylaniline

  8. Defects and Rearrangements in Disordered Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijtmans, Sven

    In this thesis, I will investigate the properties of disordered materials under strain. Disordered materials encompass a large variety of materials, including glasses, polymers, granular matter, dense colloids, and gels. There is currently no constitutive equation based on microscopic observables that describes these materials. Given the prevalence and usefulness of these materials, we derive tools to aid our understanding of them. We develop a new method to isolate localized defects from extended vibrational modes in disordered solids. This method augments particle interactions with an artificial potential that acts as a high-pass filter: it preserves small-scale structures while pushing extended vibrational modes to higher frequencies. The low-frequency modes that remain are ``bare" defects; they are exponentially localized without the quadrupolar tails associated with elastic interactions. We demonstrate that these localized excitations are excellent predictors of plastic rearrangements in the solid. We characterize several of the properties of these defects that appear in mesoscopic theories of plasticity, including their distribution of energy barriers, number density, and size, which is a first step in testing and revising continuum models for plasticity in disordered solids. We additionally study the properties of rearrangement types in 2D disordered packings of particles with a harmonic potential at a range of packing fractions above jamming. We develop a generalizable procedure that classifies events by stress drop, energy drop, and reversibility under two protocols. Somewhat surprisingly, we find a large population of contact change events that have no associated stress drop. Reversible events become more common at high pressures above a packing fraction of phi=0.865, at which point line reversible events are more common than loop reversible events. At low pressures, irreversible events are associated with spatially extended events, while at high

  9. Árni Magnússon's rearrangement of paper manuscripts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Beeke

    Árni Magnússon’s rearrangement of paper manuscripts draws attention to the early history of Árni Magnússon’s (1663-1730) manuscript collection. The thesis examines Árni’s extensive rearrangement of paper manuscripts, showing that he repeatedly altered the physical composition of codices in his...

  10. Constituent rearrangement model and large transverse momentum reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yuji; Imachi, Masahiro; Matsuoka, Takeo; Otsuki, Shoichiro; Sawada, Shoji.

    1978-01-01

    In this chapter, two models based on the constituent rearrangement picture for large p sub( t) phenomena are summarized. One is the quark-junction model, and the other is the correlating quark rearrangement model. Counting rules of the models apply to both two-body reactions and hadron productions. (author)

  11. Complete nucleotide sequence and gene rearrangement of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Engineering, Yokohama, Japan). The complete mtDNA se- quence of O. martensii reported in this paper was deposited in GenBank under the accession number GU177877. Molecular phylogenetic analyses. In an attempt to further confirm the phylogenetic rela- tions within Neobatrachia and the phylogenetic position of.

  12. DNA rearrangement events and rps3 gene transfer in pieces ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    samsung

    maintainer 2074B, and two different fertile F1 hybrids derived from both CMS lines with restorer line E5903 as plant materials (Li et al. 2013). 2074A, a CMS line with G. harknessii (D2-2) male-sterile cytoplasm, was bred by backcrossing the original sterile line DES-HAMS277 (Meyer 1975) more than 20 generations.

  13. Complete nucleotide sequence and gene rearrangement of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Species classification and sequence accession numbers of amphibian mt genomes used in phylogenetic analyses. Taxon. Species. Family. GenBank no. Archaeobatrachia. Bombina fortinuptialis. Bombinatoridae. AY458591. B. orientalis. Bombinatoridae. AY585338. B. variegata. Bombinatoridae. AY971143. B. maxima.

  14. DNA rearrangement events and rps3 gene transfer in pieces ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    samsung

    PPR_B_L1), radish (Rfo_PPR B), Arabidopsis (RPF1), petunia (Rf_PPR592), rice (Rf1a and. Rf1b)) were downloaded from .... Rf-PPR592 in petunia, Rfo in radish, RPF1 in Arabidopsis, Rf1a and Rf1b in rice (Bentolila et al. 2002; Brown et al. 2003 ...

  15. Complete nucleotide sequence and gene rearrangement of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mt) genome of the round-tongued floating frog, Occidozyga martensii was determined. Although, the base composition and codon usage of O. martensii conformed to the typical vertebrate patterns, this mt genome contained 23 tRNAs (a ...

  16. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Rearrangement in Digestive Tract Cancer: Implication for Targeted Therapy in Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Ying

    Full Text Available Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK rearrangements define a subgroup of lung cancer which is eligible to targeted kinase inhibition. The aim of this study is to observe the incidence rate of ALK fusion in a large cohort of Chinese digestive tract cancer patients.Tissue microarray (TMA was constructed from 808 digestive tract cancer cases, including 169 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 182 gastric cancer and 457 colorectal cancer (CRC cases. We tested all cases for ALK expression via a fully automated immunohistochemistry (IHC assay. The IHC-positive cases were subjected to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, target gene enrichment and sequencing for confirmation of ALK gene rearrangement and discovery of novel fusion partner.Among the tested cases, 2 (0.44% CRC cases showed positive both by IHC and FISH. By qRT-PCR, EML4-ALK fusion was found in one IHC-positive CRC case. In another IHC-positive CRC case, target gene enrichment and sequencing revealed ALK was fused to a novel partner, spectrin beta non-erythrocytic 1 (SPTBN1. One gastric cancer case showed partially positive IHC result, but no fusion was found by FISH and gene sequencing.The incidence rate of ALK gene fusion in Chinese CRC patients was 0.44%,but not detectable in gastric and esophageal cancers. The novel SPTBN1 -ALK fusion, together with other ALK fusion genes, may become a potential target for anti-ALK therapy.

  17. Development of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK inhibitors and molecular diagnosis in ALK rearrangement-positive lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwama E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Eiji Iwama,1,2 Isamu Okamoto,3 Taishi Harada,2 Koichi Takayama,2 Yoichi Nakanishi2,3 1Department of Comprehensive Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 2Research Institute for Diseases of the Chest, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3Center for Clinical and Translational Research, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan Abstract: The fusion of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK was identified as a transforming gene for lung cancer in 2007. This genetic rearrangement accounts for 2%–5% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cases, occurring predominantly in younger individuals with adenocarcinoma who are never- or light smokers. A small-molecule tyrosine-kinase inhibitor of ALK, crizotinib, was rapidly approved by the US Food and Drug Administration on the basis of its pronounced clinical activity in patients with ALK rearrangement-positive NSCLC. Next-generation ALK inhibitors, such as alectinib, LDK378, and AP26113, are also being developed in ongoing clinical trials. In addition, the improvement and validation of methods for the detection of ALK rearrangement in NSCLC patients will be key to the optimal clinical use of ALK inhibitors. We here summarize recent progress in the development of new ALK inhibitors and in the molecular diagnosis of ALK rearrangement-positive NSCLC. Keywords: ALK, rearrangement, NSCLC, ALK inhibitor, targeted therapy, diagnosis

  18. Context-based FISH localization of genomic rearrangements within chromosome 15q11.2q13 duplicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knoll Joan HM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Segmental duplicons (SDs predispose to an increased frequency of chromosomal rearrangements. These rearrangements can cause a diverse range of phenotypes due to haploinsufficiency, in cis positional effects or gene interruption. Genomic microarray analysis has revealed gene dosage changes adjacent to duplicons, but the high degree of similarity between duplicon sequences has confounded unequivocal assignment of chromosome breakpoints within these intervals. In this study, we localize rearrangements within duplicon-enriched regions of Angelman/Prader-Willi (AS/PWS syndrome chromosomal deletions with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Results Breakage intervals in AS deletions were localized recursively with short, coordinate-defined, single copy (SC and low copy (LC genomic FISH probes. These probes were initially coincident with duplicons and regions of previously reported breakage in AS/PWS. Subsequently, probes developed from adjacent genomic intervals more precisely delineated deletion breakage intervals involving genes, pseudogenes and duplicons in 15q11.2q13. The observed variability in the deletion boundaries within previously described Class I and Class II deletion AS samples is related to the local genomic architecture in this chromosomal region. Conclusions Chromosome 15 abnormalities associated with SDs were precisely delineated at a resolution equivalent to genomic Southern analysis. This context-dependent approach can define the boundaries of chromosome rearrangements for other genomic disorders associated with SDs.

  19. Cinteny: flexible analysis and visualization of synteny and genome rearrangements in multiple organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meller Jaroslaw

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying syntenic regions, i.e., blocks of genes or other markers with evolutionary conserved order, and quantifying evolutionary relatedness between genomes in terms of chromosomal rearrangements is one of the central goals in comparative genomics. However, the analysis of synteny and the resulting assessment of genome rearrangements are sensitive to the choice of a number of arbitrary parameters that affect the detection of synteny blocks. In particular, the choice of a set of markers and the effect of different aggregation strategies, which enable coarse graining of synteny blocks and exclusion of micro-rearrangements, need to be assessed. Therefore, existing tools and resources that facilitate identification, visualization and analysis of synteny need to be further improved to provide a flexible platform for such analysis, especially in the context of multiple genomes. Results We present a new tool, Cinteny, for fast identification and analysis of synteny with different sets of markers and various levels of coarse graining of syntenic blocks. Using Hannenhalli-Pevzner approach and its extensions, Cinteny also enables interactive determination of evolutionary relationships between genomes in terms of the number of rearrangements (the reversal distance. In particular, Cinteny provides: i integration of synteny browsing with assessment of evolutionary distances for multiple genomes; ii flexibility to adjust the parameters and re-compute the results on-the-fly; iii ability to work with user provided data, such as orthologous genes, sequence tags or other conserved markers. In addition, Cinteny provides many annotated mammalian, invertebrate and fungal genomes that are pre-loaded and available for analysis at http://cinteny.cchmc.org. Conclusion Cinteny allows one to automatically compare multiple genomes and perform sensitivity analysis for synteny block detection and for the subsequent computation of reversal distances

  20. Patients with ROS1 rearrangement?positive non?small?cell lung cancer benefit from pemetrexed?based chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Zhengbo; Su, Haiyan; Zhang, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract ROS1 gene?rearrangement in non?small?cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients has recently been identified as a driver gene and benefited from crizotinib treatment. However, no data are available for ROS1?positive NSCLC about chemotherapeutic options and prognostic data. We investigated pemetrexed?based treatment efficacy in ROS1 translocation NSCLC patients and determined the expression of thymidylate synthetase (TS) to provide a rationale for the efficacy results. We determined the ROS1 s...

  1. Nicotine affects protein complex rearrangement in Caenorhabditis elegans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobkowiak, Robert; Zielezinski, Andrzej; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Lesicki, Andrzej

    2017-10-01

    Nicotine may affect cell function by rearranging protein complexes. We aimed to determine nicotine-induced alterations of protein complexes in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) cells, thereby revealing links between nicotine exposure and protein complex modulation. We compared the proteomic alterations induced by low and high nicotine concentrations (0.01 mM and 1 mM) with the control (no nicotine) in vivo by using mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques, specifically the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) discontinuous gel electrophoresis coupled with liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS and spectral counting. As a result, we identified dozens of C. elegans proteins that are present exclusively or in higher abundance in either nicotine-treated or untreated worms. Based on these results, we report a possible network that captures the key protein components of nicotine-induced protein complexes and speculate how the different protein modules relate to their distinct physiological roles. Using functional annotation of detected proteins, we hypothesize that the identified complexes can modulate the energy metabolism and level of oxidative stress. These proteins can also be involved in modulation of gene expression and may be crucial in Alzheimer's disease. The findings reported in our study reveal putative intracellular interactions of many proteins with the cytoskeleton and may contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) signaling and trafficking in cells.

  2. t(X;17) as the sole karyotypic anomaly in a case of M(3r) subtype of acute promyelocytic leukemia without RARalpha rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan-Ping; Xu, Huan; Chen, Zhi-Mei; Tong, Xiang-Min; Qian, Wen-Bin; Jin, Jie

    2010-02-01

    We describe here a unique chromosomal abnormality found in a patient with M(3r) subtype of APL. Neither t(15;17) nor rearrangement of RARalpha was detected by routine R-banded chromosome as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis using PML/RARalpha dual-color dual-fusion translocation probe and RARalpha dual-color break apart rearrangement probe. Instead of the typical rearrangement between chromosomes 15 and 17, all cells analyzed had a translocation between X and 17 as the sole karyotypic anomaly. The translocation was conformed by whole chromosome painting (WCP) with painting probes of chromosomes X and 17. To our knowledge, this is the first documented APL with a novel translocation involving chromosomes X and 17 without RARalpha gene rearrangement. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Ligation-dependent RT-PCR: a new specific and low-cost technique to detect ALK, ROS, and RET rearrangements in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piton, Nicolas; Ruminy, Philippe; Gravet, Claire; Marchand, Vinciane; Colasse, Élodie; Lamy, Aude; Naoures Mear, Cécile Le; Bibeau, Fréderic; Marguet, Florent; Guisier, Florian; Salaün, Mathieu; Thiberville, Luc; Jardin, Fabrice; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe

    2018-03-01

    Detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), ROS proto-oncogene 1 (ROS1), and rearranged during transfection (RET) gene rearrangements in lung adenocarcinoma is usually performed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) screening followed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), which is an expensive and difficult technique. Ligation-dependent reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) multiplex technique can detect gene rearrangements using probes specifically hybridized to either side of the break point. PCR products are then sequenced by pyrosequencing or high throughput sequencing in order to identify the two genes involved. The reagent cost is <15 dollars per patient and results are available in 2 days. We have developed a 47-probe LD-RT-PCR kit especially for lung adenocarcinomas. Thirty-nine lung adenocarcinomas were studied: 24 ALK+, 14 ROS1+, and 1 RET+. ALK+ and ROS1+ were IHC+ (D5F3 Ventana for ALK and D4D6 Cell Signaling Technology for ROS1) and all cases were FISH+ (Vysis ALK Breakapart Probe Abbott for ALK, Zytolight SPEC ROS1 Dualcolor Breakapart Probe for ROS1 and Zytolight SPEC RET Dual Color Breakapart for RET); 14 wild type samples were included as negative controls. Using LD-RT-PCR, 15 rearrangements (63%) were detected in the ALK cases (gene partner: EML4 in all cases), 9 rearrangements (64%) in the ROS1 cases (gene partners: CD74 in 8 cases and SLC34A2 in 1 case) and 1 (100%) in the single RET case (gene partner: KIF5B). No rearrangement was found in the 14 negative control cases. Negative cases using LD-RT-PCR could be explained by the fact that some partner genes were not included in our assay and therefore could not be detected. Because it is an affordable, fast, and very simple technique, we propose using LD-RT-PCR when ALK immunostaining is positive. For LD-RT-PCR-negative cases, samples should then be analyzed by FISH.

  4. Deletional rearrangement in the human T-cell receptor α-chain locus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Villartay, J.P.; Lewis, D.; Hockett, R.; Waldmann, T.A.; Korsmeyer, S.J.; Cohen, D.I.

    1987-01-01

    The antigen-specific receptor on the surface of mature T lymphocytes is a heterodimer consisting of polypeptides termed α and β. In the course of characterizing human T-cell tumors with an immature (CD4 - , CD8 - ) surface phenotype, the authors detected a 2-kilobase α-related transcript. Analysis of cDNA clones corresponding to this transcript established that a genetic element (which they call TEA, for T early α) located between the α-chain variable- and joining-region genes had been spliced to the α constant region. The TEA transcript is present early in thymocyte ontogeny, and its expression declines during T-cell maturation. More important, the TEA area functions as an active site for rearrangement within the α gene locus. Blot hybridization of restriction enzyme-digested DNA with a TEA probe revealed a narrowly limited pattern of rearrangement in polyclonal thymic DNA, surprisingly different from the pattern expected for the mature α gene with its complex diversity. These DNA blots also showed that TEA is generally present in the germ-line configuration in cells expressing the γδ heterodimeric receptor and is deleted from mature (αβ-expressing) T-lymphocyte tumors and lines. Moreover, the TEA transcript lacked a long open reading frame for protein but instead possessed multiple copies of a repetitive element resembling those utilized in the heavy-chain class switch of the immunoglobulin genes. The temporal nature of the rearrangements and expression detected by TEA suggests that this recombination could mediate a transition between immature (γδ-expressing) T cells and mature (αβ-expressing) T cells

  5. Palindromic nucleotide analysis in human T cell receptor rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K Srivastava

    Full Text Available Diversity of T cell receptor (TCR genes is primarily generated by nucleotide insertions upon rearrangement from their germ line-encoded V, D and J segments. Nucleotide insertions at V-D and D-J junctions are random, but some small subsets of these insertions are exceptional, in that one to three base pairs inversely repeat the sequence of the germline DNA. These short complementary palindromic sequences are called P nucleotides. We apply the ImmunoSeq deep-sequencing assay to the third complementarity determining region (CDR3 of the β chain of T cell receptors, and use the resulting data to study P nucleotides in the repertoire of naïve and memory CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells. We estimate P nucleotide distributions in a cross section of healthy adults and different T cell subtypes. We show that P nucleotide frequency in all T cell subtypes ranges from 1% to 2%, and that the distribution is highly biased with respect to the coding end of the gene segment. Classification of observed palindromic sequences into P nucleotides using a maximum conditional probability model shows that single base P nucleotides are very rare in VDJ recombination; P nucleotides are primarily two bases long. To explore the role of P nucleotides in thymic selection, we compare P nucleotides in productive and non-productive sequences of CD8(+ naïve T cells. The naïve CD8(+ T cell clones with P nucleotides are more highly expanded.

  6. Simple and Rapid In Vivo Generation of Chromosomal Rearrangements using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael B. Blasco

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs for chromosomal translocations in the endogenous loci by a knockin strategy is lengthy and costly. The CRISPR/Cas9 system provides an innovative and flexible approach for genome engineering of genomic loci in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for engineering a specific chromosomal translocation in adult mice in vivo. We designed CRISPR/Cas9 lentiviral vectors to induce cleavage of the murine endogenous Eml4 and Alk loci in order to generate the Eml4-Alk gene rearrangement recurrently found in non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs. Intratracheal or intrapulmonary inoculation of lentiviruses induced Eml4-Alk gene rearrangement in lung cells in vivo. Genomic and mRNA sequencing confirmed the genome editing and the production of the Eml4-Alk fusion transcript. All mice developed Eml4-Alk-rearranged lung tumors 2 months after the inoculation, demonstrating that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a feasible and simple method for the generation of chromosomal rearrangements in vivo.

  7. Genome-wide sequencing for the identification of rearrangements associated with Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooper Sean D

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tourette Syndrome (TS is a neuropsychiatric disorder in children characterized by motor and verbal tics. Although several genes have been suggested in the etiology of TS, the genetic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Methods Using cytogenetics and FISH analysis, we identified an apparently balanced t(6,22(q16.2;p13 in a male patient with TS and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. In order to map the breakpoints and to identify additional submicroscopic rearrangements, we performed whole genome mate-pair sequencing and CGH-array analysis on DNA from the proband. Results Sequence and CGH array analysis revealed a 400 kb deletion located 1.3 Mb telomeric of the chromosome 6q breakpoint, which has not been reported in controls. The deletion affects three genes (GPR63, NDUFA4 and KLHL32 and overlaps a region previously found deleted in a girl with autistic features and speech delay. The proband’s mother, also a carrier of the translocation, was diagnosed with OCD and shares the deletion. We also describe a further potentially related rearrangement which, while unmapped in Homo sapiens, was consistent with the chimpanzee genome. Conclusions We conclude that genome-wide sequencing at relatively low resolution can be used for the identification of submicroscopic rearrangements. We also show that large rearrangements may escape detection using standard analysis of whole genome sequencing data. Our findings further provide a candidate region for TS and OCD on chromosome 6q16.

  8. Amplification and rearrangement of c-myc in radiation-induced murine osteosarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturm, S.A.; Strauss, P.G.; Adolph, S.; Hameister, H.; Erfle, V.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-one radiation-induced murine osteosarcomas were investigated for alterations in c-myc gene structure and c-myc expression. Amplification of c-myc was found in 30% of BALB/c tumors and 13% of NMRI tumors. A region of common proviral integration, Mlvi-1, localized on the same region on chromosome 15, was amplified concomitantly. Multiple copies of both loci were localized on double minutes. Three of the tumors with c-myc amplification also showed rearrangements of the c-myc gene region. One of these rearrangements included the 5' and 3'-flanking sequences and the noncoding part of the third exon. Repetitive sequences were found in the 5' region of the c-myc gene, and the 3' flanking region was substituted by sequences normally present in a more distant part of chromosome 15. Increased levels of c-myc transcripts of apparently normal size were found in tumors carrying amplified c-myc sequences. Abnormally high expression of c-myc in some tumors was correlated with an early stage of osteogenic differentiation, suggesting the involvement of the c-myc gene in the control of the osteogenic differentiation of transformed cells

  9. Chromosomal rearrangements and karyotype evolution in carnivores revealed by chromosome painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, W; Wang, J; Su, W; Wang, D; Tanomtong, A; Perelman, P L; Graphodatsky, A S; Yang, F

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal evolution in carnivores has been revisited extensively using cross-species chromosome painting. Painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of the domestic dog, which has one of the most rearranged karyotypes in mammals and the highest dipoid number (2n=78) in carnivores, are a powerful tool in detecting both evolutionary intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements. However, only a few comparative maps have been established between dog and other non-Canidae species. Here, we extended cross-species painting with dog probes to seven more species representing six carnivore families: Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), the stone marten (Martes foina), the small Indian civet (Viverricula indica), the Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphrodites), Javan mongoose (Hepestes javanicas), the raccoon (Procyon lotor) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The numbers and positions of intra-chromosomal rearrangements were found to differ among these carnivore species. A comparative map between human and stone marten, and a map among the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), stone marten and human were also established to facilitate outgroup comparison and to integrate comparative maps between stone marten and other carnivores with such maps between human and other species. These comparative maps give further insight into genome evolution and karyotype phylogenetic relationships among carnivores, and will facilitate the transfer of gene mapping data from human, domestic dog and cat to other species. PMID:22086079

  10. Nucleotide composition of CO1 sequences in Chelicerata (Arthropoda): detecting new mitogenomic rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Juliette; Judson, Mark L I; Deharveng, Louis; Lourenço, Wilson R; Cruaud, Corinne; Hassanin, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Here we study the evolution of nucleotide composition in third codon-positions of CO1 sequences of Chelicerata, using a phylogenetic framework, based on 180 taxa and three markers (CO1, 18S, and 28S rRNA; 5,218 nt). The analyses of nucleotide composition were also extended to all CO1 sequences of Chelicerata found in GenBank (1,701 taxa). The results show that most species of Chelicerata have a positive strand bias in CO1, i.e., in favor of C nucleotides, including all Amblypygi, Palpigradi, Ricinulei, Solifugae, Uropygi, and Xiphosura. However, several taxa show a negative strand bias, i.e., in favor of G nucleotides: all Scorpiones, Opisthothelae spiders and several taxa within Acari, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones, and Pycnogonida. Several reversals of strand-specific bias can be attributed to either a rearrangement of the control region or an inversion of a fragment containing the CO1 gene. Key taxa for which sequencing of complete mitochondrial genomes will be necessary to determine the origin and nature of mtDNA rearrangements involved in the reversals are identified. Acari, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones, and Pycnogonida were found to show a strong variability in nucleotide composition. In addition, both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes have been affected by higher substitution rates in Acari and Pseudoscorpiones. The results therefore indicate that these two orders are more liable to fix mutations of all types, including base substitutions, indels, and genomic rearrangements.

  11. Combinatorial aspects of genome rearrangements and haplotype networks

    OpenAIRE

    Labarre , Anthony

    2008-01-01

    The dissertation covers two problems motivated by computational biology: genome rearrangements, and haplotype networks. Genome rearrangement problems are a particular case of edit distance problems, where one seeks to transform two given objects into one another using as few operations as possible, with the additional constraint that the set of allowed operations is fixed beforehand; we are also interested in computing the corresponding distances between those objects, i.e. merely computing t...

  12. Synthesis of rearranged unsaturated drimane derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Domingos S. de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A full account to the preparation and application of three appropriately substituted vinylcyclohexenes (2,2-dimethyl-3-vinylcyclohex-3-en-1-ol, 2,2-dimethyl-3-vinylcyclohex-3-en-1-one and 3,3-dimethyl-2-vinylcyclohexene in thermal Diels-Alder reactions with alpha,beta-unsaturated esters (methyl tiglate and methyl angelate is given. This approach delivered the racemic synthesis of ten octalin derivatives bearing a rearranged drimane skeleton (4 diastereomers of 1-methoxycarbonyl-6-hydroxy-1,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1,2,3,5,6,7, 8,8a-octahydronaphthalene; 1-methoxycarbonyl-6-oxo-1,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydronaphthalene; 2-methoxycarbonyl-6-oxo-1,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1,2,3,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydronaphthalene; 3 diastereomers of 1-methoxycarbonyl-1,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1,2,3,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydronaphthalene and 2-methoxycarbonyl-1,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1,2,3,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydronaphthalene . Central synthetic features included preparation of enoltriflates by Stang's protocol and the successful palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction (Stille reaction of the triflate with the tri-n-butylvinylstannane. The octalins relative stereochemistry was unequivocally ascertained by spectroscopic methods and/or X-ray crystallography and these data now stand as useful tools to support the correct assignment of related natural products usually isolated in minute amounts.

  13. Chromogenic in situ hybridization is a reliable assay for detection of ALK rearrangements in adenocarcinomas of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Deml, Karl-Friedrich; Schmitz, Katja; Meiboom, Maren; Binot, Elke; Hauke, Sven; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Büttner, Reinhard

    2013-11-01

    Reliable detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements is a prerequisite for personalized treatment of lung cancer patients, as ALK rearrangements represent a predictive biomarker for the therapy with specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Currently, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is considered to be the standard method for assessing formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue for ALK inversions and translocations. However, FISH requires a specialized equipment, the signals fade rapidly and it is difficult to detect overall morphology and tumor heterogeneity. Chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) has been successfully introduced as an alternative test for the detection of several genetic aberrations. This study validates a newly developed ALK CISH assay by comparing FISH and CISH signal patterns in lung cancer samples with and without ALK rearrangements. One hundred adenocarcinomas of the lung were included in this study, among them 17 with known ALK rearrangement. FISH and CISH were carried out and evaluated according to the manufacturers' recommendations. For both assays, tumors were considered positive if ≥15% of tumor cells showed either isolated 3' signals or break-apart patterns or a combination of both. A subset of tumors was exemplarily examined by using a novel EML4 (echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4) CISH probe. Red, green and fusion CISH signals were clearcut and different signal patterns were easily recognized. The percentage of aberrant tumor cells was statistically highly correlated (PCISH. On the basis of 86 samples that were evaluable by ALK CISH, we found a 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity of this assay. Furthermore, EML4 rearrangements could be recognized by CISH. CISH is a highly reliable, sensitive and specific method for the detection of ALK gene rearrangements in pulmonary adenocarcinomas. Our results suggest that CISH might serve as a suitable alternative to FISH, which is the current gold

  14. The Stereochemical Course of the α-Hydroxyphosphonate-Phosphate Rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallitsch, Katharina; Roller, Alexander; Hammerschmidt, Friedrich

    2015-07-06

    The phosphonate-phosphate rearrangement is an isomerisation of α-hydroxyphosphonates bearing electron-withdrawing substituents at the α-carbon atom. We studied the stereochemical course of this rearrangement with respect to phosphorus. A set of four diastereomeric α-hydroxyphosphonates was prepared by a Pudovik reaction from two diastereomeric cyclic phosphites. The hydroxyphosphonates were separated and rearranged with Et3 N as base. In analogy to trichlorphon, which was the first reported compound undergoing this rearrangement. All four hydroxyphosphonates could be rearranged to 2,2-dichlorovinyl phosphates. Single-crystal X-ray structure analyses of the α-hydroxyphosphonates and the corresponding phosphates allowed us to show that the rearrangement proceeds with retention of configuration on the phosphorus atom. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  15. Inconsistent results in the analysis of ALK rearrangements in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, Johanna S. M.; Brunnström, Hans; Jabs, Verena; Edlund, Karolina; Jirström, Karin; Mindus, Stephanie; Fleur, Linnéa la; Pontén, Fredrik; Karlsson, Mats G.; Karlsson, Christina; Koyi, Hirsh; Brandén, Eva; Botling, Johan; Helenius, Gisela; Micke, Patrick; Svensson, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of targetable EML4-ALK fusion proteins has revolutionized the treatment of a minor subgroup of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Although fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is regarded as the gold standard for detection of ALK rearrangements, ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) is often used as screening tool in clinical practice. In order to unbiasedly analyze the diagnostic impact of such a screening strategy, we compared ALK IHC with ALK FISH in three large representative Swedish NSCLC cohorts incorporating clinical parameters and gene expression data. ALK rearrangements were detected using FISH on tissue microarrays (TMAs), including tissue from 851 NSCLC patients. In parallel, ALK protein expression was detected using IHC, applying the antibody clone D5F3 with two different protocols (the FDA approved Ventana CDx assay and our in house Dako IHC protocol). Gene expression microarray data (Affymetrix) was available for 194 patients. ALK rearrangements were detected in 1.7 % in the complete cohort and 2.0 % in the non-squamous cell carcinoma subgroup. ALK protein expression was observed in 1.8 and 1.4 % when applying the Ventana assay or the in house Dako protocol, respectively. The specificity and accuracy of IHC was high (> 98 %), while the sensitivity was between 69 % (Ventana) and 62 % (in house Dako protocol). Furthermore, only 67 % of the ALK IHC positive cases were positive with both IHC assays. Gene expression analysis revealed that 6/194 (3 %) tumors showed high ALK gene expression (≥ 6 AU) and of them only three were positive by either FISH or IHC. The overall frequency of ALK rearrangements based on FISH was lower than previously reported. The sensitivity of both IHC assays was low, and the concordance between the FISH and the IHC assays poor, questioning current strategies to screen with IHC prior to FISH or completely replace FISH by IHC. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2646-x) contains

  16. Myeloid neoplasm with prominent eosinophilia and PDGFRA rearrangement treated with imatinib mesylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Møller, Michael Boe

    2010-01-01

    The FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene is the most frequent genetic aberration in myeloid neoplasms associated with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRA, PDGFRB, or FGFR1. Affected patients in adult populations are very sensitive to imatinib therapy. Pediatric cases are rare and so far only one case...... of FIP1L1-PDGFRA positive disease has been reported. We report a 2-year-old female with a myeloid neoplasm associated with eosinophilia and rearrangement of PDGFRA. Treatment with imatinib resulted in complete and durable clinical, hematological, and molecular remission within 3 months after starting...

  17. Microsatellites mapping for non-model species with chromosomal rearrangement: a case study in the frog Quasipaa boulengeri (Anura: Dicroglossidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiuyun; Yuan, Siqi; Liu, Ya; Xia, Yun; Zeng, Xiaomao

    2017-08-01

    Gene mapping is an important resource for understanding the evolution of genes and cytogenetics. Model species with a known genetic map or genome sequence allow for the selection of genetic markers on a desired chromosome, while it is hard to locate these markers on chromosomes of non-model species without such references. A frog species, Quasipaa boulengeri, shows chromosomal rearrangement polymorphisms, making itself a fascinating model for chromosomal speciation mediated by suppressed recombination. However, no markers have been located on its rearranged chromosomes. We present a complete protocol to map microsatellites based on mechanical microdissection and chromosome amplification techniques. Following this protocol, we mapped 71 microsatellites of Q. boulengeri at the chromosome level. In total, eight loci were assigned to rearranged chromosomes, and the other 63 loci might attach to other chromosomes. These microsatellites could be used to compare the gene flow and verify the chromosomal suppressed recombination hypothesis in Q. boulengeri. This integrated protocol could be effectively used to map genes to chromosomes for non-model species.

  18. Clinicopathological characteristics and survival of ALK, ROS1 and RET rearrangements in non-adenocarcinoma non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhengbo; Yu, Xinmin; Zhang, Yiping

    2017-11-02

    ALK, ROS1 and RET rearrangements represent 3 most frequent fusion genes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Rearrangements of these 3 genes exist predominantly in lung adenocarcinoma while rarely in non-adenocarcinoma. Our objective was to explore the frequency, clinicopathological characteristics and survival of ALK, ROS1 and RET rearrangements in non-adenocarcinoma NSCLC patients. ALK, ROS1 and RET rearrangements were screened by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in patients with completely resected non-adenocarcinoma NSCLC. All positive samples were confirmed with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Survival analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank for comparison. A total of 385 patients underwent complete resection, including squamous cell carcinoma (n = 245), adenosquamous carcinoma (n = 85) and large cell carcinoma (n = 55). Twelve of them were identified as harboring fusion genes, including ALK (n = 7), ROS1 (n = 3) and RET (n = 2) rearrangements. The fusion frequencies of adenosquamous, squamous cell and large cell carcinomas were 8.2%, 1.6% and 1.8% respectively. Their median age was 49.5 y and 3 of them had a smoking history. No survival difference existed between fusion gene positive and negative patients (36.7 vs.50.2 months, P = 0.21). The frequencies of ALK, ROS1 and RET rearrangements are low in non-adenocarcinoma NSCLC patients. And their clinical characteristics are similar to those in lung adenocarcinoma. Fusions of the above 3 genes are not prognostic factor for non-adnocarcinoma NSCLC patients.

  19. Comparative mapping identifies the fusion point of an ancient mammalian X-autosomal rearrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, S.A.; Watson, J.M.; Spencer, J.A. [La Trobe Univ., Victoria (Australia)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Previous comparisons of gene location in the three major groups of mammals (eutherians, marsupials, and monotremes) have suggested that the long arm of the human X represents the ancestral mammalian X chromosome, whereas the short arm represents an autosomal region(s) recently added to the eutherian X chromosome. To identify the fusion point of this ancient X-autosome rearrangement, we have mapped four genes, three of which map near the centromere of the human Xp, in marsupials and in a monotreme. We found that ARAF1, and GATA1 are located on the X chromosome in marsupials, and ALA2 and GATA1 are also located on the X in the platypus. This implies that the proximal short arm of the human X chromosome, including the centromere, was part of the ancestral mammalian X chromosome. The fusion point between the conserved region and the recently added regions therefore maps to human Xp11.23, although gene order on the human X indicates that there has been some rearrangement of this region. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Suppression of gross chromosomal rearrangements by a new alternative replication factor C complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Soma; Sikdar, Nilabja; Myung, Kyungjae

    2007-01-01

    Defects in DNA replication fidelity lead to genomic instability. Gross chromosomal rearrangement (GCR), a type of genomic instability, is highly enhanced by various initial mutations affecting DNA replication. Frequent observations of GCRs in many cancers strongly argue the importance of maintaining high fidelity of DNA replication to suppress carcinogenesis. Recent genome wide screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified a new GCR suppressor gene, ELG1, enhanced level of genome instability gene 1. Its physical interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and complex formation with Rfc2-5p proteins suggest that Elg1 functions to load/unload PCNA onto DNA during a certain DNA metabolism. High level of DNA damage accumulation and enhanced phenotypes with mutations in genes involved in cell cycle checkpoints, homologous recombination (HR), or chromatin assembly in the elg1 strain suggest that Elg1p-Rfc2-5p functions in a fundamental DNA metabolism to suppress genomic instability

  1. Divergence of RNA polymerase α subunits in angiosperm plastid genomes is mediated by genomic rearrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazier, J. Chris; Ruhlman, Tracey A.; Weng, Mao-Lun; Rehman, Sumaiyah K.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Genes for the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) persist in the plastid genomes of all photosynthetic angiosperms. However, three unrelated lineages (Annonaceae, Passifloraceae and Geraniaceae) have been identified with unusually divergent open reading frames (ORFs) in the conserved region of rpoA, the gene encoding the PEP α subunit. We used sequence-based approaches to evaluate whether these genes retain function. Both gene sequences and complete plastid genome sequences were assembled and analyzed from each of the three angiosperm families. Multiple lines of evidence indicated that the rpoA sequences are likely functional despite retaining as low as 30% nucleotide sequence identity with rpoA genes from outgroups in the same angiosperm order. The ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions indicated that these genes are under purifying selection, and bioinformatic prediction of conserved domains indicated that functional domains are preserved. One of the lineages (Pelargonium, Geraniaceae) contains species with multiple rpoA-like ORFs that show evidence of ongoing inter-paralog gene conversion. The plastid genomes containing these divergent rpoA genes have experienced extensive structural rearrangement, including large expansions of the inverted repeat. We propose that illegitimate recombination, not positive selection, has driven the divergence of rpoA. PMID:27087667

  2. Ionizing radiation sensitivity and the rate of gross chromosomal rearrangement in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.A.; Brown, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Many of the genes conferring resistance to DNA damage in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been identified. The systematic deletion of every open reading frame presents the opportunity to make great strides in determining the physiological role of many genes whose function has remained elusive. The ability to discriminate among all of the strains carrying unique non-essential gene deletions in a pool has allowed us to screen for novel genes required for survival to ionizing radiation. Many of these genes have not yet been characterized. A possible role for these genes could be in the initial sensing of the double strand break introduced by ionizing radiation, the cell cycle arrest permitting the cell time for the repair process, or directly in the repair. A consequence of a failure of any of these functions could result in an increase in mutation rate as well the more detrimental gross chromosomal rearrangement (GCR). We tested the hypothesis that any gene which when deleted caused an increase in ionizing radiation sensitivity would also demonstrate an increase in mutation rate and GCR. This turned out not to be the case with many having no significant increase and one in particular which caused a significant decrease in GCR. Data on several of the more intriguing genes will be presented

  3. Molecular characterization of minor gene rearrangements in Finnish patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia: Identification of two common missense mutations (Gly823{r_arrow}Asp and Leu380{r_arrow}His) and eight rare mutations of the LDL receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivisto, U.M.; Viikari, J.S.; Kontula, K. [Univ. of Turku, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-10-01

    Two deletions of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene were previously shown to account for about two thirds of all mutations causing familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in Finland. We screened the DNA samples from a cohort representing the remaining 30% of Finnish heterozygous FH patients by amplifying all the 18 exons of the receptor gene by PCR and searching for DNA variations with the SSCP technique. Ten novel mutations were identified, comprising two nonsense and seven missense mutations as well as one frameshift mutation caused by a 13-bp deletion. A single nucleotide change, substituting adenine for guanidine at position 2533 and resulting in an amino acid change of glycine to aspartic acid at codon 823, was found in DNA samples from 14 unrelated FH probands. This mutation (FH-Turku) affects the sequence encoding the putative basolateral sorting signal of the LDL receptor protein; however, the exact functional consequences of this mutation are yet to be examined. The FH-Turku gene and another point mutation (Leu380{r_arrow}His or FH-Pori) together account for {approximately}8% of the FH-causing genes in Finland and are particularly common among FH patients from the southwestern part of the country (combined, 30%). Primer-introduced restriction analysis was applied for convenient assay of the FH-Turku and FH-Pori point mutations. In conclusion, this paper demonstrates the unique genetic background of FH in Finland and describes a commonly occurring FH gene with a missense mutation closest to the C terminus thus far reported. 32 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Phenotypic changes in Cyprinus carpiovar var. Jian introduced by sperm-mediated transgenesis of rearranged homologous DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zheming; Ding, Weidong; Ren, Hongtao

    2013-09-01

    Common carp, specifically the Jian variety (Cyprinus carpiovar var. Jian), is an important Chinese and global aquatic stock for commercial foodstuff. Homologous recombination of carp gene sequences has been widely used in population genetics to broadly screen for beneficial phenotypical variations, thus optimizing artificially engineered carp stocks with Jian variety and native stock varieties. Random rearrangement of homologous DNA fragments from parent specimens of C. carpiovar var. Jian were attained by digestion of genomic DNA with MspI followed by religation and redigestion with EcoR I to specifically rearrange homologous DNA fragments of myostatin and microsatellite genes. Based on known characteristics of myostatin gene function, growth pattern changes in resultant carp mutant varieties was expected. DNA fragments were introduced into metaphase-II oocytes, resulting in one to several dozen insertions of homologous fragments into the host genome by sperm-mediated transgenesis. Introduction of rearranged homologous DNA fragments often resulted in phenotypic changes in C. carpiovar var. Jian, including significant phenotypic changes linked to growth rate at 4 months.

  5. Cell Division Drives Epithelial Cell Rearrangements during Gastrulation in Chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmino, Joao; Rocancourt, Didier; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Moreau, Chloe; Gros, Jerome

    2016-02-08

    During early embryonic development, cells are organized as cohesive epithelial sheets that are continuously growing and remodeled without losing their integrity, giving rise to a wide array of tissue shapes. Here, using live imaging in chick embryo, we investigate how epithelial cells rearrange during gastrulation. We find that cell division is a major rearrangement driver that powers dramatic epithelial cell intercalation events. We show that these cell division-mediated intercalations, which represent the majority of epithelial rearrangements within the early embryo, are absolutely necessary for the spatial patterning of gastrulation movements. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these intercalation events result from overall low cortical actomyosin accumulation within the epithelial cells of the embryo, which enables dividing cells to remodel junctions in their vicinity. These findings uncover a role for cell division as coordinator of epithelial growth and remodeling that might underlie various developmental, homeostatic, or pathological processes in amniotes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genomic rearrangements of PTEN in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopheap ePhin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The phosphatase and tensin homolog gene on chromosome 10q23.3 (PTEN is a negative regulator of the PIK3/Akt survival pathway and is the most frequently deleted tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer. Monoallelic loss of PTEN is present in up to 60% of localized prostate cancers and complete loss of PTEN in prostate cancer is linked to metastasis and androgen independent progression. Studies on the genomic status of PTEN in prostate cancer initially used a two-color fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH assay for PTEN copy number detection in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue preparations. More recently, a four-color FISH assay containing two additional control probes flanking the PTEN locus with a lower false-positive rate was reported. Combined with the detection of other critical genomic biomarkers for prostate cancer such as ERG, AR, and MYC, the evaluation of PTEN genomic status has proven to be invaluable for patient stratification and management. Although less frequent than allelic deletions, point mutations in the gene and epigenetic silencing are also known to contribute to loss of PTEN function, and ultimately to prostate cancer initiation. Overall, it is clear that PTEN is a powerful biomarker for prostate cancer. Used as a companion diagnostic for emerging therapeutic drugs, FISH analysis of PTEN is promisingly moving human prostate cancer closer to more effective cancer management and therapies.

  7. Requirement for CDK6 in MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placke, Theresa; Faber, Katrin; Nonami, Atsushi; Putwain, Sarah L; Salih, Helmut R; Heidel, Florian H; Krämer, Alwin; Root, David E; Barbie, David A; Krivtsov, Andrei V; Armstrong, Scott A; Hahn, William C; Huntly, Brian J; Sykes, Stephen M; Milsom, Michael D; Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan

    2014-07-03

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving the H3K4 methyltransferase mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) trigger aberrant gene expression in hematopoietic progenitors and give rise to an aggressive subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Insights into MLL fusion-mediated leukemogenesis have not yet translated into better therapies because MLL is difficult to target directly, and the identity of the genes downstream of MLL whose altered transcription mediates leukemic transformation are poorly annotated. We used a functional genetic approach to uncover that AML cells driven by MLL-AF9 are exceptionally reliant on the cell-cycle regulator CDK6, but not its functional homolog CDK4, and that the preferential growth inhibition induced by CDK6 depletion is mediated through enhanced myeloid differentiation. CDK6 essentiality is also evident in AML cells harboring alternate MLL fusions and a mouse model of MLL-AF9-driven leukemia and can be ascribed to transcriptional activation of CDK6 by mutant MLL. Importantly, the context-dependent effects of lowering CDK6 expression are closely phenocopied by a small-molecule CDK6 inhibitor currently in clinical development. These data identify CDK6 as critical effector of MLL fusions in leukemogenesis that might be targeted to overcome the differentiation block associated with MLL-rearranged AML, and underscore that cell-cycle regulators may have distinct, noncanonical, and nonredundant functions in different contexts. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  8. Effects of chromosomal rearrangements on the zeste-white interaction in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolik-Utlaut, S.M.; Gelbart, W.M.

    1987-01-01

    Three gene systems have been shown to exhibit proximity-dependent phenotypes in Drosophila melanogaster; bithorax (BX-C), decapentaplegic (DPP-C) and white (w). In structurally homozygous genotypes, specific allelic combinations at these loci exhibit one phenotype, while in certain rearrangement heterozygotes the same allelic combinations exhibit dramatically different phenotypes. The genetic properties of the proximity-dependent allelic complementation (termed transvection effects) at the BX-C and DPP-C, are quite similar. As determined by cytogenetic analysis of transvection-disrupting rearrangements, the critical regions for the BX-C and DDP-C transvection effects extend proximally from these loci for several hundred polytene chromosome bands. The interaction between the zeste and white loci appears to depend upon the proximity of the two w + alleles. By use of insertional duplications, displacement of w + homologues has been shown to interfere with the zeste-white interaction. In this report, the authors investigate the basis for the difference in the size of the BX-C and DPP-C critical regions from that of white using a 137 Cs-mutagenesis procedure. The authors test and eliminate the possibility that the difference is due to evidence strongly suggests that the zeste-white interaction is, at the phenotypic level, much less sensitive to displacement of the homologous genes than is transvection at either the BX-C or DPP-C. Given these results, they suggest that the zeste-white interaction and transvection are two different proximity-dependent phenomena

  9. Ultrafast infrared studies of complex ligand rearrangements in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, Christine K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The complete description of a chemical reaction in solution depends upon an understanding of the reactive molecule as well as its interactions with the surrounding solvent molecules. Using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy it is possible to observe both the solute-solvent interactions and the rearrangement steps which determine the overall course of a chemical reaction. The topics addressed in these studies focus on reaction mechanisms which require the rearrangement of complex ligands and the spectroscopic techniques necessary for the determination of these mechanisms. Ligand rearrangement is studied by considering two different reaction mechanisms for which the rearrangement of a complex ligand constitutes the most important step of the reaction. The first system concerns the rearrangement of a cyclopentadienyl ring as the response of an organometallic complex to a loss of electron density. This mechanism, commonly referred to as ''ring slip'', is frequently cited to explain reaction mechanisms. However, the ring slipped intermediate is too short-lived to be observed using conventional methods. Using a combination of ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations it has been shown that the intermediate exists, but does not form an eighteen-electron intermediate as suggested by traditional molecular orbital models. The second example examines the initial steps of alkyne polymerization. Group 6 (Cr, Mo, W) pentacarbonyl species are generated photolytically and used to catalyze the polymerization of unsaturated hydrocarbons through a series of coordination and rearrangement steps. Observing this reaction on the femto- to millisecond timescale indicates that the initial coordination of an alkyne solvent molecule to the metal center results in a stable intermediate that does not rearrange to form the polymer precursor. This suggests that polymerization requires the dissociation of additional carbonyl ligands before

  10. Cytoskeletal rearrangements in synovial fibroblasts as a novel pathophysiological determinant of modeled rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis Aidinis

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a high prevalence and substantial socioeconomic burden. Despite intense research efforts, its aetiology and pathogenesis remain poorly understood. To identify novel genes and/or cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, we utilized a well-recognized tumour necrosis factor-driven animal model of this disease and performed high-throughput expression profiling with subtractive cDNA libraries and oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations, coupled with independent statistical analysis. This twin approach was validated by a number of different methods in other animal models of arthritis as well as in human patient samples, thus creating a unique list of disease modifiers of potential therapeutic value. Importantly, and through the integration of genetic linkage analysis and Gene Ontology-assisted functional discovery, we identified the gelsolin-driven synovial fibroblast cytoskeletal rearrangements as a novel pathophysiological determinant of the disease.

  11. Detection and precise mapping of germline rearrangements in BRCA1, BRCA2, MSH2, and MLH1 using zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staaf, Johan; Törngren, Therese; Rambech, Eva

    2008-01-01

    deletions or duplications occurring in BRCA1 (n=11), BRCA2 (n=2), MSH2 (n=7), or MLH1 (n=9). Additionally, we demonstrate its applicability for uncovering complex somatic rearrangements, exemplified by zoom-in analysis of the PTEN and CDKN2A loci in breast cancer cells. The sizes of rearrangements ranged...... of primers for sequence determination of the breakpoints. The array platform can be streamlined for a particular application, e.g., focusing on breast cancer susceptibility genes, with increased capacity using multiformat design, and represents a valuable new tool and complement for genetic screening...

  12. Somatic structural rearrangements in genetically engineered mouse mammary tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varela, I.; Klijn, C.N.; Stephens, P.J.; Mudie, L.J.; Stebbings, L.; Galappaththige, D.; Van der Gulden, H.; Schut, E.; Klarenbeek, S.; Campbell, P.J.; Wessels, L.F.A.; Stratton, M.R.; Jonkers, J.; Futreal, P.A.; Adams, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Here we present the first paired-end sequencing of tumors from genetically engineered mouse models of cancer to determine how faithfully these models recapitulate the landscape of somatic rearrangements found in human tumors. These were models of Trp53-mutated breast cancer, Brca1- and

  13. Triflic Anhydride-Mediated Beckmann Rearrangement Reaction of Β ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 128; Issue 6. Triflic Anhydride-Mediated Beckmann Rearrangement Reaction of Β-Oximyl Amides: Access to 5-Iminooxazolines. MANGFEI YU QIAN ZHANG JIA WANG PENG HUANG PENGFEI YAN RUI ZHANG DEWEN DONG. Regular Article Volume 128 Issue 6 ...

  14. Screening for genomic rearrangements at BRCA1 locus in Iranian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 92; Issue 1. Screening for genomic rearrangements at BRCA1 locus in Iranian women with breast cancer using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Vahid R. Yassaee Babak Emamalizadeh Mir Davood Omrani. Research Note Volume 92 Issue 1 ...

  15. Screening for genomic rearrangements at BRCA1 locus in Iranian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Despite advances in cancer biology, breast cancer is presently the second most common cause of cancer death all over the world (Marcus et al. 1996; Parker et al. 1997). Genetic factors play major role in development of breast cancer. It has been proved recently that large genomic rearrangements account for a substantial ...

  16. Conjugated polyaniline as a result of the benzidine rearrangement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sapurina, Irina; Tenkovtsev, A. V.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 4 (2015), s. 453-465 ISSN 0959-8103 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14199; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00270S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : aniline * aniline oligomers * benzidine rearrangement Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.414, year: 2015

  17. Continuous rearrangement and symmetry of solutions of elliptic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nonnegative solutions of some semilinear elliptic problems in symmetric domains satisfy a weak, `local' kind .... This type of continuous rearrangement can be used to prove the symmetry of local minimizers for certain .... of functions u P LpЕΩЖ having generalized partial derivatives uxi P LpЕΩЖ, i И 1Y ... Y n, and we write.

  18. Frequent Chromatin Rearrangements in Myelodysplastic Syndromes - What Stands Behind?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pagáčová, Eva; Falk, Martin; Falková, Iva; Lukášová, Emilie; Michalová, K.; Oltová, A.; Raška, I.; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2014 (2014), s. 1-7 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G157; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : myelodysplastic syndromes * chromosomal rearrangements * chromosome 5 deletions Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  19. Novel tumorigenic rearrangement, {delta}rfp/ret, in a papillary thyroid carcinoma from externally irradiated patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenko, Vladimir; Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Shimizu-Yoshida, Yuki; Abrosimov, Aleksandr; Lushnikov, Eugeny; Roumiantsev, Pavel; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Nakashima, Masahiro; Meirmanov, Serik; Ohtsuru, Akira; Namba, Hiroyuki; Tsyb, Anatoly; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2003-06-19

    Molecular analysis of cDNA derived from a papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) (follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma on histology) which developed in an externally irradiated patient 4 years after exposure identified a portion of the 5' region, exons 1-3, of the rfp gene juxtaposed upstream of the fragment encoding the tyrosine kinase (TK) domain of the ret gene. The fusion gene, termed {delta}rfp/ret, was the result of a balanced chromosomal translocation t(6;10) (p21.3;q11.2) confirmed by interphase FISH painting, with breakpoints occurring in introns 3 and 11 of the rfp and ret genes, respectively. Both {delta}rfp/ret and reciprocal ret/rfp chimeric introns had small deletions around breakpoints consistent with presumed misrepair of a radiation-induced double-strand DNA break underlying the rearrangement. No extensive sequence homology was found between the fragments flanking the breakpoints. The fusion protein retained the propensity to form oligomers likely to be mediated by a coiled-coil of the RFP polypeptide as assessed by a yeast two-hybrid system. NIH 3T3 fibroblasts stably transfected with a mammalian expression vector encoding full-length {delta}RFP/RET readily gave rise to the tumors in athymic mice suggestive of high transforming potential of the fusion protein. Thus, the {delta}rfp/ret rearrangement may be causatively involved in cancerogenesis and provides additional evidence of the role of activated ret oncogene in the development of a subset of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  20. Genome rearrangements detected by SNP microarrays in individuals with intellectual disability referred with possible Williams syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel M Pani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual disability (ID affects 2-3% of the population and may occur with or without multiple congenital anomalies (MCA or other medical conditions. Established genetic syndromes and visible chromosome abnormalities account for a substantial percentage of ID diagnoses, although for approximately 50% the molecular etiology is unknown. Individuals with features suggestive of various syndromes but lacking their associated genetic anomalies pose a formidable clinical challenge. With the advent of microarray techniques, submicroscopic genome alterations not associated with known syndromes are emerging as a significant cause of ID and MCA.High-density SNP microarrays were used to determine genome wide copy number in 42 individuals: 7 with confirmed alterations in the WS region but atypical clinical phenotypes, 31 with ID and/or MCA, and 4 controls. One individual from the first group had the most telomeric gene in the WS critical region deleted along with 2 Mb of flanking sequence. A second person had the classic WS deletion and a rearrangement on chromosome 5p within the Cri du Chat syndrome (OMIM:123450 region. Six individuals from the ID/MCA group had large rearrangements (3 deletions, 3 duplications, one of whom had a large inversion associated with a deletion that was not detected by the SNP arrays.Combining SNP microarray analyses and qPCR allowed us to clone and sequence 21 deletion breakpoints in individuals with atypical deletions in the WS region and/or ID or MCA. Comparison of these breakpoints to databases of genomic variation revealed that 52% occurred in regions harboring structural variants in the general population. For two probands the genomic alterations were flanked by segmental duplications, which frequently mediate recurrent genome rearrangements; these may represent new genomic disorders. While SNP arrays and related technologies can identify potentially pathogenic deletions and duplications, obtaining sequence information

  1. The genomic distribution of intraspecific and interspecific sequence divergence of human segmental duplications relative to human/chimpanzee chromosomal rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichler Evan E

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that chromosomal rearrangements harbor the molecular footprint of the biological phenomena which they induce, in the form, for instance, of changes in the sequence divergence rates of linked genes. So far, all the studies of these potential associations have focused on the relationship between structural changes and the rates of evolution of single-copy DNA and have tried to exclude segmental duplications (SDs. This is paradoxical, since SDs are one of the primary forces driving the evolution of structure and function in our genomes and have been linked not only with novel genes acquiring new functions, but also with overall higher DNA sequence divergence and major chromosomal rearrangements. Results Here we take the opposite view and focus on SDs. We analyze several of the features of SDs, including the rates of intraspecific divergence between paralogous copies of human SDs and of interspecific divergence between human SDs and chimpanzee DNA. We study how divergence measures relate to chromosomal rearrangements, while considering other factors that affect evolutionary rates in single copy DNA. Conclusion We find that interspecific SD divergence behaves similarly to divergence of single-copy DNA. In contrast, old and recent paralogous copies of SDs do present different patterns of intraspecific divergence. Also, we show that some relatively recent SDs accumulate in regions that carry inversions in sister lineages.

  2. [Lung adenocarcinoma with concomitant EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliez, J; Monnet, I; Pujals, A; Rousseau-Bussac, G; Jabot, L; Boudjemaa, A; Leroy, K; Chouaid, C

    2017-05-01

    Among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, coexistence of EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement is rare. We describe the clinical features of two patients with this double anomaly. A 62-year-old Caucasian non-smoking woman was diagnosed with cT4N0M0 lung adenocarcinoma. Initial biopsy showed EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement. She received cisplatin-gemcitabine, followed by 17 months of gemcitabine. Owing to progression, she received erlotinib for 14 months, then paclitaxel for 6 months and finally crizotinib. A partial response was achieved and maintained for 24 months. A 45-year-old Caucasian woman, light smoker, was diagnosed with cT2N3M0 lung adenocarcinoma. Only EGFR mutation was found on initial analysis. She underwent treatment with cisplatin-gemcitabine and thoracic radiotherapy. Progression occurred after 8 months and afatinbib was started. Eight months later, progression was observed with a neoplasic pleural effusion in which tumor cells expressing ALK rearrangement were found. A new FISH analysis was performed on the initial tumor but did not find this rearrangement. Despite a third line of crizotinib, the patient died one month later. The literature shows 45 other cases of these two abnormalities, observed either from the start or during follow-up. EGFR's TKI were almost always given before ALK's TKI. Therapeutic strategy needs to be clarified in cases of double alteration. With regard to the second patient, appearance of ALK rearrangement may constitute a resistance mechanism to EGFR's TKI. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Nuclear structure in cold rearrangement processes in fission and fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armbruster, P.

    1998-11-01

    In fission and fusion of heavy nuclei large numbers of nucleons are rearranged at a scale of excitation energy very small compared to the binding energy of the nuclei. The energies involved are less than 40 MeV at nuclear temperatures below 1.5 MeV. The shapes of the configurations in the rearrangement of a binary system into a monosystem in fusion, or vice versa in fission, change their elongations by as much as 8 fm, the radius of the monosystem. The dynamics of the reactions macroscopically described by a potential energy surface, inertia parameters, dissipation, and a collision energy is strongly modified by the nuclear structure of the participating nuclei. Experiments showing nuclear structure effects in fusion and fission of the heaviest nuclei are reviewed. The reaction kinematics and the multitude of isotopes involved are investigated by detector techniques and by recoil spectrometers. The advancement of the latter allows to find very small reaction branches in the range of 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -10}. The experiments reveal nuclear structure effects in all stages of the rearrangement processes. These are discussed pointing to analogies in fusion and fission on the microscopic scale, notwithstanding that both processes macroscopically are irreversible. Heavy clusters, as 132Sn, 208Pb, nuclei with closed shell configurations N=82,126, Z=50,82 survive in large parts of the nuclear rearrangement. They determine the asymmetry in the mass distribution of low energy fission, and they allow to synthesise superheavy elements, until now up to element 112. Experiments on the cold rearrangement in fission and fusion are presented. Here, in the range of excitation energies below 12 MeV the phenomena are observed most convincingly. (orig.)

  4. Fine-tiling array CGH to improve diagnostics for alpha- and beta-thalassemia rearrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phylipsen, M.; Chaibunruang, A.; Vogelaar, I.P.; Balak, J.R.; Schaap, R.A.; Ariyurek, Y.; Fucharoen, S.; den Dunnen, J.T.; Giordano, P.C.; Bakker, E.; Harteveld, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for thalassemia causing deletions has lead to the detection of new rearrangements. Knowledge of the exact breakpoint sequences should give more insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying these rearrangements, and would

  5. Classic theory for chromosome rearrangements with spatially restricted volume for broken ends interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omel'yanchuk, L.V.

    1997-01-01

    D. Lea classic theory for chromosomal rearrangements formation was modified to account for local interaction of broken chromosome ends. This assumption makes it possible to drastically improve coincidence of the theory and experiment in the case of complex rearrangements

  6. Ligand flexibility and framework rearrangement in a new family of porous metal-organic frameworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawxwell, Samuel M; Espallargas, Guillermo Mínguez; Bradshaw, Darren

    2007-01-01

    Ligand flexibility permits framework rearrangement upon evacuation and gas uptake in a new family of porous MOFs.......Ligand flexibility permits framework rearrangement upon evacuation and gas uptake in a new family of porous MOFs....

  7. Targeting brain metastases in ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Isabella; Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Palmer, Joshua D; Mehra, Ranee; Lu, Bo

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of brain metastases has increased as a result of improved systemic control and advances in imaging. However, development of novel therapeutics with CNS activity has not advanced at the same rate. Research on molecular markers has revealed many potential targets for antineoplastic agents, and a particularly important aberration is translocation in the ALK gene, identified in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ALK inhibitors have shown systemic efficacy against ALK-rearranged NSCLC in many clinical trials, but the effectiveness of crizotinib in CNS disease is limited by poor blood-brain barrier penetration and acquired drug resistance. In this Review, we discuss potential pathways to target ALK-rearranged brain metastases, including next generation ALK inhibitors with greater CNS penetration and mechanisms to overcome resistance. Other important mechanisms to control CNS disease include targeting pathways downstream of ALK phosphorylation, increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, modifying the tumour microenvironment, and adding concurrent radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The role of mitochondrial DNA rearrangements in aging and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiewacz, H D; Hermanns, J

    1992-12-01

    Instabilities and point mutations of the high molecular weight mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were shown to be correlated with various degenerative processes in both lower eukaryotes as well as in mammals. In filamentous fungi, circular and linear plasmids were demonstrated to be involved in mtDNA rearrangements and in the genetic control of senescence. In addition, in these eukaryotic microorganisms, which have proved to be ideal model systems in experimental gerontology, a number of nuclear genes were identified controlling the stability of the mitochondrial genome. Although the mitochondrial genome of mammals, including humans, appears to be quite stable in comparison to other species, mtDNA instabilities of the type described in fungi were observed in mitochondria of patients with different mitochondrial degenerative disorders (CPEO, KSS, Pearson syndrome, LHON, MERRF, MELAS). It was later demonstrated that such mtDNA rearrangements appear to accumulate progressively during aging in human subjects. These data suggest that instabilities of the mitochondrial genome may play an important role in the control of life span not only in lower eukaryotes, but also in humans.

  9. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  10. Evaluation of ALK rearrangement in Chinese non-small cell lung cancer using FISH, immunohistochemistry, and real-time quantitative RT- PCR on paraffin-embedded tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Patients with ALK gene rearrangements often manifest dramatic responses to crizotinib, an ALK inhibitor. Accurate identification of patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is essential for the clinical application of ALK-targeted therapy. However, assessing EML4-ALK rearrangement in NSCLC remains challenging in routine pathology practice. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of FISH, immunohistochemistry (IHC, and real-time quantitative RT-PCR (QPCR methodologies for detection of EML4-ALK rearrangement in NSCLC and to appraise immunohistochemistry as a pre-screening tool. In this study, a total of 473 paraffin-embedded NSCLC samples from surgical resections and biopsies were analyzed by IHC with ALK antibody. ALK rearrangement was further confirmed by FISH and QPCR. ALK protein expression was detected in twenty patients (20/473, 4.2%. Of the 20 ALK-positive cases by IHC, 15 cases were further confirmed as ALK rearrangement by FISH, and 5 cases were not interpretable. Also, we evaluated 13 out of the 20 IHC-positive tissues by QPCR in additional to FISH, and found that 9 cases were positive and 2 cases were equivocal, whereas 2 cases were negative although they were positive by both IHC and FISH. The ALK status was concordant in 5 out of 8 cases that were interpretable by three methods. Additionally, none of the 110 IHC-negative cases with adenocarcinoma histology showed ALK rearrangements by FISH. Histologically, almost all the ALK-rearranged cases were adenocarcinoma, except that one case was sarcomatoid carcinoma. A solid signet-ring cell pattern or mucinous cribriform pattern was presented at least focally in all ALK-positive tumors. In conclusion, our findings suggested that ALK rearrangement was associated with ALK protein expression. The conventional IHC assay is a valuable tool for the pre-screening of patients with ALK rearrangement in clinical practice and a combination of FISH and QPCR is

  11. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 large genomic rearrangements in Tunisian high risk breast/ovarian cancer families: Implications for genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Aouatef; Chabouni-Bouhamed, Habiba; Kharrat, Maher

    2017-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA tumor suppressor genes account for a substantial proportion of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer. However, this contribution is lower than expected. This underestimation can partly be explained by the BRCA alterations missed by using Sanger sequencing methods. Thus, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are responsible for 4-28% of all inherited BRCA mutations. In this study, Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay was used for detection of large rearrangements of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 36 unrelated high-risk breast/ovarian cancer patients negative for BRCA1/2 point mutations. MLPA assay for all exons of both genes and for 1100delC variant of CHEK2 gene were performed. Positive MLPA results were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Two different rearrangements in the BRCA1 gene were identified consisting of exon 5 deletion and exon 20 duplication. MLPA analysis did not reveal any large genomic rearrangements in BRCA2 gene. Overall BRCA1/2 LGRs prevalence among high-risk Tunisian patients was 5.5%. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed MPLA findings. Our results suggest the usefulness of screening for LGRs in BRCA genes in the Tunisian population. To avoid false-negative results, we suggest that MLPA should be used in genetic testing programs. These results are important for guidance counseling and clinical management of Tunisian high-risk patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Incremental exposure facilitates adaptation to sensory rearrangement. [vestibular stimulation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, J. R.; Lobovits, D. N.

    1978-01-01

    Visual-target pointing experiments were performed on 24 adult volunteers in order to compare the relative effectiveness of incremental (stepwise) and single-step exposure conditions on adaptation to visual rearrangement. The differences between the preexposure and postexposure scores served as an index of the adaptation elicited during the exposure period. It is found that both single-step and stepwise exposure to visual rearrangement elicit compensatory changes in sensorimotor coordination. However, stepwise exposure, when compared to single-step exposur in terms of the average magnitude of visual displacement over the exposure period, clearly enhances the rate of adaptation. It seems possible that the enhancement of adaptation to unusual patterns of sensory stimulation produced by incremental exposure reflects a general principle of sensorimotor function.

  13. Semiclassical asymptotic behavior and the rearrangement mechanisms for Coulomb particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, A.V.; Gevorkyan, A.S.; Dubrovskii, G.V.

    1986-01-01

    The semiclassical asymptotic behavior of the eikonal amplitude of the resonance rearrangement in a system of three Coulomb particles is studied. It is shown that the general formula for the amplitude correctly describes two classical mechanisms (pickup and knockout) and one nonclassical mechanism (stripping). The classical mechanisms predominate at high energies, while the stripping mechanism predominates at lower energies. In the region of medium energies the dominant mechanism is the pickup (or Thomas) mechanism, which is realized by nonclassical means. For such transitions the classical cross section diverges, and the amplitude must be computed on a complex trajectory. The physical reasons for introducing the approximate complex trajectories are discussed. The contributions of all the mechanisms to the rearrangement cross section are found in their analytic forms

  14. Ionization-induced rearrangement of defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinetskij, V.L.; Manojlo, M.A.; Matvijchuk, A.S.; Strikha, V.I.; Kholodar', G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Ionizing factor effect on defect rearrangement in silicon including centers with deep local electron levels in the p-n-transition region is considered. Deep center parameters were determined using non-steady-state capacity spectroscopy of deep levels (NCDLS) method. NCDLS spectrum measurement was performed using source p + -n - diodes and after their irradiation with 15 keV energy electrons or laser pulses. It is ascertained that in silicon samples containing point defect clusters defect rearrangement under ionizing factor effect takes place, i.e. deep level spectra are changed. This mechanism is efficient in case of silicon irradiation with subthreshold energy photons and electrons and can cause degradation of silicon semiconducting structures

  15. Interspecific chromosomal rearrangements in monosomic addition lines of Allium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, L; Ricroch, A

    2001-10-01

    Monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) are useful for assigning linkage groups to chromosomes. We examined whether the chromosomal rearrangements following the introduction of a single onion (Allium cepa) chromosome into the Allium fistulosum genome were produced by homeologous crossing over or by a nonreciprocal conversion event. Among the monosomic lines available, 17 were studied by fluorescent genomic in situ hybridisation, using total A. cepa genomic DNA as the probe and total A. fistulosum genomic DNA as the competitor. In this way, rearrangements such as chromosomal translocations between A. cepa and A. fistulosum were identified as terminal regions consisting of tandem DNA repeats. Homeologous crossing over between the two closely related genomes occurred in 4 of the 17 lines, suggesting that such events are not rare. On the basis of a detailed molecular cytogenetic characterisation, we identified true monosomic alien addition lines for A. cepa chromosomes 3, 4, 5, 7, and 8 that can reliably be used in genetic studies.

  16. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  17. A system for the detection of chromosomal rearrangements using Sordaria macrospora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaise, S.; Leblon, G.; Lares, L.

    1984-01-01

    A system is described for the detection and diagnosis of induced chromosomal rearrangement using Sordaria macrospora. The system uses the property of the rearrangement to produce defective white ascospores as meiotic progeny from heterozygous crosses. Two reconstruction experiments have shown that this system is able to give reliable quantitative measures of rearrangement frequencies. Evidence for a photoreactivation process was obtained, suggesting that pyrimidine dimers may well be an important lesion in UV-induced chromosomal rearrangement. No evidence of induction of chromosomal rearrangement was obtained in experiments with the powerful chemical mutagen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. (orig.)

  18. Recent applications of ring-rearrangement metathesis in organic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasivarao Kotha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ring-rearrangement metathesis (RRM involves multiple metathesis processes such as ring-opening metathesis (ROM/ring-closing metathesis (RCM in a one-pot operation to generate complex targets. RRM delivers complex frameworks that are difficult to assemble by conventional methods. The noteworthy point about this type of protocol is multi-bond formation and it is an atom economic process. In this review, we have covered literature that appeared during the last seven years (2008–2014.

  19. Continuous rearrangement and symmetry of solutions of elliptic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and F is continuous, and K contains only nonnegative functions and has the property that, if v P K, then also vc P .... This type of continuous rearrangement can be used to prove the symmetry of local minimizers for .... to indicate the integration over a subset G of Ω. By W1YpЕΩЖ we denote the Sobolev space of functions u ...

  20. Extensive synteny conservation of holocentric chromosomes in Lepidoptera despite high rates of local genome rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Alençon, E; Sezutsu, H; Legeai, F; Permal, E; Bernard-Samain, S; Gimenez, S; Gagneur, C; Cousserans, F; Shimomura, M; Brun-Barale, A; Flutre, T; Couloux, A; East, P; Gordon, K; Mita, K; Quesneville, H; Fournier, P; Feyereisen, R

    2010-04-27

    The recent assembly of the silkworm Bombyx mori genome with 432 Mb on 28 holocentric chromosomes has become a reference in the genomic analysis of the very diverse Order of Lepidoptera. We sequenced BACs from two major pests, the noctuid moths Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera frugiperda, corresponding to 15 regions distributed on 11 B. mori chromosomes, each BAC/region being anchored by known orthologous gene(s) to analyze syntenic relationships and genome rearrangements among the three species. Nearly 300 genes and numerous transposable elements were identified, with long interspersed nuclear elements and terminal inverted repeats the most abundant transposable element classes. There was a high degree of synteny conservation between B. mori and the two noctuid species. Conserved syntenic blocks of identified genes were very small, however, approximately 1.3 genes per block between B. mori and the two noctuid species and 2.0 genes per block between S. frugiperda and H. armigera. This corresponds to approximately two chromosome breaks per Mb DNA per My. This is a much higher evolution rate than among species of the Drosophila genus and may be related to the holocentric nature of the lepidopteran genomes. We report a large cluster of eight members of the aminopeptidase N gene family that we estimate to have been present since the Jurassic. In contrast, several clusters of cytochrome P450 genes showed multiple lineage-specific duplication events, in particular in the lepidopteran CYP9A subfamily. Our study highlights the value of the silkworm genome as a reference in lepidopteran comparative genomics.

  1. Characterization of the bovine type I IFN locus: rearrangements, expansions, and novel subfamilies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Angela M

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Type I interferons (IFN have major roles in the innate immune response to viruses, a function that is believed to have led to expansion in the number and complexity of their genes, although these genes have remained confined to single chromosomal region in all mammals so far examined. IFNB and IFNE define the limits of the locus, with all other Type I IFN genes except IFNK distributed between these boundaries, strongly suggesting that the locus has broadened as IFN genes duplicated and then evolved into a series of distinct families. Results The Type I IFN locus in Bos taurus has undergone significant rearrangement and expansion compared to mouse and human, however, with the constituent genes separated into two sub-loci separated by >700 kb. The IFNW family is greatly expanded, comprising 24 potentially functional genes and at least 8 pseudogenes. The IFNB (n = 6, represented in human and mouse by one copy, are also present as multiple copies in Bos taurus. The IFNT, which encode a non-virally inducible, ruminant-specific IFN secreted by the pre-implantation conceptus, are represented by three genes and two pseudogenes. The latter have sequences intermediate between IFNT and IFNW. A new Type I IFN family (IFNX of four members, one of which is a pseudogene, appears to have diverged from the IFNA lineage at least 83 million years ago, but is absent in all other sequenced genomes with the possible exception of the horse, a non-ruminant herbivore. Conclusion In summary, we have provided the first comprehensive annotation of the Type I IFN locus in Bos taurus, thereby providing an insight into the functional evolution of the Type I IFN in ruminants. The diversity and global spread of the ruminant species may have required an expansion of the Type I IFN locus and its constituent genes to provide broad anti-viral protection required for foraging and foregut fermentation.

  2. Assessment of RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements in fine-needle aspiration biopsy specimens collected from patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyniak-Magierska Anna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RET/PTC rearrangements are the most frequent molecular changes in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC. So far, 15 main RET/PTC rearrangements have been described, among which RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 are the most common in PTC - especially in radiation-induced tumours. RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 are the result of intrachromosomal paracentric inversions in chromosome 10, where RET and the activating genes (H4 and ELE1, respectively are located. Recently, RET/PTC rearrangements have been shown not only in PTC but also in benign thyroid lesions, including Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT. The aim of study was an assessment of RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Materials and methods Thyroid aspirates, eligible for the study, were obtained from 26 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis by fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB. Each aspirate was smeared for conventional cytology, while its remaining part was immediately washed out of the needle. The cells, obtained from the needle, were used in further investigation. Total RNA from FNAB was extracted by use of an RNeasy Micro Kit, based on modified Chomczynski and Sacchi's method and reverse transcription (RT-PCR was done. Quantitative evaluation of RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements by real-time PCR was performed by an ABI PRISM® 7500 Sequence Detection System. In the study, PTC tissues with known RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements served as a reference standard (calibrator, while β-actin gene was used as endogenous control. Results Amplification reactions were done in triplicate for each examined sample. No RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements were found in the examined samples. Conclusions Our results indicate that RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, if any, are rather rare events and further investigations should be conducted in order to determine molecular changes, connecting Hashimoto's thyroiditis with PTC.

  3. Quantifying stretching and rearrangement in epithelial sheet migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Rachel M; Nordstrom, Kerstin N; Losert, Wolfgang; Kelley, Douglas H; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2013-01-01

    Although understanding the collective migration of cells, such as that seen in epithelial sheets, is essential for understanding diseases such as metastatic cancer, this motion is not yet as well characterized as individual cell migration. Here we adapt quantitative metrics used to characterize the flow and deformation of soft matter to contrast different types of motion within a migrating sheet of cells. Using a finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) analysis, we find that—in spite of large fluctuations—the flow field of an epithelial cell sheet is not chaotic. Stretching of a sheet of cells (i.e. positive FTLE) is localized at the leading edge of migration and increases when the cells are more highly stimulated. By decomposing the motion of the cells into affine and non-affine components using the metric D m in 2 , we quantify local plastic rearrangements and describe the motion of a group of cells in a novel way. We find an increase in plastic rearrangements with increasing cell densities, whereas inanimate systems tend to exhibit less non-affine rearrangements with increasing density. (paper)

  4. Metalla-cope rearrangements: bridging organic and inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Edyta M; Hoffmann, Roald

    2010-08-26

    Density functional theory calculations are performed to explore both concerted chairlike and boatlike as well as stepwise mechanisms of the Cope rearrangement of two hypothetical metalladienes. An osma-1,5-hexadiene is designed by substituting CH(2) in 1,5-hexadiene by its isolobal analogue, 16-electron Os(PH(3))(4). The energy of activation corresponding to the rearrangement of osma-1,5-hexadiene involving the chairlike saddle point is computed as 37.4 kcal/mol, 3.9 kcal/mol above the energy barrier of the parent 1,5-hexadiene calculated with the same method and basis set, and is 4.5 kcal/mol below that of the boatlike pathway. In another isolobal replacement, the CH in 1,5-hexadiene is substituted by a 15-electron Re(PH(3))(3) fragment. Now the chairlike rearrangement of the rhenia-1,5-hexadiene has an E(a) value of 23.0 kcal/mol, 10.8 kcal/mol less than the energy barrier of the parent 1,5-hexadiene calculated at the same level of theory. The ring inversion of the chair and osma-chair diradical intermediates of the stepwise reaction pathway is also examined and is found in both cases to proceed through a very flat potential energy surface involving twist intermediates.

  5. MEK inhibition is a promising therapeutic strategy for MLL-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients carrying RAS mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstjens, Mark; Driessen, Emma M C; Willekes, Merel; Pinhanços, Sandra S; Schneider, Pauline; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W

    2017-02-28

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants is an aggressive malignancy with a poor clinical outcome, and is characterized by translocations of the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene. Previously, we identified RAS mutations in 14-24% of infant ALL patients, and showed that the presence of a RAS mutation decreased the survival chances even further. We hypothesized that targeting the RAS signaling pathway could be a therapeutic strategy for RAS-mutant infant ALL patients. Here we show that the MEK inhibitors Trametinib, Selumetinib and MEK162 severely impair primary RAS-mutant MLL-rearranged infant ALL cells in vitro. While all RAS-mutant samples were sensitive to MEK inhibitors, we found both sensitive and resistant samples among RAS-wildtype cases. We confirmed enhanced RAS pathway signaling in RAS-mutant samples, but found no apparent downstream over-activation in the wildtype samples. However, we did confirm that MEK inhibitors reduced p-ERK levels, and induced apoptosis in the RAS-mutant MLL-rearranged ALL cells. Finally, we show that MEK inhibition synergistically enhances prednisolone sensitivity, both in RAS-mutant and RAS-wildtype cells. In conclusion, MEK inhibition represents a promising therapeutic strategy for MLL-rearranged ALL patients harboring RAS mutations, while patients without RAS mutations may benefit through prednisolone sensitization.

  6. BeyondALKandROS1: RET, NTRK, EGFRandBRAFgene rearrangements in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farago, Anna F; Azzoli, Christopher G

    2017-10-01

    The discovery of gene rearrangements involving the receptor tyrosine kinase genes ALK and ROS1 has revolutionized management of the subset of non-small cell lung cancers characterized by these alterations. The oncogenic fusion proteins expressed in these tumors drive cancer cell growth and survival, and targeted inhibition of this signaling can lead to dramatic and durable responses in patients. While the best characterized gene fusions in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) involve ALK and ROS1 , fusions involving other kinases including RET , NTRK , EGFR and BRAF are now established as additional targetable drivers. Here we review data supporting the roles of these fusions as oncogenic drivers, and the potential for targeting these fusions for improved clinical outcomes. These discoveries should encourage multiplexed molecular profiling of lung cancers using next-generation platforms which identify these gene fusions in order to expand treatment options for patients.

  7. NIPBL rearrangements in Cornelia de Lange syndrome: evidence for replicative mechanism and genotype–phenotype correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, Davut; Hullings, Melanie; Carvalho, Claudia M.B.; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia G.; Loy, Elizabeth; Jackson, Laird G.; Krantz, Ian D.; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem congenital anomaly disorder characterized by mental retardation, limb abnormalities, distinctive facial features, and hirsutism. Mutations in three genes involved in sister chromatid cohesion, NIPBL, SMC1A, and SMC3, account for ~55% of CdLS cases. The molecular etiology of a significant fraction of CdLS cases remains unknown. We hypothesized that large genomic rearrangements of cohesin complex subunit genes may play a role in the molecular etiology of this disorder. Methods Custom high-resolution oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization analyses interrogating candidate cohesin genes and breakpoint junction sequencing of identified genomic variants were performed. Results Of the 162 patients with CdLS, for whom mutations in known CdLS genes were previously negative by sequencing, deletions containing NIPBL exons were observed in 7 subjects (~5%). Breakpoint sequences in five patients implicated microhomology-mediated replicative mechanisms—such as serial replication slippage and fork stalling and template switching/microhomology-mediated break-induced replication—as a potential predominant contributor to these copy number variations. Most deletions are predicted to result in haploinsuflciency due to heterozygous loss-of-function mutations; such mutations may result in a more severe CdLS phenotype. Conclusion Our findings suggest a potential clinical utility to testing for copy number variations involving NIPBL when clinically diagnosed CdLS cases are mutation-negative by DNA-sequencing studies. PMID:22241092

  8. Molecular approaches identify a cryptic MECOM rearrangement in a child with a rapidly progressive myeloid neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capela de Matos, Roberto R; Othman, Moneeb A K; Ferreira, Gerson M; Costa, Elaine S; Melo, Joana B; Carreira, Isabel M; de Souza, Mariana T; Lopes, Bruno A; Emerenciano, Mariana; Land, Marcelo G P; Liehr, Thomas; Ribeiro, Raul C; Silva, Maria Luiza M

    2018-02-01

    Myeloid neoplasms are a heterogeneous group of hematologic disorders with divergent patterns of cell differentiation and proliferation, as well as divergent clinical courses. Rare recurrent genetic abnormalities related to this group of cancers are associated with poor outcomes. One such abnormality is the MECOM gene rearrangement that typically occurs in cases with chromosome 7 abnormalities. MECOM encodes a transcription factor that plays an essential role in cell proliferation and maintenance and also in epigenetic regulation. Aberrant expression of this gene is associated with reduced survival. Hence, its detailed characterization provides biological and clinical information relevant to the management of pediatric myeloid neoplasms. In this work, we describe a rare karyotype harboring three copies of MECOM with overexpression of the gene in a child with a very aggressive myeloid neoplasm. Cytogenetic studies defined the karyotype as 46,XX,der(7)t(3;7)(q26.2;q21.2). Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) revealed a gain of 26.04 Mb in the 3q26.2-3qter region and a loss of 66.6 Mb in the 7q21.2-7qter region. RT-qPCR analysis detected elevated expression of the MECOM and CDK6 genes (458.5-fold and 35.2-fold, respectively). Overall, we show the importance of performing detailed molecular cytogenetic analysis of MECOM to enable appropriate management of high-risk pediatric myeloid neoplasms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of autosomal-heterosomal rearrangements in a multiple-X chromosome system of tiger beetles (Cicindelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogler Alfried P

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic systems involving multiple X chromosomes have arisen repeatedly in sexually reproducing animals. Tiger beetles (Cicindelidae exhibit a phylogenetically ancient multiple-X system typically consisting of 2–4 X chromosomes and a single Y. Because recombination rates are suppressed in sex chromosomes, changes in their numbers and movement of genes between sex chromosomes and autosomes, could have important consequences for gene evolution and rates of speciation induced by these rearrangements. However, it remains unclear how frequent these rearrangements are and which genes are affected. Results Karyotype analyses were performed for a total of 26 North American species in the highly diverse genus Cicindela, tallying the number of X chromosomes and autosomes during mitosis and meiosis. The chromosomal location of the ribosomal rRNA gene cluster (rDNA was used as an easily scored marker for genic turnover between sex chromosomes or autosomes. The findings were assessed in the light of a recent phylogenetic analysis of the group. While autosome numbers remained constant throughout the lineage, sex chromosome numbers varied. The predominant karyotype was n = 9+X1X2X3Y which was also inferred to be the ancestral state, with several changes to X1X2Y and X1X2X3X4Y confined to phylogenetically isolated species. The total (haploid numbers of rDNA clusters varied between two, three, and six (in one exceptional case, and clusters were localized either on the autosomes, the sex chromosomes, or both. Transitions in rDNA localization and in numbers of rDNA clusters varied independently of each other, and also independently of changes in sex chromosome numbers. Conclusion Changes of X chromosome numbers and transposition of the rDNA locus (and presumably other genes between autosomes and sex chromosomes in Cicindela occur frequently, and are likely to be the result of fusions or fissions between X chromosomes, rather than between sex

  10. Chromosomal rearrangements and protein globularity changes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seow Hoon Saw

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Meningitis is a major cause of mortality in tuberculosis (TB. It is not clear what factors promote central nervous system invasion and pathology but it has been reported that certain strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb might have genetic traits associated with neurotropism. Methods In this study, we generated whole genome sequences of eight clinical strains of Mtb that were isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients presenting with tuberculous meningitis (TBM in Malaysia, and compared them to the genomes of H37Rv and other respiratory Mtb genomes either downloaded from public databases or extracted from local sputum isolates. We aimed to find genomic features that might be distinctly different between CSF-derived and respiratory Mtb. Results Genome-wide comparisons revealed rearrangements (translocations, inversions, insertions and deletions and non-synonymous SNPs in our CSF-derived strains that were not observed in the respiratory Mtb genomes used for comparison. These rearranged segments were rich in genes for PE (proline-glutamate/PPE (proline-proline-glutamate, transcriptional and membrane proteins. Similarly, most of the ns SNPs common in CSF strains were noted in genes encoding PE/PPE proteins. Protein globularity differences were observed among mycobacteria from CSF and respiratory sources and in proteins previously reported to be associated with TB meningitis. Transcription factors and other transcription regulators featured prominently in these proteins. Homologs of proteins associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis and Neisseria meningitidis virulence were identified in neuropathogenic as well as respiratory mycobacterial spp. examined in this study. Discussion The occurrence of in silico genetic differences in CSF-derived but not respiratory Mtb suggests their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of TBM. However, overall findings in this comparative analysis support the postulation that TB

  11. Design and validation of an oligonucleotide microarray for the detection of genomic rearrangements associated with common hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini-DiNardo, Debora; Judkins, Thaddeus; Woolstenhulme, Nick; Burton, Collin; Schoenberger, Jeremy; Ryder, Matthew; Murray, Adam; Gutin, Natalia; Theisen, Aaron; Holladay, Jayson; Craft, Jonathan; Arnell, Christopher; Moyes, Kelsey; Roa, Benjamin

    2014-09-11

    Conventional Sanger sequencing reliably detects the majority of genetic mutations associated with hereditary cancers, such as single-base changes and small insertions or deletions. However, detection of genomic rearrangements, such as large deletions and duplications, requires special technologies. Microarray analysis has been successfully used to detect large rearrangements (LRs) in genetic disorders. We designed and validated a high-density oligonucleotide microarray for the detection of gene-level genomic rearrangements associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC), Lynch, and polyposis syndromes. The microarray consisted of probes corresponding to the exons and flanking introns of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (≈1,700) and Lynch syndrome/polyposis genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, APC, MUTYH, and EPCAM (≈2,200). We validated the microarray with 990 samples previously tested for LR status in BRCA1, BRCA2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, APC, MUTYH, or EPCAM. Microarray results were 100% concordant with previous results in the validation studies. Subsequently, clinical microarray analysis was performed on samples from patients with a high likelihood of HBOC mutations (13,124), Lynch syndrome mutations (18,498), and polyposis syndrome mutations (2,739) to determine the proportion of LRs. Our results demonstrate that LRs constitute a substantial proportion of genetic mutations found in patients referred for hereditary cancer genetic testing. The use of microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) for the detection of LRs is well-suited as an adjunct technology for both single syndrome (by Sanger sequencing analysis) and extended gene panel testing by next generation sequencing analysis. Genetic testing strategies using microarray analysis will help identify additional patients carrying LRs, who are predisposed to various hereditary cancers.

  12. Application of the inter-line PCR for the analyse of genomic rearrangements in radiation-transformed mammalian cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibhard, S.; Smida, J.

    1996-01-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences of the LINE-family (long interspersed elements) that are widely distributed among the mammalian genome can be activated or altered by the exposure to ionizing radiation [1]. By the integration at new sites in the genome alterations in the expression of genes that are involved in cell transformation and/or carcinogenesis may occur [2, 3]. A new technique -the inter-LINE PCR - has been developed in order to detect and analyse such genomic rearrangements in radiation-transformed cell lines. From the sites of transformation- or tumour-specific changes in the genome it might be possible to develop new tumour markers for diagnostic purpose. (orig.) [de

  13. CNV analysis in Tourette syndrome implicates large genomic rearrangements in COL8A1 and NRXN1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Nag

    Full Text Available Tourette syndrome (TS is a neuropsychiatric disorder with a strong genetic component. However, the genetic architecture of TS remains uncertain. Copy number variation (CNV has been shown to contribute to the genetic make-up of several neurodevelopmental conditions, including schizophrenia and autism. Here we describe CNV calls using SNP chip genotype data from an initial sample of 210 TS cases and 285 controls ascertained in two Latin American populations. After extensive quality control, we found that cases (N = 179 have a significant excess (P = 0.006 of large CNV (>500 kb calls compared to controls (N = 234. Amongst 24 large CNVs seen only in the cases, we observed four duplications of the COL8A1 gene region. We also found two cases with ∼400 kb deletions involving NRXN1, a gene previously implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, including TS. Follow-up using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (and including 53 more TS cases validated the CNV calls and identified additional patients with rearrangements in COL8A1 and NRXN1, but none in controls. Examination of available parents indicates that two out of three NRXN1 deletions detected in the TS cases are de-novo mutations. Our results are consistent with the proposal that rare CNVs play a role in TS aetiology and suggest a possible role for rearrangements in the COL8A1 and NRXN1 gene regions.

  14. Novel noncontiguous duplications identified with a comprehensive mutation analysis in the DMD gene by DMD gene-targeted sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Huanhuan; Xiao, Bing; Wei, Wei; Liu, Yu; Ye, Hui; Ying, Xiaomin; Chen, Yingwei; Liu, Xiaoqing; Ji, Xing; Sun, Yu

    2018-03-01

    Genomic rearrangements, such as intragenic deletions and duplications, are the most prevalent types of mutation in the DMD gene, and DMD mutations underlie Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Using multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and DMD gene-targeted sequencing, we performed a molecular characterization of two cases of complex noncontiguous duplication rearrangements that involved inverted duplications. The breakpoint sequences were analyzed to investigate the mechanisms of the rearrangement. The two cases shared the same duplication events (Dup-nml-Dup/inv), and both involved microhomology and small insertions at the breakpoints. Additionally, in case 1, SNP sequencing results indicated that the de novo duplication mutation arose in the allele that originated from the grandfather. This study has identified a novel type of DMD complex rearrangement and provides insight into the molecular basis of this genomic rearrangement. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. A genomewide screen for suppressors of Alu-mediated rearrangements reveals a role for PIF1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Chisholm

    Full Text Available Alu-mediated rearrangement of tumor suppressor genes occurs frequently during carcinogenesis. In breast cancer, this mechanism contributes to loss of the wild-type BRCA1 allele in inherited disease and to loss of heterozygosity in sporadic cancer. To identify genes required for suppression of Alu-mediated recombination we performed a genomewide screen of a collection of 4672 yeast gene deletion mutants using a direct repeat recombination assay. The primary screen and subsequent analysis identified 12 candidate genes including TSA, ELG1, and RRM3, which are known to play a significant role in maintaining genomic stability. Genetic analysis of the corresponding human homologs was performed in sporadic breast tumors and in inherited BRCA1-associated carcinomas. Sequencing of these genes in high risk breast cancer families revealed a potential role for the helicase PIF1 in cancer predisposition. PIF1 variant L319P was identified in three breast cancer families; importantly, this variant, which is predicted to be functionally damaging, was not identified in a large series of controls nor has it been reported in either dbSNP or the 1000 Genomes Project. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Pfh1 is required to maintain both mitochondrial and nuclear genomic integrity. Functional studies in yeast of human PIF1 L319P revealed that this variant cannot complement the essential functions of Pfh1 in either the nucleus or mitochondria. Our results provide a global view of nonessential genes involved in suppressing Alu-mediated recombination and implicate variation in PIF1 in breast cancer predisposition.

  16. Refining borders of genome-rearrangements including repetitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona-Medina, J A; Trelles, O

    2016-10-25

    DNA rearrangement events have been widely studied in comparative genomic for many years. The importance of these events resides not only in the study about relatedness among different species, but also to determine the mechanisms behind evolution. Although there are many methods to identify genome-rearrangements (GR), the refinement of their borders has become a huge challenge. Until now no accepted method exists to achieve accurate fine-tuning: i.e. the notion of breakpoint (BP) is still an open issue, and despite repeated regions are vital to understand evolution they are not taken into account in most of the GR detection and refinement methods. We propose a method to refine the borders of GR including repeated regions. Instead of removing these repetitions to facilitate computation, we take advantage of them using a consensus alignment sequence of the repeated region in between two blocks. Using the concept of identity vectors for Synteny Blocks (SB) and repetitions, a Finite State Machine is designed to detect transition points in the difference between such vectors. The method does not force the BP to be a region or a point but depends on the alignment transitions within the SBs and repetitions. The accurate definition of the borders of SB and repeated genomic regions and consequently the detection of BP might help to understand the evolutionary model of species. In this manuscript we present a new proposal for such a refinement. Features of the SBs borders and BPs are different and fit with what is expected. SBs with more diversity in annotations and BPs short and richer in DNA replication and stress response, which are strongly linked with rearrangements.

  17. Refining borders of genome-rearrangements including repetitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JA Arjona-Medina

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA rearrangement events have been widely studied in comparative genomic for many years. The importance of these events resides not only in the study about relatedness among different species, but also to determine the mechanisms behind evolution. Although there are many methods to identify genome-rearrangements (GR, the refinement of their borders has become a huge challenge. Until now no accepted method exists to achieve accurate fine-tuning: i.e. the notion of breakpoint (BP is still an open issue, and despite repeated regions are vital to understand evolution they are not taken into account in most of the GR detection and refinement methods. Methods and results We propose a method to refine the borders of GR including repeated regions. Instead of removing these repetitions to facilitate computation, we take advantage of them using a consensus alignment sequence of the repeated region in between two blocks. Using the concept of identity vectors for Synteny Blocks (SB and repetitions, a Finite State Machine is designed to detect transition points in the difference between such vectors. The method does not force the BP to be a region or a point but depends on the alignment transitions within the SBs and repetitions. Conclusion The accurate definition of the borders of SB and repeated genomic regions and consequently the detection of BP might help to understand the evolutionary model of species. In this manuscript we present a new proposal for such a refinement. Features of the SBs borders and BPs are different and fit with what is expected. SBs with more diversity in annotations and BPs short and richer in DNA replication and stress response, which are strongly linked with rearrangements.

  18. Immunoglobulin kappa variable region gene selection during early human B cell development in health and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehle, Verena; Fraser, Louise D; Tahir, Romeeza; Kipling, David; Wu, Yu-Chang; Lutalo, Pamela M K; Cason, John; Choong, LeeMeng; D'Cruz, David P; Cope, Andrew P; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K; Spencer, Jo

    2015-06-01

    The unique specificity of the B cell receptor is generated by an ordered sequence of gene rearrangement events. Once IGH genes have rearranged, rearrangement at the IGK locus is initiated followed by the IGL locus if functional IGK rearrangement is not achieved. Receptor specificity can subsequently be altered by secondary light chain editing based on the features of the heavy and light chain combination. The final profile of expressed genes is not random and biases in this profile are associated with several autoimmune diseases. However, how and when biases are created is not known. To increase our understanding of the processes of selection and editing of IGK rearrangements, we compared four groups of rearrangements of IGK acquired by next generation sequencing. First, expressed rearrangements of IGK from cDNA of IGK expressing B cells. Second, productive rearrangements of IGK from DNA of the same kappa expressing B cells. Third, non-productive rearrangements of IGK from DNA of IGK and IGL expressing B cells, and fourth productively rearranged IGK from DNA of IGL expressing B cells. The latter group would have been rejected during B cell development in favour of rearrangement at the IGL locus and are therefore selected against. We saw evidence that rearranged IGK segments can be selected at a checkpoint where the decision to rearrange the IGL locus is made. In addition, our data suggest that mechanisms regulating the expression or not of IGK rearrangements may also contribute to repertoire development and also that this latter component of the selection process is defective in SLE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development Refractoriness of MLL-Rearranged Human B Cell Acute Leukemias to Reprogramming into Pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Muñoz-López

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are a powerful tool for disease modeling. They are routinely generated from healthy donors and patients from multiple cell types at different developmental stages. However, reprogramming leukemias is an extremely inefficient process. Few studies generated iPSCs from primary chronic myeloid leukemias, but iPSC generation from acute myeloid or lymphoid leukemias (ALL has not been achieved. We attempted to generate iPSCs from different subtypes of B-ALL to address the developmental impact of leukemic fusion genes. OKSM(L-expressing mono/polycistronic-, retroviral/lentiviral/episomal-, and Sendai virus vector-based reprogramming strategies failed to render iPSCs in vitro and in vivo. Addition of transcriptomic-epigenetic reprogramming “boosters” also failed to generate iPSCs from B cell blasts and B-ALL lines, and when iPSCs emerged they lacked leukemic fusion genes, demonstrating non-leukemic myeloid origin. Conversely, MLL-AF4-overexpressing hematopoietic stem cells/B progenitors were successfully reprogrammed, indicating that B cell origin and leukemic fusion gene were not reprogramming barriers. Global transcriptome/DNA methylome profiling suggested a developmental/differentiation refractoriness of MLL-rearranged B-ALL to reprogramming into pluripotency.

  20. Femoral facial syndrome associated with a de novo complex chromosome 2q37 rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmann, Malte; Marx, Sylvie; Barbi, Gotthold; Flöttmann, Ricarda; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; König, Rainer; Horn, Denise; Mundlos, Stefan; Nader, Sean; Borck, Guntram

    2016-05-01

    The femoral facial syndrome (FFS) is a rare congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by bilateral femoral hypoplasia and facial dysmorphism. The etiology of FFS is currently unknown but maternal/gestational diabetes has been proposed as a strong risk factor for syndromic femoral hypoplasia. In affected children born to non-diabetic mothers, a genetic contribution to FFS is suspected; however, no chromosomal anomalies or gene mutations have been identified so far. Here, we report on a girl with FFS and a de novo complex chromosome rearrangement of terminal chromosome 2q37.2. Radiographs of the pelvis and lower limbs showed bilateral shortening and bowing of the femur and radiographs of hands and feet revealed a brachydactyly type E (BDE). Using high resolution array-CGH, qPCR, and FISH, we detected a ~1.9 Mb duplication in the chromosomal region 2q37.2 and a ~5.4 Mb deletion on chromosome 2q37.3 that were absent in the parents. The duplication contains six genes and the deletion encompasses 68 genes; the latter has previously been shown to cause BDE (through haploinsufficiency for HDAC4) but not femoral hypoplasia. Therefore, we propose that the duplication 2q37.2 could be causative for the femur phenotype. To the best of our knowledge, our report is the first to propose a genetic cause in a case of FFS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Thermal rearrangement of novolak resins used in microlithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Ricky; Zampini, Anthony; Monaghan, Michael J.; O'Leary, Michael J.; Cardin, William J.; Eugster, Timothy J.

    1995-06-01

    Changes in phenolic-formaldehyde resin properties are described in terms of thermal exposure. At high temperature, resin molecular weight, dissolution properties and chemical composition change depending on the presence or absence of monomers. Without monomer in the resin melt at 220 degree(s)C, resin molecular weight increases with a corresponding decrease in dissolution rate. In the presence of monomer, molecular weight generally decreases. Dissolution rate may fluctuate depending on the monomer mixture. Three,five- Xylenol and 2,3,5-trimethylphenol co-monomers induced the most extreme changes in resin properties with thermal treatment. Resin degradation-recombination processes suggest a classical Friedel-Craft rearrangement mechanism.

  2. 3Disease Browser: A Web server for integrating 3D genome and disease-associated chromosome rearrangement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruifeng; Liu, Yifang; Li, Tingting; Li, Cheng

    2016-10-13

    Chromosomal rearrangement (CR) events have been implicated in many tumor and non-tumor human diseases. CR events lead to their associated diseases by disrupting gene and protein structures. Also, they can lead to diseases through changes in chromosomal 3D structure and gene expression. In this study, we search for CR-associated diseases potentially caused by chromosomal 3D structure alteration by integrating Hi-C and ChIP-seq data. Our algorithm rediscovers experimentally verified disease-associated CRs (polydactyly diseases) that alter gene expression by disrupting chromosome 3D structure. Interestingly, we find that intellectual disability may be a candidate disease caused by 3D chromosome structure alteration. We also develop a Web server (3Disease Browser, http://3dgb.cbi.pku.edu.cn/disease/) for integrating and visualizing disease-associated CR events and chromosomal 3D structure.

  3. BAC-FISH assays delineate complex chromosomal rearrangements in a case of post-Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst F Zitzelsberger

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC, for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK genes, RET and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1 by intra- and interchromosomal rearrangements has been suggested as a cause of the disease. However, many phenotypically similar tumors do not carry an activated RET or NTRK-1 gene or express abnormal ret or NTRK-1 transcripts. Thus, we hypothesize that other cellular RTK-type genes are aberrantly expressed in these tumors. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization-based methods, we are studying karyotype changes in a relatively rare subgroup of PTCs, i.e., tumors that arose in children following the 1986 nuclear accident in Chernobyl, Ukraine. Here, we report our technical developments and progress in deciphering complex chromosome aberrations in case S48TK, an aggressively growing PTC cell line, which shows an unusual high number of unbalanced translocations.

  4. BAC-FISH assays delineate complex chromosomal rearrangements in a case of post-Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Weier, Jingly F.; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2009-03-09

    Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC), for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes, RET and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1) by intra- and interchromosomal rearrangements has been suggested as a cause of the disease. However, many phenotypically similar tumors do not carry an activated RET or NTRK-1 gene or express abnormal ret or NTRK-1 transcripts. Thus, we hypothesize that other cellular RTK-type genes are aberrantly expressed in these tumors. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization-based methods, we are studying karyotype changes in a relatively rare subgroup of PTCs, i.e., tumors that arose in children following the 1986 nuclear accident in Chernobyl, Ukraine. Here, we report our technical developments and progress in deciphering complex chromosome aberrations in case S48TK, an aggressively growing PTC cell line, which shows an unusual high number of unbalanced translocations.

  5. Application of molecular cytogenetic techniques to clarify apparently balanced complex chromosomal rearrangements in two patients with an abnormal phenotype: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongen Michel A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR are rare cytogenetic findings that are difficult to karyotype by conventional cytogenetic analysis partially because of the relative low resolution of this technique. High resolution genotyping is necessary in order to identify cryptic imbalances, for instance near the multiple breakpoints, to explain the abnormal phenotype in these patients. We applied several molecular techniques to elucidate the complexity of the CCRs of two adult patients with abnormal phenotypes. Results Multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH showed that in patient 1 the chromosomes 1, 10, 15 and 18 were involved in the rearrangement whereas for patient 2 the chromosomes 5, 9, 11 and 13 were involved. A 250 k Nsp1 SNP-array analysis uncovered a deletion in chromosome region 10p13 for patient 1, harbouring 17 genes, while patient 2 showed no pathogenic gains or losses. Additional FISH analysis with locus specific BAC-probes was performed, leading to the identification of cryptic interstitial structural rearrangements in both patients. Conclusion Application of M-FISH and SNP-array analysis to apparently balanced CCRs is useful to delineate the complex chromosomal rearrangement in detail. However, it does not always identify cryptic imbalances as an explanation for the abnormal phenotype in patients with a CCR.

  6. Most ultraviolet irradiation induced mutations in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans are chromosomal rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, H.I.; Rosenbluth, R.E.; Baillie, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this study the utility of 254-nm ultraviolet light (UV) as a magnetic tool in C.elegans is determined. It is demonstrated that irradiation of adult hermaphrodites provides a simple method for the induction of heritable chromosomal rearrangements. A screening protocol was employed that identifies either recessive lethal mutations in the 40 map unit region balanced by the translocation eT1(III;V), or unc-36(III) duplications. Mutations were recovered in 3% of the chromosomes screened after a dose of 120 J/m 2 . This rate resembles that for 1500 R γ-ray-induced mutations selected in a similar manner. The mutations were classified either as lethals [mapping to Linkage Group (LG)III or LGV] or as putative unc-36 duplications. In contrast to the majority of UV-induced mutations analysed in micro-organisms, a large fraction of the C.elegans UV-induced mutations were found to be not simple intragenic lesions, but deficiencies for more than one adjacent gene or more complex events. Preliminary evidence for this conclusion came from the high frequency of mutations that had a dominant effect causing reduced numbers of adult progeny. Subsequently 6 out of 9 analysed LGV mutations were found to be deficiencies. Other specific rearrangements also identified were: one translocation, sT5(II;III), and two unc-36 duplications, sDp8 and sDp9. It was concluded that UV irradiation can easily be used as an additional tool for the analysis of C.elegans chromosomes, and that C.elegans should prove to be a useful organism in which to study the mechanisms whereby UV acts as a mutagen in cells of complex eukaryotes. (author). 46 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs

  7. Large Clinically Consequential Imbalances Detected at the Breakpoints of Apparently Balanced and Inherited Chromosome Rearrangements

    OpenAIRE

    South, Sarah T.; Rector, Lyndsey; Aston, Emily; Rowe, Leslie; Yang, Samuel P.

    2010-01-01

    When a chromosome abnormality is identified in a child with a developmental delay and/or multiple congenital anomalies and the chromosome rearrangement appears balanced, follow-up studies often examine both parents for this rearrangement. If either clinically unaffected parent has a chromosome abnormality with a banding pattern identical to the affected child's study, then it is assumed that the chromosome rearrangement is balanced and directly inherited from the normal carrier parent. It is ...

  8. Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization identifies novel rearrangements of chromosomes 6, 15, and 18 in primary uveal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisley, Karen; Tattersall, Nicola; Dyson, Michael; Smith, Kath; Mudhar, Hardeep S; Rennie, Ian G

    2006-09-01

    Uveal melanomas are the commonest ocular tumour of adults and are characterized by reproducible alterations of chromosomes 1, 3, 6 and 8. These alterations are of prognostic relevance and have also be shown to correlate to high risk and low risk metastatic categories of uveal melanoma as defined by micro-array analysis. It is, however, possible that a catalogue of relevant genetic alterations, involving gene rearrangement rather than amplification, have as yet eluded identification. To address this point we examined 14 primary uveal melanomas, using 24 colour multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH). All tumours were karyotyped following G-Banding, and M-FISH was performed to confirm and clarify the identity of abnormal chromosomes. M-FISH data were obtained from all tumours and was able to establish the nature of most abnormalities not fully characterized by cytogenetics. Abnormalities of chromosome 6 were far more frequent than previously indicated, in approximately 70% of cases, indicating they have been substantially underrepresented in past studies of uveal melanoma. Spindle melanomas were found to have novel rearrangements affecting in particular chromosomes 6, 15 and 18, suggesting that juxtaposition of genes through translocational events may play a role in the development of some uveal melanomas. In conclusion, this study is the largest of primary uveal melanoma analysed by M-FISH and indicates that alterations of chromosome 6 have previously been underestimated. Furthermore spindle melanomas are prone to rearrangements affecting chromosomes 6, 15 and 18, which may relate to early changes in uveal melanoma development or associate with those melanomas of a more differentiated status.

  9. Regioselective 1-N-Alkylation and Rearrangement of Adenosine Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslovsky, Vladimir E; Drenichev, Mikhail S; Mikhailov, Sergey N

    2015-01-01

    Several methods for the preparation of some N(6)-substituted adenosines based on selective 1-N-alkylation with subsequent Dimroth rearrangement were developed. The proposed methods seem to be effective for the preparation of natural N(6)-isopentenyl- and N(6)-benzyladenosines, which are known to possess pronounced biological activities. Direct 1-N-alkylation of 2',3',5'-tri-O-acetyladenosine and 3',5'-di-O-acetyl-2'-deoxyadenosine with alkyl halides in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in the presence of BaCO3 and KI gave 1-N-substituted derivatives with quantitative yields, whereas 1-N-alkylation of adenosine was accompanied by significant O-alkylation. Moreover, the reaction of trimethylsilyl derivatives of N(6)-acetyl-2',3',5'-tri-O-acetyladenosine and N(6)-acetyl-3',5'-di-O-acetyl-2'-deoxyadenosine with alkyl halides leads to the formation of the stable 1-N-substituted adenosines. Dimroth rearrangement of 1-N-substituted adenosines in aqueous ammonia yields pure N(6)-substituted adenosines.

  10. FASEB Summer Research Conference. Genetic Recombination and Chromosome Rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2002-02-01

    The 2001 meeting entitled ''Genetic Recombination and Genome Rearrangements'' was held July 21-26 in Snowmass, Colorado. The goal of the meeting was to bring together scientists using diverse approaches to study all aspects of genetic recombination. This goal was achieved by integrating talks covering the genetics, biochemistry and structural biology of homologous recombination, site-specific recombination, and nonhomologous recombination. The format of the meeting consisted of a keynote address on the opening evening, two formal plenary sessions on each of the four full meeting days, a single afternoon workshop consisting of short talks chosen from among submitted abstracts, and afternoon poster sessions on each of the four full meeting days. The eight plenary session were entitled: (1) Recombination Mechanisms, (2) Prokaryotic Recombination, (3) Repair and Recombination, (4) Site-specific Recombination and Transposition, (5) Eukaryotic Recombination I, (6) Genome Rearrangements, (7) Meiosis, and (8) Eukaryotic Recombination II. Each session included a mix of genetic, biochemical and structural talks; talks were limited to 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of very lively, general discussion. Much of the data presented in the plenary sessions was unpublished, thus providing attendees with the most up-to-date knowledge of this rapidly-moving field.

  11. Particle rearrangement during liquid phase sintering of several carbide-metal combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppmann, W.J.; Petzow, G.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the influence of mutual solubility of the components on total rearrangement shrinkage. The explanation for large differences in rearrangement shrinkage of the carbide compacts investigated in this work may be as follows: In systems with negligible intersolubility and hence pronounced surface roughness the mechanical activation energy necessary for massive regrouping cannot be supplied and therefore only very small rearrangement shrinkage is observed. On the other hand those systems with large intersolubility and hence rapid particle smoothening undergo severe rearrangement because the mechanical activation energy for this process can be easily supplied by the energy gained during densification

  12. T cell factor-1 controls the lifetime of CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes in vivo and distal T cell receptor α-chain rearrangement required for NKT cell development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archna Sharma

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are a component of innate and adaptive immune systems implicated in immune, autoimmune responses and in the control of obesity and cancer. NKT cells develop from common CD4+ CD8+ double positive (DP thymocyte precursors after the rearrangement and expression of T cell receptor (TCR Vα14-Jα18 gene. Temporal regulation and late appearance of Vα14-Jα18 rearrangement in immature DP thymocytes has been demonstrated. However, the precise control of lifetime of DP thymocytes in vivo that enables distal rearrangements remains incompletely defined. Here we demonstrate that T cell factor (TCF-1, encoded by the Tcf7 gene, is critical for the extended lifetime of DP thymocytes. TCF-1-deficient DP thymocytes fail to undergo TCR Vα14-Jα18 rearrangement and produce significantly fewer NKT cells. Ectopic expression of Bcl-xL permits Vα14-Jα18 rearrangement and rescues NKT cell development. We report that TCF-1 regulates expression of RORγt, which regulates DP thymocyte survival by controlling expression of Bcl-xL. We posit that TCF-1 along with its cofactors controls the lifetime of DP thymocytes in vivo.

  13. Chromosome Rearrangements in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS): Report of a der(3)t(3;12)(p25.3;p13.3) in Two Half Sibs With Features of CdLS and Review of Reported CdLS Cases With Chromosome Rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeScipio, Cheryl; Kaur, Maninder; Yaeger, Dinah; Innis, Jeffrey W.; Spinner, Nancy B.; Jackson, Laird G.; Krantz, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS; OMIM 122470) is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by multisystem involvement, cognitive delay, limb defects, and characteristic facial features. Recently, mutations in NIPBL have been found in ~50% of individuals with CdLS. Numerous chromosomal rearrangements have been reported in individuals with CdLS. These rearrangements may be causative of a CdLS phenotype, result in a phenocopy, or be unrelated to the observed phenotype. We describe two half siblings with a der(3)t(3;12)(p25.3;p13.3) chromosomal rearrangement, clinical features resembling CdLS, and phenotypic overlap with the del(3)(p25) phenotype. Region-specific BAC probes were used to fine-map the breakpoint region by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH analysis places the chromosome 3 breakpoint distal to RP11-115G3 on 3p25.3; the chromosome 12 breakpoint is distal to BAC RP11-88D16 on 12p13.3. A review of published cases of terminal 3p deletions and terminal 12p duplications indicates that the findings in these siblings are consistent with the del(3)(p25) phenotype. Given the phenotypic overlap with CdLS, we have reviewed the reported cases of chromosomal rearrangements involved in CdLS to better elucidate other potential loci that could harbor additional CdLS genes. Additionally, to identify chromosome rearrangements, genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed on eight individuals with typical CdLS and without identifiable deletion or mutation of NIPBL. No pathologic rearrangements were identified. PMID:16075459

  14. No evidence for the use of DIR, D-D fusions, chromosome 15 open reading frames or VH replacement in the peripheral repertoire was found on application of an improved algorithm, JointML, to 6329 human immunoglobulin H rearrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohm-Laursen, Line; Nielsen, Morten; Larsen, Stine R

    2006-01-01

    Antibody diversity is created by imprecise joining of the variability (V), diversity (D) and joining (J) gene segments of the heavy and light chain loci. Analysis of rearrangements is complicated by somatic hypermutations and uncertainty concerning the sources of gene segments and the precise way...... in which they recombine. It has been suggested that D genes with irregular recombination signal sequences (DIR) and chromosome 15 open reading frames (OR15) can replace conventional D genes, that two D genes or inverted D genes may be used and that the repertoire can be further diversified by heavy chain V...

  15. Germline rearrangements in families with strong family history of glioma and malignant melanoma, colon, and breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Shete, Sanjay; Lau, Ching C.; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Lai, Rose; Il'yasova, Dora; Houlston, Richard S.; Schildkraut, Joellen; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Wrensch, Margaret; Davis, Faith G.; Merrell, Ryan; Johansen, Christoffer; Sadetzki, Siegal; Bondy, Melissa L.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Adatto, Phyllis; Morice, Fabian; Payen, Sam; McQuinn, Lacey; McGaha, Rebecca; Guerra, Sandra; Paith, Leslie; Roth, Katherine; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Hui; Yung, Alfred; Aldape, Kenneth; Gilbert, Mark; Weinberger, Jeffrey; Colman, Howard; Conrad, Charles; de Groot, John; Forman, Arthur; Groves, Morris; Levin, Victor; Loghin, Monica; Puduvalli, Vinay; Sawaya, Raymond; Heimberger, Amy; Lang, Frederick; Levine, Nicholas; Tolentino, Lori; Saunders, Kate; Thach, Thu-Trang; Iacono, Donna Dello; Sloan, Andrew; Gerson, Stanton; Selman, Warren; Bambakidis, Nicholas; Hart, David; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Alan; Cohen, Mark; Rogers, Lisa; Nock, Charles J; Wolinsky, Yingli; Devine, Karen; Fulop, Jordonna; Barrett, Wendi; Shimmel, Kristen; Ostrom, Quinn; Barnett, Gene; Rosenfeld, Steven; Vogelbaum, Michael; Weil, Robert; Ahluwalia, Manmeet; Peereboom, David; Staugaitis, Susan; Schilero, Cathy; Brewer, Cathy; Smolenski, Kathy; McGraw, Mary; Naska, Theresa; Rosenfeld, Steven; Ram, Zvi; Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix; Umansky, Felix; Zaaroor, Menashe; Cohen, Avi; Tzuk-Shina, Tzeela; Voldby, Bo; Laursen, René; Andersen, Claus; Brennum, Jannick; Henriksen, Matilde Bille; Marzouk, Maya; Davis, Mary Elizabeth; Boland, Eamon; Smith, Marcel; Eze, Ogechukwu; Way, Mahalia; Lada, Pat; Miedzianowski, Nancy; Frechette, Michelle; Paleologos, Nina; Byström, Gudrun; Svedberg, Eva; Huggert, Sara; Kimdal, Mikael; Sandström, Monica; Brännström, Nikolina; Hayat, Amina; Tihan, Tarik; Zheng, Shichun; Berger, Mitchel; Butowski, Nicholas; Chang, Susan; Clarke, Jennifer; Prados, Michael; Rice, Terri; Sison, Jeannette; Kivett, Valerie; Duo, Xiaoqin; Hansen, Helen; Hsuang, George; Lamela, Rosito; Ramos, Christian; Patoka, Joe; Wagenman, Katherine; Zhou, Mi; Klein, Adam; McGee, Nora; Pfefferle, Jon; Wilson, Callie; Morris, Pagan; Hughes, Mary; Britt-Williams, Marlin; Foft, Jessica; Madsen, Julia; Polony, Csaba; McCarthy, Bridget; Zahora, Candice; Villano, John; Engelhard, Herbert; Borg, Ake; Chanock, Stephen K; Collins, Peter; Elston, Robert; Kleihues, Paul; Kruchko, Carol; Petersen, Gloria; Plon, Sharon; Thompson, Patricia; Johansen, C.; Sadetzki, S.; Melin, B.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Lau, Ching C.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Georgina N.; Liu, Yanhong; Shete, Sanjay; Yu, Robert K.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Houlston, Richard S.; Hosking, Fay J.; Robertson, Lindsay; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Claus, Elizabeth B.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Sloan, Andrew E.; Barnett, Gene; Devine, Karen; Wolinsky, Yingli; Lai, Rose; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Il'yasova, Dora; Schildkraut, Joellen; Sadetzki, Siegal; Yechezkel, Galit Hirsh; Bruchim, Revital Bar-Sade; Aslanov, Lili; Sadetzki, Siegal; Johansen, Christoffer; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Broholm, Helle; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Olson, Sara H.; Schubert, Erica; DeAngelis, Lisa; Jenkins, Robert B.; Yang, Ping; Rynearson, Amanda; Andersson, Ulrika; Wibom, Carl; Henriksson, Roger; Melin, Beatrice S.; Cederquist, Kristina; Aradottir, Steina; Borg, Åke; Merrell, Ryan; Lada, Patricia; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiencke, John; Wiemels, Joe; McCoy, Lucie; McCarthy, Bridget J.; Davis, Faith G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although familial susceptibility to glioma is known, the genetic basis for this susceptibility remains unidentified in the majority of glioma-specific families. An alternative approach to identifying such genes is to examine cancer pedigrees, which include glioma as one of several cancer phenotypes, to determine whether common chromosomal modifications might account for the familial aggregation of glioma and other cancers. Methods Germline rearrangements in 146 glioma families (from the Gliogene Consortium; http://www.gliogene.org/) were examined using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. These families all had at least 2 verified glioma cases and a third reported or verified glioma case in the same family or 2 glioma cases in the family with at least one family member affected with melanoma, colon, or breast cancer.The genomic areas covering TP53, CDKN2A, MLH1, and MSH2 were selected because these genes have been previously reported to be associated with cancer pedigrees known to include glioma. Results We detected a single structural rearrangement, a deletion of exons 1-6 in MSH2, in the proband of one family with 3 cases with glioma and one relative with colon cancer. Conclusions Large deletions and duplications are rare events in familial glioma cases, even in families with a strong family history of cancers that may be involved in known cancer syndromes. PMID:24723567

  16. Improved outcome with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a poor prognostic subgroup of infants with mixed-lineage-leukemia (MLL)-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results from the Interfant-99 Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Georg; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Schrappe, Martin

    2010-01-01

    To define a role for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and rearrangements of the mixed-lineage-leukemia gene (MLL(+)), we compared the outcome of MLL(+) patients from trial Interfant-99 who either received chemotherapy only or HSCT. Of 376...

  17. Ploidy influences cellular responses to gross chromosomal rearrangements in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemoine Sophie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs such as aneuploidy are key factors in genome evolution as well as being common features of human cancer. Their role in tumour initiation and progression has not yet been completely elucidated and the effects of additional chromosomes in cancer cells are still unknown. Most previous studies in which Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a model for cancer cells have been carried out in the haploid context. To obtain new insights on the role of ploidy, the cellular effects of GCRs were compared between the haploid and diploid contexts. Results A total number of 21 haploid and diploid S. cerevisiae strains carrying various types of GCRs (aneuploidies, nonreciprocal translocations, segmental duplications and deletions were studied with a view to determining the effects of ploidy on the cellular responses. Differences in colony and cell morphology as well as in the growth rates were observed between mutant and parental strains. These results suggest that cells are impaired physiologically in both contexts. We also investigated the variation in genomic expression in all the mutants. We observed that gene expression was significantly altered. The data obtained here clearly show that genes involved in energy metabolism, especially in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, are up-regulated in all these mutants. However, the genes involved in the composition of the ribosome or in RNA processing are down-regulated in diploids but up-regulated in haploids. Over-expression of genes involved in the regulation of the proteasome was found to occur only in haploid mutants. Conclusion The present comparisons between the cellular responses of strains carrying GCRs in different ploidy contexts bring to light two main findings. First, GCRs induce a general stress response in all studied mutants, regardless of their ploidy. Secondly, the ploidy context plays a crucial role in maintaining the stoichiometric balance

  18. Clear cell myoepithelial carcinoma of salivary glands showing EWSR1 rearrangement: molecular analysis of 94 salivary gland carcinomas with prominent clear cell component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skálová, Alena; Weinreb, Ilan; Hyrcza, Martin; Simpson, Roderick H W; Laco, Jan; Agaimy, Abbas; Vazmitel, Marina; Majewska, Hanna; Vanecek, Tomas; Talarčik, Peter; Manajlovic, Spomenka; Losito, Simona N; Šteiner, Petr; Klimkova, Adela; Michal, Michal

    2015-03-01

    within 5 months to 4 years after diagnosis (mean 22 mo), distant metastases were noted in 7 patients with invasion of orbit (2 cases), and in 1 case each metastasis to the neck soft tissues, liver, lungs, mediastinum, and thoracic vertebra was noted. We describe for the first time EWSR1 gene rearrangement in a subset of myoepithelial carcinomas arising in minor and major salivary glands. The EWSR1-rearranged CCMC represents a distinctive aggressive variant composed predominantly of clear cells with frequent necrosis. Most EWSR1-rearranged CCMCs of salivary glands are characterized by poor clinical outcomes.

  19. BRAFV600E Mutation, RET/PTC1 and PAX8-PPAR Gamma Rearrangements in Follicular Epithelium Derived Thyroid Lesions - Institutional Experience and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Şahpaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thyroid cancers are the most frequently occurring endocrine malignancy worldwide. In Turkey, thyroid cancers are ranked 2nd on the incidence list in women, with a rate of 16.2%, but they are not included among the top 10 cancer types in men. Aims: To identify the contribution of the BRAFV600E mutation, and the RET/PTC1 and PAX8-PPARγ rearrangements in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of follicular epithelial-derived thyroid lesions. Study Design: Retrospective clinical and molecular genetic study. Methods: A total of 86 thyroid cases diagnosed between 2001 and 2012 at the Department of Pathology were included in the retrospective study group. Samples best representing the lesion and comprising capsules were chosen in the selection of paraffin blocks pertaining to the cases. The BRAFV600E mutation, and the RET/PTC1 and PAX8-PPARγ rearrangements were investigated in all cases. Results: The BRAFV600E mutation was observed in 12 out of 37 papillary carcinoma cases (32.4%, in 1 out of 15 follicular carcinoma cases (6.6%, and in 1 out of 7 undifferentiated carcinoma cases (14.3%. No mutation was detected in benign lesions. The RET/PTC1 rearrangement was detected in 2 out of 7 undifferentiated carcinoma cases (28.6%, and in 1 out of 15 follicular carcinoma cases (6.6%. No gene rearrangement was detected in benign lesions. The PAX8-PPARγ rearrangement was detected in 5 out of 15 follicular thyroid carcinoma cases (33.3% and in 1 out of 15 follicular adenoma cases (6.6%. Conclusion: The BRAFV600E mutation and RET/PTC1 rearrangement were effective in distinguishing the follicular epithelium-derived benign and malignant lesions of the thyroid in the resection materials. The BRAFV600E mutation was rather specific to papillary carcinoma in the thyroid, and in cases where the BRAFV600E mutation was detected, multi-centricity, lymph node metastasis and capsular invasion findings were observed more frequently compared to cases in which no

  20. SYNTHESIS OF ALLYL PHENYL ETHER AND CLAISEN REARRANGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagik Torosyan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been established the possibility for phenol allylation on natural zeolites and them analogs. Here is demonstrated the synthesis of allyl phenol, which has wide industrial applications. The offered method in comparison with the traditional methods has more advantages – higher selectivity, smaller material and power resources consumption. It has been obtained the mixture of allylating phenols (30% in general with allyl phenyl ether (1 with 80% yields. At 600 K is obtained allylphenyl ether, at 700 K beginning the formation of allyl phenols, which is the result of direct C-allylation of the aromatic ring. It has been investigated the possibility of Claisen rearrangement in the same conditions. All of that are established by gas-liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography data.

  1. Multiple scattering in the nuclear rearrangement reactions at medium energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tekou, A.

    1980-09-01

    It is shown that the multiple scattering mechanism is very important in the transfer of the large momenta involved in the nuclear rearrangement reactions at medium energy. In contrast to the usual belief, the reaction cross-section is not very sensitive to the high momenta components of the nuclear wave function. The multiple scattering mechanism is especially important in 4 He(p,d) 3 He reaction around 800 MeV. Here the collisions involving two nucleons of the target nucleus are dominant. The triple collisions contribution is also important. The four collision contribution is negligible in the forward direction and sizeable at large angles. Thus, using the K.M.T. approach in DWBA calculations, the second order term of the optical potential must be included. So, is it not well established that the second term of the K.M.T. optical potential is important for the proton elastic scattering on light nuclei. (author)

  2. New type of cells with multiple chromosome rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aseeva, E.A.; Domracheva, E.V.; Neverova, A.L; Bogomazova, A.N.; Snigiryova, G.P.; Novitskaya, N.N.; Khazins, E.D.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A comparative analysis of the distribution and the frequency of multiaberrant cells (MAC) among lymphocytes in different categories of low dose (up to 0.5 Gy) irradiated people was carried out. MAC were found in most of the examined groups and they were absent in the control population. A highest MAC frequency was observed in people exposed to alpha radiation (Pu, Ra). This fact allows MAC to be considered as an indicator of a high-energy local exposure. A new type of cells with multiple chromosome rearrangements was discovered in the course of analysis of stable aberrations by the FISH method. The biological consequences of MAC formation and possibility of revealing the whole diversity of cells with multiple aberrations by means of modern molecular-cytogenetic methods is discussed

  3. Genome Sequencing of Pediatric Medulloblastoma Links Catastrophic DNA Rearrangements with TP53 Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rausch, Tobias; Jones, David T. W.; Zapatka, Marc; Stütz, Adrian M.; Zichner, Thomas; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Jäger, Natalie; Remke, Marc; Shih, David; Northcott, Paul A.; Pfaff, Elke; Tica, Jelena; Wang, Qi; Massimi, Luca; Witt, Hendrik; Bender, Sebastian; Pleier, Sabrina; Cin, Huriye; Hawkins, Cynthia; Beck, Christian; von Deimling, Andreas; Hans, Volkmar; Brors, Benedikt; Eils, Roland; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Blake, Jonathon; Benes, Vladimir; Kulozik, Andreas E.; Witt, Olaf; Martin, Dianna; Zhang, Cindy; Porat, Rinnat; Merino, Diana M.; Wasserman, Jonathan; Jabado, Nada; Fontebasso, Adam; Bullinger, Lars; Rücker, Frank G.; Döhner, Konstanze; Döhner, Hartmut; Koster, Jan; Molenaar, Jan J.; Versteeg, Rogier; Kool, Marcel; Tabori, Uri; Malkin, David; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D.; Lichter, Peter; Pfister, Stefan M.; Korbel, Jan O.

    2012-01-01

    Genomic rearrangements are thought to occur progressively during tumor development. Recent findings, however, suggest an alternative mechanism, involving massive chromosome rearrangements in a one-step catastrophic event termed chromothripsis. We report the whole-genome sequencing-based analysis of

  4. On the Configurational Stability and Reactivity of Tertiary Silyloxy Carbanions Derived from Stereoselective Brook Rearrangement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collados, Juan F.; Harutyunyan, Syuzanna R.; Ortiz, Pablo

    Here we report a stereospecific Brook rearrangement/trapping sequence, initiated by the formation of a zinc alkoxide from an enantioenriched (hydroxyallyl)silane. The chiral carbanion resulting from the Brook rearrangement is trapped intermolecularly by carbonyl electrophiles with complete transfer

  5. Tandem Brook Rearrangement/Silicon Polonovski Reaction via Oxidative Generation of Ammonium Ylides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Hiromasa; Nakago, Takahiro; Inoue, Seiichi; Hoshino, Yujiro; Honda, Kiyoshi

    2017-08-01

    A tandem Brook rearrangement/silicon Polonovski reaction has been achieved by in situ generation of ammonium ylides via the oxidation of α-silyl-tertiary amines. Furthermore, we found that the oxidation of N-(1-cyano-1-silyl)methyl-tertiary amines with peracids induced the tandem Brook rearrangement/silicon Polonovski reaction/fragmentation to give formamide derivatives in moderate yields.

  6. Marsupials as models for understanding the role of chromosome rearrangements in evolution and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Janine E; Kruger-Andrzejewska, Maya

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome rearrangements have been implicated in diseases, such as cancer, and speciation, but it remains unclear whether rearrangements are causal or merely a consequence of these processes. Two marsupial families with very different rates of karyotype evolution provide excellent models in which to study the role of chromosome rearrangements in a disease and evolutionary context. The speciose family Dasyuridae displays remarkable karyotypic conservation, with all species examined to date possessing nearly identical karyotypes. Despite the seemingly high degree of chromosome stability within this family, they appear prone to developing tumours, including transmissible devil facial tumours. In contrast, chromosome rearrangements have been frequent in the evolution of the species-rich family Macropodidae, which displays a high level of karyotypic diversity. In particular, the genus Petrogale (rock-wallabies) displays an extraordinary level of chromosome rearrangement among species. For six parapatric Petrogale species, it appears that speciation has essentially been caught in the act, providing an opportunity to determine whether chromosomal rearrangements are a cause or consequence of speciation in this system. This review highlights the reasons that these two marsupial families are excellent models for testing hypotheses for hotspots of chromosome rearrangement and deciphering the role of chromosome rearrangements in disease and speciation.

  7. Promoter methylation and large intragenic rearrangements of DPYD are not implicated in severe toxicity to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy in gastrointestinal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savva-Bordalo, Joana; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen; Ramalho-Carvalho, João; Pinheiro, Manuela; Costa, Vera L; Rodrigues, Ângelo; Dias, Paula C; Veiga, Isabel; Machado, Manuela; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2010-01-01

    Severe toxicity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based chemotherapy in gastrointestinal cancer has been associated with constitutional genetic alterations of the dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene (DPYD). In this study, we evaluated DPYD promoter methylation through quantitative methylation-specific PCR and screened DPYD for large intragenic rearrangements in peripheral blood from 45 patients with gastrointestinal cancers who developed severe 5-FU toxicity. DPYD promoter methylation was also assessed in tumor tissue from 29 patients Two cases with the IVS14+1G > A exon 14 skipping mutation (c.1905+1G > A), and one case carrying the 1845 G > T missense mutation (c.1845G > T) in the DPYD gene were identified. However, DPYD promoter methylation and large DPYD intragenic rearrangements were absent in all cases analyzed. Our results indicate that DPYD promoter methylation and large intragenic rearrangements do not contribute significantly to the development of 5-FU severe toxicity in gastrointestinal cancer patients, supporting the need for additional studies on the mechanisms underlying genetic susceptibility to severe 5-FU toxicity

  8. MSOAR 2.0: Incorporating tandem duplications into ortholog assignment based on genome rearrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Liqing

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ortholog assignment is a critical and fundamental problem in comparative genomics, since orthologs are considered to be functional counterparts in different species and can be used to infer molecular functions of one species from those of other species. MSOAR is a recently developed high-throughput system for assigning one-to-one orthologs between closely related species on a genome scale. It attempts to reconstruct the evolutionary history of input genomes in terms of genome rearrangement and gene duplication events. It assumes that a gene duplication event inserts a duplicated gene into the genome of interest at a random location (i.e., the random duplication model. However, in practice, biologists believe that genes are often duplicated by tandem duplications, where a duplicated gene is located next to the original copy (i.e., the tandem duplication model. Results In this paper, we develop MSOAR 2.0, an improved system for one-to-one ortholog assignment. For a pair of input genomes, the system first focuses on the tandemly duplicated genes of each genome and tries to identify among them those that were duplicated after the speciation (i.e., the so-called inparalogs, using a simple phylogenetic tree reconciliation method. For each such set of tandemly duplicated inparalogs, all but one gene will be deleted from the concerned genome (because they cannot possibly appear in any one-to-one ortholog pairs, and MSOAR is invoked. Using both simulated and real data experiments, we show that MSOAR 2.0 is able to achieve a better sensitivity and specificity than MSOAR. In comparison with the well-known genome-scale ortholog assignment tool InParanoid, Ensembl ortholog database, and the orthology information extracted from the well-known whole-genome multiple alignment program MultiZ, MSOAR 2.0 shows the highest sensitivity. Although the specificity of MSOAR 2.0 is slightly worse than that of InParanoid in the real data experiments

  9. Complex chromosome 17p rearrangements associated with low-copy repeats in two patients with congenital anomalies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Stankiewicz, P.; Yatsenko, S.A.; Crawford, E.; Creswick, H.; Proud, V.K.; Vries, B. de; Pfundt, R.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Zackowski, J.; Bi, W.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Lupski, J.R.; Veltman, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent molecular cytogenetic data have shown that the constitution of complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs) may be more complicated than previously thought. The complicated nature of these rearrangements challenges the accurate delineation of the chromosomal breakpoints and mechanisms involved.

  10. Rearrangement of c-myc, pim-1 and Mlvi-1 and trisomy of chromosome 15 in MCF- and Moloney-MuLV-induced murine T-cell leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirschubsky, Z; Tsichlis, P; Klein, G; Sumegi, J

    1986-11-15

    Provirus insertion near the c-myc, pim-1 or Mlvi-1 genes occurred in 7 out of 59 virally induced T-cell leukemias. C-myc was exclusively rearranged in approximately 10% of MCF247-induced tumors while Mlvi-1 was rearranged to a similar frequency in Moloney-virus-induced lymphomas. Out of 25 karyotyped tumors, 9 (36%) showed trisomy of chromosome 15. Provirus insertion near c-myc, pim-1 or Mlvi-1 occurred both in diploid lymphomas and in tumors with trisomy 15. These results suggest that the molecular and cytogenetic changes observed in murine T-cell leukemias are independent tumor-associated events and that trisomy of chromosome 15 is a common tumor-progression-related event.

  11. Novel targeted therapies for resistant ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer: ceritinib and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaan Z

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Zeyad Kanaan,1 Goetz H Kloecker,1 Ajit Paintal,2 Cesar A Perez1 1Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, 2Department of Pathology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both sexes, accounting for over one quarter of cancer deaths. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC comprises 85%–90% of lung cancer diagnoses and despite advances in multimodality therapies, 5-year survival rates remain dismal with a median survival for patients with metastatic disease of 1 year. The positive outcomes of targeted therapies against the kinase domain of epidermal growth factor receptor in NSCLC triggered consistent efforts to identify the so-called driver mutations as other potential targets. Anaplastic large-cell kinase (ALK gene rearrangements were identified and targeted resulting in promising response rates in early studies. Unfortunately, most of the patients treated with crizotinib, the first-generation ALK inhibitor, progressed within 9 months. Ceritinib is a second-generation ALK inhibitor that has demonstrated activity in crizotinib-resistant patients, becoming a promising treatment option in this population. Furthermore, additional novel ALK inhibitors and agents targeting alternative pathways have been recruited to rechallenge this evasive disease post-crizotinib resistance. Keywords: crizotinib, EML4-ALK rearrangement, Vysis, ALK inhibitor 

  12. Chromosomal rearrangements between serotype A and D strains in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Sun

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a major human pathogenic fungus that can cause meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised hosts. It contains two divergent varieties, var. grubii (serotype A and var. neoformans (serotype D, as well as hybrids (serotype AD between these two varieties. In this study, we investigated the extent of chromosomal rearrangements between the two varieties, estimated the effects of chromosomal rearrangements on recombination frequencies, and surveyed the potential polymorphisms of the rearrangements among natural strains of the three serotypes. Through the analyses of two sequenced genomes from strains H99 (representing var. grubii and JEC21 (representing var. neoformans, we revealed a total of 32 unambiguous chromosome rearrangements, including five translocations, nine simple inversions, and 18 complex rearrangements. Our analyses identified that overall, rearranged regions had recombination frequencies about half of those around syntenic regions. Using a direct PCR screening strategy, we examined the potential polymorphisms of 11 rearrangements among 64 natural C. neoformans strains from five countries. We found no polymorphism within var. neoformans and very limited polymorphism within var. grubii. However, strains of serotype AD showed significant polymorphism, consistent with their hybrid origins coupled with differential loss of heterozygosity. We discuss the implications of these results on the genome structure, ecology, and evolution of C. neoformans.

  13. Mutational landscape of the human Y chromosome-linked genes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FISH uncovered mosaicism for SRY, AMELY, DAZ genes and DYZ1 arrays, structural rearrangement for AMELY (31%) and duplication of DAZ (57%) genes. Copy number variation for seven Y-linked genes (2–. 8 rounds of duplication), DYZ1 arrays (495–6201copies) and differential expression of SRY, UTY and VCY in the ...

  14. Comparative mitochondrial genome analysis reveals the evolutionary rearrangement mechanism in Brassica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Liu, G; Zhao, N; Chen, S; Liu, D; Ma, W; Hu, Z; Zhang, M

    2016-05-01

    The genus Brassica has many species that are important for oil, vegetable and other food products. Three mitochondrial genome types (mitotype) originated from its common ancestor. In this paper, a B. nigra mitochondrial main circle genome with 232,407 bp was generated through de novo assembly. Synteny analysis showed that the mitochondrial genomes of B. rapa and B. oleracea had a better syntenic relationship than B. nigra. Principal components analysis and development of a phylogenetic tree indicated maternal ancestors of three allotetraploid species in Us triangle of Brassica. Diversified mitotypes were found in allotetraploid B. napus, in which napus-type B. napus was derived from B. oleracea, while polima-type B. napus was inherited from B. rapa. In addition, the mitochondrial genome of napus-type B. napus was closer to botrytis-type than capitata-type B. oleracea. The sub-stoichiometric shifting of several mitochondrial genes suggested that mitochondrial genome rearrangement underwent evolutionary selection during domestication and/or plant breeding. Our findings clarify the role of diploid species in the maternal origin of allotetraploid species in Brassica and suggest the possibility of breeding selection of the mitochondrial genome. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  15. Structural rearrangements of the RNA polymerase III machinery during tRNA transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Ewan Phillip; Vannini, Alessandro

    2018-04-01

    RNA polymerase III catalyses the synthesis of tRNAs in eukaryotic organisms. Through combined biochemical and structural characterisation, multiple auxiliary factors have been identified alongside RNA Polymerase III as critical in both facilitating and regulating transcription. Together, this machinery forms dynamic multi-protein complexes at tRNA genes which are required for polymerase recruitment, DNA opening and initiation and elongation of the tRNA transcripts. Central to the function of these complexes is their ability to undergo multiple conformational changes and rearrangements that regulate each step. Here, we discuss the available biochemical and structural data on the structural plasticity of multi-protein complexes involved in RNA Polymerase III transcriptional initiation and facilitated re-initiation during tRNA synthesis. Increasingly, structural information is becoming available for RNA polymerase III and its functional complexes, allowing for a deeper understanding of tRNA transcriptional initiation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: SI: Regulation of tRNA synthesis and modification in physiological conditions and disease edited by Dr. Boguta Magdalena. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Karyotype rearrangements in a wine yeast strain by rad52-dependent and rad52-independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, David; Bartra, Enric; Piña, Benjamin

    2003-04-01

    Yeast strains isolated from the wild may undergo karyotype changes during vegetative growth, a characteristic that compromises their utility in genetic improvement projects for industrial purposes. Karyotype instability is a dominant trait, segregating among meiotic derivatives as if it depended upon only a few genetic elements. We show that disrupting the RAD52 gene in a hypervariable strain partially stabilizes its karyotype. Specifically, RAD52 disruption eliminated recombination at telomeric and subtelomeric sequences, had no influence on ribosomal DNA rearrangement rates, and reduced to 30% the rate of changes in chromosomal size. Thus, there are at least three mechanisms related to karyotype instability in wild yeast strains, two of them not requiring RAD52-mediated homologous recombination. When utilized for a standard sparkling-wine second fermentation, Deltarad52 strains retained the enological properties of the parental strain, specifically its vigorous fermentation capability. These data increase our understanding of the mechanisms of karyotype instability in yeast strains isolated from the wild and illustrate the feasibility and limitations of genetic remediation to increase the suitability of natural strains for industrial processes.

  17. The landscape of somatic mutations in Infant MLL rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Anna K; Ma, Jing; Wang, Jianmin; Chen, Xiang; Gedman, Amanda Larson; Dang, Jinjun; Nakitandwe, Joy; Holmfeldt, Linda; Parker, Matthew; Easton, John; Huether, Robert; Kriwacki, Richard; Rusch, Michael; Wu, Gang; Li, Yongjin; Mulder, Heather; Raimondi, Susana; Pounds, Stanley; Kang, Guolian; Shi, Lei; Becksfort, Jared; Gupta, Pankaj; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Boggs, Kristy; Yergeau, Donald; Manne, Jayanthi; Song, Guangchun; Edmonson, Michael; Nagahawatte, Panduka; Wei, Lei; Cheng, Cheng; Pei, Deqing; Sutton, Rosemary; Venn, Nicola C; Chetcuti, Albert; Rush, Amanda; Catchpoole, Daniel; Heldrup, Jesper; Fioretos, Thoas; Lu, Charles; Ding, Li; Pui, Ching-Hon; Shurtleff, Sheila; Mullighan, Charles G; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Gruber, Tanja A; Zhang, Jinghui; Downing, James R

    2015-01-01

    Infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with MLL rearrangements (MLL-R) represents a distinct leukemia with a poor prognosis. To define its mutational landscape, we performed whole genome, exome, RNA and targeted DNA sequencing on 65 infants (47 MLL-R and 18 non-MLL-R) and 20 older children (MLL-R cases) with leukemia. Our data demonstrated infant MLL-R ALL to have one of the lowest frequencies of somatic mutations of any sequenced cancer, with the predominant leukemic clone carrying a mean of 1.3 non-silent mutations. Despite the paucity of mutations, activating mutations in kinase/PI3K/RAS signaling pathways were detected in 47%. Surprisingly, however, these mutations were often sub-clonal and frequently lost at relapse. In contrast to infant cases, MLL-R leukemia in older children had more somatic mutations (a mean of 6.5/case versus 1.3/case, P=7.15×10−5) and contained frequent mutations (45%) in epigenetic regulators, a category of genes that with the exception of MLL was rarely mutated in infant MLL-R ALL. PMID:25730765

  18. A Complex Genomic Rearrangement Involving the Endothelin 3 Locus Causes Dermal Hyperpigmentation in the Chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorshorst, Ben; Molin, Anna-Maja; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Johansson, Anna M.; Strömstedt, Lina; Pham, Manh-Hung; Chen, Chih-Feng; Hallböök, Finn; Ashwell, Chris; Andersson, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Dermal hyperpigmentation or Fibromelanosis (FM) is one of the few examples of skin pigmentation phenotypes in the chicken, where most other pigmentation variants influence feather color and patterning. The Silkie chicken is the most widespread and well-studied breed displaying this phenotype. The presence of the dominant FM allele results in extensive pigmentation of the dermal layer of skin and the majority of internal connective tissue. Here we identify the causal mutation of FM as an inverted duplication and junction of two genomic regions separated by more than 400 kb in wild-type individuals. One of these duplicated regions contains endothelin 3 (EDN3), a gene with a known role in promoting melanoblast proliferation. We show that EDN3 expression is increased in the developing Silkie embryo during the time in which melanoblasts are migrating, and elevated levels of expression are maintained in the adult skin tissue. We have examined four different chicken breeds from both Asia and Europe displaying dermal hyperpigmentation and conclude that the same structural variant underlies this phenotype in all chicken breeds. This complex genomic rearrangement causing a specific monogenic trait in the chicken illustrates how novel mutations with major phenotypic effects have been reused during breed formation in domestic animals. PMID:22216010

  19. Family based genome-wide copy number scan identifies complex rearrangements at 17q21.31 in dyslexics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Saldanha, Marita; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2014-10-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a complex heritable disorder with unexpected difficulty in learning to read and spell despite adequate intelligence, education, environment, and normal senses. We performed genome-wide screening for copy number variations (CNVs) in 10 large Indian dyslexic families using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. Results revealed the complex genomic rearrangements due to one non-contiguous deletion and five contiguous micro duplications and micro deletions at 17q21.31 region in three dyslexic families. CNVs in this region harbor the genes KIAA1267, LRRC37A, ARL17A/B, NSFP1, and NSF. The CNVs in case 1 and case 2 at this locus were found to be in homozygous state and case 3 was a de novo CNV. These CNVs were found with at least one CNV having a common break and end points in the parents. This cluster of genes containing NSF is implicated in learning, cognition, and memory, though not formally associated with dyslexia. Molecular network analysis of these and other dyslexia related module genes suggests NSF and other genes to be associated with cellular/vesicular membrane fusion and synaptic transmission. Thus, we suggest that NSF in this cluster would be the nearest gene responsible for the learning disability phenotype. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Structural rearrangements of chromosomes in the domestic chicken: experimental production by X-irradiation of spermatozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooster, W.E.; Fechheimer, N.S.; Jaap, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    In order to produce chicks heterozygous for structural aberrations of chromosomes, 67 hens were inseminated with semen that had been exposed to 1200 R of X-rays. A sample of 204 chicks was hatched and survived. Among these, 18 (8.9%) contained rearrangements comprising 19 translocations and one pericentric inversion. All 10 males and eight females heterozygous for rearrangements were fertile and transmitted these rearrangements to approximately half their hatched progeny. Each of the major chromosomes of the chicken karyotype, except number 6, was involved in one or more of the translocations. The pericentric inversion was of a segment of chromosome number 2. (author)

  1. Catalytic [1,3] O-to-C Rearrangement: Rapid Access to Bridged Bicyclic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shifa; Zhang, Jiantao; Liao, Zhehui; Chen, Lianfen; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2018-03-05

    A catalytic [1,3] O-to-C rearrangement from enyne-ether was developed for the rapid synthesis of diverse bridged bicyclic systems. In this reaction, a vinyl oxonium intermediate, generated in situ from enyne-ether, was the precursor for the [1,3] O-to-C rearrangement. This versatile protocol represents the first example of catalytic [1,3] O-to-C rearrangement based on ring-expansion strategy, enabling efficient access to bridged bicyclic scaffolds. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Postnatal rearrangement of central hemodynamics in surgically born babies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Tumaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the impact of complicated ante- and intranatal periods on postnatal cardiovascular hemodynamic adaptation in surgically born babies who have suffered hypoxia-ischemia. Patients and methods. A total of 382 full-term neonatal infants were examined. A study group included 117 cesarean born babies who had suffered hypoxia-ischemia. Comparison Group 1 comprised 150 infants who had been born by cesarean section and had no signs of cerebral ischemia. Comparison Group 2 consisted of 65 vaginally born babies following hypoxia-ischemia. A control group included 50 infants of physiological pregnancy and labor. In the first 1—2 days of life, all the neonates underwent EchoCG and determination of structural and hemodynamic parameters by using the standard procedures. Impaired postnatal hemodynamic rearrangement was found in all the babies of the examined groups, particular in those who had been born via cesarean section and sustained hypoxia-ischemia; the magnitude of disadaptation correlated with the severity of hypoxia-ischemia. A delayed reduction of dysfunction beyond the early neonatal period was noted in babies exposed to a combination of perinatal damaging factors. Conclusion. A set of poor ante- and intranatal factors contributes to impaired cardiac hemodynamic adaptation. The babies who have been born via cesarean section and sustained hypoxia-ischemia constitute a group at risk for cardiac abnormality in different age periods.

  3. On the RET Rearrangements in Chernobyl-Related Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei V. Jargin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a consensus that Chernobyl accident has induced thyroid cancer increase in children and adolescents. The UNSCEAR report concluded that no somatic disorders other than thyroid cancer were caused by radiation exposure due to the accident except for acute radiation sickness occurred to the people within the Power Plant at the time of the accident. A hypothesis is discussed in this paper that the increase of thyroid cancer was caused predominantly by the screening, overdiagnosis, and registration of nonirradiated persons as Chernobyl victims. A mechanism of thyroid cancer overdiagnosis is described that can be active even today, causing hypertherapy. Older neglected tumors found by the screening shortly after the Chernobyl accident or brought from noncontaminated areas were misclassified as aggressive radiation-induced cancers. Therefore, supposed markers of the radiation-induced thyroid cancer, such as the RET rearrangements, are probably associated with disease duration and tumor progression. The screening effect is obviously dependent on the basis level of medical surveillance: the higher the level, the smaller the screening effect. Absence of any significant increase of thyroid cancer after the Fukushima accident in spite of the vigorous screening would certify the high level of health care in Japan especially for children.

  4. Lamellar rearrangement of internal lipids from human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coderch, L; Méndez, S; Barba, C; Pons, R; Martí, M; Parra, J L

    2008-09-01

    The internal lipids were extracted from untreated hair without surface lipids. Liposomes were formed with the internal lipids at different hydration levels to determine the organization of these lipids and the influence of the water content on the lamellar structure of the hair fibres by X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Two structures of hair lipids were observed at 4.5 and approximately 9.0 nm with a different behaviour as a function of water content: the largest bilayer being the one that showed a capacity to retain water inside its structure. SAXS was also applied directly to three samples: a packed swatch of hair fibres at 60% RH, fibres soaked in water and delipidized fibres. Only the lamella at 9.0 nm was slightly affected by water content. Moreover, there was a small diminution in intensity probably due to a high permeability of wet fibres which could give rise to a disorder of the lipid structure. These two lamellar rearrangements are probably made up of lipids with a different and specific hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance.

  5. Multiple forms of atypical rearrangements generating supernumerary derivative chromosome 15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigman Marian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternally-derived duplications that include the imprinted region on the proximal long arm of chromosome 15 underlie a complex neurobehavioral disorder characterized by cognitive impairment, seizures and a substantial risk for autism spectrum disorders1. The duplications most often take the form of a supernumerary pseudodicentric derivative chromosome 15 [der(15] that has been called inverted duplication 15 or isodicentric 15 [idic(15], although interstitial rearrangements also occur. Similar to the deletions found in most cases of Angelman and Prader Willi syndrome, the duplications appear to be mediated by unequal homologous recombination involving low copy repeats (LCR that are found clustered in the region. Five recurrent breakpoints have been described in most cases of segmental aneuploidy of chromosome 15q11-q13 and previous studies have shown that most idic(15 chromosomes arise through BP3:BP3 or BP4:BP5 recombination events. Results Here we describe four duplication chromosomes that show evidence of atypical recombination events that involve regions outside the common breakpoints. Additionally, in one patient with a mosaic complex der(15, we examined homologous pairing of chromosome 15q11-q13 alleles by FISH in a region of frontal cortex, which identified mosaicism in this tissue and also demonstrated pairing of the signals from the der(15 and the normal homologues. Conclusion Involvement of atypical BP in the generation of idic(15 chromosomes can lead to considerable structural heterogeneity.

  6. Atomic rearrangements in ordered fcc alloys during neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.A.; Blewitt, T.H.

    1978-01-01

    Three sets of experiments performed at Argonne National Laboratory over the past few years are described. These experiments deal with atomic rearrangements in the ordered alloys Ni 3 Mn and Cu 3 Au during fast and thermal neutron bombardment. The unique magnetic properties of ordered Ni 3 Mn are utilized to investigate radiation damage production mechanisms at low temperature (5 K) where defect migration is not possible and only disordering is observed. In the case of thermal neutron bombardment, the average recoil energy is about 450 eV and significant disordering due to [110] replacement collision sequences is observed. For fast neutron bombardment where typical recoil energies are 20 keV, significant random disordering is observed but no evidence for sizable replacement sequences is found. The bombardment of ordered Cu 3 Au by fast and thermal neutrons at higher temperature (approx. 150 0 C) is studied by electrical resistance techniques. Both ordering and disordering are observed and related to the number of migrating vacancies escaping from the high energy collision cascade

  7. DETECTION OF SPECIFIC CHROMOSOMAL REARRANGEMENT IN LEUKEMIA PATIENTS BY mDx HEMAVISION KIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Pajič

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The mDx HemaVision kit is a qualitative multiplex and nested Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR test designed to detect 28 different translocations or chromosomal rearrangement, found to be specific for particular subtypes of leukemia. The presence or absence of the specific mRNA transcripts or cDNA segments after the reverse transcription of the fusion or abnormal genes, appeared after chromosomal rearrangements, could be determined by the kit.Patients and methods. The usefulness of the kit was tested on the 26 RNA samples of patients with acute leukemia and seven patients with chronic mieloproliferative diseases and by comparison of the results between mDx HemaVision kit and standardized RT-PCR protocol for the specific mRNA transcripts of the t(9;22(q34;q11, t(8;21(q22;q22, t(15;17(q21;q21 and t(4;11(q21;q23. The RNA samples were isolated from mononuclear cells of the bone marrow after Ficoll-Paque density gradient centrifugation and with a High Pure RNA isolation kit. The cDNA synthesis and Polymerase Chain Reaction were performed as described in mDx HemaVisoin’s or standardized RT-PCR’s protocols. The PCR products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, by staining with etidium bromide and by visualization under UV light.Results. We obtained 100% concordance of the results by both methods. Specific BCR-ABL mRNA transcripts were found in four chronic myeloid leukemia patients, one in B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL and one with bifenotipic leukemia (BAL patient. AML1-ETO mRNA transcript of the t(8;21(q22;q22 was identified in two patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The CBF β /MYH11 mRNA transcript specific for inv16(p13;q22 was obtained in AML patient with abnormal eozinofiles in bone marrow. MLL/AF4 mRNA transcript of the t(4;11(q21;q23 was found in the girl with B-ALL and in patient with B-ALL after treatment. In patients with B-ALL we found MLL/AF10 cDNA segment specific for t(10

  8. Chromosome rearrangements, recombination suppression, and limited segregation distortion in hybrids between Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostberg, Carl O; Hauser, Lorenz; Pritchard, Victoria L; Garza, John C; Naish, Kerry A

    2013-08-22

    findings demonstrating that recombination suppression restricts gene flow between chromosomes that differ by arrangement. Conservation of synteny and map order between the hybrid and rainbow trout maps and minimal segregation distortion in the hybrids suggest rainbow and Yellowstone cutthroat trout genomes freely introgress across chromosomes with similar arrangement. Taken together, these results suggest that rearrangements impede introgression. Recombination suppression across rearrangements could enable large portions of non-recombined chromosomes to persist within admixed populations.

  9. Chromosome rearrangements, recombination suppression, and limited segregation distortion in hybrids between Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    supports several previous findings demonstrating that recombination suppression restricts gene flow between chromosomes that differ by arrangement. Conservation of synteny and map order between the hybrid and rainbow trout maps and minimal segregation distortion in the hybrids suggest rainbow and Yellowstone cutthroat trout genomes freely introgress across chromosomes with similar arrangement. Taken together, these results suggest that rearrangements impede introgression. Recombination suppression across rearrangements could enable large portions of non-recombined chromosomes to persist within admixed populations. PMID:23968234

  10. Analysis of chromosome rearrangements on the basis of synaptonemal complexes in the offspring of mice exposed to γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalikinskaya, E.I.; Bogdanov, Yu.F.; Kolomiets, O.L.; Shevchenko, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Electron-microscopic analysis of synaptonemic complexes (SC), spread on the hypophase surface, was conducted to investigate chromosome rearrangements in sterile and semisterile F 1 malemause offsprings, exposed to 5 Gy γ-rays Paralelly Chromosome rearrangement account in diakinesis-metaphase 1 was conducted using light microscope, in the same animals. During SC analysis in pachytene chromosome rearrangements were found in 63% of spermatocytes. Under chromosome analysis in diakinesis-metaphase 1 in the same animals chromosome rearrangements were found only in 32% of cells. SC analysis allows one to reveal chromosome rearrangements, which can not be revealed in diakinesis-metaphase 1

  11. Mitochondrial tRNA gene translocations in highly eusocial bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Silvestre

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial gene rearrangement events, especially involving tRNA genes, have been described more frequently as more complete mitochondrial genome sequences are becoming available. In the present work, we analyzed mitochondrial tRNA gene rearrangements between two bee species belonging to the tribes Apini and Meliponini within the "corbiculate Apidae". Eleven tRNA genes are in different genome positions or strands. The molecular events responsible for each translocation are explained. Considering the high number of rearrangements observed, the data presented here contradict the general rule of high gene order conservation among closely related organisms, and also represent a powerful molecular tool to help solve questions about phylogeny and evolution in bees.

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of the sexual oribatid mite Steganacarus magnus: genome rearrangements and loss of tRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domes, Katja; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan; Cameron, Stephen L

    2008-11-07

    Complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes and the gene rearrangements therein are increasingly used as molecular markers for investigating phylogenetic relationships, especially for elucidating deep splits. Contributing to the complete mt genomes of arthropods, especially Arachnida, available so far, we provide the first complete mt genome of a sarcoptiform mite species, the sexually reproducing oribatid mite Steganacarus magnus (Acari, Oribatida) which was determined by sequencing of long PCR products. The mt genome of S. magnus lacks 16 tRNAs, only those for leucine, histidine, proline, tryptophan, glutamine and serine are present. Within those tRNAs only tRNA-His and tRNA-Pro have kept their original position, the others are translocated. Furthermore, the mt genome of S. magnus consists of 13,818 bp and it is composed of 13 protein-coding genes and two genes for the ribosomal RNA subunits that are typically found in metazoan mt genomes. The gene order in S. magnus differs from the hypothetical ancestral chelicerate arrangement as conserved in Limulus polyphemus: instead of nad1-rrnL-rrnS-LNR-nad2 (tRNAs excluded) S. magnus is nad2-rrnL-nad1-rrnS-LNR. Phylogenetic analyses of a concatenated amino acid dataset of all mt protein-coding genes of 28 arthropod species suggest a sister-group relationship of sarcoptiform and prostigmatid mites (S. magnus and Leptotrombidium). The mt gene arrangement of S. magnus differs from the hypothetical ground plan of arthropods and from that of other mites further contributing to the variety of mt gene arrangements found in Arachnida. The unexpected lack of tRNAs is enigmatic, probably showing that the loss of mt genes is an ongoing evolutionary process. For solving phylogenetic relationships of oribatid mite lineages and their position within Acari further complete mt genomes are needed.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of the sexual oribatid mite Steganacarus magnus: genome rearrangements and loss of tRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Stephen L

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete mitochondrial (mt genomes and the gene rearrangements therein are increasingly used as molecular markers for investigating phylogenetic relationships, especially for elucidating deep splits. Contributing to the complete mt genomes of arthropods, especially Arachnida, available so far, we provide the first complete mt genome of a sarcoptiform mite species, the sexually reproducing oribatid mite Steganacarus magnus (Acari, Oribatida which was determined by sequencing of long PCR products. Results The mt genome of S. magnus lacks 16 tRNAs, only those for leucine, histidine, proline, tryptophan, glutamine and serine are present. Within those tRNAs only tRNA-His and tRNA-Pro have kept their original position, the others are translocated. Furthermore, the mt genome of S. magnus consists of 13,818 bp and it is composed of 13 protein-coding genes and two genes for the ribosomal RNA subunits that are typically found in metazoan mt genomes. The gene order in S. magnus differs from the hypothetical ancestral chelicerate arrangement as conserved in Limulus polyphemus: instead of nad1-rrnL-rrnS-LNR-nad2 (tRNAs excluded S. magnus is nad2-rrnL-nad1-rrnS-LNR. Phylogenetic analyses of a concatenated amino acid dataset of all mt protein-coding genes of 28 arthropod species suggest a sister-group relationship of sarcoptiform and prostigmatid mites (S. magnus and Leptotrombidium. Conclusion The mt gene arrangement of S. magnus differs from the hypothetical ground plan of arthropods and from that of other mites further contributing to the variety of mt gene arrangements found in Arachnida. The unexpected lack of tRNAs is enigmatic, probably showing that the loss of mt genes is an ongoing evolutionary process. For solving phylogenetic relationships of oribatid mite lineages and their position within Acari further complete mt genomes are needed.

  14. Solitary expression of CD7 among T-cell antigens in acute myeloid leukemia: identification of a group of patients with similar T-cell receptor beta and delta rearrangements and course of disease suggestive of poor prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A W; Hokland, M; Jørgensen, H

    1991-01-01

    to the French-American-British type M4, and four were under the age of 40. Despite intensive chemotherapy, four never obtained a complete remission and the fifth died of relapse after an allogenic bone marrow transplantation. While 12 randomly selected T-cell antigen negative AML patients showed only few...... rearrangements in Ig- or T-cell receptor (TCR) genes, such genetic alterations were demonstrated in four of five patients for the TCR delta gene and in all patients for the TCR beta gene. Interestingly, DNA fragments of similar size were demonstrated in three of five patients for both the beta and delta genes...

  15. Patient harboring a novel PIK3CA point mutation after acquired resistance to crizotinib in an adenocarcinoma with ROS1 rearrangement: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chun-Wei; Wang, Wen-Xian; Huang, Rong-Fang; He, Cheng; Liao, Xing-Hui; Zhu, You-Cai; Du, Kai-Qi; Zhuang, Wu; Chen, Yan-Ping; Chen, Gang; Fang, Mei-Yu

    2017-11-01

    ROS1 rearrangement occurs in 1-2% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. These patients would benefit from treatment with the anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, crizotinib; however, resistance to crizotinib inevitably develops in such patients despite an initial response. The mechanism of acquired resistance to crizotinib in patients with NSCLC with ROS1 rearrangement has not yet been identified. Herein, we report a case of a 66-year-old woman diagnosed with adenocarcinoma. PCR revealed no EGFR or ALK mutations. After the patient underwent several rounds of chemotherapy, crizotinib was administered. The disease explosively progressed six months later. A novel PIK3CA gene point mutation (p.L531P) was detected by next generation sequencing. This case is the second report of bypass activation conferred crizotinib resistance in a patient with NSCLC with ROS1-rearrangement, but is the first to confirm that activation of the mTOR signaling pathway leads to acquired crizotinib resistance. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Epigenetic heterogeneity affects the risk of relapse in children with t(8;21)RUNX1-RUNX1T1-rearranged AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Matteo; Tregnago, Claudia; Bisio, Valeria; Simula, Luca; Borella, Giulia; Manara, Elena; Zanon, Carlo; Zonta, Francesca; Serafin, Valentina; Accordi, Benedetta; Campello, Silvia; Buldini, Barbara; Pession, Andrea; Locatelli, Franco; Basso, Giuseppe; Pigazzi, Martina

    2018-02-02

    The somatic translocation t(8;21)(q22;q22)/RUNX1-RUNX1T1 is one of the most frequent rearrangements found in children with standard-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Despite the favorable prognostic role of this aberration, we recently observed a higher than expected frequency of relapse. Here, we employed an integrated high-throughput approach aimed at identifying new biological features predicting relapse among 34 t(8;21)-rearranged patients. We found that the DNA methylation status of patients who suffered from relapse was peculiarly different from that of children maintaining complete remission. The epigenetic signature, made up of 337 differentially methylated regions, was then integrated with gene and protein expression profiles, leading to a network, where cell-to-cell adhesion and cell-motility pathways were found to be aberrantly activated in relapsed patients. We identified most of these factors as RUNX1-RUNX1T1 targets, with Ras Homolog Family Member (RHOB) overexpression being the core of this network. We documented how RHOB re-organized the actin cytoskeleton through its downstream ROCK-LIMK-COFILIN axis: this increases blast adhesion by stress fiber formation, and reduces mitochondrial apoptotic cell death after chemotherapy treatment. Altogether, our data show an epigenetic heterogeneity within t(8;21)-rearranged AML patients at diagnosis able to influence the program of the chimeric transcript, promoting blast re-emergence and progression to relapse.

  17. Complex chromosome rearrangements related 15q14 microdeletion plays a relevant role in phenotype expression and delineates a novel recurrent syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaiuolo Anna

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complex chromosome rearrangements are constitutional structural rearrangements involving three or more chromosomes or having more than two breakpoints. These are rarely seen in the general population but their frequency should be much higher due to balanced states with no phenotypic presentation. These abnormalities preferentially occur de novo during spermatogenesis and are transmitted in families through oogenesis. Here, we report a de novo complex chromosome rearrangement that interests eight chromosomes in eighteen-year-old boy with an abnormal phenotype consisting in moderate developmental delay, cleft palate, and facial dysmorphisms. Standard G-banding revealed four apparently balanced traslocations involving the chromosomes 1;13, 3;19, 9;15 and 14;18 that appeared to be reciprocal. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis showed no imbalances at all the breakpoints observed except for an interstitial microdeletion on chromosome 15. This deletion is 1.6 Mb in size and is located at chromosome band 15q14, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Comparing the features of our patient with published reports of patients with 15q14 deletion this finding corresponds to the smallest genomic region of overlap. The deleted segment at 15q14 was investigated for gene content.

  18. Low frequency of large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Cruger, Dorthe

    2006-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose female carriers to breast and ovarian cancer. The majority of mutations identified are small deletions or insertions or are nonsense mutations. Large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 are found with varying frequencies in different populations......, but BRCA2 rearrangements have not been investigated thoroughly. The objective in this study was to determine the frequency of large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in a large group of Danish families with increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. A total of 617 families previously tested...... negative for mutations involving few bases were screened with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Two deletions in BRCA1 were identified in three families; no large rearrangements were detected in BRCA2. The large deletions constitute 3.8% of the BRCA1 mutations identified, which...

  19. Rearrangement of 5-trimethylsilylthebaine on treatment with L-selectride: an efficient synthesis of (+)-bractazonine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weibin; Wu, Huifang; Bernard, Denzil; Metcalf, Matthew D; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Flippen-Anderson, Judith L; MacKerell, Alexander D; Coop, Andrew

    2003-03-07

    Treatment of 5-trimethylsilylthebaine with L-Selectride gave rise to a rearrangement to 10-trimethylsilylbractazonine through migration of the phenyl group, whereas treatment of thebaine with strong Lewis acids is known to lead to a similar rearrangement through migration of the alkyl bridge to give, after reduction, (+)-neodihydrothebaine. It is suggested that the rearrangement of the alkyl group of thebaine is favored due to the formation of a tertiary benzylic cation. However, for 5-trimethylsilylthebaine, the lithium ion of L-Selectride acts as the Lewis acid and the beta-silyl effect dominates in the stabilization of any positive charge. This rearrangement provides a clear example of the greater relative migratory aptitude of phenyl groups over alkyl groups, and provides an efficient synthesis of (+)-bractazonine from thebaine.

  20. Total synthesis of broussonetine F: the orthoamide Overman rearrangement of an allylic diol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Naoto; Aoki, Toshihiro; Miwa, Shohei; Yamazaki, Miki; Sato, Takaaki; Chida, Noritaka

    2011-02-18

    A first total synthesis of broussonetine F from diethyl L-tartrate was achieved. The cornerstone of our synthesis was an orthoamide Overman rearrangement, which provided an allylic amino alcohol with complete diastereoselectivity.

  1. Two new ring A-rearranged clerodane diterpenes, dunniana acids A and B, from Clausena dunniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong-Ping; Shen, Yue-Mao; Hong, Xin; Zhao, Yi-Bin; Zhou, Jun; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2002-03-01

    Two ring A-rearranged clerodane diterpenes named dunniana acids A (1) and B (2) were isolated from the aerial parts of Clausena dunniana. The structures of 1 and 2 were determined using spectral methods.

  2. Oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum, cat eye, and distal 22q11 microdeletion syndromes: a unique double rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torti, Erin E; Braddock, Stephen R; Bernreuter, Kristen; Batanian, Jacqueline R

    2013-08-01

    An array-CGH on 19-year-old male showed a proximal 1.11 Mb duplication and a distal 1.7 Mb deletion of 22q11.2 regions flanking the Velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome region that remained intact. FISH analyses revealed both abnormalities to be on the same homolog 22. This double rearrangement lead to the co-existence of two syndromes: Cat eye and distal 22q11.2 microdeletion syndromes with a rare associated phenotype of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS). A review of the literature indicates that this is the second report of a proximal duplication and the fifth report of a distal deletion and OAVS suggestive of a possible OAVS candidate gene in this region. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Site-directed mutagenesis of Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I: [Fe-S] cluster-driven protein rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.E.; Burgess, B.K.; Stout, C.D.; Cash, V.L.; Dean, D.R.; Jensen, G.M.; Stephens, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I is a small protein that contains one [4Fe-4S] cluster and one [3Fe-4S] cluster. Recently the x-ray crystal structure has been redetermined and the fdxA gene, which encodes the protein, has been cloned and sequenced. Here the authors report the site-directed mutation of Cys-20, which is a ligand of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in the native protein, to alanine and the characterization of the protein product by x-ray crystallographic and spectroscopic methods. The data show that the mutant protein again contains one [4Fe-4S] cluster and one [3Fe-4S] cluster. The new [4Fe-4S] cluster obtains its fourth ligand from Cys-24, a free cysteine in the native structure. The formation of this [4Fe-4S] cluster drives rearrangement of the protein structure

  4. An unusual cytogenetic rearrangement originating from two different abnormalities in chromosome 6 in a child with acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, R R C; Mkrtchyan, H; Amaral, B A S; Liehr, T; de Souza, M T; Ney-Garcia, D R; Santos, N; Marques-Salles, T J; Ribeiro, R C; Figueiredo, A F; Silva, M L M

    2013-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is usually associated with a favorable outcome, but about 10% of patients tend to relapse. The genetic hallmark of APL is a balanced translocation involving chromosomes 15 and 17, and the PML-RARa gene fusion is found in more than 90% of these cases. Other chromosomal abnormalities are commonly found in APL, but their clinical significance has yet to be determined. Here we report a case of childhood APL that was studied by conventional cytogenetics along with molecular cytogenetic techniques. The patient showed a complex karyotype with an unusual cytogenetic rearrangement originating from two different abnormalities in a single chromosome 6. Our case is an exceptional example of a cryptic cytogenetic anomaly in APL and underscores the importance of detailed genetic characterization. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Genome-wide detection of chromosomal rearrangements, indels, and mutations in circular chromosomes by short read sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Ole; Bak, Mads; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    a combination of WGS and genome copy number analysis, for the identification of mutations that suppress the growth deficiency imposed by excessive initiations from the Escherichia coli origin of replication, oriC. The E. coli chromosome, like the majority of bacterial chromosomes, is circular, and DNA...... replication is initiated by assembling two replication complexes at the origin, oriC. These complexes then replicate the chromosome bidirectionally toward the terminus, ter. In a population of growing cells, this results in a copy number gradient, so that origin-proximal sequences are more frequent than...... origin-distal sequences. Major rearrangements in the chromosome are, therefore, readily identified by changes in copy number, i.e., certain sequences become over- or under-represented. Of the eight mutations analyzed in detail here, six were found to affect a single gene only, one was a large chromosomal...

  6. High levels of nuclear MYC protein predict the presence of MYC rearrangement in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Tina Marie; Nielsen, Ole; de Stricker, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Determining the presence of MYC gene rearrangements is becoming an increasingly important part of the diagnostic workup in aggressive lymphoma. Cytogenetic MYC alterations aid in differentiating diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) from Burkitt lymphoma. In addition, MYC aberrations are associated...... with poor prognosis in DLBCL. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and karyotyping are standard tests for detecting MYC aberrations, but these techniques are laborious and expensive. Here, we studied MYC status of 219 DLBCLs and Burkitt lymphomas using fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry......, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR). Overall, 15% of the cases had an MYC break. QRT-PCR analysis of MYC expression showed that 72% of DLBCLs with an MYC break had aberrantly high or low levels of MYC transcript. Excluding the cases with aberrantly low MYC expression, we found...

  7. Complete sequences of the highly rearranged molluscan mitochondrial genomes of the scaphopod graptacme eborea and the bivalve mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Medina, Monica; Rosenberg, Lewis A.

    2004-01-31

    We have determined the complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the scaphopod mollusk Graptacme eborea (Conrad, 1846) (14,492 nts) and completed the sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the bivalve mollusk Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758 (16,740 nts). (The name Graptacme eborea is a revision of the species formerly known as Dentalium eboreum.) G. eborea mtDNA contains the 37 genes that are typically found and has the genes divided about evenly between the two strands, but M. edulis contains an extra trnM and is missing atp8, and has all genes on the same strand. Each has a highly rearranged gene order relative to each other and to all other studied mtDNAs. G. eborea mtDNA has almost no strand skew, but the coding strand of M. edulis mtDNA is very rich in G and T. This is reflected in differential codon usage patterns and even in amino acid compositions. G. eborea mtDNA has fewer non-coding nucleotides than any other mtDNA studied to date, with the largest non-coding region being only 24 nt long. Phylogenetic analysis using 2,420 aligned amino acid positions of concatenated proteins weakly supports an association of the scaphopod with gastropods to the exclusion of Bivalvia, Cephalopoda, and Polyplacophora, but is generally unable to convincingly resolve the relationships among major groups of the Lophotrochozoa, in contrast to the good resolution seen for several other major metazoan groups.

  8. The Curtius Rearrangement of Cyclopropyl- and Cyclopropenoyl Azides. A Combined Theoretical and Experimental Mechanistic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarwade, Vinod; Dmitrenko, Olga; Bach, Robert D.; Fox, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study addresses the concertedness of the thermal Curtius rearrangement. The kinetics of the Curtius rearrangements of methyl 1-azidocarbonyl cycloprop-2-ene-1-carboxylate and methyl 1-azidocarbonyl cyclopropane-1-carboxylate were studied by 1H NMR spectroscopy, and there is close agreement between calculated and experimental enthalpies and entropies of activation. Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p)) on these same acyl azides suggest gas phase barriers of 27.8 and 25.1 kcal/mol. By comparison, gas phase activation barriers for the rearrangement of acetyl, pivaloyl and phenyl azides are 27.6, 27.4 and 30.0 kcal/mol, respectively. The barrier for the concerted Curtius reaction of acetyl azide at the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(d,p) level exhibited a comparable activation energy of 26.3 kcal/mol. Intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) analyses suggest that all of the rearrangements occur by a concerted pathway with the concomitant loss of N2. The lower activation energy for the rearrangement of methyl 1-azidocarbonyl cycloprop-2-ene-1-carboxylate relative to methyl 1-azidocarbonyl cyclopropane-1-carboxylate was attributed to a weaker bond between the carbonyl carbon and the three-member ring in the former compound. Calculations on the rearrangement of cycloprop-2-ene-1-oyl azides do not support π–stabilization of the transition state by the cyclopropene double bond. A comparison of reaction pathways at the CBS-QB3 level for the Curtius rearrangement versus the loss of N2 to form a nitrene intermediate provides strong evidence that the concerted Curtius rearrangement is the dominant process. PMID:18826325

  9. Discontinuous gradient centrifugation (DGC) decreases the proportion of chromosomally unbalanced spermatozoa in chromosomal rearrangement carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouen, Alexandre; Balet, Richard; Dorna, Maud; Hyon, Capucine; Pollet-Villard, Xavier; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Joyé, Nicole; Portnoï, Marie-France; Cassuto, Nino Guy; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Can the proportion of unbalanced spermatozoa in chromosomal rearrangement carriers be decreased through the use of discontinuous gradient centrifugation (DGC)? DGC significantly decreases the proportion of genetically unbalanced spermatozoa in chromosomal rearrangement carriers. Chromosomal rearrangement carriers present with a certain proportion of unbalanced gametes, which can lead to miscarriages or malformations in the offspring. There is presently no known way to select the balanced spermatozoa and use them for IVF. The proportion of unbalanced spermatozoa after DGC was compared with that before DGC in 21 patients with a chromosomal rearrangement. At least 500 spermatozoa were analysed per observation. Twenty-one male patients with a chromosomal rearrangement were included in this prospective study. They initially consulted for infertility, recurrent miscarriages or a history of abnormal pregnancy. The samples were split into two, with one part undergoing DGC and the other being immediately fixed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed to establish the chromosome segregation pattern of each spermatozoon. DGC significantly decreased the proportion of unbalanced spermatozoa in all but 1 of the 21 chromosomal rearrangement carriers (P < 0.05). Although DGC reduces the proportion of unbalanced spermatozoa in ejaculates from patients with chromosome rearrangements this elimination is only partial and some abnormal spermatozoa remain. Means to exclude these spermatozoa to ensure that only balanced ones are used in IVF remain to be discovered. The motility and morphology of the sperm before and after DGC were not measured. Used in IVF or intrauterine insemination, DGC could decrease the chance that a man carrying a chromosomal rearrangement will father an abnormal fetus.

  10. Synthesis of Benzofuran Derivatives via Rearrangement and Their Inhibitory Activity on Acetylcholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Yi Kong

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available During a synthesis of coumarins to obtain new candidates for treating Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, an unusual rearrangement of a benzopyran group to a benzofuran group occurred, offering a novel synthesis pathway of these benzofuran derivatives. The possible mechanism of the novel rearrangement was also discussed. All of the benzofuran derivatives have weak anti-AChE activities compared with the reference compound, donepezil.

  11. Cytological evidence of chromosomal rearrangement in the second meiotic division after exposure to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szemere, G.

    1982-01-01

    Metaphase II cells with unequal dyad-arms and obvious X/autosomal rearrangements were found after an exposure to X-rays (2 Gy) of male mice at different stages of meiosis (pachytene, diplotene and diakinesis) with a frequency of 0.2, 1.26 and 0.6%, respectively, giving a direct cytological evidence of structural chromosomal rearrangements in metaphase II cells, partly with autosomal and partly with X/autosomal partners. (author)

  12. 8q24/MYC rearrangement is a recurrent cytogenetic abnormality in blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddu, Prajwal C; Wang, Sa A; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Tang, Zhenya; Hu, Shimin; Li, Shaoying; Xu, Jie; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Tang, Guilin

    2018-03-01

    8q24/MYC rearrangements resulting in MYC overexpression occur most frequently in lymphoid neoplasms. MYC rearrangements rarely have been described in blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN). Over an 8-year period in our hospital, 5 of 41 (12%) patients with BPDCN were shown 8q24/MYC rearrangements, including 2 with t(6;8)(p21;q24), 1 with t(8;14)(q24;q32), 1 with t(X;8)(q24;q24), and 1 with t(3;8)(p25;q24). 8q24/MYC rearrangement was present in the stemline in 4 patients and in the sideline in one; the latter was a patient with primary myelofibrosis who then developed BPDCN. MYC overexpression by immunohistochemistry was variable, but largely correlated with the percentage of blasts. Four patients were treated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia-type chemotherapy regimens and 3 had a good response; 1 patient was treated with acute myeloid leukemia-type regimens and was refractory to therapy. By the end of the follow-up, 3 patients died and 2 were alive in complete remission. We conclude that 8q24/MYC rearrangements occur in 10-15% of BPDCN, often partnered with non-immunoglobulin chromosomal loci, and may play a role in BPDCN pathogenesis. In this small patient sample, patients with BPDCN and MYC rearrangement often responded to therapy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia-type chemotherapy regimens. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the spider habronattus oregonensis reveals rearranged and extremely truncated tRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masta, Susan E.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-31

    We sequenced the entire mitochondrial genome of the jumping spider Habronattus oregonensis of the arachnid order Araneae (Arthropoda: Chelicerata). A number of unusual features distinguish this genome from other chelicerate and arthropod mitochondrial genomes. Most of the transfer RNA gene sequences are greatly reduced in size and cannot be folded into typical cloverleaf-shaped secondary structures. At least nine of the tRNA sequences lack the potential to form TYC arm stem pairings, and instead are inferred to have TV-replacement loops. Furthermore, sequences that could encode the 3' aminoacyl acceptor stems in at least 10 tRNAs appear to be lacking, because fully paired acceptor stems are not possible and because the downstream sequences instead encode adjacent genes. Hence, these appear to be among the smallest known tRNA genes. We postulate that an RNA editing mechanism must exist to restore the 3' aminoacyl acceptor stems in order to allow the tRNAs to function. At least seven tRN As are rearranged with respect to the chelicerate Limulus polyphemus, although the arrangement of the protein-coding genes is identical. Most mitochondrial protein-coding genes of H. oregonensis have ATN as initiation codons, as commonly found in arthropod mtDNAs, but cytochrome oxidase subunit 2 and 3 genes apparently use UUG as an initiation codon. Finally, many of the gene sequences overlap one another and are truncated. This 14,381 bp genome, the first mitochondrial genome of a spider yet sequenced, is one of the smallest arthropod mitochondrial genomes known. We suggest that post transcriptional RNA editing can likely maintain function of the tRNAs while permitting the accumulation of mutations that would otherwise be deleterious. Such mechanisms may have allowed for the minimization of the spider mitochondrial genome.

  14. C-terminal BRE overexpression in 11q23-rearranged and t(8;16) acute myeloid leukemia is caused by intragenic transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marneth, A E; Prange, K H M; Al Hinai, A S A; Bergevoet, S M; Tesi, N; Janssen-Megens, E M; Kim, B; Sharifi, N; Yaspo, M L; Kuster, J; Sanders, M A; Stoetman, E C G; Knijnenburg, J; Arentsen-Peters, T C J M; Zwaan, C M; Stunnenberg, H G; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Haferlach, T; Fornerod, M; Jansen, J H; Valk, P J M; van der Reijden, B A; Martens, J H A

    2018-03-01

    Overexpression of the BRE (brain and reproductive organ-expressed) gene defines a distinct pediatric and adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subgroup. Here we identify a promoter enriched for active chromatin marks in BRE intron 4 causing strong biallelic expression of a previously unknown C-terminal BRE transcript. This transcript starts with BRE intron 4 sequences spliced to exon 5 and downstream sequences, and if translated might code for an N terminally truncated BRE protein. Remarkably, the new BRE transcript was highly expressed in over 50% of 11q23/KMT2A (lysine methyl transferase 2A)-rearranged and t(8;16)/KAT6A-CREBBP cases, while it was virtually absent from other AML subsets and normal tissues. In gene reporter assays, the leukemia-specific fusion protein KMT2A-MLLT3 transactivated the intragenic BRE promoter. Further epigenome analyses revealed 97 additional intragenic promoter marks frequently bound by KMT2A in AML with C-terminal BRE expression. The corresponding genes may be part of a context-dependent KMT2A-MLLT3-driven oncogenic program, because they were higher expressed in this AML subtype compared with other groups. C-terminal BRE might be an important contributor to this program because in a case with relapsed AML, we observed an ins(11;2) fusing CHORDC1 to BRE at the region where intragenic transcription starts in KMT2A-rearranged and KAT6A-CREBBP AML.

  15. Identification of seven novel mutations including the first two genomic rearrangements in SLC26A3 mutated in congenital chloride diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, P; Sormaala, M; Haila, S; Socha, J; Rajaram, U; Scheurlen, W; Sinaasappel, M; de Jonge, H; Holmberg, C; Yoshikawa, H; Kere, J

    2001-09-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by defective intestinal electrolyte absorption, resulting in voluminous osmotic diarrhea with high chloride content. A variety of mutations in the solute carrier family 26, member 3 gene (SLC26A3, previously known as CLD or DRA) are responsible for the disease. Since the identification of the SLC26A3 gene and the determination of its genomic structure, altogether three founder and 17 private mutations have been characterized within miscellaneous ethnic groups. We screened for mutations in seven unrelated families with CLD. The diagnoses were confirmed by fecal chloride measurements. The combined PCR-SSCP and sequencing analyses revealed altogether seven novel mutations including two missense mutations (S206P, D468V), two splicing defects (IVS12-1G>C, IVS13-2delA), one nonsense mutation (Q436X), one insertion/deletion mutation (2104-2105delGGins29-bp), and an intragenic deletion of SLC26A3 exons 7 and 8. Two previously identified mutations were also found. This is the first report of rearrangement mutations in SLC26A3. Molecular features predisposing SLC26A3 for the two rearrangements may include repetitive elements and palindromic-like sequences. The increasingly wide diversity of SLC26A3 mutations suggests that mutations in the SLC26A3 gene may not be rare events. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Medicinal Plant Lonicera japonica: Genome Rearrangement, Intron Gain and Loss, and Implications for Phylogenetic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu He

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The complete chloroplast (cp genome of Lonicera japonica, a common ornamental and medicinal plant in North America and East Asia, was sequenced and analyzed. The length of the L. japonica cp genome is 155,078 bp, contains a pair of inverted repeat regions (IRa and IRb, of 23,774 bp each, as well as large (LSC, 88,858 bp and small (SSC, 18,672 bp single-copy regions. A total of 129 genes were identified in the cp genome, 16 of which were duplicated within the IR regions. Relative to other plant cp genomes, the L. japonica cp genome had a unique rearrangement between trnI-CAU and trnN-GUU. In L. japonica cpDNA, rps19, rpl2, and rpl23 move to the LSC region, from the IR region. The ycf1 pesudogene in the IR region is lost, and only one copy locates in the SSC region. Comparative cp DNA sequence analyses of L. japonica with other cp genomes reveal that the gene order, and the gene and intron contents, are slightly different. The introns in ycf2 and rps18 genes are found for the first time. Four genes (clpP, petB, petD, and rpl16 lost introns. However, its genome structure, GC content, and codon usage were similar to those of typical angiosperm cp genomes. All preferred synonymous codons were found to use codons ending with A/T. The AT-rich sequences were less abundant in the coding regions than in the non-coding ones. A phylogenetic analysis based on 71 protein-coding genes supported the idea that L. japonica is a sister of the Araliaceae species. This study identified unique characteristics of the L. japonica cp genome that contribute to our understanding of the cpDNA evolution. It offers valuable information for the phylogenetic and specific barcoding of this medicinal plant.

  17. De novo complex intra chromosomal rearrangement after ICSI: characterisation by BACs micro array-CGH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quimsiyeh Mazin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In routine Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART men with severe oligozoospermia or azoospermia should be informed about the risk of de novo congenital or chromosomal abnormalities in ICSI program. Also the benefits of preimplantation or prenatal genetic diagnosis practice need to be explained to the couple. Methods From a routine ICSI attempt, using ejaculated sperm from male with severe oligozoospermia and having normal karyotype, a 30 years old pregnant woman was referred to prenatal diagnosis in the 17th week for bichorionic biamniotic twin gestation. Amniocentesis was performed because of the detection of an increased foetal nuchal translucency for one of the fetus by the sonographic examination during the 12th week of gestation (WG. Chromosome and DNA studies of the fetus were realized on cultured amniocytes Results Conventional, molecular cytogenetic and microarray CGH experiments allowed us to conclude that the fetus had a de novo pericentromeric inversion associated with a duplication of the 9p22.1-p24 chromosomal region, 46,XY,invdup(9(p22.1p24 [arrCGH 9p22.1p24 (RP11-130C19 → RP11-87O1x3]. As containing the critical 9p22 region, our case is in coincidence with the general phenotype features of the partial trisomy 9p syndrome with major growth retardation, microcephaly and microretrognathia. Conclusion This de novo complex chromosome rearrangement illustrates the possible risk of chromosome or gene defects in ICSI program and the contribution of array-CGH for mapping rapidly de novo chromosomal imbalance.

  18. Consistency of VDJ Rearrangement and Substitution Parameters Enables Accurate B Cell Receptor Sequence Annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Duncan K; Matsen, Frederick A

    2016-01-01

    VDJ rearrangement and somatic hypermutation work together to produce antibody-coding B cell receptor (BCR) sequences for a remarkable diversity of antigens. It is now possible to sequence these BCRs in high throughput; analysis of these sequences is bringing new insight into how antibodies develop, in particular for broadly-neutralizing antibodies against HIV and influenza. A fundamental step in such sequence analysis is to annotate each base as coming from a specific one of the V, D, or J genes, or from an N-addition (a.k.a. non-templated insertion). Previous work has used simple parametric distributions to model transitions from state to state in a hidden Markov model (HMM) of VDJ recombination, and assumed that mutations occur via the same process across sites. However, codon frame and other effects have been observed to violate these parametric assumptions for such coding sequences, suggesting that a non-parametric approach to modeling the recombination process could be useful. In our paper, we find that indeed large modern data sets suggest a model using parameter-rich per-allele categorical distributions for HMM transition probabilities and per-allele-per-position mutation probabilities, and that using such a model for inference leads to significantly improved results. We present an accurate and efficient BCR sequence annotation software package using a novel HMM "factorization" strategy. This package, called partis (https://github.com/psathyrella/partis/), is built on a new general-purpose HMM compiler that can perform efficient inference given a simple text description of an HMM.

  19. Consistency of VDJ Rearrangement and Substitution Parameters Enables Accurate B Cell Receptor Sequence Annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan K Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available VDJ rearrangement and somatic hypermutation work together to produce antibody-coding B cell receptor (BCR sequences for a remarkable diversity of antigens. It is now possible to sequence these BCRs in high throughput; analysis of these sequences is bringing new insight into how antibodies develop, in particular for broadly-neutralizing antibodies against HIV and influenza. A fundamental step in such sequence analysis is to annotate each base as coming from a specific one of the V, D, or J genes, or from an N-addition (a.k.a. non-templated insertion. Previous work has used simple parametric distributions to model transitions from state to state in a hidden Markov model (HMM of VDJ recombination, and assumed that mutations occur via the same process across sites. However, codon frame and other effects have been observed to violate these parametric assumptions for such coding sequences, suggesting that a non-parametric approach to modeling the recombination process could be useful. In our paper, we find that indeed large modern data sets suggest a model using parameter-rich per-allele categorical distributions for HMM transition probabilities and per-allele-per-position mutation probabilities, and that using such a model for inference leads to significantly improved results. We present an accurate and efficient BCR sequence annotation software package using a novel HMM "factorization" strategy. This package, called partis (https://github.com/psathyrella/partis/, is built on a new general-purpose HMM compiler that can perform efficient inference given a simple text description of an HMM.

  20. Chromosomal rearrangement segregating with adrenoleukodystrophy: Associated changes in color vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpern, M.; Zhang, H. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Sack, G.H. Jr.; Moser, H.W. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Krantz, D.H. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States))

    1993-10-15

    A patient from a large kindred with adrenoleukodystrophy showed profound disturbance of color ordering, color matching, increment thresholds, and luminosity. Except for color matching, his performance was similar to blue-cone [open quotes]monochromacy,[close quotes] an X chromosome-linked recessive retinal dystrophy in which color vision is dichromatic, mediated by the visual pigments of rods and short-wave-sensitive cones. Color matching, however, indicated that an abnormal rudimentary visual pigment was also present. This may reflect the presence of a recombinant visual pigment protein or altered regulation of residual pigment genes, due to DNA changes - deletion of the long-wave pigment gene and reorganized sequence 5[prime] to the pigment gene cluster - that segregate with the metabolic defect in this kindred. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. FISH analysis of hematological neoplasias with 1p36 rearrangements allows the definition of a cluster of 2.5 Mb included in the minimal region deleted in 1p36 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahortiga, Idoya; Vázquez, Iria; Belloni, Elena; Román, José P; Gasparini, Patrizia; Novo, Francisco J; Zudaire, Isabel; Pelicci, Pier G; Hernández, Jesús M; Calasanz, María J; Odero, María D

    2005-05-01

    Rearrangements in the distal region of the short arm of chromosome 1 are recurrent aberrations in a broad spectrum of human neoplasias. However, neither the location of the breakpoints (BP) on 1p36 nor the candidate genes have been fully determined. We have characterized, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the BP in 26 patients with hematological neoplasias and 1p36 rearrangements in the G-banding karyotype. FISH allowed a better characterization of all samples analyzed. Nine cases (35%) showed reciprocal translocations, 15 (58%) unbalanced rearrangements, and two (7%) deletions. We describe two new recurrent aberrations. In 18 of the 26 cases analyzed the BP were located in band 1p36, which is 25.5 Mb long. In 14 of these 18 cases (78%) and without distinction between myeloid and lymphoid neoplasias, the BP clustered in a 2.5 Mb region located between 1p36.32 and the telomere. Interestingly, this region is contained in the 10.5 Mb cluster on 1p36.22-1pter defined in cases with 1p36 deletion syndrome. The 2.5 Mb region, located on 1p36.32-1pter, has a higher frequency of occurrence of tandem repeats and segmental duplications larger than 1 kb, when compared with the 25.5 Mb of the complete 1p36 band. This could explain its proneness for involvement in chromosomal rearrangements in hematological neoplasias.

  2. Ig Light Chain Precedes Heavy Chain Gene Rearrangement during Development of B Cells in Swine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šinkora, Marek; Šinkorová, Jana; Štěpánová, Kateřina

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 198, č. 4 (2017), s. 1543-1552 ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02274S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : ANTIBODY REPERTOIRE DEVELOPMENT * ILEAL PEYERS-PATCHES * DELTA T-LYMPHOCYTES Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.856, year: 2016

  3. Inhibition of RORγT Skews TCRα Gene Rearrangement and Limits T Cell Repertoire Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Yanxia Guo; Kenzie D. MacIsaac; Yi Chen; Richard J. Miller; Renu Jain; Barbara Joyce-Shaikh; Heidi Ferguson; I-Ming Wang; Razvan Cristescu; John Mudgett; Laura Engstrom; Kyle J. Piers; Gretchen A. Baltus; Kenneth Barr; Hongjun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have elucidated the molecular mechanism of RORγT transcriptional regulation of Th17 differentiation and function. RORγT was initially identified as a transcription factor required for thymopoiesis by maintaining survival of CD4+CD8+ (DP) thymocytes. While RORγ antagonists are currently being developed to treat autoimmunity, it remains unclear how RORγT inhibition may impact thymocyte development. In this study, we show that in addition to regulating DP thymocytes survival, RORγ...

  4. Immunoglobulin lambda light chain gene rearrangements in human B-cell malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tümkaya (Talip)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractLymphocytes form the specific immune system, capable of recognizing and responding to any foreign antigen, while remaining indifferent to self components. Throughout human life, lymphocytes are continuously generated from pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. These hematopoietic stem

  5. Nodular fasciitis: A pseudomalignant clonal neoplasm characterized by USP gene rearrangements and spontaneous regression

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennebry, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Nodular fasciitis (NF) is a rapidly growing, self-limited, myofibroblastic neoplasm that typically arises in subcutaneous tissues of young adults and regresses spontaneously. Nodular fasciitis mimics sarcoma on clinical, radiological, and histological grounds and is usually, diagnosed following excision.\\r\

  6. Dysregulation of the DNA Damage Response and KMT2A Rearrangement in Fetal Liver Hematopoietic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Nanya

    Full Text Available Etoposide, a topoisomerase 2 (TOP2 inhibitor, is associated with the development of KMT2A (MLL-rearranged infant leukemia. An epidemiological study suggested that in utero exposure to TOP2 inhibitors may be involved in generation of KMT2A (MLL rearrangement. The present study examined the mechanism underlying the development of KMT2A (MLL-rearranged infant leukemia in response to in utero exposure to etoposide in a mouse model. Fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells were more susceptible to etoposide than maternal bone marrow mononuclear cells. Etoposide-induced Kmt2a breakage was detected in fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells using a newly developed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay. Assessment of etoposide-induced chromosomal translocation by next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq identified several chimeric fusion messenger RNAs that were generated by etoposide treatment. However, Kmt2a (Mll-rearranged fusion mRNA was detected in Atm-knockout mice, which are defective in the DNA damage response, but not in wild-type mice. The present findings suggest that in utero exposure to TOP2 inhibitors induces Kmt2a rearrangement when the DNA damage response is defective.

  7. Wnt target genes identified by DNA microarrays in immature CD34+ thymocytes regulate proliferation and cell adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J.T. Staal (Frank); F. Weerkamp (Floor); M.R.M. Baert (Miranda); C.M. van den Burg (Caroline); M. van Noort (Mascha); E.F. de Haas (Edwin); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe thymus is seeded by very small numbers of progenitor cells that undergo massive proliferation before differentiation and rearrangement of TCR genes occurs. Various signals mediate proliferation and differentiation of these cells, including Wnt signals. Wnt signals

  8. FRG2, an FSHD candidate gene, is transcriptionally upregulated in differentiating primary myoblast cultures of FSHD patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkers, T.; Deidda, G.; Koningsbruggen, S. van; Geel, M. van; Lemmers, R.J.L.F.; Deutekom, J.C.T. van; Figlewicz, D.; Hewitt, J.E.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Frants, R.R.; Maarel, S.M. van der

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autosomal dominant facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is associated with partial deletion of the subtelomeric D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4qter. This chromosomal rearrangement may result in regional chromatin relaxation and transcriptional deregulation of genes nearby.

  9. Polymorphisms, Chromosomal Rearrangements, and Mutator Phenotype Development during Experimental Evolution of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillard, François P.; Ribbera, Angela; Xiao, Kun; Ritari, Jarmo; Rasinkangas, Pia; Paulin, Lars; Palva, Airi; Hao, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is a lactic acid bacterium widely marketed by the food industry. Its genomic analysis led to the identification of a gene cluster encoding mucus-binding SpaCBA pili, which is located in a genomic island enriched in insertion sequence (IS) elements. In the present study, we analyzed by genome-wide resequencing the genomic integrity of L. rhamnosus GG in four distinct evolutionary experiments conducted for approximately 1,000 generations under conditions of no stress or salt, bile, and repetitive-shearing stress. Under both stress-free and salt-induced stress conditions, the GG population (excluding the mutator lineage in the stress-free series [see below]) accumulated only a few single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and no frequent chromosomal rearrangements. In contrast, in the presence of bile salts or repetitive shearing stress, some IS elements were found to be activated, resulting in the deletion of large chromosomal segments that include the spaCBA-srtC1 pilus gene cluster. Remarkably, a high number of SNPs were found in three strains obtained after 900 generations of stress-free growth. Detailed analysis showed that these three strains derived from a founder mutant with an altered DNA polymerase subunit that resulted in a mutator phenotype. The present work confirms the stability of the pilus production phenotype in L. rhamnosus GG under stress-free conditions, highlights the possible evolutionary scenarios that may occur when this probiotic strain is extensively cultured, and identifies external factors that affect the chromosomal integrity of GG. The results provide mechanistic insights into the stability of GG in regard to its extensive use in probiotic and other functional food products. IMPORTANCE Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is a widely marketed probiotic strain that has been used in numerous clinical studies to assess its health-promoting properties. Hence, the stability of the probiotic functions of L. rhamnosus GG

  10. Polymorphisms, Chromosomal Rearrangements, and Mutator Phenotype Development during Experimental Evolution of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillard, François P; Ribbera, Angela; Xiao, Kun; Ritari, Jarmo; Rasinkangas, Pia; Paulin, Lars; Palva, Airi; Hao, Yanling; de Vos, Willem M

    2016-07-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is a lactic acid bacterium widely marketed by the food industry. Its genomic analysis led to the identification of a gene cluster encoding mucus-binding SpaCBA pili, which is located in a genomic island enriched in insertion sequence (IS) elements. In the present study, we analyzed by genome-wide resequencing the genomic integrity of L. rhamnosus GG in four distinct evolutionary experiments conducted for approximately 1,000 generations under conditions of no stress or salt, bile, and repetitive-shearing stress. Under both stress-free and salt-induced stress conditions, the GG population (excluding the mutator lineage in the stress-free series [see below]) accumulated only a few single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and no frequent chromosomal rearrangements. In contrast, in the presence of bile salts or repetitive shearing stress, some IS elements were found to be activated, resulting in the deletion of large chromosomal segments that include the spaCBA-srtC1 pilus gene cluster. Remarkably, a high number of SNPs were found in three strains obtained after 900 generations of stress-free growth. Detailed analysis showed that these three strains derived from a founder mutant with an altered DNA polymerase subunit that resulted in a mutator phenotype. The present work confirms the stability of the pilus production phenotype in L. rhamnosus GG under stress-free conditions, highlights the possible evolutionary scenarios that may occur when this probiotic strain is extensively cultured, and identifies external factors that affect the chromosomal integrity of GG. The results provide mechanistic insights into the stability of GG in regard to its extensive use in probiotic and other functional food products. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is a widely marketed probiotic strain that has been used in numerous clinical studies to assess its health-promoting properties. Hence, the stability of the probiotic functions of L. rhamnosus GG is of importance, and

  11. Rearrangement of a common cellular DNA domain on chromosome 4 in human primary liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquinelli, C.; Garreau, F.; Bougueleret, L.; Cariani, E.; Thiers, V.; Croissant, O.; Hadchouel, M.; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C.; Grzeschik, K.H.

    1988-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA integration has been shown to occur frequently in human hepatocellular carcinomas. The authors have investigated whether common cellular DNA domains might be rearranged, possibly by HBV integration, in human primary liver tumors. Unique cellular DNA sequences adjacent to an HBV integration site were isolated from a patient with hepatitis B surface antigen-positive hepatocellular carcinoma. These probes detected rearrangement of this cellular region of chromosomal DNA in 3 of 50 additional primary liver tumors studied. Of these three tumor samples, two contained HBV DNA, without an apparent link between the viral DNA and the rearranged allele; HBV DNA sequences were not detected in the third tumor sample. By use of a panel of somatic cell hybrids, these unique cellular DNA sequences were shown to be located on chromosome 4. Therefore, this region of chromosomal DNA might be implicated in the formation of different tumors at one step of liver cell transformation, possible related to HBV integration

  12. Recurrent large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an Irish case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Terri P; Cody, Nuala; Carroll, Cliona; Duff, Marie; Farrell, Michael; Bradley, Lisa; Gallagher, David; McDevitt, Trudi; Green, Andrew J

    2017-08-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 confer a highly increased risk of cancers, mainly of the breast and ovary. Most variants are point mutations or small insertions/deletions detectable by Sanger sequencing. Large genomic rearrangements, including deletions/duplications of multiple exons, are not routinely detectable by Sanger sequencing, but can be reliably identified by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), and account for 5-17% mutations in different populations. Comprehensive mutation testing using these two methods has been facilitated via our centre since 2005. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of and phenotype associated with large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in an Irish cohort. An observational cohort study was undertaken. Patients with large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1/BRCA2 were identified from a prospectively maintained database of MLPA test results. Phenotypic and genotypic data were retrieved by chart review. Large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 were identified in 49 families; and in BRCA2 in 7 families, representing ~11% of mutations in BRCA1/BRCA2 in Ireland. The most common large genomic rearrangement in BRCA1 was deletion of exons 1-23 (11 families, 7 from Co. Galway). Other common mutations included deletions of exon 3 (8 families) and exons 1-2 (6 families). Deletion of exons 19-20 in BRCA2 represented the familial mutation in five families, all from East Ireland (Wexford/Wicklow/Dublin). It is evident that a significant proportion of highly penetrant pathogenic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 will be missed if testing is limited to PCR-based Sanger sequencing alone. Screening for large genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in the routine diagnostic workflow is critical to avoid false negative results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Stabilization of dicentric translocations through secondary rearrangements mediated by multiple mechanisms in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Pennaneach

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs observed in S. cerevisiae mutants with increased rates of accumulating GCRs include predicted dicentric GCRs such as translocations, chromosome fusions and isoduplications. These GCRs resemble the genome rearrangements found as mutations underlying inherited diseases as well as in the karyotypes of many cancers exhibiting ongoing genome instabilityThe structures of predicted dicentric GCRs were analyzed using multiple strategies including array-comparative genomic hybridization, pulse field gel electrophoresis, PCR amplification of predicted breakpoints and sequencing. The dicentric GCRs were found to be unstable and to have undergone secondary rearrangements to produce stable monocentric GCRs. The types of secondary rearrangements observed included: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ-dependent intramolecular deletion of centromeres; chromosome breakage followed by NHEJ-mediated circularization or broken-end fusion to another chromosome telomere; and homologous recombination (HR-dependent non-reciprocal translocations apparently mediated by break-induced replication. A number of these GCRs appeared to have undergone multiple bridge-fusion-breakage cycles. We also observed examples of chromosomes with extensive ongoing end decay in mec1 tlc1 mutants, suggesting that Mec1 protects chromosome ends from degradation and contributes to telomere maintenance by HR.HR between repeated sequences resulting in secondary rearrangements was the most prevalent pathway for resolution of dicentric GCRs regardless of the structure of the initial dicentric GCR, although at least three other resolution mechanisms were observed. The resolution of dicentric GCRs to stable rearranged chromosomes could in part account for the complex karyotypes seen in some cancers.

  14. Clinical and CT characteristics of surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas harboring ALK rearrangements or EGFR mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hua [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Schabath, Matthew B. [Department of Cancer Epidemiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Liu, Ying [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Department of Cancer Imaging and Metabolism, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Han, Ying [Department of Biotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Li, Qi [Department of Pathology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Gillies, Robert J. [Department of Cancer Imaging and Metabolism, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Department of Radiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Ye, Zhaoxiang, E-mail: yezhaoxiang@163.com [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To determine if clinical and CT characteristics of surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas can distinguish those harboring ALK rearrangements from EGFR mutations. Materials and methods: Patients who had surgical resection and histologically confirmed lung adenocarcinoma were enrolled, including 41 patients with ALK rearrangements and 66 patients with EGFR mutations. Eighteen categorical and six quantitative CT characteristics were used to evaluate the tumors. Differences in clinical and CT characteristics between the two groups were investigated. Results: Age (P = 0.003), histological subtypes (P < 0.001), pathological stage (P = 0.007), and five CT characteristics, including size (P < 0.001), GGO (P = 0.001), bubble-like lucency (P = 0.048), lymphadenopathy (P = 0.001), and tumor shadow disappearance rate (P = 0.005) were significantly different between patients harboring ALK rearrangements compared to patients with EGFR mutations. When we compared histologic components, a solid pattern was more common (P = 0.009) in tumors with ALK rearrangements, and lepidic and acinar patterns were more common (P < 0.001 and P = 0.040, respectively) in those with EGFR mutations. Backward elimination analyses revealed that age (OR = 0.93; 95% CI 0.89–0.98), GGO (OR = 0.14; 95% CI 0.03–0.67), and lymphadenopathy (OR = 4.15; 95% CI 1.49–11.60) were significantly associated with ALK rearrangement status. Conclusion: Our analyses revealed that clinical and CT characteristics of lung adenocarcinomas harboring ALK rearrangements were significantly different, compared with those with EGFR mutations. These differences may be related to the molecular pathology of these diseases.

  15. Intratumor Heterogeneity of ALK-Rearrangements and Homogeneity of EGFR-Mutations in Mixed Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Zito Marino

    Full Text Available Non Small Cell Lung Cancer is a highly heterogeneous tumor. Histologic intratumor heterogeneity could be 'major', characterized by a single tumor showing two different histologic types, and 'minor', due to at least 2 different growth patterns in the same tumor. Therefore, a morphological heterogeneity could reflect an intratumor molecular heterogeneity. To date, few data are reported in literature about molecular features of the mixed adenocarcinoma. The aim of our study was to assess EGFR-mutations and ALK-rearrangements in different intratumor subtypes and/or growth patterns in a series of mixed adenocarcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas.590 Non Small Cell Lung Carcinomas tumor samples were revised in order to select mixed adenocarcinomas with available tumor components. Finally, only 105 mixed adenocarcinomas and 17 adenosquamous carcinomas were included in the study for further analyses. Two TMAs were built selecting the different intratumor histotypes. ALK-rearrangements were detected through FISH and IHC, and EGFR-mutations were detected through IHC and confirmed by RT-PCR.10/122 cases were ALK-rearranged and 7 from those 10 showing an intratumor heterogeneity of the rearrangements. 12/122 cases were EGFR-mutated, uniformly expressing the EGFR-mutated protein in all histologic components.Our data suggests that EGFR-mutations is generally homogeneously expressed. On the contrary, ALK-rearrangement showed an intratumor heterogeneity in both mixed adenocarcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas. The intratumor heterogeneity of ALK-rearrangements could lead to a possible impact on the therapeutic responses and the disease outcomes.

  16. Clinical and CT characteristics of surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas harboring ALK rearrangements or EGFR mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hua; Schabath, Matthew B.; Liu, Ying; Han, Ying; Li, Qi; Gillies, Robert J.; Ye, Zhaoxiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if clinical and CT characteristics of surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas can distinguish those harboring ALK rearrangements from EGFR mutations. Materials and methods: Patients who had surgical resection and histologically confirmed lung adenocarcinoma were enrolled, including 41 patients with ALK rearrangements and 66 patients with EGFR mutations. Eighteen categorical and six quantitative CT characteristics were used to evaluate the tumors. Differences in clinical and CT characteristics between the two groups were investigated. Results: Age (P = 0.003), histological subtypes (P < 0.001), pathological stage (P = 0.007), and five CT characteristics, including size (P < 0.001), GGO (P = 0.001), bubble-like lucency (P = 0.048), lymphadenopathy (P = 0.001), and tumor shadow disappearance rate (P = 0.005) were significantly different between patients harboring ALK rearrangements compared to patients with EGFR mutations. When we compared histologic components, a solid pattern was more common (P = 0.009) in tumors with ALK rearrangements, and lepidic and acinar patterns were more common (P < 0.001 and P = 0.040, respectively) in those with EGFR mutations. Backward elimination analyses revealed that age (OR = 0.93; 95% CI 0.89–0.98), GGO (OR = 0.14; 95% CI 0.03–0.67), and lymphadenopathy (OR = 4.15; 95% CI 1.49–11.60) were significantly associated with ALK rearrangement status. Conclusion: Our analyses revealed that clinical and CT characteristics of lung adenocarcinomas harboring ALK rearrangements were significantly different, compared with those with EGFR mutations. These differences may be related to the molecular pathology of these diseases.

  17. Rearranged Terpenoids from the Marine Sponge Darwinella cf. oxeata and Its Predator, the Nudibranch Felimida grahami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Ramirez, Maria Camila; Williams, David E; Gubiani, Juliana R; Parra, Lizbeth L L; Santos, Mario F C; Ferreira, Daiane D; Mesquita, Juliana T; Tempone, Andre G; Ferreira, Antonio G; Padula, Vinícius; Hajdu, Eduardo; Andersen, Raymond J; Berlinck, Roberto G S

    2017-03-24

    Marine sponges are a rich source of terpenoids with rearranged spongian carbon skeletons. Investigation of extracts from the sponge Darwinella cf. oxeata yielded four new rearranged diterpenoids, oxeatine (2) and oxeatamides H-J (3-5), as well as the known metabolites oxeatamide A (6), oxeatamide A methyl ester (7), and membranolide (1). Oxeatine (2) has a new heterocyclic skeleton, while oxeatamide J (5) has an N-methyl urea group included in a γ-lactam moiety. UPLC-QTOF analysis of the extract obtained from the mantle of the nudibranch Felimida grahami indicated the presence of 1 and 4.

  18. Free energy landscape and cooperatively rearranging region in a hard sphere glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshidome, Takashi; Yoshimori, Akira; Odagaki, Takashi

    2007-08-01

    Exploiting the density functional theory, we calculate the free energy landscape (FEL) of the hard sphere glass in three dimensions. From the FEL, we estimate the number of the particles in the cooperatively rearranging region (CRR). We find that the density dependence of the number of the particles in the CRR is expressed as a power law function of the density. Analyzing the relaxation process in the CRR, we also find that the string motion is the elementary process for the structural relaxation, which leads to the natural definition of the simultaneously rearranging region as the particles displaced in the string motion.

  19. Aminocyclopentanols as sugar mimics. Synthesis from unsaturated bicyclic lactones by Overman rearrangement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøjstrup, Marie; Fanefjord, Mette; Lundt, Inge

    2007-01-01

    Bicyclic cyclopentane lactones, prepared from bromodeoxyaldonolactones, were transformed into aminocyclopentanols with an Overman rearrangement as the key step. Two of the compounds prepared, 7 and 19, were found to be good inhibitors of jack bean alpha-mannosidase and beta-D-N-acetylglucosaminid......Bicyclic cyclopentane lactones, prepared from bromodeoxyaldonolactones, were transformed into aminocyclopentanols with an Overman rearrangement as the key step. Two of the compounds prepared, 7 and 19, were found to be good inhibitors of jack bean alpha-mannosidase and beta...

  20. Unexpected rearrangements in the synthesis of an unsymmetrical tridentate dianionic N-heterocyclic carbene

    KAUST Repository

    Despagnet-Ayoub, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the same ethylenediamine species, three valuable carbene precursors were synthesized under differing conditions: a tridentate dianionic N-heterocyclic carbene bearing an aniline, a phenol and a central dihydroimidazolium salt, its benzimidazolium isomer by intramolecular rearrangement and a dicationic benzimidazolium-benzoxazolium salt by changing the Brønsted acid from HCl to HBF4. A DFT study was performed to understand the rearrangement pathway. The structure of a bis[(NCO)carbene] zirconium complex was determined. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. The cloning of the Bar region and the B breakpoint in Drosophila melanogaster: evidence for a transposon-induced rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, S I; Rosenberg, D; Szostak, H; Rubin, D; Schedl, P

    1989-08-01

    We have cloned the B breakpoint in Drosophila melanogaster using DNA from a P-M-induced revertant of B, which has a P element inserted at the B breakpoint. The analysis of the B DNA reveals that there is a transposable element, B104, right at the breakpoint. This suggests that this element may have been involved in the generation of the B breakpoint and the associated tandem duplication. One possible mechanism to generate the B duplication is a recombination event between two B104 elements, one at 16A1 and the other at 16A7. DNA sequencing data of the junctions of the B104 element support this model. Four partial revertants of B are the result of insertions of transposable elements very close to the B breakpoint. This supports the hypothesis that the breakpoint is the cause of the B mutation. The clones from B were used to isolate wild-type clones from 16A1, the location of the Bar gene. Four rearrangement breakpoints associated with various Bar mutations map within a 37-kb region, suggesting that the Bar gene is very large.

  2. Lung cancer with concurrent EGFR mutation and ROS1 rearrangement: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu YC

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available You-cai Zhu,1,2,* Chun-wei Xu,3,* Xiao-qian Ye,4 Man-xiang Yin,4 Jin-xian Zhang,2 Kai-qi Du,2 Zhi-hao Zhang,2 Jian Hu1 1Department of Thoracic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 2Department of Thoracic Surgery, Chinese People’s Armed Police Force, Zhejiang Corps Hospital, Jiaxing, Zhejiang, 3Department of Pathology, Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing, 4Department of Pathology, Chinese People’s Armed Police Force, Zhejiang Corps Hospital, Jiaxing, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: ROS1 rearrangement has recently emerged as a new molecular subtype in non-small cell lung cancer, and is predominantly found in lung adenocarcinomas compared with other oncogenes such as EGFR, KRAS, or ALK. Patients who have both mutations are extremely rare. Here we report a 50-year-old female diagnosed with adenocarcinoma with sarcomatoid differentiation, who was shown to have EGFR and ROS1 mutations. The patient was treated surgically and received three cycles of adjuvant postoperative chemotherapy. In addition, we reviewed the previously reported cases and related literature. This presentation will provide further understanding of the underlying molecular biology and optimal treatment for non-small cell lung cancer patients with more than one driver mutation. Keywords: non-small cell lung cancer, EGFR gene mutation, ROS1 fusion gene

  3. Pathogenesis of Germline and Somatic NF1 Rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Reiter, L.T., Murakami , T., Kocuth, T., Pentao, L., Muznv D.M., Gibbs, R.A., and Lupski, J.R. (1996) A recombination hotspot responsible for two...17. Hum. Mol. Genet.. 3, 223-228. 43. Reiter, L.T., Murakami , T., Koeuth, T., Gibbs, R.A., and Lupski, J.R. (1997) The human COX10 gene is disrupted...Billstrom, R., Borg , A., Nilsson, P.G., Van Den Berghe, H., Hagemeijer, A., Mitelman, F., and Hoglund, M. (1999) Isochromosome 17q in blast crisis of

  4. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall; Marshall, Christian; Scherer, Stephen; Vieland, Veronica; Bartlett, Christopher; Mangin, La Vonne; Goedken, Rhinda; Segre, Alberto; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cuccaro, Michael; Gilbert, John; Wright, Harry; Abramson, Ruth; Betancur, Catalina; Bourgeron, Thomas; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Buxbaum, Joseph; Davis, Kenneth; Hollander, Eric; Silverman, Jeremy; Hallmayer, Joachim; Lotspeich, Linda; Sutcliffe, James; Haines, Jonathan; Folstein, Susan; Piven, Joseph; Wassink, Thomas; Sheffield, Val; Geschwind, Daniel; Bucan, Maja; Brown, Ted; Cantor, Rita; Constantino, John; Gilliam, Conrad; Herbert, Martha; Lajonchere, Clara; Ledbetter, David; Lese-Martin, Christa; Miller, Janet; Nelson, Stan; Samango-Sprouse, Carol; Spence, Sarah; State, Matthew; Tanzi, Rudolph; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Devlin, Bernie; Estes, Annette; Flodman, Pamela; Klei, Lambertus; Mcmahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Korvatska, Elena; Rodier, Patricia; Schellenberg, Gerard; Smith, Moyra; Spence, Anne; Stodgell, Chris; Tepper, Ping Guo; Wijsman, Ellen; Yu, Chang-En; Rogé, Bernadette; Mantoulan, Carine; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Poustka, Annemarie; Felder, Bärbel; Klauck, Sabine; Schuster, Claudia; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Schmötzer, Gabi; Tsiantis, John; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Carone, Simona; Toma, Claudio; Van Engeland, Herman; De Jonge, Maretha; Kemner, Chantal; Koop, Frederieke; Langemeijer, Marjolein; Hijmans, Channa; Staal, Wouter; Baird, Gillian; Bolton, Patrick; Rutter, Michael; Weisblatt, Emma; Green, Jonathan; Aldred, Catherine; Wilkinson, Julie-Anne; Pickles, Andrew; Le Couteur, Ann; Berney, Tom; Mcconachie, Helen; Bailey, Anthony; Francis, Kostas; Honeyman, Gemma; Hutchinson, Aislinn; Parr, Jeremy; Wallace, Simon; Monaco, Anthony; Barnby, Gabrielle; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Lamb, Janine; Sousa, Ines; Sykes, Nuala; Cook, Edwin; Guter, Stephen; Leventhal, Bennett; Salt, Jeff; Lord, Catherine; Corsello, Christina; Hus, Vanessa; Weeks, Daniel; Volkmar, Fred; Tauber, Maïté; Fombonne, Eric; Shih, Andy; Meyer, Kacie

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASD is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASD by using Affymetrix 10K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and 1168 families with ≥ 2 affected individuals to perform the largest linkage scan to date, while also analyzing copy number variation (CNV) in these families. Linkage and CNV analyses implicate chromosome 11p12-p13 and neurexins, respectively, amongst other candidate loci. Neurexins team with previously-implicated neuroligins for glutamatergic synaptogenesis, highlighting glutamate-related genes as promising candidates for ASD. PMID:17322880

  5. Characterization of KRAS Rearrangements in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Song; Shankar, Sunita; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M.; Ateeq, Bushra; Sasaki, Atsuo T.; Jing, Xiaojun; Robinson, Daniel; Cao, Qi; Prensner, John R.; Yocum, Anastasia K.; Wang, Rui; Fries, Daniel F.; Han, Bo; Asangani, Irfan A.; Cao, Xuhong; Li, Yong; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Pflueger, Dorothee; Gopalan, Anuradha; Reuter, Victor E.; Kahoud, Emily Rose; Cantley, Lewis C.; Rubin, Mark A.; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2011-01-01

    Using an integrative genomics approach called Amplification Breakpoint Ranking and Assembly (ABRA) analysis, we nominated KRAS as a gene fusion with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2L3 in the DU145 cell line, originally derived from prostate cancer metastasis to the brain. Interestingly, analysis of tissues revealed that 2 of 62 metastatic prostate cancers harbored aberrations at the KRAS locus. In DU145 cells, UBE2L3-KRAS produces a fusion protein, specific knock-down of which, attenuates cell invasion and xenograft growth. Ectopic expression of the UBE2L3-KRAS fusion protein exhibits transforming activity in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and RWPE prostate epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. In NIH 3T3 cells, UBE2L3-KRAS attenuates MEK/ERK signaling, commonly engaged by oncogenic mutant KRAS, and instead signals via AKT and p38 MAPK pathways. This is the first report of a gene fusion involving Ras family suggesting that this aberration may drive metastatic progression in a rare subset of prostate cancers. PMID:22140652

  6. Large BRCA1 and BRCA2 genomic rearrangements in Danish high risk breast-ovarian cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas v O; Jønson, Lars; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Large genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 account for 0-36% of all disease causing mutations in various populations, while large genomic rearrangements in BRCA2 are more rare. We examined 642 East Danish breast and/or ovaria...

  7. DEM Modelling of Granule Rearrangement and Fracture Behaviours During a Closed-Die Compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Ryoichi; Kadota, Kazunori; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Shimosaka, Atsuko; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki

    2017-08-01

    The closed-die compaction behaviour of D-mannitol granules has been simulated by the discrete element method (DEM) to investigate the granule rearrangement and fracture behaviour during compaction which affects the compactibility of the tablet. The D-mannitol granules produced in a fluidized bed were modelled as agglomerates of primary particles connected by linear spring bonds. The validity of the model granule used in the DEM simulation was demonstrated by comparing to the experimental results of a uniaxial compression test. During uniaxial compression, the numerical results of the force-displacement curve corresponded reasonably well to the experimental data. The closed-die compaction of the modelled granules was carried out to investigate the rearrangement and fracture behaviours of the granule at different upper platen velocities. The forces during closed-die compaction calculated by DEM fluctuated in the low-pressure region due to the rearrangement of granules. A Heckel analysis showed that the force fluctuation occurred at the initial bending region of the Heckel plot, which represents the granule rearrangement and fracture. Furthermore, the upper platen velocity affected the trend of compaction forces, which can lead to compaction failure due to capping. These results could contribute to designing the appropriate granules during closed-die compaction.

  8. Evaluation of NGS and RT-PCR methods for ALK rearrangement in European NSCLC patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Letovanec, Igor; Finn, Stephen; Zygoura, Panagiota

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The reported prevalence of ALK rearrangement in NSCLC ranges from 2%-7%. The primary standard diagnostic method is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Recently, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has also proven to be a reproducible and sensitive technique. Reverse transcriptase-poly...

  9. Synthesis of N-protected Galactosamine Building Blocks from D-Tagatose via the Heyns Rearrangement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrodnigg, Tanja M.; Lundt, Inge; Stütz, Arnold E.

    2006-01-01

    N-Acetyl-D-galactosamine (11), a very important naturally occurring building block of oligosaccharides, is easily accessible via the Heyns rearrangement of D-tagatose (3) with benzylamine. The short and efficient synthesis of various differently N-protected D-galactosamine derivatives is reported....

  10. Configurational rearrangements of bistable centers in covalent semiconductors - phase transitions of the second type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanyukovich, V.A.; Karas', V.I.; Lomako, V.M.

    1989-01-01

    A new radiation configurational-bistable defect diffring from the known similar defects by the fact that it possessestemperature inversion of states is detected in gallium arsenide. Configurational-bistable rearrangements are shown to be considered as phase transitions of the second type

  11. A Pyrazole to Furan Rearrangement. Thermolysis of 5-Azido-4-formylpyrazoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Niels; Simonsen, Klaus B.; Thorup, Niels

    1999-01-01

    -phenylpyrazoles 3a-c. The formation of the 4-cyano-2-phenyl-3- phenylazofurans 2a-c is the first example in the pyrazole series of a nitrene rearrangement, in which the parent heterocyclic system of the product differs from that of the starting material. The isolation of equimolar amounts of the two products...

  12. Isolation of Betulin and Rearrangement to Allobetulin: A Biomimetic Natural Product Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Brian; Bentley, Michael D.; Chung, Bong Y.; Lynch, Nicholas G.; Jensen, Bruce L.

    2007-01-01

    The triterpenes are a diverse class of widely distributed natural products derived from squalene. Various cyclization and subsequent rearrangement reactions produce many complex structural types. These compounds frequently display a wide divergence of biological properties. For example the pentacyclic triterpene, betulin, is isolated from white…

  13. Mapping of 5q35 chromosomal rearrangements within a genomically unstable region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buysse, Karen; Crepel, An; Menten, Björn

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent molecular studies of breakpoints of recurrent chromosome rearrangements revealed the role of genomic architecture in their formation. In particular, segmental duplications representing blocks of >1 kb with >90% sequence homology were shown to mediate non-allelic homologous reco...

  14. ON THE PECULIARITIES OF THE RING CONTRACTION REACTIONS OF HOMODRIMANES VIA ACID MEDIATED EPOXIDE REARRANGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veaceslav Kulciţki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A selective rearrangement of a epoxy-homodrimanic substrate is described. Using fluorosulfonic acid at low temperature leads by ring contraction to a perhydrindanic structure. On the contrary, using boron trifluoride-diethyl ether at r.t. selectively brings about angular methyl migration.

  15. The rearrangement process in a two-stage broadcast switching network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren B.

    1988-01-01

    The rearrangement process in the two-stage broadcast switching network presented by F.K. Hwang and G.W. Richards (ibid., vol.COM-33, no.10, p.1025-1035, Oct. 1985) is considered. By defining a certain function it is possible to calculate an upper bound on the number of connections to be moved...

  16. Thermally rearranged (TR) bismaleimide-based network polymers for gas separation membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Yu Seong; Lee, Won Hee; Seong, Jong Geun; Kim, Ju Sung; Wang, Ho Hyun; Doherty, Cara M; Hill, Anita J; Lee, Young Moo

    2016-11-15

    Highly permeable, thermally rearranged polymer membranes based on bismaleimide derivatives that exhibit excellent CO 2 permeability up to 5440 Barrer with a high BET surface area (1130 m 2 g -1 ) are reported for the first time. In addition, the membranes can be easily used to form semi-interpenetrating networks with other polymers endowing them with superior gas transport properties.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms and Diagnosis of Chromosome 22q11.2 Rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Beverly S.

    2008-01-01

    Several recurrent, constitutional genomic disorders are present on chromosome 22q. These include the translocations and deletions associated with DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndrome and the translocations that give rise to the recurrent t(11;22) supernumerary der(22) syndrome (Emanuel syndrome). The rearrangement breakpoints on 22q cluster…

  18. Iridium-Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Isomerization: Expedient Synthesis of Carbohydrates from Achmatowicz Rearrangement Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao-Yuan; Yang, Ka; Bennett, Scott R; Guo, Sheng-rong; Tang, Weiping

    2015-07-20

    A highly stereoselective dynamic kinetic isomerization of Achmatowicz rearrangement products was discovered. This new internal redox isomerization provided ready access to key intermediates for the enantio- and diastereoselective synthesis of a series of naturally occurring sugars. The nature of the de novo synthesis also enables the preparation of both enantiomers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Enantioselective Copper-Catalyzed Arylation-Driven Semipinacol Rearrangement of Tertiary Allylic Alcohols with Diaryliodonium Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukamto, Daniel H; Gaunt, Matthew J

    2017-07-12

    A copper-catalyzed enantioselective arylative semipinacol rearrangement of allylic alcohols using diaryliodonium salts is reported. Chiral Cu(II)-bisoxazoline catalysts initiate an electrophilic alkene arylation, triggering a 1,2-alkyl migration to afford a range of nonracemic spirocyclic ketones with high yields, diastereo- and enantioselectivities.

  20. Electron beam-induced Fries rearrangement of arylsulfonamides and arylsulfonates in the crystalline state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Jun; Yuasa, Kanako; Yamashita, Takashi; Maekawa, Yasunari; Yoshida, Masaru

    2003-01-01

    Electron beam (EB)-induced reactions of organic crystals containing a carbonyl or a sulfonyl group have been investigated. The EB irradiation of benzenesulfonanilide (BSA) in the crystalline state induced the Fries rearrangement to yield o- and p-aminodiphenylsulfones as the major and minor products, respectively. Several BSA derivatives also had the same reactivity, while benzanilide as the corresponding carbonyl compound did not rearrange under the same conditions. These results showed that the S-N bond could be cleaved selectively by EB irradiation but the C-N bond couldn't, which could take place only by the use of EB. The EB irradiation of phenyl p-toluenesulfonate (PTS) crystals gave not only Fries-type products but also the oxidation product. By comparing with the reactivity of liquid phenyl benzenesulfonate, the EB-induced Fries rearrangement was suggested to proceed under crystalline lattice restrictions. The G-values of arylsulfonamides and arylsulfonates were in the range of ca. 1-2 molecules per 100 eV of absorbed energy. This is the first Fries rearrangement via direct excitation by EB irradiation. (author)

  1. DNA template strand sequencing of single-cells maps genomic rearrangements at high resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falconer, Ester; Hills, Mark; Naumann, Ulrike; Poon, Steven S. S.; Chavez, Elizabeth A.; Sanders, Ashley D.; Zhao, Yongjun; Hirst, Martin; Lansdorp, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    DNA rearrangements such as sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) are sensitive indicators of genomic stress and instability, but they are typically masked by single-cell sequencing techniques. We developed Strand-seq to independently sequence parental DNA template strands from single cells, making it

  2. Aminocyclopentanols as sugar mimics. Synthesis from unsaturated bicyclic lactones by Overman rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøjstrup, Marie; Fanefjord, Mette; Lundt, Inge

    2007-10-07

    Bicyclic cyclopentane lactones, prepared from bromodeoxyaldonolactones, were transformed into aminocyclopentanols with an Overman rearrangement as the key step. Two of the compounds prepared, 7 and 19, were found to be good inhibitors of jack bean alpha-mannosidase and beta-D-N-acetylglucosaminidase, respectively.

  3. Brönsted Acid of Keggin Type Polyoxometalate Catalyzed Pinacol Rearrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldes Lesbani

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Keggin type polyoxometalates K4[a-SiW12O40] was synthesized and transformed to H4[a-SiW12O40]. Both catalysts have been used for pinacol rearrangement in toluene at 373 oK. The results showed that reaction of pinacol rearrangement did not proceed using K4[a-SiW12O40] as catalyst. The extent reac-tion time until 20 h also did not produce pinacolone as main product. By using H4[a-SiW12O40] as cata-lyst at 1 h reaction time gave conversion 100% with formation of pinacolone 72%. The reaction produce 27% of 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene as byproduct and 99% carbon balance for the reaction. This phe-nomenon indicated the Brönsted acid is a key role for catalytic reaction of pinacol rearrangement to pinacolone. © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rightsSubmitted: 21st January 2014; Revised: 21st April 2014; Accepted: 3rd May 2014[ How to Cite: Lesbani, A., Mohadi, R., (2014. Brönsted Acid of Keggin Type Polyoxometalate Catalyzed Pinacol Rearrangement. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9 (2: 136-141. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.2.6074.136-141 ][ Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.2.6074.136-141

  4. Intergenomic rearrangements after polyploidization of Kengyilia thoroldiana (Poaceae: Triticeae affected by environmental factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuxia Wang

    Full Text Available Polyploidization is a major evolutionary process. Approximately 70-75% species of Triticeae (Poaceae are polyploids, involving 23 genomes. To investigate intergenomic rearrangements after polyploidization of Triticeae species and to determine the effects of environmental factors on them, nine populations of a typical polyploid Triticeae species, Kengyilia thoroldiana (Keng J.L.Yang et al. (2n = 6x = 42, StStPPYY, collected from different environments, were studied using genome in situ hybridization (GISH. We found that intergenomic rearrangements occurred between the relatively large P genome and the small genomes, St (8.15% and Y (22.22%, in polyploid species via various types of translocations compared to their diploid progenitors. However, no translocation was found between the relatively small St and Y chromosomes. Environmental factors may affect rearrangements among the three genomes. Chromosome translocations were significantly more frequent in populations from cold alpine and grassland environments than in populations from valley and lake-basin habitats (P<0.05. The relationship between types of chromosome translocations and altitude was significant (r = 0.809, P<0.01. Intergenomic rearrangements associated with environmental factors and genetic differentiation of a single basic genome should be considered as equally important genetic processes during species' ecotype evolution.

  5. Insights in dynamic kinome reprogramming as a consequence of MEK inhibition in MLL-rearranged AML

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, K. R.; ter Elst, A.; Mahmud, H.; Scherpen, F. J. G.; Diks, S. H.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; de Haas, V.; Guryev, V.; de Bont, E. S. J. M.

    Single kinase-targeted cancer therapies often failed prolonged responses because cancer cells bypass through alternative routes. In this study, high-throughput kinomic and proteomic approaches enabled to identify aberrant activity profiles in mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged acute myeloid

  6. The diverse effects of complex chromosome rearrangements and chromothripsis in cancer development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Pagter, Mirjam S.; Kloosterman, Wigard P.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, enormous progress has been made with respect to the identification of somatic mutations that contribute to cancer development. Mutation types range from small substitutions to large structural genomic rearrangements, including complex reshuffling of the genome. Sets of mutations in

  7. Radiation-induced genomic instability driven by de novo chromosomal rearrangement hot spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Allen, R.N.; Moore, S.R.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability has become generally recognized as a critical contributor to tumor progression by generating the necessary number of genetic alterations required for expression of a clinically significant malignancy. Our study of chromosomal instability investigates the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in instability acting predominantly in cis. Here we present an analysis of the karyotypic distribution of instability associated chromosomal rearrangements in TK6 and derivative human lymphoblasts. Karyotypic analysis performed on a total of 455 independent clones included 183 rearrangements distributed among 100 separate unstable clones. The results demonstrate that the breakpoints of chromosomal rearrangements in unstable clones are non-randomly distributed throughout the genome. This pattern is statistically significant, and incompatible with expectations for random breakage associated with loss or alteration of a trans-acting factor. Furthermore, specific chromosomal breakage hot spots associated with instability have been identified; these occur in several independent unstable clones and are often repeatedly broken and rejoined during the outgrowth of an individual clone. In complimentary studies, genomic instability was generated without any exposure to a DNA-damaging agent, but rather by transfection with alpha heterochromatin DNA. In a prospective analysis, human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11 were transfected with heterochromatic alpha DNA repeats and clones were analyzed by chromosome 11 painting. Transfection with alpha DNA was associated with karyotypic heterogeneity in 40% of clones examined; control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic heterogeneity

  8. Unique mosaicism of structural chromosomal rearrangement: is chromosome 18 preferentially involved?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pater, J.M. de; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Scheres, J.M.J.C.

    2003-01-01

    The mentally normal mother of a 4-year-old boy with del(18)(q21.3) syndrome was tested cytogenetically to study the possibility of an inherited structural rearrangement of chromosome 18. She was found to carry an unusual mosaicism involving chromosomes 18 and 21. Two unbalanced cell lines were seen

  9. Identification of a structural chromosomal rearrangement in the karyotype of a root vole from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadzhafova, R.S.; Bulatova, N.Sh.; Kozlovskii, A.I.; Ryabov, I.N.

    1994-01-01

    Karyological studies of rodents within a 30-km radius of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant revealed one female root vole (Microtus oeconomus) with an abnormal karyotype. The use of C, G, and AgNOR banding methods allowed determination that morphological changes in two nonhomologous autosomes, which were accompanied by rearrangements in distribution of G bands, heterochromatin, and NOR, are the result of a reciprocal translocation. Chromosomal aberrations were probably inherited or appeared in embryogenesis, since none of the analyzed cells of the studied vole had a normal karyotype. It is important to note that this rearrangement was detected five years after the meltdown. Both breaks and reunions of the chromosomes that participate in this rearrangement are probably located in regions that are not important for functioning of these chromosomes. Thus, it can be supposed that the detected rearrangement did not influence the viability of the vole. This karyotype was compared to a standard karyotype of a root vole from another area of the species range. The heteromorphism of the first pair of chromosomes in both voles, which was detected for the first time, is probably normal for the karyotype of M. oeconomus and is not linked with any radiation-induced intrachromosomal aberrations

  10. ROS1 rearrangements in lung adenocarcinoma: prognostic impact, therapeutic options and genetic variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixido, Cristina; Michels, Sebastian; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Viteri, Santiago; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Fischer, Rieke; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Fassunke, Jana; Sebastian, Martin; Serke, Monika; Kaminsky, Britta; Randerath, Winfried; Gerigk, Ulrich; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Krüger, Stefan; Schnell, Roland; Rothe, Achim; Kropf-Sanchen, Cornelia; Heukamp, Lukas; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background While recent data show that crizotinib is highly effective in patients with ROS1 rearrangement, few data is available about the prognostic impact, the predictive value for different treatments, and the genetic heterogeneity of ROS1-positive patients. Patients and Methods 1137 patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung were analyzed regarding their ROS1 status. In positive cases, next-generation sequencing (NGS) was performed. Clinical characteristics, treatments and outcome of these patients were assessed. Overall survival (OS) was compared with genetically defined subgroups of ROS1-negative patients. Results 19 patients of 1035 evaluable (1.8%) had ROS1-rearrangement. The median OS has not been reached. Stage IV patients with ROS1-rearrangement had the best OS of all subgroups (36.7 months, p < 0.001). 9 of 14 (64.2%) patients had at least one response to chemotherapy. Estimated mean OS for patients receiving chemotherapy and crizotinib was 5.3 years. Ten patients with ROS1-rearrangement (52.6%) harbored additional aberrations. Conclusion ROS1-rearangement is not only a predictive marker for response to crizotinib, but also seems to be the one of the best prognostic molecular markers in NSCLC reported so far. In stage IV patients, response to chemotherapy was remarkable high and overall survival was significantly better compared to other subgroups including EGFR-mutated and ALK-fusion-positive NSCLC. PMID:25868855

  11. A DFT exploration of the enantioselective rearrangement of cyclohexene oxide to cyclohexenol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Peter; Norrby, Per-Ola; Andersson, Pher G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present computational results for the (1S,3R,4R)-3-(pyrrolidinyl)-methyl-2-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane mediated rearrangement of cyclohexene oxide. The results nicely explain the differences in enantioselectivities between catalytic and stoichiometric mode between different ligands...

  12. Chiral bicycle imidazole nucleophilic catalysts: rational design, facile synthesis, and successful application in asymmetric Steglich rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenfeng; Xie, Fang; Jia, Jia; Zhang, Wanbin

    2010-11-17

    A new type of chiral bicycle imidazole nucleophilic catalyst was rationally designed, facilely synthesized, and successfully applied in an asymmetric Steglich rearrangement with good to excellent yield and enantioselectivity at ambient temperature. Moreover, it can be easily recycled with almost no reduction of catalytic efficiency. This is the first example for the successful chiral imidazole nucleophilic catalyst without H-bonding assistance.

  13. Immunophenotypic and cytogenetic findings of B-lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma associated with combined IGH/BCL2 and MYC rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Katalin; Holden, Jaclyn; Johnson, Laura J; Davion, Simone; Robetorye, Ryan S

    2017-07-01

    B-lymphoblastic leukemias (B-LBL) with combined IGH/BCL2 and MYC rearrangement are rare and their clinical, cytogenetic and immunophenotypic features are not well characterized. Here, we describe a case of a 61-year-old woman with B-LBL associated with these cytogenetic alterations and present a review of the literature of this disease. Four-color flow cytometry (FC) was performed on a BD FACSCanto II flow cytometer. Data were analyzed with BD FACSDiva software. Cytogenetic, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and molecular studies were performed by conventional methods. A review of the literature was performed by a PubMed-assisted search. Including our case, eight B-LBLs associated with a documented "double-hit" karyotype (IGH/BCL2 and 8q24/MYC rearrangement) were identified in the literature (male/female 2/6, age 15-65). Three occurred de-novo, and five had a history of a CD10+ B-cell lymphoma. The typical immunophenotype was CD10, CD19, TdT positive, and negative for CD34 and surface immunoglobulin (Ig), established either by FC or immunohistochemistry. Seven cases were CD20-, and one case was CD20+. Translocation partners of MYC varied, and included IGH, lambda light chain, and an unknown gene on chromosome 9. Prognosis was poor with median survival of five months. Patients with B-LBL associated with a combined IGH/BCL2 and MYC rearrangement often have a history of a mature B-cell lymphoma. The immunophenotype of these cases is different from that of mature "double-hit" lymphomas; FC is essential to differentiate the B-LBL cases from the leukemic phase of mature B-cell lymphomas. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2015 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  14. Are ribosomal DNA clusters rearrangement hotspots? A case study in the genus Mus (Rodentia, Muridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douzery Emmanuel JP

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in comparative genomics have considerably improved our knowledge of the evolution of mammalian karyotype architecture. One of the breakthroughs was the preferential localization of evolutionary breakpoints in regions enriched in repetitive sequences (segmental duplications, telomeres and centromeres. In this context, we investigated the contribution of ribosomal genes to genome reshuffling since they are generally located in pericentromeric or subtelomeric regions, and form repeat clusters on different chromosomes. The target model was the genus Mus which exhibits a high rate of karyotypic change, a large fraction of which involves centromeres. Results The chromosomal distribution of rDNA clusters was determined by in situ hybridization of mouse probes in 19 species. Using a molecular-based reference tree, the phylogenetic distribution of clusters within the genus was reconstructed, and the temporal association between rDNA clusters, breakpoints and centromeres was tested by maximum likelihood analyses. Our results highlighted the following features of rDNA cluster dynamics in the genus Mus: i rDNA clusters showed extensive diversity in number between species and an almost exclusive pericentromeric location, ii a strong association between rDNA sites and centromeres was retrieved which may be related to their shared constraint of concerted evolution, iii 24% of the observed breakpoints mapped near an rDNA cluster, and iv a substantial rate of rDNA cluster change (insertion, deletion also occurred in the absence of chromosomal rearrangements. Conclusions This study on the dynamics of rDNA clusters within the genus Mus has revealed a strong evolutionary relationship between rDNA clusters and centromeres. Both of these genomic structures coincide with breakpoints in the genus Mus, suggesting that the accumulation of a large number of repeats in the centromeric region may contribute to the high level of chromosome

  15. A new structural rearrangement associated to Wolfram syndrome in a child with a partial phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Francesca M; Ghirardello, Stefano; Giavoli, Claudia; Gangi, Silvana; Dioni, Laura; Crippa, Milena; Finelli, Palma; Bergamaschi, Silvia; Mosca, Fabio; Spada, Anna; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo

    2012-11-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes insipidus (DI), insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DM), optic atrophy (OA) and deafness caused by mutations in WFS1 gene (4p16.1), which encodes an endoplasmic reticulum protein, called Wolframin. We describe the case of an infant who presented hypernatremia and severe hypoplasia of the left eyeball with alteration of visual evoked potentials. Persistent hypernatremia, iposmolar polyuria and high plasma osmolality suggested DI, confirmed by a normal urine concentration after vasopressin test. Treatment with vasopressin allowed a normalization of sodium levels and urine output. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed absence of the neurohypophysis hyperintense signal, normal adenohypophysis and optic tracts hypoplasia. The concomitant presence of DI and OA, even in the absence of DM and deafness, prompted the suspicion of WS and complete genetic analysis was performed. Genomic DNA sequencing of WFS1 showed no inactivating mutations described to date, but suggested a structural mutation as markers genotyping revealed a segmental paternal heterodisomy involving the upstream regulatory region (promoter and 5'UTR). cDNA sequencing revealed the coexistence of the wild-type transcript and two splice variants; one variant, probably benign, is known in literature and the other one causes the loss of exon 2, containing the translation initiation site. Western blot confirmed a marked protein reduction. During the clinical follow-up child's condition remained stable and glucose metabolism is still in the standard. In conclusion, the phenotype associated with this structural rearrangement, which substantially reduces the synthesis of Wolframin, confirms a tissue-specific pattern of expression of WFS1, suggests the presence of a different protein dosage sensitivity in different tissues and could be causative of DI and OA in our patient. The "incomplete" phenotype here described, usually

  16. Co-clinical quantitative tumor volume imaging in ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishino, Mizuki, E-mail: Mizuki_Nishino@DFCI.HARVARD.EDU [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Sacher, Adrian G.; Gandhi, Leena; Chen, Zhao; Akbay, Esra [Department of Medical Oncology and Department of Medicine Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Fedorov, Andriy; Westin, Carl F.; Hatabu, Hiroto [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Johnson, Bruce E.; Hammerman, Peter; Wong, Kwok-kin [Department of Medical Oncology and Department of Medicine Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Role of co-clinical studies in precision cancer medicine is increasingly recognized. • This study compared tumor volume in co-clinical trials of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. • Similarities and differences of tumor volume changes in mice and humans were noted. • The study provides insights to optimize murine co-clinical trial designs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate and compare the volumetric tumor burden changes during crizotinib therapy in mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Volumetric tumor burden was quantified on serial imaging studies in 8 bitransgenic mice with ALK-rearranged adenocarcinoma treated with crizotinib, and in 33 human subjects with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. The volumetric tumor burden changes and the time to maximal response were compared between mice and humans. Results: The median tumor volume decrease (%) at the maximal response was −40.4% (range: −79.5%–+11.7%) in mice, and −72.9% (range: −100%–+72%) in humans (Wilcoxon p = 0.03). The median time from the initiation of therapy to maximal response was 6 weeks in mice, and 15.7 weeks in humans. Overall volumetric response rate was 50% in mice and 97% in humans. Spider plots of tumor volume changes during therapy demonstrated durable responses in the human cohort, with a median time on therapy of 13.1 months. Conclusion: The present study described an initial attempt to evaluate quantitative tumor burden changes in co-clinical imaging studies of genomically-matched mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. Differences are noted in the degree of maximal volume response between the two cohorts in this well-established paradigm of targeted therapy, indicating a need for further studies to optimize co-clinical trial design and interpretation.

  17. Micellar dipolar rearrangement is sensitive to hydrophobic chain length: Implication for structural switchover of piroxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethy, Dasaratha; Chakraborty, Hirak

    2016-10-01

    The interfacial properties of the membrane are exceptionally vital in drug-membrane interaction. They not only select out a particular prototropic form of the drug molecule for incorporation, but are also potent enough to induce structural switchover of these drugs in several cases. In this work, we quantitatively monitored the change in dipolar rearrangement of the micellar interface (as a simplified membrane mimic) by measuring the dielectric constant and dipole potential with the micellization of SDS at pH 3.6. The dielectric constant and dipole potential were measured utilizing the fluorescence of polarity sensitive probe, pyrene and potential-sensitive probe, di-8-ANEPPS, respectively. Our study demonstrates that the change in dipolar rearrangement directly influences the switchover equilibrium between the anionic and neutral from of piroxicam. We have further extended our work to evaluate the effect of hydrophobic chain length of the surfactants on the dipolar rearrangement and its effect on the structural switchover of piroxicam. It is interesting that the extent of switchover of piroxicam is directly correlated with the dipolar rearrangement induced bythe varying hydrophobic chain length of the surfactants. To the best of our knowledge, our results constitute the first report to show the dependence of dipole potential on the hydrophobic chain length of the surfactant and demonstrate that the dipolar rearrangement directly tunes the extent of structural switchover of piroxicam, which was so far only intuitive. We consider that this new finding would have promising implication in drug distribution and drug efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Internal flow inside droplets within a concentrated emulsion during droplet rearrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Chia Min; Gai, Ya; Tang, Sindy K. Y.

    2018-03-01

    Droplet microfluidics, in which each droplet serves as a micro-reactor, has found widespread use in high-throughput biochemical screening applications. These droplets are often concentrated at various steps to form a concentrated emulsion. As part of a serial interrogation and sorting process, such concentrated emulsions are typically injected into a tapered channel leading to a constriction that fits one drop at a time for the probing of droplet content in a serial manner. The flow physics inside the droplets under these flow conditions are not well understood but are critical for predicting and controlling the mixing of reagents inside the droplets as reactors. Here we investigate the flow field inside droplets of a concentrated emulsion flowing through a tapered microchannel using micro-particle image velocimetry. The confining geometry of the channel forces the number of rows of drops to reduce by one at specific and uniformly spaced streamwise locations, which are referred to as droplet rearrangement zones. Within each rearrangement zone, the phase-averaged velocity results show that the motion of the droplets involved in the rearrangement process, also known as a T1 event, creates vortical structures inside themselves and their adjacent droplets. These flow structures increase the circulation inside droplets up to 2.5 times the circulation in droplets at the constriction. The structures weaken outside of the rearrangement zones suggesting that the flow patterns created by the T1 process are transient. The time scale of circulation is approximately the same as the time scale of a T1 event. Outside of the rearrangement zones, flow patterns in the droplets are determined by the relative velocity between the continuous and disperse phases.

  19. Co-clinical quantitative tumor volume imaging in ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Mizuki; Sacher, Adrian G.; Gandhi, Leena; Chen, Zhao; Akbay, Esra; Fedorov, Andriy; Westin, Carl F.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Johnson, Bruce E.; Hammerman, Peter; Wong, Kwok-kin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Role of co-clinical studies in precision cancer medicine is increasingly recognized. • This study compared tumor volume in co-clinical trials of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. • Similarities and differences of tumor volume changes in mice and humans were noted. • The study provides insights to optimize murine co-clinical trial designs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate and compare the volumetric tumor burden changes during crizotinib therapy in mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Volumetric tumor burden was quantified on serial imaging studies in 8 bitransgenic mice with ALK-rearranged adenocarcinoma treated with crizotinib, and in 33 human subjects with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. The volumetric tumor burden changes and the time to maximal response were compared between mice and humans. Results: The median tumor volume decrease (%) at the maximal response was −40.4% (range: −79.5%–+11.7%) in mice, and −72.9% (range: −100%–+72%) in humans (Wilcoxon p = 0.03). The median time from the initiation of therapy to maximal response was 6 weeks in mice, and 15.7 weeks in humans. Overall volumetric response rate was 50% in mice and 97% in humans. Spider plots of tumor volume changes during therapy demonstrated durable responses in the human cohort, with a median time on therapy of 13.1 months. Conclusion: The present study described an initial attempt to evaluate quantitative tumor burden changes in co-clinical imaging studies of genomically-matched mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. Differences are noted in the degree of maximal volume response between the two cohorts in this well-established paradigm of targeted therapy, indicating a need for further studies to optimize co-clinical trial design and interpretation.

  20. Chromosomal instability can be induced by the formation of breakage-prone chromosome rearrangement junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.N.; Ritter, L.; Moore, S.R.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Studies in our lab have led to the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in chromosomal instability acting predominantly in cis. For example, specific breakage of large blocks of centromeric region heterochromatin on chromosome 16q by treatment with 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) is associated with repeated rearrangement of chromosome 16q during outgrowth of DAP-treated clones, thereby establishing a link between the initial site of damage and the occurrence of persistent chromosomal instability. Similarly, karyotypic analysis of gamma ray induced instability demonstrated that chromosomal rearrangements in sub-clones were significantly clustered near the site of previously identified chromosomal rearrangement junctions in unstable parental clones. This study investigates the hypothesis that integration of transfected sequences into host chromosomes could create breakage-prone junction regions and persistent genomic instability without exposure to DNA-damage agents. These junctions may mimic the unstable chromosomal rearrangements induced by DAP or radiation, and thus provide a test of the broader hypothesis that instability can to some extent be attributed to the formation of novel chromosomal breakage hot spots. These experiments were performed using human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11, which was used to monitor instability in a chromosomal painting assay. AL cells were transfected with a 2.5 Kb fragment containing multiple copies of the 180 bp human alpha heterochromatic repeat, which resulted in chromosomal instability in 41% of the transfected clones. Parallel exposure to gamma-radiation resulted in a similar level of chromosomal instability, although control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic instability. Chromosomal instability induced by integration of alpha heterochromatic repeats was also frequently associated with delayed reproductive

  1. Kinase gene fusions in defined subsets of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jacqueline; Couts, Kasey; Sheren, Jamie; Saichaemchan, Siriwimon; Ariyawutyakorn, Witthawat; Avolio, Izabela; Cabral, Ethan; Glogowska, Magdelena; Amato, Carol; Robinson, Steven; Hintzsche, Jennifer; Applegate, Allison; Seelenfreund, Eric; Gonzalez, Rita; Wells, Keith; Bagby, Stacey; Tentler, John; Tan, Aik-Choon; Wisell, Joshua; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Robinson, William

    2017-01-01

    Genomic rearrangements resulting in activating kinase fusions have been increasingly described in a number of cancers including malignant melanoma, but their frequency in specific melanoma subtypes has not been reported. We used break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to identify genomic rearrangements in tissues from 59 patients with various types of malignant melanoma including acral lentiginous, mucosal, superficial spreading, and nodular. We identified four genomic rearrangements involving the genes BRAF, RET, and ROS1. Of these, three were confirmed by Immunohistochemistry (IHC) or sequencing and one was found to be an ARMC10-BRAF fusion that has not been previously reported in melanoma. These fusions occurred in different subtypes of melanoma but all in tumors lacking known driver mutations. Our data suggest gene fusions are more common than previously thought and should be further explored particularly in melanomas lacking known driver mutations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. [Genome Rearrangements in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 with the Involvement of the Plasmid pRhico and the Prophage phiAb-Cd].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsy, E I; Petrova, L P

    2015-12-01

    Alphaproteobacteria of the species Azospirillum brasilense have a multicomponent genome that undergoes frequent spontaneous rearrangements, yielding changes in the plasmid profiles of strains. Specifically, variants (Cd, Sp7.K2, Sp7.1, Sp7.4, Sp7.8, etc.) of the type strainA. brasilense Sp7 that had lost a 115-MDa plasmid were previously selected. In many of them, the molecular weight of a 90-MDa plasmid (p90 or pRhico), which is a kind of "depot" for glycopolymer biosynthesis genes, increased. In this study, a collection of primers was designed to the plasmid pRhico and to the DNA of prophage phiAb-Cd integrated in it. The use ofthese primers in polymerase chain reactions allowed the detection of the probable excision of phiAb-Cd phage from the DNA of A. brasilense variants Sp7.4 and Sp7.8 and other alterations of the pRhico structure in A. brasilense strains Cd, Sp7.K2, and Sp7.8. The developed primers and PCR conditions may be recoin mended for primary analysis of spontaneous plasmid rearrangements in A. brasilense Sp7 and related strains.

  3. Markov State Models Reveal a Two-Step Mechanism of miRNA Loading into the Human Argonaute Protein: Selective Binding followed by Structural Re-arrangement

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Hanlun

    2015-07-16

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs) are central components in RNA interference, which is a key cellular mechanism for sequence-specific gene silencing. Despite intensive studies, molecular mechanisms of how Ago recognizes miRNA remain largely elusive. In this study, we propose a two-step mechanism for this molecular recognition: selective binding followed by structural re-arrangement. Our model is based on the results of a combination of Markov State Models (MSMs), large-scale protein-RNA docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Using MSMs, we identify an open state of apo human Ago-2 in fast equilibrium with partially open and closed states. Conformations in this open state are distinguished by their largely exposed binding grooves that can geometrically accommodate miRNA as indicated in our protein-RNA docking studies. miRNA may then selectively bind to these open conformations. Upon the initial binding, the complex may perform further structural re-arrangement as shown in our MD simulations and eventually reach the stable binary complex structure. Our results provide novel insights in Ago-miRNA recognition mechanisms and our methodology holds great potential to be widely applied in the studies of other important molecular recognition systems.

  4. Chromosome Evolution in the Free-Living Flatworms: First Evidence of Intrachromosomal Rearrangements in Karyotype Evolution of Macrostomum lignano (Platyhelminthes, Macrostomida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadesenets, Kira S; Ershov, Nikita I; Berezikov, Eugene; Rubtsov, Nikolay B

    2017-10-30

    The free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano is a hidden tetraploid. Its genome was formed by a recent whole genome duplication followed by chromosome fusions. Its karyotype (2n = 8) consists of a pair of large chromosomes (MLI1), which contain regions of all other chromosomes, and three pairs of small metacentric chromosomes. Comparison of MLI1 with metacentrics was performed by painting with microdissected DNA probes and fluorescent in situ hybridization of unique DNA fragments. Regions of MLI1 homologous to small metacentrics appeared to be contiguous. Besides the loss of DNA repeat clusters (pericentromeric and telomeric repeats and the 5S rDNA cluster) from MLI1, the difference between small metacentrics MLI2 and MLI4 and regions homologous to them in MLI1 were revealed. Abnormal karyotypes found in the inbred DV1/10 subline were analyzed, and structurally rearranged chromosomes were described with the painting technique, suggesting the mechanism of their origin. The revealed chromosomal rearrangements generate additional diversity, opening the way toward massive loss of duplicated genes from a duplicated genome. Our findings suggest that the karyotype of M. lignano is in the early stage of genome diploidization after whole genome duplication, and further studies on M. lignano and closely related species can address many questions about karyotype evolution in animals.

  5. Chromosome Evolution in the Free-Living Flatworms: First Evidence of Intrachromosomal Rearrangements in Karyotype Evolution of Macrostomum lignano (Platyhelminthes, Macrostomida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira S. Zadesenets

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano is a hidden tetraploid. Its genome was formed by a recent whole genome duplication followed by chromosome fusions. Its karyotype (2n = 8 consists of a pair of large chromosomes (MLI1, which contain regions of all other chromosomes, and three pairs of small metacentric chromosomes. Comparison of MLI1 with metacentrics was performed by painting with microdissected DNA probes and fluorescent in situ hybridization of unique DNA fragments. Regions of MLI1 homologous to small metacentrics appeared to be contiguous. Besides the loss of DNA repeat clusters (pericentromeric and telomeric repeats and the 5S rDNA cluster from MLI1, the difference between small metacentrics MLI2 and MLI4 and regions homologous to them in MLI1 were revealed. Abnormal karyotypes found in the inbred DV1/10 subline were analyzed, and structurally rearranged chromosomes were described with the painting technique, suggesting the mechanism of their origin. The revealed chromosomal rearrangements generate additional diversity, opening the way toward massive loss of duplicated genes from a duplicated genome. Our findings suggest that the karyotype of M. lignano is in the early stage of genome diploidization after whole genome duplication, and further studies on M. lignano and closely related species can address many questions about karyotype evolution in animals.

  6. Law-medicine interfacing: patenting of human genes and mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialho, Arsenio M; Chakrabarty, Ananda M

    2011-08-01

    Mutations, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), deletions and genetic rearrangements in specific genes in the human genome account for not only our physical characteristics and behavior, but can lead to many in-born and acquired diseases. Such changes in the genome can also predispose people to cancers, as well as significantly affect the metabolism and efficacy of many drugs, resulting in some cases in acute toxicity to the drug. The testing of the presence of such genetic mutations and rearrangements is of great practical and commercial value, leading many of these genes and their mutations/deletions and genetic rearrangements to be patented. A recent decision by a judge in the Federal District Court in the Southern District of New York, has created major uncertainties, based on the revocation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene patents, in the eligibility of all human and presumably other gene patents. This article argues that while patents on BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes could be challenged based on a lack of utility, the patenting of the mutations and genetic rearrangements is of great importance to further development and commercialization of genetic tests that can save human lives and prevent suffering, and should be allowed.

  7. MicroRNA-106b~25 cluster is upregulated in relapsed MLL-rearranged pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboon, Lonneke J; Obulkasim, Askar; de Rooij, Jasmijn D E; Katsman-Kuipers, Jenny E; Sonneveld, Edwin; Baruchel, André; Trka, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Pieters, Rob; Cloos, Jacqueline; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Zwaan, Christian Michel; Fornerod, Maarten; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2016-07-26

    The most important reason for therapy failure in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is relapse. In order to identify miRNAs that contribute to the clonal evolution towards relapse in pediatric AML, miRNA expression profiling of 127 de novo pediatric AML cases were used. In the diagnostic phase, no miRNA signatures could be identified that were predictive for relapse occurrence, in a large pediatric cohort, nor in a nested mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged pediatric cohort. AML with MLL- rearrangements are found in 15-20% of all pediatric AML samples, and reveal a relapse rate up to 50% for certain translocation partner subgroups. Therefore, microRNA expression profiling of six paired initial diagnosis-relapse MLL-rearranged pediatric AML samples (test cohort) and additional eight paired initial diagnosis-relapse samples with MLL-rearrangements (validation cohort) was performed. A list of 53 differentially expressed miRNAs was identified of which the miR-106b~25 cluster, located in intron 13 of MCM7, was the most prominent. These differentially expressed miRNAs however could not predict a relapse in de novo AML samples with MLL-rearrangements at diagnosis. Furthermore, higher mRNA expression of both MCM7 and its upstream regulator E2F1 was found in relapse samples with MLL-rearrangements. In conclusion, we identified the miR-106b~25 cluster to be upregulated in relapse pediatric AML with MLL-rearrangements.

  8. Targeted next-generation sequencing at copy-number breakpoints for personalized analysis of rearranged ends in solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Kyoung Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The concept of the utilization of rearranged ends for development of personalized biomarkers has attracted much attention owing to its clinical applicability. Although targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS for recurrent rearrangements has been successful in hematologic malignancies, its application to solid tumors is problematic due to the paucity of recurrent translocations. However, copy-number breakpoints (CNBs, which are abundant in solid tumors, can be utilized for identification of rearranged ends. METHOD: As a proof of concept, we performed targeted next-generation sequencing at copy-number breakpoints (TNGS-CNB in nine colon cancer cases including seven primary cancers and two cell lines, COLO205 and SW620. For deduction of CNBs, we developed a novel competitive single-nucleotide polymorphism (cSNP microarray method entailing CNB-region refinement by competitor DNA. RESULT: Using TNGS-CNB, 19 specific rearrangements out of 91 CNBs (20.9% were identified, and two polymerase chain reaction (PCR-amplifiable rearrangements were obtained in six cases (66.7%. And significantly, TNGS-CNB, with its high positive identification rate (82.6% of PCR-amplifiable rearrangements at candidate sites (19/23, just from filtering of aligned sequences, requires little effort for validation. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that TNGS-CNB, with its utility for identification of rearrangements in solid tumors, can be successfully applied in the clinical laboratory for cancer-relapse and therapy-response monitoring.

  9. Sporadic ret-rearranged papillary carcinoma of the thyroid: a subset of slow growing, less aggressive thyroid neoplasms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, P; Fonseca, E; Wynford-Thomas, D; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    1998-05-01

    Despite the large amount of information accumulated on the role played by ret activation in the oncogenesis of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), the biological and clinical significance of such activation 'in vivo' remains controversial. The aim of this study was to address some of the existing controversies by comparing two groups of unselected PTCs, one with and the other without ret rearrangement, with regard to several clinicopathological and biological features. Thirty-three PTCs were selected at random. ret rearrangement was found in eight cases (24.2 per cent) using Southern blot analysis. The mean age of the patients with tumours displaying ret rearrangement (28 +/- 3.1 years) was significantly lower than that of the patients harbouring cases that did not present rearrangement (45 +/- 2.9 years). The large majority of the tumours with ret rearrangement displayed a papillary or mixed follicular-papillary pattern and very low proliferative activity. ret rearrangement correlated significantly with decreased cytoplasmic expression of E-cadherin. No significant differences were found regarding the gender of the patients, tumour size, multicentricity, extrathyroidal growth, vascular invasion, lymphocytic infiltration, lymph node involvement or the expression of E-cadherin (membrane), c-erb-B2, c-met, Bcl-2, and vimentin. It is proposed that sporadic PTCs harbouring a ret rearrangement occur frequently as slow growing, papillary, or predominantly papillary tumours that do not usually progress towards less differentiated neoplasms representing what might be described as a Bonsai phenotype.

  10. Chromosomal Rearrangements in Post-Chernobyl Papillary Thyroid Carcinomas: Evaluation by Spectral Karyotyping and Automated Interphase FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig Hieber

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural genomic rearrangements are frequent findings in human cancers. Therefore, papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs were investigated for chromosomal aberrations and rearrangements of the RET proto-oncogene. For this purpose, primary cultures from 23 PTC have been established and metaphase preparations were analysed by spectral karyotyping (SKY. In addition, interphase cell preparations of the same cases were investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH for the presence of RET/PTC rearrangements using RET-specific DNA probes. SKY analysis of PTC revealed structural aberrations of chromosome 11 and several numerical aberrations with frequent loss of chromosomes 20, 21, and 22. FISH analysis for RET/PTC rearrangements showed prevalence of this rearrangement in 72% (16 out of 22 of cases. However, only subpopulations of tumour cells exhibited this rearrangement indicating genetic heterogeneity. The comparison of visual and automated scoring of FISH signals revealed concordant results in 19 out of 22 cases (87% indicating reliable scoring results using the optimised scoring parameter for RET/PTC with the automated Metafer4 system. It can be concluded from this study that genomic rearrangements are frequent in PTC and therefore important events in thyroid carcinogenesis.

  11. Genome sequencing of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells reveals retroelement stability and infrequent DNA rearrangement during reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Aaron R; Boland, Michael J; Leibowitz, Mitchell L; Shumilina, Svetlana; Pehrson, Sidney M; Baldwin, Kristin K; Hall, Ira M

    2011-10-04

    The biomedical utility of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) will be diminished if most iPSC lines harbor deleterious genetic mutations. Recent microarray studies have shown that human iPSCs carry elevated levels of DNA copy number variation compared with those in embryonic stem cells, suggesting that these and other classes of genomic structural variation (SV), including inversions, smaller duplications and deletions, complex rearrangements, and retroelement transpositions, may frequently arise as a consequence of reprogramming. Here we employ whole-genome paired-end DNA sequencing and sensitive mapping algorithms to identify all classes of SV in three fully pluripotent mouse iPSC lines. Despite the improved scope and resolution of this study, we find few spontaneous mutations per line (one or two) and no evidence for endogenous retroelement transposition. These results show that genome stability can persist throughout reprogramming, and argue that it is possible to generate iPSCs lacking gene-disrupting mutations using current reprogramming methods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Coupling of mRNA Structure Rearrangement to Ribosome Movement during Bypassing of Non-coding Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Coakley, Arthur; O'Connor, Michelle; Petrov, Alexey; O'Leary, Seán E; Atkins, John F; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2015-11-19

    Nearly half of the ribosomes translating a particular bacteriophage T4 mRNA bypass a region of 50 nt, resuming translation 3' of this gap. How this large-scale, specific hop occurs and what determines whether a ribosome bypasses remain unclear. We apply single-molecule fluorescence with zero-mode waveguides to track individual Escherichia coli ribosomes during translation of T4's gene 60 mRNA. Ribosomes that bypass are characterized by a 10- to 20-fold longer pause in a non-canonical rotated state at the take-off codon. During the pause, mRNA secondary structure rearrangements are coupled to ribosome forward movement, facilitated by nascent peptide interactions that disengage the ribosome anticodon-codon interactions for slippage. Close to the landing site, the ribosome then scans mRNA in search of optimal base-pairing interactions. Our results provide a mechanistic and conformational framework for bypassing, highlighting a non-canonical ribosomal state to allow for mRNA structure refolding to drive large-scale ribosome movements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Friedelin Synthase from Maytenus ilicifolia: Leucine 482 Plays an Essential Role in the Production of the Most Rearranged Pentacyclic Triterpene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Moreira, Tatiana M.; Alves, Thaís B.; Pinheiro, Karina A.; Felippe, Lidiane G.; de Lima, Gustavo M. A.; Watanabe, Tatiana F.; Barbosa, Cristina C.; Santos, Vânia A. F. F. M.; Lopes, Norberto P.; Valentini, Sandro R.; Guido, Rafael V. C.; Furlan, Maysa; Zanelli, Cleslei F.

    2016-11-01

    Among the biologically active triterpenes, friedelin has the most-rearranged structure produced by the oxidosqualene cyclases and is the only one containing a cetonic group. In this study, we cloned and functionally characterized friedelin synthase and one cycloartenol synthase from Maytenus ilicifolia (Celastraceae). The complete coding sequences of these 2 genes were cloned from leaf mRNA, and their functions were characterized by heterologous expression in yeast. The cycloartenol synthase sequence is very similar to other known OSCs of this type (approximately 80% identity), although the M. ilicifolia friedelin synthase amino acid sequence is more related to β-amyrin synthases (65-74% identity), which is similar to the friedelin synthase cloned from Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Multiple sequence alignments demonstrated the presence of a leucine residue two positions upstream of the friedelin synthase Asp-Cys-Thr-Ala-Glu (DCTAE) active site motif, while the vast majority of OSCs identified so far have a valine or isoleucine residue at the same position. The substitution of the leucine residue with valine, threonine or isoleucine in M. ilicifolia friedelin synthase interfered with substrate recognition and lead to the production of different pentacyclic triterpenes. Hence, our data indicate a key role for the leucine residue in the structure and function of this oxidosqualene cyclase.

  14. Prognostic impact of concurrent MYC and BCL6 rearrangements and expression in de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Qing; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Tzankov, Alexandar

    2016-01-01

    Double-hit B-cell lymphoma is a common designation for a group of tumors characterized by concurrent translocations of MYC and BCL2, BCL6, or other genes. The prognosis of concurrent MYC and BCL6 translocations is not well known. In this study, we assessed rearrangements and expression of MYC, BCL2...... with MYC translocation (observed in 2.0% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) predicted poorer survival in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients with MYC/BCL6 co-expression did have significantly poorer survival, however, MYC/BCL6 co-expression had no effect...... on prognosis in the absence of MYC/BCL2 co-expression, and had no additive impact in MYC+/BCL2+ cases. The isolated MYC+/BCL6+/BCL2- subset, more frequent in germinal center B-cell like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, had significantly better survival compared with the isolated MYC+/BCL2+/BCL6- subset (more...

  15. NTRK1 rearrangement in colorectal cancer patients: evidence for actionable target using patient-derived tumor cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Jin; Li, Gang Gary; Kim, Seung Tae; Hong, Min Eui; Jang, Jiryeon; Yoon, Nara; Ahn, Soo Min; Murphy, Danielle; Christiansen, Jason; Wei, Ge; Hornby, Zachary; Lee, Dong Woo; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Hong, Sung No; Kim, Seok-Hyeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Keunchil; Park, Woong Yang; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Lee, Jeeyun

    2015-11-17

    We have investigated the incidence of NTRK1 rearrangements in metastatic gastrointestinal cancer patients and demonstrated the potential for clinical response of these patients to targeted therapy. We prospectively collected tumor tissue specimens for one year and simultaneously generated patient-derived tumor cells (PDCs). Specimens were initially screened for TrkA protein expression using TrkA immunohistochemistry (IHC). In the case of TrkA IHC positive results, samples were further examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and next generation sequencing (NGS) to confirm the presence of NTRK1 rearrangements. From January 2014 to December 2014, a total of 74 metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and 66 gastric cancer (GC) patients were initially screened by TrkA IHC. Two of the 74 CRC patients (2.7%) and one of the 66 GC patients (1.5%) were positive for TrkA expression by IHC. All three IHC positive cases had evidence of NTRK1 rearrangements by FISH. NGS was performed on the 3 IHC positive cases and confirmed TPM3-NTRK1 rearrangements in the two CRC cases. One GC patient with TrkA expression by IHC did not harbor an NTRK1 rearrangement. PDCs established from the NTRK1 positive CRC patients were positive for the NTRK1 rearrangement. Entrectinib, a pan-TRK inhibitor, profoundly inhibited cell proliferation of NTRK1-rearranged PDCs with such inhibition associated with inactivation of TrkA, and down-regulation of downstream signaling pathways. TrkA IHC is an effective, initial screening method for NTRK1 rearrangement detection in the clinic. Inhibition of the TrkA kinase is a promising targeted therapy for cancer patients whose tumors harbor a NTRK1 rearrangement.

  16. RT-PCR diagnosis of recurrent rearrangements in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Cristina N; Gallego, Marta S; Rossi, Jorge G; Medina, Adriana; Rubio, Patricia L; Bernasconi, Andrea R; Zubizarreta, Pedro A; Felice, María S

    2012-06-01

    The present study was performed to establish the prevalence of the recurrent fusion transcripts in Argentinean pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A total of 380 newly diagnosed children (including 50 infants and 44 T-ALL) were screened by RT-PCR; the incidence of recurrent rearrangements was: ETV6-RUNX1, 12.9%; TCF3-PBX1, 5.0%; BCR-ABL1, 1.6%; and MLL rearrangements, 10.5%. STIL-TAL1 was detected in 22.7% of T-ALL cases. In B-ALL cases, the pEFS was significantly influenced by the presence of genetic alterations. RT-PCR studies improved patients' stratification and also the overall outcome of children treated in a pediatric hospital from a developing country. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydrogen rearrangement to and from radical z fragments in electron capture dissociation of peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savitski, Mikhail M; Kjeldsen, Frank; Nielsen, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen rearrangement is an important process in radical chemistry. A high degree of H. rearrangement to and from z. ionic fragments (combined occurrence frequency 47% compared with that of z.) is confirmed in analysis of 15,000 tandem mass spectra of tryptic peptides obtained with electron...... capture dissociation (ECD), including previously unreported double H. losses. Consistent with the radical character of H. abstraction, the residue determining the formation rate of z' = z. + H. species is found to be the N-terminal residue in z. species. The size of the complementary c(m)' fragment turned...... that other factors than thermochemistry are responsible for directing the site of ECD cleavage. Understanding hydrogen attachment to and loss from ECD fragments should facilitate automatic interpretation ECD mass spectra in protein identification and characterization, including de novo sequencing....

  18. Aza Cope Rearrangement of Propargyl Enammonium Cations Catalyzed By a Self-Assembled `Nanozyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, Courntey J.; Fiedler, Dorothea; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-27

    The tetrahedral [Ga{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} assembly (L = N,N-bis(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl)-1,5-diaminonaphthalene) encapsulates a variety of cations, including propargyl enammonium cations capable of undergoing the aza Cope rearrangement. For propargyl enammonium substrates that are encapsulated in the [Ga{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} assembly, rate accelerations of up to 184 are observed when compared to the background reaction. After rearrangement, the product iminium ion is released into solution and hydrolyzed allowing for catalytic turnover. The activation parameters for the catalyzed and uncatalyzed reaction were determined, revealing that a lowered entropy of activation is responsible for the observed rate enhancements. The catalyzed reaction exhibits saturation kinetics; the rate data obey the Michaelis-Menten model of enzyme kinetics, and competitive inhibition using a non-reactive guest has been demonstrated.

  19. A Wittig-olefination-Claisen-rearrangement approach to the 3-methylquinoline-4-carbaldehyde synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Mukund G; Desai, Mayur P; Birhade, Deekshaputra R; Shaikh, Yunus B; Dhatrak, Ajit N; Gannimani, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Efficient syntheses are described for the synthetically important 3-methylquinoline-4-carbaldehydes 6a-h from o-nitrobenzaldehydes 1a-h employing a Wittig-olefination-Claisen-rearrangement protocol. The Wittig reaction of o-nitrobenzaldehydes with crotyloxymethylene triphenylphosphorane afforded crotyl vinyl ethers 2a-h, which on heating under reflux in xylene underwent Claisen rearrangement to give 4-pentenals 3a-h. Protection of the aldehyde group of the 4-pentenals as acetals 4a-h and subsequent oxidative cleavage of the terminal olefin furnished nitroaldehydes 5a-h. Reductive cyclization of these nitroaldehydes yielded the required 3-methylquinoline-4-carbaldehydes 6a-h in excellent yields. Therefore, an efficient method was developed for the preparation of 3-methylquinoline-4-carbaldehydes from o-nitrobenzaldehydes in a simple five-step procedure.

  20. A Wittig-olefination–Claisen-rearrangement approach to the 3-methylquinoline-4-carbaldehyde synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund G. Kulkarni

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Efficient syntheses are described for the synthetically important 3-methylquinoline-4-carbaldehydes 6a–h from o-nitrobenzaldehydes 1a–h employing a Wittig-olefination–Claisen-rearrangement protocol. The Wittig reaction of o-nitrobenzaldehydes with crotyloxymethylene triphenylphosphorane afforded crotyl vinyl ethers 2a–h, which on heating under reflux in xylene underwent Claisen rearrangement to give 4-pentenals 3a–h. Protection of the aldehyde group of the 4-pentenals as acetals 4a–h and subsequent oxidative cleavage of the terminal olefin furnished nitroaldehydes 5a–h. Reductive cyclization of these nitroaldehydes yielded the required 3-methylquinoline-4-carbaldehydes 6a–h in excellent yields. Therefore, an efficient method was developed for the preparation of 3-methylquinoline-4-carbaldehydes from o-nitrobenzaldehydes in a simple five-step procedure.

  1. A Wittig-olefination–Claisen-rearrangement approach to the 3-methylquinoline-4-carbaldehyde synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mayur P; Birhade, Deekshaputra R; Shaikh, Yunus B; Dhatrak, Ajit N; Gannimani, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Summary Efficient syntheses are described for the synthetically important 3-methylquinoline-4-carbaldehydes 6a–h from o-nitrobenzaldehydes 1a–h employing a Wittig-olefination–Claisen-rearrangement protocol. The Wittig reaction of o-nitrobenzaldehydes with crotyloxymethylene triphenylphosphorane afforded crotyl vinyl ethers 2a–h, which on heating under reflux in xylene underwent Claisen rearrangement to give 4-pentenals 3a–h. Protection of the aldehyde group of the 4-pentenals as acetals 4a–h and subsequent oxidative cleavage of the terminal olefin furnished nitroaldehydes 5a–h. Reductive cyclization of these nitroaldehydes yielded the required 3-methylquinoline-4-carbaldehydes 6a–h in excellent yields. Therefore, an efficient method was developed for the preparation of 3-methylquinoline-4-carbaldehydes from o-nitrobenzaldehydes in a simple five-step procedure. PMID:23209506

  2. Guidelines for the rearrangement of Auschwitz Museum based on web pictures analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mantyka, M. (Marta); Stachura, E. (Ewa)

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempts to answer the question whether the exhibition of the Auschwitz Museum communicates its message properly to the audience or it should be modernised/ rearranged. The aim of the study is so to investigate the way visitors currently look at Auschwitz via the filter of social media. Between November 2014 until January 2015 the number of Instagram pictures with hashtag “Auschwitz” posted on-line nearly doubled to astonishing 80.000 images. In August 2016 the numbe...

  3. N-Methylimidazole-catalyzed synthesis of carbamates from hydroxamic acids via the Lossen rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganathan, Sabesan; Miller, Scott J

    2013-02-01

    An efficient, one-pot, N-methylimidazole (NMI) accelerated synthesis of aromatic and aliphatic carbamates via the Lossen rearrangement is reported. NMI is a catalyst for the conversion of isocyanate intermediates to the carbamates. Moreover, the utility of arylsulfonyl chloride in combination with NMI minimizes the formation of often-observed hydroxamate-isocyanate dimers during the sequence. Under the present conditions, lowering of temperatures is also possible, enabling a mild protocol.

  4. Exploiting the CNC side chain in heterocyclic rearrangements: synthesis of 4(5)-acylamino-imidazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccionello, Antonio Palumbo; Buscemi, Silvestre; Vivona, Nicolò; Pace, Andrea

    2010-08-06

    A new variation on the Boulton-Katritzky reaction is reported, namely, involving use of a CNC side chain. A novel Montmorillonite-K10 catalyzed nonreductive transamination of a 3-benzoyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole afforded a 3-(alpha-aminobenzyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole, which was condensed with benzaldehydes to afford the corresponding imines. In the presence of strong base, these imines underwent Boulton-Katritzky-type rearrangement to afford novel 4(5)-acylaminoimidazoles.

  5. The effect of substrate size in the Beckmann rearrangement: MOFs vs. zeolites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Opanasenko, Maksym; Shamzhy, Mariya; Lamač, Martin; Čejka, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 204, APR 2013 (2013), s. 94-100 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP106/12/G015 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) FP7/2007-2013, contract 228862 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Beckmann rearrangement * oximes * CuBTC Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.309, year: 2013

  6. The Metropolized Partial Importance Sampling MCMC mixes slowly on minimum reversal rearrangement paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklós, István; Mélykúti, Bence; Swenson, Krister

    2010-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo has been the standard technique for inferring the posterior distribution of genome rearrangement scenarios under a Bayesian approach. We present here a negative result on the rate of convergence of the generally used Markov chains. We prove that the relaxation time of the Markov chains walking on the optimal reversal sorting scenarios might grow exponentially with the size of the signed permutations, namely, with the number of syntheny blocks.

  7. Identifying Mazama gouazoubira (Artiodactyla; Cervidae) chromosomes involved in rearrangements induced by doxorubicin

    OpenAIRE

    Tomazella, Iara Maluf; Abril, Vanessa Veltrini; Duarte, José Maurício Barbanti

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The process of karyotype evolution in Cervidae from a common ancestor (2n = 70, FN = 70) has been marked by complex chromosomal rearrangements. This ancestral karyotype has been retained by the current species Mazama gouazoubira (Fischer 1814), for which a chromosomal polymorphism (Robertsonian translocations and the presence of B chromosomes) has been described, presumably caused by a chromosome fragility. Thus, this study has identified doxorubicin-induced chromosome aberrations an...

  8. Nested Inversion Polymorphisms Predispose Chromosome 22q11.2 to Meiotic Rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaerel, Wolfram; Hestand, Matthew S; Vergaelen, Elfi; Swillen, Ann; López-Sánchez, Marcos; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine; Emanuel, Beverly S; Morrow, Bernice E; Breckpot, Jeroen; Devriendt, Koenraad; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2017-10-05

    Inversion polymorphisms between low-copy repeats (LCRs) might predispose chromosomes to meiotic non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) events and thus lead to genomic disorders. However, for the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), the most common genomic disorder, no such inversions have been uncovered as of yet. Using fiber-FISH, we demonstrate that parents transmitting the de novo 3 Mb LCR22A-D 22q11.2 deletion, the reciprocal duplication, and the smaller 1.5 Mb LCR22A-B 22q11.2 deletion carry inversions of LCR22B-D or LCR22C-D. Hence, the inversions predispose chromosome 22q11.2 to meiotic rearrangements and increase the individual risk for transmitting rearrangements. Interestingly, the inversions are nested or flanking rather than coinciding with the deletion or duplication sizes. This finding raises the possibility that inversions are a prerequisite not only for 22q11.2 rearrangements but also for all NAHR-mediated genomic disorders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Low rate of interchromosomal rearrangements during old radiation of gekkotan lizards (Squamata: Gekkota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Rens, Willem; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-06-01

    Gekkotan lizards are a highly specious (∼1600 described species) clade of squamate lizards with nearly cosmopolitan distribution in warmer areas. The clade is primarily nocturnal and forms an ecologically dominant part of the world nocturnal herpetofauna. However, molecular cytogenetic methods to study the evolution of karyotypes have not been widely applied in geckos. Our aim here was to uncover the extent of chromosomal rearrangements across the whole group Gekkota and to search for putative synapomorphies supporting the newly proposed phylogenetic relationships within this clade. We applied cross-species chromosome painting with the recently derived whole-chromosomal probes from the gekkonid species Gekko japonicus to members of the major gekkotan lineages. We included members of the families Diplodactylidae, Carphodactylidae, Pygopodidae, Eublepharidae, Phyllodactylidae and Gekkonidae. Our study demonstrates relatively high chromosome conservatism across the ancient group of gekkotan lizards. We documented that many changes in chromosomal shape across geckos can be attributed to intrachromosomal rearrangements. The documented rearrangements are not totally in agreement with the recently newly erected family Phyllodactylidae. The results also pointed to homoplasy, particularly in the reuse of chromosome breakpoints, in the evolution of gecko karyotypes.

  10. The formation and recovery of two-break chromosome rearrangements from irradiated spermatozoa of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, B.

    1978-01-01

    Chromosome and chromatid-type rearrangements can be induced by exposure of spermatozoa of Drosophila to ionising radiation. A model, proposed to explain the formation and recovery of compound autosomes, has been extended to account for the induction of centric fragments capped by a duplication of paternal chromosome material. Three basic assumptions have been used; (1) that the sperm nucleus contains a haploid set of unreplicated chromosomes, (2) that the broken chromosome ends can be joined together before or after replication, and (3) that one of the first two cleavage nuclei may be lost and an adult organism derived from the other. The present paper reports a theoretical application of this combination of aasumptions to the general case of the formation and recovery of two-break rearrangements. This has led to an elucidation of the relation between repeats, compounds, fragments, and deficiencies on the one hand and inversions and translocations on the other hand. Dicentric chromosomes and segmental aneuploidy can be simply explained. A selective screen is formed by the segregation of chromatid rearrangements and the aneuploidy tolerance levels of the early cleavage nuclei. Thus there is an alternative way of explaining observations which might indicate preferential breakage or joining

  11. Mechanisms of copy number variation and hybrid gene formation in the KIR immune gene complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traherne, James A; Martin, Maureen; Ward, Rosemary; Ohashi, Maki; Pellett, Fawnda; Gladman, Dafna; Middleton, Derek; Carrington, Mary; Trowsdale, John

    2010-03-01

    The fine-scale structure of the majority of copy number variation (CNV) regions remains unknown. The killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR) gene complex exhibits significant CNV. The evolutionary plasticity of the KIRs and their broad biomedical relevance makes it important to understand how these immune receptors evolve. In this paper, we describe haplotype re-arrangement creating novel loci at the KIR complex. We completely sequenced, after fosmid cloning, two rare contracted haplotypes. Evidence of frequent hybrid KIR genes in samples from many populations suggested that re-arrangements may be frequent and selectively advantageous. We propose mechanisms for formation of novel hybrid KIR genes, facilitated by protrusive non-B DNA structures at transposon recombination sites. The heightened propensity to generate novel hybrid KIR receptors may provide a proactive evolutionary measure, to militate against pathogen evasion or subversion. We propose that CNV in KIR is an evolutionary strategy, which KIR typing for disease association must take into account.

  12. RNA Chimeras as a Gene Signature of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    viruses . Nature 1970;227:1029-31. (25) Lovf M, Thomassen GO, Bakken AC, Celestino R, Fioretos T, Lind GE, et al. Fusion gene microarray reveals cancer...landscapes of somatic rearrangement in human breast cancer genomes. Nature 2009;462:1005-10. Possible Formation of Mitochondrial-RNA Containing

  13. RET gene mutations and polymorphisms in medullary thyroid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    myelinated corneal nerves, buccal neuromas and pheochro- mocytoma (Eng 1996). The molecular pathology of inherited. MTCs is constitutive activation of proto-oncogene RET. (REarranged during Transfection, MIM 164761). The RET gene is located on chromosome 10q11.2, consisting of 21 exons (Eng 1996). The RET ...

  14. High-throughput analysis of subtelomeric chromosome rearrangements by use of array-based comparative genomic hybridization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.; Schoenmakers, E.F.P.M.; Eussen, B.H.; Janssen, I.M.; Merkx, G.F.M.; Cleef, B. van; Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A. van; Brunner, H.G.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    Telomeric chromosome rearrangements may cause mental retardation, congenital anomalies, and miscarriages. Automated detection of subtle deletions or duplications involving telomeres is essential for high-throughput diagnosis, but impossible when conventional cytogenetic methods are used. Array-based

  15. Appearance and evolution of the specific chromosomal rearrangements associated with malignant transformation of mouse m5S cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, S.; Okumura, Y.; Komatsu, K.; Sasaki, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Chromosomal alterations were studied during the acquisition of malignant phenotypes in two karyotypically distinct cells isolated from transformed foci induced by x-irradiation in mouse m5S cells. Because the transformants, despite foci origin, showed low ability to grow in agar, they were cultured in vitro with serial transfer schedules to allow further cell generations and assayed for anchorage independence (AI) at each passage level. The AI frequency increased with the cell doubling numbers. Chromosome analysis showed that a focus was one cell origin, but the transformants showed karyotypic instability during cell proliferation, giving rise to the rearrangements clustered in the distal region of the specific chromosomes. These rearrangements appeared to be directed toward the acquisition of malignant phenotypes. Analysis of the types and sites of rearrangements indicated that a mechanism exists that induces frequent rearrangements of the specific region of a chromosome during the process of transformation into the malignant state

  16. Conventional and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of three-way complex BCR-ABL rearrangement in a chronic myeloid leukemia patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganguly Bani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal analysis was carried out in bone marrow sample of an 11-year-old girl suspected of myeloproliferative disorder. Conventional G-banding study detected a complex three-way translocation involvi