WorldWideScience

Sample records for bb-12 cultures grown

  1. The Science behind the Probiotic Strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel Jungersen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This review presents selected data on the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12® (BB-12®, which is the world’s most documented probiotic Bifidobacterium. It is described in more than 300 scientific publications out of which more than 130 are publications of human clinical studies. The complete genome sequence of BB-12® has been determined and published. BB-12® originates from Chr. Hansen’s collection of dairy cultures and has high stability in foods and as freeze dried powders. Strain characteristics and mechanisms of BB-12® have been established through extensive in vitro testing. BB-12® exhibits excellent gastric acid and bile tolerance; it contains bile salt hydrolase, and has strong mucus adherence properties, all valuable probiotic characteristics. Pathogen inhibition, barrier function enhancement, and immune interactions are mechanisms that all have been demonstrated for BB-12®. BB-12® has proven its beneficial health effect in numerous clinical studies within gastrointestinal health and immune function. Clinical studies have demonstrated survival of BB-12® through the gastrointestinal tract and BB-12® has been shown to support a healthy gastrointestinal microbiota. Furthermore, BB-12® has been shown to improve bowel function, to have a protective effect against diarrhea, and to reduce side effects of antibiotic treatment, such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea. In terms of immune function, clinical studies have shown that BB-12® increases the body’s resistance to common respiratory infections as well as reduces the incidence of acute respiratory tract infections.

  2. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 administration in early childhood: a randomized clinical trial of effects on oral colonization by mutans streptococci and the probiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, T; Pienihäkkinen, K; Salminen, S; Jokela, J; Söderling, E

    2012-01-01

    A randomized clinical trial studied the effects of early administration of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (BB-12) on oral colonization of (1) mutans streptococci (MS), and (2) BB-12. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, infants (n = 106) received probiotic bacteria (BB-12 group), xylitol (X group), or sorbitol (S group). Test tablets were administered twice a day (from the age of 1-2 months) with a novel slow-release pacifier or a spoon (daily dose of BB-12 10(10) CFU, polyol 200-600 mg). Samples were collected from mucosa/teeth at the age of 8 months and 2 years for BB- 12 determination (qPCR) and plate culturing of MS (MSB, TYCSB), lactobacilli (Rogosa) and yeasts (Sabouraud). The MS levels of the mothers were determined (Dentocult SM Strip Mutans). The baseline characteristics of the three groups were similar. Mean duration of tablet delivery was 14.9 ± 6.7 months. In all groups, >90% of the mothers showed high MS counts (log CFU ≥5). MS colonization percentages of the children at the age of 2 years were rather low (BB-12 group: 6%; X group: 31%; S group: 10%; p < 0.05). The levels of lactobacilli and yeasts did not differ between the groups. BB-12 cell counts barely exceeding the detection limit were found in three of the oral samples of the 8-month-old children; however, the 2-year samples did not contain BB-12. The early administration of BB-12 did not result in permanent oral colonization of this probiotic or significantly affect MS colonization in the children.

  3. Microencapsulation and Fermentation of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 and Bifidobacterium BB-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of poor survival of probiotic bacteria, microencapsulation evolved from the immobilized cell culture technology used in the biotechnological industry. Two probiotic strains, Bifidobacterium (BB-12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5 were immobilized in calcium alginate by extrusion method. Encapsulation parameters and efficacy of this method were evaluated. Growth factors of these two bacteria were also measured by culturing in 10-L fermenter. Growth curves were obtained with respect to optical density and dry biomass weight. Encapsulation yield was over than 60% in each experiment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM of Entrapment of cells in alginate matrix and cross-sections of dried bead were obtained and illustrated. Bifidobacterium have been shown better biotechnological properties.

  4. Insights into physiological traits of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 through membrane proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilad, Ofir; Hjernø, Karin; Østerlund, Eva Christina

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 is a widely used probiotic strain associated with a variety of health-promoting traits. There is, however, only limited knowledge available regarding the membrane proteome and the proteins involved in oligosaccharide transport in BB-12. We applied two...

  5. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 in reducing the risk of infections in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, Teemu; Pienihäkkinen, Kaisu; Isolauri, Erika; Larsen, Charlotte; Brockmann, Elke; Alanen, Pentti; Jokela, Jorma; Söderling, Eva

    2011-02-01

    The impact of controlled administration of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (BB-12) on the risk of acute infectious diseases was studied in healthy newborn infants. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 109 newborn 1-month-old infants were assigned randomly to a probiotic group receiving a BB-12-containing tablet (n 55) or to a control group receiving a control tablet (n 54). Test tablets were administered to the infants twice a day (daily dose of BB-12 10 billion colony-forming units) from the age of 1-2 months to 8 months with a novel slow-release pacifier or a spoon. Breastfeeding habits, pacifier use, dietary habits, medications and all signs and symptoms of acute infections were registered. At the age of 8 months, faecal samples were collected for BB-12 determination (quantitative PCR method). The baseline characteristics of the two groups were similar, as was the duration of exclusive breastfeeding. BB-12 was recovered (detection limit log 5) in the faeces of 62% of the infants receiving the BB-12 tablet. The daily duration of pacifier sucking was not associated with the occurrence of acute otitis media. No significant differences between the groups were observed in reported gastrointestinal symptoms, otitis media or use of antibiotics. However, the infants receiving BB-12 were reported to have experienced fewer respiratory infections (65 v. 94%; risk ratio 0·69; 95% CI 0·53, 0·89; P = 0·014) than the control infants. Controlled administration of BB-12 in early childhood may reduce respiratory infections.

  6. The influence of saccharin and sorbitol upon the BB-12® activity in milk and the rheological characteristics of fermented products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminiţa PRICOPE

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available studied related to the activity of the probiotic culture BB-12® in milk. Sweeteners concentrations used in the experiments were chosen based on the results of a preferential sensorial analysis. The acidity and pH dynamics monitored during bifidobacteria incubation at 37°C showed that BB-12® behaves in a similar way in milk and milk sweetened with saccharin (0.05‰ or sorbitol (1.5%. Also it was noticed that the fermentation starts without a lag phase in the presence of sorbitol. The bifidobacteria maintained their viability at a level of 109 viable count during 14 days of storage at 4°C. Sweetened fermented milk samples showed higher consistency index compared to the control sample. More than that, after 7 days of storage (4ºC it was observed an increase of the k-value for thesaccharin and sorbitol samples, while for the control sample the consistency index has a 85% decrease. After 7 days of storage the sweetened samples maintained the same viscoelastic behavior.The study was performed in order to collect scientific evidences on the possibility to obtain probiotic dairy products sweetened with alternative sweeteners.

  7. Safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12-supplemented yogurt in healthy adults on antibiotics: a phase I safety study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenstein, Daniel J; Tan, Tina P; Molokin, Aleksey; Smith, Keisha Herbin; Roberts, Robert F; Shara, Nawar M; Mete, Mihriye; Sanders, Mary Ellen; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when administered in sufficient doses, provide health benefits on the host. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires phase I safety studies for probiotics when the intended use of the product is as a drug. The purpose of the study was to determine the safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12 (BB-12)-supplemented yogurt when consumed by a generally healthy group of adults who were prescribed a 10-day course of antibiotics for a respiratory infection. Secondary aims were to assess the ability of BB-12 to affect the expression of whole blood immune markers associated with cell activation and inflammatory response. A phase I, double-blinded, randomized controlled study was conducted in compliance with FDA guidelines for an Investigational New Drug (IND). Forty participants were randomly assigned to consume 4 ounces of either BB-12 -supplemented yogurt or non-supplemented control yogurt daily for 10 d. The primary outcome was to assess safety and tolerability, assessed by the number of reported adverse events. A total of 165 non-serious adverse events were reported, with no differences between the control and BB-12 groups. When compared to the control group, B lactis fecal levels were modestly higher in the BB-12-supplemented group. In a small subset of patients, changes in whole blood expression of genes associated with regulation and activation of immune cells were detected in the BB-12-supplemented group. BB-12-supplemented yogurt is safe and well tolerated when consumed by healthy adults concurrently taking antibiotics. This study will form the basis for future randomized clinical trials investigating the potential immunomodulatory effects of BB-12-supplemented yogurt in a variety of disease states.

  8. A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial with Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 for maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordgaard, Inge; Rumessen, Jüri Johs.; Wildt, Signe

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the clinical effect of treatment with Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (Probio-Tec AB-25) to maintain remission in patients with ulcerative colitis.......To investigate the clinical effect of treatment with Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (Probio-Tec AB-25) to maintain remission in patients with ulcerative colitis....

  9. Fermented wheat aleurone enriched with probiotic strains LGG and Bb12 modulates markers of tumor progression in human colon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicki, Anke; Michelmann, Anke; Stein, Katrin; Scharlau, Daniel; Scheu, Kerstin; Obst, Ursula; Glei, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Fermentation of dietary fiber by the microflora enhances the levels of effective metabolites, which are potentially protective against colon cancer. The specific addition of probiotics may enhance the efficiency of fermentation of wheat aleurone, a source of dietary fiber. We investigated the effects of aleurone, fermented with fecal slurries with the addition of the probiotics LGG and Bb12 (aleurone(+)), on cell growth, apoptosis, and differentiation, as well as expression of genes related to growth and apoptosis using two different human colon cell lines (HT29: adenocarcinoma cells; LT97: adenoma cells). The efficiency of fermentation of aleurone was only slightly enhanced by the addition of LGG/Bb12, resulting in an increased concentration of butyrate. In LT97 cells, the growth inhibition of aleurone(+) was stronger than in HT29 cells. In HT29 cells, a cell cycle arrest in G(0)/G(1) and the alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of differentiation, were enhanced by the fs aleurone(+). Treatment with all fermentation supernatants resulted in a significant increase in apoptosis and an upregulation of genes involved in cell growth and apoptosis (p21 and WNT2B). In conclusion, fs aleurone(+) modulated markers of cancer prevention, namely inhibition of cell growth and promotion of apoptosis as well as differentiation.

  10. Effects of Nisin on the Growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium bifidum Bb-12%Nisin 对 Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 和 Bifidobac

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴正钧; 周诚

    2002-01-01

    在MRS平板上,采用琼脂扩散法测定了Nisin对Lactobacillus acidophilus la-5和Bifidobacterium bifidumBb-12生长的抑制作用.当Nisin浓度≥50ug/ml时,对Lactobacillus acidophilus la-5表现出强烈的抑制作用,而Bifidobacterium bifidum Bb-12则几乎不生长,即使Nisin的浓度仅为25ug/ml;当L.acidophilus la-5和B.bifidum Bb-12单独或两者共同在37℃发酵10%(w/w)还原脱脂奶时,脱脂奶中添加的50ug/ml Nisin对B.bifidum Bb-12表现出杀菌作用,而对L.acidophilus La-5则为抑菌作用.当延长培养时间后,L.acidophilus La-5的存在可以降低Nisin对B.bifidum Bb-12的致死作用.

  11. Dose-response study of probiotic bacteria Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis BB-12 and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei CRL-341 in healthy young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C.N.; Nielsen, S.; Kaestel, P.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to investigate the dose-response effects of supplementation with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis (BB-12) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei (CRL-431) on blood lipids, recovery from feces and bowel habits. Changes of the fecal microflora was analy......Objective: This study was performed to investigate the dose-response effects of supplementation with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis (BB-12) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei (CRL-431) on blood lipids, recovery from feces and bowel habits. Changes of the fecal microflora...

  12. Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 cell surface hydrophobicity and survival of the cells under adverse environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakirova, Laisana; Grube, Mara; Gavare, Marita; Auzina, Lilija; Zikmanis, Peteris

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 and the survival of these cells were examined in response to varied cultivation conditions and adverse environmental conditions. An inverse linear relationship (P acidophilus La5 and B. lactis Bb12 and survival of cells subjected to subsequent freezing/thawing, long-term storage or exposure to mineral and bile acids. The observed relationships were supported by significant correlations between the CSH and changes in composition of the cell envelopes (proteins, lipids and carbohydrates) of L. acidophilus La5 and B. lactis Bb12 examined using FT-IR spectroscopy and conventional biochemical analysis methods. The results also suggest that the estimates of hydrophobicity, being a generalized characteristic of cell surfaces, are important parameters to predict the ability of intact probiotic bacteria to endure extreme environments and therefore should be monitored during cultivation. A defined balance of cell components, which can be characterized by the reduced CSH values, apparently helps to ensure the resistance, improved viability and hence the overall probiotic properties of bacteria.

  13. Inhibitory effect of honey-sweetened goat and cow milk fermented with Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Lučan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the influence of honey addition on fermentation of goat and cow milk with Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12. Additionally, inhibitory potential of honey-sweetened fermented goat and cow milk against Listeria monocytogenes strain was examined. Two monofloral honey types, dark-colored chestnut and light-colored acacia honey were added. The basic hypothesis of this study was that addition of honey could have influence on the growth of Bifidobacterium lactis during the fermentation of goat and cow milk. Furthermore, higher inhibitory potential caused by honey addition against Listeria monocytogenes has been assumed. Compared to cow milk, higher acidity and CFU of Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 were noted in the fermented goat milk in all phases of the fermentation process. The results of this study show that both types of honey enhanced growth and acidity of the Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 in both milk types during fermentation. A disc assay has shown that development of growth inhibition zones depends on the type and concentration of honey, as well as on the milk type. The chestnut honey had generally higher inhibitory effect than acacia honey.

  14. Rat fetal ventral mesencephalon grown as solid tissue cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höglinger, G U; Sautter, J; Meyer, Morten;

    1998-01-01

    Free-floating roller tube (FFRT) cultures of fetal rat and human nigral tissue are a means for tissue storage prior to grafting in experimental Parkinson's disease. In the present study, FFRT cultures prepared from embryonic-day-14 rat ventral mesencephalon were maintained for 4, 8, 12, or 16 days...

  15. Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG® and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12® on health-related quality of life in college students affected by upper respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tracey J; Rigassio-Radler, Diane; Denmark, Robert; Haley, Timothy; Touger-Decker, Riva

    2013-06-01

    College students are susceptible to upper respiratory infections (URI) due to inadequate sleep, stress and close living quarters. Certain probiotic strains modulate immune function and may improve health-related quality of life (HRQL) during URI. The present study recruited apparently healthy college students and assessed the effect of probiotics on HRQL outcomes (i.e. self-reported duration, symptom severity and functional impairment of URI) in those who developed URI. Missed school and work days due to URI were also considered. Subjects (n 231) were apparently healthy college students living on campus in residence halls at the Framingham State University (Framingham, MA, USA), and were randomised to receive placebo (n 117) or probiotic-containing powder (daily dose of minimum 1 billion colony-forming units of each Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG® (LGG®) and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12® (BB-12®); n 114) for 12 weeks. Subjects completed The Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 to assess HRQL during URI. The final analyses included 198 subjects (placebo, n 97 and probiotics, n 101). The median duration of URI was significantly shorter by 2 d and median severity score was significantly lower by 34% with probiotics v. placebo (P,0·001), indicating a higher HRQL during URI. Number of missed work days was not different between groups (P=0·429); however, the probiotics group missed significantly fewer school days (mean difference = 0·2 d) compared to the placebo group (P=0·002). LGG® and BB-12® may be beneficial among college students with URI for mitigating decrements in HRQL. More research is warranted regarding mechanisms of action associated with these findings and the cost-benefit of prophylactic supplementation.

  16. Effect of yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® on faecal excretion of secretory immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin 2 in healthy adult volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabeerdoss Jayakanthan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probiotics are used to provide health benefits. The present study tested the effect of a probiotic yoghurt on faecal output of beta-defensin and immunoglobulin A in a group of young healthy women eating a defined diet. Findings 26 women aged 18-21 (median 19 years residing in a hostel were given 200 ml normal yoghurt every day for a week, followed by probiotic yoghurt containing Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® (109 in 200 ml for three weeks, followed again by normal yoghurt for four weeks. Stool samples were collected at 0, 4 and 8 weeks and assayed for immunoglobulin A and human beta-defensin-2 by ELISA. All participants tolerated both normal and probiotic yoghurt well. Human beta-defensin-2 levels in faeces were not altered during the course of the study. On the other hand, compared to the basal sample, faecal IgA increased during probiotic feeding (P = 0.0184 and returned to normal after cessation of probiotic yoghurt intake. Conclusions Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12® increased secretory IgA output in faeces. This property may explain the ability of probiotics to prevent gastrointestinal and lower respiratory tract infections.

  17. Combined Transcriptome and Proteome Analysis of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 Grown on Xylo-Oligosaccharides and a Model of Their Utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilad, Ofir; Jacobsen, Susanne; Stuer-Lauridsen, B.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS), which are classified as emerging prebiotics, selectively enhance the growth of bifidobacteria in general and of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strains in particular. To elucidate the metabolism of XOS in the well-documente......Recent studies have demonstrated that xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS), which are classified as emerging prebiotics, selectively enhance the growth of bifidobacteria in general and of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strains in particular. To elucidate the metabolism of XOS in the well...

  18. Oxygen uptake kinetics of Pseudomonas chlororaphis grown in glucose- or glutamate-limited continuous cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Oxygen uptake and glucose and glutamate oxidation kinetics of the heterotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis grown in glucose- or glutamate-limited cultures under oxygen-saturating or oxygen-limiting conditions were determined. Km values for oxygen were 1.4– 5.6 UM. Only in the case of glucose

  19. Discovery of proteins involved in the interaction between prebiotics carbohydrates and probiotics & whole proteome analysis of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis susp. lactis BB-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilad, Ofir

    Probiotic bacteria, which primarily belong to the genera Lactobascillus and Bifidobacterium, are live microorganisms that have been related to a variety of health-promoting effects. Prebiotics are indigestible food components that specifically stimulate the growth of probiotic organisms in the hu......Probiotic bacteria, which primarily belong to the genera Lactobascillus and Bifidobacterium, are live microorganisms that have been related to a variety of health-promoting effects. Prebiotics are indigestible food components that specifically stimulate the growth of probiotic organisms...... between the widely-used, extensively-studied probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 and potentially-prebiotic carbohydrates. The project was initiated with a screening phase in which more than 40 carbohydrates were tested for their ability to promote the growth of the bacterium...

  20. Plasma-mediated inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate surfaces under continuous culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervoort, Kurt G; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturability are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the inactivation

  1. Plasma-mediated inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate surfaces under continuous culture system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt G Vandervoort

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities attached to a surface and embedded in a matrix composed of exopolysaccharides and excreted nucleic acids. Bacterial biofilms are responsible for undesirable effects such as disease, prostheses colonization, biofouling, equipment damage, and pipe plugging. Biofilms are also more resilient than free-living cells to regular sterilization methods and therefore it is indispensable to develop better ways to control and remove them. The use of gas discharge plasmas is a good alternative since plasmas contain a mixture of reactive agents well-known for their decontamination potential against free microorganisms. We have previously reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were inactivated after a 1-min plasma exposure. We determined that the adhesiveness and the thickness of Pseudomonas biofilms grown on borosilicate were reduced. We also reported sequential morphological changes and loss of viability upon plasma treatment. However, the studies were carried out in batch cultures. The use of a continuous culture results in a more homogenous environment ensuring reproducible biofilm growth. The aim of this work was to study plasma-mediated inactivation of P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate in a continuous culture system. In this paper we show that biofilms grown on glass under continuous culture can be inactivated by using gas discharge plasma. Both biofilm architecture and cell culturability are impacted by the plasma treatment. The inactivation kinetics is similar to previously described ones and cells go through sequential changes ranging from minimal modification without loss of viability at short plasma exposure times, to major structure and viability loss at longer exposure times. We report that changes in biofilm structure leading to the loss of culturability and viability are related to a decrease of the biofilm matrix adhesiveness. To our knowledge, there has been no attempt to evaluate the

  2. Phenolic Profile of Dark-Grown and Photoperiod-Exposed Hypericum perforatum L. Hairy Root Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Tusevski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypericum perforatum L. is a medicinal plant considered as an important natural source of secondary metabolites with a wide range of pharmacological attributes. Hairy roots (HR were induced from root segments of in vitro grown seedlings from H. perforatum after cocultivation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes A4. Investigations have been made to study the production of phenolic compounds in dark-grown (HR1 and photoperiod-exposed (HR2 cultures. The chromatographic analysis of phenolic acids, flavonols, flavan-3-ols, and xanthones revealed marked differences between HR1 and HR2 cultures. The production of quinic acid, kaempferol, and seven identified xanthones was increased in HR2. Moreover, HR2 showed a capability for de novo biosynthesis of two phenolic acids (3-p-coumaroylquinic acid and 3-feruloylquinic acid, three flavonol glycosides (kaempferol hexoside, hyperoside, and quercetin acetylglycoside, and five xanthones (tetrahydroxy-one-methoxyxanthone, 1,3,5-trihydroxy-6-methoxyxanthone, 1,3,5,6-tetrahydroxy-2-prenylxanthone, paxanthone, and banaxanthone E. On the other side, HR1 cultures were better producers of flavan-3-ols (catechin, epicatechin, and proanthocyanidin dimers than HR2. This is the first comparative study on phenolic profile of H. perforatum HR cultures grown under dark and photoperiod conditions.

  3. Biodiesel production potential of mixed microalgal culture grown in domestic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soydemir, Gulfem; Keris-Sen, Ulker Diler; Sen, Unal; Gurol, Mirat D

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a mixed microalgal culture grown in secondarily treated domestic wastewater effluent was investigated for biodiesel production using in situ transesterification method with conventional heating. The total lipid content of the mixed culture was found as 26.2% ± 0.6 by weight of dry biomass, and 74% of the lipids were contributed by total glycerides. In situ transesterification with conventional heating process under acidic conditions produced higher biodiesel yield with chloroform as the co-solvent (82.1% ± 3.9) compared to hexane (55.3% ± 3.9) under the same reaction conditions. The gas chromatography analysis showed that FAME composition was mainly composed of palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acid methyl esters., and thus the mixed microalgal culture fed by domestic wastewaters has had comparable biodiesel conversion yields and FAME composition to mono-culture and pure cultures fed by synthetic culture media. Hence, this study showed that secondarily treated domestic wastewater could potentially be a suitable and sustainable medium for microalgae grown to be used as biodiesel feedstock.

  4. Potencial do soro de leite líquido como agente encapsulante de Bifidobacterium Bb-12 por spray drying: comparação com goma arábica Potential of liquid whey as the encapsulating agent of Bifidobacterium Bb-12 by spray drying: comparison with arabic gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Picinin de Castro-Cislaghi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar o potencial do soro de leite líquido como agente encapsulante de Bifidobacterium Bb-12 por spray drying, comparando-o com a goma arábica, a qual é tradicionalmente utilizada na tecnologia de microencapsulação. Foram determinados o rendimento da microencapsulação e a viabilidade das microcápsulas durante o armazenamento. Quando o soro de leite foi utilizado como agente encapsulante, o rendimento da microencapsulação foi maior e a viabilidade das células manteve-se elevada e constante durante doze semanas. O soro de leite apresentou-se como um eficiente agente encapsulante de Bifidobacterium por spray drying.The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of liquid whey as the encapsulating agent Bifidobacterium Bb-12 by spray drying, compared with arabic gum, which is typically used in microencapsulation technology. The microencapsulation yield and viability during storage were determined. When the whey was used as the encapsulating agent, the microencapsulation yield was higher, and cell viability remained high and steady for twelve weeks. The whey was shown to be an effective encapsulating agent of Bifidobacterium by spray drying.

  5. Effect of Selenate on Viability and Selenomethionine Accumulation of Chlorella sorokiniana Grown in Batch Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živan Gojkovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of Se(+VI on viability, cell morphology, and selenomethionine accumulation of the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana grown in batch cultures. Culture exposed to sublethal Se concentrations of 40 mg·L−1 (212 μM decreased growth rates for about 25% compared to control. A selenate EC50 value of 45 mg·L−1 (238.2 μM was determined. Results showed that chlorophyll and carotenoids contents were not affected by Se exposure, while oxygen evolution decreased by half. Ultrastructural studies revealed granular stroma, fingerprint-like appearance of thylakoids which did not compromise cell activity. Unlike control cultures, SDS PAGE electrophoresis of crude extracts from selenate-exposed cell cultures revealed appearance of a protein band identified as 53 kDa Rubisco large subunit of Chlorella sorokiniana, suggesting that selenate affects expression of the corresponding chloroplast gene as this subunit is encoded in the chloroplast DNA. Results revealed that the microalga was able to accumulate up to 140 mg·kg−1 of SeMet in 120 h of cultivation. This paper shows that Chlorella sorokiniana biomass can be enriched in the high value aminoacid SeMet in batch cultures, while keeping photochemical viability and carbon dioxide fixation activity intact, if exposed to suitable sublethal concentrations of Se.

  6. Free radical scavenging activity and comparative metabolic profiling of in vitro cultured and field grown Withania somnifera roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil, Kalaiselvi; Thirugnanasambantham, Pankajavalli; Oh, Taek Joo; Kim, So Hyun; Choi, Hyung Kyoon

    2015-01-01

    Free radical scavenging activity (FRSA), total phenolic content (TPC), and total flavonoid content (TFC) of in vitro cultured and field grown Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) roots were investigated. Withanolides analysis and comprehensive metabolic profiling between 100% methanol extracts of in vitro and field grown root tissues was performed using high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. Significantly higher levels of FRSA, TPC, and TFC were observed in in-vitro cultured roots compared with field grown samples. In addition, 30 day-cultured in vitro root samples (1 MIR) exhibited a significantly higher FRSA (IC50 81.01 μg/mL), TPC (118.91 mg GAE/g), and TFC (32.68 mg CE/g) compared with those in 45 day-cultured samples (1.5 MIR). Total of 29 metabolites were identified in in vitro cultured and field grown roots by GC-MS analysis. The metabolites included alcohols, organic acids, purine, pyrimidine, sugars, and putrescine. Vanillic acid was only observed in the in vitro cultured root samples, and higher level of the vanillic acid was observed in 1 MIR when compared to 1.5 MIR. Therefore, it is suggested that 1 MIR might serve as an alternative to field grown roots for the development of medicinal and functional food products.

  7. Effect of cultural practices and fungicide treatments on the severity of Phytophthora root rot of blueberries grown in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora root rot is an important disease of blueberries, especially those grown in areas with poor drainage. Reliable cultural and chemical management strategies are needed for control of this disease. Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of cultural practices and fungicide treat...

  8. Biochemical and kinetic characterisation of a novel xylooligosaccharide-upregulated GH43 β-d-xylosidase/α-l-arabinofuranosidase (BXA43) from the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viborg, Alexander Holm; Sørensen, Kim Ib; Gilad, Ofir

    2013-01-01

    The Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 gene BIF_00092, assigned to encode a β-d-xylosidase (BXA43) of glycoside hydrolase family 43 (GH43), was cloned with a C-terminal His-tag and expressed in Escherichia coli. BXA43 was purified to homogeneity from the cell lysate and found to be a dual...... to xylotetraose at subsite +3 and occur only in GH43 from the Bifidobacterium genus....

  9. Effect of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on defecation frequency in healthy subjects with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskesen, Dorte; Jespersen, Lillian; Michelsen, Birgit; Whorwell, Peter J; Müller-Lissner, Stefan; Morberg, Cathrine M

    2015-11-28

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on two primary end points - defecation frequency and gastrointestinal (GI) well-being - in healthy adults with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort. A total of 1248 subjects were included in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. After a 2-week run-in period, subjects were randomised to 1 or 10 billion colony-forming units/d of the probiotic strain BB-12® or a matching placebo capsule once daily for 4 weeks. Subjects completed a diary on bowel habits, relief of abdominal discomfort and symptoms. GI well-being, defined as global relief of abdominal discomfort, did not show significant differences. The OR for having a defecation frequency above baseline for ≥50% of the time was 1·31 (95% CI 0·98, 1·75), P=0·071, for probiotic treatment overall. Tightening the criteria for being a responder to an increase of ≥1 d/week for ≥50 % of the time resulted in an OR of 1·55 (95% CI 1·22, 1·96), P=0·0003, for treatment overall. A treatment effect on average defecation frequency was found (P=0·0065), with the frequency being significantly higher compared with placebo at all weeks for probiotic treatment overall (all PEffects on defecation frequency were similar for the two doses tested, suggesting that a ceiling effect was reached with the one billion dose. Overall, 4 weeks' supplementation with the probiotic strain BB-12® resulted in a clinically relevant benefit on defecation frequency. The results suggest that consumption of BB-12® improves the GI health of individuals whose symptoms are not sufficiently severe to consult a doctor (ISRCTN18128385).

  10. DESCRIPTION OF THE CULTURE CHARACTERISTICS OF SOME LIGNICOLOUS BASIDIOMYCETES SPECIES GROWN ON THREE SYNTHETIC MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETRE Cristiana Virginia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of 12 species of lignicolous basidiomycetes were cultivated on potato dextrose agar and malt extract agar, incubated at 25 °C and carefully analyzed for a period of 5 weeks. Lignicolous basidiomycetes are fungi that produce potent enzymes and bioactive secondary metabolites which are successfully used in various industries: bioremediation of polluted environments, biodegradation of toxic substances, pharmacology or agriculture. The objective of this study was the description of the main characteristics of in vitro cultures of some lignicolous basidiomycetes species grown on synthetic media. The main characteristics followed were: the growth rate of the colonies, the general features of the mycelium: shape, color, surface aspect, reverse, the presence of fruiting bodies and exudates and the particular odor.

  11. Nitrogen deficiency hinders etioplast development in stems of dark-grown pea (Pisum sativum) shoot cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kósa, Annamária; Preininger, Éva; Böddi, Béla

    2015-11-01

    The effects of nitrogen (N) deprivation were studied in etiolated pea plants (Pisum sativum cv. Zsuzsi) grown in shoot cultures. The average shoot lengths decreased and the stems significantly altered considering their pigment contents, 77 K fluorescence spectra and ultrastructural properties. The protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) content and the relative contribution of the 654-655 nm emitting flash-photoactive Pchlide form significantly decreased. The etioplast inner membrane structure characteristically changed: N deprivation correlated with a decrease in the size and number of prolamellar bodies (PLBs). These results show that N deficiency directly hinders the pigment production, as well as the synthesis of other etioplast inner membrane components in etiolated pea stems.

  12. Influence of Dilution Rate on Enzymes of Intermediary Metabolism in Two Freshwater Bacteria Grown in Continuous Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matin, A.; Grootjans, A.; Hogenhuis, H.

    1976-01-01

    Two freshwater bacteria, a Pseudomonas sp. and a Spirillum sp., were grown in continuous culture under steady-state conditions in L-lactate-, succinate-, ammonium- or phosphate-limited media. In Pseudomonas sp., NAD-independent and NAD-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenases, aconitase, isocitrate dehydr

  13. Isolation and characterization of culturable seed-associated bacterial endophytes from gnotobiotically grown Marama bean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimwamurombe, Percy Maruwa; Grönemeyer, Jann Lasse; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Marama bean (Tylosema esculentum) is an indigenous non-nodulating legume to the arid agro-ecological parts of Southern Africa. It is a staple food for the Khoisan and Bantu people from these areas. It is intriguing how it is able to synthesize the high-protein content in the seeds since its natural habitat is nitrogen deficient. The aim of the study was to determine the presence of seed transmittable bacterial endophytes that may have growth promoting effects, which may be particularly important for the harsh conditions. Marama bean seeds were surface sterilized and gnotobiotically grown to 2 weeks old seedlings. From surface-sterilized shoots and roots, 123 distinct bacterial isolates were cultured using three media, and identified by BOX-PCR fingerprinting and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA and nifH genes. Phylogenetic analyses of 73 putative endophytes assigned them to bacterial species from 14 genera including Proteobacteria (Rhizobium, Massilia, Kosakonia, Pseudorhodoferax, Caulobacter, Pantoea, Sphingomonas, Burkholderia, Methylobacterium), Firmicutes (Bacillus), Actinobacteria (Curtobacterium, Microbacterium) and Bacteroidetes (Mucilaginibacter, Chitinophaga). Screening for plant growth-promoting activities revealed that the isolates showed production of IAA, ACC deaminase, siderophores, endoglucanase, protease, AHLs and capacities to solubilize phosphate and fix nitrogen. This is the first report that marama bean seeds may harbor endophytes that can be cultivated from seedlings; in this community of bacteria, physiological characteristics that are potentially plant growth promoting are widespread.

  14. Influence of an aerobic fungus grown on solid culture on ruminal degradability and on a mixture culture of anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Díaz, R; Pimentel-González, D J; Figueira, A C; Viniegra-González, G; Campos-Montiel, R G

    2010-06-01

    In this work, the effect of a solid fungal culture of Aspergillus niger (An) grown on coffee pulp on the in situ ruminal degradability (RD) of corn stover was evaluated. In addition, the effect of its extracts on the in vitro dry matter disappearance (IVDMD) and on a mixed culture of anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria (MCACB) was also investigated. The solid ferment was a crude culture of An, grown on coffee pulp. Regarding in situ RD, a significant difference (p < 0.05) was found between treatment with 200 g/day of the solid culture and control (no solid culture added) on dry matter, crude protein and neutral detergent fibre on RD. All the water extracts (pH 4, 7 and 10) enhanced IVDMD and stimulated the cellulolytic activity on a MCACB. Ultrafiltration results showed that active compounds with a molecular weight lower than 30 kDa were responsible for the effect on MCACB. Such results suggest that the effects of the solid An culture in RD are related to the presence of water soluble compounds having a molecular weight lower than 30 kDa.

  15. Comparison of human nasal epithelial cells grown as explant outgrowth cultures or dissociated tissue cultures in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jian; Meng, Na; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Luo

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cell growth characteristics, ciliated cell differentiation, and function of human nasal epithelial cells established as explant outgrowth cultures or dissociated tissue cultures. Human nasal mucosa of the uncinate process was obtained by endoscopy and epithelial cell cultures were established by explant outgrowth or dissociated tissue culture methods. Epithelial cell growth characteristics were observed by inverted phase contrast microscopy. Ciliated cell differentiation was detected by β-tubulin IVand ZO-1 immunocytochemistry. Basal and ATP-stimulated ciliary beat frequency (CBF) was measured using a highspeed digital microscopic imaging system. Both the explant and dissociated tissue cultures established as monolayers with tight junctions and differentiated cell composition, with both types of cultures comprising ciliated and non-ciliated epithelial cells. Fibroblasts were also frequently found in explant cultures but rarely seen in dissociated tissue cultures. In both culture systems, the highest ciliated cell density appeared at 7th-10th culture day and declined with time, with the lifespan of ciliated cells ranging from 14 to 21 days. Overall, 10% of the cells in explant cultures and 20% of the cells in the dissociated tissue cultures were ciliated. These two cultures demonstrated similar ciliary beat frequency values at baseline (7.78 ± 1.99 Hz and 7.91 ± 2.52 Hz, respectively) and reacted equivalently following stimulation with 100 μM ATP. The results of this study indicate that both the explant outgrowth and dissociated tissue culture techniques are suitable for growing well-differentiated nasal ciliated and non-ciliated cells, which have growth characteristics and ciliary activity similar to those of nasal epithelial cells in vivo.

  16. Effect of Different Pretreatment of Sugar Cane Bagasse on Cellulase and Xylanases Production by the Mutant Penicillium echinulatum 9A02S1 Grown in Submerged Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Marli Camassola; Dillon, Aldo J.P.

    2014-01-01

    The main limitation to the industrial scale hydrolysis of cellulose is the cost of cellulase production. This study evaluated cellulase and xylanase enzyme production by the cellulolytic mutant Penicillium echinulatum 9A02S1 using pretreated sugar cane bagasse as a carbon source. Most cultures grown with pretreated bagasse showed similar enzymatic activities to or higher enzymatic activities than cultures grown with cellulose or untreated sugar cane bagasse. Higher filter paper activity (1.25...

  17. Characterization of culturable bacterial endophytes and their capacity to promote plant growth from plants grown using organic or conventional practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ye; DeBolt, Seth; Dreyer, Jamin; Scott, Delia; Williams, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Plants have a diverse internal microbial biota that has been shown to have an important influence on a range of plant health attributes. Although these endophytes have been found to be widely occurring, few studies have correlated agricultural production practices with endophyte community structure and function. One agricultural system that focuses on preserving and enhancing soil microbial abundance and biodiversity is organic farming, and numerous studies have shown that organically managed system have increased microbial community characteristics. Herein, the diversity and specificity of culturable bacterial endophytes were evaluated in four vegetable crops: corn, tomato, melon, and pepper grown under organic or conventional practices. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from surface-sterilized shoot, root, and seed tissues and sequence identified. A total of 336 bacterial isolates were identified, and grouped into 32 species and five phyla. Among these, 239 isolates were from organically grown plants and 97 from those grown conventionally. Although a diverse range of bacteria were documented, 186 were from the Phylum Firmicutes, representing 55% of all isolates. Using the Shannon diversity index, we observed a gradation of diversity in tissues, with shoots and roots having a similar value, and seeds having the least diversity. Importantly, endophytic microbial species abundance and diversity was significantly higher in the organically grown plants compared to those grown using conventional practices, potentially indicating that organic management practices may increase endophyte presence and diversity. The impact that these endophytes could have on plant growth and yield was evaluated by reintroducing them into tomato plants in a greenhouse environment. Of the bacterial isolates tested, 61% were found to promote tomato plant growth and 50-64% were shown to enhance biomass accumulation, illustrating their potential agroecosystem application.

  18. Characterization of culturable bacterial endophytes and their capacity to promote plant growth from plants grown using organic or conventional practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye eXia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants have a diverse internal microbial biota that has been shown to have an important influence on a range of plant health attributes. Although these endophytes have been found to be widely occurring, few studies have correlated agricultural production practices with endophyte community structure and function. One agricultural system that focuses on preserving and enhancing soil microbial abundance and biodiversity is organic farming, and numerous studies have shown that organically managed system have increased microbial community characteristics. Herein, the diversity and specificity of culturable bacterial endophytes were evaluated in four vegetable crops: corn, tomato, melon and pepper grown under organic or conventional practices. Endophytic bacteria were isolated from surface-sterilized shoot, root and seed tissues and sequence identified. A total of 336 bacterial isolates were identified, and grouped into 32 species and 5 phyla. Among these, 239 isolates were from organically grown plants and 97 from those grown conventionally. Although a diverse range of bacteria were documented, 186 were from the Phylum Firmicutes, representing 55% of all isolates. Using the Shannon diversity index, we observed a gradation of diversity in tissues, with shoots and roots having a similar value, and seeds having the least diversity. Importantly, endophytic microbial species abundance and diversity was significantly higher in the organically grown plants compared to those grown using conventional practices, potentially indicating that organic management practices may increase endophyte presence and diversity. The impact that these endophytes could have on plant growth and yield was evaluated by reintroducing them into tomato plants in a greenhouse environment. Of the bacterial isolates tested, 61% were found to promote tomato plant growth and 50%-64% were shown to enhance biomass accumulation, illustrating their potential agroecosystem application.

  19. mtDNA depletion confers specific gene expression profiles in human cells grown in culture and in xenograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramaswamy Krishna

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between the gene products encoded by the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes play critical roles in eukaryotic cellular function. However, the effects mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA levels have on the nuclear transcriptome have not been defined under physiological conditions. In order to address this issue, we characterized the gene expression profiles of A549 lung cancer cells and their mtDNA-depleted ρ0 counterparts grown in culture and as tumor xenografts in immune-deficient mice. Results Cultured A549 ρ0 cells were respiration-deficient and showed enhanced levels of transcripts relevant to metal homeostasis, initiation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and glucuronidation pathways. Several well-established HIF-regulated transcripts showed increased or decreased abundance relative to the parental cell line. Furthermore, growth in culture versus xenograft has a significantly greater influence on expression profiles, including transcripts involved in mitochondrial structure and both aerobic and anaerobic energy metabolism. However, both in vitro and in vivo, mtDNA levels explained the majority of the variance observed in the expression of transcripts in glucuronidation, tRNA synthetase, and immune surveillance related pathways. mtDNA levels in A549 xenografts also affected the expression of genes, such as AMACR and PHYH, involved in peroxisomal lipid metabolic pathways. Conclusion We have identified mtDNA-dependent gene expression profiles that are shared in cultured cells and in xenografts. These profiles indicate that mtDNA-depleted cells could provide informative model systems for the testing the efficacy of select classes of therapeutics, such as anti-angiogenesis agents. Furthermore, mtDNA-depleted cells grown culture and in xenografts provide a powerful means to investigate possible relationships between mitochondrial activity and gene expression profiles in normal and pathological cells.

  20. Site of cleavage in infected cells and polypeptides of representative paramyxoviruses grown in cultured cells of the chorioallantoic membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seto, J.T.; Garten, W.; Rott, R. (Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1981-01-01

    Cultured cells of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) fulfilled the need of using the same cell system that was permissive for representative paramyxoviruses to carry out studies on the biosynthesis of their glycoproteins in infected cells. The polypeptide composition of the respective paramyxoviruses (Newcastle disease virus (NDV), paramyxovirus Yucaipa (PMY), and Sendai virus), grown in eggs and CAM-cells, was essentially identical. In egg-grown PMY a large glycoprotein (LGP) was present but only in some CAM-grown preparations of virus labeled with (/sup 3/H)-glucosamine and rarely in (/sup 35/S)-methionine or (/sup 3/H)-amino acids (valine, leucine, and tyrosine) labeled viruses. The site of cleavage of precursor F/sub 0/ to Fsub(1,2) was not the same. In contrast to the cleavage of Sendai virus glycoprotein, cleavage was intracellular in NDV and PMY infected cells. Homologous antisera against the glycoproteins failed to inhibit cleavage of HN/sub 0/ or F/sub 0/ in cells infected with the representative paramyxoviruses.

  1. Biological aspects on the cultures of the entomophthoralean fungus Pandora delphacis grown on broomcorn millets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Mingguang; LIANG Yong

    2003-01-01

    A novel method was developed to use glutinous broomcorn millets (Panicum miliaceum L.) as solid substrate to make cultures of the entomophthoralean fungus Pandora delphacis specifically pathogenic to planthoppers, leafhoppers and aphids. Steamed millets with water content of 45% were inoculated with a liquid culture of P. delphacis at a ratio of 20% (v/w) and then incubated at 25℃ and L:D 12:12. The millets cultured for 3-17 d exhibited high potential for conidialproduction. The 5-d-old millet culture sporulated most abundantly, discharging up to 17.12 (±1.31) × 104 conidia/ millet. The cultures incubated for 7-11 d also had a satisfactory sporulation capability, yielding 13.00-13.90 × 104 conidia/millet. Compared to 2.32 (±0.34) × 104 conidia discharged from each of Myzus persicae adults killed by P. delphacis and a ≤60-h duration of sporulation, eachof the millets cultured for 5-11 d produced 5.6-7.4 times more conidia with an over doubled duration for conidial discharge (144 h). Among 106 M. persicae adults exposed to the shower of conidia discharged from the cultured millets, a total mortality of 69.8% caused by P. delphacis infection was observed within 7 d after exposure, but no death was attributed to the fungal infection in the aphids unexposed. The results indicate that the millet cultures of P. delphacis are biologically similar to aphid cadavers killed by the same fungus. Due to the superiority of the cultured millets to the cadavers in sporulation potential and duration, the method for making cultures of P. delphacis on the broomcorn millets is highly recommended for use in study of entomophthoralean fungi for microbial control. This is the first report on the success of the solid culture of Pandora species on cereals.

  2. Heavy metal uptake by selected marsh plant species grown in hydroponic cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.R.; Sturgis, T.C.; Landin, M.C.

    1975-01-01

    Eight marsh plant species (Cyperus esculentus, Scirpus validus, Spartina patens, Scirpus robustus, Triglochin maritima, Distichlis spicata, Spartina alterniflora, and Spartina foliosa) were grown under greenhouse conditions in chemically controlled nutrient solutions. Heavy metals (zinc, cadmium, nickel, chromium, and lead) were added to the nutrient solutions at levels of 0, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/l. Plant parts (leaves, rhizomes, tubers, and roots) were harvested separately for each species and analyzed for heavy metal content. The concentration and plant uptake of heavy metals in each plant species will be discussed.

  3. Biological studies of Chlorella pyrenoidosa (strain LARG-1) cultures grown under space flight conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, V A; Shepelev, E Y; Meleshko, G I; Setlik, I; Kordyum, E L; Sytnik, K M; Mashinsky, A L; Popova, A F; Dubinin, N P; Vaulina, E N; Polivoda, L V

    1980-01-01

    This paper reports data from an electron microscopic analysis of Chlorella pyrenoidosa (LARG-1) cultures after five days of growth in the dark on a semiliquid mineral/glucose medium in the IFS-2 device on board the Soyuz 27-Salyut 6-Soyuz 28 orbital research complex (Soviet-Czechoslovak experiment "Chlorella-1"). For space flight of five days duration the ultrastructural cellular organization of the flight and control cultures were similar. This testifies to normal cell function.

  4. Evidence of biogenic corrosion of titanium after exposure to a continuous culture of thiobacillus ferrooxidans grown in thiosulfate medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, J M; Martin, S I; Masterson, B

    2000-12-07

    Experiments were undertaken to evaluate extreme conditions under which candidate materials intended for use in a proposed nuclear waste repository might be susceptible to corrosion by endogenous microorganisms. Thiobucillus ferrooxidans, a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, was grown in continuous culture using thiosulfate as an energy source; thiosulfate is oxidized to sulfate as a metabolic endproduct by this organism. Culture conditions were optimized to produce a high-density, metabolically active culture throughout a period of long term incubation in the presence of Alloy 22 (a high nickel-based alloy) and Titanium grade 7 (Tigr7) material coupons. After seven months incubation under these conditions, material coupons were withdrawn and analyzed by high resolution microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyses. Alloy 22 coupons showed no detectable signs of corrosion. Tigr7, however, demonstrated distinct roughening of the coupon surface, and [presumably solubilized and precipitated] titanium was detected on Alloy 22 coupons incubated in the same T. ferrooxiduns culture vessel. Control coupons of these materials incubated in sterile thiosulfate medium did not demonstrate any signs of corrosion, thus showing that observed corrosive effects were due to the T. ferrooxidans metabolic activities. T. ferrooxidans intermediates of thiosulfate oxidation or sulfate may have caused the corrosive effects observed on Tigr7.

  5. ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF TISSUE CULTURE-RAISED BALLOTA NIGRA L. PLANTS GROWN EX VITRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowczyńska, Joanna; Grzegorczyk-KAROLAK, Izabela; Wysokińska, Halina

    2015-01-01

    Antioxidant properties and total phenolic and flavonoid contents were evaluated in methanolic extracts of shoots from Ballota nigra plants initiated in vitro (from nodal explants) and in vivo (from seeds). The plants were grown in greenhouse and in the field, and were analyzed at the vegetative and flowering stages. The shoot extract of wild-grown plants of B. nigra was also investigated. The results indicate that antioxidant potential of the B. nigra extracts seems to be due to their scavenging of free radicals (DPPH assay) and metal reducing (FRAP test), while they were less effective at the prevention of linoleic acid peroxidation (LPO test). The extracts from shoots of in vitro derived plants were found to exhibit the greatest antioxidant properties. The extracts were also characterized by the highest content of phenolic compounds and their level was affected by plant developmental stage. The extracts of shoots collected at the flowering period exhibited higher amounts of phenolics and flavonoids than in the extracts of immature plants. A close correlation between the total phenolic content and flavonoid content and antioxidant activity using the DPPH and FRAP assays was obtained. The results of the present study suggest the use in vitro-derived plants of B. nigra instead of using wild plants for pharmaceutical purposes.

  6. Culture conditions for yellow pigment formation byMonascus sp. KB 10 grown on cassava medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongsmith, B; Tabloka, W; Yongmanitchai, W; Bavavoda, R

    1993-01-01

    An isolate ofMonascus, from a commercial, fermented soybean curd (sufu) was grown on a cassava medium. With medium at an initial pH of 7.0 an orange-red pigmentation was produced but with an initial pH below 4, a light golden pigment was obtained. A medium containing, w/v, 3% cassava starch, 0.4% peptone and 0.1% glutamic acid, with an initial pH of 2.5 was optimal for the production of this yellow pigment, which had a single maximum absorption spectrum at 330 nm. The spectroscopic characterization of the purified yellow pigments demonstrated a monascin-ankaflavin-monascorubrin skeleton.

  7. Nutritional evaluation of farm-waste-grown and axenically cultured algal biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, J.J.; Fallowfield, H.J.; Fraser, T.W.; Garrett, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    Algal biomass produced in an outdoor pilot plant facility for the treatment of the liquid phase of pig slurry was nutritionally evaluated together with Chlorella vulgaris 211/le produced axenically in defined media in laboratory chemostats. Data from amino acid analyses showed that the sulphur-containing amino acids were limiting. Digestibility, net protein utilisation and biological values of the algal products were assayed. In vivo and in vitro enzymic digestions were monitored by transmission electron microscopy. Although the cell wall was only partially digested, the cell contents, and especially the pyrenoid, were extensively digested in several treatments. The most indigestible components of the cell may be the membranes of the chloroplast. It is suggested that the absence of sporopollenin from the cell wall of this alga may be responsible for the high nitrogen digestibility of the laboratory-produced material. The waste-grown algal biomass contained appreciable amounts of algal species other than Chlorella vulgaris 211/le which may have contributed to the lower digestibility of this material. 44 references.

  8. High Spatial Resolution nanoSIMS Analysis to Calibrate Environmental Proxies in Coral Grown During Short Culture Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, A. C.; Adkins, J. F.; Erez, J.; Eiler, J. M.; Guan, Y.

    2009-12-01

    An important application of SIMS is the measurement of chemical and isotopic proxies for environmental conditions in coral and other biogenic carbonates. Using organisms cultured under controlled conditions, laboratory calibrations of these proxies have the potential to (1) ensure accurate reconstructions of past climate; (2) separate environmental signals from biological variability; (3) resolve the influence of environmental parameters which co-vary in much of the modern ocean but likely diverged in the past, (i.e. T and [CO32-]). However, culture experiments typically require a large investment of time and energy -- this is especially true of slow growing coral. To overcome this limitation we use the nanoSIMS, a new instrument capable of accurate compositional and isotopic analysis with sub-micron spatial resolution, as a tool to identify and analyze the several-to-10s of micron region of skeletal growth resulting from a short (6-day) culture experiment in adult reef-building coral. In this method seawater culture media is enriched in the naturally low abundance stable isotopes 43Ca, 87Sr and 136Ba to uniquely label material grown during the experiment. At the start of the experiment a short incubation with Calcein, a CaCO3 binding fluorescent probe, marks the margin of new growth guiding subsequent microanalysis. NanoSIMS images of skeletal 43Ca/42Ca clearly show a 43Ca enriched region corresponding to new growth during the culture experiment. This region is distinguished from un-spiked initial material along a sharp and continuous boundary. These results demonstrate we can localize and analyze cultured skeletal material in adult coral from a short growth experiment, enabling higher-throughput culture experiments with applications to paleoclimatology, biomineralization, and ecology. As an initial application we quantify the sensitivity of Sr/Ca, a proxy for temperature, to another important environmental parameter, [CO32-]. Five branches of Stylophora sp. coral

  9. Effect of different pretreatment of sugar cane bagasse on cellulase and xylanases production by the mutant Penicillium echinulatum 9A02S1 grown in submerged culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camassola, Marli; Dillon, Aldo J P

    2014-01-01

    The main limitation to the industrial scale hydrolysis of cellulose is the cost of cellulase production. This study evaluated cellulase and xylanase enzyme production by the cellulolytic mutant Penicillium echinulatum 9A02S1 using pretreated sugar cane bagasse as a carbon source. Most cultures grown with pretreated bagasse showed similar enzymatic activities to or higher enzymatic activities than cultures grown with cellulose or untreated sugar cane bagasse. Higher filter paper activity (1.253 ± 0.147 U · mL(-1)) was detected in the medium on the sixth day of cultivation when bagasse samples were pretreated with sodium hydroxide, hydrogen peroxide, and anthraquinone. Endoglucanase enzyme production was also enhanced by pretreatment of the bagasse. Nine cultures grown with bagasse possessed higher β -glucosidase activities on the sixth day than the culture grown with cellulose. The highest xylanase activity was observed in cultures with cellulose and with untreated sugar cane bagasse. These results indicate that pretreated sugar cane bagasse may be able to serve as a partial or total replacement for cellulose in submerged fermentation for cellulase production using P. echinulatum, which could potentially reduce future production costs of enzymatic complexes capable of hydrolyzing lignocellulosic residues to form fermented syrups.

  10. Effect of Different Pretreatment of Sugar Cane Bagasse on Cellulase and Xylanases Production by the Mutant Penicillium echinulatum 9A02S1 Grown in Submerged Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marli Camassola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main limitation to the industrial scale hydrolysis of cellulose is the cost of cellulase production. This study evaluated cellulase and xylanase enzyme production by the cellulolytic mutant Penicillium echinulatum 9A02S1 using pretreated sugar cane bagasse as a carbon source. Most cultures grown with pretreated bagasse showed similar enzymatic activities to or higher enzymatic activities than cultures grown with cellulose or untreated sugar cane bagasse. Higher filter paper activity (1.253 ± 0.147 U·mL−1 was detected in the medium on the sixth day of cultivation when bagasse samples were pretreated with sodium hydroxide, hydrogen peroxide, and anthraquinone. Endoglucanase enzyme production was also enhanced by pretreatment of the bagasse. Nine cultures grown with bagasse possessed higher β-glucosidase activities on the sixth day than the culture grown with cellulose. The highest xylanase activity was observed in cultures with cellulose and with untreated sugar cane bagasse. These results indicate that pretreated sugar cane bagasse may be able to serve as a partial or total replacement for cellulose in submerged fermentation for cellulase production using P. echinulatum, which could potentially reduce future production costs of enzymatic complexes capable of hydrolyzing lignocellulosic residues to form fermented syrups.

  11. Genotoxic Effects of Low- and High-LET Radiation on Human Epithelial Cells Grown in 2-D Versus 3-D Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Z. S.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Huff, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Risk estimation for radiation-induced cancer relies heavily on human epidemiology data obtained from terrestrial irradiation incidents from sources such as medical and occupational exposures as well as from the atomic bomb survivors. No such data exists for exposures to the types and doses of high-LET radiation that will be encountered during space travel; therefore, risk assessment for space radiation requires the use of data derived from cell culture and animal models. The use of experimental models that most accurately replicate the response of human tissues is critical for precision in risk projections. This work compares the genotoxic effects of radiation on normal human epithelial cells grown in standard 2-D monolayer culture compared to 3-D organotypic co-culture conditions. These 3-D organotypic models mimic the morphological features, differentiation markers, and growth characteristics of fully-differentiated normal human tissue and are reproducible using defined components. Cultures were irradiated with 2 Gy low-LET gamma rays or varying doses of high-LET particle radiation and genotoxic damage was measured using a modified cytokinesis block micronucleus assay. Our results revealed a 2-fold increase in residual damage in 2 Gy gamma irradiated cells grown under organotypic culture conditions compared to monolayer culture. Irradiation with high-LET particle radiation gave similar results, while background levels of damage were comparable under both scenarios. These observations may be related to the phenomenon of "multicellular resistance" where cancer cells grown as 3-D spheroids or in vivo exhibit an increased resistance to killing by chemotherapeutic agents compared to the same cells grown in 2-D culture. A variety of factors are likely involved in mediating this process, including increased cell-cell communication, microenvironment influences, and changes in cell cycle kinetics that may promote survival of damaged cells in 3-D culture that would

  12. COMPARISON OF POLYSACCHARIDES ISOLATED FROM THE MYCELIA OF A CULTIVATED STRAIN OF PORIA COCOS GROWN IN DIFFERENT LIQUID CULTURE MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-na Zhang; Li Chen; Yong Jin; Yu-lu Lin; Peter Chi Keung Cheung; Li-guo Chen

    2003-01-01

    Mycelium of a cultivated strain of Poria cocos was grown by submerged fermentation in a liquid medium containing com steep liquor with orbital shaking. Six polysaccharides coded as ac-PCM 1, ac-PCM2, ac-PCM3-I and II, acPCM4-I and II were isolated from the mycelium by extracting with 0.9% NaC1 aqueous solution, hot water, 0.5 mol/L NaOH aqueous solution and 88% formic acid. Exo-polysaccharide was obtained from the culture medium and coded as ac-PCM0.The monosaccharide composition and molecular weights of these polysaccharides were characterized by using infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography, elemental analysis, 13C-NMR, viscometry and light scattering. The results indicated that ac-PCM0, ac-PCM1 and ac-PCM2 are heteropolysaccharides containing glucose, galactose, mannose and fucose, and acPCM3-I and ac-PCM3-II mainly consist of D-glucose. The content of the glucose in the polysaccharides increased with the isolation progress. Remarkably, a-glucan and β-glucan coexisted in the extract by NaOH aqueous solution (ac-PCM3), and could be separated by chemical methods. The protein in the ac-PCM polysaccharides cultured from the medium containing com steep liquor was higher than that in the ab-PCM from the medium with bran extract. Therefore, the polysaccharides from Poria cocos mycelia cultured in different media have different chemical composition, molecular weights and conformations.

  13. Effect of nitrogen and phosphate on the levels of intermediates in bakers' yeast grown in continuous culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, C.M.M.; Smith, J.E.; Berry, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    Bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was grown in continuous culture using a control medium and media which contained low levels of NH4 and phosphate. The effects of medium composition and growth rate on the levels of intermediates of the glycolytic pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the glyoxylate cycle were investigated. The energy charge varied only between 0.7 and 0.9 over the range of dilution rates studied; however, the level of ATP decreased by 50% at higher aerobic growth rates. Intermediates of the Embden-Meyerhoff-Parnas pathway were higher at the low aerobic growth rates and decreased as the dilution rate was increased. However, higher levels of these intermediates were also observed at even higher dilution rates at which EtOH formation and fermentative metabolism occurred. Significant differences in levels of intermediates were observed between control experiments and fermentations using the low N and phosphate media. The greatest differences were observed in the levels of glucose 6-phosphate, 6-phosphogluconate, pyruvate, citrate and glyoxlate. Twenty-one different steady states were investigated and each had a unique composition.

  14. Oxygen Partial Pressure Is a Rate-Limiting Parameter for Cell Proliferation in 3D Spheroids Grown in Physioxic Culture Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Aurélie; Guillaume, Ludivine; Grimes, David Robert; Fehrenbach, Jérôme; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The in situ oxygen partial pressure in normal and tumor tissues is in the range of a few percent. Therefore, when studying cell growth in 3D culture systems, it is essential to consider how the physiological oxygen concentration, rather than the one in the ambient air, influences the proliferation parameters. Here, we investigated the effect of reducing oxygen partial pressure from 21% to 5% on cell proliferation rate and regionalization in a 3D tumor spheroid model. We found that 5% oxygen concentration strongly inhibited spheroid growth, changed the proliferation gradient and reduced the 50% In Depth Proliferation index (IDP50), compared with culture at 21% oxygen. We then modeled the oxygen partial pressure profiles using the experimental data generated by culturing spheroids in physioxic and normoxic conditions. Although hypoxia occurred at similar depth in spheroids grown in the two conditions, oxygen partial pressure was a major rate-limiting factor with a critical effect on cell proliferation rate and regionalization only in spheroids grown in physioxic condition and not in spheroids grown at atmospheric normoxia. Our findings strengthen the need to consider conducting experiment in physioxic conditions (i.e., tissue normoxia) for proper understanding of cancer cell biology and the evaluation of anticancer drugs in 3D culture systems.

  15. Phytofiltration of cadmium from water by Limnocharis flava (L.) Buchenau grown in free-floating culture system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhilash, P.C., E-mail: pcabhilash@gmail.com [Eco-Auditing Group, National Botanical Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow-226 001, Uttar Pradesh (India); School of Environmental Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadharshini Hills P.O., Kottayam- 686 008, Kerala (India); Pandey, Vimal Chandra; Srivastava, Pankaj [Eco-Auditing Group, National Botanical Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow-226 001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Rakesh, P.S.; Chandran, Smitha [School of Environmental Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadharshini Hills P.O., Kottayam-686 008, Kerala (India); Singh, Nandita [Eco-Auditing Group, National Botanical Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow-226 001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Thomas, A.P. [School of Environmental Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadharshini Hills P.O., Kottayam-686 008, Kerala (India)

    2009-10-30

    A hydroponics experiment was conducted to examine the phytofiltration of Cd by Limnocharis flava (L.) Buchenau grown in low-level Cd-contaminated water. For this, 45 d old seedlings of L .flava were transferred to a floating-support culture system containing nutrient solution spiked with four levels of Cd (0.5, 1, 2 and 4 mg l{sup -1}) and were separately harvested after 3, 7, 21 and 30 d. After 30 d harvesting, the percentage removal of Cd from the above four treatments reached up to 98, 96, 95 and 93%, respectively. Interestingly, all treatments had higher growth rate than control at 95% confidence level and plants still remained healthy at 4 mg l{sup -1} Cd exposure. The bioaccumulation study showed a linear relationship of Cd (R{sup 2} = 0.896-0.999) in all plant parts with the exposure time (3-30 d) and Cd concentrations in hydroponics system (0.5-4 mg l{sup -1}). Although, the root of L. flava had higher Cd concentration than leaf and peduncles, the total Cd concentrations in aerial plant parts were higher than the roots. The maximum bioconcentration factor (BCF) and translocation factor (TF) value of L. flava were calculated as 984.42 and 1.43, respectively. Estimated Cd accumulation capacity of L. flava per unit area (m{sup 2}) was found to be in the range of 218. 35-1698.92 mg m{sup -2}.The experimental results demonstrated that L. flava is a suitable candidate for the phytofiltartion (>93%) of Cd from low-level Cd-contaminated water.

  16. The gene expression profiles of canine mammary cancer cells grown with carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs as a co-culture in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Król Magdalena

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is supposed that fibroblasts present in tumour microenvironment increase cancer invasiveness and its ability to metastasize but the mechanisms have not been clearly defined yet. Thus, the current study was designed to assess changes in gene expression in five various cancer cell lines grown as a co-culture with the carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs in vitro. Results A carcinoma-associated fibroblast cell line was isolated from a canine mammary cancer. Then, a co-culture of cancer cells with the CAFs was established and maintained for 72 hrs. Having sorted the cells, a global gene expression in cancer cells using DNA microarrays was examined. The analysis revealed an up-regulation of 100 genes and a down-regulation of 106 genes in the cancer cells grown as a co-culture with the CAFs in comparison to control conditions. The PANTHER binomial statistics tool was applied to determine statistically over-manifested pathways (p Conclusion The results of the current study showed that the co-culturing of cancer cells and the CAFs caused significant changes to the cancer gene expression. The presence of the CAFs in a microenvironment of cancer cells promotes adhesion, angiogenesis and EMT.

  17. Fast Swinnex Filtration (FSF): A fast and robust sampling and extraction method suitable for metabolomics analysis of cultures grown in complex media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCloskey, Douglas; Utrilla, Jose; Naviaux, Robert K.;

    2015-01-01

    of a suitable method for anaerobic cultures grown in complex media. Given that a vast majority of bacteria are facultative or obligate anaerobes that grow to low biomass density and need to be cultured in complex media, a suitable sampling and extraction strategy for anaerobic cultures is needed. In this work......Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) provides a powerful means to analyze intracellular metabolism. A prerequisite to accurate metabolomics analysis using LC–MS/MS is a robust sampling and extraction protocol. One unaddressed area in sampling is a detailed examination......, we develop a fast-filtration method using pressuredriven Swinnex filters. We show that the method is fast enough to provide an accurate snapshot of intracellular metabolism, reduces matrix interference from the media to improve the number of compounds that can be detected, and is applicable...

  18. Analysis of the exopolysaccharides produced by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCFB 2772 grown in continuous culture on glucose and fructose.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grobben, G.J.; Casteren, van W.H.M.; Schols, H.A.; Oosterveld, A.; Sala, G.; Smith, M.R.; Sikkema, J.; Bont, de J.A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The exopolysaccharides produced by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCFB 2772 grown in defined medium were investigated. At equal cell densities, the strain produced 95 mg l−1 exopolysaccharides with glucose and 30 mg l−1 with fructose as the carbohydrate source. High-performance size-exc

  19. Use of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence to estimate photosynthetic activity and biomass productivity in microalgae grown in different culture systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix L Figueroa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In vivo chlorophyll fluorescence associated to Photosystem II is being used to evaluate photosynthetic activity of microalgae grown in different types of photobioreactors; however, controversy on methodology is usual. Several recommendations on the use of chlorophyll fluorescence to estimate electron transport rate and productivity of microalgae grown in thin-layer cascade cultivators and methacrylate cylindrical vessels are included. Different methodologies related to the measure of photosynthetic activity in microalgae are discussed: (1 measurement of light absorption, (2 determination of electron transport rates versus irradiance and (3 use of simplified devices based on pulse amplitude modulated (PAM fluorescence as Junior PAM or Pocket PAM with optical fiber and optical head as measuring units, respectively. Data comparisons of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence by using these devices and other PAM fluorometers as Water-PAM in the microalga Chlorella sp. (Chlorophyta are presented. Estimations of carbon production and productivity by transforming electron transport rate to gross photosynthetic rate (as oxygen evolution using reported oxygen produced per photons absorbed values and carbon photosynthetic yield based on reported oxygen/carbon ratio are also shown. The limitation of ETR as estimator of photosynthetic and biomass productivity is discussed. Low cost:quality PAMs can promote monitoring of chlorophyll fluorescence in algal biotechnology to estimate the photosynthetic activity and biomass productivity.

  20. Carbohydrate nutrition and anthocyanin accumulation in light grown and etiolated shoot cultures of carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinterhalter Branka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of anthocyanins was studied in shoot cultures of carob at high (45.9 μmol s-1m-2 and low (9.2 μmol s-1m-2 irradiance levels and in darkness in relation to carbohydrate nutrition. Anthocyanin production was stimulated by light, but it also occurred in etiolated shoot cultures which developed in darkness. Anthocyanins were present in both leaves and shoot tips. The major factor affecting anthocyanin production was carbohydrate nutrition, with sucrose as a choice superior to fructose and glucose. The carbohydrate effect was clearly osmotic in nature, since anthocyanin production increased even at supraoptimal concentrations detrimental to the growth of shoot cultures. This conclusion was further confirmed in experiments in which sucrose was partly replaced with the sugar alcohols sorbitol and mannitol.

  1. Arsenic- and mercury-induced phytotoxicity in the Mediterranean shrubs Pistacia lentiscus and Tamarix gallica grown in hydroponic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Jiménez, E; Esteban, E; Carpena-Ruiz, R O; Peñalosa, J M

    2009-09-01

    Hg and As resistance and bioaccumulation were studied in hydroponically grown Pistacia lentiscus and Tamarix gallica plants. Both elements caused growth inhibition in roots and shoots, with mercury showing greater phytotoxicity than arsenic. Accumulation of both elements by plants increased in response to element supply, with the greatest uptake found in T. gallica. Both elements affected P and Mn status in plants, reduced chlorophyll a concentration and increased MDA and thiol levels. These stress indices showed good correlations with As and Hg concentration in plant tissues, especially in the roots. Toxic responses to mercury were more evident than for arsenic, especially in shoot tissues. T. gallica showed higher resistance to both Hg and As than P. lentiscus, as well accumulating more As and Hg.

  2. Regulation of methanol oxidation and carbon dioxide fixation in Xanthobacter strain 25a grown in continuous culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, L.M.; Meijer, Wilhelmus; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1991-01-01

    The regulation of C1-metabolism in Xanthobacter strain 25a was studied during growth of the organism on acetate, formate and methanol in chemostat cultures. No activity of methanol dehydrogenase (MDH), formate dehydrogenase (FDS) or ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisC/O) could be

  3. Effects of phosphate and thiosulphate on arsenic accumulation in Brassica juncea plants grown in soil and in hydroponic culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzarossa, Beatrice; Petruzzelli, Gianniantonio; Grifoni, Martina; Rosellini, Irene; Malagoli, Mario; Schiavon, Michela

    2013-04-01

    Arsenic is recognised as a toxic metalloid and a strong pollutant in soils of many countries. Thus, the reclamation of contaminated areas is fundamental in order to protect both human health and agricultural production. This study is focused on the assisted phytoextraction, a technology for reclaiming polluted soils that takes advantage of the capability of some plants to extract inorganic elements from soils with the aid of additive agents. The nutrients phosphorus, as phosphate, and sulphur, as thiosulphate, can compete with the form more oxidised of arsenic, both in soil and plant. This study examined the capability of thiosulphate (Th) and phosphate (Ph) to promote the release of As from soil surfaces in order to improve the phytoavailability and thus the absorption of As by Brassica juncea plants. In the first experiment B. juncea plants were grown on a soil that had been sampled from an industrial area strongly contaminated by As (790 mg As kg-1 soil). The second experiment was carried out in hydroponics where As has been added at a concentration (100 microM) similar to the As available concentration measured in soil. In both trials ammonium thiosulphate (at the concentration of 0.27 M in soil, and 400 microM in hydroponics) and potassium hydrogen phosphate (at the concentration of 0.05 M in soil, and 112 microM in hydroponics) were added. The biomass of B. juncea was determined and the accumulation of P, S and As in root and in the above-ground tissues have been analyzed. Our results showed that thiosulphate and phosphate acted either as nutrients and detoxifying agents, due to the stimulation of plant defensive systems, and influenced either the biomass production and the As accumulation in plant tissues. In the plants grown in soil, As accumulated at higher levels in the above-ground part than in the roots and the addition of Th induced a higher biomass production and a higher total As accumulation (concentration x biomass) in the above-ground tissues

  4. Fermentation and growth response of a primary poultry isolate of Salmonella typhimurium grown under strict anaerobic conditions in continuous culture and amino acid-limited batch culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciorowski, K G; Nisbet, D J; Ha, S D; Corrier, D E; DeLoach, J R; Ricke, S C

    1997-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is a significant hazard to consumer health that is carried asymptomatically in poultry gastrointestinal tracts. Nurmi cultures may prevent Salmonella colonization in young chicks, but the mechanism of competitive exclusion is unclear. Modeling Salmonella's metabolism in pure culture may allow for greater definition in choosing strains for Nurmi cultures. The growth rates and affinity constants of S. typhimurium growing in amino acid-limited conditions were determined in batch culture and compared to primary poultry isolates of cecal strains. Serine and NH4Cl were the best N sources for growth of all organisms tested in this study. The fermentation response of S. typhimurium was also monitored in continuous culture at a slow dilution rate of 0.021 h-1. S. typhimurium was found to adapt to VL media, with trends in protein disappearance, Yglucose, and Yprotein. This may show that amino acid or protein concentrations may be an integral component of the initial establishment of S. typhimurium in the cecum.

  5. Heavy metal accumulation and tolerance of energy grass (Elymus elongatus subsp. ponticus cv. Szarvasi-1) grown in hydroponic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Gyula; Solti, Adám; Czech, Viktória; Vashegyi, Ildikó; Tóth, Brigitta; Cseh, Edit; Fodor, Ferenc

    2013-07-01

    Phytoremediation is a plant based, cost effective technology to detoxify or stabilise contaminated soils. Fast growing, high biomass, perennial plants may be used not only in phytoremediation but also in energy production. Szarvasi-1 energy grass (Elymus elongatus subsp. ponticus cv. Szarvasi-1), a good candidate for this combined application, was grown in nutrient solution in order to assess its Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn accumulation and tolerance. Its shoot metal accumulation showed the order Pb < Ni < Cu ∼ Cd < Zn. In parallel with this, Pb and Ni had no or very little influence on the growth, dry matter content, chlorophyll concentration and transpiration of the plants. Cu and Cd treatment resulted in significant decreases in all these parameters that can be attributed to Fe plaque formation in the roots suggested by markedly increased Fe and Cu accumulation. This came together with decreased shoot and root Mn concentrations in both treatments while shoot Cu and Zn concentrations decreased under Cd and Cu exposure, respectively. Zn treatment had no effect or even slightly stimulated the plants. This may be due to a slight stimulation of Fe translocation and a very efficient detoxification mechanism. Based on the average 300 mg kg⁻¹ (dry mass) Zn concentration which is 0.03% of the shoot dry mass the variety is suggested to be classified as Zn accumulator.

  6. Strictosidine-related enzymes involved in the alkaloid biosynthesis of Uncaria tomentosa root cultures grown under oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Reyes, Ileana; Huerta-Heredia, Ariana A; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Flores-Sanchez, Isvett Josefina; Esparza-García, Fernando; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Trejo-Tapia, Gabriela; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2013-01-01

    The activity and gene expression of strictosidine-related enzymes in Uncaria tomentosa root cultures exposed to oxidative stress were studied. Elicitation with 0.2 mM hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) or a combination of 0.8 mM buthionine sulfoximine and 0.2 mM jasmonic acid (BSO-JA) increased peroxidase activities by twofold at Day 8 and glutathione reductase by 1.4-fold at Day 5 in H2 O2 elicited cultures respect to the control. Production of monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloids (MOA), 3α-dihydrocadambine, and dolichantoside was stimulated after H2 O2 elicitation, reaching levels of 886.4 ± 23.6, 847.7 ± 25.4, and 87.5 ± 7.2 µg/g DW, at Day 8 which were 1.7-, 2.1-, and 2.3-fold higher relative to control. BSO-JA elicited cultures produced about twice alkaloids than H2 O2 -treated cultures, following a biphasic pattern with maxima at 0.5 and 8 days. Alkaloid production was preceded by increase in strictosidine synthase (STR) and strictosidine glucosidase (SGD) activities. After elicitation with H2 O2 or BSO-JA, the STR activity (pKat/mg protein) increased by 1.9-fold (93.8 ± 17.8 at 24 h) or 2.5-fold (102.4 ± 2.2 at 6 h) and the SGD activity (pKat/mg protein) by 2.8-fold (245.2 ± 14.4 at 6 h) or 4.2-fold (421.2 ± 1.8 at 18 h) relative to control. STR and SGD transcripts were upregulated after elicitation. H2 O2 -treated roots showed higher levels of STR at 48-192 h and SGD at 24-48 h, while BSO-JA treatments showed STR increased at 12 h and SGD at 24 h. Also, LC/ESI-MS confirmed the biosynthesis of dolichantoside from N-ω-methyltryptamine and secologanin by U. tomentosa protein extracts.

  7. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles exert different cytotoxic effects on cells grown in monolayer cell culture versus as multicellular spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theumer, Anja; Gräfe, Christine; Bähring, Franziska; Bergemann, Christian; Hochhaus, Andreas; Clement, Joachim H.

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) with human blood-brain barrier-forming endothelial cells (HBMEC) in two-dimensional cell monolayers as well as in three-dimensional multicellular spheroids. The precise nanoparticle localisation and the influence of the NP on the cellular viability and the intracellular Akt signalling were studied in detail. Long-term effects of different polymer-coated nanoparticles (neutral fluidMAG-D, anionic fluidMAG-CMX and cationic fluidMAG-PEI) and the corresponding free polymers on cellular viability of HBMEC were investigated by real time cell analysis studies. Nanoparticles exert distinct effects on HBMEC depending on the nanoparticles' surface charge and concentration, duration of incubation and cellular context. The most severe effects were caused by PEI-coated nanoparticles. Concentrations above 25 μg/ml led to increased amounts of dead cells in monolayer culture as well as in multicellular spheroids. On the level of intracellular signalling, context-dependent differences were observed. Monolayer cultures responded on nanoparticle incubation with an increase in Akt phosphorylation whereas spheroids on the whole show a decreased Akt activity. This might be due to the differential penetration and distribution of PEI-coated nanoparticles.

  8. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles exert different cytotoxic effects on cells grown in monolayer cell culture versus as multicellular spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theumer, Anja; Gräfe, Christine; Bähring, Franziska [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747 Jena (Germany); Bergemann, Christian [Chemicell GmbH, Eresburgstrasse 22–23, 12103 Berlin (Germany); Hochhaus, Andreas [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747 Jena (Germany); Clement, Joachim H., E-mail: joachim.clement@med.uni-jena.de [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Jena University Hospital, Erlanger Allee 101, 07747 Jena (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) with human blood–brain barrier-forming endothelial cells (HBMEC) in two-dimensional cell monolayers as well as in three-dimensional multicellular spheroids. The precise nanoparticle localisation and the influence of the NP on the cellular viability and the intracellular Akt signalling were studied in detail. Long-term effects of different polymer-coated nanoparticles (neutral fluidMAG-D, anionic fluidMAG-CMX and cationic fluidMAG-PEI) and the corresponding free polymers on cellular viability of HBMEC were investigated by real time cell analysis studies. Nanoparticles exert distinct effects on HBMEC depending on the nanoparticles' surface charge and concentration, duration of incubation and cellular context. The most severe effects were caused by PEI-coated nanoparticles. Concentrations above 25 µg/ml led to increased amounts of dead cells in monolayer culture as well as in multicellular spheroids. On the level of intracellular signalling, context-dependent differences were observed. Monolayer cultures responded on nanoparticle incubation with an increase in Akt phosphorylation whereas spheroids on the whole show a decreased Akt activity. This might be due to the differential penetration and distribution of PEI-coated nanoparticles.

  9. Sporulation of Clostridium cellulolyticum while grown in cellulose-batch and cellulose-fed continuous cultures on a mineral-salt based medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvaux, M; Petitdemange, H

    2002-03-01

    Clostridium cellulolyticum sporulation was investigated during growth on cellulose fibers in a mineral-salt based medium which corresponds to conditions linked to its natural ecological niche. At steady state of the continuous cultures under limitation and with an excess of cellulose and/or ammonium, bacterial cells mainly sporulated at low dilution rates (D), at least 10% sporulation being observed at the lowest D tested. Increasing the cellulose concentration in the feed-medium reservoir increased the percentage of spores in the bioreactor. It appeared that the remaining undigested cellulose could serve as an exogenous carbon source supply at a continuous but limited rate throughout the sporulation process. In addition to the proportion of carbon and nitrogen, the influence of the environmental pH on spore formation was studied. In cellulose-fed continuous cultures at a constant D and a pH decreasing from 7.2 to 6.4, the percentage of spores increased to 14% at the lowest pH tested. When C. cellulolyticum was grown in batch culture, the level of sporulation was dramatically higher in unregulated-pH fermentation compared to pH-controlled growth conditions at pH 7.2 since in the former it reached 45% within 5 days of cultivation. It then appeared that a low specific growth rate and a low environmental pH in the presence of an insoluble carbon substrate were the major factors inducing sporulation in C. cellulolyticum. Furthermore, since the spores adhere to the carbon substrate (the cellulose) the bacteria gain advantages when the environment allows germination thanks to the recovery of suitable growth conditions. By allowing the maintenance and the integrity of the bacteria in the microbiota, spore formation could then explain the successful survival of C. cellulolyticum in cellulosic anaerobic habitats where low environmental pH conditions are often found.

  10. Global gene expression profiles of canine macrophages and canine mammary cancer cells grown as a co-culture in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Król Magdalena

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solid tumours comprise various cells, including cancer cells, resident stromal cells, migratory haemopoietic cells and other. These cells regulate tumour growth and metastasis. Macrophages constitute probably the most important element of all interactions within the tumour microenvironment. However, the molecular mechanism, that guides tumour environment, still remains unknown. Exploring the underlying molecular mechanisms that orchestrate these phenomena has been the aim of our study. A co-culture of canine mammary cancer cells and macrophages was established and maintained for 72 hrs. Having sorted the cells, gene expression in cancer cells and macrophages, using DNA microarrays, was examined. The results were confirmed using real-time qPCR and confocal microscopy. Moreover, their ability for migration and invasion has been assessed. Results Microarray analysis showed that the up-regulated genes in the cancer cell lines are involved in 15 highly over-manifested pathways. The pathways that drew our diligent attention included: the inflammation pathway mediated by chemokine and cytokine, the Toll receptor signalling pathway and the B cell activation. The up-regulated genes in the macrophages were involved in only 18 significantly over-manifested pathways: the angiogenesis, the p53 pathway feedback loops2 and the Wnt signalling pathway. The microarray analysis revealed that co-culturing of cancer cells with macrophages initiated the myeloid-specific antigen expression in cancer cells, as well as cytokine/chemokine genes expression. This finding was confirmed at mRNA and protein level. Moreover, we showed that macrophages increase cancer migration and invasion. Conclusions The presence of macrophages in the cancer environment induces acquisition of the macrophage phenotype (specific antigens and chemokines/cytokines expression in cancer cells. We presumed that cancer cells also acquire other myeloid features, such as

  11. Screening of Fungal Strains Grown in Solid-state Culture for Production of Pectinase from Coffee Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Thi Ty Ngo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Eighty percent of Vietnamese coffee production can be found in Central Highlands (Tay Nguyen. This paper describes a screening of fungi strains isolated from coffee husk waste collected in Dak Lak province, Tay Nguyen, for pectinase production. It was found that 17 different fungi strains were isolated from samples of 11 coffee farms. Among them. there were only 9 trains which could hydrolyze pectin. The diameter of the hydrolysis halo around fungi colonies in Pectinase Screening Agar Medium (PSAM was measured as an indicator to assess the pectinase activity. Phylogenetic analysis based on 28S rRNA gene sequences showed that detected Rhizopus oryzae. Aspergillus oryzae and Hypocrea pseudokoningii were those giving the largest holo zones. Hypocrea pseudokoningii presented the best pectinase activity of 657.16 UI/g and was chosen for biomass production to collect enzyme. In a further study, effect of rice bran addition to coffee husk and moisture of culture medium on the spore yield of Hypocrea pseudokoningii were investigated. Using coffee husk medium with 23% rice bran addition and 65% moisture at ambient temperature, the highest spore yield of 9.2 x108 spores/g was found after incubation for 168 hours. The fungi biomass product was dried at 40oC for 54 hours to obtain the final moisture of 12% and spore survival of 5.9 x108 spores/g.  

  12. Bioprecipitation of Calcium Carbonate Crystals by Bacteria Isolated from Saline Environments Grown in Culture Media Amended with Seawater and Real Brine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Silva-Castro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The precipitation of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate by isolated bacteria from seawater and real brine obtained in a desalination plant growth in culture media containing seawater and brine as mineral sources has been studied. However, only bioprecipitation was detected when the bacteria were grown in media with added organic matter. Biomineralization process started rapidly, crystal formation taking place in the beginning a few days after inoculation of media; roughly 90% of total cultivated bacteria showed. Six major colonies with carbonate precipitation capacity dominated bacterial community structure cultivated in heterotrophic platable bacteria medium. Taxonomic identification of these six strains through partial 16S rRNA gene sequences showed their affiliation with Gram-positive Bacillus and Virgibacillus genera. These strains were able to form calcium carbonate minerals, which precipitated as calcite and aragonite crystals and showed bacterial fingerprints or bacteria calcification. Also, carbonic anhydrase activity was observed in three of these isolated bacteria. The results of this research suggest that microbiota isolated from sea water and brine is capable of precipitation of carbonate biominerals, which can occur in situ with mediation of organic matter concentrations. Moreover, calcium carbonate precipitation ability of this microbiota could be of importance in bioremediation of CO2 and calcium in certain environments.

  13. Ammonium accumulation and use of mineral oil overlay do not alter imprinting establishment at three key imprinted genes in mouse oocytes grown and matured in a long-term follicle culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anckaert, Ellen; Adriaenssens, Tom; Romero, Sergio; Smitz, Johan

    2009-10-01

    Imprinted genes are differentially methylated during gametogenesis to allow parent-of-origin-specific monoallelic expression. Follicle culture under oil overlay has been associated with altered imprinting establishment in mouse oocytes. We previously demonstrated normal imprinting establishment at four key imprinted genes in mouse oocytes grown and matured in a long-term in vitro follicle culture system without oil overlay. Ammonium (300 microM) has been linked to aberrant imprinting in in vitro preimplantation embryo culture. Compared to culture without oil, mineral oil overlay during follicle culture led to a dramatic increase in ammonia levels in culture medium: mean ammonia levels were, respectively, 39 and 290 microM at Day 4 of culture, 73 and 465 microM at Day 8, and 101 and 725 microM at Day 12 (P Mineral oil overlay and high ammonia levels (comparable to the follicle culture system for which aberrant imprinting was previously described) during follicle culture did not affect follicle survival, metaphase II (MII) rate, or MII oocyte diameter. Bisulphite sequencing revealed that high levels of ammonia and mineral oil overlay during follicle culture did not alter the methylation status of differentially methylated regions of three key imprinted genes (Snrpn, Igf2r, and H19) in MII oocytes. In the current culture setup, ammonium accumulation and mineral oil overlay during follicle culture do not induce aberrant imprinting establishment at the studied regulatory sequences in mouse oocytes.

  14. Selection and Evaluation of Reference Genes for Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR Expression Studies in a Thermophilic Bacterium Grown under Different Culture Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen D Cusick

    Full Text Available The phylum Deinococcus-Thermus is a deeply-branching lineage of bacteria widely recognized as one of the most extremophilic. Members of the Thermus genus are of major interest due to both their bioremediation and biotechnology potentials. However, the molecular mechanisms associated with these key metabolic pathways remain unknown. Reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR is a high-throughput means of studying the expression of a large suite of genes over time and under different conditions. The selection of a stably-expressed reference gene is critical when using relative quantification methods, as target gene expression is normalized to expression of the reference gene. However, little information exists as to reference gene selection in extremophiles. This study evaluated 11 candidate reference genes for use with the thermophile Thermus scotoductus when grown under different culture conditions. Based on the combined stability values from BestKeeper and NormFinder software packages, the following are the most appropriate reference genes when comparing: (1 aerobic and anaerobic growth: TSC_c19900, polA2, gyrA, gyrB; (2 anaerobic growth with varied electron acceptors: TSC_c19900, infA, pfk, gyrA, gyrB; (3 aerobic growth with different heating methods: gyrA, gap, gyrB; (4 all conditions mentioned above: gap, gyrA, gyrB. The commonly-employed rpoC does not serve as a reliable reference gene in thermophiles, due to its expression instability across all culture conditions tested here. As extremophiles exhibit a tendency for polyploidy, absolute quantification was employed to determine the ratio of transcript to gene copy number in a subset of the genes. A strong negative correlation was found to exist between ratio and threshold cycle (CT values, demonstrating that CT changes reflect transcript copy number, and not gene copy number, fluctuations. Even with the potential for polyploidy in extremophiles, the results obtained via absolute

  15. Selection and Evaluation of Reference Genes for Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR Expression Studies in a Thermophilic Bacterium Grown under Different Culture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Kathleen D; Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Cockrell, Allison L; Biffinger, Justin C

    2015-01-01

    The phylum Deinococcus-Thermus is a deeply-branching lineage of bacteria widely recognized as one of the most extremophilic. Members of the Thermus genus are of major interest due to both their bioremediation and biotechnology potentials. However, the molecular mechanisms associated with these key metabolic pathways remain unknown. Reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) is a high-throughput means of studying the expression of a large suite of genes over time and under different conditions. The selection of a stably-expressed reference gene is critical when using relative quantification methods, as target gene expression is normalized to expression of the reference gene. However, little information exists as to reference gene selection in extremophiles. This study evaluated 11 candidate reference genes for use with the thermophile Thermus scotoductus when grown under different culture conditions. Based on the combined stability values from BestKeeper and NormFinder software packages, the following are the most appropriate reference genes when comparing: (1) aerobic and anaerobic growth: TSC_c19900, polA2, gyrA, gyrB; (2) anaerobic growth with varied electron acceptors: TSC_c19900, infA, pfk, gyrA, gyrB; (3) aerobic growth with different heating methods: gyrA, gap, gyrB; (4) all conditions mentioned above: gap, gyrA, gyrB. The commonly-employed rpoC does not serve as a reliable reference gene in thermophiles, due to its expression instability across all culture conditions tested here. As extremophiles exhibit a tendency for polyploidy, absolute quantification was employed to determine the ratio of transcript to gene copy number in a subset of the genes. A strong negative correlation was found to exist between ratio and threshold cycle (CT) values, demonstrating that CT changes reflect transcript copy number, and not gene copy number, fluctuations. Even with the potential for polyploidy in extremophiles, the results obtained via absolute quantification

  16. A comparative study on the effect of subtherapeutic tylosin administration on select feral or domestic porcine gut microflora grown in continuous-flow culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continuous flow cultures of feral (culture FC) and domesticated (culture RPCF) pig gut microflora were established in steady state. Cultures, in duplicate, were continuously infused subtherapeutic (25 ug/ml) levels of tylosin and sampled at intervals to assess effects on total culturable anaerobes,...

  17. Coexistence of a sulphate-reducing Desulfovibrio species and the dehalorespiring Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1 in defined chemostat cultures grown with various combinations of sulphate and tetrachloroethene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drzyzga, O; Gerritse, J; Dijk, JA; Elissen, H; Gottschal, JC

    2001-01-01

    A two-member co-culture consisting of the dehalorespiring Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1 and the sulphate-reducing Desulfovibrio sp. strain SULF1 was obtained via anaerobic enrichment from soil contaminated with tetrachloroethene (PCE), In this co-culture, PCE dechlorination to cis-dichloroethene

  18. Differences in stationary-phase cells of a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast grown in aerobic and microaerophilic batch cultures assessed by electric particle analysis, light diffraction and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portell, X; Ginovart, M; Carbó, R; Vives-Rego, J

    2011-01-01

    We applied electric particle analysis, light diffraction and flow cytometry to obtain information on the morphological changes during the stationary phase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The reported analyses of S. cerevisiae populations were obtained under two different conditions, aerobic and microaerophilic, at 27°C. The samples analysed were taken at between 20 and 50 h from the beginning of culture. To assist in the interpretation of the observed distributions a complexity index was used. The aerobically grown culture reached significantly greater cell density. Under these conditions, the cell density experienced a much lower reduction (3%) compared with the microaerophilic conditions (30%). Under aerobic conditions, the mean cell size determined by both electric particle analysis and light diffraction was lower and remained similar throughout the experiment. Under microaerophilic conditions, the mean cell size determined by electric particle analysis decreased slightly as the culture progressed through the stationary phase. Forward and side scatter distributions revealed two cell subpopulations under both growth conditions. However, in the aerobic growing culture the two subpopulations were more separated and hence easier to distinguish. The distributions obtained with the three experimental techniques were analysed using the complexity index. This analysis suggested that a complexity index is a good descriptor of the changes that take place in a yeast population in the stationary phase, and that it aids in the discussion and understanding of the implications of these distributions obtained by these experimental techniques.

  19. Human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells undergo enhanced chondrogenic differentiation when grown on nanofibrous scaffolds and in a sequential two-stage culture medium environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Chui-Yee; Subramanian, Arjunan; Gauthaman, Kalamegam; Venugopal, Jayarama; Biswas, Arijit; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Bongso, Ariff

    2012-03-01

    The current treatments used for osteoarthritis from cartilage damage have their disadvantages of donor site morbidity, complicated surgical interventions and risks of infection and graft rejection. Recent advances in tissue engineering have offered much promise in cartilage repair but the best cell source and in vitro system have not as yet been optimised. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) have thus far been the cell of choice. However, we derived a unique stem cell from the human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly (hWJSC) that has properties superior to hBMSCs in terms of ready availability, prolonged stemness characteristics in vitro, high proliferation rates, wide multipotency, non-tumorigenicity and tolerance in allogeneic transplantation. We observed enhanced cell attachment, cell proliferation and chondrogenesis of hWJSCs over hBMSCs when grown on PCL/Collagen nanoscaffolds in the presence of a two-stage sequential complex/chondrogenic medium for 21 days. Improvement of these three parameters were confirmed via inverted optics, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), MTT assay, pellet diameters, Alcian blue histology and staining, glycosaminglycans (GAG) and hyaluronic acid production and expression of key chondrogenic genes (SOX9, Collagen type II, COMP, FMOD) using immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In separate experiments we demonstrated that the 16 ng/ml of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) present in the complex medium may have contributed to driving chondrogenesis. We conclude that hWJSCs are an attractive stem cell source for inducing chondrogenesis in vitro when grown on nanoscaffolds and exposed sequentially first to complex medium and then followed by chondrogenic medium.

  20. Beta-carotene-rich carotenoid-protein preparation and exopolysaccharide production by Rhodotorula rubra GED8 grown with a yogurt starter culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frengova, Ginka I; Simova, Emilina D; Beshkova, Dora M

    2006-01-01

    The underlying method for obtaining a beta-carotene-rich carotenoid-protein preparation and exopolysaccharides is the associated cultivation of the carotenoid-synthesizing lactose-negative yeast strain Rhodotorula rubra GED8 with the yogurt starter culture (Lactobacillus bulgaricus 2-11 + Streptococcus thermophilus 15HA) in whey ultrafiltrate (45 g lactose/l) with a maximum carotenoid yield of 13.37 mg/l culture fluid on the 4.5th day. The chemical composition of the carotenoid-protein preparation has been identified. The respective carotenoid and protein content is 497.4 microg/g dry cells and 50.3% per dry weight, respectively. An important characteristic of the carotenoid composition is the high percentage (51.1%) of beta-carotene (a carotenoid pigment with the highest provitamin A activity) as compared to 12.9% and 33.7%, respectively, for the other two individual pigments--torulene and torularhodin. Exopolysaccharides (12.8 g/l) synthesized by the yeast and lactic acid cultures, identified as acid biopolymers containing 7.2% glucuronic acid, were isolated in the cell-free supernatant. Mannose, produced exclusively by the yeast, predominated in the neutral carbohydrate biopolymer component (76%). The mixed cultivation of R. rubra GED8 with the yogurt starter (L. bulgaricus 2-11 + S. thermophilus 15HA) in ultrafiltrate under conditions of intracellular production of maximum amount of carotenoids and exopolysaccharides synthesis enables combined utilization of the culture fluid from the fermentation process.

  1. Production and characterization of high-titer serum-free cell culture grown hepatitis C virus particles of genotype 1-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Christian K; Jensen, Tanja B; Prentoe, Jannick

    2014-01-01

    .5 hepatoma cells cultured in adenovirus expression medium. Compared to HCVcc, sf-HCVcc showed 0.6-2.1 log10 higher infectivity titers (4.7-6.2 log10 Focus Forming Units/mL), possibly due to increased release and specific infectivity of sf-HCVcc. In contrast to HCVcc, sf-HCVcc had a homogeneous single...

  2. MALDI-TOF characterization of hGH1 produced by hairy root cultures of Brassica oleracea var. italica grown in an airlift with mesh bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Edgar García; Ramírez, Emma Gloria Ramos; Gúzman, Octavio Gómez; Calva, Graciano Calva; Ariza-Castolo, Armando; Pérez-Vargas, Josefina; Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Expression systems based on plant cells, tissue, and organ cultures have been investigated as an alternative for production of human therapeutic proteins in bioreactors. In this work, hairy root cultures of Brassica oleracea var. italica (broccoli) were established in an airlift with mesh bioreactor to produce isoform 1 of the human growth hormone (hGH1) as a model therapeutic protein. The hGH1 cDNA was cloned into the pCAMBIA1105.1 binary vector to induce hairy roots in hypocotyls of broccoli plantlets via Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Most of the infected plantlets (90%) developed hairy roots when inoculated before the appearance of true leaves, and keeping the emerging roots attached to hypocotyl explants during transfer to solid Schenk and Hildebrandt medium. The incorporation of the cDNA into the hairy root genome was confirmed by PCR amplification from genomic DNA. The expression and structure of the transgenic hGH1 was assessed by ELISA, western blot, and MALDITOF-MS analysis of the purified protein extracted from the biomass of hairy roots cultivated in bioreactor for 24 days. Production of hGH1 was 5.1 ± 0.42 µg/g dry weight (DW) for flask cultures, and 7.8 ± 0.3 µg/g DW for bioreactor, with productivity of 0.68 ± 0.05 and 1.5 ± 0.06 µg/g DW*days, respectively, indicating that the production of hGH1 was not affected by the growth rate, but might be affected by the culture system. These results demonstrate that hairy root cultures of broccoli have potential as an alternative expression system for production of hGH1, and might also be useful for production of other therapeutic proteins.

  3. Improvement and modeling of culture parameters to enhance biomass and lipid production by the oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus curvatus grown on acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béligon, Vanessa; Poughon, Laurent; Christophe, Gwendoline; Lebert, André; Larroche, Christian; Fontanille, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    The improvement of culture parameters for lipid production from acetate as carbon source was investigated using the oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus curvatus. A new pH regulation system dispensing acetate was developed for fed-batch culture and allowed obtaining nearly 80 g/L biomass within 60 h with a maximal growth rate of 0.28 h(-1). A biological model was developed from experimental data. The influence of three C/N ratios of 300, 500 and 900 were tested during a multi-phases process on lipid accumulation. The C/N ratio of 300 was reported to be the most suitable for lipid storage. No significant increase of lipids content was obtained with higher value. A maximal content of 60% DCW of lipid was obtained. The determination of fatty acids profiles of the microbial oils has confirmed that the valorization of acetate by microbial oils production was a promising perspective.

  4. Effects of cyclophosphamide and acrolein in organoid cultures of mouse limb bud cells grown in the presence of adult rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaida, J; Merker, H J

    1992-01-01

    The effects were evaluated of cyclophosphamide (CPA) and its metabolite, acrolein, on chondrogenesis in organoid cultures of mouse limb bud mesenchymal cells co-cultured with non-enzymatically isolated adult rat hepatocytes. The studies were conducted with or without the simultaneous addition of 2-mercaptoethanesulphonic acid sodium (mesna) or glutathione (GSH). Alcian blue binding assay and light and electron microscopic techniques were used. Increasing concentrations of the two compounds (bioactivated CPA, 18-180 mum; acrolein, 50-500 mum) led to a dose-dependent inhibition of chondrogenesis associated with cellular dedifferentiation and/or cytotoxicity. Addition of mesna (1 mm) or GSH (1 mm) partially protected the cultures against CPA and acrolein. However, the protective effect depended on the dose of CPA or acrolein used. A higher protection was observed with mesna than with GSH, and the effect was more pronounced with acrolein than with CPA. The morphological findings suggested that CPA and acrolein acted by different mechanisms. Bioactivated CPA primarily inhibited the differentiation process, whereas acrolein exhibited a high cytotoxic activity affecting particularly monolayer cells that normally grow on the periphery of the cultures. These findings suggest that acrolein possesses a specific mode of action directed towards this type of cell. This could be explained by the specific shape and/or behaviour of the cells (i.e. cytoskeletal arrangement, proliferation rate, migration activity, intercellular communication pattern, etc.). The results demonstrated that the cell system used was suitable for the performance of cytotoxicity and teratogenicity studies such as those conducted with CPA and acrolein.

  5. Aluminium toxicity in seedlings of spruce (Picea abies (L. ) Karst) grown in culture broth. Aluminiumtoxizitaet bei Saemlingen der Fichte (Picea abies (L. ) Karst) in Naehrloesungskultur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorns, A.C.

    1988-01-01

    The work aimed to study the changes that take place in spruce seedlings in water culture under conditions of aluminium toxicity (170-5200 ..mu..M Al; pH 3.8) and to verify whether these changes are comparable to the ones observed in damaged spruces in the field. Furthermore, it aimed to establish how the supply of nutrients influences the plant's aluminium tolerance and whether by supplying nutrients correspondingly such adverse effects through aluminium can be avoided. The following results were obtained: The untreated long and short roots of spruce belong to the root type of 'periblemo-calyptrogens'. The spruce seedlings proved exceptionally tolerant to aluminium; yet damage to roots and inhibition of root growth were observed even at relatively low aluminium concentrations (170-520 ..mu..M) if nutrient supply was reduced. After 40 days of treatment with aluminium, needles began to show chloroses and red-brown discolouration; this was identified by means of needle analyses as lack of magnesium and slight lack of calcium. By increasing the total concentration and, especially, the magnesium concentration of the culture broth, the seedlings' tolerance to aluminium was increased. On treatment of the plants with 520 ..mu..M aluminium in dilute culture broth the roots showed the metacutinisation specific for aluminium toxicity. Supposedly, the zone of the root tip, an important one for apoplastic ion uptake, is reduced by the process of metacutinisation, resulting in inhibited magnesium and calcium transport.

  6. Net assimilation and photosynthate allocation of Populus clones grown under short-rotation intensive culture: Physiological and genetic responses regulating yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickmann, D.I.; Pregitzer, K.S.; Nguyen, P.V. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The overall objective of this project was to determine the differential responses of poplar clones from sections Tacamahaca and Aigeiros of the genus Populus to varying levels of applied water and nitrogen. Above- and below-ground phenology and morphology, photosynthate allocation, and physiological processes were examined. By manipulating the availability of soil resources, we have been able to separate inherent clonal differences from plastic responses, and to determine genotype-environment interactions. We also have been able to make some contrasts between trees grown from hardwood cuttings and coppice sprouts. Our overall hypothesis was that carbon allocation during growth is greatly influenced by interactions among moisture, nitrogen, and genotype, and that these interactions greatly influence yield in short-rotation plantations. As is true of any project, some of our original expectations were not realized, whereas other initially unforeseen results were obtained. The reduced funding from the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) during the last few years of the project slowed us down to some extent, so progress was not been as rapid as we might have hoped. The major problem associated with this funding shortfall was the inability to employ skilled and unskilled student labor. Nonetheless, we were able to accomplish most of our original goals. All of the principal investigators on this project feel that we have made progress in advancing the scientific underpinning of short-rotation woody biomass production.

  7. THE EFFECT OF SALINITY AND NITROGEN DEFICIENCY ON THE CHANGES IN SELECTED PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF COMMON BEAN (PHASEOLEUS VULGARIS L. GROWN IN HYDROPONIC CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Wróbel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the physiological activity of common bean grown under the conditions of stress being induced by salinity and nitrogen deficiency and its lack in substrate. Three series of two-factorial hydroponic experiment with the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivar Basta were carried out from May to July in 2013–2014. The first experimental factor was three levels of nitrogen content in a Hoagland hydroponic medium (level 1 – a complete medium, level 2 – without 50% N, level 3 – without 100% N. The second experimental factor was three levels of medium salinity (level 1 – no NaCl addition, level 2 – 30 mM NaCl addition, level 3 – 50 mM NaCl addition. Nitrogen deficiency in a Hoagland hydroponic medium, together with increased salinity level, significantly affected the changes in the physiological parameters of the common bean cultivar Basta being tested, i.e. assimilation pigment concentration (chlorophyll-a, chlorophyll-b and chlorophyll-a+b and carotenoids, assimilation and transpiration intensities, and RWC (relative water content. The 50% nitrogen deficiency in medium induced a significant increase in the concentration of all assimilation pigments in common bean leaves and was by far the highest among the experimental variants being tested. A significant decrease in the content of assimilation pigments was observed in the hydroponic mediums without nitrogen and salined with 30 and 50 mM sodium chloride. The interaction of these two experimental factors being analysed, i.e. nitrogen deficiency and its lack in a Hoagland hydroponic medium and its salinity, significantly decreased the intensity of assimilation in bean leaves, while a significant increase in transpiration was observed in the variant without nitrogen and with 50 mM NaCl. The experimental variants being tested had a significant effect on the changes in leaf water balance of the common bean cultivar being tested. Salinity, in interaction with

  8. Characterization of the Bacterial Community Naturally Present on Commercially Grown Basil Leaves: Evaluation of Sample Preparation Prior to Culture-Independent Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siele Ceuppens

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fresh herbs such as basil constitute an important food commodity worldwide. Basil provides considerable culinary and health benefits, but has also been implicated in foodborne illnesses. The naturally occurring bacterial community on basil leaves is currently unknown, so the epiphytic bacterial community was investigated using the culture-independent techniques denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and next-generation sequencing (NGS. Sample preparation had a major influence on the results from DGGE and NGS: Novosphingobium was the dominant genus for three different basil batches obtained by maceration of basil leaves, while washing of the leaves yielded lower numbers but more variable dominant bacterial genera including Klebsiella, Pantoea, Flavobacterium, Sphingobacterium and Pseudomonas. During storage of basil, bacterial growth and shifts in the bacterial community were observed with DGGE and NGS. Spoilage was not associated with specific bacterial groups and presumably caused by physiological tissue deterioration and visual defects, rather than by bacterial growth.

  9. Use of a feline respiratory epithelial cell culture system grown at the air-liquid interface to characterize the innate immune response following feline herpesvirus 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelli, Rahul K; Maes, Roger; Kiupel, Matti; Hussey, Gisela Soboll

    2016-03-02

    Infection with feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) accounts for 50% of viral upper respiratory diseases in domestic cats and is a significant cause of ocular diseases. Despite the clinical significance and high prevalence of FHV-1 infection, currently available vaccines cannot completely protect cats from infection and lifelong latency. FHV-1 infects via the mucous membranes and replicates in respiratory epithelial cells, but very little is known about the early innate immunity at this site. To address questions about immunity to FHV-1, feline respiratory epithelial cells cultured at air-liquid interface (ALI-FRECs) were established by collecting respiratory tracts from 6 healthy cats after euthanasia. Cells were isolated, cultured and characterized histologically and immunologically before infection with FHV-1. The expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokine and chemokine responses were measured by real time PCR. ALI-FRECs morphologically resembled the natural airways of cats with multilayered columnar epithelial cells and cilia. Immunological properties of the natural airways were maintained in ALI-FRECs, as evidenced by the expression of TLRs, cytokines, chemokines, interferons, beta-defensins, and other regulatory genes. Furthermore, ALI-FRECs were able to support infection and replication of FHV-1, as well as modulate transcriptional regulation of various immune genes in response to infection. IL-1β and TNFα were increased in ALI-FRECs by 24hpi, whereas expression levels of IFN-α and TLR9 were not increased until 36hpi. In contrast, TLR3, GM-CSF and TGF-1β expression was down-regulated at 36hpi. The data presented show the development of a system ideal for investigating the molecular pathogenesis and immunity of FHV-1 or other respiratory pathogens.

  10. Assessment of the dinitrogen released as ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen by unicellular and filamentous marine diazotrophic cyanobacteria grown in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo eBerthelot

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The dinitrogen (N2 released as dissolved nitrogen (DN has been compared in batch cultures of four marine diazotrophic cyanobacteria: the colony forming Trichodesmium IMS101 and the unicellular strains Cyanothece ATCC51142, Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501 and WH0003. Two approaches were conducted for this purpose. The first approach consisted in the comparison of the total accumulation of fixed N2 in the culture (both in dissolved and particulate pools with the net N2 fixation rates (i. e. the fixed N2 incorporated only in the particulate fraction after 15N2 incubation. The difference between the two measures accounted for the fixed N2 released as DN. The second approach consisted in the direct measure of the 15N-enrichment of ammonium (NH4+ and dissolved organic N (DON following the 15N2 incubations. The N2 released as DN accounted for ~0 - 20 % and ~1 % of the N2 fixed after 24 h in the first and second approach, respectively. We show that the recent methodological improvements in the net N2 fixation determination applied in this study tend to reconcile the two approaches that formerly led to contrasted values. However, the large analytical uncertainties of the first approach limit its reliability. Thus, the direct determination of the 15N-enrichment of the dissolved pool remains the best tool to assess the fixed N2 released in the DN pool, in particular as it allows shorter incubation times. There were no clear patterns detected between the filamentous Trichodesmium and unicellular strains, neither in terms of the amount of N2 released as DN nor in terms of the proportion of NH4+ relative to DON. This suggests that N2 release processes are shared among the filamentous and free living diazotrophs.

  11. Sterol composition in field-grown and cultured mycelia of Inonotus obliquus%桦褐孔菌野生菌丝体和培养菌丝体的甾体类化合物组成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑维发; 刘彤; 项小燕; 顾琪

    2007-01-01

    for differing sterol composition, the field-grown and cultured mycelia were extracted with 80% ethanol at room temperature and total sterols were prepared using silicon gel column chromatography followed by identification using either GC-MS or spectroscopic methods. For culturing Inonotus obliquus, the seed culture was grown either in basic medium consisting of glucose (2%), yeast extract (0.5%), KH2PO4 (0.01%), MgSO4·7H2O (0.05%) and distilled water at pH 6.5, or the basic medium supplemented with serial concentrations of AgNO3. The results indicated that field-grown mycelia contained lanosterol and inotodiol (comprised 45.47% and 25.36% of the total sterols, respectively) and other 10 sterols (comprising the remaining 30.17%) including ergosterol biosynthetic intermediates such as 24-methylene dihydrolanosterol, 4,4-dimethylfecosterol, 4-methyl fecosterol, fecosterol and episterol. Column chromatography also led to the isolation of lanosterol, Inotodiol, trametenolic acid, foscoparianol B and a new triterpenoid foscoparianol D in field-grown mycelia. In comparison, the cultured mycelia only contained three sterols with ergosterol as the predominant one (82.20%). Lanosterol only accounted for 3.68%. Supplementing Ag+ into the culture at 0.28 μmol·L-1 greatly enhanced content of lanosterol (accounting for 56.81%) and decreased the content of ergosterol (18.5%) together with the presence of intermediates for ergosterol biosynthesis. These results suggested that the sterol composition in mycelia of the fungus can be diversified by supplementing substances inhibiting enzymatic process towards the synthesis of ergosterol. Harsh growth conditions in field environment (I.e. temperature variation, UV irradiation etc.) can delay the synthesis of ergosterol and hereby diversify the sterol composition in the mycelia of Inonotus obliquus.

  12. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  13. Cultivar of Gerbera grown in soil less culture on inert substrates with open and closed systems in comparison with a traditional cultivation on soil in beds; Coltivazione di gerbera in idroponica su substrato con sistema di irrigazione a ciclo aperto e a ciclo chiuso a confronto con la coltivazione tradizionale in cassone su terriccio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiavi, A. [MIRAAF, Istituto Sperimentale per l`Orticultura (Italy). Sezione di Ascoli Piceno; Venezia, A. [Istituto Sperimentale per l`Orticoltura (Italy). Sezione di Montanaso Lomabardo; Martignon, G. [Centro Ricerca Ambiente e Materiali, Unita` Calore residuo e Biomasse, Gruppo Agritermia, Milan (Italy)

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the experiment was the evaluation of the yield of several cultivar of gerbera grown in soil less culture on inert substrates with open and closed systems, in comparison with a traditional cultivation on soil in beds. The trial was carried out in the experimental station at Tavazzano (Milan), in a iron plastic greenhouse heated with the waste water discharged by the local thermo electrical power plant. Two inert substrates (rokwool and perlite) were tested in soil less culture both with an open system and a closed system, based on the reuse of the drained nutrient solution. The cultivars Rosula, Pascal, Queen Rebecca, Horizon, Sunspot e Fleur were utilized, grown with a plant density of 10 plants/mq. The trial started in april 1993 and ended in december 1994. The results have pointed out statistically significative differences in the production of cut flower in the growing systems tested. Plants grown in soil less culture with open system gave a number of cut flowers/plant higher both than those grown on soil and with soil less closed system. Agriperlite gave a better commercially yield than rockwool in soil less culture. The distribution of commercial cut flowers in the three category considered (extra, first and second class) was the same for the all thesis; the not marketable production was lower for plant grown on soil than on both the soil less culture systems. With regard to the response of the cultivar, Queen Rebecca and Pascal gave a commercial yield of about 30 cut flowers/plant higher than Rosula, Horizon and Fleur; the cultivar SunSpot showed the lower yield (17 cut flowers/plant).

  14. The isotopic composition of valves and organic tissue of diatoms grown in steady state cultures under varying conditions of temperature, light and nutrients. Implications for the interpretation of oxygen isotopes from sedimentary biogenic opal as proxies of environmental variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, K.

    2006-05-15

    The oxygen isotopes of diatomaceous silica from marine and freshwater sediments are frequently used as indicators of the palaeotemperature development, particularly in cases where calcareous microfossils are rare or absent. With regard to terrestrial waters it is unknown whether or not palaeotemperature scale can be used in a limnic ecosystem. Due to the fact that the seasonal variations in lakes are larger than in oceans, specific problems arise when working with freshwater sediments. Thus, an understanding of the contribution of the various factors (e.g. temperature, light nutrients, competition) influencing the formation of isotope signals in biogenic opal is a prerequisite for the accurate interpretation of environmental processes. Since it is impossible to examine the influence of a single parameter under natural ecosystem conditions due to permanent changes of the environment, laboratory experiments with single diatom species are needed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the oxygen isotope variations in biogenic opal and different environmental parameters using steady state cultures with diatoms. It should be examined whether or not the different diatom species grown under identical conditions show equal oxygen isotope ratios (species relationship), if variations of the water temperature induce variations of the oxygen isotope ratio (relationship with temperature), variable parameters such as light intensity and nitrate concentration influence the isotope ratio, and if vital effects (e.g. growth rate) lead to variations of the oxygen isotope ratio. (orig.)

  15. Harvesting microalgae grown on wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udom, Innocent; Zaribaf, Behnaz H; Halfhide, Trina; Gillie, Benjamin; Dalrymple, Omatoyo; Zhang, Qiong; Ergas, Sarina J

    2013-07-01

    The costs and life cycle impacts of microalgae harvesting for biofuel production were investigated. Algae were grown in semi-continuous culture in pilot-scale photobioreactors under natural light with anaerobic digester centrate as the feed source. Algae suspensions were collected and the optimal coagulant dosages for metal salts (alum, ferric chloride), cationic polymer (Zetag 8819), anionic polymer (E-38) and natural coagulants (Moringa Oleifera and Opuntia ficus-indica cactus) were determined using jar tests. The relative dewaterability of the algae cake was estimated by centrifugation. Alum, ferric chloride and cationic polymer could all achieve >91% algae recovery at optimal dosages. Life cycle assessment (LCA) and cost analysis results revealed that cationic polymer had the lowest cost but the highest environmental impacts, while ferric chloride had the highest cost and lowest environmental impacts. Based on the LCA results, belt presses are the recommended algae dewatering technology prior to oil extraction.

  16. Effect of Bifidobacterium upon Clostridium difficile growth and toxicity when co-cultured in different prebiotic substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Valdés Varela

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal overgrowth of Clostridium difficile, often after disturbance of the gut microbiota by antibiotic treatment, leads to C. difficile infection (CDI which manifestation ranges from mild diarrhoea to life-threatening conditions. The increasing CDI incidence, not only in compromised subjects but also in traditionally considered low-risk populations, together with the frequent relapses of the disease, has attracted the interest for prevention/therapeutic options. Among these, probiotics, prebiotics or synbiotics constitute a promising approach. In this study we determined the potential of selected Bifidobacterium strains for the inhibition of C. difficile growth and toxicity in different carbon sources. We conducted co-cultures of the toxigenic strain C. difficile LMG21717 with four Bifidobacterium strains (Bifidobacterium longum IPLA20022, Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20006, Bifidobacterium bifidum IPLA20015, and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12 in the presence of various prebiotic substrates (Inulin, Synergy and Actilight or glucose, and compared the results with those obtained for the corresponding mono-cultures. C. difficile and bifidobacteria levels were quantified by qPCR; the pH and the production of short chain fatty acids was also determined. Moreover, supernatants of the cultures were collected to evaluate their toxicity using a recently developed model. Results showed that co-culture with B. longum IPLA20022 and B. breve IPLA20006 in the presence of short-chain fructooligosaccharides, but not of Inulin, as carbon source significantly reduced the growth of the pathogen. With the sole exception of B. animalis Bb12, whose growth was enhanced, the presence of C. difficile did not show major effects upon the growth of the bifidobacteria. In accordance with the growth data, B. longum and B. breve were the strains showing higher reduction in the toxicity of the co-culture supernatants.

  17. Dicty_cDB: FC-BB12 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available neering technology. 86 6e-13 1 U40704 |U40704.1 Candida albicans catalase (Cat) gen...l catalase, gene of said catalase and composition containing said catalase, and process for preparing catalase using the genetic engi

  18. Use of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy in direct, non-destructive, and rapid assessment of developmental cotton fibers grown in planta and in culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton fibers are routinely harvested from cotton plants (in planta), and their end-use qualities depend on their development stages. Cotton fibers are also cultured at controlled laboratory environments, so that cotton researchers can investigate many aspects of experimental protocols in cotton bre...

  19. Grown on Novel Microcarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Falk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE cells have been tested as a cell-based therapy for Parkinson’s disease but will require additional study before further clinical trials can be planned. We now show that the long-term survival and neurotrophic potential of hRPE cells can be enhanced by the use of FDA-approved plastic-based microcarriers compared to a gelatin-based microcarrier as used in failed clinical trials. The hRPE cells grown on these plastic-based microcarriers display several important characteristics of hRPE found in vivo: (1 characteristic morphological features, (2 accumulation of melanin pigment, and (3 high levels of production of the neurotrophic factors pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A. Growth of hRPE cells on plastic-based microcarriers led to sustained levels (>1 ng/ml of PEDF and VEGF-A in conditioned media for two months. We also show that the expression of VEGF-A and PEDF is reciprocally regulated by activation of the GPR143 pathway. GPR143 is activated by L-DOPA (1 μM which decreased VEGF-A secretion as opposed to the previously reported increase in PEDF secretion. The hRPE microcarriers are therefore novel candidate delivery systems for achieving long-term delivery of the neuroprotective factors PEDF and VEGF-A, which could have a value in neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson’s disease.

  20. Shade periodicity affects growth of container grown dogwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Container-grown dogwoods rank third in the US in nursery sales of ornamental trees. However, Dogwoods are a challenging crop to produce in container culture, especially when bare root liners are used as the initial transplant into containers due unacceptable levels of mortality and poor growth. This...

  1. The fertilization ability and developmental competence of bovine oocytes grown in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Miho; Ueda, Mayuko; Miyano, Takashi

    2016-08-25

    In vitro growth culture systems for oocytes are being developed in several mammalian species. In these growth culture systems, in vitro grown oocytes usually have lower blastocyst formation than in vivo grown oocytes after in vitro fertilization. Furthermore, there have been a few reports that investigated the fertilization ability of in vitro grown oocytes in large animals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the fertilization process and developmental competence of bovine oocytes grown in vitro. Oocyte-granulosa cell complexes collected from bovine early antral follicles (0.4-0.7 mm in diameter) were cultured for growth with 17β-estradiol and androstenedione for 14 days and matured in vitro. These oocytes were then inseminated for 6 or 12 h, and further cultured for development up to 8 days in vitro. After growth culture, oocytes grew from 95 µm to around 120 µm and acquired maturation competence (79%). Although fertilization rates of in vitro grown oocytes were low after 6 h of insemination, 34% of in vitro grown oocytes fertilized normally after 12 h of insemination, having two polar bodies and two pronuclei with a sperm tail, and 22% of these oocytes developed into blastocysts after 8 days of culture. The fertilization and blastocyst formation rates were similar to those of in vivo grown oocytes. In addition, blastocyst cell numbers were also similar between in vitro and in vivo grown oocytes. In conclusion, in vitro grown bovine oocytes are similar to in vivo grown oocytes in fertilization ability and can develop into blastocysts.

  2. Effect of solution pH on the growth of Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa grown in nutrient solution culture; Sugi to hinoki no seiiku ni oyobosu baiyoeki pH no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, Y.; Matsumura, H.; Kobayashi, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-01-10

    When wet deposition including acid rain, mist and fog, and dry deposition including gaseous and particulate SOx and NOx are added to soil, the soil acidification occurs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the soil acidification stress, which may contribute to the conifer decline. Two-year-old seedlings of Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa were cultivated to examine the effect of root sphere acidity on the plant growth in the nutrient solution culture. Acidity of one fifth Hoagland`s nutrient culture solution was adjusted to the pH in five levels, i.e., 3.5 to 4.0, 4.0 to 4.5, 4.5 to 5.0, 5.0 to 5.5, and 5.5 to 6.0. Cultivation period was for 15 weeks. The growth performance of both Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa was best under the lowest pH level of 3.5 to 4.0. Both species, however, decreased plant dry weight at high pH level. Total cation contents in the leaves and roots of both species cultivated at pH 3.5 to 4.0 were highest. These results suggested that both species have a characteristic adaptability to such a low pH condition. 13 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Neural signal registration and analysis of axons grown in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigareva, Y.; Malishev, E.; Gladkov, A.; Kolpakov, V.; Bukatin, A.; Mukhina, I.; Kazantsev, V.; Pimashkin, A.

    2016-08-01

    Registration of neuronal bioelectrical signals remains one of the main physical tools to study fundamental mechanisms of signal processing in the brain. Neurons generate spiking patterns which propagate through complex map of neural network connectivity. Extracellular recording of isolated axons grown in microchannels provides amplification of the signal for detailed study of spike propagation. In this study we used neuronal hippocampal cultures grown in microfluidic devices combined with microelectrode arrays to investigate a changes of electrical activity during neural network development. We found that after 5 days in vitro after culture plating the spiking activity appears first in microchannels and on the next 2-3 days appears on the electrodes of overall neural network. We conclude that such approach provides a convenient method to study neural signal processing and functional structure development on a single cell and network level of the neuronal culture.

  4. DIAGNOSIS OF CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBU MĂDĂLINA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cultural institution management is to direct the organization to a specific cultural profile purpose, namely production values esthetic sense, artistic, moral, spiritual, distribution, promotion of these values, protection and circulation of cultural heritage. In this regard, an analysis in the diagnosis cultural organizations aims to determine the main strengths and weaknesses, assess the potential and making recommendations focused on the root causes of failures and positive aspects. This paper presents considerations diligence activity Culture House "IL Caragiale "in Ploiesti. The mission of this organization is to contribute to the cultural development of the community by initiating projects and cultural programs, offer development programs and services to meet cultural needs, increase public access to diverse cultural life, providing a constant presence institution circuit local, national, European and international level. Conclusions drawn from the analysis shows that in a world of economic globalization, information and culture in a company in constant change, in a competitive market where there is information readily available means and leisure, but not cultural consistency in a social environment where interest in culture of people is declining, the situation of the population is impaired, the remuneration of staff working in the field of cultural education is demotivating, the funds allocated to culture have grown lately effectively lead a cultural institution is a challenge.

  5. Biodiesel production from indigenous microalgae grown in wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolafe, Oladapo; Velasquez Orta, Sharon B; Monje-Ramirez, Ignacio; Yáñez Noguez, Isaura; Harvey, Adam P; Orta Ledesma, María T

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes a process for producing biodiesel sustainably from microalgae grown in wastewater, whilst significantly reducing the wastewater's nutrients and total coliform. Furthermore, ozone-flotation harvesting of the resultant biomass was investigated, shown to be viable, and resulted in FAMEs of greater oxidation stability. Desmodesmus sp. and two mixed cultures were successfully grown on wastewater. Desmodesmus sp. grew rapidly, to a higher maximum biomass concentration of 0.58 g/L. A native mixed culture dominated by Oscillatoria and Arthrospira, reached 0.45 g/L and exhibited the highest lipid and FAME yield. The FAME obtained from ozone-flotation exhibited the greatest oxidative stability, as the degree of saturation was high. In principle ozone could therefore be used as a combined method of harvesting and reducing FAME unsaturation. During microalgae treatment, the total nitrogen in wastewater was reduced by 55.4-83.9%. More importantly, total coliform removal was as high as 99.8%.

  6. Culturing rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C

    2001-01-01

    Cultured neurons are widely used to investigate the mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons may be grown as described under a wide variety of conditions to suit differing experimental procedures, including electrophysiology, morphological analysis of neurite development, and various biochemical and molecular analyses.

  7. Tissue grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Cells from kidneys lose some of their special features in conventional culture but form spheres replete with specialized cell microvilli (hair) and synthesize hormones that may be clinically useful. Ground-based research studies have demonstrated that both normal and neoplastic cells and tissues recreate many of the characteristics in the NASA bioreactor that they display in vivo. Proximal kidney tubule cells that normally have rich apically oriented microvilli with intercellular clefts in the kidney do not form any of these structures in conventional two-dimensional monolayer culture. However, when normal proximal renal tubule cells are cultured in three-dimensions in the bioreactor, both the microvilli and the intercellular clefts form. This is important because, when the morphology is recreated, the function is more likely also to be rejuvenated. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  8. Properties of soil and hydroponicaly grown lettuce

    OpenAIRE

    Mlakar, Mirjam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to examine the quality of the lettuce Lactuca sativa L., which was grown with two methods. Hydroponically grown lettuce was compared with lettuce grown in soil. The purpose of this research was to find out with which method the lettuce would look better and with which method the quality of the lettuce`s nutritiousness would be higher. We ascertained that plants grown with hydroponics did look better and were heavier. About quality results showed that the contents of ...

  9. Proteolytic and ACE-inhibitory activities of probiotic yogurt containing non-viable bacteria as affected by different levels of fat, inulin and starter culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerian, Mansour; Razavi, Seyed Hadi; Ziai, Seyed Ali; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Yarmand, Mohammad Saeid; Moayedi, Ali

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effects of fat (0.5 %, 3.2 % and 5.0 %), inulin (0.0 and 1.0 %) and starter culture (0.0 %, 0.5 %, 1.0 % and 1.5 %) on the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity of probiotic yogurt containing non-viable bacteria were assessed. Proteolytic activities of bacteria were also investigated. Yogurts were prepared either using a sole yogurt commercial culture including Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subs. bulgaricus or bifidobacterium animalis BB-12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 in addition to yogurt culture. Relative degrees of proteolysis were found to be considerably higher in yogurt samples than UHT milk as the control. Both regular and probiotic yogurts showed considerable ACE-inhibitory activities. Results showed that degree of proteolysis was not influenced by different fat contents, while was increased by high concentration of starter culture (1.5 % w/w) and reduced by inulin (1 % w/w). ACE-inhibitory activities of yogurt were also negatively affected by the presence of inulin and high levels of fat (5 % w/w). Moreover, yogurt containing probiotic bacteria showed higher inhibitory against ACE in comparison to the yogurt prepared with non-probiotic strains.

  10. Differential carotenoid production and gene expression in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous grown in a nonfermentable carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Aniela; Lozano, Carla; Barahona, Salvador; Niklitschek, Mauricio; Marcoleta, Andrés; Alcaíno, Jennifer; Sepulveda, Dionisia; Baeza, Marcelo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2011-05-01

    Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is a basidiomycetous yeast of considerable biotechnological interest because it synthesizes astaxanthin as its main carotenoid. The carotenoid production increases when it is grown using nonfermentable compounds as the sole carbon source. This work analyzes the expression of the carotenogenic genes and their relationship with the amount and types of carotenoids produced when X. dendrorhous is grown using a nonfermentable (succinate) or a fermentable carbon source (glucose). When X. dendrorhous is grown in succinate, carotenoid production is approximately three times higher than when it is grown in glucose. Moreover, carotenoid biosynthesis occurs at the start of the growth cycle when X. dendrorhous is grown in succinate, whereas when it is grown in glucose, carotenoids are produced at the end of the exponential phase. Additionally, we observed that some carotenogenic genes, such as alternative transcripts of crtYB and crtI, are differentially expressed when the yeast is grown in these carbon sources; other genes, such as crtS, exhibit a similar pattern of expression. Our data indicate that transcriptional regulation is not sufficient to explain the differences in carotenoid production between the two culture conditions, indicating that additional regulatory mechanisms may be operating in the carotenogenic pathway of X. dendrorhous.

  11. Aging impairs osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells grown on titanium by favoring adipogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABUNA, Rodrigo Paolo Flores; STRINGHETTA-GARCIA, Camila Tami; FIORI, Leonardo Pimentel; DORNELLES, Rita Cassia Menegati; ROSA, Adalberto Luiz; BELOTI, Marcio Mateus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aging negatively affects bone/titanium implant interactions. Our hypothesis is that the unbalance between osteogenesis and adipogenesis induced by aging may be involved in this phenomenon. Objective We investigated the osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from young and aged rats cultured on Ti. Material and Methods Bone marrow MSCs derived from 1-month and 21-month rats were cultured on Ti discs under osteogenic conditions for periods of up to 21 days and osteoblast and adipocyte markers were evaluated. Results Cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular matrix mineralization and gene expression of RUNX2, osterix, ALP, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, and osteocalcin were reduced in cultures of 21-month rats compared with 1-month rats grown on Ti. Gene expression of PPAR-γ , adipocyte protein 2, and resistin and lipid accumulation were increased in cultures of 21-month rats compared with 1-month rats grown on the same conditions. Conclusions These results indicate that the lower osteogenic potential of MSCs derived from aged rats compared with young rats goes along with the higher adipogenic potential in cultures grown on Ti surface. This unbalance between osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation should be considered in dental implant therapy to the elderly population. PMID:27556209

  12. Morpho-anatomical study of Stevia rebaudiana roots grown in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael V. Reis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni Bertoni, Asteraceae, is used as a food additive because its leaves are a source of steviol glycosides. There are examples of tissue culture based on micropropagation and phytochemical production of S. rebaudiana leaves but there are few studies on adventitious root culture of S. rebaudiana. More than 90% of the plants used in industry are harvested indiscriminately. In order to overcome this situation, the development of methodologies that employ biotechnology, such as root culture, provides suitable alternatives for the sustainable use of plants. The aim of this study was to compare morpho-anatomical transverse sections of S. rebaudiana roots grown in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro system used to maintain root cultures consisted of a gyratory shaker under dark and light conditions and a roller bottle system. Transverse sections of S. rebaudiana roots grown in vitro were structurally and morphologically different when compared to the control plant; roots artificially maintained in culture media can have their development affected by the degree of media aeration, sugar concentration, and light. GC–MS and TLC confirmed that S. rebaudiana roots grown in vitro have the ability to produce metabolites, which can be similar to those produced by wild plants.

  13. Adaptive changes in cardiolipin content of Staphylococcus aureus grown in different salt concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takatsu,Tieko

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive changes in cardiolipin content were examined in Staphylococcus aureus 209P using the 32P pulse-labelling method. Cardiolipin synthesis showed increased adaptation when cells grown in normal medium were transferred into high NaCl containing medium. When S. aureus cultured in 10% NaCl medium was transferred back to normal medium, cardiolipin concentration decreased to the normal level within 3 hours. The catabolic rate of cardiolipin in the cells was much slower in the 5% NaCl medium than in normal medium. The cardiolipin synthetase activity was examined by isolated membrane fraction from S. aureus grown both in normal and 10% NaCl medium. The activity was higher by two-fold in membrane fractions from cells cultured in 10% NaCl-containing medium than in membranes from cells cultured in normal medium.

  14. Simple and convenient method for culturing anaerobic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Behbehani, M J; Jordan, H. V.; Santoro, D L

    1982-01-01

    A simple and convenient method for culturing anaerobic bacteria is described. Cultures can be grown in commercially available flasks normally used for preparation of sterile external solutions. A special disposable rubber flask closure maintains anaerobic conditions in the flask after autoclaving. Growth of a variety of anaerobic oral bacteria was comparable to that obtained after anaerobic incubation of broth cultures in Brewer Anaerobic Jars.

  15. Chloride and potassium conductances of cultured human sweat ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Pedersen, P S; Larsen, Erik Hviid

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the ion conductances, in particular those for Cl- and K+, of human sweat duct cells grown in primary culture. Sweat duct cells from healthy individuals were grown to confluence on a dialysis membrane, which was then mounted in a mini-Ussing chamber...

  16. Hydrogen production by photoautotrophic sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii pre-grown and incubated under high light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstygina, Irina V; Antal, Taras K; Kosourov, Sergey N; Krendeleva, Tatyana E; Rubin, Andrey B; Tsygankov, Anatoly A

    2009-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can produce hydrogen under strictly photoautotrophic conditions during sulfur deprivation [Tsygankov et al. (2006); Int J Hydrogen Energy 3:1574-1584]. The maximum hydrogen photoproduction was achieved by photoautotrophic cultures pre-grown under a low light regime (25 microE m(-2) s(-1)). We failed to establish sustained hydrogen production from cultures pre-grown under high light (100 microE m(-2) s(-1)). A new approach for sustained hydrogen production by these cultures is presented here. Assuming that stable and reproducible transition to anerobiosis as well as high starch accumulation are important for hydrogen production, the influence of light intensity and dissolved oxygen concentration during the oxygen evolving stage of sulfur deprivation were investigated in cultures pre-grown under high light. Results showed that light higher than 175 microE m(-2) s(-1) during sulfur deprivation induced reproducible transition to anerobiosis, although the total amount of starch accumulation and hydrogen production were insignificant. The potential PSII activity measured in the presence of an artificial electron acceptor (DCBQ) and an inhibitor of electron transport (DBMIB) did not change in cultures pre-grown under 20 microE m(-2) s(-1) and incubated under 150 microE m(-2) s(-1) during sulfur deprivation. In contrast, the potential PSII activity decreased in cultures pre-grown under 100 microE m(-2) s(-1) and incubated under 420 microE m(-2) s(-1). This indicates that cultures grown under higher light experience irreversible inhibition of PSII in addition to reversible down regulation. High dissolved O(2) content during the oxygen evolving stage of sulfur deprivation has a negative regulatory role on PSII activity. To increase hydrogen production by C. reinhardtii pre-grown under 100 microE m(-2) s(-1), cultures were incubated under elevated PFD and decreased oxygen pressure during the oxygen evolving stage

  17. Manufacturing technology for high quality swept-culture growth quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balascio, J. F.; Lias, N. C.

    1983-09-01

    Relatively low impurity alpha-quartz has been grown from the hydroxide mineralizer system with the use of three types of nutrient: converted, special cultured and cultured. The converted nutrient resulted in the lowest total ppm level (2.6) and Al ppm level (0.5) in the as-grown crystals. Special cultured and cultured nutrients resulted in 1.7 ppm and 2.1 ppm of aluminum in crystals grown, respectively, from these nutrients. Infrared Q values ranged from 2.5x10 to the 6th power in these crystals. With respect to rho in the as-grown crystals, a ten minute etching of seeds in 7.0 molal ammonium bifluoride has resulted in the growth of the lowest etch channel density crystals (approx = 135/sq cm).

  18. A cytochemical study of acid carbohydrates on the surface of Candida lipolytica grown in tween 80-containing medium

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento Aline E.; Shariá Allana E. do Nascimento; Lima Marco Antonio Barbosa de; Campos-Takaki Galba Maria de

    2000-01-01

    Carbohydrate-containing molecules were located on the surface of Candida lipolytica by using ruthenium red in a cytochemical study. The yeast was grown in media containing Tween 80. The surfactant, at 1.0% and 0.5%, was added to the culture medium in different intervals of time, correspondent to the beginning of exponential growth phase, mid of logarithimic phase and beginning of stationary growth phase. Control cultures were grown in a medium containing glucose. The growth of the yeast in me...

  19. Luminescence from Erbium Oxide Grown on Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    H9.14 Luminescence from erbium oxide grown on silicon E. Nogales’, B. Mrndez , J.Piqueras’, R.Plugaru2 , J. A. Garcfa3 and T. J. Tate4 ’ Universidad ... Complutense de Madrid, Dpto. Ffsica de Materiales, 28040 Madrid, Spain.2Inst. of Microtechnology, Bucharest, Romania.3Universidad del Pais Vasco, Dpto

  20. Recrystallization phenomena of solution grown paraffin dendrites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, F.F.A.; Stasse, O.; Suchtelen, van J.; Enckevort, van W.J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Paraffin crystals were grown from decane solutions using a micro-Bridgman set up for in-situ observation of the morphology at the growth front. It is shown that for large imposed velocities, dendrites are obtained. After dendritic growth, aging or recrystallization processes set in rather quickly, c

  1. Urine culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...

  2. Proximate composition of CELSS crops grown in NASA's Biomass Production Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Mackowiak, C. L.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.; Berry, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    Edible biomass from four crops of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), four crops of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), four crops of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), and three crops of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) grown in NASA's CELSS Biomass Production Chamber were analyzed for proximate composition. All plants were grown using recirculating nutrient (hydroponic) film culture with pH and electrical conductivity automatically controlled. Temperature and humidity were controlled to near optimal levels for each species and atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressures were maintained near 100 Pa during the light cycles. Soybean seed contained the highest percentage of protein and fat, potato tubers and wheat seed contained the highest levels of carbohydrate, and lettuce leaves contained the highest level of ash. Analyses showed values close to data published for field-grown plants with several exceptions: In comparison with field-grown plants, wheat seed had higher protein levels; soybean seed had higher ash and crude fiber levels; and potato tubers and lettuce leaves had higher protein and ash levels. The higher ash and protein levels may have been a result of the continuous supply of nutrients (e.g., potassium and nitrogen) to the plants by the recirculating hydroponic culture.

  3. Controlling hyperhydration of carnations (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) grown in a mist reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, M J; Wu, Y; Weathers, P J

    Carnations (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) grown in vitro often develop physiological abnormalities such as hyperhydration. The amount of hyperhydration and growth was compared between carnations grown in mist reactors and conventional semisolid micropropagation systems (vented or unvented GA7 culture boxes). Plants grown in the mist reactor with long misting times (10 min h(-1)) produced more dry mass than those grown with <10 min h(-1); however, more misting also produced more hyperhydrated plants (70% hyperhydration). Control of hyperhydration in the mist reactor involved either reducing the overall nutrient mist supply or altering the mist supply throughout the culturing period. Stepped decreases in the mist supply throughout the 3-week period or an overall decrease in the duration of misting reduced hyperhydration to 13% and 5%, respectively. However, for both misting regimes, the biomass of normal (healthy) plants (fresh and dry weights) was limited. Further analysis suggested that, although normal plant biomass increased with longer mist exposure, hyperhydration levels also increased while the water content, based on percent dry weight, approached that of hyperhydrated plants. Sufficient normal plant development (fresh weight, leaf and shoot numbers, height, and rooting) with < 50% hyperhydration was obtained by weekly, stepped increases in the nutrient mist supply.

  4. Safeguards Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2012-07-01

    The concepts of nuclear safety and security culture are well established; however, a common understanding of safeguards culture is not internationally recognized. Supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the authors prepared this report, an analysis of the concept of safeguards culture, and gauged its value to the safeguards community. The authors explored distinctions between safeguards culture, safeguards compliance, and safeguards performance, and evaluated synergies and differences between safeguards culture and safety/security culture. The report concludes with suggested next steps.

  5. Peritoneal culture alters Streptococcus pneumoniae protein profiles and virulence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orihuela, C. J.; Janssen, R.; Robb, C. W.; Watson, D. A.; Niesel, D. W.

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the properties of Streptococcus pneumoniae cultured in the murine peritoneal cavity and compared its virulence-associated characteristics to those of cultures grown in vitro. Analysis of mRNA levels for specific virulence factors demonstrated a 2.8-fold increase in ply expression and a 2.2-fold increase in capA3 expression during murine peritoneal culture (MPC). Two-dimensional gels and immunoblots using convalescent-phase patient sera and murine sera revealed distinct differences in protein production in vivo (MPC). MPC-grown pneumococci adhered to A549 epithelial cell lines at levels 10-fold greater than those cultured in vitro.

  6. Organizational Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian HUDREA

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Cultural orientations of an organization can be its greatest strength, providing the basis for problem solving, cooperation, and communication. Culture, however, can also inhibit needed changes. Cultural changes typically happen slowly – but without cultural change, many other organizational changes are doomed to fail. The dominant culture of an organization is a major contributor to its success. But, of course, no organizational culture is purely one type or another. And the existence of secondary cultures can provide the basis for change. Therefore, organizations need to understand the cultural environments and values.

  7. Enhanced Productivity of a Lutein-Enriched Novel Acidophile Microalga Grown on Urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vilchez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Coccomyxa acidophila is an extremophile eukaryotic microalga isolated from the Tinto River mining area in Huelva, Spain. Coccomyxa acidophila accumulates relevant amounts of b-carotene and lutein, well-known carotenoids with many biotechnological applications, especially in food and health-related industries. The acidic culture medium (pH < 2.5 that prevents outdoor cultivation from non-desired microorganism growth is one of the main advantages of acidophile microalgae production. Conversely, acidophile microalgae growth rates are usually very low compared to common microalgae growth rates. In this work, we show that mixotrophic cultivation on urea efficiently enhances growth and productivity of an acidophile microalga up to typical values for common microalgae, therefore approaching acidophile algal production towards suitable conditions for feasible outdoor production. Algal productivity and potential for carotenoid accumulation were analyzed as a function of the nitrogen source supplied. Several nitrogen conditions were assayed: nitrogen starvation, nitrate and/or nitrite, ammonia and urea. Among them, urea clearly led to the best cell growth (~4 ´ 108 cells/mL at the end of log phase. Ammonium led to the maximum chlorophyll and carotenoid content per volume unit (220 mg·mL-1 and 35 mg·mL-1, respectively. Interestingly, no significant differences in growth rates were found in cultures grown on urea as C and N source, with respect to those cultures grown on nitrate and CO2 as nitrogen and carbon sources (control cultures. Lutein accumulated up to 3.55 mg·g-1 in the mixotrophic cultures grown on urea. In addition, algal growth in a shaded culture revealed the first evidence for an active xanthophylls cycle operative in acidophile microalgae.

  8. Possible Internalization of an Enterovirus in Hydroponically Grown Lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carducci, Annalaura; Caponi, Elisa; Ciurli, Adriana; Verani, Marco

    2015-07-17

    Several studies have shown that enteric viruses can be transferred onto the surface of vegetables and fruits through spray irrigation, but, recently, reports have suggested viral contamination of vegetables sub-irrigated with reused wastewater. Hydroponic cultures, used to grow ready to eat fresh lettuce, have also been used to study the possibility of viral absorption through roots. This study was conducted to assess a possible risk of viral contamination in lettuce from contaminated water. The leaves of lettuce plants grown in hydroponic cultures where the roots were exposed to water containing Coxsakievirus B2, were analysed for evidence of the virus. The plants and water were sampled at different times and virus was measured using quantitative RT-PCR and infectivity assay. In leaf samples, the lowest observed infective data were lower than the qRT-PCR detection limits, suggesting that free viral RNA or damaged viruses are eliminated rapidly while infectious particles remain stable for a longer time. The obtained data revealed that the leaves were contaminated at a water concentration of 4.11 ± 1 Log Most Probable Number/L (8.03 ± 1 Log GC/L) a concentration observed in contaminated untreated water of wastewater treatment plants. However, the absorption dynamics and whether the virus is inactive in the leaves still remains to be clarified. Nevertheless, this work has practical implications for risk management in using reclaimed water for agricultural use; when irrigated vegetables are destined for raw consumption, virological contamination in water sources should be evaluated.

  9. Thermodynamic and structural properties of tuber starches from transgenic potato plants grown in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Luybov A; Sergeev, Andrey I; Vasil'ev, Viktor G; Plashchina, Irina G; Aksenova, Nina P; Konstantinova, Tatyana N; Golyanovskaya, Svetlana A; Sergeeva, Lidiya I; Romanov, Georgy A

    2015-07-10

    Potato plants harboring Phytochrome B (PHYB) gene from Arabidopsis thaliana or rol genes from Agrobacterium rhizogenes were used to study the effect of transgene expression on structure and properties of starch in tubers. Thermodynamic characteristics of starch (melting temperature, enthalpy of melting, thickness of crystalline lamellae) were shown to be variable depending on the transgene expression and plant culturing mode: in vitro or in soil. The expression of rolB or rolC genes in in vitro cultured plants evoked opposite effects on starch melting temperature and crystalline lamellae thickness. AtPHYB or rolB expression in the soil-grown potato led to the formation of more defective or more ordered starch structures, respectively, in comparison with starches of the same lines grown in vitro. On the whole, our study revealed genotype-dependent differences between starches extracted from tubers of in vitro or in vivo grown plants.

  10. Influence of ultrasound on sorbitol release by Zymomonas mobilis grown on high sucrose concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Márcio de Barros; Maria Antonia P. Colabone Celligoi; Josiane Alessandra Vignoli; Lucia Helena Mendonça Vargas

    2006-01-01

    This work investigated the effect of applying low intensity ultrasound on sorbitol release by Z.mobilis cultures grown on 200 g/L sucrose medium up to 48 h. The best sorbitol production was 36.09 g/L in 36 h culture. Ultrasound irradiation did not alter the sorbitol values detected after disrupting the cells with 20 minutes treatment.A bactéria Zymomonas mobilis produtora de etanol, produz também vários subprodutos quando crescida em meio de sacarose, entre esses o sorbitol. O sorbitol é prod...

  11. Industrial cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    1996-01-01

    The chapter deals with different paradigms andtheories of cultural development. The problem toexplain change and methods to analyse developmentin different cultures are presented and discussed.......The chapter deals with different paradigms andtheories of cultural development. The problem toexplain change and methods to analyse developmentin different cultures are presented and discussed....

  12. Lethal photosensitization of biofilm-grown bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael

    1997-12-01

    Antibacterial agents are increasingly being used for the prophylaxis and treatment of oral diseases. As these agents can be rendered ineffective by resistance development in the target organisms there is a need to develop alternative antimicrobial approaches. Light-activated antimicrobial agents release singlet oxygen and free radicals which can kill adjacent bacteria and a wide range of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria has been shown to be susceptible to such agents. In the oral cavity these organisms are present as biofilms (dental plaques) which are less susceptible to traditional antimicrobial agents than bacterial suspensions. The results of these studies have shown that biofilm-grown oral bacteria are also susceptible to lethal photosensitization although the light energy doses required are grater than those needed to kill the organisms when they are grown as aqueous suspensions.

  13. A comparative study on growth performance and biochemical composition of mixed culture of Isochrysis galbana and Chaetoceros calcitrans with monocultures

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Phatarpekar, P.V.; Sreepada, R.A.; Pednekar, C.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    The growth performance, biochemical composition and nutritive value of the mixed culture of Isochrysis galbana and Chaetoceros calcitrans, grown in batch cultures under laboratory conditions was compared with those in monoculture conditions...

  14. Linguistic Cultural Signs in College English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    1.IntroductionOne way of thinking aboutculture is to contrastit with nature. Nature refers to what is born andgrows Organically ( from the L atin nascere:to be born) ;culture refers to what has been grown andgroomed( from the Latin colere:to cultivate) .The word culture evokes the traditional nature/nurturedebate:Are human beings mainly what nature determines them to be from birth or what culture en-ables them to become through socialization and schooling?The screws that language and culture impose on natur...

  15. Effects of culture conditions and biofilm formation on the iodine susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, K. L.; Pyle, B. H.; Sauer, R. L.; McFeters, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to iodination was studied with cultures grown in well water, on rich agar media, and attached to stainless-steel surfaces. Legionella pneumophila grown in water cultures in association with other microorganisms were less sensitive to disinfection by chlorine and iodine than were agar-passaged cultures. Differences in sensitivity to disinfection between water-cultured and agar-grown legionellae were determined by comparing C x T values (concentration in milligrams per litre multiplied by time in minutes to achieve 99% decrease in viability) and CM x T values (concentration in molarity). Iodine (1500x) gave a greater difference in CM x T values than did chlorine (68x). Iodine was 50 times more effective than chlorine when used with agar-grown cultures but was only twice as effective when tested against water-grown Legionella cultures. C x T x S values (C x T multiplied by percent survivors), which take into consideration the percent surviving bacteria, were used to compare sensitivities in very resistant populations, such as those in biofilms. Water cultures of legionellae associated with stainless-steel surfaces were 135 times more resistant to iodination than were unattached legionellae, and they were 210,000 times more resistant than were agar-grown cultures. These results indicate that the conditions under which legionellae are grown can dramatically affect their susceptibility to some disinfectants and must be considered when evaluating the efficacy of a disinfecting agent.

  16. Mineral composition of organically grown tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, consumer concerns on environmental and health issues related to food products have increased and, as a result, the demand for organically grown production has grown. Results indicate that consumers concerned about healthy diet and environmental degradation are the most likely to buy organic food, and are willing to pay a high premium. Therefore, it is important to ensure the quality of the produce, especially for highly consumed products. The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) is one of the most widely consumed fresh vegetables in the world. It is also widely used by the food industries as a raw material for the production of derived products such as purees or ketchup. Consequently, many investigations have addressed the impact of plant nutrition on the quality of tomato fruit. The concentrations of minerals (P, Na, K, Ca and Mg) and trace elements (Cu, Zn and Mn) were determined in tomatoes grown organically in East Georgia, Marneuli District. The contents of minerals and Mn seem to be in the range as shown in literature. Cu and Zn were found in considerably high amounts in comparison to maximum permissible values established in Georgia. Some correlations were observed between the minerals and trace elements studied. K and Mg were strongly correlated with Cu and Zn. Statistically significant difference have shown also P, K and Mg based between period of sampling.

  17. Development of greenhouse grown onion transplants and effect of plant density and fertilizer rate on marketable yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhouse grown onion (Allium cepa L.) transplants may have potential for use in production systems, but how they respond to cultural practices needs clarification. Seedlings of ‘Candy' and ‘Texas Grano 1015Y' were raised in a greenhouse. ‘Candy' seedlings were heavier than ‘Texas Grano 1015Y' se...

  18. Response of container-grown flowering dogwood cultivars to powdery mildew under sun/shade production and different fertilizer regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Container-grown dogwoods are an important product in the nursery and landscape industry and rank third in the US in nursery sales of ornamental trees. Dogwoods are a challenging crop to produce in container culture mainly due to fertilizer, water, and shade management. Our experiments indicate that ...

  19. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc., has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc., is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  20. Biocompatibility of silicon-based arrays of electrodes coupled to organotypic hippocampal brain slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Noraberg, J; Thiébaud, P

    2001-01-01

    ) rats were grown for 4-8 weeks on the perforated silicon chips with silicon nitride surfaces and 40 microm sized holes and compared with corresponding tissue slices grown on conventional semiporous membranes. In terms of preservation of the basic cellular and connective organization, as visualized...... around the upper recording part of the 47-microm-high platinum-tip electrodes. Slice cultures grown on a separate set of chips with platinum instead of silicon nitride surfaces also displayed normal MAP2 and GFAP immunostaining. The width of the GFAP-rich zone (glia limitans) at the bottom surface...... of the slice cultures was the same ( approximately 20 microm) in cultures grown on chips with silicon nitride and platinum surfaces and on conventional insert membranes. The slice cultures grown on chips maintained a normal, subfield differentiated susceptibility to the glutamate receptor agonist N...

  1. Cultural commons and cultural evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Giangiacomo Bravo

    2010-01-01

    Culture evolves following a process that is akin to biological evolution, although with some significant differences. At the same time culture has often a collective good value for human groups. This paper studies culture in an evolutionary perspective, with a focus on the implications of group definition for the coexistence of different cultures. A model of cultural evolution is presented where agents interacts in an artificial environment. The belonging to a specific memetic group is a majo...

  2. Tissue grown in space in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens of cartilage tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. Constructs grown on Mir (A) tended to become more spherical, whereas those grown on Earth (B) maintained their initial disc shape. These findings might be related to differences in cultivation conditions, i.e., videotapes showed that constructs floated freely in microgravity but settled and collided with the rotating vessel wall at 1g (Earth's gravity). In particular, on Mir the constructs were exposed to uniform shear and mass transfer at all surfaces such that the tissue grew equally in all directions, whereas on Earth the settling of discoid constructs tended to align their flat circular areas perpendicular to the direction of motion, increasing shear and mass transfer circumferentially such that the tissue grew preferentially in the radial direction. A and B are full cross sections of constructs from Mir and Earth groups shown at 10-power. C and D are representative areas at the construct surfaces enlarged to 200-power. They are stained red with safranin-O. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Photo credit: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  3. Throat Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Throat Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Collecting | ... treatment | Getting results | see BLOOD SAMPLE Collecting A culture is a test that is often used to ...

  4. Culturing Protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Compares various nutrient media, growth conditions, and stock solutions used in culturing protozoa. A hay infusion in Chalkey's solution maintained at a stable temperature is recommended for producing the most dense and diverse cultures. (WB)

  5. Repellent Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    Considers defining "culture," noting how it is difficult to define because those individuals defining it cannot separate themselves from it. Relates these issues to student writing and their writing improvement. Addresses violence in relation to culture. (SG)

  6. Microscopy of nitride layers grown on diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécz, B.; Tóth, L.; Barna, Á.;

    2011-01-01

    are determined by selected area electron diffraction. Besides threading dislocations a high number of inversion domains (ID) were formed in some GaN films. The preparation of the diamond surface and the growth conditions proved to affect significantly the formation of crystal defects such as threading...... dislocations and IDs. Single polarity GaN films with a low density of dislocations were achieved for the optimized growth conditions. The highest quality GaN layers were grown on AlN buffer in which two crystalline variants were nucleated, but one of them was overgrown already in the thickness of the buffer...

  7. Safety culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keen, L.J. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Safety culture has become a topic of increasing interest for industry and regulators as issues are raised on safety problems around the world. The keys to safety culture are organizational effectiveness, effective communications, organizational learning, and a culture that encourages the identification and resolution of safety issues. The necessity of a strong safety culture places an onus on all of us to continually question whether the safety measures already in place are sufficient, and are being applied. (author)

  8. Osteoblasts generate an osteogenic microenvironment when grown on surfaces with rough microtopographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyan B. D.

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoblasts respond to microarchitectural features of their substrate. On smooth surfaces (tissue culture plastic, tissue culture glass, and titanium, the cells attach and proliferate but they exhibit relatively low expression of differentiation markers in monolayer cultures, even when confluent. When grown on microrough Ti surfaces with an average roughness (Ra of 4-7 µm, proliferation is reduced but differentiation is enhanced and in some cases, is synergistic with the effects of surface microtopography. In addition, cells on microrough Ti substrates form hydroxyapatite in a manner that is more typical of bone than do cells cultured on smooth surfaces. Osteoblasts also respond to growth factors and cytokines in a surface-dependent manner. On rougher surfaces, the effects of regulatory factors like 1alpha,25(OH2D3 or 17beta-estradiol are enhanced. The response to the surface is mediated by integrins, which signal to the cell through many of the same mechanisms used by growth factors and hormones. Studies using PEG-modified surfaces indicate that increased differentiation may be related to altered attachment to the surface. When osteoblasts are grown on surfaces with chemistries or microarchitectures that reduce cell attachment and proliferation, and enhance differentiation, the cells tend to increase production of factors like TGF-beta1 that promote osteogenesis while decreasing osteoclastic activity. Thus, on microrough Ti surface, osteoblasts create a microenvironment conducive to new bone formation.

  9. Plant Growth and Photosynthetic Characteristics of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum Grown Aeroponically under Different Blue- and Red-LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Qin, Lin; Chong, Emma L C; Choong, Tsui-Wei; Lee, Sing Kong

    2017-01-01

    Mesembryanthemum crystallinum is a succulent, facultative crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant. Plant growth and photosynthetic characteristics were studied when M. crystallinum plants were grown indoor under light emitting diodes (LED)-lighting with adequate water supply. Plants were cultured aeroponically for a 16-h photoperiod at an equal photosynthetic photon flux density of 350 μmol m(-2) s(-1) under different red:blue LED ratios: (1) 100:0 (0B); (2) 90:10 (10B); (3) 80:20 (20B); (4) 70:30 (30B); (5) 50:50 (50B); and (6)100:0 (100B). M. crystallinum grown under 10B condition had the highest shoot and root biomass and shoot/root ratio while those grown under 0B condition exhibited the lowest values. Compared to plants grown under 0B condition, all other plants had similar but higher total chlorophyll (Chl) and carotenoids (Car) contents and higher Chl a/b ratios. However, there were no significant differences in Chl/Car ratio among all plants grown under different red- and blue-LEDs. Photosynthetic light use efficiency measured by photochemical quenching, non-photochemical quenching, and electron transport rate, demonstrated that plants grown under high blue-LED utilized more light energy and had more effective heat dissipation mechanism compared to plants grown under 0B or lower blue-LED. Statistically, there were no differences in photosynthetic O2 evolution rate, light-saturated CO2 assimilation rate (Asat), and light-saturated stomatal conductance (gssat) among plants grown under different combined red- and blue-LEDs but they were significantly higher than those of 0B plants. No statistically differences in total reduced nitrogen content were found among all plants. For the total soluble protein, all plants grown under different combined red- and blue-LEDs had similar values but they were significantly higher than that of plants grown under 0B condition. However, plants grown under higher blue-LEDs had significant higher ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate

  10. Handling Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nispen tot Pannerden, P.J.M. van

    2011-01-01

    The article indicates how companies may prepare for and deal with cultural differences. Because the research base is still rather limited an overall perspective may not be realised. After discussing definitions and concepts of culture, as well as values, cultural differences between states are discu

  11. Beyond Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel D.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the lack of literature relating to cultural differences and school library media programs and reviews the book "Beyond Culture" by Edward T. Hall. Highlights include the population/environment crisis, cultural literacy, the use of technology, and Marshall McLuhan's idea of the global village. (LRW)

  12. Cultural Rights and Cultural Diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG SIXIN

    2011-01-01

    @@ Culture is a very big concept, big enough almost to comprise all the activities of human beings and the tangible and intangible results caused by human activities.Therefore, it is very difficult to define culture in a few words.

  13. Membrane-assisted culture of fungal mycelium on agar plates for RNA extraction and pharmacological analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Mario; Müller, Carolin; Peiter, Edgar

    2014-05-15

    Fungal mycelium grown in liquid culture is easy to harvest for RNA extraction and gene expression analyses, but liquid cultures often develop rather heterogeneously. In contrast, growth of fungal mycelium on agar plates is highly reproducible. However, this biological material cannot be harvested easily for downstream analyses. This article describes a PVDF (polyvinylidene difluoride) membrane-assisted agar plate culture method that enables the harvest of mycelium grown on agar plates. This culture method leads to a strongly reduced variation in gene expression between biological replicates and requires less growth space as compared with liquid cultures.

  14. Citric acid cycle in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum grown autotrophically, heterotrophically, and mixotrophically with acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yajing; Holden, James F

    2006-06-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum uses the citric acid cycle in the oxidative and reductive directions for heterotrophic and autotrophic growth, respectively, but the control of carbon flow is poorly understood. P. islandicum was grown at 95 degrees C autotrophically, heterotrophically, and mixotrophically with acetate, H2, and small amounts of yeast extract and with thiosulfate as the terminal electron acceptor. The autotrophic growth rates and maximum concentrations of cells were significantly lower than those in other media. The growth rates on H2 and 0.001% yeast extract with and without 0.05% acetate were the same, but the maximum concentration of cells was fourfold higher with acetate. There was no growth with acetate if 0.001% yeast extract was not present, and addition of H2 to acetate-containing medium greatly increased the growth rates and maximum concentrations of cells. P. islandicum cultures assimilated 14C-labeled acetate in the presence of H2 and yeast extract with an efficiency of 55%. The activities of 11 of 19 enzymes involved in the central metabolism of P. islandicum were regulated under the three different growth conditions. Pyruvate synthase and acetate:coenzyme A (CoA) ligase (ADP-forming) activities were detected only in heterotrophically grown cultures. Citrate synthase activity decreased in autotrophic and acetate-containing cultures compared to the activity in heterotrophic cultures. Acetylated citrate lyase, acetate:CoA ligase (AMP forming), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities increased in autotrophic and acetate-containing cultures. Citrate lyase activity was higher than ATP citrate synthase activity in autotrophic cultures. These data suggest that citrate lyase and AMP-forming acetate:CoA ligase, but not ATP citrate synthase, work opposite citrate synthase to control the direction of carbon flow in the citric acid cycle.

  15. van der Waals Heterostructures Grown by MBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Christopher

    In this work, we demonstrate the high-quality MBE heterostructure growth of various layered 2D materials by van der Waals epitaxy (VDWE). The coupling of different types of van der Waals materials including transition metal dichalcogenide thin films (e.g., WSe2, WTe2, HfSe2) , insulating hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), and topological insulators (e.g., Bi2Se3) allows for the fabrication of novel electronic devices that take advantage of unique quantum confinement and spin-based characteristics. The relaxed lattice-matching criteria of van der Waals epitaxy has allowed for high-quality heterostructure growth with atomically abrupt interfaces, allowing us to couple these materials based primarily on their band alignment and electronic properties. We will discuss the impact of sample preparation, surface reactivity, and lattice mismatch of various substrates (sapphire, graphene, TMDs, Bi2Se3) on the growth mode and quality of the films and will discuss our studies of substrate temperature and flux rates on the resultant growth and grain size. Structural and chemical characterization was conducted via reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman spectroscopy. Experimentally determined band alignments have been determined and compared with first-principles calculations allowing the design of novel low-power logic and magnetic memory devices. Initial results from the electrical characterization of these grown thin films and some simple devices will also be presented. These VDWE grown layered 2D materials show significant potential for fabricating novel heterostructures with tunable band alignments and magnetic properties for a variety of nanoelectronic and optoelectronic applications.

  16. Effect of Ca/Al molar ratio on the growth of Cryptomeria japonica, Chamaecyparis obtusa and Chamaecyparis pisifera grown in nutrient solution culture and their critical point; Suiko saibai jokenka ni okeru sugi, hinoki, sawara no seiiku ni oyobosu Ca/Al no eikyo to critical point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, Y. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Umezawa, T.; Murakoshi, M. [Bio-Environment Research, Co. Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    1998-11-10

    A solution culture is experimented for the investigation of the effect of Ca/Al on the growth of Sugi (cryptomeria), Hinoki (cypress), and Sakura (cherry tree), and of CP (critical point for the emergence of the effect of Al). The solution culture is performed in water under specified conditions, the harvest is assortedly collected after 14 weeks, and is measured for dried weight. Sugi and Hinoki wither and die at an Al concentration of 5mM, but not at an Al concentration of 1mM or less. The concentration of Ca fails to exert any significant influence. At the Al concentration of 5mM, the trees are inhibited from growing in height or trunk diameter, but not affected by Ca concentration. The dried weight shares the same trend. The dried weight begins to decrease when the mol concentration ratio of Ca/Al or (K+Ca+Mg)/Al lowers to four or less. It may be concluded that conifers are inhibited from growing when the Al concentration is 2mM or higher, Ca/Al is one or lower, or (K+Ca+Mg)/Al is five or lower. If the point where growth is inhibited by 20% or 50% is chosen as the reference point, the CP of (K+Ca+Mg)/Al will be 1 or 0.5, respectively. This means that a different reference point yields a different value. There is an experimental outcome stating that growth is not affected even when this value is 0.4 in the case of soil exposed to artificial acid rain. 22 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Spatial Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    for re-subjectivization. By developing a dialogue with other disciplines, such as the conception of architecture outlined by Alberto Pérez-Gómez, humanistic urban studies may even contribute to reappropriations of objective culture. During the first decade of the 2000s, graduate students at the Faculty......Spatial Culture – A Humanities Perspective Abstract of introductory essay by Henrik Reeh Secured by alliances between socio-political development and cultural practices, a new field of humanistic studies in spatial culture has developed since the 1990s. To focus on links between urban culture...... and modern society is, however, an intellectual practice which has a much longer history. Already in the 1980s, the debate on the modern and the postmodern cited Paris and Los Angeles as spatio-cultural illustrations of these major philosophical concepts. Earlier, in the history of critical studies, the work...

  18. Culture Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋文玲

    2004-01-01

    Specialists say that it is not easy to get used to life in a new culture.“Culture shock”is the term these specialists use when talking about the feelings that people have in a new environment.There are three stages of culture shock,say the specialists.In the first stage,the newcomers like their new environment,Then when the fresh experience

  19. Skin or nail culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucosal culture; Culture - skin; Culture - mucosal; Nail culture; Culture - fingernail; Fingernail culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria, ...

  20. Cultural Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jose

    It is too often taken for granted that the communication process with culturally different children takes place as readily as it might with children from Anglo cultures. Most teachers receive training in verbal and formal communication skills; children come to school with nonverbal and informal communication skills. This initially can create…

  1. Culture Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2007-01-01

    by certain representations and embedded in certain norms and values. The analytical framework is applied on a case of cultural urban branding. The case is the harbour front in Aalborg, Denmark where a number of flagship architecture projects and cultural institutions are being planned. It is shown how...

  2. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  3. Manuscript Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What do Mesoamerica, Greece, Byzantium, Island, Chad, Ethiopia, India, Tibet, China and Japan have in common? Like many other cultures of the world, they share a particular form of cultural heritage: ancient handwritten documents. In 2007, scholars from some20 countries around the world gathered...

  4. Study on Grown Performance and High Yield Cultural Techniques of Conventional Rice Guinongzhan in Wenchang City%优质常规稻桂农占在文昌市的试种表现及高产栽培技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑丹艳

    2011-01-01

    Guinongzhan was the super rice breeding variety bred by rice research institute of Guangdong academy of agricultural sciences. It has characteristics of wide adaptability, high yield, great resistance and high quality, and is suitable to plant in Wenchang city as early and late rice. Agronomic traits, grain quality, resistance and yield performance were introduced and high yield cultural techniques of Guinongzhan were summarized including the time of sowing, breeding the vigorous seedlings, reasonable density, scientific fertilization, reasonable irrigation and pest control.%桂农占是广东省农业科学院水稻研究所选育的广适型优质超级稻品种。该品种具有适应性广、丰产性好、抗性强、米质优等特点,是一个适宜在海南省文昌市早、晚造种植的常规稻种。介绍了桂农占在文昌市的农艺性状、米质、抗性和产量表现,并总结了该品种的高产栽培技术,包括适时播种、培育壮秧、合理密植、科学施肥、合理排灌、及时防治病虫害等。

  5. PLD-grown thin film saturable absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tellkamp, Friedjof

    2012-11-01

    The subject of this thesis is the preparation and characterization of thin films made of oxidic dielectrics which may find their application as saturable absorber in passively Q-switched lasers. The solely process applied for fabrication of the thin films was the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) which stands out against other processes by its flexibility considering the composition of the systems to be investigated. Within the scope of this thesis the applied saturable absorbers can be divided into two fundamentally different kinds of functional principles: On the one hand, saturable absorption can be achieved by ions embedded in a host medium. Most commonly applied bulk crystals are certain garnets like YAG (Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) or the spinel forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}), in each case with chromium as dopant. Either of these media was investigated in terms of their behavior as PLD-grown saturable absorber. Moreover, experiments with Mg{sub 2}GeO{sub 4}, Ca{sub 2}GeO{sub 4}, Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and further garnets like YSAG or GSGG took place. The absorption coefficients of the grown films of Cr{sup 4+}:YAG were determined by spectroscopic investigations to be one to two orders of magnitude higher compared to commercially available saturable absorbers. For the first time, passive Q-switching of a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm with Cr{sup 4+}:YAG thin films could be realized as well as with Cr:Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films. On the other hand, the desirable effect of saturable absorption can also be generated by quantum well structures. For this purpose, several layer system like YAG/LuAG, Cu{sub 2}O/MgO, and ZnO/corumdum were investigated. It turned out that layer systems with indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) did not only grew in an excellent way but also showed up a behavior regarding their photo luminescence which cannot be explained by classical considerations. The observed luminescence at roughly 3 eV (410 nm) was assumed to be of excitonic nature and its

  6. CULTURAL TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana POP

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will try to analyse the cultural tourism. We will start by referring to the complex concepts of tourism and culture and to the synergies existing between them. We will define cultural tourism and present its appearance and evolution as well as its importance as a modern form of tourism. We will present the various types of cultural tourism with their characteristics and the specific features of cultural tourists according to their interests. We will also mention that there are advantages and disadvantages for any kind of tourism depending on the position – local communities, companies or tourists. For the future we will refer to the new partnership between UNWTO and UNESCO.

  7. Losses in germination mechanized harvest of corn grown in small spacing and conventional

    OpenAIRE

    Loureiro, Danilo Roberto; Universidade Federal de Viçosa; Fernandes, Haroldo Carlos; Universidade Federal de Viçosa; Teixeira, Mauri Martins; Universidade Federal de Viçosa; Leite, Daniel Mariano; Universidade Federal de Viçosa; Fernandes, Lara Santana; Universidade Federal de Viçosa

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the germination potential losses due to the mechanized harvest of corn grown with row spacing of conventional seeding (0.90 m) and low (0.45m) under different travel speeds of harvester thresher and openings in the system. The cultivar used was the DKB 747. The experimental design was randomized blocks in scheme 2 x 3 x 3 with three replications. The treatments were two row spacing of culture (0.45 and 0.90 m), three harvester travel speeds (1.8, 3....

  8. Reduced phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and tyrosine ammonia-lyase activities and lignin synthesis in wheat grown under low pressure sodium lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, D.; Anderson, A. J.; Salisbury, F. B.

    1985-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Fremont) grown in hydroponic culture under 24-hour continuous irradiation at 560 to 580 micromoles per square meter per second from either metalhalide (MH), high pressure sodium (HPS), or low pressure sodium (LPS) lamps reached maturity in 70 days. Grain yields were similar under all three lamps, although LPS-grown plants lodged at maturity. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and a tyrosine ammonia lyase (TAL) with lesser activity were detected in all extracts of leaf, inflorescence, and stem. Ammonia-lyase activities increased with age of the plant, and plants grown under the LPS lamp displayed PAL and TAL activities lower than wheat cultured under MH and HPS radiation. Greenhouse solar-grown wheat had the highest PAL and TAL activities. Lignin content of LPS-grown wheat was also significantly reduced from that of plants grown under MH or HPS lamps or in the greenhouse, showing a correlation with the reduced PAL and TAL activities. Ratios of far red-absorbing phytochrome to total phytochrome were similar for all three lamps, but the data do not yet warrant a conclusion about specific wavelengths missing from the LPS lamps that might have induced PAL and TAL activities in plants under the other lamps.

  9. In vitro evaluation of gastrointestinal survival of Lactobacillus amylovorus DSM 16698 alone and combined with galactooligosaccharides, milk and/or Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb-12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, R.C.R.; Anynaou, A.E.; Albrecht, S.A.; Schols, H.A.; Martinis, de E.C.P.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Venema, K.; Saad, S.M.I.; Smidt, H.

    2011-01-01

    Probiotic properties of Lactobacillus amylovorus DSM 16698 were previously demonstrated in piglets. Here, its potential as a human probiotic was studied in vitro, using the TIM-1 system, which is fully validated to simulate the human upper gastrointestinal tract. To evaluate the effect of the food m

  10. Superconductivity in MBE grown InN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunes, M.; Balkan, N. [School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, CO4 3SQ, Colchester (United Kingdom); Tiras, E.; Ardali, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Anadolu University, Yunus Emre Campus, 26470, Eskisehir (Turkey); Ajagunna, A.O.; Iliopoulos, E.; Georgakilas, A. [Microelectronics Research Group, IESL, FORTH and Physics Department, University of Crete, P.O. Box 1385, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2011-05-15

    We present the experimental investigation of superconductivity in unintentionally doped MBE grown InN samples with various InN film thicknesses. A significant change in resistivity was observed at 3.82 K, for an 1080 nm InN layer with carrier concentration n{sub 3D}=1.185x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. However, no significant resistance change was observed in the case of InN samples with carrier density of 1.024x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, 1.38x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, and thicknesses of 2070 and 4700 nm, respectively. The carrier density of all investigated samples was within the range of values between the Mott transition (2x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) and the superconductivity to metal transition (7x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}). We believe that at lower temperatures ({sup 3}He) which we cannot achieve with our set-up, the phase transition in other samples is likely to be observed. The origin of the observed anisotropic type-II superconductivity is discussed (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Cultural History and Cultural Materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Ronald

    1990-01-01

    Historicism critiques cultural history and cultural materialism as a methodology for literary analysis. Questions the finality of interpretation, how original values change, and whether dramatic history implies actual history. Using Shakespearean plays, analyzes the power and politics of a play in relation to its audience; posits that cultural…

  12. Culture Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Warner-Søderholm

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Whether managers are concerned with financial issues, marketing, or human resource management (HRM, cultural values and practices do matter. The purpose of this article is to understand Norwegian managers’ cultural values within the cross-cultural landscape of her neighbors in the “Scandinavian cluster.” Clearly, subtle but disturbing differences may surface even when representatives from similar cultures work together. As a follow on from the GLOBE project, data based on the GLOBE instrument were collected on culture and communication values in Norway from 710 Norwegian middle managers for this present study. Although the Scandinavian cultures appear ostensibly similar, the results illustrate that research can reveal subtle but important cultural differences in nations that are similar yet dissimilar. All three Scandinavian societies appear intrinsically egalitarian; they appear to value low Power Distance, directness, and consensus in decision making and to promote Gender Egalitarianism. Nevertheless, there are significant differences in the degrees of commitment to these values by each individual Scandinavian partner. These differences need to be understood and appreciated to avoid misunderstandings.

  13. Systemic regulation of photosynthetic function in field-grown sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Liu, Yujun; Shi, Lei; Jiang, Chuangdao

    2015-09-01

    The photosynthetic characteristics of developing leaves of plants grown under artificial conditions are, to some extent, regulated systemically by mature leaves; however, whether systemic regulation of photosynthesis occurs in field-grown crops is unclear. To explore this question, we investigated the effects of planting density on growth characteristics, gas exchange, leaf nitrogen concentration and chlorophyll a fluorescence in field-grown sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.). Our results showed that close planting resulted in a marked decline in light intensity in lower canopy. Sorghum plants grown at a high planting density had lower net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs), and transpiration rate (E) than plants grown at a low planting density. Moreover, in the absence of mineral deficiency, close planting induced a slight increase in leaf nitrogen concentration. The decreased photosynthesis in leaves of the lower canopy at high planting density was caused mainly by the low light. However, newly developed leaves exposed to high light in the upper canopy of plants grown at high planting density also exhibited a distinct decline in photosynthesis relative to plants grown at low planting density. Based on these results, the photosynthetic function of the newly developed leaves in the upper canopy was not determined fully by their own high light environment. Accordingly, we suggest that the photosynthetic function of newly developed leaves in the upper canopy of field-grown sorghum plants is regulated systemically by the lower canopy leaves. The differences in systemic regulation of photosynthesis were also discussed between field conditions and artificial conditions.

  14. Influence of shading on container-grown flowering dogwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bare root dogwoods can be successfully grown when transplanted into a container production system. Shade treatments regardless of color or density did have an effect on the plant growth of Cherokee Brave™ and Cherokee Princess dogwood. Plants grown under 50% black and 50% white shade had more heigh...

  15. Thermal behaviour of strontium tartrate single crystals grown in gel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M H Rahimkutty; K Rajendra Babu; K Sreedharan Pillai; M R Sudarsana Kumar; C M K Nair

    2001-04-01

    Thermal behaviour of strontium tartrate crystals grown with the aid of sodium metasilicate gel is investigated using thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Effect of magnetic field and dopant (Pb)2+ on the crystal stability is also studied using thermal analysis. This study reveals that water molecules are locked up in the lattice with different strengths in the grown crystals.

  16. Effects of Impellor Speed and Aeration Rate on Mycelial Biomass and Extracellular Polysaccharide Production,Reducing Sugar Consumption and Dissolved Oxygen Levels in Fermentor-grown Cultures of Phellinus baumii%不同搅拌转速和通气量对桑黄深层发酵培养的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷萍; 吴亚召; 张文隽; 陈旭; 吕德平; 安军民

    2014-01-01

    The effects of impellor speed and aeration rate on mycelial biomass and extracellular polysaccharide production,reducing sugar consumption and dissolved oxygen levels during growth of Phellinus baumii in a 20-L fermentor were determined.Highest biomass (12.65 g/L)and extracellular polysaccharide(2.99 g/L) yields,and the most rapid decrease in dissolved oxygen levels,were recorded when the impellor speed was set at 150 r/min.Mycelial pellets were globose and compact,and the proportion of hyphal filaments was low. Highest yields of mycelial biomass (12.69 g/L)and extracellular polysaccharide(3.0 g/L),and the most rapid decrease in dissolved oxygen levels,were recorded when the aeration rate was set at 1∶0.65 vvm (air volume/culture volume/min).At this setting,the fungal mycelium grew well and formed compact pellets of uniform size.%探讨在20 L搅拌式发酵罐中,转速和通气量对桑黄菌丝生物量、胞外多糖产率、溶氧以及菌丝形态的影响。结果表明,实验范围内,转速为150 r/min时,桑黄菌丝体生物量最大(12.65 g/L),胞外多糖得率最高(2.99 g/L),相对溶氧下降最快,菌球小球状、较紧密、丝状体比例小;通气量为1∶0.65 vvm,桑黄菌丝体生物量最大(12.69 g/L),胞外多糖得率最高(3.00 g/L),相对溶氧下降最快,菌球大小均匀、紧密、生长良好。

  17. Evaluation of holocellulase production by plant-degrading fungi grown on agro-industrial residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Siqueira, Félix Gonçalves; de Siqueira, Aline Gonçalves; de Siqueira, Eliane Gonçalves; Carvalho, Marly Azevedo; Peretti, Beatriz Magalhães Pinto; Jaramillo, Paula Marcela Duque; Teixeira, Ricardo Sposina Sobral; Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Félix, Carlos Roberto; Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes Ferreira

    2010-09-01

    Agaricus brasiliensis CS1, Pleurotus ostreatus H1 and Aspergillus flavus produced holocellulases when grown in solid and submerged liquid cultures containing agro-industrial residues, including sugar cane bagasse and dirty cotton residue, as substrates. These isolates proved to be efficient producers of holocellulases under the conditions used in this screening. Bromatological analysis of agro-industrial residues showed differences in protein, fiber, hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin content. Maximal holocellulase activity (hemicellulase, cellulase and pectinase) was obtained using solid-state cultivation with 10% substrate concentration. In this case, remarkably high levels of xylanase and polygalacturonase activity (4,008 and 4,548 IU/l, respectively) were produced by A. flavus when grown in media containing corn residue, followed by P. ostreatus H1 with IU/l values of 1,900 and 3,965 when cultivated on 5% and 10% sugar cane bagasse, respectively. A. brasiliensis CS1 showed the highest reducing sugar yield (11.640 mg/ml) when grown on medium containing sugar cane bagasse. A. brasiliensis was also the most efficient producer of protein, except when cultivated on dirty cotton residue, which induced maximal production in A. flavus. Comparison of enzymatic hydrolysis of sugar cane bagasse and dirty cotton residue by crude extracts of A. brasiliensis CS1, P. ostreatus H1 and A. flavus showed that the best reducing sugar yield was achieved using sugar cane bagasse as a substrate.

  18. Advancements in Root Growth Measurement Technologies and Observation Capabilities for Container-Grown Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley A. Judd

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study, characterization, observation, and quantification of plant root growth and root systems (Rhizometrics has been and remains an important area of research in all disciplines of plant science. In the horticultural industry, a large portion of the crops grown annually are grown in pot culture. Root growth is a critical component in overall plant performance during production in containers, and therefore it is important to understand the factors that influence and/or possible enhance it. Quantifying root growth has varied over the last several decades with each method of quantification changing in its reliability of measurement and variation among the results. Methods such as root drawings, pin boards, rhizotrons, and minirhizotrons initiated the aptitude to measure roots with field crops, and have been expanded to container-grown plants. However, many of the published research methods are monotonous and time-consuming. More recently, computer programs have increased in use as technology advances and measuring characteristics of root growth becomes easier. These programs are instrumental in analyzing various root growth characteristics, from root diameter and length of individual roots to branching angle and topological depth of the root architecture. This review delves into the expanding technologies involved with expertly measuring root growth of plants in containers, and the advantages and disadvantages that remain.

  19. Influência do teor de nitrogênio no cultivo de Spirulina maxima em duas temperaturas - Parte I: Alteração da composição da biomassa Influence of nitrogen concentration on the culture of Spirulina maxima grown at two temperatures - Part I: Changes in biomass composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilvair Marconi dos Santos

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Spirulina maxima é uma cianobactéria de grande interesse para a produção de substâncias nutritivas e terapêuticas. É mesofílica, essencialmente fotoautotrófica, sendo suas principais fontes de nitrogênio os nitratos, uréia ou sais de amônio em meios com alta alcalinidade [1, 2, 3, 10, 16]. Spirulina maxima foi cultivada em fermentadores, expostos a luz com intensidade de 2400lux, contendo 3L do meio proposto por PAOLETTI, PUSHPARAJ & TOMASELLI [7] com concentração de 2,5g/L de KNO3, em meio modificado com 0,2g/L de KNO3 e em meio sem fonte de nitrogênio, denominados respectivamente meios 2,5N, 0,2N e SN, visando observar as alterações provocadas em sua composição final. Em culturas crescidas a 35ºC observou-se redução do teor de proteínas na massa celular seca de 28,84% e de 32,87%, aumento do teor de carboidratos de 30,34% e de 54,21% e aumento dos lipídios totais de 287,90% e 277,37%, quando se utilizou os meios 0,2N e SN, respectivamente, em comparação com o meio 2,5N. O teor de cinzas mostrou variação desprezível. Quando a temperatura de cultivo foi reduzida para 25ºC, ocorreu uma redução do teor de proteínas da massa seca de 40,28% e 39,02%, aumento de teor de carboidratos de 88,90% e de 91,15% e aumento do teor de lipídios totais em 321,25% e de 307,08%, quando se utilizou os meios 0,2N e SN em comparação com o meio 2,5N, respectivamente. Os resultados mostraram alterações sensíveis na composição da biomassa seca, com a diminuição do teor de nitrogênio e da temperatura de cultivo, exceto no teor de cinzas que não foi significativo.Spirulina maxima is a cianobacter of great interest to the production of nutritious and therapeutic substances. It is mesophilic, essentially fotoautotrophic and has preference for media with high alkalinity. Its principal nitrogen source are nitrates and ammonium salts or urea [1, 2, 3, 10, 16]. Spirulina maxima was cultured in fermentors with 3 liters of medium

  20. Safety assessment of bone marrow derived MSC grown in platelet-rich plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Fukuda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The injection of endothelial progenitor cells and mononuclear cells derived from bone marrow at the ischemic region of peripheral artery disease patients is reported to be effective for therapeutic angiogenesis; however, these cell therapies require large amounts of bone marrow to obtain sufficient numbers of cells. To solve this problem, we attempted to culture bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC, which are supposed to secrete several cytokines that promote angiogenesis. We also focused on using platelet-rich plasma (PRP as a supplement for cell culture instead of fetal bovine serum. Human BM-MSC obtained from healthy volunteers expanded rapidly when cultured with 10% PRP prepared from their own blood. FACS analysis revealed that these cultured human MSC were homogeneous populations, and chromosomal analysis showed a normal karyotype. Moreover, the angiogenetic effect was apparent two weeks after human BM-MSC were injected into the ischemic muscle in SCID mice. Tumor formation was not detected three months after injection into SCID mice either subcutaneously or intramuscularly. To simulate clinical settings, canine BM-MSC were grown with canine PRP and injected into their ischemic muscles. We confirmed that donor cells existed in situ two and six weeks after operation without any side effects. These results suggest that cultured human BM-MSC can be a promising cell source for therapeutic angiogenesis.

  1. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  2. Culture School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MATTHEW LIM

    2008-01-01

    @@ Until recently, employees posted abroad would, if they were lucky, receive some limited language training before they relocated. How they would cope with living in a completely new culture when they arrived was left up to them to figure out.

  3. Rectal culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016:chap 283. Haines CF, Sears CL. Infectious enteritis and proctocolitis. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt ... PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 22. Read More Cryptosporidium enteritis Fecal culture Proctitis Review Date 5/11/2016 ...

  4. Cultural Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Exorbitant Performance Fees ProhibitedThe Ministry of Culture has taken measures todiscourage performance artists from charging excessively for their stage appearances. According to the ministry, payment for performers and ticket prices must be in line with average con-

  5. Yangshao Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Yangshao culture was born in the Neolithic Age. In 1921, archaeologists unearthed a number of chipped stone implements such as knives and axes; bone objects and everyday ceramic items. Thus Yangshao Village and its matriarchal society have

  6. Cultural Imports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    FOREIGN commodities have flowed into China since the country opened its doors to the outside world. China is an expansive territory with a huge population offering a vast potential consumer market. There are absolutely no limits to the world of culture in China, with Chinese people having access to foreign films, dramas, music and books, all of which have helped to strengthen exchanges between Chinese and Western cultures.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Microarrays Grown on Nanoflake Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Howard K.; Hauge, Robert H.; Pint, Cary; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-01-01

    This innovation consists of a new composition of matter where single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are grown in aligned arrays from nanostructured flakes that are coated in Fe catalyst. This method of growth of aligned SWNTs, which can yield well over 400 percent SWNT mass per unit substrate mass, exceeds current yields for entangled SWNT growth. In addition, processing can be performed with minimal wet etching treatments, leaving aligned SWNTs with superior properties over those that exist in entangled mats. The alignment of the nanotubes is similar to that achieved in vertically aligned nanotubes, which are called "carpets. " Because these flakes are grown in a state where they are airborne in a reactor, these flakes, after growing SWNTs, are termed "flying carpets. " These flakes are created in a roll-to-roll evaporator system, where three subsequent evaporations are performed on a 100-ft (approx. =30-m) roll of Mylar. The first layer is composed of a water-soluble "release layer, " which can be a material such as NaCl. After depositing NaCl, the second layer involves 40 nm of supporting layer material . either Al2O3 or MgO. The thickness of the layer can be tuned to synthesize flakes that are larger or smaller than those obtained with a 40-nm deposition. Finally, the third layer consists of a thin Fe catalyst layer with a thickness of 0.5 nm. The thickness of this layer ultimately determines the diameter of SWNT growth, and a layer that is too thick will result in the growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes instead of single-wall nanotubes. However, between a thickness of 0.5 nm to 1 nm, single-walled carbon nanotubes are known to be the primary constituent. After this three-layer deposition process, the Mylar is rolled through a bath of water, which allows catalyst-coated flakes to detach from the Mylar. The flakes are then collected and dried. The method described here for making such flakes is analogous to that which is used to make birefringent ink that is

  8. Identification of microorganisms grown on chromogenic media by MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüthje, Petra; Pranada, Arthur B; Carruthers-Lay, Duncan; Desjardins, Marc; Gaillot, Olivier; Wareham, David; Ciesielczuk, Holly; Özenci, Volkan

    2017-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and chromogenic media are widely used in clinical microbiology laboratories to facilitate the rapid selection and identification of pathogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether usage of chromogenic media limits the diagnostic performance of MALDI-TOF MS for microbial identification. A total of 386 microorganisms collected and analyzed at five laboratories were included. Isolates were cultured on relevant chromogenic media and non-selective agar plates in parallel and identified using the Bruker MALDI-TOF MS. Among the tested isolates, no misidentification was recorded and there was no medium-related difference in the identification level. However, score values were overall slightly but significantly lower for isolates grown on chromogenic media. In conclusion, the use of chromogenic culture media tested here had no relevant impact on MALDI-TOF MS performance for diagnostic purposes.

  9. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... urinary tract infections may be found in the culture. This is called a contaminant. You may not ...

  10. Citrus and avocado grown in nutrient solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, A.R.C.; Brusca, J.N.

    1961-02-01

    Studies show that extremely low concentrations of chromium benefit the growth of lemon, orange, and avocado trees. Tests were carried out in three-gallon-capacity sand or soil cultures. Plant nutrients were supplied by stock Hoagland's solutions A, B and C. Distilled water and chemically pure mineral salts were used in all the tests, and the drainage was excellent. A preliminary test was made in silica sand cultures planted to rooted cuttings of Prior Lisbon lemon. Potassium chromate was added to the nutrient solution at each application, to give chromium concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 ppm - parts per million - for the experiments. The growth obtained at 0.1 ppm chromium was distinctly better than with no chromium, and at 0.5 ppm the growth was somewhat better than with no chromium, though less favorable than at 0.1 ppm. At 1.0 ppm the growth was poorer than that of the control, and at higher concentrations the rooted cuttings failed to survive.

  11. Effects of Nutrient and NaCl Salinity on Growth, Yield, Quality and Composition of Pepper Grown in Soilless Closed System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giuffrida, F.; Graziani, G.; Fogliano, V.; Scuderia, D.; Romano, D.; Leonardi, C.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of nutrient or sodium chloride (NaCl) salinity on pepper grown in closed soilless culture systems were studied. A control (2 dS m-1) and two saline nutrient solutions (4 dS m-1) differing in the salt sources (fertilizers or NaCl) were studied. Shoot biomass production as well as total an

  12. Cultural tourism and tourism cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    Presenting a comprehensive and dynamic understanding of cultural tourism, this volume examines cultural mediators and how they help tourists appreciate foreign cultures. It also shows how tourism experiences are strategically crafted by mediators, the complexity of the mediation process, and how...... various products are mediated differently. A number of different products are investigated, including destination brand identities, "living" cultures and everyday life, art and history. The author illustrates his arguments by comparing the tourism strategies of Copenhagen and Singapore, and demonstrates...... how tourism is an agent for social change. The author also offers an original and refreshing way of understanding tourist behaviour through the concept of the "versatile tourist". The book's empirical cases and dialogic framework provide new and deep insights into tourism activities. In his...

  13. Callus and cell suspension cultures of carnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1972-01-01

    Callus cultures of carnation, Dianthus caryophyllus L. ev. G. J. Sim, were grown on a synthetic medium of half strength Murashige and Skoog salts, 3 % sucrose, 100 mg/l of myo-inositol, 0.5 mg/l each of thiamin, HCl, pyridoxin, HCl and nicotinic acid and 10 g/l agar. Optimal concentrations of gro......, but all attempts to induce formation of shoots or em-bryoids gave negative results....

  14. Wound Coverage by Cultured Skin Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    and spread. 6 We later coated collagen sponges with human or porcine plasma. Although this coating improved the plating of epidermal cells, it did not...healing by cultured epidermal grafts, we have found that: - We were able to grow epidermal cells on collapsed collagen sponges . As a result, we can create...plastic. Epidermal cells grown on collagen sponges formed four to five layers of nucleated cells, compared to only one layer on plastic surfaces. The use of

  15. Characterization of Escherichia coli MG1655 grown in a low-shear modeled microgravity environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierson Duane L

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extra-cellular shear force is an important environmental parameter that is significant both medically and in the space environment. Escherichia coli cells grown in a low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG environment produced in a high aspect rotating vessel (HARV were subjected to transcriptional and physiological analysis. Results Aerobic LSMMG cultures were grown in rich (LB and minimal (MOPS + glucose medium with a normal gravity vector HARV control. Reproducible changes in transcription were seen, but no specific LSMMG responsive genes were identified. Instead, absence of shear and a randomized gravity vector appears to cause local extra-cellular environmental changes, which elicit reproducible cellular responses. In minimal media, the majority of the significantly up- or down-regulated genes of known function were associated with the cell envelope. In rich medium, most LSMMG down-regulated genes were involved in translation. No observable changes in post-culture stress responses and antibiotic sensitivity were seen in cells immediately after exposure to LSMMG. Comparison with earlier studies of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium conducted under similar growth conditions, revealed essentially no similarity in the genes that were significantly up- or down-regulated. Conclusion Comparison of these results to previous studies suggests that different organisms may dramatically differ in their responses to medically significant low-shear and space environments. Depending on their specific response, some organisms, such as Salmonella, may become preadapted in a manner that predisposes them to increased virulence.

  16. In vitro growth and leaf anatomy of Cattleya walkeriana (Gardner, 1839 grown in natural ventilation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Bortolotti da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural ventilation system facilitates gaseous exchanges in in vitro plants promoting changes in the leaf tissue, which can be evaluated through the leaf anatomy, and it allows a cultivation closer to the photoautrophic micropropagation. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects on in vitro growth and on the leaf anatomy of Cattleya walkeriana grown in natural and conventional ventilation system with different concentrations of sucrose (0; 15; 30 and 45 L-1 combined with different cultivation systems (conventional micropropagation and natural ventilation system. The culture medium was composed of MS salts, solidified with 7 g L-1 of agar and pH adjusted to 5.8. Forty milliliters of culture medium were distributed in 250 mL flasks, autoclaved at 120 ºC for 20 minutes. The greater plant growth, as well as the greater thickness of the mesophyll was observed with the use of 20 g L-1 sucrose in natural ventilation system. Plants grown in natural ventilation system showed a thicker leaf mesophyll, which is directly related to photoautotrophic crops. The natural ventilation system induced more elliptical stomata and probably more functional formats.

  17. Electronic states of germanium grown under micro-gravity condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugahara, A. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)]. E-mail: sugahara@tsurugi.phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ogawa, T. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Fujii, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ohyama, T. [Liberal Arts, Fukui University of Technology, 3-6-1 Gakuen, Fukui, Fukui 910-8505 (Japan); Nakata, J. [Kyoto Semiconductor Corp. 418-9 Yodo Saime-cho, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto 613-0915 (Japan)

    2006-04-01

    Magneto-optical absorption measurements of Sb-doped germaniums grown under micro-gravity condition were carried out to investigate the influence of the gravity on crystal growth, using far-infrared laser and microwave. For comparison, we prepared two germanium crystals grown in the same conditions except the gravity conditions. In spite of the quite short growth period, the germanium grown under micro-gravity has a quite good quality. The lineshape analysis of Zeeman absorption peaks due to donor electrons indicates the existence of residual thermal acceptors.

  18. Method for Producing Non-Neoplastic, Three Dimensional, Mammalian Tissue and Cell Aggregates Under Microgravity Culture Conditions and the Products Produced Therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural, and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  19. Cultural Robotics: The Culture of Robotics and Robotics in Culture

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the concept of "Cultural Robotics" with regard to the evolution of social into cultural robots in the 21st Century. By defining the concept of culture, the potential development of a culture between humans and robots is explored. Based on the cultural values of the robotics developers, and the learning ability of current robots, cultural attributes in this regard are in the process of being formed, which would define the new concept of cultural robotics. Ac...

  20. Culture and transfection of axolotl cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Jean-François; Sader, Fadi; Ferretti, Patrizia; Roy, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    The use of cells grown in vitro has been instrumental for multiple aspects of biomedical research and especially molecular and cellular biology. The ability to grow cells from multicellular organisms like humans, squids, or salamanders is important to simplify the analyses and experimental designs to help understand the biology of these organisms. The advent of the first cell culture has allowed scientists to tease apart the cellular functions, and in many situations these experiments help understand what is happening in the whole organism. In this chapter, we describe techniques for the culture and genetic manipulation of an established cell line from axolotl, a species widely used for studying epimorphic regeneration.

  1. Cultural Resurrection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    "Who are we?Where are we from?"Humans have been pondering these questions since the day they first came into being.One of the ways we preserve memories of the past is through our cul- tural heritage that has been passed on from generation to genera- tion.Intangible cultural heritage,as well as tangible cultural her- itage,is essential to the continuity of human civilization. Since the United Nations Educational,Scientific and Cultural Organization(UNESCO)unveiled the Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity in 2001,China has had Kunqu opera,Guqin and its music,the art of Uygur Muqam of Xinjiang and the traditional Mongolian folk song Long Song added to UNESCO’s protection list.It is now one of the coun-

  2. Japanese Shame Culture and American Guilt Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Weijie

    2016-01-01

    Culture is an important factor contributing to the success of intercultural communication. In the east and west, there are many different cultures, among which Japanese shame culture and American guilt culture are two typical ones. Influenced by different cultures, these two countries have different characteristics, which reminds us that in intercultural communication culture should be paid much attention to.

  3. Culturally Responsive Teaching: Understanding Disability Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2013-01-01

    To be culturally responsive teachers, we must first have an understanding of other cultures and how students from these cultures differ from one another. As we consider the many cultures represented in our classrooms, we might also consider students with disabilities as a cultural group. Within any main culture are subgroups differentiated by…

  4. Mayan Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter Bent

    1992-01-01

    The social categories « Maya » and « mestizo » habe been applied to denote the Yucatec Mayan people in Mexico. The A. examines the cluster of perceived attributes (schemata) evoked by the terms and how they relate to each other. He shows that there is an incongruency between them along the lines ...... of local and academic categorization, which is an implication of the different social spaces in which they arise. In spite of the incongruency and the cultural plurality evoked by their usage, the A. argues that the people of Yucatec share a single culture....

  5. MARKETING CULTURAL

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez, Claudia Gómez

    2013-01-01

    Este artículo analiza la definición de "Marketing" Cultural y la adaptación y beneficios del "marketing" tradicional respecto al conjunto de manifestaciones artísticas de las diversas industrias involucradas en el sector cultural o artístico; asimismo, se desagregan los conceptos básicos que lo componen como factor de éxito en dichas empresas. Se hace uso de la exposición de casos específicos para ilustrar la articulación de estos dos conceptos aparentemente contrapuestos, cultura y "marketin...

  6. Boosting Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU JIANXIONG

    2011-01-01

    Culture makes up an indispensable part of our lives,just like material comfort.It is thought of as an important source of a nation's vitality and creativity,and constitutes a key factor uniting the nation,while making it distinctive from other countries.It is also said culture is a productive power that not only shapes human concepts and impacts their behavior,but also contributes in no small measure to the betterment of our material as well as spiritual world.

  7. Information cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skouvig, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to suggest a genealogy of the concept of information beyond the 20th century. The article discusses how the concept of information culture might provide a way of formulating such a genealogic strategy. The article approaches this purpose by providing a general...... narrative of premodern information cultures, examining works on early-modern scholars and 18th century savants and discussion of what seems to be a Foucauldian rupture in the conceptualization of information in 19th century England. The findings of the article are situated in the thinking that a genealogy...... of information would reveal that information had specific purposes in specific settings....

  8. Culture Consciousness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This year, June 10 marked China's first Cultural Heritage Day. The designation by the Chinese Government aims to raise awareness of the need to protect and understand the value of the nation's abundant cultural treasures. In future the second Saturday in June each year will be set aside for this purpose. Recently, the State Council published the sixth group of major relics under state protection. On the list are 1,080 historic relics such as the Grand Canal from Beijing to Hangzhou and the

  9. Cultural Usability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Qingxin

    2007-01-01

    Culture has already played an important role in the global market. It not only affects products, but also impacts on usability evaluation methods. This project aims to examine in the established thinking aloud usability evaluation method (TA UEM), how does the evaluator build a supportive...... relationship and communicate effectively with the user in order to find relevant usability problems in culturally localized applications. It includes three parts, pilot study, field study and experiments, to get both qualitative data and quantitative data. From this project, we hope to find an effective way...

  10. Comparative lipid composition of heterotrophically and autotrophically grown Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langworthy, T A

    1977-06-01

    Complex lipids from the thermoacidophilic facultative autotroph Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, as well as a strictly autotrophic isolate, were compared between cells grown on yeast extract and elemental sulfur. Lipids from both organisms grown autotrophically were nearly identical. Each contained about 15% neutral lipids, 35% glycolipids, and 50% acidic lipids. Glycolipids and acidic lipids contained C40H82-76-derived glycerol ether residues. Major glycolipids included the glycerol ether analogues of glucosyl galactosyl diglyceride (5%) and glucosyl polyol diglyceride (75%). Acidic lipids were comprised mainly of the glycerol ether analogues of phosphatidyl inositol (7%), inositolphosphoryl glucosyl polyol diglyceride (72%), and a partially characterized sulfate- and phosphate-containing derivative of glucosyl polyol diglyceride (13%). The lipids from cells grown heterotrophically were similar to those from autotrophically grown cells, except that the partially characterized acidic lipid was absent. In addition, the two glycolipids as well as the respective inositolphosphoryl derivatives were each present in nearly equal proportions.

  11. Membrane-bound respiratory chain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown aerobically.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsushita, K.; Yamada, M.; Shinagawa, E; Adachi, O; Ameyama, M

    1980-01-01

    The electron transport chain of the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, grown aerobically, contained a number of primary dehydrogenases and respiratory components (soluble flavin, bound flavin, coenzyme Q9, heme b, heme c, and cytochrome o) in membrane particles of the organism. Cytochrome o, about 50% of the b-type cytochrome, seemed to function as a terminal oxidase in the respiratory chain. The electron transport chain of P. aeruginosa grown aerobically was suggested to be line...

  12. Hydroponic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steucek, G. L.; Yurkiewicz, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a hydroponic culture technique suitable for student exercises in biology. This technique of growing plants in nutrient solutions enhances plant growth, and is an excellent way to obtain intact plants with root systems free of soil or other particulate matter. (JR)

  13. Culture Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela Khristin

    2013-01-01

    The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united. The population of blacks past downs a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape…

  14. Re-grown aligned carbon nanotubes with improved field emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Xiaodai; Zhu, Yanwu; Varghese, Binni; Gao, Xingyu; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Sow, Chorng-Haur

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a simple technique to improve the field emission property of multi-walled carbon nanotubes is presented. Re-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes are grown on the same substrates after the as-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes are transferred to other substrates using polydimethylsiloxane as intermediation. For the duration of the synthesis of the re-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes, similar synthesis parameters used in growing the as-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes are utilized. As a form of possible application, field emission studies show -2.6 times improvement in field enhancement factor and more uniform emission for the re-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes. In addition, the turn-on field is reduced from 2.85 V/microm to 1.40 V/microm. Such significant improvements are attributed to new emission sites comprising of sharp carbonaceous impurities encompassing both tip and upper portion of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes. As such, this technique presents a viable route for the production of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with better field emission quality.

  15. Cultured articular chondrocytes sheets for partial thickness cartilage defects utilizing temperature-responsive culture dishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kaneshiro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM of articular cartilage has several functions that are unique to joints. Although a technique for transplanting cultured chondrocytes has already been introduced, it is difficult to collect intact ECM when using enzymes to harvest samples. Temperature-responsive culture dishes have already been clinically applied in the fields of myocardial and corneal transplantation. Earlier studies have shown that a sheet of cultured cells with intact ECM and adhesive factors can be harvested using such culture dishes, which allow the surface properties of the dish to be reversibly altered by changing the temperature. Human chondrocytes were subjected to enzymatic digestion and then were seeded in temperature-responsive culture dishes. A sheet of chondrocytes was harvested by only reducing the temperature after the cultured cells reached confluency. A real-time PCR analysis of the chondrocyte sheets confirmed that type II collagen, aggrecan, and fibronectin were present. These results suggested that, although chondrocytes undergo dedifferentiation in a monolayer culture, multilayer chondrocyte sheets grown in a similar environment to that of three-dimensional culture may be able to maintain a normal phenotype. A histological examination suggested that multilayer chondrocyte sheets could thus prevent the loss of proteoglycans because the area covered by the sheets was well stained by safranin-O. The present experiments suggested that temperature-responsive culture dishes are useful for obtaining cultured chondrocytes, which may then be clinically employed as a substitute for periosteal patches because such sheets can be applied without a scaffold.

  16. Effects of Female Sex Hormones on Susceptibility to HSV-2 in Vaginal Cells Grown in Air-Liquid Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yung; Dizzell, Sara E; Leung, Vivian; Nazli, Aisha; Zahoor, Muhammad A; Fichorova, Raina N; Kaushic, Charu

    2016-08-30

    The lower female reproductive tract (FRT) is comprised of the cervix and vagina, surfaces that are continuously exposed to a variety of commensal and pathogenic organisms. Sexually transmitted viruses, such as herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), have to traverse the mucosal epithelial lining of the FRT to establish infection. The majority of current culture systems that model the host-pathogen interactions in the mucosal epithelium have limitations in simulating physiological conditions as they employ a liquid-liquid interface (LLI), in which both apical and basolateral surfaces are submerged in growth medium. We designed the current study to simulate in vivo conditions by growing an immortalized vaginal epithelial cell line (Vk2/E6E7) in culture with an air-liquid interface (ALI) and examined the effects of female sex hormones on their growth, differentiation, and susceptibility to HSV-2 under these conditions, in comparison to LLI cultures. ALI conditions induced Vk2/E6E7 cells to grow into multi-layered cultures compared to the monolayers present in LLI conditions. Vk2 cells in ALI showed higher production of cytokeratin in the presence of estradiol (E2), compared to cells grown in progesterone (P4). Cells grown under ALI conditions were exposed to HSV-2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the highest infection and replication was observed in the presence of P4. Altogether, this study suggests that ALI cultures more closely simulate the in vivo conditions of the FRT compared to the conventional LLI cultures. Furthermore, under these conditions P4 was found to confer higher susceptibility to HSV-2 infection in vaginal cells. The vaginal ALI culture system offers a better alternative to study host-pathogen interactions.

  17. Adventitious shoot regeneration from the leaves of some pear varieties (Pyrus spp.) grown in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bharat Kumar POUDYAL; Yuxing ZHANG; Guoqiang DU

    2008-01-01

    The pear (Pyrus spp.) is one of the most important temperate fruit crops. A complete protocol for adventitious shoot regeneration was developed from the leaves of four pear varieties grown in vitro: Abbe Fetel, Yali, Packham's Triumph and Aikansui, and the Chinese rootstock variety Dull. Shoot explants were collected from the field and cultured in vitro in Murashige and acid (IBA). After four weeks, leaf explants of all 5 varieties grown in vitro were excised and cultured in MS cultures were maintained in darkness for 21 days for shoot induction in the shoot induction medium (IM), then transferred to the shoot expression medium (EM) in room at (25±2)℃ under a 16/8 h light/dark photoperiod regime for 8 weeks. Finally, the shoots were transferred to the MS shoot elongation medium (SEM) supplemented gibberellic acid (GA3). A combination of TDZ and NAA had a significant effect on the number of shoot regenera-tions in all 5 tested varieties. The maximum mean number of shoots and maximum number of shoots per leaf obtained from Yali variety were 11.8 (P≤0.001) and 22, followed by Aikansui with 6.6 (P≤0.001) and 4.6, and Duff with 8 (P≤0.001) and 12, all arising from the For Packham's Triumph and Abbe Fetel, the maximum mean number of shoots and maximum number of shoots per leaf were 5.6 (P≤0.001), 4.8 and 8 (P≤0.001), and 11, which produced significantly higher adventitious shoots problems associated with shoot proliferation and regenera-tion were also observed and discussed in this paper.

  18. Growth and Plating of Cell Suspension Cultures of Datura Innoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1974-01-01

    Suspension cultures of Datura innoxia Mill, were successfully grown on a modified Murashige and Skoog medium with 2,4–D, NAA or BAP as growth substances, provided the micronutrient levels were reduced to 1/10. Normal amounts of micronutrients were toxic. Attempts to identify the toxic elements did...

  19. NASA Bioreactor tissue culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Lisa E. Freed of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and her colleagues have reported that initially disc-like specimens tend to become spherical in space, demonstrating that tissues can grow and differentiate into distinct structures in microgravity. The Mir Increment 3 (Sept. 16, 1996 - Jan. 22, 1997) samples were smaller, more spherical, and mechanically weaker than Earth-grown control samples. These results demonstrate the feasibility of microgravity tissue engineering and may have implications for long human space voyages and for treating musculoskeletal disorders on earth. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators.

  20. Alpha amylase from a fungal culture grown on oil cakes and its properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitra Ramachandran

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state fermentation was carried out for the production of alpha-amylase using Aspergillus oryzae. Different oil cakes such as coconut oil cake (COC sesame oil cake (SOC, groundnut oil cake (GOC, palm kernel cake (PKC and olive oil cake (OOC were screened to be used as substrate for the enzyme production and also compared with wheat bran (WB. GOC was found to be the best producer of the enzyme among these. Combination of WB and GOC (1:1 resulted higher enzyme titres than the individual substrates. Maximum amount of enzyme (9196 U/gds was obtained when SSF was carried out using WB + GOC, having initial moisture of 64% and supplemented with lactose and ammonium nitrate (1% each at 30ºC for 72h using 2 mL spore suspension (6x10(7spores/ml. Partial purification of the enzyme using ammonium sulphate fractionation resulted in 2.4-fold increase in the activity. The enzyme showed molecular weight of 68 KDa by SDS-PAGE. Except Mn, all other metal ions such as Ca, K, Na, Mg were found to be inhibitory for the enzyme activity. The enzyme was optimally active at 50(0C and pH 5.0.Fermentação no Estado Sólido foi empregada na produção de alfa-amilase usando Aspergillus niger. Diferentes tipos de torta foram utilizadas, como torta de óleo de coco (COC, torta de de óleo de amendoim (GOC torta de óleo de sesamo (SOC, torta de palma (PKC e torta de óleo de oliva (OOC foram selecionadas para serem usadas como substratos para produção de enzima e comparadas com o farelo de trigo (WB, GOC foi escolhido por ser o que produziu maiores concentrações de enzima. A combinação WB e GOC (1:1 resultou em maiores títulos da enzima quando em comparação com os substratos individuais. A máxima concentração de enzima (9196 U/ gms foi obtida quando a FES foi conduzida utilizando WB + GOC, com umidade de 64% e suplementada com lactose e nitrato de amônia (1% cada a 300C por 72 horas utilizando 2 mL de uma suspensão de esporo (6x107sporos/ml. A purificação parcial da enzima usando frações de sulfato de amônio resultou num aumento de 2-4 vezes o aumento da atividade. A enzima apresentou um peso molecular de 68 Kda pelo SDS_PAGE. Exceto Mn, todos os outros íons metálicos como Ca, K, Na, Mg são inibitórios na produção da enzima.

  1. Characterization of ‘Pinky’ Strain Grown in Culture of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26.1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Yan; XIE Jing; KOYAMA Yasushi; LI Shi-hao; WANG En-si; HOU A-li

    2013-01-01

    In the process of cultivating Rhodobater sphaeroides R26.1,some of which turned from blue to pink due to the irradiation of a beam of leaking white light.The mutant strains were named ‘pinky’ strains,which were cultivated in the red light and in the dark for a comparative study.It turned out that the strains did not grow in the dark,so they might be photosynthetic bacteria.The electronic absorption spectrum of the ‘pinky’ strains was measured,which shows they contained two main photosynthetic pigments,carotenoids(Cars) and bacteriochlorophylls(BChls).And then they were extracted and analyzed.It proves that Bchls included Bchl a and Bchl a'.Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were exploited to determine the chemical structure of Cars.The results indicate that there were seven kinds of Cars,including lycopene,rhodopin,anhydrorhodovibrin,3,4-dihydroanhydrorhodovibrin,3,3,4-dihydrospirilloxanthin,3,4,3',4'-tetrahydrospirilloxanthin and spirilloxanthin.Based on the above results,it was found that most identified Cars formed via spirilloxanthin biosynthesis pathway.The analyzed results of 16S rRNA gene show that the homology of ‘pinky’ strains with Rhodopseudomonas palusteris was 99%.Rhodopseudomonas palusteris has been cultivated in our laboratory.Because of its strong vitality,it did not become extinct with so many years passing.When Rhodobater sphaeroides R26.1 was cultivated,it got rejuvenated under the appropriate conditions and caused Rhodobater sphaeroides R26.1 to be contaminated.

  2. Is The Boron Uptake Affected When Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Grown At Poly Culture Systems?

    OpenAIRE

    YILDIZTEKİN, Mahmut; TUNA, Atilla Levent

    2015-01-01

    n this study, sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) was growth alone and with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and clover plants (Medicago sativa L.). Boron at 25-50-75 mg L-1 concentrations was applied by the foliarly in the forms of Boric

  3. Defect studies in 4H- Silicon Carbide PVT grown bulk crystals, CVD grown epilayers and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrappa, Shayan M.

    Silicon Carbide [SiC] which exists as more than 200 different polytypes is known for superior high temperature and high power applications in comparison to conventional semiconductor materials like Silicon and Germanium. The material finds plethora of applications in a diverse fields due to its unique properties like large energy bandgap, high thermal conductivity and high electric breakdown field. Though inundated with superior properties the potential of this material has not been utilized fully due to impeding factors such as defects especially the crystalline ones which limit their performance greatly. Lots of research has been going on for decades to reduce these defects and there has been subsequent improvement in the quality as the diameter of SiC commercial wafers has reached 150mm from 25mm since its inception. The main focus of this thesis has been to study yield limiting defect structures in conjunction with several leading companies and national labs using advanced characterization tools especially the Synchrotron source. The in depth analysis of SiC has led to development of strategies to reduce or eliminate the density of defects by studying how the defects nucleate, replicate and interact in the material. The strategies discussed to reduce defects were proposed after careful deliberation and analysis of PVT grown bulk crystals and CVD grown epilayers. Following are some of the results of the study: [1] Macrostep overgrowth mechanism in SiC was used to study the deflection of threading defects onto the basal plane resulting in stacking faults. Four types of stacking faults associated with deflection of c/c+a threading defects have been observed to be present in 76mm, 100mm and 150mm diameter wafers. The PVT grown bulk crystals and CVD grown epilayers in study were subjected to contrast studies using synchrotron white beam X-ray topography [SWBXT]. The SWBXT image contrast studies of these stacking faults with comparison of calculated phase shifts for

  4. Talking Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte

    When Danish businesses move production abroad, ‘culture’ is often seen as a huge challenge to the successful outcome of cross-border collaboration. Therefore, business leaders often seek information and guidelines of how to cope in the vast amount of literature on culture and intercultural...... communication. Much of this literature is based on functionalist approaches providing the dos and don’ts of intercultural encounters. This involves inter alia conceptualising ‘culture’ as a relatively fixed, homogeneous entity of values, attitudes and norms shared by members of a group, often leading readers...... to adopt dichotomised understandings and discourses about other cultures (see e.g. Hofstede 2001; Jandt 1998; Trompenaars & Hampden-Turner 1997). However, experience shows that the world in which intercultural encounters take place is not as simple and easy to categorise as these approaches may suggest...

  5. Dialysis cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pörtner, R; Märkl, H

    1998-10-01

    Dialysis techniques are discussed as a means for effective removal of low-molecular-mass components from fermentation broth to reach high cell density. Reactor systems and process strategies, the relevant properties of membranes and examples for high-density fermentation with dialysis, and problems related to scale-up are addressed. The dialysis technique has turned out to be very efficient and reliable for obtaining high cell densities. As in dialysis processes the membranes are not perfused, membrane clogging is not a problem as it is for micro- and ultrafiltration. By applying a "nutrient-split" feeding strategy, the loss of nutrients can be avoided and the medium is used very efficiently. The potential of dialysis cultures is demonstrated on the laboratory scale in a membrane dialysis reactor with an integrated membrane and in reactor systems with an external dialysis loop. In dialysis cultures with different microorganisms (Staphylococci, Escherichia coli, extremophilic microorganisms, Lactobacilli) the cell densities achieved were up to 30 times higher than those of other fermentation methods. The technique enables high cell densities to be attained without time-consuming medium optimization. For animal cell cultures the concept of a fixed bed coupled with dialysis proved to be very effective.

  6. Cultural neurolinguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui; Mei, Leilei; Chen, Chunhui; Dong, Qi

    2009-01-01

    As the only species that evolved to possess a language faculty, humans have been surprisingly generative in creating a diverse array of language systems. These systems vary in phonology, morphology, syntax, and written forms. Before the advent of modern brain-imaging techniques, little was known about how differences across languages are reflected in the brain. This chapter aims to provide an overview of an emerging area of research - cultural neurolinguistics - that examines systematic cross-cultural/crosslinguistic variations in the neural networks of languages. We first briefly describe general brain networks for written and spoken languages. We then discuss language-specific brain regions by highlighting differences in neural bases of different scripts (logographic vs. alphabetic scripts), orthographies (transparent vs. nontransparent orthographies), and tonality (tonal vs. atonal languages). We also discuss neural basis of second language and the role of native language experience in second-language acquisition. In the last section, we outline a general model that integrates culture and neural bases of language and discuss future directions of research in this area.

  7. Cultural Robotics: The Culture of Robotics and Robotics in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Samani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated the concept of "Cultural Robotics" with regard to the evolution of social into cultural robots in the 21st Century. By defining the concept of culture, the potential development of a culture between humans and robots is explored. Based on the cultural values of the robotics developers, and the learning ability of current robots, cultural attributes in this regard are in the process of being formed, which would define the new concept of cultural robotics. According to the importance of the embodiment of robots in the sense of presence, the influence of robots in communication culture is anticipated. The sustainability of robotics culture based on diversity for cultural communities for various acceptance modalities is explored in order to anticipate the creation of different attributes of culture between robots and humans in the future.

  8. Popular Music Memories : Places and Practices of Popular Music Heritage, Memory and Cultural Identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.C. van der Hoeven (Arno)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract __ Ever since the late 1950s, people have grown up with popular music as an important element of their daily lives. This dissertation explores the connections between popular music memories, cultural identity and cultural heritage, looking at the different ways in which

  9. The effect of organic nitrogen sources on recombinant glucoamylase production by Aspergillus niger in chemostat culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swift, R.J.; Karandikar, A.; Griffen, A.M.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Robson, G.D.; Trinci, A.P.J.; Wiebe, M.G.

    2000-01-01

    Aspergillus niger B1, a recombinant strain carrying 20 extra copies of the native glucoamylase gene, was grown in glucose-limited chemostat cultures supplemented with various organic nitrogen sources (dilution rate 0.12 ± 0.01 h-1, pH 5.4). In cultures supplemented with L-alanine, L-methionine, casa

  10. Recovery of important physiological functions in 3D culture of immortal hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Fey, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    hepatocytes using the classical approaches (in “2D”) and using a system which leads to the generation of spheroids of cells held in suspension (“3D”). Both approaches gave rise to cultures where the large majority of cells were viable, produced similar amounts of ATP, incorporated similar amounts......It is widely expected that cells grown in 3D environments (in suspension, on scaffolds etc.) will be superior to growing cells in classical 2D culture flasks. These expectations include the belief that cells grown in 3D culture will possess physiological characteristics that resemble more closely...... to grow human liver cells in ‘3 dimensional’ cultures so that they behave very similar to the liver in our bodies. By growing the immortal hepatocytes in specially designed bioreactors they form small pieces of ‘pseudotissue’ which exhibit several of the functions seen in the adult liver. We have grown...

  11. Seedborne fungal contamination: consequences in space-grown wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, D. L.; Levine, H. G.; Kropp, B. R.; Anderson, A. J.; Hood, E. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Plants grown in microgravity are subject to many environmental stresses that may promote microbial growth and result in disease symptoms. Wheat (cv. Super Dwarf) recovered from an 8-day mission aboard a NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) space shuttle showed disease symptoms, including girdling of leaf sheaths and chlorosis and necrosis of leaf and root tissues. A Neotyphodium species was isolated from the seed and leaf sheaths of symptomatic wheat used in the spaceflight mission. Certain isozymes of a peroxidase unique to extracts from the microgravity-grown plants were observed in extracts from earth-grown Neotyphodium-infected plants but were not present in noninfected wheat. The endophytic fungus was eliminated from the wheat seed by prolonged heat treatment at 50 degrees C followed by washes with water at 50 degrees C. Plants from wheat seed infected with the Neotyphodium endophyte were symptomless when grown under greenhouse conditions, whereas symptoms appeared after only 4 days of growth in closed containers. Disease spread from an infected plant to noninfected plants in closed containers. Dispersion via spores was found on asymptomatic plants at distances of 7 to 18 cm from infected plants. The size and shape of the conidia, mycelia, and phialide-bearing structures and the ability to grow rapidly on carbohydrates, especially xylose, resembled the characteristics of N. chilense, which is pathogenic on orchard grass, Doctylis glomerati. The Neotyphodium wheat isolate caused disease symptoms on other cereals (wheat cv. Malcolm, orchard grass, barley, and maize) grown in closed containers.

  12. La arquitectura cultural. / Cultural architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobos, Jorge

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo releva la Arquitectura Cultural, que es plural y diversa en términos estéticos y conceptuales. Sugiere la apertura a otras dinámicas de comprensión de lo arquitectónico, a otras lógicas de construcción de las ciudades. Para aclarar el concepto se expone un breve ejemplo práctico./This article points out the "cultural architecture", which is plural and diverse in concept and aesthetic terms. It suggests the opening to other dinamics of comprehention of the architectural issue and the building of cities. The article presents a brief empirical example that clarifies the conceptual approach.

  13. Community perspectives on barriers and strategies for promoting locally grown produce from an urban agriculture farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Alice; Acosta, Angela; McDaniel, Abigail; Gittelsohn, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Although much is understood about barriers to healthy food consumption in low-income, urban communities, knowledge regarding the crucial next step of building feasible, community-supported approaches to address those barriers remains limited. This qualitative study used in-depth interviews (n = 20), focus groups (n = 2), and participant observations (n = 3) to identify strategies to promote locally grown produce from an urban food security project, Produce From the Park (PFP), an urban farm. Informants included community organization representatives and residents from low-income neighborhoods in a mid-Atlantic city. Informants identified structural and cultural barriers to purchasing healthy food, including price, location, food culture, and lack of interest. Participants proposed a number of strategies, such as distribution through mobile food carts and farm stands, marketing new foods through taste tests and cooking demonstrations, and youth mentorship. Informants also described their perceptions of the local urban farm and suggested ways to increase community buy-in. Strategies mentioned were inexpensive and incorporated cultural norms and local assets. These community perspectives can provide insights for those promoting healthy eating in urban African American communities through urban food security projects.

  14. Reinventing Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Singer puts a modern musical face on ancient cultural classics In traditional loose sleeved Chinese costume and a hairstyle straight from ancient China, a slim female singer stepped onto the stage, singing a wistful song called Li. "Li is respect, Li is elegance, Li is purity, Li is tranquility; Li comes from a smile, Li comes from love, Li comes from the heart," she sings, accompanied by a melody of haunting court music. The singer is appearing on CCTV, China’s National TV station, in a music program aired during the 2008 Olympic Games.

  15. Black Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Khristin Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united.  The population of blacks past downs a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape from poverty of enslavement and to establish a way of life through tradition. A way of personal freedoms was through getting a good education that lead to a better foundation and a better way of life.

  16. Nanostructures of Indium Gallium Nitride Crystals Grown on Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Man Song, Keun; Min, Yo-Sep; Choi, Chel-Jong; Seok Kim, Yoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2015-11-16

    Nanostructure (NS) InGaN crystals were grown on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The NS-InGaN crystals, grown on a ~5-μm-long CNT/Si template, were estimated to be ~100-270 nm in size. Transmission electron microscope examinations revealed that single-crystalline InGaN NSs were formed with different crystal facets. The observed green (~500 nm) cathodoluminescence (CL) emission was consistent with the surface image of the NS-InGaN crystallites, indicating excellent optical properties of the InGaN NSs on CNTs. Moreover, the CL spectrum of InGaN NSs showed a broad emission band from 490 to 600 nm. Based on these results, we believe that InGaN NSs grown on CNTs could aid in overcoming the green gap in LED technologies.

  17. SERS-applicable silver nanoisland film grown under protective coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reduto, I.; Chervinskii, S.; Matikainen, A.; Baklanov, A.; Kamenskii, A.; Lipovskii, A.

    2014-10-01

    We have used recently developed out-diffusion technique of growing silver nanoisland films on glass surface to grow silver nanoislands under TiO2 layer deposited on the glass. After covering the surface of silver ion-exchanged glasses with TiO2 film using atomic layer deposition technique and subsequent thermal processing of the samples in hydrogen their optical absorption spectra demonstrate the absorption peak corresponding to surface plasmon resonance in grown silver nanoislands. The spectral position of the peak is shifted relatively to the peak observed in the spectra of the nanoisland film grown on the surface of ion exchanged and annealed glass samples without dielectric cover. The applicability of the silver nanoislands grown under several nm thick protective TiO2 coating in surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  18. Enhancement of Immune Activation Activities of Spirulina maxima Grown in Deep-Sea Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woon Yong; Kang, Do Hyung; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the immuno-modulatory and anticancer activities of marine algae, Spirulina maxima grown in deep-sea water (DSW), were investigated. It was found that the extract of S. maxima, cultured in DSW, effectively suppressed the expression of Bcl2 in A549 cells as well as inhibiting various human cancer cells with concentration dependency, which possibly implies that the extracts may play more important roles in controlling cancer cell growth. The secretion of cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α from human B cells was also greatly increased, compared to those of the extract grown in conventional sea-water. The growth of Human Natural Killer (NK) cells in the presence of the extracts from DSW was significantly higher (12.2 × 104 viable cells/mL) when compared to the control (1.1 × 104 viable cells/mL). Based on HPLC analysis, the increase in the biological activities of the extracts from DSW was caused by considerably high amounts of β-carotene and ascorbic acid because the DSW contained high concentrations and good ratios of several key minerals for biosynthesizing β-carotene and ascorbic acid, as well as maintaining high cell growth. PMID:23743830

  19. Inactive corrinoid-compound significantly decreases in Spirulina platensis grown in a cobalt-deficient medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, F; Miyamoto, E; Nakano, Y

    2001-11-01

    Spirulina platensis NIES-39 was grown under open culture system in the presence or absence of CoSO(4) (12 microg/L) and/or vitamin B(12) (10 microg/L) to confirm whether CoSO(4) and/or vitamin B(12) stimulate or are essential for growth of the algal cells and for accumulation of vitamin B(12). The addition of CoSO(4) and/or vitamin B(12) could not affect both cell growth and cell yield of the alga. The amount of corrinoid-compound was increased significantly by the addition of CoSO(4) but not by vitamin B(12). A C18 reversed-phase HPLC pattern of the Spirulina corrinoid-compound increased by the addition of CoSO(4) was identical to that of authentic pseudovitamin B(12), which is inactive for human. These results indicate that the algal cells grown in the absence of CoSO(4) are suitable for use of human health foods because the inactive corrinoid-compound can be reduced significantly.

  20. Effect of coated urea on cadmium accumulation in Oryza sativa L. grown in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chao; Wu, Zisong; Zhu, Qihong; Zhu, Hanhua; Zhang, Yangzhu; Huang, Daoyou

    2015-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of three types of coated urea on the accumulation of cadmium (Cd) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown in contaminated soil. Pot-culture experiments were conducted in a greenhouse from July to November 2012 on the rice cultivar "Hua Hang Si Miao" in Guangzhou (China). The experimental design was completely randomized with four treatments and three replications. The treatments were control (CK) (N 0 mg/kg), prilled urea (PU) (N 200 mg/kg), polymer-coated urea (PCU) (N 200 mg/kg), and sulfur-coated urea (SCU) (N 200 mg/kg). Our results indicated that applications of PCU and SCU slightly increased the dry weight of rice grains. The application of SCU significantly decreased the CaCl2 and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP)-extractable Cd concentrations by 15.4 and 56.1%, respectively. Sequential extractions showed that PCU and SCU applications led to a significant decrease in Cd in the exchangeable fraction and an increase in the bound iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) oxides fractions. Cd concentrations in grains treated with PCU were reduced by 11.7%, whereas SCU significantly reduced Cd concentrations by 29.1%. SCU reduced Cd transfer from the straws to the grain. Our results demonstrated that PCU and SCU may be effective in mitigating Cd accumulation in rice grown in acidic Cd-contaminated soil, especially in plants receiving SCU.

  1. Comparison of Chloroflexus aurantiacus strain J-10-fl proteomes of cells grown chemoheterotrophically and photoheterotrophically

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Li; Bryant, Donald A.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Vogl, Kajetan; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Callister, Stephen J.

    2012-01-17

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl is a thermophilic green bacterium, a filamentous anoxygenic phototroph, and the model organism of the phylum Chloroflexi. We applied high-throughput, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in a global quantitative proteomics investigation of C. aurantiacus cells grown under oxic (chemoorganoheterotrophically) and anoxic (photoorganoheterotrophically) redox states. Our global analysis identified 13,524 high-confidence peptides that matched to 1,286 annotated proteins, 242 of which were either uniquely identified or significantly increased in abundance under anoxic culture conditions. Fifty-three of the 242 proteins are previously characterized photosynthesis-related proteins, including chlorosome proteins, proteins involved in the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis, 3-hydroxypropionate (3-OHP) CO2 fixation pathway, and components of electron transport chains. The remaining 190 proteins have not previously been reported. Of these, five proteins were found to be encoded by genes from a novel operon and observed only in photoheterotrophically grown cells. These proteins candidates may prove useful in further deciphering the phototrophic physiology of C. aurantiacus and other filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs.

  2. The plasma membrane proteome of maize roots grown under low and high iron conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopff, David; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Lüthje, Sabine

    2013-10-08

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is essential for life and has been intensively investigated for dicots, while our knowledge for species in the Poaceae is fragmentary. This study presents the first proteome analysis (LC-MS/MS) of plasma membranes isolated from roots of 18-day old maize (Zea mays L.). Plants were grown under low and high Fe conditions in hydroponic culture. In total, 227 proteins were identified in control plants, whereas 204 proteins were identified in Fe deficient plants and 251 proteins in plants grown under high Fe conditions. Proteins were sorted by functional classes, and most of the identified proteins were classified as signaling proteins. A significant number of PM-bound redox proteins could be identified including quinone reductases, heme and copper-containing proteins. Most of these components were constitutive, and others could hint at an involvement of redox signaling and redox homeostasis by change in abundance. Energy metabolism and translation seem to be crucial in Fe homeostasis. The response to Fe deficiency includes proteins involved in development, whereas membrane remodeling and assembly and/or repair of Fe-S clusters is discussed for Fe toxicity. The general stress response appears to involve proteins related to oxidative stress, growth regulation, an increased rigidity and synthesis of cell walls and adaption of nutrient uptake and/or translocation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics in Europe.

  3. Culture collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David

    2012-01-01

    Culture collections no matter their size, form, or institutional objectives play a role in underpinning microbiology, supplying the resources for study, innovation, and discovery. Their basic roles include providing a mechanism for ex situ conservation of organisms; they are repositories for strains subject to publication, taking in safe, confidential, and patent deposits from researchers. They supply strains for use; therefore, the microorganisms provided must be authentic and preserved well, and any associated information must be valid and sufficient to facilitate the confirmation of their identity and to facilitate their use. The organisms must be collected in compliance with international conventions, international and national legislation and distributed to users indicating clearly the terms and conditions under which they are received and can be used. Collections are harmonizing approaches and characterizing strains to meet user needs. No one single collection can carry out this task alone, and therefore, it is important that output and strategy are coordinated to ensure culture collections deliver the basic resources and services microbiological innovation requires. This chapter describes the types of collection and how they can implement quality management systems and operate to deliver their basic functions. The links to information sources given not only provide support for the practitioners within collections but also provide guidance to users on accessing the huge resource available and how they can help ensure microbiology has the resources and a solid platform for future development.

  4. Space activities and global popular music culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Allison Rae; Collins, Patrick

    During the "space age" era, space activities appear increasingly as a theme in Western popular music, as they do in popular culture generally. In combination with the electronics and tele-communications revolution, "pop/rock" music has grown explosively during the space age to become an effectively global culture. From this base a number of trends are emerging in the pattern of influences that space activities have on pop music. The paper looks at the use of themes and imagery in pop music; the role of space technology in the modern "globalization" of pop music; and current and future links between space activities and pop music culture, including how public space programmes are affected by its influence on popular attitudes.

  5. A synchrotron FTIR microspectroscopy investigation of fungal hyphae grown under optimal and stressed conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeghalmi, Adriana; Kaminskyj, Susan; Gough, Kathleen M

    2007-03-01

    Synchrotron FTIR can provide high spatial resolution (fungal model systems, each with sequenced genomes and a wealth of research: Aspergillus, Neurospora, and Rhizopus. We have analyzed the FTIR maps of Aspergillus nidulans cells containing the hypA1 allele, a well-characterized single-gene temperature-sensitive morphogenetic mutation. The hypA1 cells resemble wildtype at 28 degrees C but have growth defects at 42 degrees C. We have also investigated Neurospora and Rhizopus cultures grown in media with optimal or elevated pH. Significant differences between the spectra of the three fungi are likely related to differences in composition and structure. In addition, high spatial resolution synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy provides an outstanding method for monitoring subtle subcellular changes that accompany environmental stress.

  6. Methyl sterol and cyclopropane fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus grown at low oxygen tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Nichols, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The sterol and fatty acid concentrations for M. capsulatus grown in fed-batch cultures over a wide range of oxygen tensions (0.1-10.6 percent) and at a constant methane level are evaluated. The analyses reveal that the biomass decreases as oxygen levels are lowered; the sterol concentration increases when the oxygen range is between 0.5-1.1 percent and decreases when the oxygen range is below 0.5 percent; and the amount of monounsaturated C16 decreases and the concentration of cyclopropane fatty acids increases after oxygen is reduced. It is noted that growth and membrane synthesis occur at low oxygen concentrations and that the synthesis of membrane lipids responds to growth conditions.

  7. Ficus benjamina grown on pot with ebb-flood; Primo ciclo di coltivazione di Ficus benjamina con tecnica Ebb-Flood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The trial was carried out in 1994 in the experimental station at Tavazzano.The aim was to evaluate the production of Ficus Benjamina grown on pot with Ebb-Flood (closed system) and with a traditional technique. The trial started at february 8 and ended, after 154 days of cultivation, at june 29. Salinity an nutritional aspects of the soil solution were controlled during the cultural cycle, by means water extract analysis, taking into account the upper, medium end lower layers of the substrate in the pot, and also the growth of the plant at different ages during the cultivation, were considered. At the end of the trail the plants grown with Ebb-Flood technique showed a better development (vegetative mass and length) than those grown traditionally, with an higher commercial value.

  8. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor for Three-Dimensional Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Spaulding, Glenn F.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Flechsig, Scott; Jones, Leslie; Soehnge, Holly

    2003-01-01

    The hydrodynamic focusing bioreactor (HFB) is a bioreactor system designed for three-dimensional cell culture and tissue-engineering investigations on orbiting spacecraft and in laboratories on Earth. The HFB offers a unique hydrofocusing capability that enables the creation of a low-shear culture environment simultaneously with the "herding" of suspended cells, tissue assemblies, and air bubbles. Under development for use in the Biotechnology Facility on the International Space Station, the HFB has successfully grown large three-dimensional, tissuelike assemblies from anchorage-dependent cells and grown suspension hybridoma cells to high densities. The HFB, based on the principle of hydrodynamic focusing, provides the capability to control the movement of air bubbles and removes them from the bioreactor without degrading the low-shear culture environment or the suspended three-dimensional tissue assemblies. The HFB also provides unparalleled control over the locations of cells and tissues within its bioreactor vessel during operation and sampling.

  9. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  10. Microbiological Sampling Methods and Sanitation of Edible Plants Grown on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Charles H. II; Khodadad, Christina L.; Garland, Nathaniel T.; Larson, Brian D.; Hummreick, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes on the surfaces of salad crops and growth chambers pose a threat to the health of crew on International Space Station. For astronauts to safely consume spacegrown vegetables produced in NASA's new vegetable production unit, VEGGIE, three technical challenges must be overcome: real-time sampling, microbiological analysis, and sanitation. Raphanus sativus cultivar Cherry Bomb II and Latuca sativa cultivar Outredgeous, two saled crops to be grown in VEGGIE, were inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), a bacterium known to cause food-borne illness Tape- and swab-based sampling techniques were optimized for use in microgravity and assessed for effectiveness in recovery of bacteria from crop surfaces: Rapid pathogen detection and molecular analyses were performed via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactiop using LightCycler® 480 and RAZOR® EX, a scaled-down instrument that is undergoing evaluation and testing for future flight hardware. These methods were compared with conventional, culture-based methods for the recovery of S. Typhimurium colonies. A sterile wipe saturated with a citric acid-based, food-grade sanitizer was applied to two different surface materials used in VEGGIE flight hardware that had been contaminated with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa,. another known human pathogen. To sanitize surfaces, wipes were saturated with either the sanitizer or sterile deionized water and applied to each surface. Colony forming units of P. aeruginosa grown on tryptic soy agar plates were enumerated from surface samples after sanitization treatments. Depending on the VEGGIE hardware material, 2- to 4.5-log10 reductions in colony-forming units were observed after sanitization. The difference in recovery of S. Typhimurium between tape- and swab- based sampling techniques was insignificant. RAZOR® EX rapidly detected S. Typhimurium present in both raw culture and extracted DNA samples.

  11. Characterization of high temperature-tolerant rhizobia isolated from Prosopis juliflora grown in alkaline soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Suneeta; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    1999-10-01

    A method was developed for the fast screening and selection of high-temperature tolerant rhizobial strains from root nodules of Prosopis juliflora growing in alkaline soils. The high-temperature tolerant rhizobia were selected from 2,500 Rhizobium isolates with similar growth patterns on yeast mannitol agar plates after 72 h incubation at 30 and 45 degrees C, followed by a second screening at 47.5 degrees C. Seventeen high-temperature tolerant rhizobial strains having distinguishable protein band patterns were finally selected for further screening by subjecting them to temperature stress up to 60 degrees C in yeast mannitol broth for 6 h. The high-temperature tolerant strains were NBRI12, NBRI329, NBRI330, NBRI332, and NBRI133. Using this procedure, a large number of rhizobia from root nodules of P. juliflora were screened for high-temperature tolerance. The assimilation of several carbon sources, tolerance to high pH and salt stress, and ability to nodulate P. juliflora growing in a glasshouse and nursery of the strains were studied. All five isolates had higher plant dry weight in the range of 29.9 to 88.6% in comparison with uninoculated nursery-grown plants. It was demonstrated that it is possible to screen in nature for superior rhizobia exemplified by the isolation of temperature-tolerant strains, which established effective symbiosis with nursery-grown P. juliflora. These findings indicate a correlation between strain performance under in vitro stress in pure culture and strain behavior under symbiotic conditions. Pure culture evaluation may be a useful tool in search for Rhizobium strains better suited for soil environments where high temperature, pH, and salt stress constitutes a limitation for symbiotic biological nitrogen fixation.

  12. Culture Wars in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2016-01-01

    In the 1960s high and low culture were brought into sharp conflict, as the Ministry of Culture was established to support cultural enlightenment and democratic access to art and culture, while popular demands for more entertainment were raised.......In the 1960s high and low culture were brought into sharp conflict, as the Ministry of Culture was established to support cultural enlightenment and democratic access to art and culture, while popular demands for more entertainment were raised....

  13. THE ROLE OF LIBRARIES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF CULTURAL TOURISM WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS TO THE BIBLIOTHECA ALEXANDRINA IN EGYPT

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Cultural tourism has grown rapidly in the past few decades as a result of more income, higher levels of education, globalization processes that make the world a smaller place, technology, the effects of media and telecommunications and new types of cultural attractions. Libraries, as cultural institutions, may contribute significantly to the development of cultural tourism. One good example is the role of Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt.

  14. THE ROLE OF LIBRARIES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF CULTURAL TOURISM WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS TO THE BIBLIOTHECA ALEXANDRINA IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Lazarevic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cultural tourism has grown rapidly in the past few decades as a result of more income, higher levels of education, globalization processes that make the world a smaller place, technology, the effects of media and telecommunications and new types of cultural attractions. Libraries, as cultural institutions, may contribute significantly to the development of cultural tourism. One good example is the role of Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt.

  15. Cultural Misreading in ELT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunCuilan; RenHuaiping; MaDaoshan

    2004-01-01

    In inter-linguistic-cultural communication, cultural misreading is unavoidable. The same is true in foreign language teaching and learning owning to the cultural dissimilarities, for the influence exerted by cultural components upon languages constitutes the major barriers. Language can not exist without culture as its component. Culture consists of all the shared

  16. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  17. Culture-lovers and Culture-leavers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank Huysmans; Andries van den Broek; Jos de Haan

    2005-01-01

    Who are the people in the Netherlands with an active interest in cultural heritage and the performing arts, and who prefer to leave these forms of culture alone? Have the size and composition of the groups of 'culture-lovers' and 'culture-leavers' changed since the end of the 1970s? These are the ce

  18. In vitro androgenetic cultures of Hyoscyamus niger L., H. albus L. and alkaloid content assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wesołwska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro cultures of Hyoscyamus niger L. and H. albus L. anthers were initiated which resulted in obtaining androgenectic plants and callus cultures. The leaves of these pants and the callus cultures were subjected to analysis (TLC, GC for the presence of alkaloids, derivatives of tropane. In the studied material, alkaloids of different qualitative and quantitative composition from that of ground-grown plants were found.

  19. Algal culture studies related to a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Fernandez, E.; Ollinger, O.; Howell, C.; Venables, A.; Huggins, D.; Gladue, R.

    1984-01-01

    In many respects, algae would be the ideal plant component for a biologically based controlled life support system, since they are eminently suited to the closely coupled functions of atmosphere regeneration and food production. Scenedesmus obliquus and Spirulina platensis were grown in three continuous culture apparatuses. Culture vessels their operation and relative merits are described. Both light and nitrogen utilization efficiency are examined. Long term culture issues are detailed and a discussion of a plasmid search in Spirulina is included.

  20. Advertising cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malefyt, Timothy de Waal; Moeran, Brian

    The growth, success and secrets of advertizing are legendary. Advertizing agencies ceaselessly churn out evermore sophisticated campaigns that, when successful, manage to capture the every essence of consumer desire. The secrets of advertizing are perhaps best understood by turning......, but exposes, through in-depth accounts based on personal experience, the inner workings of the advertizing industry. How do adverts manage to capture "real" life? What issues do agencies have to consider when using an advert in a range of different countries? What specific methods are used to persuade us...... to the relationship between advertizing and anthropology. The link between them may come as a surprise to those who consider advertizing to be firmly rooted in commerce and anthropology in culture. Through the lens of anthropologists, this book not only shows how anthropology and advertizing are connected...

  1. patrimonio cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Fernández de Paz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Desde el momento en que Europa sacralizó un determinado conjunto de objetos y los convirtió en referentes patrimoniales activados y protegidos por los representantes de la cultura oficial, hasta el presente, mucho se han ensanchado los estrechos límites patrimoniales; se ha superado la concepción objetual, historicista y esteticista para abarcar todo el conjunto de bienes de valor cultural. El patrimonio deja así de ser contemplado exclusivamente como un tesoro histórico-artístico para pasar a convertirse en algo mucho más valioso: en elementos -materiales e inmateriales- fundamentales para comprender nuestra identidad. No obstante, la creciente demanda turística de supuestas autenticidades está hoy provocando que este patrimonio se oferte, en no pocas ocasiones, como la expresión de un pasado idealizado.

  2. Structure of shaped sapphire grown from multicapillary dies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovinskaya, E. R.; Litvinov, L. A.; Pischik, V. V.

    1990-07-01

    Peculiarities in grain structure development have been studied in sapphire crystals grown with multicapillary channels in the die to feed melt to the crystallization zone. A new mechanism of grain boundary formation based on gas-bubble collapse at the crystal-melt interface is proposed.

  3. 76 FR 67320 - Walnuts Grown in California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ..., these costs are offset by the benefits derived by the operation of the marketing order. In addition, the... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 984 Walnuts Grown in California; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule increases the assessment...

  4. Epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, D.H.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique to control the growth of metal oxide materials at atomic level using high-pressure reflective high-energy electron diffraction and ellipsometry. These developments have helped to make PLD a grown-up technique to fabricate complex

  5. Commercially Grown Short Rotation Coppice Willow in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Sevel, Lisbeth; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate biomass production in commercially grown short rotation coppice willow in Denmark and to investigate effects of site and management factors on willow yield. Biomass production assessed by non-destructive sampling on 296 plots from 25 plantations...

  6. 75 FR 9536 - Olives Grown in California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    ... Committee for the 2010 fiscal year include $300,000 for research, $255,000 for marketing activities, and... include $300,000 for research, $255,000 for marketing activities, and $324,923 for administration...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 932 Olives Grown in California;...

  7. 77 FR 33104 - Olives Grown in California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... Committee for the 2012 fiscal year include $333,791 for research, $480,000 for marketing activities, $50,000... marketing activities, $50,000 for inspection equipment development, and $333,500 for administration...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 932 Olives Grown in California;...

  8. Phase transition of bismuth telluride thin films grown by MBE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fülöp, Attila; Song, Yuxin; Charpentier, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    A previously unreported phase transition between Bi2Te3 and Bi4Te3 in bismuth telluride grown by molecular beam epitaxy is recorded via XRD, AFM, and SIMS observations. This transition is found to be related to the Te/Bi beam equivalent pressure (BEP) ratio. BEP ratios below 17 favor the formation...

  9. Antioxidative properties of some phototropic microalgae grown in waste water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safafar, Hamed; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Møller, Peter

    for the screening and selection of the species. In this study,the potential antioxidant activities of 12 micro algal sample from Chlorella., Spirulina., Euglena, Scenedesmus and Haematococcus species grown in waste water in Kalundborg micro algal facilities were evaluated using three antioxidant assays, including...

  10. Soybean micronutrient content in irrigated plants grown in the Midsouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micronutrients are essential to soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) but required in minute quantities. Concentrations and tissue contents of Fe, B, Zn, Mn and Cu were determined for two MG IV and one MG V irrigated cultivars grown in twin-rows in the Mississippi Delta on clay and sandy loam soil sites i...

  11. 78 FR 77604 - Tomatoes Grown in Florida; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 966 Tomatoes Grown in Florida; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This proposed... ``order.'' The order is effective under the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7...

  12. 76 FR 50703 - Walnuts Grown in California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 984 Walnuts Grown in California; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This... Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7 U.S.C. 601-674), hereinafter referred to as...

  13. 78 FR 77327 - Walnuts Grown in California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 984 Walnuts Grown in California; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule increases the assessment rate..., hereinafter referred to as the ``order.'' The order is effective under the Agricultural Marketing...

  14. 78 FR 77367 - Almonds Grown in California; Continuance Referendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 981 Almonds Grown in California; Continuance Referendum AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Referendum order. SUMMARY: This document directs that a... referred to as the ``order,'' and the applicable provisions of the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act...

  15. 75 FR 22211 - Olives Grown in California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 932 Olives Grown in California; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule increases the assessment rate... California, hereinafter referred to as the ``order.'' The order is effective under the Agricultural...

  16. 77 FR 51684 - Olives Grown in California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 932 Olives Grown in California; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule increases the assessment rate... California, hereinafter referred to as the ``order.'' The order is effective under the Agricultural...

  17. 76 FR 8871 - Walnuts Grown in California; Decreased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 984 Walnuts Grown in California; Decreased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural..., hereinafter referred to as the ``order.'' The order is effective under the Agricultural Marketing Agreement... Act (RFA) (5 U.S.C. 601-612), the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) has considered the...

  18. Yield performance of cowpea plant introductions grown in calcareous soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowpea or Southernpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] is an important legume crop used as a feed for livestock, as a green vegetable and for consumption of its dry beans which provide 22-25% protein. The crop is very sensitive to alkaline soil conditions. When grown at a soil pH of 7.5 or higher, co...

  19. Yield performance of cowpea genotypes grown in alkaline soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowpea or Southernpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] is an important legume crop used as a feed for livestock, as a green vegetable and for consumption of its dry beans which provide 22-25% protein. The crop is very sensitive to alkaline soil conditions. When grown at soil pH of 7.5 or higher, cowp...

  20. Characterization of the collagen phenotype of rabbit proximal tubule cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, S R; Goins, R A; Belvin, E L; Dimari, S J; Merriam, A P; Bowling-Brown, S; Harris, R C; Haralson, M A

    1999-01-01

    Studies were performed to characterize the collagen phenotype of cultured rabbit proximal tubule (RPT) epithelial cells grown on plastic and on the reconstituted basement membrane preparation, Matrigel. When grown on a plastic substratum, RPT cells display a cobblestone appearance characteristic of glomerular epithelial cells. While initially forming an interlocking network of cells after subculture on Matrigel, this pattern of culture morphology rapidly develops into one characterized by isolated, organized groups of cells. Notwithstanding the effects of Matrigel on culture morphology, total cellular proliferation was reduced only 25% when RPT cells were grown on this substrate. Greater than 90% of the collagen synthesized by RPT cells grown on plastic was secreted into the culture medium. Qualitative analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed components exhibiting electrophoretic mobilities corresponding to the chains present in type IV and type I collagens. Quantitative analysis by CM-Trisacryl chromatography established that approximately 2/3 of the total collagen synthesized by RPT cells grown on plastic was type IV and approximately 1/3 type I. Quantitative analysis of the collagens produced by RPT cells grown on Matrigel again indicated the synthesis of only type IV and type I molecules but in a slightly more equal ratio of both collagen types and in the ratio of secreted to cell-associated molecules. However, the total amount of collagen synthesized by RPT cells grown on Matrigel was reduced to approximately 1% of the level synthesized by the cells grown on plastic. On plastic, approximately 3/4 of the type I collagen produced was recovered as the type I homotrimer, but on Matrigel type I homotrimers represented only approximately 55% of the total type I collagen synthesized. On Matrigel, the majority of the type IV collagen was recovered as heterotrimers containing alpha1(IV) and alpha2(IV) chains. In contrast, RTP cells grown on plastic predominantly produced type IV

  1. Thermotherapy, chemotherapy, and meristem culture in banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassois, Ludivine; Lepoivre, Philippe; Swennen, Rony; van den Houwe, Ines; Panis, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Bananas that provide a staple food to the millions of people are adversely affected by several viruses such as Banana bunchy Top Virus (BBTV), Banana Streak Virus (BSV), and Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV). These viruses are known to have a devastating effect on crop production and constraint to the international exchange and conservation of banana germplasm-a cornerstone for breeding new cultivars. The viruses are particularly problematic in vegetative propagated crops, like bananas, because of their transmission in the planting material. Different virus eradication techniques have been developed, such as thermotherapy, chemotherapy, and meristem culture for providing virus-free planting material. Meristem culture proved to be the most effective procedure to eradicate phloem-associated viruses. This method requires isolation of meristematic dome of plant under the aseptic conditions and culture in an appropriate nutrient medium to develop new virus-free plants. Thermotherapy is another widely used virus eradication technique, which is initially carried out on in vivo or in vitro plants and eventually combined with meristem culture technique. The plantlets are initially grown at 28°C day temperature and increase it by 2°C per day until reaches 40°C and the night temperature at 28°C; maintain plants at 40°C for 4 weeks; excise meristem and culture onto the regeneration medium. In chemotherapy technique, antiviral chemical compound Virazole(®) is applied on meristem culture. Combination of these techniques is also applied to improve the eradication rate.

  2. Vasoactive intestinal peptide and nitric oxide promote survival of adult rat myenteric neurons in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandgren, Katarina; Lin, Zhong; Svenningsen, Åsa Fex;

    2003-01-01

    of VIP, NO donor, VIP antiserum, or NOS inhibitor. A marked loss of neurons was noted during culturing. VIP and NO significantly promoted neuronal survival. Corroborating this was the finding of an enhanced neuronal cell loss when cultures were grown in the presence of VIP antiserum or NOS inhibitor....... adaptation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether VIP and nitric oxide (NO) influence survival of cultured, dissociated myenteric neurons. Neuronal survival was evaluated after 0, 4, and 8 days in culture. Influence of VIP and NO on neuronal survival was examined after culturing in the presence...

  3. Production of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate by Pseudomonas oleovorans grown in sugary cassava extract supplemented with andiroba oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Aires da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas oleovorans were grown on sugary cassava extracts supplemented with andiroba oil for the synthesis of a mediumchain- length polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA MCL. The concentration of total sugars in the extract was approximately: 40 g/L in culture 1, 15 g/L in cultures 2 and 3, and 10 g/L in culture 4. Supplementation with 1% andiroba oil and 0.2 g/L of (NH42HPO4 was performed 6.5 hours after growth in culture 3, and supplementation with the same amount of andiroba oil and 2.4 g/L of (NH42HPO4 was performed at the beginning of growth in culture 4. The synthesis resulted mainly in 3-hydroxy-decanoate and 3-hydroxy-dodecanoate units; 3-hydroxy-butyrate, 3-hydroxy-hexanoate; and 3-hydroxy-octanoate monomers were also produced but in smaller proportions. P. oleovorans significantly accumulated PHA MCL in the deceleration phase of growth with an oxygen limitation but with sufficient nitrogen concentration to maintain cell growth. The sugary cassava extract supplemented with andiroba oil proved to be a potential substrate for PHA MCL production.

  4. Shock initiation experiments on ratchet grown PBX 9502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsen, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Darla G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olinger, Barton W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Deluca, Racci [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pierce, Timothy H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Nathaniel J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    This study compares the shock initiation behavior of PBX 9502 pressed to less than nominal density (nominal density is 1.890 {+-} 0.005 g/cm{sup 3}) with PBX 9502 pressed to nominal density and then ''ratchet grown'' to low density. PBX 9502 is an insensitive plastic bonded explosive consisting of 95 weight % dry-aminated tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) and 5 weight % Kel-F 800 plastic binder. ''Ratchet growth'' - an irreversible increase in specific volume - occurs when an explosive based on TATB is temperature cycled. The design of our study is as follows: PBX 9502, all from the same lot, received the following four treatments. Samples in the first group were pressed to less than nominal density. These were not ratchet grown and used as a baseline. Samples in the second group were pressed to nominal density and then ratchet grown by temperature cycling 30 times between -54 C and +80 C. Samples in the final group were pressed to nominal density and cut into 100 mm by 25.4 mm diameter cylinders. During thermal cycling the cylinders were axially constrained by a 100 psi load. Samples for shock initiation experiments were cut perpendicular (disks) and parallel (slabs) to the axial load. The four sample groups can be summarized with the terms pressed low, ratchet grown/no load, axial load/disks, and axial load/slabs. All samples were shock initiated with nearly identical inputs in plate impact experiments carried out on a gas gun. Wave profiles were measured after propagation through 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm of explosive. Side by side comparison of wave profiles from different samples is used as a measure of relative sensitivity. All reduced density samples were more shock sensitive than nominal density PBX 9502. Differences in shock sensitivity between ratchet grown and pressed to low density PBX 9502 were small, but the low density pressings are slightly more sensitive than the ratchet grown samples.

  5. Bioluminescent Mammalian Cells Grown in Sponge Matrices to Monitor Immune Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okechukwu Ojogho

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth and bioluminescence of cells seeded in collagen and gelatin sponge matrices were compared in vitro under different conditions, and immune rejection was quantified and visualized directly in situ based on loss of bioluminescence activity. Mammalian cells expressing a Renilla luciferase complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA were used to seed collagen and gelatin sponge matrices soaked in either polylysine or gelatin to determine optimal growth conditions in vitro. The sponges were incubated in tissue culture plates for 3 weeks and received 2, 9, or 15 injections of coelenterazine. Measurements of bioluminescence activity indicated that gelatin sponges soaked in gelatin emitted the highest levels of light emission, multiple injections of coelenterazine did not affect light emission significantly, and light emission from live cells grown in sponges could be measured qualitatively but not quantitatively. Histologic analysis of sponge matrices cultured in vitro showed that cells grew best in gelatin matrices. Visualization of subcutaneously implanted sponges in mice showed accelerated loss of light emission in immunocompetent BALB/c mice compared with immunodeficient BALB/c-scid mice, which was associated with increased cell infiltration. Our results indicate that sponge matrices carrying bioluminescent mammalian cells are a valid model system to study immune rejection in situ.

  6. Effects of brassinazole, an inhibitor of brassinosteroid biosynthesis, on light- and dark-grown Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajguz, Andrzej; Asami, Tadao

    2004-03-01

    Treatment of cultured Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck cells with 0.1-10 microM brassinazole (Brz2001), an inhibitor of brassinosteroid (BR) biosynthesis, inhibits their growth during the first 48 h of cultivation in the light. This inhibition is prevented by the co-application of BR. This result suggests that the presence of endogenous BRs during the initial steps of the C. vulgaris cell cycle is indispensable for their normal growth in the light. In darkness, a treatment with 10 nM brassinolide (BL) promotes growth through the first 24 h of culture, but during the following 24 h the cells undergo complete stagnation. Treatment of dark-grown cells with either Brz2001 alone, or a mixture of 10 nM BL and 0.1/10 microM Brz2001, also stimulates their growth. The effects of treatment with 10 nM BL mixed with 0.1-10 microM of a mevalonate-pathway inhibitor (mevinolin), or a non-mevalonate-pathway inhibitor (clomazone), were also investigated. Mevinolin at these concentrations did not inhibit growth of C. vulgaris; however, clomazone did. Addition of BL overcame the inhibition. These results suggest that the mevalonate pathway does not function in C. vulgaris, and that the non-mevalonate pathway for isopentenyl diphosphate biosynthesis is responsible for the synthesis of one of the primary precursors in BR biosynthesis.

  7. Diversity of endophytic fungi of Myricaria laxiflora grown under pre- and post-flooding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, W; Bi, Y H; Zeng, W; Jiang, W; Xue, Y H; Wang, G X; Liu, S P

    2015-09-09

    Myricaria laxiflora is distributed along the riverbanks of the Yangtze River valley. The Three Gorges Dam has dramatically changed the habitat of M. laxiflora, which has evolved to develop increased resistance to flooding stress. In order to elucidate the relationship between plant endophytic fungi and flooding stress, we isolated and taxonomically characterized the endophytic fungi of M. laxiflora. One hundred and sixty-three fungi were isolated from healthy stems, leaves and roots of M. laxiflora grown under pre- and post-flooding conditions. Culture and isolation were carried out under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Based on internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis and morphological characteristics, the isolates exhibited abundant biodiversity; they were classified into 5 subphyla, 7 classes, 12 orders, 17 families, and 26 genera. Dominant endophytes varied between pre- and post-flooding plants, among different plant tissues, and between aerobic and anaerobic culture conditions. Aspergillus and Alternaria accounted for more than 55% of all isolates. Although the number of isolates from post-flooding plants was greater, endophytes from pre-flooding plants were more diverse and abundant. Endophytes were distributed preferentially in particular tissues; this affinity was constrained by both the host habitat and the oxygen availability of the host.

  8. Variability in the production of extracellular enzymes by entomopathogenic fungi grown on different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio Gomes Fernandes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Entomopathogenic fungi are important controllers of pest-insects populations in agricultural production systems and in natural environment. These fungi have enzymatic machinery which involve since the recognition and adherence of spores in their hosts culminating with infection and death of these insects. The main objective of this study was to analyzed extracellular enzyme production of the fungi strains Beauveria bassiana, Metarhizium anisopliae and Paecilomyces sp when cultured on substrates. These fungi were grown in minimal media containing specific substrates for the analysis of different enzymes such as amylases, cellulases, esterases, lipases, proteases (gelatin and caseinase, pectinases and cuticles of Musca domestica larvae and adults. All the assays were performed with and without the presence of dextrose in the culture media. The quantification of enzyme activity was performed by the ratio of halo / colony (H/C and the results subjected to variance analysis level of 5% (ANOVA followed by post-Tukey test. All strains were positive for lipase and also they showed a high significant enzyme production for gelatin at concentrations of 4 and 1%. B. bassiana and Paecilomyces sp. were positive for amylase, pectinase and caseinase, and only Paecilomyces sp. showed cellulase activity.

  9. Comparative Studies on Cellular Behaviour of Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus Linn. cv. Grenadin Grown In Vivo and In Vitro for Early Detection of Somaclonal Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamilah Syafawati Yaacob

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the cytological investigations on the meristematic root cells of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus Linn. grown in vivo and in vitro. Cellular parameters including the mitotic index (MI, chromosome count, ploidy level (nuclear DNA content, mean cell and nuclear areas, and cell doubling time (Cdt were determined from the 2 mm root tip segments of this species. The MI value decreased when cells were transferred from in vivo to in vitro conditions, perhaps due to early adaptations of the cells to the in vitro environment. The mean chromosome number was generally stable (2n=2x=30 throughout the 6-month culture period, indicating no occurrence of early somaclonal variation. Following the transfer to the in vitro environment, a significant increase was recorded for mean cell and nuclear areas, from 26.59 ± 0.09 μm2 to 35.66 ± 0.10 μm2 and 142.90 ± 0.59 μm2 to 165.05 ± 0.58 μm2, respectively. However, the mean cell and nuclear areas of in vitro grown D. caryophyllus were unstable and fluctuated throughout the tissue culture period, possibly due to organogenesis or rhizogenesis. Ploidy level analysis revealed that D. caryophyllus root cells contained high percentage of polyploid cells when grown in vivo and maintained high throughout the 6-month culture period.

  10. Comparative studies on cellular behaviour of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus Linn. cv. Grenadin) grown in vivo and in vitro for early detection of somaclonal variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaacob, Jamilah Syafawati; Taha, Rosna Mat; Khorasani Esmaeili, Arash

    2013-01-01

    The present study deals with the cytological investigations on the meristematic root cells of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus Linn.) grown in vivo and in vitro. Cellular parameters including the mitotic index (MI), chromosome count, ploidy level (nuclear DNA content), mean cell and nuclear areas, and cell doubling time (Cdt) were determined from the 2 mm root tip segments of this species. The MI value decreased when cells were transferred from in vivo to in vitro conditions, perhaps due to early adaptations of the cells to the in vitro environment. The mean chromosome number was generally stable (2n = 2x = 30) throughout the 6-month culture period, indicating no occurrence of early somaclonal variation. Following the transfer to the in vitro environment, a significant increase was recorded for mean cell and nuclear areas, from 26.59 ± 0.09  μm² to 35.66 ± 0.10  μm² and 142.90 ± 0.59  μm² to 165.05 ± 0.58  μm², respectively. However, the mean cell and nuclear areas of in vitro grown D. caryophyllus were unstable and fluctuated throughout the tissue culture period, possibly due to organogenesis or rhizogenesis. Ploidy level analysis revealed that D. caryophyllus root cells contained high percentage of polyploid cells when grown in vivo and maintained high throughout the 6-month culture period.

  11. Integrating biological treatment of crop residue into a hydroponic sweetpotato culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, A A; David, P P; Bonsi, C K; Hill, W A; Mortley, D G; Loretan, P A

    1997-01-01

    Residual biomass from hydroponic culture of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] was degraded using natural bacterial soil isolates. Sweetpotato was grown for 120 days in hydroponic culture with a nutrient solution comprised of a ratio of 80% modified half Hoagland solution to 20% filtered effluent from an aerobic starch hydrolysis bioreactor. The phytotoxicity of the effluent was assayed with Waldmann's Green' lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and the ratio selected after a 60-day bioassay using sweetpotato plants propagated vegetatively from cuttings. Controlled environment chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of filtrate from biological treatment of crop residue on growth and storage root production with plants grown in a modified half Hoagland solution. Incorporation of bioreactor effluent, reduced storage root yield of 'Georgia Jet' sweetpotato but the decrease was not statistically significant when compared with yield for plants cultured in a modified half Hoagland solution without filtrate. However, yield of 'TU-82-155' sweetpotato was significantly reduced when grown in a modified half Hoagland solution into which filtered effluent had been incorporated. Total biomass was significantly reduced for both sweetpotato cultivars when grown in bioreactor effluent. The leaf area and dry matter accumulation were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced for both cultivars when grown in solution culture containing 20% filtered effluent.

  12. Integrating biological treatment of crop residue into a hydroponic sweetpotato culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman, A. A.; David, P. P.; Bonsi, C. K.; Hill, W. A.; Mortley, D. G.; Loretan, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    Residual biomass from hydroponic culture of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] was degraded using natural bacterial soil isolates. Sweetpotato was grown for 120 days in hydroponic culture with a nutrient solution comprised of a ratio of 80% modified half Hoagland solution to 20% filtered effluent from an aerobic starch hydrolysis bioreactor. The phytotoxicity of the effluent was assayed with `Waldmann's Green' lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and the ratio selected after a 60-day bioassay using sweetpotato plants propagated vegetatively from cuttings. Controlled environment chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of filtrate from biological treatment of crop residue on growth and storage root production with plants grown in a modified half Hoagland solution. Incorporation of bioreactor effluent, reduced storage root yield of `Georgia Jet' sweetpotato but the decrease was not statistically significant when compared with yield for plants cultured in a modified half Hoagland solution without filtrate. However, yield of `TU-82-155' sweetpotato was significantly reduced when grown in a modified half Hoagland solution into which filtered effluent had been incorporated. Total biomass was significantly reduced for both sweetpotato cultivars when grown in bioreactor effluent. The leaf area and dry matter accumulation were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced for both cultivars when grown in solution culture containing 20% filtered effluent.

  13. Effects of inulin and oligofructose on the rheological characteristics and probiotic culture survival in low-fat probiotic ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akalin, A S; Erişir, D

    2008-05-01

    The effects of supplementation of oligofructose or inulin on the rheological characteristics and survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12 in low-fat ice cream stored at -18 degrees C for 90 d were studied. Addition of oligofructose or inulin to ice cream mix significantly increased apparent viscosity and overrun and developed the melting properties in ice cream during storage (P ice cream containing inulin (P ice cream mix (P ice cream with oligofructose during storage.

  14. Stability of Propofol in Polystyrene-Based Tissue Culture Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sall, Jeffrey W.; Leong, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Propofol has been reported to have high stability in glass and relatively high stability up to 24 hours in polyvinyl chloride-based medical plastics. Recent publications have observed the effects of propofol on cells and tissues grown in culture. Many cell culture plastics are formulated from polystyrene but we could find little information on the stability of propofol exposed to these products. We observed very little change in the concentration of propofol diluted in cell culture medium over 24 hours when exposed to glass, but substantial loss of the drug when exposed to 96-well polystyrene cell culture plates. This decrease was most rapid in the first hour but continued until 24 hours. The type of plastic used in cell and tissue culture experiments with propofol may influence the results by increasing the apparent dose required to see an effect. PMID:23632056

  15. Regeneration of the Barley Zygote in In Vitro Cultured Ovules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Inger B; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Lange, Mette;

    2010-01-01

    In vitro cultures of zygotes and small embryos carry a lot of potential for studying plant embryogenesis and are also highly relevant for plant biotechnology. Several years ago we established an in vitro ovule culture technique for barley that allows the regeneration of plants from zygotes (Holm et...... al., 1995, Sex. Plant. Reprod. 8:49-59). This culture system proved to be highly effective and indications for genotype independency was obtained. To further sustain this we recently investigated the ovule culture response in the cultivar Golden Promise and three cultivars known for low tissue...... pollination. Ovules were grown for 3 weeks on a culture medium where after embryos could be isolated and transferred to regeneration medium. An average of 1.2 green plantlets per ovule could be regenerated from 50 % of the isolated ovules. No genotypic differences were found on embryo induction...

  16. Effect of management practices on mycorrhizal infection, growth and dry matter partitioning in field-grown bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alberto Rocha Oliveira

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was carried out on unsterilized field soil with low phosphorus availability with the objective of examining the effect of cultural practices on mycorrhizal colonization and growth of common bean. The treatments were: three pre-crops (maize, wheat and fallow followed by three soil management practices ("ploughing", mulching and bare fallow without "ploughing" during the winter months. After the cultural practices, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Canadian Wonder was grown in this soil. Fallowing and soil disturbance reduced natural soil infectivity. Mycorrhizal infection of the bean roots occurred more rapidly in the recently cropped soil than in the fallow soil. Prior cropping with a strongly mycorrhizal plant (maize increased infectivity even further.

  17. Teaching Culture Through Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐婷

    2016-01-01

    Cultural teaching is an issue which is associated with complexity and paradox and also it is a big challenge for faculty. Teaching culture through films has become an important way of cross-cultural teaching This paper focuses on the reasons for teaching culture through films, the value and how it works. And finally it leads out the prospects of cultural teaching through films.

  18. Culture and Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-hui; REN Pei-hong

    2015-01-01

    Language, as a kind of symbol system of social culture, is strongly connected with culture. Language is a carrier of cul⁃ture and a form of culture. Just because the strong connection between culture and language, so we can believe that language is a mirror of culture.

  19. Study on culturing Trichodema mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-ai; WANG Wei-ming

    2004-01-01

    @@ Trichodema mutants strains T5, T0803, T1010, T1003were cultured in different conditions and media, also in the presence of fungicides at 40 mg/kg (CK or procymidone + chlorothalonil, or maneb or phosethyl-Al) . The pH values of media were 5, 6, 7 and 8 and hyphae were grown at temperatures of 15, 20, 25 and 30 ℃. After being cultured for 3, 4, 5, or 6 days, the strains were transferred at a lower temperature to sporulate (20℃) Obtained data were analyzed statistically, with the orthogonal array and ranges (R) differing dependes on the treatments (R = 40.0,42.4, 48.0, 62.8,107.0). The results indicated that the most important factor was the nature of the strain (R =107.0), while the change in temperature and time of cultivation produced the lowest effect (R =40.0). Each factor variance was significant and A3B4C2D1E3 was the optimum combined condition, in which strain T1010 grew more quickly and sporulated most.

  20. Silicon on glass grown from indium and tin solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansen, Roman; Ehlers, Christian; Teubner, Thomas; Böttcher, Klaus; Gambaryan, Karen; Schmidtbauer, Jan; Boeck, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    A two-step process is used to grow crystalline silicon (c-Si) on glass at low temperatures. In the first step, nanocrystalline seed layers are formed at temperatures in the range of 230 to 400°C by either metal-induced crystallization or by direct deposition on heated substrates. In the second step, c-Si is grown on the seed layer by steady-state liquid phase epitaxy at a temperature range of 580 to 710°C. Microcrystalline Si layers with grain sizes of up to several tens of micrometers are grown from In and Sn solutions. Three-dimensional simulations of heat and convective flow in the crucible have been conducted and give valuable insights into the growth process. The experimental results are promising with regard to the designated use of the material in photovoltaics.

  1. Platinum blue staining of cells grown in electrospun scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Mohammed; Millas, Ana Luiza G; Estandarte, Ana Katrina C; Bhella, Gurdeep K; McKean, Robert; Bittencourt, Edison; Robinson, Ian K

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast cells grown in electrospun polymer scaffolds were stained with platinum blue, a heavy metal stain, and imaged using scanning electron microscopy. Good contrast on the cells was achieved compared with samples that were gold sputter coated. The cell morphology could be clearly observed, and the cells could be distinguished from the scaffold fibers. Here we optimized the required concentration of platinum blue for imaging cells grown in scaffolds and show that a higher concentration causes platinum aggregation. Overall, platinum blue is a useful stain for imaging cells because of its enhanced contrast using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the future it would be useful to investigate cell growth and morphology using three-dimensional imaging methods.

  2. Microprobe analysis of brine shrimp grown on meteorite extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, J. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)]. E-mail: j.kennedy@gns.cri.nz; Mautner, M.N. [Soil, Plant and Ecological Sciences Division, Lincoln University (New Zealand) and Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8001 (New Zealand)]. E-mail: m.mautner@solis1.com; Barry, B. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Markwitz, A. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2007-07-15

    Nuclear microprobe methods have been used to investigate the uptake and distribution of various elements by brine shrimps and their unhatched eggs when grown in extracts of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous meteorites, which were selected as model space resources. Measurements were carried out using a focussed 2 MeV proton beam raster scanned over the samples in order to obtain the average elemental concentrations. Line scans across the egg and shrimp samples show uptake of elements such as Mg, Ni, S and P which are present in the meteorites. The results confirmed that carbonaceous chondrite materials can provide nutrients, including high levels of the essential nutrient phosphate. The concentrations of these elements varied significantly between shrimp and eggs grown in extracts of the two meteorite types, which can help in identifying optimal growth media. Our results illustrate that nuclear microprobe techniques can determine elemental concentrations in organisms exposed to meteorite derived media and thus help in identifying useful future resources.

  3. Growth and Characterization of Agar Gel Grown Brushite Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Suryawanshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brushite [CaHPO4·2H2O] or calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (CHPD also known as urinary crystal is a stable form of calcium phosphate. The brushite crystals were grown by single and double diffusion techniques in agar-agar gel at room temperature. Effects of different growth parameters were discussed in single diffusion and double diffusion techniques. Good quality star, needle, platy, rectangular, and prismatic shaped crystals in single diffusion and nuclei with dendritic growth were obtained in double diffusion. These grown nuclei were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. SEM has shown the different morphologies of crystals; FTIR has confirmed the presence of functional groups; crystalline nature was supported by XRD, whereas the TGA indicates total 24.68% loss in weight and formation of stable calcium pyrophosphate (Ca2P2O7 at 500°C.

  4. MBE-Grown Lead Tin Telluride Infrared Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Srinivasan

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt was made to examine the performance of the Pb0.82sn0.18Te films grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBEtechnique as infrared (IR band pass filter and photoconductive IR detector. Films of required thickness for these purposes were precalculated and were grown by controlling the growth time. The fabricated band-pass filters were with Full Width at Half Maximum(FWHM of 20-25 per ent centred at 6.5, 8 and 10 microns. The measured detectivity of the film was of the order of 10 power 8 cm H Z (1/2W(-1 for 500 K black body temperature with 800 Hz chopping frequencyand 10 per cent electrical bandwidth at 77 K. All these films weregrown on freshly cleaved KC1 (100 substrates.

  5. Present and future applications of magnetic nanostructures grown by FEBID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresa, J.M. de [CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (ICMA), Saragossa (Spain); Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Saragossa (Spain); Fernandez-Pacheco, A. [University of Cambridge, TFM Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Currently, magnetic nanostructures are routinely grown by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). In the present article, we review the milestones produced in the topic in the past as well as the future applications of this technology. Regarding past milestones, we highlight the achievement of high-purity cobalt and iron deposits, the high lateral resolution obtained, the growth of 3D magnetic deposits, the exploration of magnetic alloys and the application of magnetic deposits for Hall sensing and in domain-wall conduit and magnetologic devices. With respect to future perspectives of the topic, we emphasize the potential role of magnetic nanostructures grown by FEBID for applications related to highly integrated 2D arrays, 3D nanowires devices, fabrication of advanced scanning-probe systems, basic studies of magnetic structures and their dynamics, small sensors (including biosensors) and new applications brought by magnetic alloys and even exchange biased systems. (orig.)

  6. Thermally grown thin nitride films as a gate dielectric

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, H C; Hwang, T K; Lee, K R

    1998-01-01

    High-quality very thin films ( <=6 nm) of silicon nitride were thermally grown in ammonia atmosphere with an IR (Infrared) gold image furnace. As-grown nitride film was analyzed using AES(Auger Emission Spectroscopy). Using MIS (Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor) devices, the growth rate was calculated using CV (Capacitance-Voltage) measurements and various electrical characteristics were obtained using CV, IV (Current-Voltage), trapping, time-dependent breakdown, high-field stress, constant current injection stress and dielectric breakdown techniques. These characteristics showed that very thin thermal silicon nitride films can be used as gate dielectrics for future highly scaled-down ULSI (Ultra Large Scale Integrated) devices, especially for EEPROM (Electrically Erasable and Programmable ROM)'s.

  7. X-ray diffraction study of directionally grown perylene crystallites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiby, Dag W.; Lemke, H. T.; Hammershøj, P.

    2008-01-01

    Using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, perylene crystallites grown on thin highly oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films on silicon substrates have been investigated. All the perylene crystallites are found to orient with the ab plane of the monoclinic unit cell parallel to the subst......Using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, perylene crystallites grown on thin highly oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films on silicon substrates have been investigated. All the perylene crystallites are found to orient with the ab plane of the monoclinic unit cell parallel...... to the substrate. The scattering data is interpreted as a trimodal texture of oriented perylene crystallites, induced by interactions between the perylene molecules and the oriented PTFE substrate. Three families of biaxial orientations are seen, with the axes (h = 1, 2, or 3) parallel to the PTFE alignment......, all having the ab-plane parallel to the substrate. About 92% of the scattered intensity corresponds to a population with highly parallel to (PTFE)....

  8. Growth and characterization of hexamethylenetetramine crystals grown from solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, B.; Chandrasekaran, J.; Balaprabhakaran, S.

    2014-06-01

    Organic nonlinear optical single crystals of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT; 10 × 10 × 5 mm3) were prepared by crystallization from methanol solution. The grown crystals were subjected to various characterization techniques such as single crystal XRD, powder XRD, UV-Vis and electrical studies. Single crystal XRD analysis confirmed the crystalline structure of the grown crystals. Their crystalline nature was also confirmed by powder XRD technique. The optical transmittance property was identified from UV-Vis spectrum. Dielectric measurements were performed as a function of frequency at different temperatures. DC conductivity and photoconductivity studies were also carried out for the crystal. The powder second harmonic generation efficiency (SHG) of the crystal was measured using Nd:YAG laser and the efficiency was found to be two times greater than that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP).

  9. Transfer of tylosin resistance between Enterococcus spp. during continuous-flow culture of feral or domestic porcine gut microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixed populations of domesticated and feral pig gut microbes (RPCF and FC, respectively) were grown in continuous culture to investigate the effects of tylosin on antimicrobial resistance. Cultures established in steady state were inoculated with 9.7 log10 colony forming units (CFU) of a tylosin-re...

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of aerobic freshwater and marine enrichment cultures efficient in hydrocarbon degradation: effect of profiling method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Y.J.; Stephen, J.R.; Richter, A.P.; Venosa, A.D.; Bruggemann, J.; MacNaughton, S.J.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Haines, J.R.; Kline, E.; White, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    Aerobically grown enrichment cultures derived from hydrocarbon- contaminated seawater and freshwater sediments were generated by growth on crude oil as sole carbon source. Both cultures displayed a high rate of degradation for a wide range of hydrocarbon compounds. The bacterial species composition

  11. Growth characteristics and nutrient depletion of Miscanthus x ogiformis Honda 'Giganteus' suspension cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, Inger Bæksted

    1998-01-01

    The growth characteristics and nutrient depletion in suspension cultures of Miscanthus ogiformis Honda ‘Giganteus' grown in media containing either Murashige and Skoog or N6 basal nutrient salts were studied during a culture period of 15 days. Proline was added to both media in concentrations from...

  12. Targeting FAK Radiosensitizes 3-Dimensional Grown Human HNSCC Cells Through Reduced Akt1 and MEK1/2 Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehlgans, Stephanie [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Institute of Radiopharmacy, Helmholtz Center Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Eke, Iris [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Cordes, Nils, E-mail: Nils.Cordes@OncoRay.de [OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany); Institute of Radiopharmacy, Helmholtz Center Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital and Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a main regulator of integrin signaling and cell migration, is frequently overexpressed and hyperphosphorylated in human head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We have previously shown that pharmacologic FAK inhibition leads to radiosensitization of 3-dimensionally grown HNSCC cell lines. To further evaluate the role of FAK in radioresistance and as a potential cancer target, we examined FAK and FAK downstream signaling in HNSCC cell lines grown in more physiologic extracellular matrix-based 3-dimensional cell cultures. Methods and Materials: Seven HNSCC cell lines were grown in 3-dimensional extracellular matrix and the clonogenic radiation survival, expression, and phosphorylation of FAK, paxillin, Akt1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, and MEK1/2 were analyzed after siRNA-mediated knockdown of FAK, Akt1, MEK1, FAK+Akt1, or FAK+MEK1 compared with controls or stable overexpression of FAK. The role of MEK1/2 for clonogenic survival and signaling was investigated using the MEK inhibitor U0126 with or without irradiation. Results: FAK knockdown moderately or significantly enhanced the cellular radiosensitivity of 3-dimensionally grown HNSCC cells. The FAK downstream targets paxillin, Akt1, and ERK1/2 were substantially dephosphorylated under FAK depletion. FAK overexpression, in contrast, increased radiation survival and paxillin, Akt1, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The degree of radiosensitization upon Akt1, ERK1/2, or MEK1 depletion or U0126 was superimposable to FAK knockdown. Combination knockdown conditions (ie, Akt1/FAK, MEK1/FAK, or U0126/FAK) failed to provide additional radiosensitization. Conclusions: Our data provide further evidence for FAK as important determinant of radiation survival, which acts in the same signaling axis as Akt1 and ERK1/2. These data strongly support our hypothesis that FAK is a relevant molecular target for HNSCC radiotherapy.

  13. Culture ou Intercultures (Culture or Intercultural).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Ross

    1996-01-01

    While planet Earth endeavors to transmit information instantaneously, cultural misunderstanding interferes with communication more than any language barrier. The article urges teachers of French to be cognizant of their role as cultural mediators. (Author/CK)

  14. Exploring Culture : Exercises, Stories and Synthetic Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    A unique training book containing over 100 culture awareness exercises, dialogues, stories incidents and simulations that bring to life Geert Hofstede's five dimensions of culture. These dimensions are: power distance, collectivism versus individualism, femininity versus masculinity, uncertainly avo

  15. Consumer sensory analysis of organically and conventionally grown vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Chambers, Edgar; Matta, Ziad; Loughin, Thomas M; Carey, Edward E

    2007-03-01

    Consumers of organically grown fruits and vegetables often believe that these products taste better than conventional produce. However, comparison of produce from supermarket shelves does not permit adequate assessment of this consumer perception, given potentially confounding cultivar and environmental effects. We used replicated side-by-side plots to produce organic and conventional vegetables for consumer sensory studies. In one test, red loose leaf lettuce, spinach, arugula, and mustard greens, grown organically and conventionally, were evaluated for overall liking as well as for intensity of flavor and bitterness. Another consumer test was conducted comparing organically and conventionally grown tomatoes, cucumbers, and onions. Overall, organically and conventionally grown vegetables did not show significant differences in consumer liking or consumer-perceived sensory quality. The only exception was in tomatoes where the conventionally produced tomato was rated as having significantly stronger flavor than the organically produced tomato. However, overall liking was the same for both organic and conventional samples. As conventional tomatoes also were scored marginally significantly higher in ripeness and a positive correlation was found between ratings of flavor intensity and ripeness, the flavor difference observed could not be simply ascribed to the contrasting growing conditions. Consumer panelists in both tests considered organic produce to be healthier (72%) and more environmentally friendly (51%) than conventional produce, while 28% considered organic produce to have better taste. Covariance analysis indicated that consumer demographics affected sensory comparisons of organic and conventional lettuce and cucumbers. Future study is needed to substantiate the influence of segmentation of consumers on their preference for organic food.

  16. Nano transfer and nanoreplication using deterministically grown sacrificial nanotemplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melechko, Anatoli V [Oak Ridge, TN; McKnight, Timothy E [Greenback, TN; Guillorn, Michael A [Ithaca, NY; Ilic, Bojan [Ithaca, NY; Merkulov, Vladimir I [Knoxville, TX; Doktycz, Mitchel J [Knoxville, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H [Knoxville, TN; Simpson, Michael L [Knoxville, TN

    2012-03-27

    Methods, manufactures, machines and compositions are described for nanotransfer and nanoreplication using deterministically grown sacrificial nanotemplates. An apparatus, includes a substrate and a nanoconduit material coupled to a surface of the substrate. The substrate defines an aperture and the nanoconduit material defines a nanoconduit that is i) contiguous with the aperture and ii) aligned substantially non-parallel to a plane defined by the surface of the substrate.

  17. Spectral response of THM grown CdZnTe crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H.; Awadalla, S.A.; Harris, F.

    2008-01-01

    The spectral response of several crystals grown by the Traveling Heater Method (THM) were investigated. An energy resolution of 0.98% for a Pseudo Frisch-Grid of 4 × 4 × 9 mm3 and 2.1% FWHM for a coplanar-grid of size 11 × 11 × 5 mm3 were measured using 137Cs-662 keV. In addition a 4% FWHM at 122...

  18. Glucosinolates in collard greens grown under three soil management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonious, George F

    2015-01-01

    Glucosinolates (GSLs, β-D-thioglucoside-N-hydroxysulfates) are polar compounds present in varying amounts in members of the Brassicaceae family. They suppress soil-borne pests due to the biofumigant properties of the highly toxic isothiocyanates present in Brassica vegetables. The objectives of this investigation were to: (1) assess variation in GSLs concentrations among collard plants grown under three soil management practices: sewage sludge (SS) mixed with native soil, chicken manure (CM) mixed with native soil, and no-mulch (NM) native soil, (2) quantify GSLs concentrations in collard roots, leaves, and stems at harvest for potential use of their crude extracts in plant protection, and (3) assess myrosinase activity in soil amended with CM and SS mixed with native soil. Separation of GSLs was accomplished by adsorption on a DEAE-Sephadex ion exchange resin using disposable pipette tips filled with DEAE, a weak base, with a net positive charge when ionized and exchange anions such as GSLs (hydrophilic plant secondary metabolites). Quantification of total GSLs was based on inactivation of collard endogenous myrosinase and liberation of the glucose moiety from the GSLs molecule by addition of standardized myrosinase and colorimetric determination of the liberated glucose moiety. Across all treatments, SS and CM increased soil organic matter content from 2.2% in native soil to 4.2 and 6.5%, respectively. GSLs concentrations were significantly greater in collard leaves (30.9 µmoles g(-1) fresh weight) compared to roots and stems (7.8 and 1.2 µmoles g(-1) fresh weight), respectively. Leaves of collard grown in soil amended with SS contained the greatest concentrations of GSLs compared to leaves of plants grown in CM and NM treatments. Accordingly, leaves of collard plants grown in soil amended with SS could play a significant role in sustainable agriculture as alternative tools for soil-borne disease management in conventional and organic agriculture.

  19. A novel process for production of hepatitis A virus in Vero cells grown on microcarriers in bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Bo Sun; Yan-Jun Jiang; Wei-Dong Li; Ping-Zhong Li; Guo-Liang Li; Shu-De Jiang; Guo-Yang Liao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To develop a novel process for production of HAV in Vero cells grown on microcarriers in a bioreactor.METHODS: Vero cells infected with HAV strain W were seeded at an initial density of 1×105 cells/mL into a 7-L bioreactor containing Cytodex-I microcarriers. During the stage of cell proliferation, the following conditions were applied: pH 7.2±0.2, temperature 37±0.2 ℃, dissolved oxygen 40% of air saturation and agitation rate 40 r/min.After the stage of virus culture started, the culture conditions were altered to pH 7.2±0.2, temperature 35±0.2 ℃,dissolved oxygen 25% of air saturation, agitation rate 50 r/min and perfusion of fresh medium at a flux of 20 mL/h. During the course of fermentation, cell density, HAV antigen titre,glucose, lactate and ammonia levels were monitored. A control experiment using conventional static culture was conducted in the T150 flask.RESULTS: After a 28-d cultivation, cell density increased to 14.0×105 cells/mL in the bioreactor, 5.6×109viable cells and 4 000 mL virus suspension with a titre of 1:64 were harvested.The viral antigen output per cell unit in the bioreactor was 3-fold higher than that in the T150 flask. Meanwhile the metabolic mode of Vero cells did not change after the infection with HAV strain W.CONCLUSION: The process for production of HAV in Veto cells grown on microcarriers in a bioreactor is a novel,efficient and practical way to obtain virus antigen for vaccine purpose. This approach produces more cells and HAV antigen than the conventional static culture. With futher improvement, it is possible to be used for the production of hepatitis A vaccine.

  20. Complejidad Cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Soto Ramírez

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A inicios del 2007, un llamativo suceso se convirtió en el ‘foco de atención' de la opinión pública: 600 internas de La Villa de las niñas de Chalco, presentaron síntomas como: mareo, náuseas, vómitos y problemas musculares. Una vez descartados los factores orgánicos y con el aval de la ‘ciencia médica' se procedió a construir una versión oficial respaldada por la ‘ciencia' y los ‘sistemas de expertos'. En las entrevistas televisivas aparecían ‘académicos' de distintas instituciones del país opinando al respecto y lo sorprendente es que su ‘punto de vista' sobre el caso, resultaba ser tan inverosímil como el de las instancias de salud. Incluso, como se verá, las ‘versiones académicas' terminaron otorgándole, quizá sin quererlo, verosimilitud a la ‘versión oficial' de la Secretaría de Salud. Lo interesante del caso es que las explicaciones que se produjeron para justificar la existencia de los ‘hechos' se apegaron con estricto fervor romántico a las suposiciones hipnótico-epidemiológicas desarrolladas por la ‘psicología de masas' de finales del siglo XIX y principios del XX. Sirva el presente ensayo para hacer una revisión no sólo del curioso caso de la villa de las niñas sino de la forma en que la construcción de versiones, descripciones y explicaciones, circulan de modos particulares y que el entendimiento de la forma en cómo circulan dichas versiones, descripciones y explicaciones, permite entender la complejidad cultural de cualquier entorno social. 

  1. Cultural Understanding Through Cross-Cultural Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, Jean-Francois

    1986-01-01

    A college course used an explicit intercultural approach and collective research activities to compare French and American cultures and to examine the reasons for cultural attitudes and culture conflict. Class assignments dealt with contrastive analyses of American and French institutions like advertising, cinema, feminism, etc. (MSE)

  2. Genotype by environment interaction for adult body weights of shrimp Penaeus vannamei when grown at low and high densitie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Famula Thomas R

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Shrimp is one of few marine species cultured worldwide for which several selective breeding programs are being conducted. One environmental factor that can affect the response to selection in breeding programs is the density at which the shrimp are cultured (low-medium-high. Phenotypic plasticity in the growth response to different densities might be accompanied by a significant genotype by environment interaction, evidenced by a change in heritabilities between environments and by a genetic correlation less than one for a unique trait between environments. Our goal was to understand whether different growth densities affect estimates of those genetic parameters for adult body weight (BW in the Pacific white shrimp (Penaeus vannamei. BW heritabilities were significantly different between environments, with the largest at high density. These differences resulted from both an increased additive genetic variance and a decreased environmental variance when grown at high density. The genetic correlation between BWs at the two environmental conditions was significantly less than one. Whereas these results might be suggestive for carrying out shrimp selective breeding for BW under high density conditions, further understanding of genetic correlations between growth and reproductive traits within a given environment is necessary, as there are indications of reduced reproductive fitness for shrimp grown at high densities.

  3. Culture - joint fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joint fluid culture ... fungi, or viruses grow. This is called a culture. If these germs are detected, other tests may ... is no special preparation needed for the lab culture. How to prepare for the removal of joint ...

  4. Routine sputum culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sputum culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Culture, routine. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, ... . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:409- ...

  5. Peritoneal fluid culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... based on more than just the peritoneal fluid culture (which may be negative even if you have ...

  6. Lymph node culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - lymph node ... or viruses grow. This process is called a culture. Sometimes, special stains are also used to identify specific cells or microorganisms before culture results are available. If needle aspiration does not ...

  7. Blood Culture (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Blood Culture KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Culture Print A A ... adjust the treatment choice. Why Do a Blood Culture? During some illnesses, certain infection-causing bacteria and ...

  8. Animal culture: chimpanzee conformity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Carel P

    2012-05-22

    Culture-like phenomena in wild animals have received much attention, but how good is the evidence and how similar are they to human culture? New data on chimpanzees suggest their culture may even have an element of conformity.

  9. Microalgal Culture Collection Transfers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Milford Microalgal culture Collection holds over 200 live cultures representing 13 classes of of algae. The cultures are maintained in three different growing...

  10. Cross-cultural awareness

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the importance of cultural awareness for businesspeople when they go abroad. It also gives some cultural advice and factors which are thought to be the most important in creating a culture.

  11. Ear drainage culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... checks the dish every day to see if bacteria, fungi, or viruses have grown. More tests may be ... results may be a sign of infection by bacteria, virus, or fungus. The test results may show which organism is ...

  12. Characteristics of HgCdTe epilayer grown by LPE using horizontal slider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J K Radhakrishnan; S Sitharaman; S C Gupta

    2002-11-01

    The characteristics of HgCdTe epilayers grown in a modified horizontal slider system, are reported here. The surface morphology of the grown layers, their IR transmission characteristics, depth and lateral compositional uniformity, structural and electrical characteristics are discussed.

  13. Cultural Context and Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敏

    2009-01-01

    cultural context plays an important role in translation. Because translation is a cross-culture activity, the culture context that influ-ences translating is consisted of both the culture contexts of source language and target language. This article firstly analyzes the concept of context and cultural context, then according to the procedure of translating classifies cultural context into two stages and talks about how they respectively influence translating.

  14. Accumulation of mercury in rice grain and cabbage grown on representative Chinese soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-fa LIU; Ting-qiang LI; Xiao-e YANG; Cheng-xian WU; Muhammad T. RAFIQ; Rukhsanda AZIZ; Dan-di HOU; Zhe-li DING; Zi-wen LIN; Lin-jun LOU; Yuan-yuan FENG

    2013-01-01

    A pot culture experiment was carried out to investigate the accumulation properties of mercury (Hg) in rice grain and cabbage grown in seven soil types (Udic Ferrisols, Mol isol, Periudic Argosols, Latosol, Ustic Cambosols, Calcaric Regosols, and Stagnic Anthrosols) spiked with different concentrations of Hg (CK, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, 2.00, and 4.00 mg/kg). The results of this study showed that Hg accumulation of plants was significantly affected by soil types. Hg concentration in both rice grain and cabbage increased with soil Hg concentrations, but this increase differed among the seven soils. The stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that pH, Mn(II), particle size distribution, and cation exchange capacity have a close relationship with Hg accumulation in plants, which suggested that physico-chemical characteristics of soils can affect the Hg accumulation in rice grain and cabbage. Critical Hg concentrations in seven soils were identified for rice grain and cabbage based on the maximum safe level for daily intake of Hg, dietary habits of the population, and Hg accumulation in plants grown in different soil types. Soil Hg limits for rice grain in Udic Ferrisols, Mol isol, Periudic Argosols, Latosol, Ustic Cambosols, Calcaric Regosols, and Stagnic Anthrosols were 1.10, 2.00, 2.60, 2.78, 1.53, 0.63, and 2.17 mg/kg, respectively, and critical soil Hg levels for cabbage are 0.27, 1.35, 1.80, 1.70, 0.69, 1.68, and 2.60 mg/kg, respectively.

  15. Accumulation of mercury in rice grain and cabbage grown on representative Chinese soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-fa; Wu, Cheng-xian; Rafiq, Muhammad T; Aziz, Rukhsanda; Hou, Dan-di; Ding, Zhe-li; Lin, Zi-wen; Lou, Lin-jun; Feng, Yuan-yuan; Li, Ting-qiang; Yang, Xiao-e

    2013-12-01

    A pot culture experiment was carried out to investigate the accumulation properties of mercury (Hg) in rice grain and cabbage grown in seven soil types (Udic Ferrisols, Mollisol, Periudic Argosols, Latosol, Ustic Cambosols, Calcaric Regosols, and Stagnic Anthrosols) spiked with different concentrations of Hg (CK, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, 2.00, and 4.00 mg/kg). The results of this study showed that Hg accumulation of plants was significantly affected by soil types. Hg concentration in both rice grain and cabbage increased with soil Hg concentrations, but this increase differed among the seven soils. The stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that pH, Mn(II), particle size distribution, and cation exchange capacity have a close relationship with Hg accumulation in plants, which suggested that physicochemical characteristics of soils can affect the Hg accumulation in rice grain and cabbage. Critical Hg concentrations in seven soils were identified for rice grain and cabbage based on the maximum safe level for daily intake of Hg, dietary habits of the population, and Hg accumulation in plants grown in different soil types. Soil Hg limits for rice grain in Udic Ferrisols, Mollisol, Periudic Argosols, Latosol, Ustic Cambosols, Calcaric Regosols, and Stagnic Anthrosols were 1.10, 2.00, 2.60, 2.78, 1.53, 0.63, and 2.17 mg/kg, respectively, and critical soil Hg levels for cabbage are 0.27, 1.35, 1.80, 1.70, 0.69, 1.68, and 2.60 mg/kg, respectively.

  16. The replacement of serum by hormones in cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, G; Hayashi, I

    1976-12-01

    The replacement of serum by hormones in cell culture media. (Reemplazo del suero por hormonas en el medio de cultivo de células). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 120-121, 1976. The serum used in cell culture media can be replaced by a mixture of hormones and some accesory blood factors. The pituitary cell line GH3 can be grown in a medium in which serum is replaced by triiodothyronine, transferrin, parathormone, tyrotrophin releasing hormone and somatomedins. Hela and BHK cell strains can also be grown in serum free medium supplemented with hormones. Each cell type appears to have different hormonal requirements yet it may found that some hormones are required for most cell types.

  17. Gene Expression by the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Grown on an Iron Electrode under Cathodic Protection Conditions▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Sean M.; Park, Hyung Soo; Been, Jenny; Gordon, Paul; Sensen, Christoph W.; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2008-01-01

    The genome sequence of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was reanalyzed to design unique 70-mer oligonucleotide probes against 2,824 probable protein-coding regions. These included three genes not previously annotated, including one that encodes a c-type cytochrome. Using microarrays printed with these 70-mer probes, we analyzed the gene expression profile of wild-type D. vulgaris grown on cathodic hydrogen, generated at an iron electrode surface with an imposed negative potential of −1.1 V (cathodic protection conditions). The gene expression profile of cells grown on cathodic hydrogen was compared to that of cells grown with gaseous hydrogen bubbling through the culture. Relative to the latter, the electrode-grown cells overexpressed two hydrogenases, the hyn-1 genes for [NiFe] hydrogenase 1 and the hyd genes, encoding [Fe] hydrogenase. The hmc genes for the high-molecular-weight cytochrome complex, which allows electron flow from the hydrogenases across the cytoplasmic membrane, were also overexpressed. In contrast, cells grown on gaseous hydrogen overexpressed the hys genes for [NiFeSe] hydrogenase. Cells growing on the electrode also overexpressed genes encoding proteins which promote biofilm formation. Although the gene expression profiles for these two modes of growth were distinct, they were more closely related to each other than to that for cells grown in a lactate- and sulfate-containing medium. Electrochemically measured corrosion rates were lower for iron electrodes covered with hyn-1, hyd, and hmc mutant biofilms than for wild-type biofilms. This confirms the importance, suggested by the gene expression studies, of the corresponding gene products in D. vulgaris-mediated iron corrosion. PMID:18310429

  18. 76 FR 69673 - Tart Cherries Grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 930 Tart Cherries Grown in Michigan, New... tart cherries grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin. These... handling of tart cherries grown in Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington,...

  19. Titanium distribution in Ti-sapphire single crystals grown by Czochralski and Verneuil technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alombert-Goget, G.; Li, H.; Faria, J.; Labor, S.; Guignier, D.; Lebbou, K.

    2016-01-01

    The distributions of Ti3+ and Ti4+ ions were evaluated by photoluminescence measurement in the wafers cut from different positions of the ingots grown by Czochralski and Verneuil techniques. Particular radial distributions of Ti4+ as function of the position in the ingot were observed in the crystals grown by Verneuil technique different than the crystals grown by Czochralski method.

  20. 29 CFR 780.505 - Definition of “shade-grown tobacco.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definition of âshade-grown tobacco.â 780.505 Section 780... Employment or Agricultural Employees in Processing Shade-Grown Tobacco; Exemption From Minimum Wage and Overtime Pay Requirements Under Section 13(a)(14) Shade-Grown Tobacco § 780.505 Definition of...

  1. Response of container-grown flowering dogwood cultivars to sun/shade production regime, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowering dogwood, Cornus florida, ‘Cherokee Brave™’ and ‘Cherokee Princess’ were grown in #5 nursery containers in an amended 100% bark substrate. Treatments were assigned based on exposure time to a full sun/shade condition during the growing season: 1) plants grown in full sun, 2) plants grown in...

  2. Cultural Analysis - towards cross-cultural understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullestrup, Hans

    The book considers intercultural understanding and co-action, partly by means of general insight into concept of culture and the dimensions which bring about cultural differences, and partly as a methodology to analyse a certain culture - whether one's own or others'. This leads towards an unders......The book considers intercultural understanding and co-action, partly by means of general insight into concept of culture and the dimensions which bring about cultural differences, and partly as a methodology to analyse a certain culture - whether one's own or others'. This leads towards...... a theoretical/abstract proposal for cultural understanding. The second part presents a theoretical/abstract proposal for under-standing intercultural plurality and complexity. The third part provides an empirical model for the analysis of intercultural co-action. Finally, the fourth part present and discusses...

  3. FROM CULTURAL IMPOTENCE TO CULTURAL AMPUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вячеслав Владимирович Суханов

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cultural space of any state is formed by a population that is within its borders. In this article, the author introduces a new cultural definitions «cultural impotence» and «cultural amputation», justifying their use, both in terms of population of the Russian Federation and the European Union and America. The article analyzes the state of society and the cultural factors that influence the development of society in Russia, there are options to bring the country out of a deep cultural crisis. Also established a close relationship between the domestic policy of the state and development of culture.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-2-1

  4. Semiautomated analysis of dendrite morphology in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Eric S; Langhammer, Chris L; Kutzing, Melinda K; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying dendrite morphology is a method for determining the effect of biochemical pathways and extracellular agents on neuronal development and differentiation. Quantification can be performed using Sholl analysis, dendrite counting, and length quantification. These procedures can be performed on dendrite-forming cell lines or primary neurons grown in culture. In this protocol, we describe the use of a set of computer programs to assist in quantifying many aspects of dendrite morphology, including changes in total and localized arbor complexity.

  5. Production of Newcastle Disease Virus by Vero Cells Grown on Cytodex 1 Microcarriers in a 2-Litre Stirred Tank Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Azmir Arifin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to prepare a model for the production of Newcastle disease virus (NDV lentogenic F strain using cell culture in bioreactor for live attenuated vaccine preparation. In this study, firstly we investigated the growth of Vero cells in several culture media. The maximum cell number was yielded by culture of Vero cells in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM which was 1.93×106 cells/ml. Secondly Vero cells were grown in two-litre stirred tank bioreactor by using several commercial microcarriers. We achieved the maximum cell concentration about 7.95×105 cells/ml when using Cytodex 1. Later we produced Newcastle Disease virus in stirred tank bioreactor based on the design developed using Taguchi L4 method. Results reveal that higher multiplicity of infection (MOI and size of cell inoculums can yield higher virus titer. Finally, virus samples were purified using high-speed centrifugation based on 3∗∗(3-1 Fractional Factorial Design. Statistical analysis showed that the maximum virus titer can be achieved at virus sample concentration of 58.45% (v/v, centrifugation speed of 13729 rpm, and centrifugation time of 4 hours. As a conclusion, high yield of virus titer could be achieved through optimization of cell culture in bioreactor and separation by high-speed centrifugation.

  6. Polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity in organically and conventionally grown vegetables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kevser Unal; Deny Susanti; Muhammad Taher

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity of ethanol extracts of some organically and conventionally grown leafy vegetables. Methods:The ethanol extracts of kailan (Brassica alboglabra), bayam (Amaranthus spp.) and sawi (Brassica parachinensis) were tested for total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), and total anthocyanin content (TAC) and the antioxidant capacity of the extracts measured using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay. Results:In TPC test, sawi extract showed the highest phenolic content while bayam contained the least phenolic content for both organically and conventionally grown types. In TFC test, organically grown sawi extract showed the highest flavonoid content, while organically grown kailan extract showed the least flavonoid content among all types of vegetables. The flavonoid content of the conventionally grown types of vegetable extracts was the highest in kalian and the least in sawi. For 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity, the activity increased with the increasing concentration of each extract. All conventionally grown vegetable extracts showed higher antioxidant activity compared to their organically grown counterparts. Extracts of conventionally grown sawi showed the highest percentage inhibition followed by conventionally grown kailan and organically grown sawi. There were no correlation between TPC, TFC, TAC and IC25 of both organically and conventionally grown vegetables. However, there was a correlation between TAC and IC25 of conventionally grown vegetable extracts. The results showed relatively similar polyphenol content between organically and conventionally grown vegetable extracts. However, the conventionally grown vegetables extracts generally have higher antioxidant activity compared to the organically grown extracts. Conclusions:These results suggested that the different types of agricultural practice had a significant contribution to the polyphenol

  7. ARPE-19 cell growth and cell functions in euglycemic culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimsath, Ernest G; Unda, Richard; Vidro, Eileen; Muniz, Albert; Villazana-Espinoza, Elia T; Tsin, Andrew

    2006-12-01

    Human retinal pigmented epithelial cells (ARPE-19) grown in euglycemic media (5.5 mM) had lower cell number, significantly different cell morphology, and lower levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the culture media than those grown in hyperglycemic media (18 mM) customarily used for culturing ARPE-19 cells. Although it has been shown that within a 24-hour period, all-trans retinoic acid significantly reduces VEGF secretion by retinal pigmented epithelial cells (grown in 18 mM glucose), such an inhibitory effect was not observed in cells grown in 5.5 mM glucose. Our results suggest that ARPE-19 cells grown in euglycemic media exhibit distinctly different cell growth, cell differentiation, and cell functions in comparison to cells grown in hyperglycemic media. Because euglycemic conditions provide a physiological glucose environment, this glucose concentration must be included in all future investigations of the mechanism of diabetic retinopathy when studying VEGF secretion by ARPE-19 cells.

  8. Large-scale culture of a tropical marine microalga Chaetoceros calcitrans (Paulsen) Takano 1968 at different temperatures using annular photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J I; Yusoff, F M; Shariff, M

    2012-07-01

    Outdoor mass culture of microalgae in the tropical area is important to minimize its production cost. This study evaluates the growth of Chaetoceros calcitrans in 120 L annular photobioreactors at indoor temperature (Treatment I, 25 +/- 2 degrees C) and outdoor tropical ambient temperature, (Treatment II, 30 +/- 6 degrees C). Each treatment was done in duplicates. For both treatments, C. calcitrans was first grown in starter columns of 10 L capacity for a period of 7 days at 25 +/- 2 degrees C. After 7 days, the 9 L culture was transferred to the annular photobioreactors and subsequently brought to a final volume of 100 L by adding 20 L fresh medium every 5 days. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in the dry weight of microalgae grown in natural light and those grown indoor. The results suggest that C. calcitrans can be grown in outdoor conditions, hence, saving time and microalgae production cost for the larviculture industry.

  9. Information and Corporate Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Miriam A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper defines "corporate culture" (set of values and beliefs shared by people working in an organization which represents employees' collective judgments about future) and discusses importance of corporate culture, nature of corporate cultures in business and academia, and role of information in shaping present and future corporate cultures.…

  10. Many Forms of Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam B.

    2009-01-01

    Psychologists interested in culture have focused primarily on East-West differences in individualism-collectivism, or independent-interdependent self-construal. As important as this dimension is, there are many other forms of culture with many dimensions of cultural variability. Selecting from among the many understudied cultures in psychology,…

  11. Culture and English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莹

    2008-01-01

    There is a natural relationship between culture and language. Language reflects how the people of a nation form the unique way of life and the way of thinking. Therefore, English teaching necessarily involves cultural education as well. This paper analyzes the influence of social culture in English teaching and tries to set up a principle of teaching English culture.

  12. Annealing to reduce scattering centers in Czochralski-grown beta-BaB2O4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouta, H; Kuwano, Y

    1999-02-20

    When a visible laser beam passes through beta-BaB(2)O(4) (BBO), scattered light can be observed along the beam within the crystal. Scattering centers caused by structural defects in Czochralski-grown BBO can be reduced by 95% by annealing at 920 degrees C. In the flux-grown BBO, centers actually increase by the same annealing because the process causes microcracks and/or secondary inclusions. It is shown that annealed Czochralski-grown BBO is superior to flux-grown BBO (annealed or as-grown) in terms of optical loss.

  13. Comparison Of Energy Sources Grown On Agricultural Land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jureková Zuzana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to compare biomass production of energy plants and selected crops grown on arable land in the south-western Slovakia in 2007–2014, its energy value and the influence of decisive climatic factors on the size of the production. The data on yields of dominant crops grown in the agricultural farm were obtained from the statistical data of the farm. Aboveground biomass of willows and poplars was harvested at the end of the harvest cycle. Aboveground biomass of Miscanthus sinensis was harvested in 2010–2014, always in early spring period of the following year. Winter wheat, spring barley and maize grown for silage during the period 2007–2014 provided the lowest yields in 2010 and the highest in 2011 and 2014. The highest energy value was obtained from maize in 2014 (400.66 GJ ha−1. The short rotation coppice poplars of Italian provenance yielded biomass with energy value of 951.68 GJ ha−1 year−1 at the end of the first three-year harvest cycle in 2012. The analysis of variance confirmed that there are highly significant statistical differences in the poplar biomass yield among the varieties and individual experimental years. The fast growing willows of Swedish provenance provided aboveground biomass energy value of 868.88 GJ ha−1 year−1 at the end of the first four-year harvest cycle in 2011. The biomass production of the perennial grass Miscanthus sinensis, depending on the growing period, can be expressed by a polynomial trend function. The highest biomass production was obtained in the third growing period (2012. At the end of the fifth growing period (2014, the yield amounted to 28.60 t ha−1 of the dry aboveground biomass. The energy value of the aboveground biomass of Miscanthus reached 486.20 GJ ha−1 in 2014. Differences in the biomass yield of the Miscanthus genotypes are statistically highly significant in each of the monitored growing periods. The growth and production process of the selected energy

  14. Uptake of /sup 131/I by some hydroponically grown crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asprer, G.A.; Lansangan, L.M.; de la Paz, L.R. (Philippine Atomic Energy Commission, Diliman, Quezon City)

    Biologically labelled vegetables which include kangkong and sweet potato tops were grown hydroponically in a modified Hoagland-Arnon nutrient solution containing radioiodine with 0.5% non-radioactive Nal solution as the medium. The crops considered in this study are commonly eaten by Filipinos. The concentration of the solution as well as the uptake in the plant system were determined at various time intervals. The extent of radioiodine uptake through air-water-plant pathway is one of the parameters needed for calculating the dose that the general populace could be exposed to, due to radioactivity in the environment.

  15. Effects of irrigation strategies and soils on field grown potatoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, Seyed Hamid; Plauborg, Finn; Andersen, Mathias Neumann;

    2011-01-01

    Root distribution of field grown potatoes (cv. Folva) was studied in 4.32m2 lysimeters and subjected to full (FI), deficit (DI), and partial root-zone drying (PRD) irrigation strategies. Drip irrigation was applied for all irrigations. Irrigations were run in three different soils: coarse sand......, loamy sand, and sandy loam. Irrigation treatments started after tuber bulking and lasted until final harvest with PRD and DI receiving 65% of FI. Potatoes irrigated with water-saving irrigation techniques (PRD and DI) did not show statistically different dry root mass and root length density (RLD, cm...... in practice for efficient use of water and nutrients in the field....

  16. Progress in MBE grown type-II superlattice photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Cory J.; Li, Jian V.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the status of GaSb/InAs type-II superlattice diodes grown and fabricated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory designed for infrared absorption in the 8-12(mu)m range. Recent devices have produced detectivities as high as 8x10 to the tenth power Jones with a differential resistance-area product greater than 6 Ohmcm(sup 2) at 80K with a long wavelength cutoff of approximately 12(mu)m. The measured quantum efficiency of these front-side illuminated devices is close to 30% in the 10-11(mu)m range without antireflection coatings.

  17. Inversion domains in AlN grown on (0001) sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasinski, J.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Paduano, Q.S.; Weyburne, D.W.

    2003-08-25

    Al-polarity inversion domains formed during AlN layer growth on (0001) sapphire were identified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They resemble columnar inversion domains reported for GaN films grown on (0001) sapphire. However, for AlN, these columns have a V-like shape with boundaries that deviate by 2 {+-} 0.5{sup o} from the c-axis. TEM identification of these defects agrees with the post-growth surface morphology as well as with the microstructure revealed by etching in hot aqueous KOH.

  18. Fabrication of metal nanoclusters on graphene grown on Ru(0001)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui; FU Qiang; CUI Yi; TAN DaLi; BAO XinHe

    2009-01-01

    Monolayer graphene was epitaxially grown on Ru(0001) through exposure of the Ru(0001) to ethylene at room temperature followed by annealing in ultrahigh vacuum at elevated temperatures. The resulting graphene structures were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spec-troscopy (XPS), and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The graphene/Ru(0001) surface was used as a periodic template for growth of metal nanoclusters. Highly dispersed Pt clusters with well controlled size and spatial distribution were fabricated on the surface.

  19. Lipid profiling of some authotrophic microalgae grown on waste water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safafar, Hamed; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Møller, Per

    the most suitable microalgae and downstream processing for food and feed production. The present study is part of a big project funded by GUDP (green development and demonstration program of ministry of agriculture and fisheries of Denmark) which aims at developing new processing technologies, so...... that microalgae-biomass can be used as an alternative valuable resource in fish feed. In this work, 10 fresh water and marine microalgae from Chlorella, Scenedesmus, Haematococcus, Nannochloropsis, Nannochloropsis and Dunialiella species grown in waste water in Kalundborg micro algal facility were harvested...

  20. Language and Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐君

    2011-01-01

    As the carrier of culture,language is considered as the main expressional form of culture which develops with nation,country and society’s development.Language is a part of a nation’s culture.The different nations own their unique cultures,his-tory,manners and customs and so on.However,various cultural characteristics can be displayed in the form of language.This ar-ticle,by analyzing the influence and the difference of historical culture,regional culture and custom culture,mainly reveals the relationship between language and culture which is interdependent and interactive.What’s more,a better comprehension of this relationship prevents us from misunderstanding in cross-culture communication.

  1. Coupling of organotypic brain slice cultures to silicon-based arrays of electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Henrik; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Thiébaud, P

    1999-01-01

    such hippocampal rat brain slice cultures on biocompatible silicon-based chips with arrays of electrodes with a histological organization comparable to that of conventional brain slice cultures grown by the roller drum technique and on semiporous membranes. Intracellular and extracellular recordings from neurons......Fetal or early postnatal brain tissue can be cultured in viable and healthy condition for several weeks with development and preservation of the basic cellular and connective organization as so-called organotypic brain slice cultures. Here we demonstrate and describe how it is possible to establish...

  2. CO2 Biofixation by the Cyanobacterium Spirulina sp. LEB 18 and the Green Alga Chlorella fusca LEB 111 Grown Using Gas Effluents and Solid Residues of Thermoelectric Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Vaz, Bruna; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; de Morais, Michele Greque

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has increased from 280 to 400 ppm in the last 10 years, and the coal-fired power plants are responsible for approximately 22 % of these emissions. The burning of fossil fuel also produces a great amount of solid waste that causes serious industrial and environmental problems. The biological processes become interesting alternative in combating pollution and developing new products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the CO2 biofixation potential of microalgae that were grown using gaseous effluents and solid residues of thermoelectric origin. The microalgae Chlorella fusca LEB 111 presented higher rate of CO2 biofixation (42.8 %) (p Spirulina sp. LEB 18. The values for the CO2 biofixation rates and the kinetic parameters of Spirulina and Chlorella cells grown using combustion gas did not differ significantly from those of cells grown using CO2 and a carbon source in the culture media. These microalgae could be grown using ash derived from coal combustion, using the minerals present in this residue as the source of the essential metals required for their growth and the CO2 derived from the combustion gas as their carbon source.

  3. Absorbing the Culture Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Participants at a forum on communication between cultures generate ideas on how China can deal with its growing cultural deficit Five months ago, Ding Wei, Assistant Minister of Culture, described China's deficit in international cultural trade as "huge" at a press conference held by the State Council Information Office. "Our statistics years ago showed that the ratio of imports of cultural products to exports was 10 to 1," he

  4. KEEPING CULTURAL GENES ALIVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Shi

    2012-01-01

    China's contemporary culture and the protection of its diverse cultural heritage have become some of the most talked about issues today.Cultural prosperity was put forward as an important objective of the Central Government's national development strategy last year.However,the industrialization and commercialization of China's culture have been both criticized and celebrated.Many scholars believe industrialization and enormous government investment may not be the best means to protect intangible cultural heritage (ICH).

  5. Cross-cultural upbringing : A comparison of the "Third Culture Kids" framework and "Kaigai/Kikoku-shijo" studies

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This paper will look at two fields of study which, although dealing with a similar subject matter, have up until now grown quite independently from each other. American scholars who look at the phenomenon of "Third Culture Kids" and Japanese scholars in "Kaigai/Kikoku-shijo" studies are both interested in the impact of a cross-cultural overseas upbringing on a child's subsequent life experience. We will examine some of the main findings from the respective fields, and point out their common t...

  6. A Case Study of Native Plants at Industrially Contaminated Area in Bhopal and Their Tissue Culture Approach for Phytoremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwini A Waoo; Sujata Ganguly; Swati Khare

    2014-01-01

    In phytoremediation techniques,experiments were done with normal soil-grown or hydroponically grown plants. In recent days, more and more effort is directed toward research to understand and improve the performance of plants in remediation technologies, the number of results obtained with the help of in vitro plant cell and tissue cultures is rapidly increasing.This review focuses on the report of various phytoremediation technologies, paying special attention to removal of pollutants from so...

  7. Development of an in situ detachment protocol of Vero cells grown on Cytodex1 microcarriers under animal component-free conditions in stirred bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourou, Samia; Riahi, Nesrine; Majoul, Samy; Trabelsi, Khaled; Kallel, Héla

    2013-08-01

    Subcultivation of Vero cells grown in a proprietary animal component-free medium named IPT-AFM, on microcarriers, was studied. TrypLE Select, a non-animal-derived protease, was used as an alternative to trypsin for cell passaging. We first studied the effect of increasing concentrations of TrypLE Select toward cell growth and then studied the inactivation of the protease using either soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) or the soy hydrolysate Hypep 1510, in six-well plates. Data showed that cell growth was impaired by residual level of TrypLE Select; STI was identified as an efficient agent to neutralize this effect. To restore cell growth and inactivate TrypLE Select, STI should be added to the medium at least at 0.2 g L(-1). Cells were also grown in spinner flask on 2 g L(-1) Cytodex1 in IPT-AFM. In these conditions, the cell detachment yield was equal to 78 ± 8 %. Furthermore, cells exhibited a typical growth profile when using the dislodged cells to seed a new culture. A cell detachment yield of 70 ± 19 % was also achieved when the cells were grown in a 2-L stirred bioreactor in IPT-AFM, on 3 g L(-1) Cytodex1. This protocol can be of great interest to scale-up the process of Vero cells cultivation in IPT-AFM on Cytodex1 from one stirred bioreactor culture to another.

  8. Hyperforin production in Hypericum perforatum root cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaid, Mariam; Haas, Paul; Beuerle, Till; Scholl, Stephan; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-03-20

    Extracts of the medicinal plant Hypericum perforatum are used to treat depression and skin irritation. A major API is hyperforin, characterized by sensitivity to light, oxygen and temperature. Total synthesis of hyperforin is challenging and its content in field-grown plants is variable. We have established in vitro cultures of auxin-induced roots, which are capable of producing hyperforin, as indicated by HPLC-DAD and ESI-MS analyses. The extraction yield and the productivity upon use of petroleum ether after solvent screening were ∼5 mg/g DW and ∼50 mg/L culture after six weeks of cultivation. The root cultures also contained secohyperforin and lupulones, which were not yet detected in intact plants. In contrast, they lacked another class of typical H. perforatum constituents, hypericins, as indicated by the analysis of methanolic extracts. Hyperforins and lupulones were stabilized and enriched as dicyclohexylammonium salts. Upon up-scaling of biomass production and downstream processing, H. perforatum root cultures may provide an alternative platform for the preparation of medicinal extracts and the isolation of APIs.

  9. Studies on suspension culture of virginia mallow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kasprzyk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Virginia mallow (Sida hermaphrodita (L. Rusby belongs to the Malvaceae family. It is a very important industrial and energetic crop (Kasprzyk et al. 2013. In our studies, we used plant cell suspension cultures due to the fact that it is a useful tool to investigate biochemical, molecular and physiological aspects of many cellular functions (Dong et al. 2010. Virginia mallow seeds, obtained from Prof. Borkowska (University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland, were used in this investigation to obtain plants which were grown in sterile conditions in the Department of Plant Anatomy and Cytology, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University in Lublin, Poland. The seeds were surface sterilized and washed three times in sterile, distilled water. After 3 weeks of in vitro culture, young seedlings were used as a source of explants (to callus induction. Two types of explants were used to form callus culture: leaf and petiole. Callus tissues were then aseptically transferred to an Erlenmeyer flask with liquid medium and placed on an orbital shaker moving at 120 rpm. The observations of this suspense culture were conducted under light and confocal LSM microscopes. The authors observed that depending on the type of explants and composition of medium, callus tissue has varied in color and character of growth.

  10. Rotating cell culture systems for human cell culture: human trophoblast cells as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Warner, Jessica A; Machado, Heather L; Morris, Cindy A; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin

    2012-01-18

    The field of human trophoblast research aids in understanding the complex environment established during placentation. Due to the nature of these studies, human in vivo experimentation is impossible. A combination of primary cultures, explant cultures and trophoblast cell lines support our understanding of invasion of the uterine wall and remodeling of uterine spiral arteries by extravillous trophoblast cells (EVTs), which is required for successful establishment of pregnancy. Despite the wealth of knowledge gleaned from such models, it is accepted that in vitro cell culture models using EVT-like cell lines display altered cellular properties when compared to their in vivo counterparts. Cells cultured in the rotating cell culture system (RCCS) display morphological, phenotypic, and functional properties of EVT-like cell lines that more closely mimic differentiating in utero EVTs, with increased expression of genes mediating invasion (e.g. matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)) and trophoblast differentiation. The Saint Georges Hospital Placental cell Line-4 (SGHPL-4) (kindly donated by Dr. Guy Whitley and Dr. Judith Cartwright) is an EVT-like cell line that was used for testing in the RCCS. The design of the RCCS culture vessel is based on the principle that organs and tissues function in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment. Due to the dynamic culture conditions in the vessel, including conditions of physiologically relevant shear, cells grown in three dimensions form aggregates based on natural cellular affinities and differentiate into organotypic tissue-like assemblies. The maintenance of a fluid orbit provides a low-shear, low-turbulence environment similar to conditions found in vivo. Sedimentation of the cultured cells is countered by adjusting the rotation speed of the RCCS to ensure a constant free-fall of cells. Gas exchange occurs through a permeable hydrophobic membrane located on the back of the bioreactor. Like their parental tissue in vivo, RCCS-grown

  11. InSb thin films grown by electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Joginder, E-mail: joginderchauhan82@gmail.com; Rajaram, P., E-mail: joginderchauhan82@gmail.com [School of Studies in Physics, Jiwaji University, Gwalior-474011 (India)

    2014-04-24

    We have grown InSb thin films on Cu substrates using the electrodeposition technique. The electrochemical bath from which the InSb thin films were grown was made up of a mixture of aqueous solutions of 0.05 M InCl{sub 3} and 0.03M SbCl{sub 3}, 0 .20M citric acid and 0.30M sodium citrate. Citric acid and sodium citrate were used as complexing agents to bring the reduction potential of In and Sb closer to maintain binary growth. The electrodeposited films were characterized by structural, morphological and optical studies. X-ray diffraction studies show that the films are polycrystalline InSb having the zinc blende structure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies reveal that the surface of the films is uniformly covered with submicron sized spherical particles. FTIR spectra of InSb thin films show a sharp absorption peak at wave number 1022 cm{sup −1} corresponding to the band gap. Hot probe analysis shows that the InSb thin films have p type conductivity.

  12. GaAsP Nanowires Grown by Aerotaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaferia, Wondwosen; Persson, Axel R; Mergenthaler, Kilian; Yang, Fangfang; Zhang, Wei; Yartsev, Arkady; Wallenberg, Reine; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Deppert, Knut; Samuelson, Lars; Magnusson, Martin H

    2016-09-14

    We have grown GaAsP nanowires with high optical and structural quality by Aerotaxy, a new continuous gas phase mass production process to grow III-V semiconductor based nanowires. By varying the PH3/AsH3 ratio and growth temperature, size selected GaAs1-xPx nanowires (80 nm diameter) with pure zinc-blende structure and with direct band gap energies ranging from 1.42 to 1.90 eV (at 300 K), (i.e., 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.43) were grown, which is the energy range needed for creating tandem III-V solar cells on silicon. The phosphorus content in the NWs is shown to be controlled by both growth temperature and input gas phase ratio. The distribution of P in the wires is uniform over the length of the wires and among the wires. This proves the feasibility of growing GaAsP nanowires by Aerotaxy and results indicate that it is a generic process that can be applied to the growth of other III-V semiconductor based ternary nanowires.

  13. Pb-210 in beans grown in normal background environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingote, Raquel M.; Nogueira, Regina A., E-mail: mingote@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: rnogueira@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro-Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    A survey was carried out on the activity concentration of {sup 210}Pb in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown in normal background environments in Brazil. The Carioca beans and the black type were analyzed, which contribute with 90% of the Brazilian market share of the common beans. To this study 18 bean samples sowing in the Middle-Western and Southern regions of Brazil during the years 2010-2011 were analyzed. The proportion per bean type was similar to the national production: most of the Carioca beans (n=13; 72%) and black beans (n=5; 28%). Other 17 values of {sup 210}Pb activity concentration in beans grown in Southeastern region available in the GEORAD, a dataset of radioactivity in Brazil, were added to the statistic analysis of the data. Considering the information contained in censored observations (60%), representative value of {sup 210}Pb activity concentration in beans was estimated by using robust ROS, a censored data analysis method. The value 0.047 Bq kg{sup -1} fresh wt. obtained here is according to {sup 210}Pb activity concentration in grains reported by UNSCEAR 0.05 Bq kg{sup -1}. (author)

  14. Orthodox etching of HVPE-grown GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyher, J.L.; Lazar, S.; Macht, L.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Molnar,R.J.; Muller, S.; Nowak, G.; Grzegory, I.

    2006-08-10

    Orthodox etching of HVPE-grown GaN in molten eutectic of KOH + NaOH (E etch) and in hot sulfuric and phosphoric acids (HH etch) is discussed in detail. Three size grades of pits are formed by the preferential E etching at the outcrops of threading dislocations on the Ga-polar surface of GaN. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as the calibration tool it is shown that the largest pits are formed on screw, intermediate on mixed and the smallest on edge dislocations. This sequence of size does not follow the sequence of the Burgers values (and thus the magnitude of the elastic energy) of corresponding dislocations. This discrepancy is explained taking into account the effect of decoration of dislocations, the degree of which is expected to be different depending on the lattice deformation around the dislocations, i.e. on the edge component of the Burgers vector. It is argued that the large scatter of optimal etching temperatures required for revealing all three types of dislocations in HVPE-grown samples from different sources also depends upon the energetic status of dislocations. The role of kinetics for reliability of etching in both etches is discussed and the way of optimization of the etching parameters is shown.

  15. Quality characteristics of the radish grown under reduced atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Lanfang H.; Bisbee, Patricia A.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Birmele, Michele N.; Prior, Ronald L.; Perchonok, Michele; Dixon, Mike; Yorio, Neil C.; Stutte, Gary W.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    This study addresses whether reduced atmospheric pressure (hypobaria) affects the quality traits of radish grown under such environments. Radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv. Cherry Bomb Hybrid II) plants were grown hydroponically in specially designed hypobaric plant growth chambers at three atmospheric pressures; 33, 66, and 96 kPa (control). Oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures were maintained constant at 21 and 0.12 kPa, respectively. Plants were harvested at 21 days after planting, with aerial shoots and swollen hypocotyls (edible portion of the radish referred to as the “root” hereafter) separated immediately upon removal from the chambers. Samples were subsequently evaluated for their sensory characteristics (color, taste, overall appearance, and texture), taste-determining factors (glucosinolate and soluble carbohydrate content and myrosinase activity), proximate nutrients (protein, dietary fiber, and carbohydrate) and potential health benefit attributes (antioxidant capacity). In roots of control plants, concentrations of glucosinolate, total soluble sugar, and nitrate, as well as myrosinase activity and total antioxidant capacity (measured as ORACFL), were 2.9, 20, 5.1, 9.4, and 1.9 times greater than the amount in leaves, respectively. There was no significant difference in total antioxidant capacity, sensory characteristics, carbohydrate composition, or proximate nutrient content among the three pressure treatments. However, glucosinolate content in the root and nitrate concentration in the leaf declined as the atmospheric pressure decreased, suggesting perturbation to some nitrogen-related metabolism.

  16. Automorphogenesis and gravitropism of plant seedlings grown under microgravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, T; Saiki, M; Kamisaka, S; Yamashita, M

    2001-01-01

    Plant seedlings exhibit automorphogenesis on clinostats. The occurrence of automorphogenesis was confirmed under microgravity in Space Shuttle STS-95 flight. Rice coleoptiles showed an inclination toward the caryopsis in the basal region and a spontaneous curvature in the same adaxial direction in the elongating region both on a three-dimensional (3-D) clinostat and in space. Both rice roots and Arabidopsis hypocotyls also showed a similar morphology in space and on the 3-D clinostat. In rice coleoptiles, the mechanisms inducing such an automorphic curvature were studied. The faster-expanding convex side of rice coleoptiles showed a higher extensibility of the cell wall than the opposite side. Also, in the convex side, the cell wall thickness was smaller, the turnover of the matrix polysaccharides was more active, and the microtubules oriented more transversely than the concave side, and these differences appear to be causes of the curvature. When rice coleoptiles grown on the 3-D clinostat were placed horizontally, the gravitropic curvature was delayed as compared with control coleoptiles. In clinostatted coleoptiles, the corresponding suppression of the amyloplast development was also observed. Similar results were obtained in Arabidopsis hypocotyls. Thus, the induction of automorphogenesis and a concomitant decrease in graviresponsiveness occurred in plant shoots grown under microgravity conditions.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of gel-grown cobalt tartrate crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V M Athivanan; M Haris; T Prasanyaa; M Amgalan

    2014-03-01

    Crystals of cobalt tartrate are grown from the gel using chemical reaction method. The functional groups are found from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The OH stretching mode owing to water, carbonyl group, CH stretching modes and metal–oxygen stretching are identified. The unit cell dimensions, interaxial angles and unit cell volume are found from powder X-ray diffraction studies (XRD) which show the orthorhombic nature of the crystal. The magnetic study is used to find the magnetic susceptibility and magnetic moment of the grown crystal. It reveals the magnetic nature of the crystal. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) are done to find the thermal properties of the crystal which manifest the water of hydration in the crystal. The variation of dielectric constant with respect to the applied frequency shows the polarization property of the crystal. The AC conductivity is increased proportionally with increase in frequency. The reverse nature is found for the AC resistivity. The nature of the composition of the crystals affects the dielectric properties.

  18. Gallium Nitride Nanowires Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhan-Hui; XIU Xiang-Qan; YAN Huai-Yue; ZHANG Rong; XIE Zi-Li; HAN Ping; SHI Yi; ZHENG You-Dou

    2011-01-01

    @@ GaN nanowires are grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy using nickel as a catalyst.The properties of the obtained GaN nanowires are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy,electron diffraction,roomtemperature photoluminescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy.The results show that the nanowires are wurtzite single crystals growing along the[0001]direction and a redshift in the photoluminescence is observed due to a superposition of several effects.The Raman spectra are close to those of the bulk GaN and the significantly broadening of those modes indicates the phonon confinement effects associated with the nanoscale dimensions of the system.%GaN nanowires are grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy using nickel as a catalyst. The properties of the obtained GaN nanowires are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, room-temperature photoluminescence and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results show that the nanowires are wurtzite single crystals growing along the [0001] direction and a redshift in the photoluminescence is observed due to a superposition of several effects. The Raman spectra are close to those of the bulk GaN and the significantly broadening of those modes indicates the phonon confinement effects associated with the nanoscale dimensions of the system.

  19. Food Value of Mealworm Grown on Acrocomia aculeata Pulp Flour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Vieira Alves

    Full Text Available Insects have played an important role as human food throughout history, especially in Africa, Asia and Latin America. A good example of edible insects is the mealworm, Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus, 1758 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae, which are eaten in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Australia. This species is easily bred in captivity, requiring simple management. The bocaiuva (Acrocomia aculeata (Jacq. Lodd is an abundant palm tree found in the Brazilian Cerrado, providing fruits with high nutritional value. The aim of this work was to determine the chemical composition of T. molitor grown in different artificial diets with bocaiuva pulp flour. The nutritional composition, fatty acid composition, antioxidant activity, trypsin activity and anti-nutritional factors of larvae were analyzed. The results showed that mealworms grown on artificial diet with bocaiuva are a good source of protein (44.83% and lipid (40.45%, with significant levels of unsaturated fatty acids (65.99%, antioxidant activity (4.5 μM Trolox/g of oil extracted from larvae and absence of anti-nutritional factors. This study indicates a new source of biomass for growing mealworms and shows that it is possible to breed mealworms in artificial diet with bocaiuva flour without compromising the nutritional quality of the larvae.

  20. Organically grown food provides health benefits to Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Ria; Kolli, Santharam; Bauer, Johannes H

    2013-01-01

    The "organic food" market is the fastest growing food sector, yet it is unclear whether organically raised food is nutritionally superior to conventionally grown food and whether consuming organic food bestows health benefits. In order to evaluate potential health benefits of organic foods, we used the well-characterized fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Fruit flies were raised on a diets consisting of extracts of either conventionally or organically raised produce (bananas, potatoes, raisins, soy beans). Flies were then subjected to a variety of tests designed to assess overall fly health. Flies raised on diets made from organically grown produce had greater fertility and longevity. On certain food sources, greater activity and greater stress resistance was additionally observed, suggesting that organic food bestows positive effects on fly health. Our data show that Drosophila can be used as a convenient model system to experimentally test potential health effects of dietary components. Using this system, we provide evidence that organically raised food may provide animals with tangible benefits to overall health.

  1. Organically grown food provides health benefits to Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Chhabra

    Full Text Available The "organic food" market is the fastest growing food sector, yet it is unclear whether organically raised food is nutritionally superior to conventionally grown food and whether consuming organic food bestows health benefits. In order to evaluate potential health benefits of organic foods, we used the well-characterized fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Fruit flies were raised on a diets consisting of extracts of either conventionally or organically raised produce (bananas, potatoes, raisins, soy beans. Flies were then subjected to a variety of tests designed to assess overall fly health. Flies raised on diets made from organically grown produce had greater fertility and longevity. On certain food sources, greater activity and greater stress resistance was additionally observed, suggesting that organic food bestows positive effects on fly health. Our data show that Drosophila can be used as a convenient model system to experimentally test potential health effects of dietary components. Using this system, we provide evidence that organically raised food may provide animals with tangible benefits to overall health.

  2. Food Value of Mealworm Grown on Acrocomia aculeata Pulp Flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Ariana Vieira; Sanjinez-Argandoña, Eliana Janet; Linzmeier, Adelita Maria; Cardoso, Claudia Andrea Lima; Macedo, Maria Lígia Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Insects have played an important role as human food throughout history, especially in Africa, Asia and Latin America. A good example of edible insects is the mealworm, Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus, 1758 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae), which are eaten in Africa, Asia, the Americas and Australia. This species is easily bred in captivity, requiring simple management. The bocaiuva (Acrocomia aculeata (Jacq.) Lodd) is an abundant palm tree found in the Brazilian Cerrado, providing fruits with high nutritional value. The aim of this work was to determine the chemical composition of T. molitor grown in different artificial diets with bocaiuva pulp flour. The nutritional composition, fatty acid composition, antioxidant activity, trypsin activity and anti-nutritional factors of larvae were analyzed. The results showed that mealworms grown on artificial diet with bocaiuva are a good source of protein (44.83%) and lipid (40.45%), with significant levels of unsaturated fatty acids (65.99%), antioxidant activity (4.5 μM Trolox/g of oil extracted from larvae) and absence of anti-nutritional factors. This study indicates a new source of biomass for growing mealworms and shows that it is possible to breed mealworms in artificial diet with bocaiuva flour without compromising the nutritional quality of the larvae.

  3. Mechanoresponses of human primary osteoblasts grown on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroustalli, A; Kotsikoris, V; Karamitri, A; Topouzis, S; Deligianni, D

    2015-03-01

    Bone mechanotransduction is strongly influenced by the biomaterial properties. A good understanding of these mechanosensory mechanisms in bone has the potential to provide new strategies in the highly evolving field of bone tissue engineering. The aim of the present investigation was to study the interactive effects of local mechanical stimuli on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/osteoblast interface, using an in vitro model that allows the study of cell growth, attachment and differentiation. Strain was applied at physiological levels [strain magnitudes 500 microstrain (μɛ), at frequency of load application 0.5 Hz]. The effect of mechanical strain and substrate was thus studied by measuring the messenger RNA expression of alkaline phosphatase, vinculin, collagen 1A, and integrins β1, β3, α4, and αv, using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The osteoblasts grown on MWCNTs displayed quick adaptation to the new environment by modulating the expression of key adhesion integrins. Furthermore, the addition of mechanical strain interplayed with the extracellular matrix and was efficiently transduced by cells grown on MWCNTs, providing stronger adhesion and survival. MWCNTs are therefore a material perfectly compatible with osteoblast differentiation, adhesion, and growth, and should be further evaluated, to derive new-generation biomaterial scaffolds for the treatment of skeletal defects which require bone reconstruction.

  4. A clash of human resource management cultures : a micro-state case study

    OpenAIRE

    Baldacchino, Godfrey

    1997-01-01

    When resorting to Greek divine mythology to purchase original insights on management styles, Handy (1991) identifies Apollo and Dionysius as representative of two ideal types which can be developed and fine-tuned to highlight one relatively under explored area of inter-cultural human resource management. This concerns the cultural interface between alien, imported management styles and local, home-grown practices in the context of small and island states. This paper argues that indigenous b...

  5. Production of Normal Mammalian Organ Culture Using a Medium Containing Mem-Alpha, Leibovitz L 15, Glucose Galactose Fructose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under micro- gravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel. The medium used for culturing the cells, especially a mixture of epithelial and mesenchymal cells contains a mixture of Mem-alpha and Leibovits L15 supplemented with glucose, galactose and fructose.

  6. Influence of ultrasound on sorbitol release by Zymomonas mobilis grown on high sucrose concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio de Barros

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This work investigated the effect of applying low intensity ultrasound on sorbitol release by Z.mobilis cultures grown on 200 g/L sucrose medium up to 48 h. The best sorbitol production was 36.09 g/L in 36 h culture. Ultrasound irradiation did not alter the sorbitol values detected after disrupting the cells with 20 minutes treatment.A bactéria Zymomonas mobilis produtora de etanol, produz também vários subprodutos quando crescida em meio de sacarose, entre esses o sorbitol. O sorbitol é produzido pela enzima glicose-frutose oxidorredutase (GFOR presente no periplasma da bactéria, a função fisiológica da enzima é estabelecer a regulação do equilíbrio osmótico, quando a célula é crescida em meio com altas concentrações de açucares. A enzima produz sorbitol e este é acumulado, como um soluto compatível à alta concentração de açúcar fora da célula. Este trabalho investigou efeito da aplicação de ultra-som de baixa intensidade na liberação de sorbitol de células de Zymomonas mobilis crescida em meio com sacarose a 200 g/L até 48 h de fermentação. A melhor produção de sorbitol foi de 36,09 g/L em 36 h de cultivo. A irradiação ultra-sônica não alterou os valores de sorbitol detectados e o ultra-som levou ao rompimento das células após 20 min de tratamento.

  7. Cultural Activation of Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Carole E; Reid-Rose, Lenora; Joseph, Adriana M; Hernandez, Jennifer C; Haugland, Gary

    2016-02-01

    This column discusses "cultural activation," defined as a consumer's recognition of the importance of providing cultural information to providers about cultural affiliations, challenges, views about, and attitudes toward behavioral health and general medical health care, as well as the consumer's confidence in his or her ability to provide this information. An aid to activation, "Cultural Activation Prompts," and a scale that measures a consumer's level of activation, the Cultural Activation Measurement Scale, are described. Suggestions are made about ways to introduce cultural activation as a component of usual care.

  8. On value and culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Value stands for the significance of things,and concepts of value are ideas,opinions and attitudes about what kind of things are significant.Studies on the concept of value cannot be separated from culture.Every society has its own distinct culture and concept of value shared by its people.The relationship between concept of value and culture shows that the building of the concept of value must be based on culture.Developing culture,providing excellent products of culture and better humanitarian environment are the premise for people's possession of the correct concept of value.

  9. Culture Wars in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2016-01-01

    In the 1960s high and low culture were brought into sharp conflict i Denmark. In 1961 a Ministry of Culture was established for the first time. The first minister of culture, the social democrat Julius Bomholt, saw art and culture as an important part of education for democracy that should be mad...... available to everyone. The general public, however, raised demands for more popular and relaxing entertainment. The confrontation between the cultural elite and popular opinion escalated to a series of veritable culture wars....

  10. Developing Cultural Awareness

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims at emphasizing the issue of teaching of culture in foreign language teaching.  In this respect, the reasons of teaching culture in foreign language classes are focused on initially.  So, the justifications of teaching culture are considered and explained and by the help of a dialogue.  Right after this, ways of developing cultural awareness is taken into account.  At this step, types of courses to develop cultural awareness are dealt with.  Developing cultural awareness in cla...

  11. Cultural Exchange Strengthens Ties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Year of Chinese Culture in Australia is poised to cement bonds between the Chinese and Australians As the Year of Australian Culture in China drew to a close in June,the Year of Chinese Culture in Australia,titled Experience China,came ons tage to showcase the rich variety of China’s traditional and contemporary culture to the Australians.The opening ceremony of the event was held on June 24 at the Sydney State Theater.It featured famous Chinese dancer Yang Liping’s original dance drama The Legend of Shangri-La.The Year of Chinese Culture in Australiais by far the largest Chinese cultural festival

  12. Updating cultural capital theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prieur, Annick; Savage, Mike

    2011-01-01

    of ‘‘highbrow’’ culture, cultural oppositions can nonetheless readily be detected. We point to nine oppositions, mostly shared between the nations. Three tensions between (a) participation and non-participation in cultural activities; (b) knowledge and ignorance in cultural issues (such as for music, literature...... than absolute terms, and that a field analytic perspective provides the means of understanding cultural capital as such a relative entity. Second, the move from the empirical observation of oppositions to the conceptualisation of cultural capital also demands that the functioning of features...

  13. Nga Manu Korero: Revitalizing Communication, Customs and Cultural Competencies amongst Maori Students, Teachers, Whanau and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinirau, Rawiri; Gillies, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    The Nga Manu Speech Contest has grown to be one of the biggest and most positive events for New Zealand secondary school students where competitors articulate their thoughts and aspirations in both Maori and English. The contest is acknowledged as an avenue that enhances language and cultural development amongst Maori youth, yet no formal…

  14. Effects of plants and essential oils on ruminal in vitro batch culture methane production and fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, plants (14) and essential oils (EO; 88) from plants that are naturalized to, or can be successfully grown in North America were evaluated in a batch culture in vitro screening experiments with ruminal fluid as potential anti-methanogenic additives for ruminant diets. Essential oils we...

  15. Ribosome-inhibiting proteins from in vitro cultures of Phytolacca dodecandra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S.; Hansen, Harald S.; Nyman, U.

    1991-01-01

    Phytolacca dodecandra (L'Herit) grown in cell cultures was investigated for content of ribosome-inhibiting proteins, which was evaluated hy measuring inhibition of protein synthesis in a cell-free rat liver extract. Calli initiated from leaf, cotyledon, radicle, and hypocotyl and suspension cells...

  16. Fibronectin in cultured rat keratinocytes: distribution, synthesis, and relationship to cytoskeletal proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibson, W T; Couchman, J R; Badley, R A;

    1983-01-01

    immunofluorescence staining of cultures grown in the absence of a feeder layer using an antiserum which had been cross-adsorbed with foetal calf serum proteins to remove antibodies which recognised serum fibronectin. The distribution of fibronectin in areas of cell-cell and cell-substratum contact...

  17. Socio-Cultural Adaptation, Academic Adaptation and Satisfaction of International Higher Degree Research Students in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Baohua; Wright, Ewan

    2016-01-01

    The number of international higher degree research students has grown at a significant rate in recent years, with Australia becoming a hub for attracting such students from around the world. However, research has identified that international higher degree research students often encounter a wide range of academic and socio-cultural challenges in…

  18. Resurrecting Class : Class voting and cultural voting in postwar western societies (1956-1990)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.H.J. Achterberg (Peter); D. Houtman (Dick); J. van der Waal (Jeroen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBy means of a re-analysis of the most relevant data source - the international social mobility and politics file - this paper criticizes the newly grown consensus in political sociology that class voting has declined since World War II. An increase of crosscutting cultural voting, rooted

  19. Self-Determination, the Right to Die, and Culture: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Self-determination is a primary ethical principle underlying social work practice in health care settings. Since the 1970s, a right-to-die movement that shares the social work commitment to self-determination has grown and influences end-of-life care decisions. However, the role of culture is notably absent in discussions of the right to die. A…

  20. Label-free optical detection of cells grown in 3D silicon microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Sabina; Carpignano, Francesca; Silva, Gloria; Aredia, Francesca; Scovassi, A Ivana; Mazzini, Giuliano; Surdo, Salvatore; Barillaro, Giuseppe

    2013-08-21

    We demonstrate high aspect-ratio photonic crystals that could serve as three-dimensional (3D) microincubators for cell culture and also provide label-free optical detection of the cells. The investigated microstructures, fabricated by electrochemical micromachining of standard silicon wafers, consist of periodic arrays of silicon walls separated by narrow deeply etched air-gaps (50 μm high and 5 μm wide) and feature the typical spectral properties of photonic crystals in the wavelength range 1.0-1.7 μm: their spectral reflectivity is characterized by wavelength regions where reflectivity is high (photonic bandgaps), separated by narrow wavelength regions where reflectivity is very low. In this work, we show that the presence of cells, grown inside the gaps, strongly affects light propagation across the photonic crystal and, therefore, its spectral reflectivity. Exploiting a label-free optical detection method, based on a fiberoptic setup, we are able to probe the extension of cells adherent to the vertical silicon walls with a non-invasive direct testing. In particular, the intensity ratio at two wavelengths is the experimental parameter that can be well correlated to the cell spreading on the silicon wall inside the gaps.

  1. Production and characterization of cyanocobalamin-enriched lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) grown using hydroponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bito, Tomohiro; Ohishi, Noriharu; Hatanaka, Yuka; Takenaka, Shigeo; Nishihara, Eiji; Yabuta, Yukinori; Watanabe, Fumio

    2013-04-24

    When lettuces (Lactuca sativa L.) grown for 30 days in hydroponic culture were treated with various concentrations of cyanocobalamin for 24 h, its content in their leaves increased significantly from nondetectable to 164.6 ± 74.7 ng/g fresh weight. This finding indicated that consumption of only two or three of these fresh leaves is sufficient to meet the Recommended Dietary Allowance for adults of 2.4 μg/day. Analyses using a cobalamin-dependent Escherichia coli 215 bioautogram and LC/ESI-MS/MS demonstrated that the cyanocobalamin absorbed from the nutrient solutions by the leaves did not alter any other compounds such as coenzymes and inactive corrinoids. Gel filtration indicated that most (86%) of the cyanocobalamin in the leaves was recovered in the free cyanocobalamin fractions. These results indicated that cyanocobalamin-enriched lettuce leaves would be an excellent source of free cyanocobalamin, particularly for strict vegetarians or elderly people with food-bound cobalamin malabsorption.

  2. Holocellulase activity from Schizophyllum commune grown on bamboo: a comparison with different substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda Valencia, Jorge William; Valencia Jiménez, Arnubio; Gonçalves de Siqueira, Félix; Dussan Medina, Kelly; Restrepo Franco, Gloria M; Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes Ferreira; Siegfried, Blair D; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fatima

    2011-12-01

    The natural biodiversity that is found in tropical areas offers countless biotechnological opportunities; especially if we take in account that many biomolecules from several microorganisms have supported for many years, different industrial applications in areas such as pharmacology, agro-industry, bioprocess, environmental technology, and bioconversion. In order to find new lignocellulolytic enzymes and evaluate bamboo fibers as substrate, Schizophyllum commune a fungus with broad distribution was isolated and grown during 15 days in liquid culture medium containing 1% lignocellulosic fibers from bamboo, banana stem, and sugarcane bagasse. The enzymatic activity of xylanase, mannanase, polygalacturonase, CMCase, FPase, and avicelase were evaluated. Sugarcane bagasse and banana stem showed to induce higher hollocellulase activity when compared with bamboo as the main carbon source. The physical mechanism that the fungus uses to degrade bamboo was observed not only in fibers naturally infected but also in healthy fibers that were treated and untreated with enzyme solution. SEM analysis showed the structural disruption and invasion of the vascular bundles, parenchyma cells, and parenchymatous tissues as a consequence of the presence of this fungus and the catalytic action of its enzymes into the plant tissue.

  3. Proteome of Salmonella enterica serotype Tyhimurium Grown in Low Mg2+/pH Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Ansong, Charles; Smallwood, Heather S.; Rommereim, Leah M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Gustin, Jean K.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2009-09-04

    To determine the impact of a low Mg2+/pH defined growth medium (MgM) on the proteome of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, we cultured S. Typhimurium cells in the medium under two different conditions termed MgM Shock and MgM Dilution and then comparatively analyzed the bacterial cells harvested from these conditions by a global proteomic approach. Proteomic results showed that MgM Shock and MgM Dilution differentially affected the S. Typhimurium proteome. MgM Shock induced a group of proteins whose induction usually occurred at low O2 level, while MgM Dilution induced those related to the type III secretion system (T3SS) of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) and those involved in thiamine or biotin biosynthesis. The metabolic state of the S. Typhimurium cells grown under MgM Shock condition also differed significantly from that under MgM Dilution condition. Western blot analysis not only confirmed the proteomic results, but also showed that the abundances of SPI2-T3SS proteins SsaQ and SseE and biotin biosynthesis proteins BioB and BioD increased after S. Typhimurium infection of RAW 264.7 macrophages. Deletion of the gene encoding BioB reduced the bacterial ability to replicate inside the macrophages, suggesting a biotin-limited environment encountered by S. Typhimurium within RAW 264.7 macrophages.

  4. Phenolic Concentrations and Antioxidant Properties of Wines Made from North American Grapes Grown in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of wine phenolics found in several North American and (for comparison European grape cultivars grown in China were analyzed. This was done to find non-Vitis vinifera wines with prominent features in order to diversify the kinds of wines. The phenolic richness and antioxidant activity decreased in the order: red > rose > white wines. In the red wines, the American grape ‘Cynthiana’ had the highest total concentrations of phenols, anthocyanins, flavonols and phenolic acids, as well as antioxidant capacity, followed by the French hybrid ‘Chambourcin’, the lowest were detected in two European grape varieties, ‘Merlot’ and ‘Cabernet Sauvignon’, while the total flavon-3-ols levels were reversed among these red grape cultivars. The highest concentration of stilbenes out of all the wines analyzed was found in the ‘Merlot’ variety. There were significant differences among wine phenolic compositions between North American and European grape cultivars. The antioxidant activities were significantly related to the concentrations of total phenols (r2 = 0.996, anthocyanins (r2 = 0.984, flavonols (r2 = 0.850 and gallic acid (r2 = 0.797. The prominent features of wine aroma and nutrition could make the American grape wines attractive to consumers. It is therefore necessary to perform further research on cultural practices and wine making involving these grapes.

  5. A Synchrotron FTIR Microspectroscopy Investigation of Fungal Hyphae Grown under Optimal and Stressed Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeghalmi,A.; Kaminskyj, S.; Gough, K.

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron FTIR can provide high spatial resolution (<10 {mu}m pixel size) in situ biochemical analyses of intact biotissues, an area of increasing importance in the post-genomic era, as gene functions and gene networks are coming under direct scrutiny. With this technique, we can simultaneously assess multiple aspects of cell biochemistry and cytoplasmic composition. In this paper, we report the first results of our synchrotron FTIR examination of hyphae of three important fungal model systems, each with sequenced genomes and a wealth of research: Aspergillus, Neurospora, and Rhizopus. We have analyzed the FTIR maps of Aspergillus nidulans cells containing the hypA1 allele, a well-characterized single-gene temperature-sensitive morphogenetic mutation. The hypA1 cells resemble wildtype at 28 {sup o}C but have growth defects at 42 {sup o}C. We have also investigated Neurospora and Rhizopus cultures grown in media with optimal or elevated pH. Significant differences between the spectra of the three fungi are likely related to differences in composition and structure. In addition, high spatial resolution synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy provides an outstanding method for monitoring subtle subcellular changes that accompany environmental stress.

  6. Comparative study of lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidants from in vivo and in vitro grown Coriandrum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Maria Inês; Barros, Lillian; Sousa, Maria João; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2011-06-01

    Coriander is commonly used for medicinal purposes, food applications, cosmetics and perfumes. Herein, the production of antioxidants in vegetative parts (leaves and stems) of in vivo and in vitro grown samples was compared. In vitro samples were clone A- with notorious purple pigmentation in stems and leaves and clone B- green. Seeds were also studied as they are used to obtain in vivo and in vitro vegetative parts. Lipophilic (tocopherols, carotenoids and chlorophylls) and hydrophilic (sugars, ascorbic acid, phenolics, flavonols and anthocyanins) compounds were quantified. The antioxidant activity was evaluated by radical scavenging activity, reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition. The in vivo sample showed the highest antioxidant activity mainly due to its highest levels of hydrophilic compounds. Otherwise, in vitro samples, mainly clone A, gave the highest concentration in lipophilic compounds but a different profile when compared to the in vivo sample. Clones A and B revealed a lack of β-carotene, β- and δ-tocopherols, a decrease in α-tocopherol, and an increase in γ-tocopherol and clorophylls in comparison to the in vivo sample. In vitro culture might be useful to explore the plants potentialities for industrial applications, controlling environmental conditions to produce higher amounts of some bioactive products.

  7. Neocartilage formation from mesenchymal stem cells grown in type II collagen-hyaluronan composite scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsi-Yi; Lin, Ting-Yu; Lin, Chen-Huan; Yen, B Linju; Tsai, Ching-Lin; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) collagen type II-hyaluronan (HA) composite scaffolds (CII-HA) which mimics the extracellular environment of natural cartilage were fabricated in this study. Rheological measurements demonstrated that the incorporation of HA increased the compression modulus of the scaffolds. An initial in vitro evaluation showed that scaffolds seeded with porcine chondrocytes formed cartilaginous-like tissue after 8 weeks, and HA functioned to promote the growth of chondrocytes into scaffolds. Placenta-derived multipotent cells (PDMC) and gingival fibroblasts (GF) were seeded on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), CII-HA films, and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) sheets for comparing their chondrogenesis differentiation potentials with those of adipose-derived adult stem cells (ADAS) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC). Among different cells, PDMC showed the greatest chondrogenic differentiation potential on both CII-HA films and SIS sheets upon TGF-β3 induction, followed by GF. This was evidenced by the up-regulation of chondrogenic genes (Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type II), which was not observed for cells grown on TCPS. This finding suggested the essential role of substrate materials in the chondrogenic differentiation of PDMC and GF. Neocartilage formation was more obvious in both PDMC and GF cells plated on CII-HA composite scaffolds vs. 8-layer SIS at 28 days in vitro. Finally, implantation of PDMC/CII-HA constructs into NOD-SCID mice confirmed the formation of tissue-engineered cartilage in vivo.

  8. Cultural Dyphemisms in the Turkish Culture Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhami Durmuş

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Turkish steppe culture constituted a typical structure with regard to its creation and development. It emerged from steppe geography. The geography affected social, politic, economical, military and religious structure of the society substantially. The Turkish culture was shaped up under these influences. The agents of the culture appeared as a shepherd generally. Shepherding provided a basic to the animal husbandry. The shepherds headed to search the fertile grass. Shepherding obliged people to became seminomadic. Thus the life continued in a manner of searching new pastures and shuttling between plateau and winter quarters . The horse that is one of the important ingredient of the culture provided mobility and speed to the culture. In social, politic, and military life of society the horse came into prominence. The nomadic houses or the cars contributed to Turks’ life very much. These nomad houses were shelter at the nights and cold days for them. Going from the plateau to winter quarters and from pasture to another pasture was made easy thanks to these. The finding which took out from graves reflects to all features of the culture.The ruins of nomad houses and horses were arised from the graves . These support the informations which was given in the written sources. Among the findings, there were also The animal struggle scenes which reflect art concept of theseminomadism between tomb finds. This art concept named as turkish animal style. It’s tried to determine The scope of the Turkish culture by emphasizing steppe, shepherding, semi-nomadism, horse, nomad house, tomb. It is also emphasized that aforementioned notions can be used for Turkish culture. Thus, cultural dysphemisms in the turkish culture based on that idea.

  9. Serum-free culture of H pylori intensifies cytotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki Ohno; Akiyuki Murano

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To perform a long culture passage of H pylori without serum, taking into account its cytotoxicity and the presence of the probable new cytotoxic factor.METHODS: One sample of H pylori 60190 (ATCC49503) was grown on Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) agar containing 0.5% 2,6-di-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin without any serum, being passaged 70-100 times every 3-4 d for approximately 2 h, while another sample of H pylori contained 70 mL/L fetal calf serum without 2,6-di-Omethyl-β-cyclodextrin. Their supernatant and extract after 16 h in culture were evaluated for changes in cell morphology and for cell viability using HeLa cells. Furthermore, the characteristics of the probable cytotoxic factor in the extract were examined on partial purification studies and its cytotoxicity was evaluated in various human cells.RESULTS: The supernatant and the extract of the bacterium grown on serum-free medium had strong cytotoxicity compared with those grown on serumcontaining medium. They irreversibly damaged HeLa cells without vacuolation that was altogether different from that of the bacterium when grown with serum.Their cytotoxicity was easily measured by cell viability assay. The probable cytotoxic factor partially purified and detected by chromatography had characteristics difference from that of vacuolating toxin and a broad cytotoxicity toward various cell lines.CONCLUSION: Serum-free long culture method of H pylori makes its supematant and its extract cytotoxic enough to be easily measured by cell viability assay. The probable cytotoxic factor has a unique characteristic and might be a new cytotoxin.

  10. Characterization of free nitrogen fixing bacteria of the genus Azotobacter in organic vegetable-grown Colombian soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Javier Jiménez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose of isolating and characterizing free nitrogen fixing bacteria (FNFB of the genus Azotobacter, soil samples were collected randomly from different vegetable organic cultures with neutral pH in different zones of Boyacá-Colombia. Isolations were done in selective free nitrogen Ashby-Sucrose agar obtaining a recovery of 40%. Twenty four isolates were evaluated for colony and cellular morphology, pigment production and metabolic activities. Molecular characterization was carried out using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA. After digestion of 16S rDNA Y1-Y3 PCR products (1487pb with AluI, HpaII and RsaI endonucleases, a polymorphism of 16% was obtained. Cluster analysis showed three main groups based on DNA fingerprints. Comparison between ribotypes generated by isolates and in silico restriction of 16S rDNA partial sequences with same restriction enzymes was done with Gen Workbench v.2.2.4 software. Nevertheless, Y1-Y2 PCR products were analysed using BLASTn. Isolate C5T from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum grown soils presented the same in silico restriction patterns with A. chroococcum (AY353708 and 99% of similarity with the same sequence. Isolate C5CO from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis grown soils showed black pigmentation in Ashby-Benzoate agar and high similarity (91% with A. nigricans (AB175651 sequence. In this work we demonstrated the utility of molecular techniques and bioinformatics tools as a support to conventional techniques in characterization of the genus Azotobacter from vegetable-grown soils.

  11. Growth and development of rabbit oocytes in vitro: effect of fetal bovine serum concentration on culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, H; Kida, Y; Miyamoto, Y; Kitada, K; Matsumoto, K; Saeki, K; Taniguchi, T; Hosoi, Y

    2012-09-15

    The objective was to develop a culture system that produced blastocyst stage embryos from rabbit oocytes grown in vitro. Two experiments were performed. First, various concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS, 0, 0.05, 0.5 and 5%) were used in the culture medium for in vitro growth (IVG) of oocytes recovered from follicles 200 to 299 μm in diameter. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was performed on mature oocytes obtained after IVG for 8 days and in vitro maturation for 14 to 16 h. Rates of survival and pronuclear formation after ICSI were higher for oocytes grown in a medium with 0.05% FBS compared to oocytes grown in a medium lacking FBS (97.6 vs. 76.9%, 97.5 vs. 70%, P cultured in 0.05% FBS, oxygen consumption and the number of cells were analyzed. Blastocysts from oocytes grown in vitro with 0.05% FBS had reduced oxygen consumption and number of cells compared with those from ovulated oocytes (21.66 ± 4.54 × 10(14) vs. 50.19 ± 4.61 × 10(14) mol/sec, 244 ± 25 vs. 398 ± 24, P vitro with 0.05% FBS achieved pregnancy, but pregnancies were not maintained to term. In conclusion, the addition of 0.05% FBS to the culture medium for IVG improved developmental competence of rabbit oocytes grown in vitro.

  12. CULTURE, CULTURE LEARNING AND NEW TECHNOLOGIES: TOWARDS A PEDAGOGICAL FRAMEWORK

    OpenAIRE

    Mike Levy

    2007-01-01

    This paper seeks to improve approaches to the learning and teaching of culture using new technologies by relating the key qualities and dimensions of the culture concept to elements within a pedagogical framework. In Part One, five facets of the culture concept are developed: culture as elemental; culture as relative; culture as group membership; culture as contested; and culture as individual (variable and multiple). Each perspective aims to provide a focus for thinking about culture, and th...

  13. Characteristics of Preferentially Attached Network Grown from Small World

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seungyoung

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a model for a preferentially attached network which has grown from a small world network. Here, the average path length and the clustering coefficient are estimated, and the topological properties of modeled networks are compared as the initial conditions are changed. As a result, it is shown that the topological properties of the initial network remain even after the network growth. However, the vulnerability of each to preferentially attached nodes being added is not the same. It is found that the average path length rapidly decreases as the ratio of preferentially attached nodes increases and that the characteristics of the initial network can be easily disappeared. On the other hand, the clustering coefficient of the initial network slowly decreases with the ratio of preferentially attached nodes and its clustering characteristic remains much longer.

  14. Carbon nanotubes grown on bulk materials and methods for fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchhofer, Paul A.; Montgomery, Frederick C.; Baker, Frederick S.

    2011-11-08

    Disclosed are structures formed as bulk support media having carbon nanotubes formed therewith. The bulk support media may comprise fibers or particles and the fibers or particles may be formed from such materials as quartz, carbon, or activated carbon. Metal catalyst species are formed adjacent the surfaces of the bulk support material, and carbon nanotubes are grown adjacent the surfaces of the metal catalyst species. Methods employ metal salt solutions that may comprise iron salts such as iron chloride, aluminum salts such as aluminum chloride, or nickel salts such as nickel chloride. Carbon nanotubes may be separated from the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species by using concentrated acids to oxidize the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species.

  15. Grown Up Congenital Heart Diseases (GUCH: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajmer Singh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The survival of children with congenital heart disease into adulthood has increased. These patients may require primary cardiac surgical repair, repair after prior palliation, revision of repair for residual lesion, or non-cardiac surgery. Preoperative cardiac evaluation consists of review of laboratory data, echocardiography, cardiac MRI, CT, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, arrhythmia monitoring, and cardiac catheterization. Perioperative complications are more frequently seen in high-risk patients i.e. those with pulmonary hypertension, cyanosis, heart failure, and poor general health. Guidelines for the management of patients with grown up congenital heart (GUCH diseases suggest that such patients are best treated in dedicated tertiary care centres by a multidisciplinary team, knowledgeable about the anatomy and pathophysiology of the lesion.

  16. Photoluminescence of ingaas/inp grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmand Jean Christophe

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoluminescence (PL measurements due to temperature and excitation power were carried out in as function of sample containing a In0,53Ga0,47. As layer, grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy on an InP substrate. The origins of the several luminescence processes observed at low temperature were determined by studying their different behaviors with increasing temperature and excitation power and by comparing the results with the data found in the literature. The following transitions have been identified: one transition involving localized excitons and two transitions involving acceptor impurities. A review of the main works published in the literature related to the optical transitions observed at low temperature in InGaAs/InP is also presented.

  17. Nitrides optoelectronic devices grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauer, M.; Bousquet, V.; Hooper, S.E.; Barnes, J.M.; Windle, J.; Tan, W.S.; Heffernan, J. [Sharp Laboratories of Europe, Edmund Halley Road, Oxford Science Park, Oxford OX4 4GB (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-15

    We report on the characteristics of our recent room temperature continuous-wave InGaN quantum well laser diodes grown by by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Uncoated ridge waveguide lasers fabricated on freestanding GaN substrates have a continuous-wave (cw) threshold current of 110 mA, corresponding to a threshold current density of 5.5 kA cm{sup -2}. We report on our steps taken to reduce threshold voltage to 7 V. Lasers with uncoated facets have a maximum cw output power of 14 mW and a cw characteristic temperature T{sub 0} of 123 K. Cw laser lifetime vs. power dissipation data is presented, with a maximum lifetime of 2.6 hours for the best laser. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Transport properties of polymer-vapour grown carbon fibre composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeyev, S. A.; Macedo, F. J.; Ferreira, J. A.; van Hattum, F. W. J.; Bernardo, C. A.

    2000-04-01

    DC electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of polypropylene (PP) filled with vapour grown carbon fibre (VGCF) was studied. This was done for a wide range of fibre content and compared to systems produced under the same conditions in which a conventional carbon fibre was used as filler. The composites studied exhibit characteristic percolating behaviour. Because of the low degree of graphite perfection in the VGCF used in this work, the fraction of VGCF required to achieve percolation was higher than expected. Non-linear I- V characteristics and time dependent electrical resistivity effects are only observed in PP filled with VGCF. Several mechanisms must be called upon to explain the observed electrical behaviour of the PP/VGCF composite. The thermal conductivity of the composites is in agreement with the effective medium theories.

  19. Stress determination in thermally grown alumina scales using ruby luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renusch, D.; Veal, B.W.; Koshelev, I.; Natesan, K.; Grimsditch [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hou, P.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    By exploiting the strain dependence of the ruby luminescence line, we have measured the strain in alumina scales thermally grown on Fe-Cr- Al alloys. Results are compared and found to be reasonably consistent with strains determined using x rays. Oxidation studies were carried out on alloys Fe - 5Cr - 28Al and Fe - 18Cr - 10Al (at.%). Significantly different levels of strain buildup were observed in scales on these alloys. Results on similar alloys containing a ``reactive element`` (Zr or Hf) in dilute quantity are also presented. Scales on alloys containing a reactive element (RE) can support significantly higher strains than scales on RE-free alloys. With the luminescence technique, strain relief associated with spallation thresholds is readily observed.

  20. Sustainability and economic evaluation of microalgae grown in brewery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Teresa M; Mendes, Adélio M; Caetano, Nídia S; Martins, António A

    2014-09-01

    This article evaluates the sustainability and economic potential of microalgae grown in brewery wastewater for biodiesel and biomass production. Three sustainability and two economic indicators were considered in the evaluation within a life cycle perspective. For the production system the most efficient process units were selected. Results show that harvesting and oil separation are the main process bottlenecks. Microalgae with higher lipid content and productivity are desirable for biodiesel production, although comparable to other biofuel's feedstock concerning sustainability. However, improvements are still needed to reach the performance level of fossil diesel. Profitability reaches a limit for larger cultivation areas, being higher when extracted biomass is sold together with microalgae oil, in which case the influence of lipid content and areal productivity is smaller. The values of oil and/or biomass prices calculated to ensure that the process is economically sound are still very high compared with other fuel options, especially biodiesel.

  1. Anisotropic magnetothermopower in ferromagnetic thin films grown on macroscopic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayathilaka, P.B. [Department of Physical Sciences, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Mihintale (Sri Lanka); Belyea, D.D. [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Fawcett, T.J. [College of Engineering, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Miller, Casey W. [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, 85 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We report observing the anisotropic magnetothermopower in a variety of ferromagnetic thin films grown on macroscopic substrates. These measurements were enabled by eliminating spurious signals related to the Anomalous Nernst Effect by butt-mounting the sample to the heat source and sink, and appropriate positioning of electrical contacts to avoid unwanted thermal gradients. This protocol enabled detailed measurements of the magnetothermopower in the transverse and longitudinal configurations. This may enable Spin Seebeck Effect studies in the in-plane geometry. - Highlights: • Unintentional thermal gradients along surface normal mitigated via butt-mounting. • Longitudinal/transverse magnetothermopower measured on many systems. • Anomalous Nernst Effect reduced. • Importance of magnetic anisotropy identified with angle-dependent measurements.

  2. InP Bulk Crystals Grown from Various Stoichiometric Melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    InP crystal was grown from stoichiometric or non-stoichiometric melt, including P-rich and In-rich condition by the P-injection synthesis LEC method. Owing to the non-stoichiometric condition, there are many pores in the tail of the P-rich ingot. Samples were characterized by high speed photoluminescence mapping and E.P.D. mapping. The perfection (dislocation, stoichiometry and uniformity) of these samples were studied and compared. The PL peak intensity standard deviation of the 4-inch InP wafer is higher. The EPDs around the pores are higher than the other regions. Besides the stress releasing, the pores and the high concentration of dislocations around them are the leading factors causing the inhomogeneity of the wafer. By adjusting the thermal field and ensuring the chemical stoichiometry, InP crystals of larger diameters and better performance can be developed.

  3. Plant tissue culture techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Rolf Dieter Illg

    1991-01-01

    Plant cell and tissue culture in a simple fashion refers to techniques which utilize either single plant cells, groups of unorganized cells (callus) or organized tissues or organs put in culture, under controlled sterile conditions.

  4. Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

  5. Rectal culture (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  6. Armenian Cultural Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Cultural Astronomy is the reflection of sky events in various fields of nations' culture. In foreign literature this field is also called "Astronomy in Culture" or "Astronomy and Culture". Cultural astronomy is the set of interdisciplinary fields studying the astronomical systems of current or ancient societies and cultures. It is manifested in Religion, Mythology, Folklore, Poetry, Art, Linguistics and other fields. In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to this sphere, particularly international organizations were established, conferences are held and journals are published. Armenia is also rich in cultural astronomy. The present paper focuses on Armenian archaeoastronomy and cultural astronomy, including many creations related to astronomical knowledge; calendars, rock art, mythology, etc. On the other hand, this subject is rather poorly developed in Armenia; there are only individual studies on various related issues (especially many studies related to Anania Shirakatsi) but not coordinated actions to manage this important field of investigation.

  7. Athletes’ careers across cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia

    in this symposium continue the initiated dialogue of the relevance of culture and cultural issues in their analyses of how social and cultural discourses shape career development and career transitions of athletes in different countries. Opening the foundations of sport psychological knowledge to culturally diverse......This symposium will introduce a project developed under the auspices of the International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) in an effort to inspire and support the development of culturally sensitive theoretical frameworks and research methodologies in career studies and career assistance services...... around the world. The cultural approach to the theory and practice of sport psychological research has been recently articulated in two edited books, Cultural Sport Psychology (Schinke & Hanrahan, 2009) and The Cultural Turn in Sport Psychology (Ryba, Schinke, & Tenenbaum, 2010). The presenters...

  8. Nordic cultural policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund, Peter

    2008-01-01

    A critical view on Nordic Cultural Policy 1961-2008 - Aims, measures, forms of organisation, state og national identity......A critical view on Nordic Cultural Policy 1961-2008 - Aims, measures, forms of organisation, state og national identity...

  9. Cultural changes in aerospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobl, Bill

    1991-01-01

    Cultural changes; people and jobs; examples of cultural changes required; advanced launch system (ALS) philosophy; ALS operability capabilities; and ALS operability in design are outlined. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs.

  10. Plant tissue culture techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Dieter Illg

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell and tissue culture in a simple fashion refers to techniques which utilize either single plant cells, groups of unorganized cells (callus or organized tissues or organs put in culture, under controlled sterile conditions.

  11. Cross-Cultural Nongeneralizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    1985-01-01

    This synthesis of the previous articles concludes that cultural considerations are important for effective evaluation practice. Culturally sensitive and situationally responsive evaluation practices can contribute to international understanding. (BS)

  12. Native Culture Issues in Cross-cultural Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万欣

    2012-01-01

      The bi-direction of cross-cultural communication determines culture teaching should include both target culture and native culture. Currently, however, mere emphasis of target culture with ignoring native culture has resulted in“two-skin”phenomenon and“aphasia of Chinese culture”. Therefore, this paper aims to underline native culture teaching, to explore proper techniques for native culture teaching, to achieve integration of target culture and native culture, to enhance students’expressive competence in native culture and finally to carry out effective cross-cultural communication.

  13. Glycoalkaloids in potato tubers grown under controlled environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitithamyong, A.; Vonelbe, J. H.; Wheeler, R. M.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1999-01-01

    Tuber content of alpha-solanine, alpha-chaconine, and total glycoalkaloids (TGA) was determined for the potato cultivars, Norland, Russet Burbank, and Denali grown under different environmental conditions in growth chambers. The lowest TGA concentrations (0.30 to 0.35 mg g-1 dry tissue) were found in the cv. Norland with 400 micromoles m-2 s-1 photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), 12 h day length, 16 C temperature, and 350 micromoles mol-1 carbon dioxide. The ratio of alpha-chaconine to alpha-solanine was close to 60:40 under all growing conditions, except that it was 50:50 under the low temperature of 12 C. Cultivars responded similarly to environmental conditions although TGA was about 20% greater in cv. Russet Burbank and about 30% greater in Denali compared to Norland. The largest changes in TGA occurred with changes in temperature. In comparison to 16 C, TGA were 40% greater at 12 C, 80% greater at 20 C, and 125% greater at 24 C (0.70 mg g-1 dry weight). The TGA concentration increased from 10 to 25% with an increase in light from 400 to 800 micromoles m-2 s-1 PPF for all three cultivars. TGA increased 20% with extension of the day length from 12 to 24 hr and also increased 20% when carbon dioxide was increased from 350 to 1000 micromoles mol-1. TGA concentrations were not influenced by changes in relative humidity from 50 to 80%. TGA concentrations decreased only slightly in harvests made from 9 to 21 weeks after planting. Variations in TGA among the different growing conditions and cultivars were below 20 mg/100 g fresh weight (approximately 1.0 mg g-1 dry weight) recognized as the upper concentration for food safety. However the results suggest that TGA should be considered when potatoes are grown at temperatures above 20 C.

  14. Epitaxially Grown Layered MFI–Bulk MFI Hybrid Zeolitic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Wun-gwi

    2012-11-27

    The synthesis of hybrid zeolitic materials with complex micropore-mesopore structures and morphologies is an expanding area of recent interest for a number of applications. Here we report a new type of hybrid zeolite material, composed of a layered zeolite material grown epitaxially on the surface of a bulk zeolite material. Specifically, layered (2-D) MFI sheets were grown on the surface of bulk MFI crystals of different sizes (300 nm and 10 μm), thereby resulting in a hybrid material containing a unique morphology of interconnected micropores (∼0.55 nm) and mesopores (∼3 nm). The structure and morphology of this material, referred to as a "bulk MFI-layered MFI" (BMLM) material, was elucidated by a combination of XRD, TEM, HRTEM, SEM, TGA, and N2 physisorption techniques. It is conclusively shown that epitaxial growth of the 2-D layered MFI sheets occurs in at least two principal crystallographic directions of the bulk MFI crystal and possibly in the third direction as well. The BMLM material combines the properties of bulk MFI (micropore network and mechanical support) and 2-D layered MFI (large surface roughness, external surface area, and mesoporosity). As an example of the uses of the BMLM material, it was incorporated into a polyimide and fabricated into a composite membrane with enhanced permeability for CO2 and good CO2/CH4 selectivity for gas separations. SEM-EDX imaging and composition analysis showed that the polyimide and the BMLM interpenetrate into each other, thereby forming a well-adhered polymer/particle microstructure, in contrast with the defective interfacial microstructure obtained using bare MFI particles. Analysis of the gas permeation data with the modified Maxwell model also allows the estimation of the effective volume of the BMLM particles, as well as the CO2 and CH4 gas permeabilities of the interpenetrated layer at the BMLM/polyimide interface. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  15. Metallic impurities in gallium nitride grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugo, S.A.; Krueger, J.; Kisielowski, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Transition metals are often encountered in trace amounts in semiconductors. They have been extensively studied in most elemental and compound systems, since they form deep donor and/or acceptor levels which usually degrade the electronic and optical material properties. Only very little is known about transition metals in recent III-V semiconducting materials, such as GaN, AlN and InN. These few studies have been done exclusively on Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) or Hybrid Vapor Phase Epitaxy HVPE-grown GaN. Preliminary x-ray fluorescence studies at the Advanced Light Source, beamline 10.3.1, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have revealed that GaN materials grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) have Fe, Ni and Cr as the dominant transition metal contaminants. This finding is commensurate with the extremely high concentrations of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen (up to 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}) measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Preliminary work using the mapping capabilities of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe revealed the metal impurities were inhomogeneously distributed over the film. Future work of this collaboration will be to find a correlation between the existence of transition metals in MBE films, as revealed by x-ray fluorescence, and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra taken in the infrared region. Also, the authors will make use of the 1 {mu}m spatial resolution of x-ray microprobe to locate the contaminants in relation to structural defects in the GaN films. Because of the large strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the GaN films and the substrates, the films grow in a columnar order with high densities of grain boundaries and dislocations. These structural defects offer preferential sites for metal precipitation or agglomeration which could degrade the optical properties of this material more so than if the impurities were left dissolved in the GaN.

  16. Observations on arbuscular mycorrhiza associated with important edible tuberous plants grown in wet evergreen forest in Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAJA RISHI

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Kumar R, Tapwal A, Pandey S, Rishi R, Borah D. 2013. Observations on arbuscular mycorrhiza associated with important edible tuberous plants grown in wet evergreen forest in Assam, India. Biodiversitas 14: 67-72. Non-timber forest products constitute an important source of livelihood for rural households from forest fringe communities across the world. Utilization of wild edible tuber plants is an integral component of their culture. Mycorrhizal associations influence the establishment and production of tuber plants under field conditions.The aim of present study is to explore the diversity and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AMF colonization of wild edible tuber plants grown in wet evergreen forest of Assam, India. A survey was conducted in 2009-10 in Sunaikuchi, Khulahat, and Bura Mayong reserved forest of Morigaon district of Assam to determine the AMF spore population in rhizosphere soils and root colonization of 14 tuberous edible plants belonging to five families. The results revealed AMF colonization of all selected species in all seasons. The percent colonization and spore count was less in summer, moderate in winter and highest in rainy season. Seventeen species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were recorded in four genera viz. Acaulospora (7 species, Glomus (5 species, Sclerocystis (3 species and Gigaspora (2 species.

  17. Heavy metal accumulation in different varieties of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown in soil amended with domestic sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamali, Muhammad K., E-mail: mkhanjamali@yahoo.com [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)] [Govt. Degree College Usta Muhammad, Balochistan (Pakistan); Kazi, Tasneem G., E-mail: tgkazi@yahoo.com [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Arain, Muhammad B., E-mail: bilal_KU2004@yahoo.com [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Afridi, Hassan I., E-mail: hassanimranafridi@yahoo.com [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Jalbani, Nusrat, E-mail: nusratjalbani_21@yahoo.com [PCSIR Laboratories Karachi (Pakistan); Kandhro, Ghulam A. [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Shah, Abdul Q., E-mail: aqshah07@yahoo.com [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Baig, Jameel A. [Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan)

    2009-05-30

    The concentrations of heavy metals (HMs) in plants served to indicate the metal contamination status of the site, and also revealed the abilities of various plant species to take up and accumulate them from the soil dressed with sewage sludge. A study to comprehend the mobility and transport of HMs from soil and soil amended with untreated sewage sludge to different newly breaded varieties of wheat (Anmol, TJ-83, Abadgar and Mehran-89) in Pakistan. A pot-culture experiment was conducted to study the transfer of HMs to wheat grains, grown in soil (control) and soil amended with sewage sludge (test samples). The total and ethylenediaminetetraaceticacid (EDTA)-extractable HMs in agricultural soil and soil amended with domestic sewage sludge (SDWS) and wheat grains were analysed by flame atomic absorption spectrometer/electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer, prior to microwave-assisted wet acid digestion method. The edible part of wheat plants (grains) from test samples presented high concentration of all HMs understudy (mg kg{sup -1}). Significant correlations were found between metals in exchangeable fractions of soil and SDWS, with total metals in control and test samples of wheat grains. The bio-concentration factors of all HMs were high in grains of two wheat varieties, TJ-83 and Mehran-89, as compared to other varieties, Anmol and Abadgar grown in the same agricultural plots.

  18. [Analysis of inorganic elements in hydroponic Taraxacum mongolicum grown under different spectrum combinations by ICP-AES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-li; Morewane, M B; Xue, Xu-zhang; Guo, Wen-zhong; Wang, Li-chun

    2015-02-01

    Dandelion (Taraxacum mongolicum) was hydroponically cultured in a completely enclosed plant factory, in which fluorescence and LED emitting spectra of different bands were used as the sole light source for plant growth. Effects of spectral component on the growth of dandelion were studied and the contents of ten inorganic elements such as K, P, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu and B in dandelion were analyzed by ICP-AES technology. The results showed that: (1) Under the condition of similar photosynthetic active radiation (PAR), single R or combined spectrums of FLRB were beneficial for biomass accumulation, while single B was the contrary; (2) Macroelements content ratio in Taraxacum mongolicum grown under FLwas K:Ca:P:Mg : Na=79.74:32.39:24.32:10.55:1.00, microelements content ratio was Fe:Mn:B:Zn:Cu = 9.28:9.71:3.82:2.08:1.00; (3) Red light (peak at 660 nm) could promote the absorptions of Ca, Fe, Mn, Zn, while absorption of Cu was not closely related to spectral conditions; (4) Thehighest accumulation of Ca, Na, Mn and Zn were obtained in aerial parts of Taraxacum mongolicum plants grown under pure red spectrum R, while the accumulation of the rest six elements reached the highest level under the mixed spectrum FLRB.

  19. Research on audit culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王仪

    2016-01-01

    It is the basis of promoting the scientific development of the audit business to strengthen the cultural construction of the audit staff, and also can improve the comprehensive quality of the audit staff. Aiming at the shortcomings of the current audit culture, this paper analyzes the reasons, and then puts forward some countermeasures for the construction of the audit culture, which is the goal of accelerating the construction of the audit culture and enhancing the strength of the audit team.

  20. Euphemism and Social Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Nan

    2008-01-01

    Euphemism,as a unique form in language expression,conveys a lot about the society and culture in which it exists.The study of euphemism is one method to understand the relation between language,society and culture.This paper analyzes the application of euphemism in social-cultural activities,studies the features of euphemisms in such application with the purpose to reveal connections between language and culture.

  1. Urine, faeces and culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quitzau, M.

    This article looks upon the importance of considering cultural aspects in relation to toilet technologies. It is outlined how culture theoretically can be seen as an integrated part of every day actions and technology.......This article looks upon the importance of considering cultural aspects in relation to toilet technologies. It is outlined how culture theoretically can be seen as an integrated part of every day actions and technology....

  2. Rupestrian culture in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Crescenzi, C

    2012-01-01

    Rupestrian culture in Italy. L'articolo descrive sinteticamente le aree di studio, di alcune regioni italiane interessate dal fenomeno dell’architettura rupestre, che sono state oggetto dei workshop realizzati nell'ambito del progetto di ricerca internazionale Cultural Rupestrian Heritage in the Circum-Mediterraneam Area-cinp. Programme Culture 2007-2013, Budget 2010, Strand 1.1 Multi-annual cooperation project, Strand 1.2.1- Cooperation measures. estrian culture in Italy

  3. Cultural Identity Through CLIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprescu Monica

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The CLIL approach is a modern manner of teaching English, which has been adapted in Romanian schools and universities. An interesting aspect of learning a foreign language is the contact with its culture/s and the changes it produces in terms of identity. Therefore, a challenging question to be answered is whether a CLIL approach focusing on culture influences students' cultural identity.

  4. Culture Differences and English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Language is a part of culture, and plays a very important role in the development of the culture. Some sociologists consider it as the keystone of culture. They believe, without language, culture would not be available. At the same time, language is influenced and shaped by culture, it reflects culture. Therefore, culture plays a very important…

  5. Cultur(ally) Jammed: Culture Jams as a Form of Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ulyssa

    2012-01-01

    Does the person become the name or does the name become the person? This question was asked by a participant of my culture jam entitled, "What's my name?" In this culture jam, I asked people to discern the name of a person based solely on their appearance and a list of possible names below their picture. This article aims to show how culture jams…

  6. Bio-Culturalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2007-01-01

    The article argues on the basis of analyses of successful films for children that not only cultural determinants but also innate determinats are important, and that film studies should combine cultural studies with cognitive theory, evolutionary theory and neuroscience, an approach that is called...... Bio-culturalism....

  7. Restoring Cultural Heritage Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Most of the post-quake cultural heritage rescue and protection projects in Sichuan have been completed The State Administration of Cultural Heritage recently rewarded 132 individuals and organizations for their work in rescuing and protecting cultural relics damaged by the Wenchuan earthquake on May12,2008.

  8. The Value of Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klamer, Arjo

    1997-01-01

    Culture manifests itself in everything human, including the ordinary business of everyday life. Culture and art have their own value, but economic values are also constrained. Art sponsorships and subsidies suggest a value that exceeds market price. So what is the real value of culture? Unlike the u

  9. Language, Perception, Culture & Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Man-li

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores the prospect of introducing language, perception, culture and communication. Starting with some definitions of language, perception, culture and communication, the paper argues for the internal connection among them. It pro⁃vides better understanding of these factors in foreign language learning and encourages learners to achieve the better learning re⁃sult to communicate effectively through language, culture etc.

  10. TESOL and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Dwight

    1999-01-01

    Looks at the question of how culture is understood in the Teaching English as a Second/Other-Language (TESOL) profession. Examines the perspectives toward culture implicitly or explicitly expressed in recent "TESOL Quarterly" articles, and concludes that different views of culture exist in the field. (Author/VWL)

  11. A Cultural Classroom Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Native American and other cultural stories provide students with a broader perspective on the world. In addition, cultural stories connect science content and knowledge about the world to cultural interpretations and people's life ways. By implementing the ideas suggested in this article, you can select books that both enrich your science library…

  12. Why Teach Visual Culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Kaye

    2007-01-01

    Visual culture is a hot topic in art education right now as some teachers are dedicated to teaching it and others are adamant that it has no place in a traditional art class. Visual culture, the author asserts, can include just about anything that is visually represented. Although people often think of visual culture as contemporary visuals such…

  13. Culture Difference and Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何冬兰

    2012-01-01

    Culture difference is necessary to be paid attention to during the process of translating.Culture difference is caused by different history,regions,customs,religions and the modes of thinking.Having the awareness of the culture difference will make translation more accurate and successful.

  14. Organizational culture, Anthropology of

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause-Jensen, Jakob; Wright, Susan

    2015-01-01

    cultures’ into transnational corporations and organizations concerned with international governance. In such organizations, anthropology graduates are increasingly employed as ‘cultural experts.’ We track the anthropological research on organizational culture and argue that the sensibilities and analytical...... skills acquired and the concepts developed through the ethnographic encounter gives anthropology a unique voice in the study of cultural matters in organizations....

  15. The University Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simplicio, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author discusses the role university culture can play on a campus and how it can impact policy and practice. The article explores how a university's history, values, and vision form its culture and how this culture in turn affects its stability and continuity. The article discusses how newcomers within the university are…

  16. Cultural Industries Bloom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZAN JIFANG

    2010-01-01

    @@ The market scale of China's cultural industries reached around 800 billion yuan($118 billion)in 2009,said a report on China's cultural industry development jointly released by a cultural research center under the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and the academy's Social Sciences Academic Press on May 6.

  17. Culture and Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琳

    2008-01-01

    @@ Ⅰ.What Is Culture In 1871,in his classic book Primitive Culture,British anthropologist Edward Tylor first gave the definition of culture which is widely quoted: "Culture…is that complex whole which includes knowledge,beliefs,arts,morals,law,custom and any other capacities and habits acquired by man as a member of society".

  18. Insect Cell Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, van M.M.; Lynn, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are widely used in studies on insect cell physiology, developmental biology and microbial pathology. In particular, insect cell culture is an indispensable tool for the study of insect viruses. The first continuously growing insect cell cultures were established from lepidoptera

  19. Accumulation Pattern of Heavy Metals in Chromolaena odorata (L. King & Robins. Grown in Nutrient Solution and Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna K.S.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation pattern of Al, Cd, Fe, Hg, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn in Chromolaena odorata plants grown in Hoagland nutrient solution and soil contaminated with known quantities of the above said metals was investigated. Significant variations in the quantity of accumulation as well as distribution among plant parts like root, stem and leaf were shown between the metals. Accumulation of Pb was maximum in the root followed by Fe and Al. Maximum quantity of each metal was accumulated in the root as compared to stem and leaf. Drastic differences in the accumulation pattern of metals between the nutrient solution and soil culture was observed. Comparatively small quantity of metal was accumulated in the plants of soil despite several fold quantity of each metal was given. The results are discussed in terms of BCF, TF, metal specificity as well as detoxification mechanisms.

  20. Confocal Raman studies in determining crystalline nature of PECVD grown Si nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Nafis; Bhargav, P. Balaji; Ramasamy, P. [SSN Research Centre, Kalavakkam-603110, Tamilnadu (India); Department of Physics, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam-603110, Tamilnadu (India); Sivadasan, A. K.; Tyagi, A. K.; Dhara, S., E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in [Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Amirthapandian, S.; Panigrahi, B. K. [Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Bhattacharya, S. [SSN Research Centre, Kalavakkam-603110, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-06-24

    Silicon nanowires of diameter ∼200 nm and length of 2-4 µm are grown in the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique using nanoclustered Au catalyst assisted vapour-liquid-solid process. The crystallinity in the as-grown and annealed samples is studied using confocal Raman spectroscopic studies. Amorphous phase is formed in the as-grown samples. Structural studies using high resolution transmission electron microscopy confirm the polycrystalline nature in the annealed sample.

  1. Culture-sensitive psychotraumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Schnyder

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there is some evidence of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD construct's cross cultural validity, trauma-related disorders may vary across cultures, and the same may be true for treatments that address such conditions. Experienced therapists tailor psychotherapy to each patient's particular situation, to the nature of the patient's psychopathology, to the stage of therapy, and so on. In addition, culture-sensitive psychotherapists try to understand how culture enhances the meaning of their patient's life history, the cultural components of their illness and help-seeking behaviors, as well as their expectations with regard to treatment. We cannot take for granted that all treatment-seeking trauma survivors speak our language or share our cultural values. Therefore, we need to increase our cultural competencies. Methods: The authors of this article are clinicians and/or researchers from across the globe, working with trauma survivors in various settings. Each author focused on one or more specific cultural aspects of working with trauma survivors and highlighted the following aspects. Results: As a result of culture-specific individual and collective meanings linked to trauma and trauma-related disorders survivors may be exposed to (self-stigma in the aftermath of trauma. Patients who are reluctant to talk about their traumatic experiences may instead be willing to write or use other ways of accessing the painful memories such as drawing. In other cultures, community and family cohesion are crucial elements of recovery. While awareness of culture-specific aspects is important, we also need to beware of premature cultural stereotyping. When disseminating empirically supported psychotherapies for PTSD across cultures, a number of additional challenges need to be taken into account: many low and middle income countries have very limited resources available and suffer from a poor health infrastructure. Conclusions: In summary

  2. Assessment of photosynthesis regulation in mixotrophically cultured microalga Chlorella sorokiniana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tingting; Kirchhoff, Helmut; Gargouri, Mahmoud; Feng, Jie; Cousins, Asaph B.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Gang, David R.; Chen, Shulin

    2016-11-01

    Mixotrophic growth of microalgae offers great potential as an efficient strategy for biofuel production. In this study, photosynthetic regulation of mixotrophically cultured Chlorella sorokiniana cells was systematically evaluated. Mixotrophic cells in the exponential growth phase showed the highest photosynthetic activity, where maximum photosynthetic O2 evolution was approximately 3- and 4-fold higher than cells in the same phase grown photoautotrophically in 1% CO2 (in air) and air, respectively. Additionally, characteristic chlorophyll fluorescence parameters demonstrated that no limitation in electron transport downstream of PSII was detected in mixotrophic cells. Up-regulation of photosynthetic activity was associated with high total ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) carboxylase activity and expression level of phosphoribulokinase (PRK). After 3 days, photosynthetic O2 evolution of mixotrophic cells that went to the stationary phase, was strongly reduced, with reduced photochemical efficiency and reorganization of the PSII complex. Simultaneously, enzymatic activity for Rubisco carboxylase and mRNA levels of Rubisco and PRK diminished. Importantly, there was almost no non-photochemical quenching for mixotrophic cells, whether grown in log or stationary phase. A decline in the quantum efficiency of PSII and an oxidized plastoquinone pool (PQ pool) was observed under N-depleted conditions during mixotrophic growth. These results demonstrate that photosynthesis is regulated differently in mixotrophically cultured C. sorokiniana cells than in cells grown under photoautotrophic conditions, with a particularly strong impact by nitrogen levels in the cells.

  3. Analysis of host-inducing proteome changes in bifidobacterium longum NCC2705 grown in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Wang, Bin; Sun, Zhongke; Bo, Xin; Yuan, Xitong; He, Xiang; Zhao, Hongqing; Du, Xinying; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Zheng; Zhang, Ling; Jia, Leili; Wang, Yufei; Wei, Kaihua; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Xuemin; Sun, Yansong; Huang, Liuyu; Zeng, Ming

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the adaptation of Bifidobacterium longum to the intestinal tract, we utilized a new model for rabbit intestinal culture of B. longum and reported the changes in proteomic profiles after incubation in the in vivo environment. By 2D-PAGE coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and/or electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) analyses, proteomic profiles of B. longum strain NCC2705 grown in the in vivo and in vitro environments were compared. Confirmed by semiquantitative RT-PCR, which exhibited at least a 3-fold change or greater, 19 up-regulated proteins, 14 down-regulated proteins, and 4 proteins with mobility changes were identified during intestinal growth. These identified proteins include key stress proteins, metabolism-related proteins, and proteins related to translation. Our results indicate that some useful proteins are expressed at higher levels in cells during intestinal growth. These proteins reflected the adaptation of B. longum NCC2705 to the intestine, such as EF-Tu which contributes to the retention or attachment as a Bifidobacterium adhesin-like factor, bile salt hydrolase (BSH) which might play an important role in the molecular mechanisms for the initial interaction of probiotic with the intestinal environment, and stress proteins which defend B. longum against the action of bile salts and other harmful ingredients of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The most striking fact of our observation was that four proteins GlnA1, PurC, LuxS, and Pgk exhibit clear post-translational modification. Western blot (WB) analysis and Pro-Q Diamond staining revealed that substances of the GIT trigger Pgk and LuxS phosphorylation at Ser/Thr residues for bacteria grown in vivo. These proteins were identified for the first time as bifidobacterial phosphoproteins. Our data suggest that the phosphorylated autoinducer-2 production

  4. Cultural Capital in Context:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ida Gran; Jæger, Mads Meier

    This paper analyzes the extent to which the effect of cultural capital on academic achievement varies across high- and low-achieving schooling environments. We distinguish three competing theoretical models: Cultural reproduction (cultural capital yields higher returns in high-achieving schooling...... to be higher in low-achieving schooling environments than in high-achieving ones. These results support the cultural mobility explanation and are in line with previous research suggesting that children from low-SES families benefit more from cultural capital than children from high-SES families....

  5. Theories of Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王燕

    2012-01-01

      “Culture” is such a broad concept which is understood and defined differently by different people and has been remaining a focus for research. Some view culture as skills, values, understandings, knowledge or ways of being achieved as members of society and it is acquired and transmitted over generations; some regard culture as meaning which is established and constructed in practice and it is the context of production of new meaning and constraint of action. In this article it will focus on two theories of culture, namely, Cultural Relativism and Cultural Structuralism, and will illustrate the general ideas, main representatives and their arguments of these two theories.

  6. Leadership and Organizational Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋丽娜

    2015-01-01

    This essay attempts to explore the relationship between leaders, organizational culture, and national culture. Leaders cre⁃ate“climate of the organization”with six mechanisms. Furthermore, leaders style of management is considerably influenced by their national culture based on Hofstede’s organizational culture theory. Varieties of examples and cases are analyzed to illustrate that leadership beliefs and practices have direct relationship with organizational culture and shape their individualistic communica⁃tion styles and goals that influence to a significant degree in establishing shared values, beliefs and practices among employees within an organization.

  7. Culture shock and travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, L; Leggat, P A

    1998-06-01

    As travel has become easier and more affordable, the number of people traveling has risen sharply. People travel for many and varied reasons, from the business person on an overseas assignment to backpackers seeking new and exotic destinations. Others may take up residence in different regions, states or countries for family, business or political reasons. Other people are fleeing religious or political persecution. Wherever they go and for whatever reason they go, people take their culture with them. Culture, like language, is acquired innately in early childhood and is then reinforced through formal and complex informal social education into adulthood. Culture provides a framework for interpersonal and social interactions. Therefore, the contact with a new culture is often not the exciting or pleasurable experience anticipated. When immersed in a different culture, people no longer know how to act when faced with disparate value systems. Contact with the unfamiliar culture can lead to anxiety, stress, mental illness and, in extreme cases, physical illness and suicide. "Culture shock" is a term coined by the anthropologist Oberg. It is the shock of the new. It implies that the experience of the new culture is an unpleasant surprise or shock, partly because it is unexpected and partly because it can lead to a negative evaluation of one's own culture. It is also known as cross-cultural adjustment, being that period of anxiety and confusion experienced when entering a new culture. It affects people intellectually, emotionally, behaviorally and physically and is characterized by symptoms of psychological distress. Culture shock affects both adults and children. In travelers or workers who have prolonged sojourns in foreign countries, culture shock may occur not only as they enter the new culture, but also may occur on their return to their original culture. Children may also experience readjustment problems after returning from leading sheltered lives in expatriate

  8. INCREASING LEARNERS’ CULTURAL AWARENESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    IntroductionCommunicative competence is now widely recognised as the goal of language teaching.A studentcannot obtain this competence in the target language without knowledge of the target culture sincelanguage and culture are closely interrelated.From this,it follows that EFL teaching involvesteaching of two languages and two cultures,in our case,English and Chinese.Then what is culture?Culture is‘the customs,beliefs,and music,and all the other products of human thought made by aparticular group of people at a particular time.’(Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English,1990:251)

  9. Culture and Negotiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Anne Marie; Kumar, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    The literature on cross-cultural negotiation has expanded considerably over the past few decades, but the findings are often ambiguous and sometimes even contradictory. This introduction highlights the critical areas where objections are commonly raised about the relevance of national culture......, the applicability of typologies that treat cultures as static, and the problem of ambiguous terminology. It may not be surprising that studies contradict each other given the ambiguity of the national cultural construct and variations in the context of the negotiating situations that are studied. The articles...... in this issue contribute to deepening our understanding about cross-cultural negotiation processes....

  10. Meat products and consumption culture in the East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki-Chang; Jo, Cheorun; Lee, Mooha

    2010-09-01

    Food consumption is a basic activity necessary for survival of the human race and evolved as an integral part of mankind's existence. This not only includes food consumption habits and styles but also food preparation methods, tool development for raw materials, harvesting and preservation as well as preparation of food dishes which are influenced by geographical localization, climatic conditions and abundance of the fauna and flora. Food preparation, trade and consumption have become leading factors shaping human behavior and developing a way of doing things that created tradition which has been passed from generation to generation making it unique for almost every human niche in the surface of the globe. Therefore, the success in understanding the culture of other countries or ethnic groups lies in understanding their rituals in food consumption customs. Meat consumption culture in the East has not been well developed by its characteristic environment, religion, history, and main food staples. However, recently, the amount of meat production and consumption of the Eastern countries has grown rapidly by the globalization of food industry and rapid economic growth of the countries. This manuscript introduces meat-based products and consumption culture in Asian countries. However, because the environments and cultures within Asia are too diverse to cover all food cultures, this manuscript focused mainly on three northeast Asian countries including China, Japan, and Korea (Republic of) and some southeast Asian countries including Vietnam and Thailand, which have similar environments and cultural interactions historically but retain their own characteristic food culture.

  11. Cultural aspects of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharajh, Hari D; Abdool, Petal S

    2005-09-08

    Undefined cultural factors cannot be dismissed and significantly contribute to the worldwide incidence of death by suicide. Culture is an all embracing term and defines the relationship of an individual to his environment. This study seeks to investigate the effect of culture on suicide both regionally and internationally. Culture-bound syndrome with suicidal behaviours specific to a particular culture or geographical region are discussed. Opinions are divided as to the status of religious martyrs. The law itself is silent on many aspects of suicidal behaviour and despite decriminalization of suicide as self-murder, the latter remains on the statutes of many developing countries. The Caribbean region is of concern due to its steady rise in mean suicide rate, especially in Trinidad and Tobago where socio-cultural factors are instrumental in influencing suicidal behaviour. These include transgenerational cultural conflicts, psycho-social problems, media exposure, unemployment, social distress, religion and family structure. The methods used are attributed to accessibility and lethality. Ingestion of poisonous substances is most popular followed by hanging. The gender differences seen with regard to suicidality can also be attributed to gender related psychopathology and psychosocial differences in help-seeking behaviour. These are influenced by the cultural environment to which the individual is exposed. Culture provides coping strategies to individuals; as civilization advances many of these coping mechanisms are lost unclothing the genetic predisposition of vulnerable groups. In the management of suicidal behaviour, a system of therapeutic re-culturation is needed with an emphasis on relevant culture- based therapies.

  12. Porcine mitral valve interstitial cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, W; Rosenthal, A; Granton, B; Gotlieb, A I

    1988-11-01

    There are connective tissue cells present within the interstitium of the heart valves. This study was designed to isolate and characterize mitral valve interstitial cells from the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. Explants obtained from the distal part of the leaflet, having been scraped free of surface endocardial cells, were incubated in medium 199 supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. Cells grew out of the explant after 3 to 5 days and by 3 weeks these cells were harvested and passaged. Passages 1 to 22 were characterized in several explant sets. The cells showed a growth pattern reminiscent of fibroblasts. Growth was dependent on serum concentration. Cytoskeletal localization of actin and myosin showed prominent stress fibers. Ultrastructural studies showed many elongated cells with prominent stress fibers and some gap junctions and few adherens junctions. There were as well cells with fewer stress fibers containing prominent Golgi complex and dilated endoplasmic reticulum. In the multilayered superconfluent cultures, the former cells tended to be on the substratum of the dish or surface of the multilayered culture, whereas the latter was generally located within the layer of cells. Extracellular matrix was prominent in superconfluent cultures, often within the layers as well. Labeling of the cells with antibody HHF 35 (Tsukada T, Tippens D, Gordon D, Ross R, Gown AM: Am J Pathol 126:51, 1987), which recognizes smooth muscle cell actin, showed prominent staining of the elongated stress fiber-containing cells and much less in the secretory type cells. These studies show that interstitial mitral valve cells can be grown in culture and that either two different cell types or one cell type with two phenotypic expressions is present in culture.

  13. Cultural Goods Production, Cultural Capital Formation and the Provision of Cultural Services

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Sao-Wen

    2005-01-01

    Cultural capital is assumed to benefit all members of society. It is accumulated through the consumption of cultural services and is diminished through depreciation. Using the stock of cultural goods, cultural services are provided by the cultural services industry; the stock of cultural goods is enlarged by the flow of new cultural goods created by individuals who are both consumers and creators of culture and whose utility is positively affected by the cultural goods they created. In the no...

  14. Metabolic characteristics of an aerobe isolated from a methylotrophic methanogenic enrichment culture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stephen V Rapheal; K R Swaminathan; K Lalitha

    2003-03-01

    An anaerobic methylotrophic methanogenic enrichment culture, with sustained metabolic characteristics, including that of methanation for over a decade, was the choice of the present study on interspecies interactions. Growth and methanation by the enrichment were suppressed in the presence of antibiotics, and no methanogen grown on methanol could be isolated using stringent techniques. The present study confirmed syntrophic metabolic interactions in this enrichment with the isolation of a strain of Pseudomonas sp. The organism had characteristic metabolic versatility in metabolizing a variety of substrates including alcohols, aliphatic acids, amino acids, and sugars. Anaerobic growth was favoured with nitrate in the growth medium. Cells grown anaerobically with methanol, revealed maximal nitrate reductase activity. Constitutive oxidative activity of the membrane system emerged from the high-specific oxygen uptake and nitrate reductase activities of the aerobically and anerobically grown cells respectively. Cells grown anaerobically on various alcohols effectively oxidized methanol in the presence of flavins, cofactor FAD and the methanogenic cofactor F420, suggesting a constitutive alcohol oxidizing capacity. In cells grown anaerobically on methanol, the rate of methanol oxidation with F420 was three times that of FAD. Efficient utilization of alcohols in the presence of F420 is a novel feature of the present study. The results suggest that utilization of methanol by the mixed culture would involve metabolic interactions between the Pseudomonas sp. and the methanogen(s). Methylotrophic, methanogenic partnership involving an aerobe is a novel feature hitherto unreported among anaerobic syntrophic associations and is of ecological significance.

  15. Cultural effects on mindreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Zapata, Daniel; Slaughter, Virginia; Henry, Julie D

    2016-01-01

    People from other cultural backgrounds sometimes seem inscrutable. We identified a potential cause of this phenomenon in two experiments demonstrating that adults' mental state inferences are influenced by the cultural identity of the target. We adapted White, Hill, Happé, and Frith's (2009) Strange Stories to create matched intra-cultural and cross-cultural mindreading and control conditions. Experiment 1 showed that Australian participants were faster to respond and received higher scores in the intra-cultural mindreading condition relative to the cross-cultural mindreading condition, but performance in the control conditions was equivalent. Experiment 2 replicated this pattern in independent samples of Australian and Chilean participants. These findings have important implications for cross-cultural communication and understanding.

  16. Cultural Stress Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hastings; K; Shula; Aizhong; Liu

    2011-01-01

    Cultural stress is no longer a rare phenomenon because the world has been reduced to the size of a village due to modern technology and advancements. It is a concept that grows in magnitude each year. More and more people are affected. In this paper, we discuss the assessment of cultural stress by combining some instruments like the Perceived Stress Scale, the Depression Anxiety, and Stress Scale with the Cultural Stress Scale. They appear to be valid and can be used across different cultures. We discuss the need to come up with a standard instrument for measuring cultural stress as opposed to having so many. We also outline ways of coping with cultural stress as it occurs at different stages. There is need for more research to counter the negative effects of cultural stress.

  17. AccessCulture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valtysson, Bjarki

    in cultural production and consumption. The first part of this works looks at how these changes respond to the field of cultural policy, as well as suggesting a possible culturepolitical reaction in a model which I refer to as access culture. In terms of theoretical approach, the notion of digital cultural...... on the system, the lifeworld, and the inter-mediating public sphere, and in order to adapt his theory better to the network society, I make much use of Manuel Castells' theories on the global network of new media and the culture of realvirtuality. Finally, the third main theoretician which I make use of, is Lev...... and the Audiovisual Media Services Directive from 2007. In order to exemplify the functions of digital cultural public spheres adequately, I therefore take a thorough look at EU's interventions within the cultural, media and communication sectors. Finally, I also analyse projects and programmes that the European...

  18. Hydrogen production and enzyme activities in the hyperthermophile Thermococcus paralvinellae grown on maltose, tryptone and agricultural waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Hensley

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermococcus may be an important alternative source of H2 in the hot subseafloor in otherwise low H2 environments such as some hydrothermal vents and oil reservoirs. It may also be useful in industry for rapid agricultural waste treatment and concomitant H2 production. Thermococcus paralvinellae grown at 82°C without sulfur produced up to 5 mmol of H2 L-1 at rates of 5-36 fmol H2 cell-1 h-1 on 0.5% (wt vol-1 maltose, 0.5% (wt vol-1 tryptone, and 0.5% maltose + 0.05% tryptone media. Two potentially inhibiting conditions, the presence of 10 mM acetate and low pH (pH 5 in maltose-only medium, did not significantly affect growth or H2 production. Growth rates, H2 production rates, and cell yields based on H2 production were the same as those for Pyrococcus furiosus grown at 95°C on the same media for comparison. Acetate, butyrate, succinate, isovalerate and formate were also detected as end products. After 100 h, T. paralvinellae produced up to 5 mmol of H2 L-1 of medium when grown on up to 70% (vol vol-1 waste milk from cows undergoing treatment for mastitis with the bacterial antibiotic Ceftiofur and from untreated cows. The amount of H2 produced by T. paralvinellae increased with increasing waste concentrations, but decreased in P. furiosus cultures supplemented with waste milk above 1% concentration. All mesophilic bacteria from the waste milk that grew on Luria Bertani, Sheep’s Blood (selective for Staphylococcus, the typical cause of mastitis, and MacConkey (selective for Gram-negative enteric bacteria agar plates were killed by heat during incubation at 82°C. Ceftiofur, which is heat labile, was below the detection limit following incubation at 82°C. T. paralvinellae also produced up to 6 mmol of H2 L-1 of medium when grown on 0.1-10% (wt vol-1 spent brewery grain while P. furiosus produced < 1 mmol of H2 L-1. Twelve of 13 enzyme activities in T. paralvinellae showed significant (p<0.05 differences across six different growth conditions

  19. Cross-Cultural Impression Management: A Cultural Knowledge Audit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Abigail; Kamau, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many people moving into a new culture for work or study do so without prior cross-cultural training, yet successful cultural adaptation has important ramifications. The purpose of this paper is to focus on cross-cultural impression management as an element of cultural adaptation. Does cultural adaptation begin by paying strong attention…

  20. Cloning higher plants from aseptically cultured tissues and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    A review of aseptic culture methods for higher plants is presented, which focuses on the existing problems that limit or prevent the full realization of cloning plants from free cells. It is shown that substantial progress in clonal multiplication has been made with explanted stem tips or lateral buds which can be stimulated to produce numerous precocious axillary branches. These branches can then be separated or subdivided and induced to root in order to yield populations of genetically and phenotypically uniorm plantlets. Similarly, undifferentiated calluses can sometimes be induced to form shoots and/or roots adventitiously. Although the cell culture techniques required to produce somatic embryos are presently rudimentary, steady advances are being made in learning how to stimulate formation of somatic or adventive embryos from totipotent cells grown in suspension cultures. It is concluded that many problems exist in the producing and growing of totipotent or morphogenetically competent cell suspensions, but the potential benefits are great.

  1. Shoot Tip Culture of Arnica montana for Micropropagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchou, O; Nichterlein, K; Vömel, A

    1992-02-01

    Multiple shoots were regenerated from shoot tips of ARNICA MONTANA on MS and B5 media supplemented with BA (1 mg/l) and NAA (0.1 mg/l). Sections of 1-2 mm in length cultured from IN VITRO germinated seedlings regenerated 7.7 (mean) shoots on the MS medium, whereas sections cultured from greenhouse plants regenerated 9.0 (mean) shoots on the B5 medium within 6 weeks. Subsequent subcultures of shoots on the same media but without NAA resulted in similar or lower multiplication rates (1.6 to 3.1 in 3 weeks). Shoot development was promoted, whereas shoot initiation was simultaneously inhibited by the addition of activated charcoal to the media. Rooting was induced by culturing shoots from seedling as well as from greenhouse plant shoot tips on MS or B5 medium supplemented with NAA. The plantlets were transplanted into soil and grown successfully under greenhouse and field conditions.

  2. Batch variation between branchial cell cultures: An analysis of variance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Grosell, M.; Kristensen, L.

    2003-01-01

    We present in detail how a statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA) is used to sort out the effect of an unexpected batch-to-batch variation between cell cultures. Two separate cultures of rainbow trout branchial cells were grown on permeable filtersupports ("inserts"). They were supposed...... and introducing the observed difference between batches as one of the factors in an expanded three-dimensional ANOVA, we were able to overcome an otherwisecrucial lack of sufficiently reproducible duplicate values. We could thereby show that the effect of changing the apical medium was much more marked when...... the radioactive lipid precursors were added on the apical, rather than on the basolateral, side. Theinsert cell cultures were obviously polarized. We argue that it is not reasonable to reject troublesome experimental results, when we do not know a priori that something went wrong. The ANOVA is a very useful...

  3. ESTABLISHMENT OF PHELIPANCHE RAMOSA TISSUE CULTURE AND EFFECT OF KANAMYCIN ON CULTURE GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Kullačová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Orobanchaceae family includes parasitic plants that attack many important food crops. Genus Phelipanche, belonging to this family is considered to cause high negative impact on food production. Developing Phelipanche plant must establish connection with the root of host plant, from which it receives all resources needed for further development. Nowadays big effort is directed to finding a reliable strategy to control parasitic plants. In vitro cultures of P. ramosa can be genetically manipulated and used for study of genes involved in host-parasite interactions. We established in vitro cultures of parasitic species Phelipanche ramosa on solid and liquid media in parallel. The obtained results point out that development of P. ramosa calli was origin specific. We tested the effect of antibiotic kanamycin on in vitro cultures of Phelipanche ramosa with aim to develop system for its genetic manipulation and selection of transgenic tissue using kanamycin- resistance approach. The selection pressure of kanamycin was stronger in liquid grown cultures. However, concentrations of kanamycin tested (up to 250 mg.l-1 did not ensured elimination of kanamycine non-resistant tissue. Tests of other candidate selection markers are currently in progress.

  4. Defect studies in low-temperature-grown GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, D.E.

    1992-11-01

    High content of excess As is incorporated in GaAs grown by low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy (LTMBE). The excess As exists primarily as As antisite defects AsGa and a lesser extent of gallium vacancies V[sub Ga]. The neutral AsGa-related defects were measured by infrared absorption at 1[mu]m. Gallium vacancies, V[sub Ga], was investigated by slow positron annihilation. Dependence of defect contents on doping was studied by Si and Be dopants. No free carriers are generated by n-type or p-type doping up to 10[sup 19] cm[sup [minus]3] Si or Be. Raman data indicate Be occupies Ga substitutional sites but Si atom is not substitutional. Si induces more As[sub Ga] in the layer. As As[sub Ga] increases, photoquenchable As[sub Ga] decreases. Fraction of photoquenchable defects correlates to defects within 3 nearest neighbor separations disrupting the metastability. Annealing reduces neutral As[sub Ga] content around 500C, similar to irradiation damaged and plastically deformed Ga[sub As], as opposed to bulk grown GaAs in which As[sub Ga]-related defects are stable up to 1100C. The lower temperature defect removal is due to V[sub Ga] enhanced diffusion of As[sub Ga] to As precipitates. The supersaturated V[sub GA] and also decreases during annealing. Annealing kinetics for As[sub Ga]-related defects gives 2.0 [plus minus] 0.3 eV and 1.5 [plus minus] 0.3 eV migration enthalpies for the As[sub Ga] and V[sub Ga]. This represents the difference between Ga and As atoms hopping into the vacancy. The non-photoquenchable As[sub Ga]-related defects anneal with an activation energy of 1.1 [plus minus] 0.3eV. Be acceptors can be activated by 800C annealing. Temperature difference between defect annealing and Be activation formation of As[sub Ga]-Be[sub Ga] pairs. Si donors can only be partially activated.

  5. Defect studies in low-temperature-grown GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, D.E.

    1992-11-01

    High content of excess As is incorporated in GaAs grown by low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy (LTMBE). The excess As exists primarily as As antisite defects AsGa and a lesser extent of gallium vacancies V{sub Ga}. The neutral AsGa-related defects were measured by infrared absorption at 1{mu}m. Gallium vacancies, V{sub Ga}, was investigated by slow positron annihilation. Dependence of defect contents on doping was studied by Si and Be dopants. No free carriers are generated by n-type or p-type doping up to 10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3} Si or Be. Raman data indicate Be occupies Ga substitutional sites but Si atom is not substitutional. Si induces more As{sub Ga} in the layer. As As{sub Ga} increases, photoquenchable As{sub Ga} decreases. Fraction of photoquenchable defects correlates to defects within 3 nearest neighbor separations disrupting the metastability. Annealing reduces neutral As{sub Ga} content around 500C, similar to irradiation damaged and plastically deformed Ga{sub As}, as opposed to bulk grown GaAs in which As{sub Ga}-related defects are stable up to 1100C. The lower temperature defect removal is due to V{sub Ga} enhanced diffusion of As{sub Ga} to As precipitates. The supersaturated V{sub GA} and also decreases during annealing. Annealing kinetics for As{sub Ga}-related defects gives 2.0 {plus_minus} 0.3 eV and 1.5 {plus_minus} 0.3 eV migration enthalpies for the As{sub Ga} and V{sub Ga}. This represents the difference between Ga and As atoms hopping into the vacancy. The non-photoquenchable As{sub Ga}-related defects anneal with an activation energy of 1.1 {plus_minus} 0.3eV. Be acceptors can be activated by 800C annealing. Temperature difference between defect annealing and Be activation formation of As{sub Ga}-Be{sub Ga} pairs. Si donors can only be partially activated.

  6. Cultural Differences and English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李毅

    2009-01-01

    ach culture in English education.This paper expounds the connotation of culture and language, points out the reasons of culture teaching in English education, and raises some suggestions and methods on English culture teaching.

  7. Culture-sensitive psychotraumatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, Ulrich; Bryant, Richard A.; Ehlers, Anke; Foa, Edna B.; Hasan, Aram; Mwiti, Gladys; Kristensen, Christian H.; Neuner, Frank; Oe, Misari; Yule, William

    2016-01-01

    Background Although there is some evidence of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) construct's cross cultural validity, trauma-related disorders may vary across cultures, and the same may be true for treatments that address such conditions. Experienced therapists tailor psychotherapy to each patient's particular situation, to the nature of the patient's psychopathology, to the stage of therapy, and so on. In addition, culture-sensitive psychotherapists try to understand how culture enhances the meaning of their patient's life history, the cultural components of their illness and help-seeking behaviors, as well as their expectations with regard to treatment. We cannot take for granted that all treatment-seeking trauma survivors speak our language or share our cultural values. Therefore, we need to increase our cultural competencies. Methods The authors of this article are clinicians and/or researchers from across the globe, working with trauma survivors in various settings. Each author focused on one or more specific cultural aspects of working with trauma survivors and highlighted the following aspects. Results As a result of culture-specific individual and collective meanings linked to trauma and trauma-related disorders survivors may be exposed to (self-)stigma in the aftermath of trauma. Patients who are reluctant to talk about their traumatic experiences may instead be willing to write or use other ways of accessing the painful memories such as drawing. In other cultures, community and family cohesion are crucial elements of recovery. While awareness of culture-specific aspects is important, we also need to beware of premature cultural stereotyping. When disseminating empirically supported psychotherapies for PTSD across cultures, a number of additional challenges need to be taken into account: many low and middle income countries have very limited resources available and suffer from a poor health infrastructure. Conclusions In summary, culture

  8. Culture of soybean mesophyll protoplasts in alginate beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricoli, D M; Hein, M B; Carnes, M G

    1986-10-01

    Mesophyll protoplasts were isolated from leaves of 10 day old aseptically grown soybean seedlings, or from surface disinfested leaves of 3 week old plants grown in environmental chambers. The protoplasts were encapsulated in 2mm diameter Ca alginate beads. Immobilized protoplasts were induced to divide by culturing in shaker flasks containing an actively growing soybean cell suspension. The feeder cell suspension supported the division of protoplasts independent of the protoplast density in the Ca alginate beads. At day 18 after encapsulation, the alginate matrix was dissolved, releasing viable callus colonies. The feeder cell suspension obviated plating of protoplasts at high density which is usually required for subsequent cell division and colony development. Since the protoplasts were embedded at low density, the cell colonies were derived from single cells.

  9. Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning.

  10. Characterizing European cultural landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tieskens, Koen F.; Schulp, Catharina J E; Levers, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Almost all rural areas in Europe have been shaped or altered by humans and can be considered cultural landscapes, many of which now are considered to entail valuable cultural heritage. Current dynamics in land management have put cultural landscapes under a huge pressure of agricultural intensifi......Almost all rural areas in Europe have been shaped or altered by humans and can be considered cultural landscapes, many of which now are considered to entail valuable cultural heritage. Current dynamics in land management have put cultural landscapes under a huge pressure of agricultural...... intensification and land abandonment. To prevent the loss of cultural landscapes, knowledge on the location of different types of cultural landscapes is needed. In this paper, we present a characterization of European cultural landscapes based on the prevalence of three key dimensions of cultural landscapes......: landscape structure, management intensity, and value and meaning. We mapped these dimensions across Europe at a 1-km resolution by combining proxies on management intensity and landscape structure with new indicators such as social media usage and registered traditional food products. We integrated...

  11. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF CULTURAL TOURISM

    OpenAIRE

    Zrinka Zadel; Sinisa Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    The subject of analysis in the paper is economic impact of cultural tourism and identification of the main factors which directly affect cultural tourism revenues. Most countries do not have a statistical system of monitoring and analysing individual factors of cultural tourism such as the number of arrivals of cultural tourists and consumption of cultural tourists. Therefore, it is hard to assess the economic impact of cultural tourism. In cultural tourism, cultural assets are prepared and p...

  12. Epitaxial yttrium iron garnet films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, P. C.; Bushnell, S. E.; Seed, R. G.; Vittoria, C.

    1993-07-01

    Epitaxial Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) films have been grown by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique on (111) gadolinium gallium garnet substrates. The effect of substrate temperature and oxygen partial pressure on the structure, composition, and magnetic properties of the films was investigated and compared to liquid phase epitaxy YIG films. The results demonstrated that epitaxial YIG films could be prepared under a wide range of deposition conditions, but narrow linewidth (ΔH≂1 Oe) films were producible only at low oxygen partial pressures (O2temperatures (Ts≳800 °C). Since the linewidth of single-crystal YIG is dominated by surface and volume defects and/or impurities, the narrow linewidth indicated that PLD is a viable technique for producing high-quality ferrite films for microwave device applications. In addition, under all deposition conditions (50-1000 mTorr and 700-850 °C) there is a uniaxial axis perpendicular to the film plane. However, at low oxygen pressure the uniaxial anisotropy energy constant Ku is negative while at high oxygen pressure Ku is positive.

  13. Purification of carbon nanotubes grown by thermal CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porro, S.; Musso, S.; Vinante, M.; Vanzetti, L.; Anderle, M.; Trotta, F.; Tagliaferro, A.

    2007-03-01

    We show the results of a set of purifications on carbon nanotubes (CNT) by acid and basic treatments. CNTs were obtained by thermal decomposition of camphor at 850 °C in a CVD growth system, by means of a growth process catalyzed by iron clusters originating from the addition of ferrocene in the precursors mixture. The purification procedures involved HNO 3, H 2SO 4, HSO 3Cl and NaOH for different process temperatures. As-grown CNTs showed a consistent presence of metal catalyst (about 6 wt%), evidenced by TGA. The purification treatments led to a certain amount of opening of the CNT tips, with a consequent loss of metal catalyst encapsulated in tips. This is also confirmed by BET analysis, which showed an increase of the surface area density of CNT after the purification. FT-IR and XPS revealed the presence of carboxylic groups on the CNT surface chemically modified by the harsh environment of the purification process. Among the various treatments that have been tested, the 1:3 solution of nitric and sulphuric acid was the most effective in modifying the CNT surface and inducing the formation of functional groups.

  14. Polyphenol and glycoalkaloid contents in potato cultivars grown in Luxembourg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deusser, Hannah; Guignard, Cédric; Hoffmann, Lucien; Evers, Danièle

    2012-12-15

    The polyphenol (phenolic acids, flavanols and flavonols) and glycoalkaloid (α-chaconine and α-solanine) contents of potato tubers grown in Luxembourg were analyzed by UPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS/MS separately in peel (approx. 2mm), outer (approx. 1cm) and inner flesh. Polyphenol contents decreased from the peel via the outer to the inner flesh and differed among the cultivars. The cultivars Vitelotte and Luminella had the highest polyphenol contents (5202 and 572 μg/g dry weight (DW) in the outer flesh), whereas Charlotte and Bintje had the lowest contents (19.5 and 48.0 μg/g DW). Chlorogenic acid and its isomers (neo- and cryptochlorogenic acid) were the major polyphenols. Glycoalkaloid contents were highest in the peel and lowest in the inner flesh, values in the flesh were below guideline limits in all cultivars. In conclusion, potatoes contribute to the daily intake of polyphenols and their consumption, thereby, may have positive effects on health.

  15. Arsenic uptake and speciation in vegetables grown under greenhouse conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E; Juhasz, A L; Weber, J

    2009-04-01

    The accumulation of arsenic (As) by vegetables is a potential human exposure pathway. The speciation of As in vegetables is an important consideration due to the varying toxicity of different As species. In this study, common Australian garden vegetables were hydroponically grown with As-contaminated irrigation water to determine the uptake and species of As present in vegetable tissue. The highest concentrations of total As were observed in the roots of all vegetables and declined in the aerial portions of the plants. Total As accumulation in the edible portions of the vegetables decreased in the order radish > mung bean > lettuce = chard. Arsenic was present in the roots of radish, chard, and lettuce as arsenate (As(V)) and comprised between 77 and 92% of the total As present, whereas in mung beans, arsenite (As(III)) comprised 90% of the total As present. In aerial portions of the vegetables, As was distributed equally between both As(V) and As(III) in radish and chard but was present mainly as As(V) in lettuce. The presence of elevated As in vegetable roots suggests that As species may be complexed by phytochelatins, which limits As translocation to aerial portions of the plant.

  16. Tensile stress and creep in thermally grown oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veal, Boyd W; Paulikas, Arvydas P; Hou, Peggy Y

    2006-05-01

    Structural components that operate at high temperatures (for example, turbine blades) rely on thermally grown oxide (TGO), commonly alumina, for corrosion protection. Strains that develop in TGOs during operation can reduce the protectiveness of the TGO. However, the occurrence of growth strains in TGOs, and mechanisms that cause them, are poorly understood. It is accepted that compressive strains can develop as oxygen and metal atoms meet to form new growth within constrained oxide. More controversial is the experimental finding that large tensile stresses, close to 1 GPa, develop during isothermal growth conditions in alumina TGO formed on a FeCrAlY alloy. Using a novel technique based on synchrotron radiation, we have confirmed these previous results, and show that the tensile strain develops as the early oxide, (Fe,Cr,Al)(2)O(3), converts to alpha-Al2O3 during the growth process. This allows us to model the strain behaviour by including creep and this diffusion-controlled phase change.

  17. Modeling uptake kinetics of cadmium by field-grown lettuce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Weiping [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)], E-mail: chenweip@yahoo.com.cn; Li Lianqing [Institute of Resources, Ecosystem and Environment of Agriculture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Chang, Andrew C.; Wu Laosheng [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of California, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Kwon, Soon-Ik [Agricultural Environmental and Ecology Division, National Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology, Suwon 441-707 (Korea, Republic of); Bottoms, Rick [Desert Research and Extension Center, 1004 East Holton Road, El Centro, CA 92243 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Cadmium uptake by field grown Romaine lettuce treated with P-fertilizers of different Cd levels was investigated over an entire growing season. Results indicated that the rate of Cd uptake at a given time of the season can be satisfactorily described by the Michaelis-Menten kinetics, that is, plant uptake increases as the Cd concentration in soil solution increases, and it gradually approaches a saturation level. However, the rate constant of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics changes over the growing season. Under a given soil Cd level, the cadmium content in plant tissue decreases exponentially with time. To account for the dynamic nature of Cd uptake, a kinetic model integrating the time factor was developed to simulate Cd plant uptake over the growing season: C{sub Plant} = C{sub Solution} . PUF{sub max} . exp[-b . t], where C{sub Plant} and C{sub Solution} refer to the Cd content in plant tissue and soil solution, respectively, PUF{sub max} and b are kinetic constants. - A kinetic model was developed to evaluate the uptake of Cd under field conditions.

  18. Evaluation of endosulfan residues in vegetables grown in greenhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrebola, F J; Egea-González, F J; Moreno, M; Fernández-Gutiérrez, A; Hernández-Torres, M E; Martínez-Vidal, J L

    2001-07-01

    The reduction in residue levels of endosulfan with time after treatment of tomatoes, green beans, peppers and cucumbers grown in different types of commercial greenhouses (flat- and asymmetric-roof greenhouses) in Almería (Spain) was investigated. A study of the major and minor degradation products of endosulfan in peppers and cucumbers (endosulfan-sulfate, -ether and -lactone) was carried out using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). To establish the influence of environmental conditions on the degradation of endosulfan, several field trials have been carried out in which crops were sprayed at different rates (full, half- and quarter- of those rates recommended) during two seasons (spring and winter). For statistical purposes, the disappearance of endosulfan with time was considered to follow a pseudo-first-order reaction. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) has been applied to the results obtained. Half-lives of residue disappearance were 4.03-4.68 days in green beans, 4.03-4.20 days in tomatoes, 8.22 days in peppers and 7.97 days in cucumbers. Half-lives in spring were shorter than in the winter season. The application rate and the type of greenhouse did not influence the half-lives.

  19. Characteristics of purple nonsulfur bacteria grown under Stevia residue extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; Feng, Y; Wang, Y; Lin, X

    2013-11-01

    As a consequence of the large-scale cultivation of Stevia plants, releases of plant residues, the byproduct after sweetener extraction, to the environment are inevitable. Stevia residue and its effluent after batching up contain large amounts of organic matters with small molecular weight, which therefore are a potential pollution source. Meanwhile, they are favourite substrates for micro-organism growths. This investigation was aimed to utilize the simulated effluent of Stevia residue to enrich the representative purple nonsulfur bacterium (PNSB), Rhodopseudomonas palustris (Rps. palustris), which has important economic values. The growth profile and quality of Rps. palustris were characterized by spectrophotometry, compared to those grown in common PNSB mineral synthetic medium. Our results revealed that the simulated effluent of Stevia residue not only stimulated Rps. palustris growth to a greater extent, but also increased its physiologically active cytochrome concentrations and excreted indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) content. This variation in phenotype of Rps. palustris could result from the shift in its genotype, further revealed by the repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) fingerprinting analysis. Our results showed that the effluent of Stevia residue was a promising substrate for microbial growth.

  20. Insitu CCVD grown bilayer graphene transistors for applications in nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessely, Pia Juliane; Schwalke, Udo

    2014-02-01

    We invented a method to fabricate graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) on oxidized silicon wafers in a Silicon CMOS compatible process. The graphene layers needed are grown in situ by means of a transfer-free catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) process directly on silicon dioxide. Depending on the process parameters the fabrication of single, double or multi-layer graphene FETs (GFETs) is possible. The produced graphene layers have been characterized by SEM, TEM, TEM-lattice analysis as well as Raman-Spectroscopy. Directly after growth, the fabricated GFETs are electrically functional and can be electrically characterized via the catalyst metals which are used as contact electrodes. In contrast to monolayer graphene FETs, the fabricated bilayer graphene FETs (BiLGFETs) exhibit unipolar p-type MOSFET behavior. Furthermore, the on/off current-ratio of 104 up to several 107 at room temperature of the fabricated BiLGFETs allows their use in digital logic applications [1]. In addition, a stable hysteresis of the GFETs enables their use as memory devices without the need of storage capacitors and therefore very high memory device-densities are possible. The whole fabrication process is fully Si-CMOS compatible, enabling the use of hybrid silicon/graphene electronics.