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  1. Photodynamic research at Baylor University Medical Center Dallas, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Aronoff, Billie L.; Judy, Millard M.

    1993-03-01

    We received our first CO2 laser at Baylor University Medical Center in December 1974, following a trip to Israel in January of that year. Discussion with the customs office of the propriety of charging an 18% import tax lasted for nine months. We lost that argument. Baylor has been using lasers of many types for many procedures since that time. About ten years ago, through the kindness of Tom Dougherty and Roswell Park, we started working with photodynamic therapy, first with hematoporphyrin I and later with dihematoporphyrin ether (II). In February 1984, we were invited to a conference at Los Alamos, New Mexico, U.S.A. on medical applications of the free electron laser as part of the Star Wars Program. A grant application from Baylor was approved that November, but funding did not start for many months. This funding contributed to the development of a new research center as part of Baylor Research Institute. Many of the projects investigated at Baylor dealt with applications of the free electron laser (FEL), after it became available. A staff was assembled and many projects are still ongoing. I would like to outline those which are in some way related to photodynamic therapy.

  2. History of the biomedical studies PhD program: a joint graduate program of the Baylor Health Care system and Baylor University

    OpenAIRE

    Morel, Christine R.; Horton, Joshua M.; Peng, Han; Xu, Kangling; Batra, Sushil K.; Miles, Jonathan P.; Kane, Robert R.

    2008-01-01

    On a sweltering summer morning, throngs of people filed into Jones Theatre at Baylor University in Waco for the graduate student orientation. One could look around and notice the diversity of not only the student population, but also the disciplines being represented. Many students had stepped off planes only hours prior, but even those who had been traveling for days could not contain their excitement. As for me, I was nowhere near any of this. I was still 40 miles north of Waco in Waxahachi...

  3. The Math You Need at Baylor University: Improving Quantitative Skills in an Introductory Geology Lab Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Math You Need (TMYN) modules were introduced at Baylor University in fall 2012 to address issues of math anxiety common among freshmen non-majors completing their lab science requirement, and to reduce lab time spent reviewing basic math concepts. Modules and associated assessment questions commonly use geoscience examples to illustrate the mathematical principles involved, reinforcing topics addressed in lab. Large enrollments in the course selected for these modules necessitate multiple graduate teaching assistants in the lab, making the online nature of the modules and minimal required involvement of the teaching assistants even more valuable. Students completed three selected modules before encountering associated topics in lab, as well as a pre and post-test to gauge improvement. This presentation will review lessons learned and changes made in the first two years of TMYN at Baylor. Results indicate continued increases in mean pre to post test scores (e.g. 3.2% in fall 2012 to 11.9% in spring 2014), percentage of student pre to post- test improvement (59% in fall 2012 to 72% in spring 2014) and student participation (95 in fall 2012 to 186 in spring 2014). Continued use of these modules is anticipated.

  4. Executive competencies in healthcare administration: preceptors of the Army-Baylor University Graduate Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finstuen, Kenn; Mangelsdorff, A David

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the mentoring and executive competencies required among preceptors of the Army-Baylor University Graduate Program in Health and Business Administration, and to specify the requisite skills, knowledge, and abilities (SKAs) needed to achieve those competencies. In the first wave of inquiry, a list of 123 competencies and associated SKAs was elicited from a network of 80 current and past preceptor executives employing a Delphi methodology using e-mail. An expert panel, which consisted of seven past program directors, examined and sorted the list into four preceptor content domains, viz., Health Systems Management (HS Management), Leadership, Residency Administration, and Community Involvement. Frequency analyses showed that the HS Management domain constituted over half of the competencies, with particular emphasis on strategic thinking, planning, billing, finance, manpower, and contracting. In the second wave, the preceptor Delphi network reviewed the expertpanel list and made 7-pointSKA importance ratings on an 80-item structured questionnaire representative of the four domains. Findings indicated thataverage SKA ratings were reliable and agreed upon to a high degree among preceptors. Results, rank ordered by SKA item means within preceptor content domains and overall, suggested that the most important rated items centered on teamwork, negotiation, interpersonal skills, communication, leadership vision, and customer and healthcare business operations. Outcomes from the competency list are expected to be useful for preceptor mentoring, self-assessment, and for professional development. Additionally, specific SKAs can provide a means for developing job requirements and career performance criteria at a behavioral task level, and can contribute information for identifying continuing education and conference topical needs.

  5. Elementary Particle Physics at Baylor (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittmann, J.R.

    2012-08-25

    This report summarizes the activities of the Baylor University Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) group on the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment from August 15, 2005 to May 31, 2012. Led by the Principal Investigator (Dr. Jay R. Dittmann), the Baylor HEP group has actively pursued a variety of cutting-edge measurements from proton-antiproton collisions at the energy frontier.

  6. Accelerating best care at baylor dallas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydar, Ziad; Cox, Marsha; Stafford, Pam; Rodriguez, Vera; Ballard, David J

    2009-10-01

    A culture of quality improvement (QI) is needed to bridge the gap between possible STEEEP (safe, timely, effective, efficient, equitable, and patient-centered) care and actual usual care. Baylor Health Care System (BHCS) developed Accelerating Best Care at Baylor (ABC Baylor), an innovative educational program that teaches health care leaders the theory and techniques of rapid-cycle QI. Course participants learn general principles of continuous QI, as well as health care-specific QI techniques, and finish the course by designing and implementing their own QI project. ABC Baylor has been employed in a variety of settings and has spread its success to other organizations, especially small and rural hospitals. These hospitals, like BHCS, have demonstrated sustained improvements that are due in part to the use of ABC Baylor and its reliance on specific modules that focus on health care safety, service, equity, and chronic disease management. The role of ABC Baylor training and consulting is part of the overall culture and infrastructure that have allowed BHCS to achieve success in its improvement journey, including the receipt of several national awards and the achievement of high reliability in compliance with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services core measures of processes of care related to heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, community-acquired pneumonia, and surgical care. The culture of rapid-cycle QI facilitated by ABC Baylor serves to link BHCS's vision and goals to practical execution. PMID:19865500

  7. Development of the NASA/Baylor VAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aber, G. S.; Akkerman, J. W.; Bozeman, R. J., Jr.; Saucler, D. R.; Bacak, J. W.; Svejkovsky, P. A.; Damm, G. A.; Mizuguchi, K.; Noon, G. P.; Nose, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A cooperative effort between the NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) has been underway since 1988 to develop a long-term implantable Ventricular Assist Device (VAD). The VAD is intended to boost the cardiac output of patients with deteriorated cardiac function. For many of these patients, the best alternative is heart transplantation. Heart transplantation is a complex and expensive procedure and usually requires a long waiting period for a donor heart. The condition of the patient often deteriorates during this waiting period which complicates the pre and post-operative care. Because of these factors, the need for a long-term implantable VAD for use as a bridge-to-transplant device or as a permanent assist device has become the focus of much research. The need for a VAD has been estimated at 50,000 to 60,000 patients per year in the United States alone. A device which satisfies all the system performance and reliability requirements has yet to be achieved. However, the development of the NASA/Baylor VAD has progressed to a state in which commercial viability can being to be considered. The device is small, simple, efficient and reliable which meets all requirements for a totally implantable VAD.

  8. [Kyongsong Imperial University Medical College].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, C D

    1992-01-01

    Japan annexed Korea in 1910 and with the promulgation of the Chosen Kyoyuk Ryong (the Korea Education Decree) in 1911, it began to conduct education for the Korean people. However, this was only a matter of formality and a policy for liquidating the spirit of the Korean people. It finally resulted in the uprising of March 1, 1919 of the Korean people that has a cultural tradition of a high level. This event served as a cause of widely spread censure among the Korean people as well as the people of the whole world. Even in Japan voice of criticism rose high. Such being the situation, Japan amended the Korean educational law under the pretext of shifting to a so-called civil-rule policy. The Japanese authorities adopted the same educational system as was practiced in Japan proper, for primary and middle school education. As for higher education, they placed under a strict control the educational facilities already established by Korean people and foreign missionaries, suppressing even minor expansions of existing facilities. However, the movement by some Korean educators to establish a private university and efforts by some missionaries to integrate the existing educational organizations into a university made it inevitable for the Japanese authorities to set up a university of their own in Korea. Thus, they hurriedly established the Kyonsong Imperial University in which was included a medical college that was an indispensable organization for colonial education. They professed that the medical college was established for the purpose of providing equal opportunities and privileges to Korean and Japanese students, but, on the contrary, the operation of the college was done strictly under their colonial policy. The system of the Kyongsong Imperial University was enforced acording to the Japanese Imperial University Law, and all the faculty members and the administratial officials were Japanese. As for Koreans, a few graduates of the university was named nonpaid deputy

  9. Medical Physics Undergraduate Degree Courses at University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Roy

    1989-01-01

    Described are the course, teaching/study, entry qualifications, and destination of graduates of four courses in medical physics from Exeter University, King's College London, University College London, and University College of Swansea. (YP)

  10. Initiatives for Medical Education Research at the International Medical University

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    Ramesh Chandra Jutti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical Education research is a relativelynew field but one that is progressing rapidly worldwide.This article is an attempt to take stock of the currentstatus of Medical Education research in InternationalMedical University and to explore the various factorsthat have influenced its direction. It also shares some ofthe initiatives that have been instituted or intended tobe instituted at our university.

  11. Mashhad University of Medical Sciences

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    Ali Shoeibi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available     Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV types 1 and 2 belong to the Oncorna group of retroviridae, a large family of viruses, grouped initially by pathogenic features, but later revised on the basis of genome structure and nucleotide sequence. HTLV-I was the first discovered human retrovirus to be associated with a malignancy in 1980. The malignancy, first described by Uchiyama and co-workers in southwestern Japan, was named Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL and characterized with cutaneous and respiratory involvement, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy and various metabolic abnormalities such as hypercalcemia. The HTLV-I has been known to be endemic to certain parts of Iran like the province of Khorasan in the northeast since 1990, with a 2.3% prevalence rate of infection. The main manifestations of HTLV-I infection are neurologic and hematologic (such as ATL disorders, but it has also other manifestations such as uveitis, arthritis, dermatitis, vitiligo and lymphocytic alveolitis. Its main neurologic manifestation is a chronic progressive myelopathy that is referred to HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy (HAM in Japan and Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (TSP in Caribbean. But other disorders such as peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, myopathy, peripheral facial paresis, and so on have been reported too. In this review we wish to give some brief information on the different aspects (including epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathology, clinical findings, and treatment of HTLV-I infection according to our twenty-year researches. The department of neurology of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences has been a pioneer in researches on HTLV-I in the last twenty years.  

  12. University medical education in Kenya: The challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndetei, David M; Mathai, Muthoni; Khasakhala, Lincoln I; Mutiso, Victoria; Mbwayo, Anne W

    2010-01-01

    There are two medical schools training doctors in Kenya: the Moi University established in 1984 and the University of Nairobi established in 1967. The University of Nairobi has so far produced the majority of Kenyan doctors. Both are public universities with the Government being the main financier. The increased demand for university education and the inability to meet these demands has led to the introduction of a system of training self-sponsored medical students alongside Government-subsidised students. One other public university has started a medical school. The pressure to increase the number of schools and students in the absence of increased resources poses a particular challenge to the country. PMID:20854156

  13. Industry analysis - Canadian medical doctoral universities

    OpenAIRE

    Crighton, Lyla Eileen

    2005-01-01

    Most public sector and non-profit entities do not undergo standard business analysis that is typically found in their private sector counterparts, however such approaches may provide administrators with information to better understand their industry. A high-level industry analysis of Canadian medical-doctoral universities, based on Porter's five forces and value chain analysis, combined with an analysis of pertinent issues indicated that universities are greatly affected by strategic decisio...

  14. Planning and Development of the Computer Resource at Baylor College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Ogilvie, W. Buckner, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the development and implementation of a plan at Baylor College of Medicine for providing computer support for both the administrative and scientific/ research needs of the Baylor community. The cost-effectiveness of this plan is also examined. (Author/CMV)

  15. Notes for contributors to Journal of Nanjing Medical University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Journal of Nanjing Medical University (English Edition) JNMU, sponsored by Nanjing Medical University, was established in 1987. It is a bimonthly comprehensive English medical journal published locally and abroad.Since 2007, Journal of Nanjing Medical University (English Edition )was granted Elsevier the full publishing and distribution rights worldwide for the Electronic Edition, excluding the People's Republic of China.

  16. Knowledge Management within the Medical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauzina, Svetlana Ye; Tikhonova, Tatiana A; Karpenko, Dmitriy S; Bogopolskiy, Gennady A; Zarubina, Tatiana V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work is studying the possibilities of ontological engineering in managing of medical knowledge. And also practical implementation of knowledge management system (KMS) in medical university. The educational process model is established that allows analyzing learning results within time scale. Glossary sub-system has been developed; ontologies of educational disciplines are constructed; environment for setup and solution of situational cases is established; ontological approach to assess competencies is developed. The possibilities of the system for solving situation tasks have been described. The approach to the evaluation of competence has been developed. PMID:26152966

  17. Knowledge Management within the Medical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauzina, Svetlana Ye; Tikhonova, Tatiana A; Karpenko, Dmitriy S; Bogopolskiy, Gennady A; Zarubina, Tatiana V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work is studying the possibilities of ontological engineering in managing of medical knowledge. And also practical implementation of knowledge management system (KMS) in medical university. The educational process model is established that allows analyzing learning results within time scale. Glossary sub-system has been developed; ontologies of educational disciplines are constructed; environment for setup and solution of situational cases is established; ontological approach to assess competencies is developed. The possibilities of the system for solving situation tasks have been described. The approach to the evaluation of competence has been developed.

  18. Students of Tehran Universities of Medical Sciences

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    Ghezelbash Sima

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social anxiety is an important factor in peoples’ mental health. Good mental health while studying in university makes students able to deal effectively with numerous stressors that they experience. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the social anxiety of nursing students in grades one to four of medical universities in Tehran. Methods: In this analytic cross-sectional study, 400 students from universities of medical sciences in Tehran were recruited by stratified sampling with proportional allocation. Data were collected during the first semester in 2010. Students completed a two-part questionnaire including the Liebowitz social anxiety questionnaire and a demographic information form. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics methods and an analytical test by SPSS statistical software. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the total scores of social anxiety of first- to fourth-year students. The mean score of the avoidance of social interaction dimension in fourth-year students was significantly lower than in first year students (p<0.05. Conclusion: In regard to the relationship between social anxiety and interpersonal communication as an associated part of nursing care, decrease of social anxiety of students could play an important role in their mental health. According to the results of this study, it seems that the placement of students in the nursing education system does not produce any changes in their social anxiety.

  19. ON ENGLISH TEACHING METHOD OF MEDICAL UNIVERSITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QinDerong; ChangMingli

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines issues in Teaching College English toMedicine major students at the Shanxi Medical University.According to a questionnaire survey which I carried out at theend of English courses in 1999, quite a few students complainedthat they didn't make considerable progress in English study after2 years' learning. Through investigation, 1 found that one ofthe main reasons was the pressure of their medical subjects --There were so many subjects and heavy tasks for them that they didn't have enough time to learn English. Then how to improvetheir English level? Some feasible solutions therefore aresuggested here and applied into practice. Now, Generallyspeaking, the English level of the students has somewhatimproved, which is embodied in their performances of variousexaminations, such as CET Band 4, Band 6, the graduateentrance examination and all kinds of English competitions.

  20. Computer Literacy Among Students of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Robabi, Hassan; Arbabisarjou, Azizollah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The need for medical students to be computer literate is vital. With the rapid integration of information technology (IT) in the health care field, equipping students of medical universities withcomputer competencies to effectively use are needed. The purpose of this study was to assess computer literacy (CL) needs of medical sciences students. Methods: This is descriptive-analytic. The population of the study comprised all students at Zahedan University of Medical Sciences. 385...

  1. Using Computer and Internet for Medical Literature Searching Among Medical Students in Hadramout University, Yemen

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulla Salim Bin Ghouth

    2008-01-01

    Background: Some researchers have observed that medical students used computer and internet for nonmedical purposes. Is this the case among medical students in a newly established medical college of Hadramout University in Yemen? Objectives: To assess the knowledge and usage of computer and internet among medical students of Hadramout University, find out the medical applications for which they use internet, and the factors that encourage the students to use computer and internet, with an ...

  2. Exploring academic leadership in medical schools and universities in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Bikmoradi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Background: Medical education in Iran has been integrated into the health care system through a complex organizational change that included the formation of a single government division called the Ministry of Health and Medical Education. This division is responsible for both medical education and health services at the national level, whereas health care at the provincial level is provided by medical universities. Due to this restructuring, medical academic leadership in th...

  3. Journal of Nanjing Medical University Instruction to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Journal of Nanjing Medical University, a citation source of China Science and Technology papers,sponsored by Nanjing Medical University, was established in 1987. It is a bimonthly comprehensive medical English journal, published in China and abroad.And it has been embodied by many famous international Resource Indexes such as CA, AJ. The Journal publishes English articles, summaries, reviews and case reports concerning basic, clinical and preventive medicine from teachers and researchers in medical institutes and hospitals world-wide. Priority for publication will be given to those funded by national or provincial foundation and on prize-winning research projects.

  4. Are medical ethics universal or culture specific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Furqaan; Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    In our society and culture where family is of utmost importance,sometimes I wonder how much of a doctor’s duty is to the patient and how much is to the whole family.As a medical student,I remember being told by my professors that we should treat the patient as a whole and not focus on just one problem or organ system.Similarly when practicing medicine in Pakistan,one cannot treat the patient alone and ignore the family.How much should relatives’ wishes be taken into account when dealing with a patient? Don’t patients have a right to their medical information? When,how,and by whom can that right be waived? What role does culture play when debating medical ethics?

  5. STOMATOLOGICAL FACULTY OF SARATOV STATE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY CELEBRATES - 20 YEARS

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    L.A. Googe

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Stomatological faculty of SaratovState Medical University was founded in 1988. During 20 years scientific stomatologic school on the basis of all major directions was formed in our university. Greatamountof high professional scientific staff and practitioners was trained.

  6. [SOROKA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER: THE ROAD TO LEADERSHIP IN QUALITY OF MEDICAL CARE, SERVICE AND RESEARCH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Ehud; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-02-01

    Soroka University Medical Center is a tertiary hospital, and the sole medical center in the Negev, the southern part of Israel. Soroka has invested in quality, service and research. The region has developed joint programs in order to advance the quality of medical care whilst optimizing the utilization of available resources. In this editorial we describe the path to leadership in quality of medical care, service and research.

  7. Identifying challenges for academic leadership in medical universities in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Masiello, Italo

    2010-05-01

    CONTEXT The crucial role of academic leadership in the success of higher education institutions is well documented. Medical education in Iran has been integrated into the health care system through a complex organisational change. This has called into question the current academic leadership, making Iranian medical universities and schools a good case for exploring the challenges of academic leadership. OBJECTIVES This study explores the leadership challenges perceived by academic managers in medical schools and universities in Iran. METHODS A qualitative study using 18 face-to-face, in-depth interviews with academic managers in medical universities and at the Ministry of Health and Medical Education in Iran was performed. All interviews were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis. RESULTS The main challenges to academic leadership could be categorised under three themes, each of which included three sub-themes: organisational issues (inefficacy of academic governance; an overly extensive set of missions and responsibilities; concerns about the selection of managers); managerial issues (management styles; mismatch between authority and responsibilities; leadership capabilities), and organisational culture (tendency towards governmental management; a boss-centred culture; low motivation). CONCLUSIONS This study emphasises the need for academic leadership development in Iranian medical schools and universities. The ability of Iranian universities to grow and thrive will depend ultimately upon the application of leadership skills. Thus, it is necessary to better designate authorities, roles of academic staff and leaders at governance.

  8. Identifying challenges for academic leadership in medical universities in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Masiello, Italo

    2010-05-01

    CONTEXT The crucial role of academic leadership in the success of higher education institutions is well documented. Medical education in Iran has been integrated into the health care system through a complex organisational change. This has called into question the current academic leadership, making Iranian medical universities and schools a good case for exploring the challenges of academic leadership. OBJECTIVES This study explores the leadership challenges perceived by academic managers in medical schools and universities in Iran. METHODS A qualitative study using 18 face-to-face, in-depth interviews with academic managers in medical universities and at the Ministry of Health and Medical Education in Iran was performed. All interviews were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis. RESULTS The main challenges to academic leadership could be categorised under three themes, each of which included three sub-themes: organisational issues (inefficacy of academic governance; an overly extensive set of missions and responsibilities; concerns about the selection of managers); managerial issues (management styles; mismatch between authority and responsibilities; leadership capabilities), and organisational culture (tendency towards governmental management; a boss-centred culture; low motivation). CONCLUSIONS This study emphasises the need for academic leadership development in Iranian medical schools and universities. The ability of Iranian universities to grow and thrive will depend ultimately upon the application of leadership skills. Thus, it is necessary to better designate authorities, roles of academic staff and leaders at governance. PMID:20518985

  9. Sleep quality in Zanjan university medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Ghoreishi A; Aghajani A H

    2008-01-01

    Background: Sleep has a major role in daily cycles and reconstruction of physical and mental abilities. Regarding the importance of this feature, we decided to determine sleep quality in medical students.Methods: A questionnaire containing demographic data, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was prepared. We distributed the questionnaires using a census method to every student at the Zanjan Faculty of Medicine. The completed questionnaires were collected and the data ...

  10. Self-Medication Practice with Nonprescription Medication among University Students: a review of the literature

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    Dedy Almasdy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review the literature relating to self-medicationpractice with nonprescription medication among universitystudents.Methods: A narrative review of studies on self-medicationpractice with nonprescription medication among universitystudent was performed. An extensive literature search wasundertaken using indexing services available at UniversitiSains Malaysia (USM library. The following keywords wereused for the search: self-care, self-medication, over-thecountermedicine, nonprescription medicine, minor illnesses,minor ailment, university population and communitypharmacy. Electronic databases searched were Science Direct,Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge, Inside Web, JSTOR, SpringerLink, Proquest, Ebsco Host and Google Scholar. Theseelectronic databases were searched for full text paperspublished in English.Results: Eleven studies were identified. In general, the reviewhas shown that self-medication practice with nonprescriptionmedication highly prevalence among university students. Thereasons for self-medication are vary among this populationand the main symptoms leading to self-medication areheadache or minor pain; fever, flu, cough, or cold; anddiarrhoea.The common medication is analgesic, antipyreticproducts, cough and cold remedies, anti allergy andvitamins or minerals. The sources of the medicines arepharmacy, home medicine cabinet, supermarket/shopand other person such as family, friend, neighbours andclassmates. The sources of drug information are familymember, previous experience, pharmacy salesman,doctor or nurse, advertisement and others. The reviewalso has shown that the self-medication practice couldhave many problems.Conclusions: The review provides insights about theself-medication practices among the university students.These practices were highly prevalence among universitystudents. The symptoms leading to self-medication arevary, thus the medication used and the medicationsources. It needs an adequate drug information

  11. Medical Physics Education at the University of Novi Sad - Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanković, Slobodanka; Vesković, Miroslav; Klisurić, Olivera; Spasić, Vesna

    2007-04-01

    Overview of new educational program and training in Medical Physics at the University of Novi Sad is presented, where the medical physics education from undergraduate to doctoral study is established in the last decade. Necessity for basic and additional education and hospital training for medical physicists becomes the evident subject in clinical practice in which physicists and physicians are in close collaboration to ensure high quality of patient care. Learning objectives: to incorporate the latest scientific and professional findings in the field of medical physics, medical diagnostics, therapy and instruments; to accomodate students' pursuits of individual fields by offering elective courses from different areas of current medical practice; to reflect the multidisciplinary spirit of the studies, since teaching is performed by experts from diverse fields.

  12. Sleep quality in Zanjan university medical students

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    Ghoreishi A

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep has a major role in daily cycles and reconstruction of physical and mental abilities. Regarding the importance of this feature, we decided to determine sleep quality in medical students.Methods: A questionnaire containing demographic data, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was prepared. We distributed the questionnaires using a census method to every student at the Zanjan Faculty of Medicine. The completed questionnaires were collected and the data was analyzed using SPSS.Results: A total of 224 students answered the questionnaire, with 133 (59.4% students evaluated to have good sleep quality and 91 (40.6% poor sleep quality. Of these 91 students, 38% were female and 44.8% were male (p=0.307. The prevalence of poor sleep quality according to the four stages of medical training was 24.6% of those in basic sciences, 42.9% of those in physiopathology, 41.7% of externs, and 53.5% of interns (p=0.008. According to residential status, the prevalence of poor sleep quality was 61.5% among students living with their spouse, 44.6% for students living in their own private homes, 37.6% among students living in the dormitory, and 20.8% for those living with their parents (p=0.024. According to marital status, 35.8% of singles and 64.9% of married students had poor sleep quality (p=0.001. According to financial status, 57.9%, 46.9%, and 33.9% of those from low, moderate and high economic classes, respectively, were sleep deprived (p=0.049. Among those with average grades of under 16 and over 16 out of 20, 47.5% and 32%, respectively, were suffering from poor sleep quality (p=0.047. There was no obvious relationship between sleep quality and BMI, sex, or history of depression or anxiety.Conclusion: Poor sleep quality was significantly associated with lower grades, economic status, living arrangement and type of training. A large number of students quality of life and work may suffer because sleep deprivation.

  13. Depression in Nursing Students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    F Rafati; J Ahmadi

    2004-01-01

    Background: University students are important parts of all educational systems. They are susceptible to different psychiatric disturbances, which in turn may cause considerable problems with their course programs. Depression is among the most important indices for investigation on human mental health status. This research was planed to study the prevalence and characteristics of depression and its consequences (suicidality, hopelessness, etc.) in nursing students at Shiraz University of Medic...

  14. [Physical anthropology studies at Keijo Imperial University Medical School].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ock-Joo

    2008-12-01

    Medical research during the Japanese Colonial Period became systematic and active after the Keijo Imperial University Medical School was established in 1926. Various kinds of research were conducted there including pharmacological, physiological, pathological and parasitological research. The Keijo Imperial University was give a mission to study about Korea. Urgent topics for medical research included control of infectious diseases, hygiene and environmental health that might have affected colonizing bodies of the Japanese as well as the colonized. The bodies of Koreans had been studied by Japanese even before the establishment of the University. The Keijo Imperial University research team, however, organized several field studies for physical anthropology and blood typing research at the national scale to get representative sampling of the people from its north to its south of the Korean peninsula. In the filed, they relied upon the local police and administrative power to gather reluctant women and men to measure them in a great detail. The physical anthropology and blood typing research by the Japanese researchers was related to their eagerness to place Korean people in the geography of the races in the world. Using racial index R.I.(= (A%+AB%)/(B%+AB%)), the Japanese researchers put Koreans as a race between the Mongolian and the Japanese. The preoccupation with constitution and race also pervasively affected the medical practice: race (Japanese, Korean, or Japanese living in Korea) must be written in every kind of medical chart as a default. After the breakout of Chinese-Japanese War in 1937, the Keijo Imperial University researchers extended its physical anthropology field study to Manchuria and China to get data on physics of the people in 1940. The Japanese government and research foundations financially well supported the Keijo Imperial University researchers and the field studies for physical anthropology in Korea, Manchuria and China. The physical

  15. Medical ethics as practiced by students, nurses and faculty members in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEILA BAZRAFCAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Assuming any social role has obligations and fulfilling the related responsibilities has ethical aspects that must be addressed carefully. Each role requires extensive training, which usually takes place in university institutions. Ethics is applied in at least three academic areas, including: a in education of students’ personal growth, b in patient care, and c in university communion in population-based health care. Given the importance of this issue in the moral domain, this study examines the correlation among the students, nurses and teacher’s opinions regarding principles of medical ethics at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This is a descriptive-analytic and cross-sectional study conducted in 2010. The participants of this research consisted of all medical students, nurses in public hospitals, and faculty members in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. For validity evaluation, the expert panel method and for reliability evaluation, test-retest method was used. Results: Based on the medical ethics’ scores in these three groups, there was a significant relationship between the mean scores of student-nurses and employed nurses, but there was no significant relationship between those of student-faculties. Also the mean score of the students was the highest in medical ethics. Conclusion: In this study, we presented a list of virtues and moral characteristics of medical staff and found out the method of practicing medical ethics in everyday life of students to improve the moral reasoning of teachers, nurses and students. Moreover, medical ethics, with the presentation of specific criteria for ethical behavior in various domains of human life, especially in dealing with patients, can help practice ethical values in the medical community.

  16. Self-medication in health students from two Brazilian universities

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    Delprina de G. Rocha de Carvalho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Self medication is a component of self care and it is considered as primary public health resource in health care system. It can be defined as use of non-prescription medicines by people on their own initiative. Dentists, together with doctors and veterinarians, comprise the professional classes that may and must prescribe medications for their patients. On the other hand, the nursing professionals are the ones who more administer drugs to patients in the ambulatory and hospital. Objective: This study was aimed to find out the frequency of self medication in selected university students, to find out the difference in the proportions of self medication between dentistry and nursing students, as well to evaluate the students’ knowledge of harmful effects of self medication and common problems of students that use the self medication. Material and methods: We were applied 209 questionnaires among dentistry students from the 3rd to 8th semesters at the Paulista University/Goiânia and 542 among nursing students from the 3rd to 8th semesters at the Estacio de Sa University of Goiás. Results and conclusion: In the present study was observed a high rate of self-medication among undergraduate students in the health area,particularly among the dentistry and nurse students. The result was alarming because the professional him/herself who should educate patients and dissuade them from this practice is a habitual user; it makes it more difficult to aspire to the future inhibition and reduction of this practice that is so harmful to health.

  17. E-learning in Type 1 Medical Universities of Iran

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    Mohammad Bagher ROKNI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nowadays the Internet is the technological pedestal of organization in the information society and one of the main applications that the Internet offers is the Digital Library (DL. Each society, especially those that claim training of the public, predictably need implementation and endorsement these systems. The time of chalk and board is passed and the globalization and universal village demands a movement targeting to establish an information society. The university is said to be responsible for making "Human". In the era of information explosion, how can a university rely on a physical classroom, a tired teacher and some drowsy students listening to him? Internet "the sweet invention of man" is a bridge, between "slump" and "spurt". It is up to each authority in a university to design, employ, develop and evaluate a system embracing Internet, Multimedia, Network and so on to go parallel in modern era and to introduce the supreme system of E-learning in its program. Of different aspects of E-learning including computer networks, multimedia, search engines, electronic libraries, distance learning, and all that (Piskurich, 2003, most of the type 1 medical universities of Iran exploit, some how or another, all or some of them. These universities including Tehran, Iran, Shahid Beheshti, Mashhad, Isfahan, Tabriz, Shiraz, Ahwaz, and Kerman, at present encompass a powerful link with their audiences regarding digital libraries, search engine and authentic data bases. The present article is going to have a bird's eye view at various capacities of these universities in this regard.

  18. Motivation of university and non-university stakeholders to change medical education in Vietnam

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    Ruitenberg EJ

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both university and non-university stakeholders should be involved in the process of curriculum development in medical schools, because all are concerned with the competencies of the graduates. That may be difficult unless appropriate strategies are used to motivate each stakeholder. From 1999 to 2006, eight medical schools in Vietnam worked together to change the curriculum and teaching for general medical students to make it more community oriented. This paper describes the factors that motivated the different stakeholders to participate in curriculum change and teaching in Vietnamese medical schools and the activities to address those factors and have sustainable contributions from all relevant stakeholders. Methods Case study analysis of contributions to the change process, using reports, interviews, focus group discussions and surveys and based on Herzberg's Motivation Theory to analyze involvement of different stakeholders. Results Different stakeholders were motivated by selected activities, such as providing opportunities for non-university stakeholders to share their opinions, organizing interactions among university stakeholders, stimulating both bottom-up and top-down inputs, focusing on learning from each other, and emphasizing self-motivation factors. Conclusion The Herzberg Motivation theory helped to identify suitable approaches to ensure that teaching topics, materials and assessment methods more closely reflected the health care needs of the community. Other medical schools undertaking a reform process may learn from this experience.

  19. Frequency and risk factors associated with emergency medical readmissions in Galway University Hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, J

    2010-06-01

    Unplanned readmissions of medical hospital patients have been increasing in recent years. We examined the frequency and associates of emergency medical readmissions to Galway University Hospitals (GUH).

  20. THE MEDICAL COLLECTIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TARTU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomsalu, Maie; Pärnsalu, Liina; Tapfer, Helle; Mesila, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    In the year 1999, a new and modern building Biomedicum was finished addressed to preclinic subjects of the Medical Faculty of the University of Tartu; the institutions of anatomy as well as pathological anatomy and forensic medicine moved there. However; no place was planned to exhibit the collections of specimens. Many of the specimens which had so far only been used for learning purposes found their place in the Old Anatomical Theatre, in the hope that this could be transformed as a museum. The medical collections of the Medical Faculty were opened up for a broader audience in October 2005. With the support of the national programme "The collections of humanities and natural sciences", the medical study specimens, models, moulages, and literature related to them in danger of being destroyed were collected from several subdivisions and buildings of the Medical Faculty. In 2012, the medical exhibition moved to the premises of Science Centre AHHAA and in the same time a specifc educational study began to be developed.

  1. Medical education quality assessment. Perspectives in University Policlinic context.

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    Maricel Castellanos González

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Quality has currently a central role within our National Health System, particularly in the formative process of human resources where we need professionals more prepared every day and ready to face complex tasks. We make a bibliographic review related to quality assessment of educational process in health system to analyze the perspectives of the new model of University Policlinic, formative context of Medical Sciences students.

  2. University of North Carolina's experience with state medical assistance teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Jeff; Murtaugh, Lisa; Hoffman, Randy

    2010-01-01

    Events in the last several years have shown a clear need for better preparation regarding disaster management. In an effort to improve this preparation, North Carolina implemented state medical assistant teams to provide alternative care facilities, decontamination facilities, and shelter assistance during times of disaster. This article explores these teams from the perspective of the University of North Carolina, which serves as a lead agency for one of these teams. Key components of the team, training provided, and lessons learned will be discussed.

  3. Organizational behavior of employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Dargahi, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Organizational behaviors are commonly acknowledged as fundamentals of organizational life that strongly influence both formal and informal organizational processes, interpersonal relationships, work environments, and pay and promotion policies. The current study aims to investigate political behavior tendencies among employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted on 810 TUMS employees at the headquarters of the T...

  4. Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics Program at Ryerson University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimirova, Tetyana

    2006-12-01

    A new Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics program at Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario was launched in Fall 2006. The program builds on Ryerson’s strong existing capabilities in biomedical physics research. The program’s point of entry is the common first year during which all students in Biology, Chemistry, Contemporary Science and Medical Physics programs complete the foundation courses that include physics, calculus, biology, chemistry, and introduction to computing. In addition to the foundation courses, the first-year studies include an orientation course that supports the students in making a successful transition to university studies. The courses beyond the first year include such topics as radiation therapy, image analysis, medical diagnostics and computer modeling techniques. In the final year the students will undertake an independent, faculty-supervised thesis project in an area of personal research interest. Co-op and industrial internship options are available. Our program promotes natural interaction between physics, life sciences, mathematics and computing. The flexibility built into our curriculum will open a variety of career options for our graduates.

  5. Emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Mohammadifar, Mehdi

    2013-04-06

    Nowadays, educators pay attention to emotional intelligence which is defined as the ability to monitor and explain one's own and other's emotional experience and feelings to differentiate between them as well as applying necessary information for determining thoughts and actions. The goal of this study was to determine emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. By means of two stage cluster sampling, 98 medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected. Participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian version of Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i) questionnaire which had been developed due to Bar-On model. Seventy two filled-up questionnaires were returned (RR=73%). Mean EI score of all participants was 319.94 ± 32.4. Mean EI score was not significantly different between male and female also, single and married participants. EI did not differ significantly in residents in respect to their discipline. Mean responsibility subscale differ significantly between male and female participants (P=0.008). Multiple regression analysis showed that happiness subscale is a predictive factor for total EI score (B=-0.32, P=0.009). Responsibility subscale differed significantly between men and women participants and happiness subscale was a good predictor for emotional intelligence score. These factors should be considered in education of medical residents.

  6. Emotional Intelligence of Medical Residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Ghajarzadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, educators pay attention to emotional intelligence which is defined as the ability to monitor and explain one’s own and other’s emotional experience and feelings to differentiate between them as well as applying necessary information for determining thoughts and actions. The goal of this study was to determine emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. By means of two stage cluster sampling, 98 medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected. Participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian version of Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i questionnaire which had been developed due to Bar-On model. Seventy two filled-up questionnaires were returned (RR=73%. Mean EI score of all participants was 319.94 ± 32.4. Mean EI score was not significantly different between male and female also, single and married participants. EI did not differ significantly in residents in respect to their discipline. Mean responsibility subscale differ significantly between male and female participants (P=0.008. Multiple regression analysis showed that happiness subscale is a predictive factor for total EI score (B=-0.32, P=0.009. Responsibility subscale differed significantly between men and women participants and happiness subscale was a good predictor for emotional intelligence score. These factors should be considered in education of medical residents.

  7. Emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Mohammadifar, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, educators pay attention to emotional intelligence which is defined as the ability to monitor and explain one's own and other's emotional experience and feelings to differentiate between them as well as applying necessary information for determining thoughts and actions. The goal of this study was to determine emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. By means of two stage cluster sampling, 98 medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected. Participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian version of Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i) questionnaire which had been developed due to Bar-On model. Seventy two filled-up questionnaires were returned (RR=73%). Mean EI score of all participants was 319.94 ± 32.4. Mean EI score was not significantly different between male and female also, single and married participants. EI did not differ significantly in residents in respect to their discipline. Mean responsibility subscale differ significantly between male and female participants (P=0.008). Multiple regression analysis showed that happiness subscale is a predictive factor for total EI score (B=-0.32, P=0.009). Responsibility subscale differed significantly between men and women participants and happiness subscale was a good predictor for emotional intelligence score. These factors should be considered in education of medical residents. PMID:23605604

  8. Modernizing and transforming medical education at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisasi, Esther; Kulanga, Ahaz; Muiruri, Charles; Killewo, Lucy; Fadhili, Ndimangwa; Mimano, Lucy; Kapanda, Gibson; Tibyampansha, Dativa; Ibrahim, Glory; Nyindo, Mramba; Mteta, Kien; Kessi, Egbert; Ntabaye, Moshi; Bartlett, John

    2014-08-01

    The Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University (KCMU) College and the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) are addressing the crisis in Tanzanian health care manpower by modernizing the college's medical education with new tools and techniques. With a $10 million MEPI grant and the participation of its partner, Duke University, KCMU is harnessing the power of information technology (IT) to upgrade tools for students and faculty. Initiatives in eLearning have included bringing fiber-optic connectivity to the campus, offering campus-wide wireless access, opening student and faculty computer laboratories, and providing computer tablets to all incoming medical students. Beyond IT, the college is also offering wet laboratory instruction for hands-on diagnostic skills, team-based learning, and clinical skills workshops. In addition, modern teaching tools and techniques address the challenges posed by increasing numbers of students. To provide incentives for instructors, a performance-based compensation plan and teaching awards have been established. Also for faculty, IT tools and training have been made available, and a medical education course management system is now being widely employed. Student and faculty responses have been favorable, and the rapid uptake of these interventions by students, faculty, and the college's administration suggests that the KCMU College MEPI approach has addressed unmet needs. This enabling environment has transformed the culture of learning and teaching at KCMU College, where a path to sustainability is now being pursued. PMID:25072581

  9. Reflections: Evolution of PBL in the International Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hla-Yee-Yee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the evolution of PBL inthe International Medical University over a periodof twenty years; since its inception in 1992 till 2012.It is a record of the reasons for the evolution, the peopleinvolved and the strategies adopted. The PBL in IMUhas metamorphosed over the years from a paper-basedcomplete case history into its present form of staggeredrelease of information, paper-based or otherwise (videos,web-based, newspaper cuttings, debates. Strategies toimprove student and facilitator buy-in, strengtheningof facilitator training, adoption of PBL templates,innovations to improve student participation arediscussed.

  10. Knowledge of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences regarding plagiarism.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Hadi Gharedaghi; Keramat Nourijelyani; Mohammad Salehi Sadaghiani; Yashar Yousefzadeh-Fard; Azadeh Gharedaghi; Pouya Javadian; Afsaneh Morteza; Yasir Andrabi; Saharnaz Nedjat

    2013-01-01

    The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people’s ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions ...

  11. The medical school curriculum at University Malaysia Sabah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, P; Osman, A

    2005-08-01

    The integrated curriculum at the newly established medical school at University Malaysia Sabah is examined from aspects of the objectives of the medical training in achieving development of the required skills and knowledge as well as personal and professional development. The teaching is spread over five years with an emphasis on basic medical sciences in the first two years although the students are exposed to clinical skills right from the onset. A gradual transition to emphasis on the acquisition of clinical skills occurs from the third year onwards. However, community medicine and professional development are incorporated into the programme from the first year and are carried over to the final year. Although there are examinations to be passed in all the courses taught every semester, with a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3.0 (65 percentile score) and the candidate has to pass all the examinations in that year to clear a particular year, two professional examinations are administered, one at the end of the Third Year (end of the Phase I of the Medical Programme) and another at the end of the Fifth or Final year (end of the Phase II of the Medical Programme). Programmes for Postings, Shadow House Officers (SHOP) and Population Health are also incorporated into the curriculum. Delivery of the courses involve Lectures, Self-Learning Packages (SLP), Small Group Discussions (SGD), Seminars, Debates, Dramas, Video clips, Special Study Modules (SSM), Computer-Aided Instruction (CAI), Problem-based Learning (PBL), Problem-solving Sessions (PSS) and Clinical Skills Learning (CSL). The examination involves elements of continuous assessment and final end of semester or end of phases I and II Professional Examinations. Practical may involve Objective Structured Practical Examinations (OSPE) and/or Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE). They may also involve viva voce and/or short and long case presentations and assessment of log book entries.

  12. HOW MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATES PREPARE FOR UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION: LESSON FROM A TEACHING MEDICAL INSTITUTION IN SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shib Sekhar Datta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical colleges in India conventionally follow a curriculum overfed with large volume of information expecting students will imbibe such curriculum unquestionably overlooking what and how they progress. There have been many attempts to improve the learning process of medical students, neglecting the process which students adopt towards such learning and prepare for their exams aiming better performance. Objective: To explore qualitatively the way medical undergraduates prepare for their university examination. Methods: Present qualitative research was undertaken among medical interns during Nov-2011 to March-2012. FGDs were conducted by trained moderator using semi-structured guidelines and note taker recorded each FGD. Content analysis of FGDs was primarily oriented towards behaviour of medical undergraduates during preparatory phase before their university examinations like study pattern, study material, eating behaviour, level of stress, addiction etc. Qualitative content analysis of textual level of data was undertaken using Atlas.ti.5.0 software package. Results: Students are serious about studies just before examinations and refer to notes prepared by seniors, small books with important topics, and self-made notes. Girls depend predominantly on self-made notes. Students primarily focus on important topics in each subject. Time-in-hand decides what they study and try to remember before exams. They become casual about their diet, clothing and self-care. Stress, fear and high academic expectation often drive them towards addictive substances. They often suffer from loneliness and seek empathy from opposite sex batch mates, seniors, teachers and family members and start believing in their fortune and examiners' will rather than actual preparation. Conclusion: Students' psychology and culture should be addressed in harmony with curriculum reform for better learning by medical undergraduates.

  13. Medication therapy management clinic: perception of healthcare professionals in a University medical center setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the overall perception and utilization of the pharmacist managed medication therapy management (MTM clinic services, by healthcare professionals in a large, urban, university medical care setting.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, anonymous survey sent to 195 healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists at The University of Illinois Outpatient Care Center to determine their perception and utilization of the MTM clinic. The survey consisted of 12 questions and was delivered through a secure online application. Results: Sixty-two healthcare professionals (32% completed the survey. 82% were familiar with the MTM clinic, and 63% had referred patients to the clinic. Medication adherence and disease state management was the most common reason for referral. Lack of knowledge on the appropriate referral procedure was the prominent reason for not referring patients to the MTM clinic. Of the providers that were aware of MTM services, 44% rated care as ‘excellent’, 44% as ‘good’, 5% as ‘fair’, and 0% stated ‘poor’. Strengths of MTM clinic identified by healthcare providers included in-depth education to patients, close follow-up, and detailed medication reconciliation provided by MTM clinic pharmacists. Of those familiar with MTM clinic, recommendations included; increase marketing efforts to raise awareness of the MTM clinic service, create collaborative practice agreements between MTM pharmacists and physicians, and ensure that progress notes are more concise.Conclusion: In a large, urban, academic institution MTM clinic is perceived as a valuable resource to optimize patient care by providing patients with in-depth education as it relates to their prescribed medications and disease states. These identified benefits of MTM clinic lead to frequent patient referrals specifically for aid with medication adherence and disease state management.

  14. Depression in Nursing Students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

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    F Rafati

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: University students are important parts of all educational systems. They are susceptible to different psychiatric disturbances, which in turn may cause considerable problems with their course programs. Depression is among the most important indices for investigation on human mental health status. This research was planed to study the prevalence and characteristics of depression and its consequences (suicidality, hopelessness, etc. in nursing students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: All undergraduate nursing students at Fatemeh College of Nursing and Midwifery were tested with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results: This research revealed that 60% of students were depressed, 34% of them had mild depression, 18.4% moderate, 6% relatively severe and 1.6% severe depression. Mean score of BDI was not significantly different between female and male subjects (13.8 ± 9 in females vs. 15.2 ± 10 in males; total 14.1 ± 11 Conclusions: This research shows that there is still a high proportion of University students having depression, which necessitates considerable attention to their problems. Keywords: Nursing Students, Beck Depression Inventory, Depression.

  15. Surviving Hurricane Katrina: reconstructing the educational enterprise of Tulane University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, N Kevin; Kahn, Marc J; Markert, Ronald J; Whelton, Paul K; Traber, Peter G; Taylor, Ian L

    2007-08-01

    Hurricane Katrina was one of the greatest natural disasters to ever strike the United States. Tulane University School of Medicine, located in downtown New Orleans, and its three major teaching hospitals were flooded in the aftermath of the storm and forced to close. Faculty, students, residents, and staff evacuated to locations throughout the country. All critical infrastructure that normally maintained the school, including information technology, network communication servers, registration systems, and e-mail, became nonoperational. However, on the basis of experiences learned when Tropical Storm Allison flooded the Texas Medical Center in 2001, Baylor College of Medicine, University of Texas-Houston, University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, and Texas A&M School of Medicine created the South Texas Alliance of Academic Health Centers, which allowed Tulane to move its education programs to Houston. Using Baylor's facilities, Tulane faculty rebuilt and delivered the preclinical curriculum, and clinical rotations were made available at the Alliance schools. Remarkably, the Tulane School of Medicine was able to resume all educational activities within a month after the storm. Educational reconstruction approaches, procedures employed, and lessons in institutional recovery learned are discussed so that other schools can prepare effectively for either natural or man-made disasters. Key disaster-response measures include designating an evacuation/command site in advance; backing up technology, communication, financial, registration, and credentialing systems; and establishing partnership with other institutions and leaders. PMID:17762249

  16. Antibiotics self-medication among medical and nonmedical students at two prominent Universities in Benghazi City, Libya

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed F Ghaieth; Sara R. M. Elhag; Mamoun E Hussien; Konozy, Emad H. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trivial use of antibiotics is a major reason for the spread of antibiotics resistance. The aim behind undertaking this investigation was to study the prevalence antibiotics self-medication among university students in Benghazi city. Methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional, survey was conducted at both Libyan International Medical University and Benghazi University. A total of 665 copies of questionnaires was distributed. A total of 363 forms were completed and returned (res...

  17. [The assessment of health behaviours among Warsaw Medical University students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowska, Alicja; Szewczyńiski, Jerzy A

    2002-01-01

    Some health behaviours among 228 students of Warsaw Medical University (130 women and 98 men) using anonymous questionnaire were examined. Percentage of smokers among female and male students was similar (13.1% and 14.3% respectively). Among respondents the greatest frequency of drinking alcohol was from a few times weekly to a few times monthly. Male students drunk alcohol more often than female ones. Beer was prefered by men, wine and beer--by women. Only male students (10.2%) used drugs (amphetamine, marihuana). About 1/3 of respondents did not do any sports. Female students had better knowledge about objective factors of their health status (blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol level) compared to males ones. PMID:17474607

  18. Security of Radioactive Sources in the University Medical Centre Utrecht

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past years, the security of radioactive sources in the University Medical Centre Utrecht was enhanced by taking different security measures. Radiation protection experts and security professionals worked together in making a fit gap analysis of sources, threats and security measures. The analysis showed where and which action was necessary. Several electronic and organizational measures were taken to comply with the new ministerial order for the security of radioactive sources. All security measures are recorded in a security plan that will be part of the radiation protection programme. Awareness and acceptance of possible threats is essential for staff to comply with security regulations. Frequent inspection of compliance is essential to internalize the new security rules. Plans to test the effectiveness of the security measures in place are under development. (author)

  19. Self-medication with analgesics among medical students and interns in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Nahla Khamis; Alamoudi, Banan Mohammad; Baamer, Wejdan Omar; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and predictors of self-medication with analgesics among senior medical students and interns in King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 504 participants in 2013. A multistage stratified random sampling was used. A confidential, anonymous & self-administered questionnaire was used to collect personal & socio-demographic data. Data about self-medication and self-medication with analgesics ...

  20. Knowledge of triage in the senior medical students in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOSSEIN MAHMOODIAN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Triage is a response to the problem of overcrowding in Emergency Departments (EDs and accuracy of decisions made by the triage unit affects the ultimate outcome of EDs. This study was conducted to evaluate the knowledge of triage among last year medical students in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This is a cross-sectional analytical study whose subjects were all the senior students of medicine (62 in the last year of medicine from January to June 2013 who attended emergency medicine course in the screen room of 2 University Hospitals. This questionnaire was designed in 3 sections including personal data, 15 questions on knowledge of triage and 10 case scenarios for triage decision making and completed by the students. Statistical analysis was performed in SPSS statistical software (version 14 using independent sample t-test, one way ANOVA, and Pearson correlation coefficient (p≤0.001. Results: The total mean score of the participants was 10.6±1.5, ranging from 7 to 13. 58(93.5% students had poor triage knowledge. In the scenario’s section, the percentage of correct triage by students was 49.2% and those of over and under triage were 28.1% and 22.7%, respectively. There was a significant relationship between the triage accuracy and level of triage (ESI 4 (p≤0.001. Conclusion: The level of knowledge of triage in the last year medical students was poor, although most of them had passed a course in the screen room. It is recommended that medical students’ educational courses should include sections on the knowledge of triage in emergency rooms.

  1. The Prevalence and Affecting Factors on Self-Medication Among Students of Kermanshah University of Medical Science in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Sayed Mojtaba; Sadeghi, Khirollah; Abdi, Alireza; Vahid, Mansour Pashaie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Self-medication is an increasingly growing health problem, which has many adverse effects on human and the cost used in the production of medications. Aim The current study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of self-medication among student of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2014. Materials and Methods In a descriptive-cross-sectional study, 364 students of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences were recruited through stratified random sampling method. Data collection was done by researcher-made questionnaire, entered to SPSS22 software and analysed by descriptive and inferential statistics. Results Of the 364 students, prevalence of self-medication was 123 (33.7%) the mean age was 21.63±1.92, among them 64.2% took the medication from the pharmacy and 34.95% have faced complications of self-medication. The main cause of self-medication among students were the history of a disease of taking medication (44.71%), deemed no importance of the disease (34.95%), and easy accessibility of the medication (20.32%). Conclusion With regard to the high prevalence of self-medication among the students, it is suggested to provide educational programs on the adverse effects of self-medication, and appropriate measures to control and prevent easy access to the medications. PMID:27437242

  2. Evaluation of self-medication practices in acute diseases among university students in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Al Flaiti

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of self-medication among university students was very high. There is a need for intensive education and comprehensive awareness campaign to advocate for reduction in the prevalence of self-medication practices among students.

  3. Nonstandard Programs: the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's next frontier in graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroboth, Frank J; Zerega, W Dennis; Patel, Rita M; Barnes, Barbara E; Webster, Marshall W

    2011-02-01

    The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center has seen continuous growth in the number and types of graduate training programs not accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the American Board of Medical Specialties, or the American Osteopathic Association. For the purposes of ensuring best educational products and of controlling unrecognized competition with our accredited programs, a sequential process of centralized oversight of these nonstandard programs was undertaken. The first step involved programs whose fellows were hired and tracked like accredited fellows (i.e., not instructors). The basic process began with consensus among leadership, writing of policy with consultation as necessary, establishment of a registry of programs and graduates, and a committee to allow sharing of best practices and dissemination of policy. The second step applied the same process to instructor-level programs. Whereas the previous group of programs was made subject to ACGME regulations, more latitude in duty hours and progressive responsibility were allowed for instructor programs. The final step, in progress, is extending a similar but modified approach to short-duration clinical experiences and observerships. The outcomes of these efforts have been the creation of a centralized organizational structure, policies to guide this structure, an accurate registry of a surprising number of training programs, and a rolling record of all graduates from these programs. Included in the process is a mechanism that ensures that core program directors and department chairs specifically review the impact of new programs on core programs before allowing their creation. PMID:21169779

  4. [Tobacco smoking amongst students in the Medical Faculty of Wroclaw Medical University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpas, Donata; Jasińska, Ajicja; Wojtal, Mariola; Sochocka, Lucyna; Seń, Mariola

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of health promotion and diseases profilaxis is a struggle with smoking, which is a well known factor in many disorders, i.e. malignant carcinomas, noncarcinomatous diseases of respiratory system and cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the study was the analysis of the smoking level amongst the students of 6th year of the Medical Faculty of Wroclaw Medical University. Amongst 131 polled women--116 were non-smoking persons (88.5%), 15 smoking (11.5%). Amongst 55 polled men--43 these are non-smoking persons (78%), 12 smoking (22%). Out of smoking women, the most women (6) is smoking from 11 to 15 cigarettes per day, out of smoking men, the most (5 men)--6-10 cigarettes per day. Smoking women began smoking during the secondary school the most often. 8 of men began the smoking in the secondary school. The majority of examined didn't try to limit smoking. Respondents would expect the biggest support from close persons during giving up smoking Only 59% of women and 64% of men disagree definitely to smoking in their presence. In the consequence of above results surprising seems still high percentage of smokers amongst examined, scantiness of taking attempts of giving up smoking and indifference of non-smoking medical students towards smoking in their presence. PMID:18409311

  5. Effect of rising medical student debt on residency specialty selection at the University of Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, Paul

    2006-06-01

    The cost of a medical education continues to increase while the real value of physician compensation is decreasing. The University of Minnesota Medical School is the most expensive public medical school in the country. Rising tuition costs combined with a relative decrease in scholarship money is resulting in dramatic increases in medical student debt. The average debt load of a medical student graduating from the University of Minnesota was dollars 119,868 in 2004 and dollars 132,988 in 2005. Experts in medical education speculate that such heavy debt affects medical students' career choices. However, prior to this study, the relationship between student debt and residency specialty selection at the University of Minnesota had not been analyzed. This study found a significant correlation between debt and specialty selection at the University of Minnesota, Duluth campus, and no significant correlation at the Twin Cities campus in Minneapolis. PMID:16846185

  6. Definition of "Rural" Determines the Placement Outcomes of a Rural Medical Education Program: Analysis of Jichi Medical University Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Masatoshi; Inoue, Kazuo; Kajii, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To show the impact of changing the definition of what is "rural" on the outcomes of a rural medical education program. Methods: A cross-sectional sample of 643 graduates under obligatory rural service and 1,699 graduates after serving their obligation, all from Jichi Medical University (JMU), a binding rural education program in Japan,…

  7. Attitudes of undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University towards medical practice and migration, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deressa Wakgari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The health care system of Ethiopia is facing a serious shortage of health workforce. While a number of strategies have been developed to improve the training and retention of medical doctors in the country, understanding the perceptions and attitudes of medical students towards their training, future practice and intent to migrate can contribute in addressing the problem. This study was carried out to assess the attitudes of Ethiopian medical students towards their training and future practice of medicine, and to identify factors associated with the intent to practice in rural or urban settings, or to migrate abroad. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2009 among 600 medical students (Year I to Internship program of the Faculty of Medicine at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. A pre-tested self-administered structured questionnaire was used for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used for data summarization and presentation. Degree of association was measured by Chi Square test, with significance level set at p  Results Only 20% of the students felt ‘excellent’ about studying medicine; followed by ‘very good’ (19%, ‘good’ (30%, ‘fair’ (21% and ‘bad’ (11%. About 35% of respondents responded they felt the standard of medical education was below their expectation. Only 30% of the students said they would like to initially practice medicine in rural settings in Ethiopia. However, students with rural backgrounds were more likely than those with urban backgrounds to say they intended to practice medicine in rural areas (adjusted OR = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.18-5.26. Similarly, students in clinical training program preferred to practice medicine in rural areas compared to pre-clinical students (adjusted OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.12-2.99. About 53% of the students (57% males vs. 46% females, p = 0.017 indicated aspiration to emigrate following graduation, particularly to the

  8. Medical Residents’ Viewpoints on Clinical Training Status of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Ordoei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical training is an important process in residency academic program in different fields. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, we identified the views of clinical residents about clinical training status at Yazd University of Medical Sciences at their second-year of residency or above. We used questionnaire as the instrument for collecting information and select all residents as the sample of study. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistical tests. Clinical training status was assessed to be at an intermediate level by residents, and the areas of evaluation method, resources and facilities, training system, performance, performance of personnel of therapeutic departments, and resident’s performance received the highest score, respectively. Areas of evaluation method and facilities were determined as strengths, and areas of the performance of therapeutic department’s personnel and residents as the weaknesses of clinical training.

  9. 78 FR 15957 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... Medical Device Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference... University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Medical Device... to protect the public health. The conference will provide those engaged in FDA-regulated...

  10. An Investigation of GEPT Test Anxiety for Medical University Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-huei; Lai, Ching-Ju; Liao, Hung-Chang

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether or not different medical university students experience different levels of anxiety in taking the General English Proficiency Test (GEPT), and whether or not there are differences in GEPT test anxiety levels among medical university students with different genders and from different departments. This study uses a GEPT…

  11. Antibiotics self-medication among medical and nonmedical students at two prominent Universities in Benghazi City, Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F Ghaieth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trivial use of antibiotics is a major reason for the spread of antibiotics resistance. The aim behind undertaking this investigation was to study the prevalence antibiotics self-medication among university students in Benghazi city. Methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional, survey was conducted at both Libyan International Medical University and Benghazi University. A total of 665 copies of questionnaires was distributed. A total of 363 forms were completed and returned (response rate 55%. Remaining responses were either with no antibiotics use history within the past 1 year or were provided incomplete. Results: Among the respondents, 45% were males and 55% females. Males practiced self-medication more compared to females. Approximately, 43% and 46% from medical and nonmedical students, respectively, were antibiotics self-medicated. A total of 153 students (42% out of total respondents administered antibiotics for symptoms related to respiratory problems, among which 74 students (48% took antibiotics based on doctor′s prescription. Among the respondents, 94 students (27% who had antibiotics, were covered under medical insurance, and 19 (29% of the medically insured students had antibiotics without doctor′s prescription. About 14% of students did not complete their antibiotics course. Of these, 57% were medical students, and 43% were nonmedical students. The rate of self-medication among higher classes was more as compared to lower classes. About 58% of students overdosed the antibiotic, while 15% had antibiotics for <3 days, for treatment of ailments such as acne, toothache, diarrhea, earache, and tonsillitis. About 75% of students purchased the antibiotics in consultation with a pharmacist. Conclusion: Self-medication is a frequent problem among university students in Benghazi city. There is a need for an immediate intervention to address this malpractice among both students and medical practitioners.

  12. Quality of life of medical students in Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Heidari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the quality of life (QOL of Tehran University of Medical Sciences' (TUMS medical students at different educational levels and specify the most important factors related to this quality. A sample of 242 medical students was selected randomly, given their number in three educational levels (basic sciences, physiopathology-stager and intern. The QOL was measured by WHOQOL-BREF. The students obtained average high score in two psychological and environmental health domains, and low score in physical health and social relationship domains. As the educational level of students increased their quality of life decreased at all four domains. At social relationship domain, the female students had overall better situation as compared to males (p=0.009. The female and male students had opposite condition at the level of basic sciences and internship, in a way that the female students earned higher marks at basic sciences level and the males at internship level (P= 0.008. The condition of female students in terms of environmental, physical and psychological health became static while their education rose. However, only environmental health of the male students reduced as their education level increased (P= 0.05. The students were of undesirable conditions in two domains of social relationship and physical health. Internship is a specific level in both groups which has a negative impact on the dimensions of quality of life and naturally needs more care for the students. Married status improved the students' QOL and could moderate the undesired effects of internship.

  13. A Study of Medical Students\\' Viewpoints at Zahedan Medical University on the Effects of the Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Roudbari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The course "Health IV" and "consulting room" are two resources of learning about the method of preparing proposal and passing the final thesis for medical students at Zahedan University of Medical Sciences (ZUMS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the students' viewpoints on the effects of "Health IV" and consulting room on their final theses (pl. of thesis. Methods : The sample in this descriptive study included 155 medical students of ZUMS who had registered their theses at the school. The study was conducted during 2005-2006 and the data were collected using a questionnaire and analyzed via descriptive statistics of correlation and Chi-square test. Results : The findings of the study revealed that 38.1% of the students agreed or completely agreed with integrating the two courses "Research Methods" and "Health IV". Also, 43.9% of the subjects disagreed or completely disagreed with it. Approximately, 35% of the students used the services of the consulting room in writing their proposals. The effect of this service on the final thesis was low and very low in 10.3%, moderate in 12.3%, and high and very high in 20% of the students. About 25.8% of the subjects used the room services in conducting their theses, 61.3% did not use the services. The percent of the students who used the room in writing the proposal or doing their theses or did not use it at all was 85%. The effect of the room on conducting the thesis project was low and very low in 7.1%, moderate in 11.6%, and high and very high in 20%. Conclusion : The high amount of agreement with the complete integration of the "Research Methods" and "Health IV" needs more investigation. Also, the necessity of the consulting room should be revised by the manager and its continuation should be on the students' demands.

  14. Scientific Production of Medical Universities in the West of Iran: a Scientometric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasolabadi, Masoud; Khaledi, Shahnaz; Khayati, Fariba; Kalhor, Marya Maryam; Penjvini, Susan; Gharib, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to compare scientific production by providing quantitative evaluation of science output in five Western Iranian Medical Universities including Hamedan, Ilam, Kermanshah, Kurdistan and Lorestan University of Medical Sciences using scientometrics indicators based on data indexed in Scopus for period between the years 2010 to 2014. Methods: In this scientometric study data were collected using Scopus database. Both searching and analyzing features of Scopus were used to data retrieval and analysis. We used Scientometrics indicators including number of publications, number of citations, nationalization index (NI), Internationalization Index (INI), H-index, average number of citations per paper, and growth index. Results: Five Western Iranian Universities produced over 3011 articles from 2010 to 2014. These articles were cited 7158 times with an average rate of 4.2 citations per article. H- Index of under study universities are varying from 14 to 30. Ilam University of Medical Sciences had the highest international collaboration with an INI of 0.33 compared to Hamedan and Kermanshah universities with INI of 0.20 and 0.16 respectively. The lowest international collaboration belonged to Lorestan University of Medical Sciences (0.07). The highest Growth Index belonged to Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences (69.7). Conclusion: Although scientific production of five Western Iranian Medical Universities was increasing, but this trend was not stable. To achieve better performance it is recommended that five Western Iranian Universities stabilize their budgeting and investment policies in research. PMID:26483592

  15. Analysis of the Status Quo of Humanistic Quality-Oriented Education in Medical Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shulei; Li, Yamin

    2012-01-01

    With transformation of contemporary modern medical educational modes and improvement of requirement upon doctors' humanistic quality, it seems quite important to strengthen humanistic quality-oriented education in medical colleges and universities. Medical humanistic quality-oriented education in China started late, which determines that there are…

  16. Webometric analysis of Iranian medical universities according to visibility, size and rich files

    OpenAIRE

    Roghaye Tafaroji; Iman Tahamtan; Masoud Roudbari; Shahram Sedghi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a webometric analysis of web sites of medical universities of Iran. This study was conducted in Sept 2012 using Majestic SEO, Google, Yahoo and Bing search engines. The number of web pages, external inlinks, rich files and the total rank for 43 universities with active exclusive web sites were calculated. Findings indicated that Tehran University Medical Sciences with 220453 web pages, 887545 external inlinks, and 14495 rich files ranked...

  17. Knowledge of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences regarding plagiarism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Gharedaghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people's ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  18. Knowledge of Medical Students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences Regarding Plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Gharedaghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people’s ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  19. Knowledge of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences regarding plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Salehi Sadaghiani, Mohammad; Yousefzadeh-Fard, Yashar; Gharedaghi, Azadeh; Javadian, Pouya; Morteza, Afsaneh; Andrabi, Yasir; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2013-07-13

    The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people's ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively) were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  20. Knowledge of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences regarding plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Salehi Sadaghiani, Mohammad; Yousefzadeh-Fard, Yashar; Gharedaghi, Azadeh; Javadian, Pouya; Morteza, Afsaneh; Andrabi, Yasir; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2013-01-01

    The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people's ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively) were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard. PMID:23852849

  1. [Jageillonian University medical students' relationship to awarding of the doctorate degree in all medical sciences in the period between wars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolski, S

    1997-01-01

    The Academic Schools Act of 1920 and the Ordinance of 1924 pertaining to doctorates provided that one could earn the degree only having submitted a disseration. The Austrian Act which was in force up to that moment had allowed to receive the degree without writing a thesis. Protests voiced by medical students extended validity of the Act. The Jagiellonian University medicals played an important role in delaying the Ordinance coming into force. Protesting against the newest regulations they organized public meetings, wrote memorials and filled petitions. The Jagiellonian University Faculty of Medicine granted doctorates without dissertation up to the end of December 1932. However some doctorates were granted even after that term.

  2. Clinical Experience of Medical Students at University Sains Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Quah, Ban Seng; Malik, Alam Sher; Simpson, Hamish

    2000-01-01

    Experience of acute medical, surgical conditions, and clinical procedures of undergraduate students were assessed via a questionnaire survey during the final week of the 1993/1998 programme at the School of Medical Sciences, Univestiti Sains Malaysia. Individual performances were assessed by a scoring system. One hundred and twenty four students responded, (response rate 97%). More than 90% had seen myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, pneumonia, respiratory distress, gastroenteri...

  3. Self-medication in health students from two Brazilian universities

    OpenAIRE

    Delprina de G. Rocha de Carvalho; Felipe Eduardo Ferreira Valoz; Danilo Santos Carneiro; Patricia Freire Gasparetto; Vírginia Farias Alves; Cláudio Maranhão Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Self medication is a component of self care and it is considered as primary public health resource in health care system. It can be defined as use of non-prescription medicines by people on their own initiative. Dentists, together with doctors and veterinarians, comprise the professional classes that may and must prescribe medications for their patients. On the other hand, the nursing professionals are the ones who more administer drugs to patients in the ambulatory and hospital...

  4. Self-medication among medical student in King Abdul-Aziz University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mooataz Mohammed Aashi

    2016-03-01

    Results: Paracetamol were the most frequently 117 (23.1% drug uses by medical students, followed by antihistaminic 48 (9.5%, antibiotic 33 (6.5%, NSAIDS 22 (4.3%, anti- anxiety 7 (1.4% and opioid 4 (0.8%. Most of them were self-medication (74%. Relief fever was the most common cause for seeking self-medication reported by medical student 103 (20.4%, most frequent side effects was nausea and vomiting 47 (9.3% Conclusions: There is an increase of self-medication in medical students of KAU especially paracetamol and NSAIDs use. We suggest increasing studies on the local irrational use of medications and increasing awareness on the importance of prescribed medications. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(3.000: 942-946

  5. Master's Level Graduate Training in Medical Physics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the master's degree program in medical physics developed at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Required courses for the program, and requirements for admission are included in the appendices. (HM)

  6. E-learning in Type 1 Medical Universities of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Bagher ROKNI

    2005-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nowadays the Internet is the technological pedestal of organization in the information society and one of the main applications that the Internet offers is the Digital Library (DL). Each society, especially those that claim training of the public, predictably need implementation and endorsement these systems. The time of chalk and board is passed and the globalization and universal village demands a movement targeting to establish an information society. The university is sai...

  7. Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge

    OpenAIRE

    Ball L; Crowley J; Laur C; Rajput-Ray M; Gillam S; Ray S

    2014-01-01

    Lauren Ball,1 Jennifer Crowley,2 Celia Laur,3 Minha Rajput-Ray,3 Stephen Gillam,4 Sumantra Ray3 1Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Allied Health Sciences, Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; 2Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 3Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, Medical Research Council Human Nutrition Research, Cambridge, UK; 4Department of Public Health and Primary C...

  8. Suggested Minimum Data Set for Speech Therapy Centers Affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Damanabi, Shahla; Abdolnejad, Shawbo; Karimi, Gelavizh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The minimum data considered as a conceptual framework, based on the achievement of effectiveness indicators and it ensures to access of precise and clear health data. The aims of the present study were identified and proposed a data element set of speech therapy centers affiliated with Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Material and Methods: This study that was cross – sectional type, performed in 9 speech therapy clinic from medical university in 2014. Firstly, the minimum da...

  9. Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and the Success of Educational Managers at Golestan University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Einollah Mollaei; Ladan Heravi; Reza Eftekharaldyn; Hamid Asayesh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Emotional intelligence is a new evolution in the field of thought – excitement relationship, which has a major effect on the success of managers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the relationship between emotional intelligence and the success of educational managers at Golestan University of medical sciences. Methods: This study was conducted with all (n=96) educational managers (45 females and 51 males) at Golestan University of Medical Sciences who were selected ...

  10. Research performance of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 1385 (April 2006- March 2007)

    OpenAIRE

    Farzaneh Aminpour

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the frequently used measures of research performance of a country or a university is counting the related scientific production. In the present study the number of scientific production including research projects, books, journal articles and conference proceedings published under the name of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences were identified and then compared with those reported by Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education for the ye...

  11. Informed consent from patients participating in medical education: a survey from a university hospital in Jamaica

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson Diaqa; Gordon-Strachan Georgiana; Lindo John F; Crandon Ivor W; Cawich Shamir O; Barnett Alan T; Ranglin Deonne

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Medical students at the University of the West Indies receive clinical training by passing through a series of hospital rotations at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI). Many of these patients are unaware that medical students may be involved in their care. We performed this study to determine patient awareness and their willingness to participate in research and teaching activities. Findings All consecutive patients admitted to the UHWI between May 1, 2006 a...

  12. Scientific Production of Medical Universities in the West of Iran: a Scientometric Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Rasolabadi, Masoud; Khaledi, Shahnaz; Khayati, Fariba; Kalhor, Marya Maryam; Penjvini, Susan; Gharib, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to compare scientific production by providing quantitative evaluation of science output in five Western Iranian Medical Universities including Hamedan, Ilam, Kermanshah, Kurdistan and Lorestan University of Medical Sciences using scientometrics indicators based on data indexed in Scopus for period between the years 2010 to 2014. Methods: In this scientometric study data were collected using Scopus database. Both searching and analyzing features of Scopus were us...

  13. The redesign of the medical informatics master of science course at the University of Amsterdam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Monique W M; Hasman, Arie

    2007-10-11

    The University of Amsterdam redesigned its former 4 years Medical Informatics university program into a Dutch 3 years BSc program and a 2 years English MSc program. The new MSc program is aimed at (international) baccalaureates in medical informatics, computer science, medicine, health sciences, and biology. Besides, health care professionals or professionals with a background in computer science may enter the program. We present our new MSc program shortly.

  14. Attitudes toward Psychiatry: A Survey of Medical Students at the University of Nairobi, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndetei, David M.; Khasakhala, Lincoln; Ongecha-Owuor, Francisca; Kuria, Mary; Mutiso, Victoria; Syanda, Judy; Kokonya, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The authors aim to determine the attitudes of University of Nairobi, Kenya, medical students toward psychiatry. Methods: The study design was cross-sectional. Self-administered sociodemographic and the Attitudes Toward Psychiatry-30 items (ATP-30) questionnaires were distributed sequentially to every third medical student in his or her…

  15. Voluntary Medication Error Reporting Program in a Japanese National University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Bunko, Hisashi; Miyamoto, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Japan, as in other countries, medical accidents arising from human error can seriously damage public confidence in medical services, as well as being intrinsically undesirable. OBJECTIVE: Errors voluntarily reported by the healthcare practitioners in our institution (Kanazawa University Hospital) were considered to assess the contributory factors by using the accumulated error database in the hospital information system. METHODS: Medical errors in our institution during the per...

  16. E-LEARNING READINESS AMONG MEDICAL EDUCATORS IN UNIVERSITI SAINS ISLAM MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Salleha Khalid; Tengku Madeehah Tengku Mohd; Khadijah Hassanah; Suhaila Sanip; Muhammad Shamsir Aris; Khaironi Sharif; Mohd Mokthar

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in information technology has made e-learning feasible in many fields of education. Medical education is not any different. This survey is conducted among all the medical educators in Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia (USIM) assessing their readiness and attitudes towards e-learning. A cross-sectional questionnaires assessing the IT skills, Internet usage, attitude, perceived benefits and usage of e-learning among USIM medical lecturers were used. Data gained were then analyzed....

  17. Stress among medical Saudi students at College of Medicine, King Faisal University

    OpenAIRE

    ABDEL RAHMAN, A.G.; AL HASHIM, B.N.; AL HIJI, N.K.; AL-ABBAD, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background. Sources of student stress can be academic pressures, social or personal issues and medical students have to face the challenge of rigorous curriculum and also have to learn how to deal with emotionally difficult experiences. Aim of Work. Determination of the prevalence of stress and to identify the risk factors of stress among Saudi medical students at Faculty of Medicine, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia. Methods. A survey study design was conducted among medical stud...

  18. Learning styles of medical students at Taibah University: Trends and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Shaista Salman Guraya; Salman Yousuf Guraya; Habib, Fawzia A.; Khoshhal, Khalid I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Understanding the learning styles of medical students can drive the institutions to adapt instructional materials to enhance students′ learning of knowledge and skills. This study explored the learning styles of undergraduate medical students, comparing gender variations in terms of their significant preferences. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was performed in 2012-2013, incorporating 1 st -5 th year undergraduate medical students of Taibah University...

  19. To determine the level of satisfaction among medical students of a public sector medical university regarding their academic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzar Bushra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An ongoing evaluation system is essential to determine if the academic system in place has worked to produce a better product, hence the objective of our study was to evaluate the satisfaction level among medical students regarding their academic teaching and assessment method and what measures will they suggest for the future to rectify the current situation. This questionnaire based cross sectional study was conducted in a public sector medical university from February to July 2010. A well structured questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 375 final year medical students. However 292 of the students provided informed consent and filled in the questionnaire which included their demographic profile as well as questions in line with the study objective. Data was entered in a Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version.16 and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Findings The male to female ratio in our study was 1:2. Most of the students (57.2% were dissatisfied with the quality of teaching in the university. Fifty-seven percent of the participants believed that the current standard of their institute were not at par with those of international medical universities. BCQ's were the mode of examination questions preferred by the majority of the students. Most of the students (66.1% wanted the university to conduct career planning seminars to help them plan their career. Conclusions These results suggest that the students of public sector medical universities are unsatisfied from current academic facilities and teaching activities. Students recommend increased emphasis on better lectures and practical training as well as a need to incorporate career planning sessions for the students to help plan them their future career paths.

  20. Homophobia in Medical Students of the University of Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, R. W. M.; Au, K. P.; Chan, W. K.; Cheung, L. W. M.; Lam, C. Y. Y.; Liu, H. H. W.; Ng, L. Y.; Wong, M. Y.; Wong, W. C.

    2009-01-01

    Homosexuality is now accepted as a normal variant of human sexuality, but homophobia among healthcare professionals is well documented. Establishment of trustful doctor-patient relationships is impossible in the presence of homophobia. We were interested to examine the extent of homophobia among medical students, the future doctors. This article…

  1. Webometric analysis of Iranian medical universities according to visibility, size and rich files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghaye Tafaroji

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a webometric analysis of web sites of medical universities of Iran. This study was conducted in Sept 2012 using Majestic SEO, Google, Yahoo and Bing search engines. The number of web pages, external inlinks, rich files and the total rank for 43 universities with active exclusive web sites were calculated. Findings indicated that Tehran University Medical Sciences with 220453 web pages, 887545 external inlinks, and 14495 rich files ranked as the first and Jiroft University of Medical Sciences had the lowest rank in the study. Findings indicated a significant relationship between the Webometric rank and the university rank in Iranian Ministry of Health. This study indicated that the use of rich files can give a better and more reliable view of university rankings. There are few studies focusing on the indicators such as rich files. The present study; however, is one of the few studies that used rich files to examine and analyze the university web sites. The paper would provide information to eliminate the barriers to improve web sites of medical universities in Iran.

  2. Medical Universities Educational and Research Online Services: Benchmarking Universities’ Website Towards E-Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzandipour, Mehrdad; Meidani, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Websites as one of the initial steps towards an e-government adoption do facilitate delivery of online and customer-oriented services. In this study we intended to investigate the role of the websites of medical universities in providing educational and research services following the E-government maturity model in the Iranian universities. Methods: This descriptive and cross- sectional study was conducted through content analysis and benchmarking the websites in 2012. The research population included the entire medical university website (37). Delivery of educational and research services through these university websites including information, interaction, transaction, and Integration were investigated using a checklist. The data were then analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and using SPSS software. Results: Level of educational and research services by websites of the medical universities type I and II was evaluated medium as 1.99 and 1.89, respectively. All the universities gained a mean score of 1 out of 3 in terms of integration of educational and research services. Conclusions: Results of the study indicated that Iranian universities have passed information and interaction stages, but they have not made much progress in transaction and integration stages. Failure to adapt to e-government in Iranian medical universities in which limiting factors such as users’ e-literacy, access to the internet and ICT infrastructure are not so crucial as in other organizations, suggest that e-government realization goes beyond technical challenges. PMID:25132713

  3. Drug use prevalence among students of universities of medical sciences in Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    Farhad Taremian; Jafar Bolhari; Hamid Peyravi; Ali Asgari

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of drug use among students of universities of Medical Sciences in Tehran. Method: Four thousands of medical students (both sexes) in academic year 1388-89 in different level of education, B.A., M.Sc. and Ph.D. were selected by random stratified sampling method. These students were selected from Iran, Tehran and Shahid Beheshti Universities of Medical Sciences considering their sex and level of education. We used drug use prevalence q...

  4. Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge

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    Ball L

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lauren Ball,1 Jennifer Crowley,2 Celia Laur,3 Minha Rajput-Ray,3 Stephen Gillam,4 Sumantra Ray3 1Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Allied Health Sciences, Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; 2Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 3Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, Medical Research Council Human Nutrition Research, Cambridge, UK; 4Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Landmark reports have confirmed that it is within the core responsibilities of doctors to address nutrition in patient care. There are ongoing concerns that doctors receive insufficient nutrition education during medical training. This paper provides an overview of a medical nutrition education initiative at the University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, including 1 the approach to medical nutrition education, 2 evaluation of the medical nutrition education initiative, and 3 areas identified for future improvement. The initiative utilizes a vertical, spiral approach during the clinically focused years of the Cambridge undergraduate and graduate medical degrees. It is facilitated by the Nutrition Education Review Group, a group associated with the UK Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, and informed by the experiences of their previous nutrition education interventions. Three factors were identified as contributing to the success of the nutrition education initiative including the leadership and advocacy skills of the nutrition academic team, the variety of teaching modes, and the multidisciplinary approach to teaching. Opportunities for continuing improvement to the medical nutrition education initiative included a review of evaluation tools, inclusion of nutrition in assessment items, and further alignment of the Cambridge curriculum with the

  5. Transition from traditional to innovative teaching in and beyond pharmacology at Ziauddin Medical University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qamaruddin BARAKZAI

    2004-01-01

    Innovative teaching methodologies in different parts of the world are being practiced since last 3 decades. The aim of this review is to report the transition from traditional to innovative self learning process in Ziauddin Medical University, a new medical institute of Pakistan. Various problems encountered have been duly looked after by inducting faculty training programs and regular review sessions in which monitoring of the transition process was duly observed as well as further advancements were also planned. The University being a pioneer has attracted other institutions which have also planned to induct PBL in their curriculum.Vertical and horizontal integration has also inducted better understanding of subjects and fruitful advantages had been accomplished in subjects as pharmacology and pathology. In conclusion, the initial decision of the university to adapt innovative teaching methodologies along with following an integrated curriculum based on PBL and Community Oriented Medical Education system has now made ZMU a Novel institute amongst other medical institutes in the country.

  6. Stability of medical specialty selection at the University of Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarecky, R K; Schwartz, R W; Haley, J V; Donnelly, M B

    1991-12-01

    In the fall of 1989, all graduates of a 30-year-old medical college were surveyed by questionnaire concerning their motivations for their original selections of specialties, motivations for changing their specialties when such changes had occurred, and factors involved in their current choices of specialties. The 723 respondents were grouped by specialty response into one of three groups (primary care plus medicine and pediatrics subspecialties; surgery; or controllable lifestyle), and responses were statistically analyzed. The most important factors influencing initial specialty selection were perceived match of personality and specialty; technology and methodology characteristic of the specialty; and time for family activities, in that order. The ratings of the 175 respondents who stated that they had changed specialties indicated that time for avocational pursuits and time for family activities were the most important reasons for change. The reasons for selecting a different specialty varied. This study's findings suggest that a student's likelihood of making an inappropriate specialty choice may be reduced by a broad undergraduate medical education with realistic experiences in clinical activity. Students' lack of awareness of the lifestyle of a particular specialty may be a significant factor in the flow of physicians from noncontrollable lifestyle specialty areas. Those who counsel medical students need to be aware of the increasing importance of controllable lifestyle features, changing attitudes, faculty role-modeling, and mentors as strong influences on students' choices of specialties. PMID:1750955

  7. The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine summer medical program for high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jerome; Atkins, R Matthew; Tucker, Phebe; Monson, Angela; Corpening, Brian; Baker, Sherri

    2011-06-01

    To enhance diversity of applicants to University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, a Summer Medical Program for High School Students was started in 2009. This comprehensive pipeline program included sessions on applying to medical school, interaction with a panel of minority physicians and health care professionals role models, clinically oriented didactics taught by physician faculty, shadowing experiences in clinics and hospitals, and presentation of student research reports. Students' assessments in 2009 showed increased understanding of the medical school application process, the medical curriculum and the medical field, and an increase in students'likeliness to choose a medical career. Importance of long-term mentoring and follow-up with students to sustain their medical interests is discussed.

  8. Evaluation of Randomly Selected Completed Medical Records Sheets in Teaching Hospitals of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, 2009

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    Mohammad Parsa Mahjob

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Medical record documentation, often use to protect the patients legal rights, also providing information for medical researchers, general studies, education of health care staff and qualitative surveys is used. There is a need to control the amount of data entered in the medical record sheets of patients, considering the completion of these sheets is often carried out after completion of service delivery to the patients. Therefore, in this study the prevalence of completeness of medical history, operation reports, and physician order sheets by different documentaries in Jahrom teaching hospitals during year 2009 was analyzed. Methods and Materials: In this descriptive / retrospective study, the 400 medical record sheets of the patients from two teaching hospitals affiliated to Jahrom medical university was randomly selected. The tool of data collection was a checklist based on the content of medical history sheet, operation report and physician order sheets. The data were analyzed by SPSS (Version10 software and Microsoft Office Excel 2003. Results: Average of personal (Demography data entered in medical history, physician order and operation report sheets which is done by department's secretaries were 32.9, 35.8 and 40.18 percent. Average of clinical data entered by physician in medical history sheet is 38 percent. Surgical data entered by the surgeon in operation report sheet was 94.77 percent. Average of data entered by operation room's nurse in operation report sheet was 36.78 percent; Average of physician order data in physician order sheet entered by physician was 99.3 percent. Conclusion: According to this study, the rate of completed record papers reviewed by documentary in Jahrom teaching hospitals were not desirable and in some cases were very weak and incomplete. This deficiency was due to different reason such as medical record documentaries negligence, lack of adequate education for documentaries, High work

  9. The Webometric Status of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Taheri, Behjat; Ghazavi, Roghayeh; Zahed, Arash; Otroj, Zahra; Mazaheri, Elahe; Soleimanzade-Najafi, Nayere-Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Webometrics refers to the quantitative study of science production, application, structure and technology in the cyber environment. Impact analysis, website collaboration, and recognition of core websites are regarded as the most practical advantages of webometrics. Furthermore, webometrics is applied in ranking studies for universities and academic institutes. This serves as an internationally approved means of academic ranking worldwide. Our study aimed to evaluate the webometri...

  10. Medical Informatics in the Curriculum at the George Washington University

    OpenAIRE

    Piemme, Thomas E.; Yamamoto, William S.; Tidball, Charles S.; Orthner, Helmuth F.; Pincetl, Pierre S.; Bader, Shelley

    1990-01-01

    The introduction of the computer into the curriculum of the School of Medicine at The George Washington University began in 1986 with the imposition by the faculty of a requirement that students demonstrate computer literacy by the end of their second academic year. The requirement can be satisfied by interview for those students with prior computer science education. Students without prior training or experience may participate in elective courses offered by the Department of Computer Medici...

  11. Mistreatment of university students most common during medical studies

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    Nuutinen Matti

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study concerns the occurrence of various forms of mistreatment by staff and fellow students experienced by students in the Faculty of Medicine and the other four faculties of the University of Oulu, Finland. Methods A questionnaire with 51 questions on various forms of physical and psychological mistreatment was distributed to 665 students (451 females after lectures or examinations and filled in and returned. The results were analysed by gender and faculty. The differences between the males and females were assessed statistically using a test for the equality of two proportions. An exact two-sided P value was calculated using a mid-P approach to Fisher's exact test (the null hypothesis being that there is no difference between the two proportions. Results About half of the students answering the questionnaire had experienced some form of mistreatment by staff during their university studies, most commonly humiliation and contempt (40%, negative or disparaging remarks (34%, yelling and shouting (23%, sexual harassment and other forms of gender-based mistreatment (17% and tasks assigned as punishment (13%. The students in the Faculty of Medicine reported every form of mistreatment more commonly than those in the Faculties of Humanities, Education, Science and Technology. Experiences of mistreatment varied, but clear messages regarding its patterns were to be found in each faculty. Female students reported more instances of mistreatment than males and were more disturbed by them. Professors, lecturers and other staff in particular mistreated female students more than they mistreated males. About half of the respondents reported some form of mistreatment by their fellow students. Conclusion Students in the Faculty of Medicine reported the greatest amount of mistreatment. If a faculty mistreats its students, its success in the main tasks of universities, research, teaching and learning, will be threatened. The results

  12. Medication taking behavior of students attending a private university in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Nishat; Matin, Fatema; Chowdhury, Sk Feroz Uddin Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the patterns of self-reported medication use, including both prescription and OTC drugs, and to assess the possible predictors of self-medication and medication non-compliance (non-adherence), for 929 non-medical undergraduate students of the American International University, a private university situated in Dhaka city, Bangladesh. Although a high proportion (69%, n = 644) of students of this university had fallen sick in the last six months before the study, the rate of visiting qualified health practitioners was much lower (53%). A good proportion of the sick students were reported to have practiced self-medication (16%, n = 100) and medication non-adherence (15%, n = 98). The average treatment cost involved in self medication was much lower than that offered by a qualified physician (Tk 463 vs Tk 2546 per case). Those students living with parents were more likely to have visited qualified health practitioners (56%, p students whose families kept a well-stocked medicine cabinet at home were more likely to have completed the full course (39%, p part-time jobs etc. The study also showed that antimicrobials are widely available (170 incidents) in the home medicine cabinets of the Dhaka City population. The storage of leftover antibiotics in the home constitutes an alternative potential source of self-medication that can have untoward consequences. Further elaborate studies are required to reveal the true pattern of antibiotic usage in Bangladesh. PMID:20014639

  13. The Effect of Stress on Medical Students in a Private Medical University in Malaysia

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    Jagmohni Kaur Sidhu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress amongst medical students is oftenoverlooked. Intelligent students are not always the mostcomposed. This study aimed to look at both male andfemale students of three different ethnic groups and theeffects of stress in areas such as academic, social,financial and their everyday life. The Chinese studentsreported significantly less “academic stress” than theMalay students, and the Malay students reportedsignificantly less “financial stress” compared to theChinese and Indian students. Medical education can bea health hazard for medical students

  14. Perceptions of personal health risks by medical and non-medical workers in a university medical center : a survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Listyowardojo, Tita Alissa; Nap, Raoul E.; Johnson, Addie

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health care workers (HCWs) are faced with many work-related choices which may depend on how they perceive risk, such as whether or not to comply with safety regulations. Little research has investigated risk perception in medical workers in comparison with non-medical workers and the ext

  15. Clinical experience of medical students at university sains malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, B S; Malik, A S; Simpson, H

    2000-01-01

    Experience of acute medical, surgical conditions, and clinical procedures of undergraduate students were assessed via a questionnaire survey during the final week of the 1993/1998 programme at the School of Medical Sciences, Univestiti Sains Malaysia. Individual performances were assessed by a scoring system. One hundred and twenty four students responded, (response rate 97%). More than 90% had seen myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, pneumonia, respiratory distress, gastroenteritis, coma, and snake bite. Less than 33% had witnessed acute psychosis, diabetic ketoacidosis, acute hepatic failure, status epilepticus, near drowning, hypertensive encephalopathy, acute haemolysis or child abuse.Acute surgical/obstetrics cases, seen by >90% students, included fracture of long bones, head injury, acute abdominal pain, malpresentation and foetal distress. Less than 33% had observed epistaxis, sudden loss of vision, peritonitis or burns. Among operations only herniorrhaphy, Caesarian section, internal fixation of fracture and cataract extraction were seen by >80% students. The main deficits in clinical procedures are in rectal and vaginal examinations, urine collection and microscopic examinations. The performance of individual students, assessed by a scoring system, showed 15 students had unacceptably low scores (181.4/230, 70%) and 5 had superior scores (197.6/230, 80%). PMID:22844212

  16. Perception of the Medical Students on Their Future Career in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Barikani, Ameneh; Afaghi, Mahsa; Barikani, Firooze; Afaghi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Young physicians have many recruitment barriers in Iran. Therefore, for planning purpose, assessment of the attitudes of medical intern students towards their future career is important. Methods: This cross-sectional study assessed the view points of 300 medical students through a self administered questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS software with P value < 0.05. Results: Two hundred and forty students (80%) of the students had responded to the questionnaire. Among them...

  17. CURRENT STATUS OF RESEARCH PROJECT ACTIVITIES IN MEDICAL UNIVERSITIES IN BULGARIA.

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    Svetoslav Garov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Bulgaria there are five medical universities: in the cities of Sofia, Plovdiv, Varna, Pleven and Stara Zagora. Their main mission is training specialists in the fields of medicine and health care, increasing their qualification by means of postgraduate education and performing research activities. One of medical universities’ top priorities is encouraging research activities mainly aimed at preparation and implementation of research projects. Aim: The purpose of our study is to examine the current status of research project activities in Bulgarian medical universities.Material and methods: In order to define the science competitions related to Bulgarian medical universities we have applied a documentary and sociological approach. Results: Research projects that Bulgarian medical universities can apply for are divided into two groups – national and international. The most significant international projects are European ones since Bulgaria is an EU member state and this allows us to participate in such projects. Conclusion: Universities should strive for establishing even better conditions for encouraging application for research projects aimed at developing competent and experienced staff, even though the majority of them may not obtain approval for financing.The changes in the situation regarding Bulgarian science require the implementation and development of more research staff motivated to improve their knowledge and skills in the relevant dynamically changing competition and project field.

  18. Knowledge and Attitude Level of Students about Solid Waste Recycling; Kashan University of Medical Sciences

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    Mazaheri Tehrani A.MSc,

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims Increasing of the population and development of urban areas, has led to solid waste generation increasing which is one of the problems and difficulties that put human and environmental health in danger. The aim of present study was to determine the knowledge and attitude level of Kashan University of Medical Sciences’ students about solid waste recycling. Instrument & Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out in the fall of 2012 at the Kashan University of Medical Sciences and all the 250 students studying at nursing, medical, and paramedical schools were participated in it. A researcher-made questionnaire consisting of 20 questions was used to determine the knowledge about and attitude toward solid waste recycling. Data was analyzed by ANOVA, Pearson correlation and independent T test. Findings The knowledge of students was the highest about the definition of recycling (84.4% and lowest about delivery of recycled materials to badgers (23.6%. Most medical (55.1% and paramedical (75.3% students had “weak” and most nursing students (47.1% had “moderate” knowledge about solid waste recycling. 69.2% of paramedical, 27.3% of medical and 25.5% of nursing students stated that “there is no information about recycling in the university courses”. Conclusion Most of the students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences have weak knowledge regarding to solid waste recycling and their knowledge are different among schools.

  19. Prevalence and Religious Predictors of Healing Prayer Use in the USA: Findings from the Baylor Religion Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Jeff

    2016-08-01

    Using data from the 2010 Baylor Religion Survey (N = 1714), this study investigates the prevalence and religious predictors of healing prayer use among US adults. Indicators include prayed for self (lifetime prevalence = 78.8 %), prayed for others (87.4 %), asked for prayer (54.1 %), laying-on-of-hands (26.1 %), and participated in a prayer group (53.0 %). Each was regressed onto eight religious measures, and then again controlling for sociodemographic variables and health. While all religious measures had net effects on at least one healing prayer indicator, the one consistent predictor was a four-item scale assessing a loving relationship with God. Higher scores were associated with more frequent healing prayer use according to every measure, after controlling for all other religious variables and covariates. PMID:27075199

  20. [Jageillonian University medical students' relationship to awarding of the doctorate degree in all medical sciences in the period between wars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolski, S

    1997-01-01

    The Academic Schools Act of 1920 and the Ordinance of 1924 pertaining to doctorates provided that one could earn the degree only having submitted a disseration. The Austrian Act which was in force up to that moment had allowed to receive the degree without writing a thesis. Protests voiced by medical students extended validity of the Act. The Jagiellonian University medicals played an important role in delaying the Ordinance coming into force. Protesting against the newest regulations they organized public meetings, wrote memorials and filled petitions. The Jagiellonian University Faculty of Medicine granted doctorates without dissertation up to the end of December 1932. However some doctorates were granted even after that term. PMID:9591461

  1. Internationalizing Medical Education: The Special Track Curriculum 'Global Health' at Justus Liebig University Giessen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipper, Michael; Baumann, Adrian; Hofstetter, Christine; Korte, Rolf; Krawinkel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Internationalizing higher education is considered to be a major goal for universities in Germany and many medical students aspire to include international experiences into their academic training. However, the exact meaning of "internationalizing" medical education is still poorly defined, just as is the possible pedagogic impact and effects. Against this background, this article presents the special track curriculum on global health (in German: Schwerpunktcurriculum Global Health, short: SPC) at Justus Liebig University Giessen, which was established in 2011 as a comprehensive teaching program to integrate international perspectives and activities systematically into the clinical years of the medical curriculum. The report of the structure, content, didactic principles and participants' evaluations of the SPC is embedded into a larger discussion of the pedagogic value of a broad and interdisciplinary perspective on "global health" in medical education, that explicitly includes attention for health inequities, social determinants of health and the cultural dimensions of medicine and health abroad and "at home" (e.g. in relation to migration). We conclude that if properly defined, the emerging field of "global health" represents a didactically meaningful approach for adding value to medical education through internationalizing the curriculum, especially in regard to themes that despite of their uncontested value are often rather weak within medical education. The concrete curricular structures, however, have always to be developed locally. The "SPC" at Giessen University Medical School is only one possible way of addressing these globally relevant issues in one particular local academic setting. PMID:26604994

  2. Internationalizing Medical Education: The Special Track Curriculum 'Global Health' at Justus Liebig University Giessen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knipper, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Internationalizing higher education is considered to be a major goal for universities in Germany and many medical students aspire to include international experiences into their academic training. However, the exact meaning of “internationalizing” medical education is still poorly defined, just as is the possible pedagogic impact and effects. Against this background, this article presents the special track curriculum on global health (in German: , short: at Justus Liebig University Giessen, which was established in 2011 as a comprehensive teaching program to integrate international perspectives and activities systematically into the clinical years of the medical curriculum. The report of the structure, content, didactic principles and participants’ evaluations of the SPC is embedded into a larger discussion of the pedagogic value of a broad and interdisciplinary perspective on “global health” in medical education, that explicitly includes attention for health inequities, social determinants of health and the cultural dimensions of medicine and health abroad and “at home” (e.g. in relation to migration. We conclude that if properly defined, the emerging field of “global health” represents a didactically meaningful approach for adding value to medical education through internationalizing the curriculum, especially in regard to themes that despite of their uncontested value are often rather weak within medical education. The concrete curricular structures, however, have always to be developed locally. The “SPC” at Giessen University Medical School is only one possible way of addressing these globally relevant issues in one particular local academic setting.

  3. Internationalizing Medical Education: The Special Track Curriculum 'Global Health' at Justus Liebig University Giessen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipper, Michael; Baumann, Adrian; Hofstetter, Christine; Korte, Rolf; Krawinkel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Internationalizing higher education is considered to be a major goal for universities in Germany and many medical students aspire to include international experiences into their academic training. However, the exact meaning of "internationalizing" medical education is still poorly defined, just as is the possible pedagogic impact and effects. Against this background, this article presents the special track curriculum on global health (in German: Schwerpunktcurriculum Global Health, short: SPC) at Justus Liebig University Giessen, which was established in 2011 as a comprehensive teaching program to integrate international perspectives and activities systematically into the clinical years of the medical curriculum. The report of the structure, content, didactic principles and participants' evaluations of the SPC is embedded into a larger discussion of the pedagogic value of a broad and interdisciplinary perspective on "global health" in medical education, that explicitly includes attention for health inequities, social determinants of health and the cultural dimensions of medicine and health abroad and "at home" (e.g. in relation to migration). We conclude that if properly defined, the emerging field of "global health" represents a didactically meaningful approach for adding value to medical education through internationalizing the curriculum, especially in regard to themes that despite of their uncontested value are often rather weak within medical education. The concrete curricular structures, however, have always to be developed locally. The "SPC" at Giessen University Medical School is only one possible way of addressing these globally relevant issues in one particular local academic setting.

  4. Sleep Hygiene Practices and Their Relation to Sleep Quality in Medical Students of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Zohreh; Loukzadeh, Ziba; Moghaddam, Parichehr; Jalilolghadr, Shabnam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Poor quality of sleep is a distressing and worrying condition that can disturb academic performance of medical students. Sleep hygiene practices are one of the important variables that affect sleep quality. The objective of this study was to assess association between sleep hygiene practices and sleep quality of medical students in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. Methods:In this descriptive-correlational study, a total of 285 medical students completed a self-administered questionnaire. Demographic data, sleep-wake schedule in weekday and weekend, and sleep duration were collected. Students' sleep quality was assessed by Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Data were analyzed by SPSS Ver 13. Results: Overall, 164 (57.5) of students had poor sleep quality. Mean global PSQI score and average score of four subscales were significantly higher in male than female. Regression analysis showed that male students (β=-0.85, P<0.05), students at senior level (β=-0.81, P<0.05), married students (β=-0.45, P<0.05), and those with improper sleep hygiene practices slept worse. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that the prevalence of poor sleep quality in medical students is high. Improper sleep hygiene behaviors might be a reason for poor quality of sleep in medical students. PMID:27354979

  5. Sleep Hygiene Practices and Their Relation to Sleep Quality in Medical Students of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Yazdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Poor quality of sleep is a distressing and worrying condition that can disturb academic performance of medical students. Sleep hygiene practices are one of the important variables that affect sleep quality. The objective of this study was to assess association between sleep hygiene practices and sleep quality of medical students in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive-correlational study, a total of 285 medical students completed a self-administered questionnaire. Demographic data, sleep-wake schedule in weekday and weekend, and sleep duration were collected. Students' sleep quality was assessed by Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Data were analyzed by SPSS Ver 13. Results: Overall, 164 (57.5 of students had poor sleep quality. Mean global PSQI score and average score of four subscales were significantly higher in male than female. Regression analysis showed that male students (β=-0.85, P<0.05, students at senior level (β=-0.81, P<0.05, married students (β=-0.45, P<0.05, and those with improper sleep hygiene practices slept worse. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that the prevalence of poor sleep quality in medical students is high. Improper sleep hygiene behaviors might be a reason for poor quality of sleep in medical students.

  6. A Dual Hesitant Fuzzy Multigranulation Rough Set over Two-Universe Model for Medical Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Deyu; Yan, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In medical science, disease diagnosis is one of the difficult tasks for medical experts who are confronted with challenges in dealing with a lot of uncertain medical information. And different medical experts might express their own thought about the medical knowledge base which slightly differs from other medical experts. Thus, to solve the problems of uncertain data analysis and group decision making in disease diagnoses, we propose a new rough set model called dual hesitant fuzzy multigranulation rough set over two universes by combining the dual hesitant fuzzy set and multigranulation rough set theories. In the framework of our study, both the definition and some basic properties of the proposed model are presented. Finally, we give a general approach which is applied to a decision making problem in disease diagnoses, and the effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated by a numerical example. PMID:26858772

  7. Collaboration between the University of Michigan Taubman Health Sciences library and the University of Michigan Medical School Office of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Christine; Harris, Bethany; Mahraj, Katy; Schnitzer, Anna Ercoli; Rosenzweig, Merle

    2013-01-01

    Librarians have traditionally facilitated research development resulting in grants through performing biomedical literature searches for researchers. The librarians at the Taubman Health Sciences Library of the University of Michigan have taken additional steps forward by instituting a proactive approach to assisting investigators. To accomplish this, the librarians have taken part in a collaborative effort with the University of Michigan Medical School Office of Research. Through this partnership, both units have created and adopted various techniques intended to facilitate the submission of grants, thus allowing researchers more time to conduct their primary activities.

  8. Assessing bone banking activities at University of Malaya medical centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, Suhaili; Samsuddin, Sharifah Mazni; Ramalingam, Saravana; Min, Ng Wuey; Yusof, Norimah; Zaman, T Kamarul; Mansor, Azura

    2015-12-01

    The main advantage of establishing in-house bone banks is its ability to readily provide allograft bones for local surgeries. Bone procurement activities of our university bone bank during the 10 years of operation were reviewed. Socio-demographic data of donors, types of bone procured, cases of rejected bones and types of allograft bones transplanted are presented. From 179 potential donors, 73 % were accepted with 213 procured bones. Femoral head was the common bone transplanted (45 %), as it was also the most common procured (82 %). Bones were rejected mainly due to non-technical reasons (83 %) rather than positive results of microbiological (13 %) and serological (4 %) tests. Comprehensive data could not be obtained for further analysis due to difficulties in retrieving information. Therefore, quality assurance system was improved to establish more systematic documentations, as the basis of good banking practice with process control hence allowing traceability.

  9. Planning and Applying Indicators of Resource Allocation in Universities of Medical Sciences: Application of

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    Mohammad Shariati

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Regarding the importance of health economics in education, it is a bear necessity to justify and organize the process of resource allocation in health allied faculties in all medical universities. Applying the "Principal–Agent Theory", researchers sought to determine indicators for resource allocation in faculties in a university of medical sciences, based on principles of scientific management and economics. Methods: In this qualitative study, using expert panel discussion and Delphi technique, researchers investigated many recourse allocation methods in universities all over the world and did their best to establish localized indicators for resource allocation in the university. Results: Based on the findings of this study, resource allocation in a selected medical university was not in accordance with their performance, number of faculty members, number of students and the types (undergraduate & postgraduate and costs of their programs. In this study, indicators for resource allocation were, mostly, based on last year costs of faculties and authorities. bargaining abilities in each faculty, but not based on their performance. Conclusion: This research showed that bargaining and verbal justifications were replaced by documentation and improved performance in order to receive proper resources in the process of resource allocation. Moreover, this research showed that the best indicator to proportionate the financial resources among faculties in a university is to multiply the number of student by program cost weight in under and postgraduate curriculums. In this study, localized programs cost weights in the selected university were identified

  10. Mental health status among Japanese medical students: a cross-sectional survey of 20 universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Tadahiro; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Osaki, Yoneatsu; Kokaze, Akatsuki; Ochiai, Hirotaka; Shirasawa, Takako; Nanri, Hinako; Ohida, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the mental health status of Japanese medical students and to examine differences based on gender, as well as on university type and location, using the results of a nationwide survey. Between December 2006 and March 2007, we conducted a questionnaire survey among fourth-year medical students at 20 randomly selected medical schools in Japan. The data from 1,619 students (response rate: 90.6%; male: 1,074; female: 545) were analyzed. We used the Japanese version of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) to measure mental health status. Poor mental health status (GHQ-12 score of 4 points or higher) was observed in 36.6% and 48.8% of the male and female medical students, respectively. The ratio of the age-adjusted prevalence of poor mental health status in female versus male medical students was 1.33 (95% confidence interval: 1.10-1.62). The universities were categorized into two groups based on the university type (national/public: 15 vs. private: 5) or location (in a large city: 7 vs. in a local city: 13 cities). The prevalence of poor mental health status in both men and women differed between these groups, although not significantly. The GHQ-12 scores in men significantly differed between the categorized groups of universities. These results suggest that adequate attention must be paid to the mental health of medical students, especially females, and that a system for providing mental health care for medical students must be established in the context of actual conditions at each university.

  11. Characteristics of undergraduate medical thesis of a Peruvian public university

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    Betty Castro Maldonado

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The undergraduate thesis rather than a requirement to graduate, are a way of doing research. Previous studies show a thesis published between 2.7% to 17.6% in indexed journals. Objective: Describe the characteristics of the undergraduate thesis of the Faculty of a medical school. Bibliometric study. 221 theses were reviewed, collecting: Year, number of authors, advisers, and references, study population, and national priorities for health research. A search was performed on Google Scholar to assess publication. Descriptive statistics were used. Results: Being lower production in the years 2008-2010 was observed. 91.6% had one advisor, 76% descriptive, 82.8% in hospital population, and 62.4% of adults. Theses displayed between 2010-2014 72.9% did not correspond to any national health research priority. Only 6.8% was based on literature of the last five years. Only 9 (4.1% were published in a scientific journal indexed. Conclusions: The undergraduate thesis were characterized as descriptive, hospital, adults, literature based on outdated and not in line with the national priorities for health research. The publication is low.

  12. Drug Utilization in Self Medication Practice among Students of University of Sumatera Utara

    OpenAIRE

    Nasution, Azizah; Lubis FRW; Rosidah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Self-medication practice to release symptoms and treat illness sometimes can be misused because lack of knowledge about drugs. Objectives: This study aimed was to characterize the drug utilization and analyze the level of self medication error among students from 14 faculties in University of Sumatera Utara (USU), Indonesia. Methods: This study applied survey techniques by distributing a predetermined and validated questionnaire to the students (n = 384). Data obtained were desc...

  13. Dysmenorrhea among female medical students in King Abdulaziz University: Prevalence, Predictors and outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Nahla Khamis; AlGhamdi, Manar Saleh; Al-Shaibani, Alanoud Nawaf; AlAmri, Fatima Ali; Alharbi, Huda Abdulrahman; Al-Jadani, Arwa Kheder; Alfaidi, Raghad Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, predictors and outcome of dysmenorrhea among female medical students in King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 435 medical students at KAU, Jeddah selected through stratified random sample method. A pre-constructed, validated, self-administered questionnaire was used to collect personal and socio-demographic information. Data about menstrual history, stress, smoking were also collected...

  14. Academic leagues: a Brazilian way to teach about cancer in medical universities

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Diogo Antonio Valente; Aranha, Renata Nunes; de Souza, Maria Helena Faria Ornellas

    2015-01-01

    Background Performance of qualified professionals committed to cancer care on a global scale is critical. Nevertheless there is a deficit in Cancer Education in Brazilian medical schools (MS). Projects called Academic Leagues (AL) have been gaining attention. However, there are few studies on this subject. AL arise from student initiative, arranged into different areas, on focus in general knowledge, universal to any medical field. They are not obligatory and students are responsible for the ...

  15. ATTITUDES OF MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY GRADUATES TOWARDS THE INTERNSHIP TRAINING PERIOD AT KING FAISAL UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    Bashawri, Layla A.M.; Ahmed, Mirghani A.; Bahnassy, Ahmed A.L.; Al-Salim, Jawaher A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this present survey was to look into the attitudes of medical laboratory technology (MLT) graduates towards the internship training period of the MLT Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Faisal University. Material and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was designed and distributed for this purpose. The study period was from December 1st 2002 – 31st December 2004. Two-hundred questionnaires were distributed to recent graduates, and 115 wer...

  16. Trends in attrition among medical teaching staff at universities in Myanmar 2009–2013

    OpenAIRE

    Nang Mie Mie Htun,; REYER, JOSHUA A; Yamamoto, Eiko; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although lack of human resources for health is becoming a global problem, there are few studies on human resources in Myanmar. This study was conducted to investigate the attrition rates of teaching staff from universities for medical professions in Myanmar from 2009 to 2013. The data were collected from administrative records from Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Health, Myanmar. Numbers of staff and those who permanently left work (attrition) from 2009 to 2013 were count...

  17. Stress among First and Third Year Medical Students at University Kebangsaan Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Salam, Abdus; Mahadevan, Raynuha; Abdul Rahman, Amir; Abdullah, Norsyafiqah; Abd Harith, Aimi Aqilah; Shan, Chu Pei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the stress-prevalence and coping-strategies among University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) medical students. Methods: This was an observational study conducted among 234 UKM first and third year medical students. Standardized questionnaire on stress and coping strategies was used. Stress data was related to subjective experiences on some positive and negative adjectives such as tense, relaxed etc. Positive adjectives were measured by sign “++” and “+” scoring “1” while stre...

  18. The medical examination and biological selection of university students in Nazi Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodó, Béla

    2002-01-01

    This article looks at the history of the medical inspection and biological selection of students in the Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany. It discusses the emergence of regular medical inspection of various social groups, including students, in the 1920s and explains why the Nazis were so eager to make health inspections--complete with anthropological and racial surveys--an integral part of the admission process to German universities. It examines why certain individuals, mainly young physicians, complied with the Nazi laws and why others, such as female and fraternity students, older and established physicians in the university clinics, and university administrators, sought to sabotage the procedures. Finally, it explains the failure of biological selection on university campuses in the context of the evolving educational and social policies of the Nazi regime. PMID:12446977

  19. The medical examination and biological selection of university students in Nazi Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodó, Béla

    2002-01-01

    This article looks at the history of the medical inspection and biological selection of students in the Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany. It discusses the emergence of regular medical inspection of various social groups, including students, in the 1920s and explains why the Nazis were so eager to make health inspections--complete with anthropological and racial surveys--an integral part of the admission process to German universities. It examines why certain individuals, mainly young physicians, complied with the Nazi laws and why others, such as female and fraternity students, older and established physicians in the university clinics, and university administrators, sought to sabotage the procedures. Finally, it explains the failure of biological selection on university campuses in the context of the evolving educational and social policies of the Nazi regime.

  20. Educational needs of faculty members of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2011

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    S. S Mazloomy Mahmoodabad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Identifying educational needs is an essential step in planning faculty development programs. It plays an important role in promoting the quality of education. The aim of this study was to determine and prioritize the educational needs of clinical and non clinical faculty members of Faculty of Medicne of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences. Methods: A questionnaire was developed for this cross-sectional study using the indices identified by reviewing the literature. The questionnaire was sent to all faculty members of Medical Faculty (n=260. The items were scored from 1 to 20 according to the importance of the educational needs. Data was analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Different areas of educational needs of the clinical faculty members were respectively prioritized as: familiarity with National Medical Universities Ranking Schemeresearch, personal development, administrative and executive activities, education, specialized activities outside the university and health services and health promotion. In the non clinical faculty members: research, familiarity with National Medical Universities Ranking Schemeeducation, personal development, specialized activities outside the university, administrative and executive activities. The first priority of education in the clinical faculty members was design, implementation and analysis of oral exams. In research domain priorities were data analysis skills and the first priority of education in the non clinical faculty members was how to foster critical thinking and reasoning in research and critical appraisal skills. Conclusion: Faculty members need all of the seven studiedmajor areas. It is recommended further research to determine the weight of these seven areas using a standard method.

  1. Life in the Medical Career: Perception of Pre-University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Somsubhra De; Ankur Barua; Alpana Chhetri

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Pre-University students have to decide their career pathway. In this study the primary objective was to find out the perception of students keen on pursuing medical career. Our secondary objective was to find out the parents’ response to their decision according to them.Material and Methods: Fifty one students from two colleges were given questionnaire survey. They were from the same Pre-University institution but their colleges were located in East and Peninsula Malaysia. They fu...

  2. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION ON INFECTIOUS DISEASES: A SAUDI UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL EXPERIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Qurashi, Abdulrahman M.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Continuing medical education (CME) is an important and useful activity for updating knowledge in order to improve for outcome of health care. A CME update symposium on Infectious Diseases was therefore organized at the King Fahd Hospital of the University (KFHU), Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia. Participants included clinicians, laboratory personnel and nursing staff from different hospitals and universities in Saudi Arabia. Objectives: To report the proceedings of the first CME on Infect...

  3. Features of Medical Student's Theses at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences during a Five-Year Period

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    Yazdan Hamzavi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Most of the studies conducted in Iranian medical schools are carried out as student's theses on which a lot of time and energy is spent. The purpose of the present study was to determine the characteristics of medical student's theses at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences during a five year period (2004-2008.Methods: In this descriptive, cross-sectional study a checklist consisting of 21 questions was designed. The data were gathered from all medical student's theses during 2004-2008 (n=189 using a consensus method of data collection. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software.Results: In terms of type, most of the theses were descriptive cross-sectional (33.3%, descriptive (29.1%, and descriptive-analytical (18.5%. The highest number of theses belonged to clinical psychiatry (18.5% and obstetrics and gynecology (17.5% departments. Other departments, especially basic science departments had the lowest number of theses because clinical teachers constituted 86.2% of the supervisors. The duration of the thesis completion was between 2 and 24 months. Using hospital records and inpatients files were the methods mostly used for data collection and as data sources. Furthermore, we could not find an appropriate assessment and scoring system of theses in place.Conclusion: Medical student's theses lacked appropriate quality therefore this issue should be seriously taken into consideration by educational managers.

  4. Cases from the Osler Medical Service at Johns Hopkins University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habas, Allison B; Kim, Yuli; Jefferson, Brian K

    2003-12-01

    A 50-year-old African American woman presented with bilateral lower extremity pain, a history of falls during the past several months, and personality and behavior changes. She had been in good health until approximately 5 months before admission, when she began to fall with increasing frequency, often while going down a flight of stairs. She described these falls as her "legs giving out" and feeling very heavy and unsteady. There was no head trauma or loss of consciousness. Her daughter noticed that her gait had become somewhat unsteady during the last several months. Her family also noted a change in her personality at this time. Previously, she had been a very tidy person who took great care with her appearance, who was working as a customer service representative. However, she had become less social and very withdrawn. She had been observed putting on dirty clothes after showering, as well as eating constantly. The patient denied any fevers, chills, night sweats, headaches, vision changes, or tinnitus. She also denied any rashes, muscle pain, or intolerance to heat or cold. There was no history of seizure disorder or depression. Her past medical history was notable only for hypertension and being a passenger in a motor vehicle crash 1 year before admission. She denied any alcohol, tobacco, or illicit drug use, and had no travel history other than coming to the United States, as she was originally from Trinidad. On physical examination, she was a moderately obese African American woman with a flat affect, psychomotor slowing, and alopecia of the scalp. She was alert and oriented to person, place, and time, but had a score of 26 out of 30 on the Mini-Mental State Examination. She lost points only for recall; she had no difficulty with serial 7s. Her cranial nerves were intact and her speech was fluent, although sparse, and she did not make any paraphasic errors. Her muscle strength was 5/5 in both the upper and lower extremities. Reflexes were 2+ in the upper

  5. [Medical pedagogy and special didactics in graduate courses at the medical school of the University of São Paulo, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes, E; Vanzolini, M E; Basile, M A; Fujimura, I; Pasqualucci, C A

    1992-01-01

    Graduate courses of medical pedagogy and special didactics at S. Paulo University Medical School are analysed. The authors present objectives, subject matters and methodologies of both courses, as well as their evaluation by the graduate students. After an initial rejection, the evaluation became very positive (67% in medical pedagogy and 82% in special didactics). Some future perspectives are discussed.

  6. Medical universities in Austria: impact of curriculum modernization on medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Lischka, M.

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade medical education in Austria has seen more changes than in the whole of the previous century, with a complete overhaul of the structure of undergraduate curricula. Curricula now are organized in thematic, integrated modules, students have early patient encounters, the number of examinations has been drastically reduced, objective examinations have been introduced throughout the entire course as has skills training, and quality management is assured. As a consequence of ...

  7. Medical universities in Austria: impact of curriculum modernization on medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Lischka, Martin

    2010-01-01

    [english] During the last decade medical education in Austria has seen more changes than in the whole of the previous century, with a complete overhaul of the structure of undergraduate curricula. Curricula now are organized in thematic, integrated modules, students have early patient encounters, the number of examinations has been drastically reduced, objective examinations have been introduced throughout the entire course as has skills training, and quality management is assured. As a conse...

  8. The Effect of Stress on Medical Students in a Private Medical University in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Jagmohni Kaur Sidhu

    2007-01-01

    Stress amongst medical students is oftenoverlooked. Intelligent students are not always the mostcomposed. This study aimed to look at both male andfemale students of three different ethnic groups and theeffects of stress in areas such as academic, social,financial and their everyday life. The Chinese studentsreported significantly less “academic stress” than theMalay students, and the Malay students reportedsignificantly less “financial stress” compared to theChinese and Indian students. Medi...

  9. Self-medication among non-healthcare students of the University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

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    Suleiman Ibrahim Sharif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of the following study is to estimate the prevalence of self-medication among university students and evaluate factors associated with the practice. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted during May, 2012 using a pre-validated questionnaire distributed to 250 students of the 4 years of study at the college of business administration. Data were analyzed using PASW Statistics for Windows, Version 18.0. Chicago: SPSS Inc and results are expressed as counts and percentages. Chi-square test was used to evaluate significant association among the study variables and P < 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Results: The response rate was 80% and all respondents were Arabs with 114 (57% females and 86 (43% males. Self-medication was practiced by 118 (59% students and most (88.1% of them obtained medications from pharmacies. About 21 (11% respondents self-medicated with antibiotics. Only 34 (17% and 16 (8% of respondents were aware of bacterial resistance and rational drug use respectively. The most common reasons for self-medication were seeking quick relief (134, 67%, physician′s advice of self-management (100, 50%, illness is minor (91, 45.5%. Common reasons against self-medication include risk of misdiagnosis of illness (160, 80%, risk of using the wrong medication (154, 77%, risk of adverse effects (140, 70%. Self-medication was practiced for headache or mild pain, eye and ear symptoms, gastric problems, cold, fever and allergy. Conclusion: Self-medication among non-healthcare students is common with high prevalence. Knowledge of students of reasons for and against self-medication was adequate, but awareness of respondents of rational drug use and risk of bacterial resistance in response to misuse was poor. Orientation courses/workshops directed to university students would be beneficial.

  10. Pattern of self-medication with analgesics among Iranian University students in central Iran

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    Shadi Sarahroodi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-medication is defined as the use of drugs for the treatment of self-diagnosed disorders. It is influenced by factors such as education, family, society, law, availability of drugs and exposure to advertisements. This study was performed to evaluate self-medication with analgesics and its pattern among different groups of Iranian University Students. Materials and Methods: A randomized, cross-sectional, multicenter study was conducted from December 2009 to February 2010. The target population of this study was 564 students out of 10,000 students attending four medical and non-medical science universities in Qom state. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16, and analysis was conducted with descriptive analysis procedures. Results: 76.6% of the students had used analgesics in self-medication in the previous 3 months. The frequency of analgesic use in the study period was once in 19.2% of the participants, twice in 22.2%, three times in 16.3% and more than three times in 35.5% of the participants, although 6.8% of them were not sure when they were used. Of all the respondents, 49.8% reported headache as the problem. This was the most common problem, after which came Dysmenorrhea,headache and stomach ache. Bone and joint pains were other problems that led to the use of analgesics. The most commonly used source of information for self-medication with analgesics was advice from friends and family (54.7%, previously prescribed medications (30.1%, their medical knowledge (13.3% and recommendation of a pharmacist (1.9%. Conclusion: Self-medication with analgesics is very high among Iranian students in Qom city. This could be an index for other parts of the Iranian community. Because the source of information about analgesics is inappropriate, we would recommend education courses about analgesics and self-medication on the radio and television for the entire population.

  11. The Basic Life Support Training and Its Importance for Medical University Staff

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    Afrooz Habibi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The survival rate of a cardiac arrest victim increases with basic life support (BLS as the first level of medical care. The purpose of this study was to compare BLS knowledge and skills of medical university staff before and after training course. Methods Thirty eight medical university staff participated in a BSL training course. The course included the assessment of participant’s knowledge by a pretest questionnaire, a lecture, hands-on training in BLS skills, a post-test questionnaire and an interview to evaluate their attitudes. Data were analyzed by the SPSS software version 19, using t-test, one-way ANOVA and chi square tests. P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Our results demonstrated that the mean knowledge score was 6.00 ± 2.09 vs. 8.26 ± 2.10 in pre- and post- education, respectively. A significant mean gain score (2.26 from the pre-test scores to post-test scores was statistically observed (P0.05 whereas, there were the significant differences between trainees’ gain scores and, education and career fields(p< 0.05. Our result also presents that staff attitudes toward the training were positive. Conclusion The present research shows the BLS training had a positive impact on the knowledge and attitudes among university staff. BLS training is extremely useful for medical university staf

  12. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  13. Impact of 5 years of Lean Six Sigma in a university medical center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.C. Niemeijer; A. Trip; L.J. de Jong; K.W. Wendt; R.J.M.M. Does

    2012-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is an originally industry-based methodology for cost reduction and quality improvement. In more recent years, LSS was introduced in health care as well. This article describes the experiences of the University Medical Center Groningen, the second largest hospital in the Netherla

  14. Research priorities in medical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences: categories and subcategories in the Iranian context

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    PARISA NABEIEI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Research in education is a globally significant issue without a long history. Due to the importance of the issue in Health System Development programs, this study intended to determine research priorities in medical education, considering their details and functions. By determining barriers existing in research in education progress, it is tried to make research priorities more functional by recommending acceptable strategies. Methods: This is a qualitative-descriptive study in two descriptive phases. The goal of these phases was to determine research priorities subcategories in medical education by Nominal Group Technique (NGT and two rounds of Delphi method. Through the first phase, subcategories of research priorities were determined, using Nominal Group Technique under medical education experts’ supervision. Through two rounds of Delphi, a questionnaire was constructed based on the subcategories. Eventually, research priorities were determined based on their highest score (scores more than 7 out of 10. Results: In the first phase (NGT, 35 priorities in 5 major fields of medical education were presented. In the second phase, priorities were scored, using Delphi method. Medical Ethics and professionalism gained the highest scores (7.63±1.26 and educational evaluation the lowest (7.28±1.52. In this stage, 7 items were omitted but 2 of them were added again after experts’ revision in the third round of Delphi. Conclusion: According to the results of the present study and based on previous studies, it really seems that the fields of “Learning and Teaching Approaches” and “Medical Ethics and Professionalism” were more important. Because of financial and resource limitations in our country and the importance of research priorities, it is recommended to frequently study “research priorities determination program” at universities.

  15. Nutritional knowledge of medical students studying in clinical courses of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2012

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    H. Mozaffari-Khosravi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutrition is one of the important components of health promotion and disease prevention. However, nutrition literacy of medical students is unclear. This study aims to determine nutritional knowledge of medical students studying in clinical course of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 114 medical students in clinical course of Shahid Sadoughi hospital were randomly selected. Nutritional knowledge questionnaire was completed. Each correct answer had one score and wrong answers had no score. Results: Of 114 students, 69 students (60.5% were female and 45 students (39.5% were male with the mean age of 24.1±1.5 year. The mean score of students in basic nutrition, nutrition in the life cycle and diet therapy was 4.6±2.2, 6.2±3.2 and 6.2±3.8, respectively. There was significant association between the score of nutrition course and nutritional knowledge score in all of the fields. Conclusion: The average of scores was low. Improving the nutrition courses, especially clinical aspects, during clinical education and presence of nutritionist in treatment teams will be helpful.

  16. Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lauren; Crowley, Jennifer; Laur, Celia; Rajput-Ray, Minha; Gillam, Stephen; Ray, Sumantra

    2014-01-01

    Landmark reports have confirmed that it is within the core responsibilities of doctors to address nutrition in patient care. There are ongoing concerns that doctors receive insufficient nutrition education during medical training. This paper provides an overview of a medical nutrition education initiative at the University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, including 1) the approach to medical nutrition education, 2) evaluation of the medical nutrition education initiative, and 3) areas identified for future improvement. The initiative utilizes a vertical, spiral approach during the clinically focused years of the Cambridge undergraduate and graduate medical degrees. It is facilitated by the Nutrition Education Review Group, a group associated with the UK Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, and informed by the experiences of their previous nutrition education interventions. Three factors were identified as contributing to the success of the nutrition education initiative including the leadership and advocacy skills of the nutrition academic team, the variety of teaching modes, and the multidisciplinary approach to teaching. Opportunities for continuing improvement to the medical nutrition education initiative included a review of evaluation tools, inclusion of nutrition in assessment items, and further alignment of the Cambridge curriculum with the recommended UK medical nutrition education curriculum. This paper is intended to inform other institutions in ongoing efforts in medical nutrition education.

  17. Assessment of academic libraries in Mazandran, Goleston and Babol Medical Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehteram Sadat Ilali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 3 August, 2009; Accepted 13 Jan, 2010AbstractBackground and purpose: Libraries have a specific place in universities and have also an important role in students' education and research. The aim of this study was to evaluate the situation of academic libraries in Mazandaran, Babol and Golestan Universities of Medical Sciences.Materials and methods: This study is a descriptive survey in 25 academic libraries in Mazandaran, Golestan and Babol medical Universities. The tool of the survey was a standard questionnaire (ACRL, and the libraries were assessed using of checklist and interview.Results: Thirteen librarians (53% hold a BSc degree, one (4% with an MSc degree and two (8% had an AA degree. Regarding to prediction and design of the libraries structure, only 40% (10 libraries had prior programs. Related to budget, 40% relied on resources from the deputy for research, 12% on faculty current budget and 8% on hospital current budget, (40% of others libraries did not have a planned budget. 12 libraries (45% were open 6 days a week, 10 libraries (40% 5 days a week and 3 libraries (12% provided services every day. 39665 references were held at central library of Babol Medical Sciences University and less than 1016 at 5 Azar Hospital in Golestan Medical Sciences University. Fifteen libraries (60% had access to Medline and Elsevier databases and 10 Libraries (40% did not have any access.Conclusion: University libraries must be standardized to meet the need of the students and staff.Key words: School libraries, therapeutic and teaching hospitals, standards, ACRL, IranJ Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 20(74: 85-89 (Persian

  18. Evaluation of self-medication practices in acute diseases among university students in Oman

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marwa Al Flaiti; Khaloud Al Badi; Wefaq Othman Hakami; Shah Alam Khan

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the practices of university students towards self-medication to treat minor ailments inMuscat andSohar region ofSultanate ofOman.Methods:A cross sectional study was conducted inOctober2013-January2014.A total of450 university students were randomly selected and their verbal consent was obtained.The data were collected through the self-administered, close ended, pretested questionnaire and was analyzed statistically bySPSS version19.0.Results:Overall204 males(45.3%) and246 females(56.7%) participated in the study.The mean age of respondents was22.3 years.Ninety-four percent of respondents reported practicing self-medication and165(36.7%) participants admitted of having purchased drugs without prescription more than four times over the last six months.Headache, fever, cough and cold were the most common ailments which prompted respondents to seek self-medication. Analgesics, cough preparations and antibiotics were the most common classes of drugs used in self-medication.The majority of respondents practiced self-medication either because their illness was not serious or they had prior experience with the drug.The majority of respondents had good medicationknowledge which they reported to acquire from reading drug leaflet or from pharmacists’ advice.Conclusion:The prevalence of self-medication among university students was very high.There is a need for intensive education and comprehensive awareness campaign to advocate for reduction in the prevalence of self-medication practices among students.

  19. Medical and surgical ward rounds in teaching hospitals of Kuwait University: students’ perceptions

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    AlMutar S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sara AlMutar,1 Lulwa AlTourah,1 Hussain Sadeq,2 Jumanah Karim,2 Yousef Marwan3 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pediatrics, Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Al-Razi Orthopedic Hospital, Kuwait City, Kuwait Background: Teaching sessions for medical students during ward rounds are an essential component of bedside teaching, providing students with the opportunity to regard patients as actual people, and to observe their physical conditions directly, allowing a better understanding of illnesses to be developed. We aim to explore medical students’ perceptions regarding medical and surgical ward rounds within the Faculty of Medicine at Kuwait University, and to evaluate whether this teaching activity is meeting the expectation of learners. Methods: A pretested questionnaire was used to collect data from 141 medical students during the 2012–2013 academic year. They were asked to provide their current and expected ratings about competencies that were supposed to be gained during ward rounds, on a scale from 1 (lowest to 5 (highest. Mean scores were calculated, and the Student t-test was used to compare results. P < 0.05 was the cut-off level for significance. Results: Only 17 students (12.1% declined to participate in the study. The students' current competency scores (for competencies taught within both disciplines – medical and surgical were significantly lower than the scores indicating students’ expectations (P < 0.001. The best-taught competency was bedside examination, in both medical (mean: 3.45 and surgical (mean: 3.05 ward rounds. However, medical ward rounds were better than surgical rounds in covering some competencies, especially the teaching of professional attitude and approach towards patients (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Both medical and surgical ward rounds were deficient in meeting the students’ expectations. Medical educators should utilize the available literature to improve the bedside

  20. Methylphenidate use among medical students at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

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    Yael Givon Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Methylphenidate is a psychotropic agent commonly used for the treatment of attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity and narcolepsy in children and adults. The awareness to attention deficit disorder as well as the non-medical use of methylphenidate for cognitive enhancement has increased during the past years. Objectives: To evaluate the medical and non-medical use of methylphenidate among medical students in the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Materials and Methods: Medical students were asked to report methylphenidate use, symptoms and diagnosis of attention deficit disorder using a structured questionnaire. Results: A total of 229 students participated in the study, out of which 105 (45.9% were in the pre-clinical years of medical school. Twenty-two students (9.6% were previously diagnosed with attention deficit disorder. Lifelong use of methylphenidate was reported by 39 (17% students, while 31 students (13.5% reported using methylphenidate during the preceding 12 month. In the beginning of medical school, only 7% of the students used methylphenidate, most of them began using it during pre-clinical academic years. Discussion: High rates of attention deficit disorder compared to the general population were reported by medical students. The rate of methylphenidate use is similar to recent report from a US medical school, and is considerably higher than in college students population. Conclusions: Many medical students are using methylphenidate without a medical indication. Further study is needed to evaluate the effect of methylphenidate on academic performance of healthy adults.

  1. Predictors of dietary supplement usage among medical interns of Tehran university of medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoudeh, Gity; Kabiri, Sanaz; Yeganeh, Haleh Sadrzadeh; Koohdani, Fariba; Khajehnasiri, Farahnaz; Khosravi, Shahla

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of dietary supplement-use and its relationship with demographics and lifestyle of medical interns. The study sample comprised 356 interns aged 23 to 25 years. Participants completed a questionnaire on dietary supplement-use during the month preceding the study, information on demographic characteristics and lifestyle was also obtained. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression were employed to assess the correlates of dietary supplement-use. The prevalence of dietary supplement-use was about 33% (males 20.4% and females 43.2%, pnutritional status (39.3%) and reducing hair loss (23.4%). The decision to use dietary supplement was mostly driven by the interns themselves (56% in males, 61% in females). In the univariable analysis, men who exercised once or twice a week were less likely to use supplements compared to those who reported doing exercise more than twice weekly (OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.12-0.98). Females who reported their health status to be 'excellent' were more likely to use supplements compared to those who described their health status as 'moderate/poor/very poor' (OR=2.53, 95% CI 1.15-5.56) as were women who mentioned their breakfast consumption status as 'always' (OR=2.69, 95% CI 1.47-4.92). In the multivariable analysis, only breakfast consumption was significantly related with dietary supplement-use in females (OR=2.20, 95% CI 1.11-4.38). In conclusion, dietary supplement-use among medical interns, especially among females, was relatively very common. Dietary supplement-use was related to a healthier lifestyle.

  2. Teaching medical information retrieval and application courses in Chinese universities: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adam W; Li, Hong-Mei

    2010-12-01

    An important aspect of Chinese academic health science libraries is their involvement in teaching medical information retrieval courses as part of the medical curriculum. Health science librarians in China have a more formal teaching role than is generally found in Western countries, including many full-time teaching positions. This article provides a case study of Kunming Medical University Library, where courses are provided as credit units at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. The teaching practices of Chinese health science libraries are compared with teaching experiences reported in Western countries. It is noted that Chinese government's educational policy is similar to that of the United States in promoting the role of the library in teaching subjects as part of the medical curriculum. In China, this has lead to the development of teaching departments within health science libraries and the appointment of full and part-time teacher librarians.

  3. Testing and Validation for Internet Attitude Scale among male and female students at Isfahan University and University of Medical Science

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    Mohammad Ali Zaki

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The advent of the third millennium witnessed the culmination of two decades of interest expressed by social researchers about the importance, status and utilization of ICT, particularly the Net, concerning scientific production in the areas of theory-formation and research. Part of this scientific output dealt with measurement of internet attitude. The present paper attempts to test, measure and validate internet attitude scales. It offers the findings of a survey conducted among 200 students, both male and female, at Isfahan University and Isfahan University of Medical Science. Standard Dinev and Koufteros questionnaire was used. It measures two kinds of attitude towards internet use and self-efficacy. Using factor analysis, the present paper investigated the reliability of two sets of questionnaires. Both possessed appropriate internal consistency. Construct Validity was confirmed using factor analysis. The statements incorporated within the research instrument could be distinguished and therefore offers a suitable tool for evaluating internet attitude.

  4. Developing eLearning Technologies to Implement Competency Based Medical Education: Experiences from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagunwa, Thomas; Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the practical experience of developing an eLearning technology as a tool to implement Competency-based Medical Education (CBME) in Tanzania medical universities, with a specific focus on Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences. The paper provides a background to eLearning and the early attempt to adopt it in 2006 at…

  5. Informed consent from patients participating in medical education: a survey from a university hospital in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Medical students at the University of the West Indies receive clinical training by passing through a series of hospital rotations at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI). Many of these patients are unaware that medical students may be involved in their care. We performed this study to determine patient awareness and their willingness to participate in research and teaching activities. Findings All consecutive patients admitted to the UHWI between May 1, 2006 and May 29, 2006 who required elective or emergency surgical procedures were prospectively identified These patients were interviewed using a standardised pre-tested questionnaire about their knowledge and willingness to have medical students participate in the delivery of their hospital care. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 12.0. There were 83 (39.5%) males and 127 (60.5%) females interviewed. The patients were unaware of the grade of the medical professional performing their interview/examination at admission in 157 (74.8%) cases or the grade of medical professional performing their operations in 101 (48.1%) cases. Only 14 (6.7%) patients were specifically asked to allow medical students to be present during their clinical evaluation and care. When specifically asked, 1 patient declined. Had they been asked, 196 (93.3%) patients would have voluntarily allowed medical student involvement. Only 90 (42.9%) patients were made aware that they were admitted to an academic centre with research interests. Only 6 (6.7%) patients declined. Had they been asked, 84 (93.3%) patients would be willing to participate in teaching or research projects. Conclusions As medical educators, we are responsible to adhere to ethical and legal guidelines when we interact with patients. It is apparent that there is urgent need for policy development at the UWI to guide clinicians and students on their interactions with patients. PMID:20003471

  6. Informed consent from patients participating in medical education: a survey from a university hospital in Jamaica

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    Robinson Diaqa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical students at the University of the West Indies receive clinical training by passing through a series of hospital rotations at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI. Many of these patients are unaware that medical students may be involved in their care. We performed this study to determine patient awareness and their willingness to participate in research and teaching activities. Findings All consecutive patients admitted to the UHWI between May 1, 2006 and May 29, 2006 who required elective or emergency surgical procedures were prospectively identified These patients were interviewed using a standardised pre-tested questionnaire about their knowledge and willingness to have medical students participate in the delivery of their hospital care. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 12.0. There were 83 (39.5% males and 127 (60.5% females interviewed. The patients were unaware of the grade of the medical professional performing their interview/examination at admission in 157 (74.8% cases or the grade of medical professional performing their operations in 101 (48.1% cases. Only 14 (6.7% patients were specifically asked to allow medical students to be present during their clinical evaluation and care. When specifically asked, 1 patient declined. Had they been asked, 196 (93.3% patients would have voluntarily allowed medical student involvement. Only 90 (42.9% patients were made aware that they were admitted to an academic centre with research interests. Only 6 (6.7% patients declined. Had they been asked, 84 (93.3% patients would be willing to participate in teaching or research projects. Conclusions As medical educators, we are responsible to adhere to ethical and legal guidelines when we interact with patients. It is apparent that there is urgent need for policy development at the UWI to guide clinicians and students on their interactions with patients.

  7. Drug use prevalence among students of universities of medical sciences in Tehran

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    Farhad Taremian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of drug use among students of universities of Medical Sciences in Tehran. Method: Four thousands of medical students (both sexes in academic year 1388-89 in different level of education, B.A., M.Sc. and Ph.D. were selected by random stratified sampling method. These students were selected from Iran, Tehran and Shahid Beheshti Universities of Medical Sciences considering their sex and level of education. We used drug use prevalence questionnaire. Findings: The most prevalent drug of abuse in life time period was qalyan (classical pipe, followed by cigarette, and alcohol. The least frequent drug of abuse was Shisheh, followed by heroine krack. As we expected, drugs morphine, ritalin and tramadol were placed in forth, fifth and sixth of prevalent drugs. Use of different substances was significantly more prevalent in male students. Conclusion: Using soft drugs (qalyan, cigarette and alcohol was more prevalent than hard drugs (hashish, taryak, heroine kerack among Universities Medical Sciences of Tehran. Similar to drug use pattern in society, use of all of drugs were more prevalent in male students. We should pay special attention to use of drugs such as tramadol, ritalin, petedin and morphine.

  8. Strategies to Improve Students’ Educational Achievement Motivation at Guilan University of Medical Sciences

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    Mahdokht Taheri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In view of the fact that motivation is linked directly to the learning process and educational achievement, this study endeavored to identify strategies to improve students’ educational achievement motivation at Guilan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: To conduct this descriptive-analytical study, 368 students from Guilan University of Medical Sciences were selected using simple random sampling from 2013-2014. All of the Guilan University of Medical Sciences’ students met the general eligibility criteria except guest students. The questionnaire included five domains of economic, socio-cultural, educational, geo-regional, and personality factors in educational achievement motivation. Through using descriptive and inferential statistics (Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests, the compiled data were analyzed at the significance level of 0.05. Results: Data analysis revealed that socio-cultural factors have the maximum score (64.14 ± 9.92 and geo-regional factors have the minimum score (19.01±3.63 on the participants’ educational achievement motivation. What is more, a significant difference was revealed between educational field and educational effective factors as well as educational level and educational effective factors (p<0.011, p<0.004, respectively. Conclusion: Given that the socio-cultural factors had the maximum score on the students’ educational achievement motivation, it is recommended that university officials take these factors into account, and attempt to plan to provide appropriate strategies to enhance their students’ motivation, specifically their educational achievement motivation.

  9. The Direct Cost of Parkinson Disease at Juntendo Medical University Hospital, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoritaka, Asako; Fukae, Jiro; Hatano, Taku; Oda, Eisei; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many studies on the cost of Parkinson disease (PD) have been published; however, there are limited studies pertaining to this issue in Asia. This study looks to assess the direct medical costs of patients with PD at a university hospital in Japan by calculating the average monthly direct medical costs of PD patients from July to December 2008. Methods We enrolled 724 consecutive patients (411 women and 313 men) with PD who were registered in Japan's "Specified Disease Treatment Research Program" and obtained data on the total direct medical costs of all patients. Results Values are reported as the mean (standard deviation). The major finding of the direct medical cost analysis was that the outpatient clinic cost per subject (n=715) was USD 485.74 (376.31) per month. A multivariate analysis revealed that a younger age, the presence of wearing-off, hallucination, and longer disease duration increased the direct medical cost significantly. Disease severity had no influence on the direct medical costs. A longer disease duration was significantly correlated with higher hospitalization costs. Conclusion The direct medical cost of PD in Japan was found to be similar to that in Western countries. Costs due to productivity loss exceeded the direct costs, and they may be reduced through the better integration of PD patients in the work environment. PMID:26781008

  10. Documentation of Medical Records in Hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014: a Quantitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Asgari, Zolaykha; Siamian, Hasan; Farahabadi, Ebrahim Bagherian; Gorji, Alimorad Heidari; Motamed, Nima; Fallahkharyeki, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Documentation of patient care in medical record formats is always emphasized. These documents are used as a means to go on treating the patients, staff in their own defense, assessment, care, any legal proceedings and medical science education. Therefore, in this study, each of the data elements available in patients’ records are important and filling them indicates the importance put by the documenting teams, so it has been dealt with the documentation the patient records in the hospitals of Mazandaran province. Method: This cross-sectional study aimed to review medical records in 16 hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (MazUMS). In order to collection data, a check list was prepared based on the data elements including four forms of the admission, summary, patients’ medical history and progress note. The data recording was defined as “Yes” with the value of 1, lack of recording was defined as “No” with the value of 2, and “Not applied” with the value of 0 for the cases in which the mentioned variable medical records are not applied. Results: The overall evaluation of the documentation was considered as 95-100% equal to “good”, 75-94% equal to “average” and below -75% equal to “poor”. Using the stratified random sample volume formula, 381 cases were reviewed. The data were analyzed by the SPSS version 19 and descriptive statistics. Results: The results showed that %62 of registration and all the four forms were in the “poor” category. There was no big difference in average registration among the hospitals. Among the educational groups Gynecology and Infectious were equal and had the highest average of documentation of %68. In the data categories, the highest documentation average belonged to the verification, %91. Conclusion: According to the overall assessment in which the rate of documentation was in the category “week”, we should make much more efforts to reach better conditions. Even if a data

  11. Documentation of Medical Records in Hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014: a Quantitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Asgari, Zolaykha; Siamian, Hasan; Farahabadi, Ebrahim Bagherian; Gorji, Alimorad Heidari; Motamed, Nima; Fallahkharyeki, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Documentation of patient care in medical record formats is always emphasized. These documents are used as a means to go on treating the patients, staff in their own defense, assessment, care, any legal proceedings and medical science education. Therefore, in this study, each of the data elements available in patients’ records are important and filling them indicates the importance put by the documenting teams, so it has been dealt with the documentation the patient records in the hospitals of Mazandaran province. Method: This cross-sectional study aimed to review medical records in 16 hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (MazUMS). In order to collection data, a check list was prepared based on the data elements including four forms of the admission, summary, patients’ medical history and progress note. The data recording was defined as “Yes” with the value of 1, lack of recording was defined as “No” with the value of 2, and “Not applied” with the value of 0 for the cases in which the mentioned variable medical records are not applied. Results: The overall evaluation of the documentation was considered as 95-100% equal to “good”, 75-94% equal to “average” and below -75% equal to “poor”. Using the stratified random sample volume formula, 381 cases were reviewed. The data were analyzed by the SPSS version 19 and descriptive statistics. Results: The results showed that %62 of registration and all the four forms were in the “poor” category. There was no big difference in average registration among the hospitals. Among the educational groups Gynecology and Infectious were equal and had the highest average of documentation of %68. In the data categories, the highest documentation average belonged to the verification, %91. Conclusion: According to the overall assessment in which the rate of documentation was in the category “week”, we should make much more efforts to reach better conditions. Even if a data

  12. Survey of Professional Skill Among Medical Residents of Tabriz University of Medical Science For Breaking Bad News

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    Bagher Matloubi-Sisi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of knowledge on scientific behaving with patients during giving bad news involves most of physicians even experienced physicians. Interestingly, this hurts physicians mind and in some cases causes sadness and depression or reaction on dealing with patient. In a cross sectional-descriptive study, 203 clinical assistant were included in study from 2009 to 2010 at Tabriz university of medical sciences. Comments of residents about giving bad news were registered on valid and reliable questionnaire. State of awareness by considering positive answers of statistical population were categorized into three groups; first group: weak awareness (true questions fewer than 50%, second group: medium awareness (true questions between 50 to75%, and third group: good awareness (true questions more than 75%. Validity of questionnaire was assessed by evaluating contents and reliability using Cronbach's alpha. Stratified sampling was used based on academic year. Mean age of residents was 32.01±3.25 years between the ranges of 26 to 43 years. Females were 76 individuals (37.4% and 127 individuals (62.6% males. Mean of physicians work experience was 2.1-2.9 (0-15 years range at general period. Among residents, internal medicine residents agree on considering patients education before giving bad news much than other majors residents (P=0.004. Mean score for residents' awareness about patients' right for knowing disease were 4.81±1.58 (min=0, max=7; the mean for female residents was 4.9±1.49 and 4.75±1.64 for male residents. There is statistically significant differences between majors.Present study, has shown that the knowledge of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences residents about breaking bad news are low. It seems that holding workshops about breaking bad news are necessary for educating medical students and residents. Keywords: Breaking bad news; residents; knowledge; attitude

  13. Reasons of absence from clinical foundation classes from the viewpoints of medical students of Semnan University of Medical Sciences

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    abedin vakili

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Absence of students from classes can reduce the quality of education and increase the failure rate. The present study aims to assess the reasons of absence from classes in basic sciences from the viewpoints of medical students of Semnan University of Medical Sciences in 2011. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed using a questionnaire with the participation of medical students who undertook basic sciences' course and BSc. students who studied in year two of the course. A questionnaire containing demographic data and factors influencing on students' absence including teacher, student, educational processing and physical conditions of classrooms was designed. Students completed the questionnaire before starting of lectures in classrooms. Results: The results showed that 39% of students were absent two hours and 22.4% were absent for four hours per course credit and 38.6% said they were not aim to be absent except in emergency situation. at all.   Inappropriate teaching was identified as the main reason for absence (3.53 / 4±1.1 followed by inadequate sleep the night before the class (3.45 / 4±1.33 lack of scholarship in teaching (3.43 / 4±1.21 and lack of self-interest to the field (1.76 / 4±1.13. Conclusion: Education planners should consider factors influencing on absence of students. In faculty recruitment, academic proficiency and scholarship of teaching should also be considered. Moreover, emotional status of students should be noticed.

  14. AN ASSESSMENT OF PERSONALITY ASPECTS OF THE STUDENTS OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

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    B. Nikpour

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study a base-scale is prepared for the evaluation of the personality grounds of the Tehran University of Medical Science students. Such a scoring scale may be useful to help the medical science students in career development, psychosocial consultations, and appropriate supportive care plans. A sample of 205 female and male students resident in dormitories were evaluated using “Bernreuter” personality questionnaires and computer programs prepared in this center. The percentiles of each scale is scored and represented in a systematic framework. Considering the normal distribution of the results using their means and standard deviations, the important percentages in each scale is tabulated.

  15. How Medical Statistics has been established at the University of Freiburg: a historical perspective

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    Schumacher, Martin

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution gives an outline on the reasons why the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Freiburg established an Institute of Medical Statistics and Documentation about fourty years ago as one of the first in Germany. It will be shown that the Professor of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene at that time initiated and promoted this development being himself motivated by the successful implementation of a vaccine against poliomyelitis through rigorous design, conduct and statistical analysis of a large scale field trial.

  16. [Attitudes of pharmacy and dentistry students of Poznan Medical University towards smoking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniowska, Katarzyna; Cieślewicz, Artur; Szałek, Edyta; Jabłecka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the attitude of students of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Division of Dentistry (Poznan University of Medical Sciences) towards smoking. Information was collected using a self-completion questionnaire for students. 114 students of the 5th year of Faculty of Pharmacy and 60 students of 4th year of Division of Dentistry took part in the survey. Most of the students were non-smokers (77% in the Faculty of Pharmacy and 72% in the Division of Dentistry). The main reason for abandoning smoking in both groups was knowledge on the dangers of addiction obtained in medical studies.

  17. The first anatomy professors in the medical school of the University of Athens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piagkou, Maria; Androutsos, Georgios; Demesticha, Theano; Lappas, Dimitrios; Karamanou, Marianna; Piagkos, Giannoulis; Skandalakis, Panayiotis; Piagkos, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this historical review is to add new elements to the international literature in relation to the birth and progress of the science of anatomy in modern Greece. Step by step, it outlines the efforts of prominent Greek anatomists to establish the course of the basic science of anatomy in the newly founded Medical School, the laborious effort to collect cadaveric material to compile museum anatomical collections and to gradually build the foundations of modern anatomy science at the Medical School of the Athenian University.

  18. Virtual University hospital as an arena for medical training and health education

    OpenAIRE

    Kleven, Nils Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to contribute to the virtual univer- sity initiative at NTNU with some initial recommendations for the early design and development of a virtual university hospital. The findings in this thesis are based on a preliminary study and two ex- ploratory studies using a virtual operating room (designed to recreate a real one at St. Olavs hospital) with both medical and non-medical participants. The goal of the studies has been to explore how to sup- port educational ac...

  19. Weighing the views of a university hospital and medical school regarding an HMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, T J; Matthews, C W; Segadelli, L J

    1983-09-01

    After 14 years of study, the University of Michigan decided to terminate development of a health maintenance organization (HMO). The process was long and difficult because of the university's need to consider the HMO from the university's perspective of both an employer and a provider. As an employer, the university's early view was favorable and then declined when employee interest was found to be weak and the HMO's impact on the rapidly rising cost of the university's health insurance benefit was determined to be modest. As a provider, the university's view was mixed. In regard to its hospitals, the university's judgment was positive largely because it hoped that HMO incentives might help the hospitals remain viable in the health care delivery environment that was becoming increasingly competitive. From the Medical School's point of view, an HMO was felt not to be desirable because it could put in jeopardy the professional fee revenue used by the school to help underwrite its academic programs, which are the primary source of faculty pride and recognition.

  20. Patenting of university and non-university public research organisations in Germany: evidence from patent applications for medical research results.

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    Peter Tinnemann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patents are one of the most important forms of intellectual property. They grant a time-limited exclusivity on the use of an invention allowing the recuperation of research costs. The use of patents is fiercely debated for medical innovation and especially controversial for publicly funded research, where the patent holder is an institution accountable to public interest. Despite this controversy, for the situation in Germany almost no empirical information exists. The purpose of this study is to examine the amount, types and trends of patent applications for health products submitted by German public research organisations. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a systematic search for patent documents using the publicly accessible database search interface of the German Patent and Trademark Office. We defined keywords and search criteria and developed search patterns for the database request. We retrieved documents with application date between 1988 and 2006 and processed the collected data stepwise to compile the most relevant documents in patent families for further analysis. We developed a rationale and present individual steps of a systematic method to request and process patent data from a publicly accessible database. We retrieved and processed 10194 patent documents. Out of these, we identified 1772 relevant patent families, applied for by 193 different universities and non-university public research organisations. 827 (47% of these patent families contained granted patents. The number of patent applications submitted by universities and university-affiliated institutions more than tripled since the introduction of legal reforms in 2002, constituting almost half of all patent applications and accounting for most of the post-reform increase. Patenting of most non-university public research organisations remained stable. CONCLUSIONS: We search, process and analyse patent applications from publicly accessible databases

  1. Implant Success Rate in the Faculty of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahroodi MH

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the use of titanium implant have received special attention in dentistry. In 1994 an implant clinic has established in Faculty of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Science and since then, 289 implants have been placed for 120 patients. In literatures a success rate of 93% and 84% of implants placed in mandible and maxilla respectively, have been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate implant success rate at implant clinic of Faculty of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Science. This study was based on reviewing the patients' charts. Results showed that success rates for Branmark, ITI, and IMZ implant systems were 94%, 95%, and 97% respectively. The higher success rate achieved in this clinic might be due to shorter period of time which implants were placed. Researches showed that care in patient selection, treatment planning, and following exact surgical and prosthetic principles will lead to a higher success and lower failure rates.

  2. The situation analysis of the international relations management and inter-university collaboration in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during the years 2005-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Farajollahi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nowadays, with the development of science and communication, collaboration with other countriesand universities seems inevitable to universities. The aim of this study was to analyze the situation of internationalrelations management and inter-university collaboration (IRM-IUC in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (TUMS,Iran, during the years 2005-2010. METHODS: In this descriptive study, one checklist was used for analysis of the inter-university collaboration management and another one for the situation analysis of international relations management which included 4 sections itself. There were a total of 56 questions designed and developed through literature review and the expert panel.RESULTS: The results indicated the poor performance of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in the international relations management and inter-university collaboration fields. Most of the reviewed items had not been adequatelypaid attention to in the management of international relations and only one out of 14 evaluated items was considered inthe field of inter-university collaboration. CONCLUSIONS: In line with the overall globalization process, education and research have also become globalizedprocesses, and as a result, it is necessary for universities to develop effective ties and relationships with otherorganizations. However, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences has not been doing quite optimally in this regard. Thus,it is suggested that, based on the shortcomings pointed out in this study, new appropriate plans and policies be set todevelop fruitful and effective relations and correspondences with other universities and countries.

  3. Information-seeking behavior of cardiovascular disease patients in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Zamani, Maryam; Soleymani, Mohammad Reza; Afshar, Mina; Shahrzadi, Leila; Zadeh, Akbar Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients, as one of the most prominent groups requiring health-based information, encounter numerous problems in order to obtain these pieces of information and apply them. The aim of this study was to determine the information-seeking behavior of cardiovascular patients who were hospitalized in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences hospitals. Materials and Methods: This is a survey research. The population consisted of all patients with cardiovascular disease who were hospitaliz...

  4. Ethnic Differences And Motivation Based On Maslow’s Theory At a MedicaL University

    OpenAIRE

    Jagmohni Kaur Sidhu

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Motivation in Malaysia is to a largeextent influenced by the value system amongst allMalaysians. Being able to motivate employees is one ofthe important keys to the success of the organization.In this paper, an attempt was made to look into theneeds of employees in organizations and in particular,the needs based on Maslow’s theory on motivation. Subjects and Methods: Employees which consisted ofboth academic and administrative employees of theInternational Medical University (...

  5. Board of Undergraduate Courses: a Means to Improve Academic Quality in Medical Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Norma Mur Villar; María Felicia Casanova González; Miriam Iglesias León; Marta González Deben; Carlos Zerquera Álvarez; Mayra Gil León

    2014-01-01

    Improving the quality of the service provided to the society by the University of Medical Sciences and its participation in solving health problems is undoubtedly, the most important challenge facing this institution. In order to disseminate the results of the meeting of the board of undergraduate courses as a means to achieve academic quality, the main results derived from such meeting are presented. The board of undergraduate courses contributes to systematically foster a culture of quality...

  6. Perception of Medical University Members From Nutritional Health in the Quran

    OpenAIRE

    Salarvand, Shahin; Pournia, Yadollah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Desirable health is impossible without good nutrition, and Allah has addressed us on eating foods in 118 verses. Objectives: This study aimed to describe the medical university faculty members’ perceptions of nutritional health in the Quran, revealing the important role of faculty members. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was conducted with a phenomenological approach. Homogeneous sampling was performed in a final sample size of 16 subjects. The Colaizzi's phenomenolo...

  7. Incidence of Red Cell Alloantibody among the Transfusion Recipients of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Yousuf, Rabeya; Abdul Aziz, Suria; Yusof, Nurasyikin; Leong, Chooi Fun

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cell alloimmunization is a common complication among the transfusion recipients. In Malaysia, multiple ethnicity causes genetic heterogeneity among the population which in turn can cause a wide variation of antibody. The objective of this study was to analyse the red cell alloantibody detected during the pre-transfusion testing. This was a cross-sectional study done in the blood bank of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre during the period of January–December 2010. The dat...

  8. Evaluating the immunity against hepatitis B virus among Yasuj University of Medical Sciences students-2014

    OpenAIRE

    F Tarkhan; SA Mousavizadeh; F Hadinia; a Hadinia

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim:  Hepatitis B virus vaccination, Ab titer of particular importance in health care workers is high. Due to the fact that the rate of immunization against the disease is not directly measurable, the presence of detectable levels of antibody in the serum of the vaccinated individual, the individual's immunity against disease is considered to be equivalent. The aim of this study was to evaluating the immunity against hepatitis B virus among Yasuj University of Medical Scienc...

  9. Prevalence of Substance Abuse Among Dormitory Students of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Babaei Heydarabadi, Akbar; Ramezankhani, Ali; Barekati, Hasan; Vejdani, Marjan; Shariatinejad, Keyvan; Panahi, Rahman; Kashfi, Seyed Hanan; Imanzad, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adolescence is a risky period with high tendency towards drug abuse. Addressing the problem of drug abuse among students is essential. Objectives: This study was carried out in 2013 with the purpose of investigating the prevalence of substance abuse among dormitory students of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive analytical study, which was carried out in 2013, a total of 604 students living at dormitories of Shahid Beheshti Uni...

  10. The Effect of Emotional Intelligence on Entrepreneurial Behavior: A Case Study in a Medical Science University

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadkarim Bahadori

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays with complex and dynamic environment in organizations, scholars make more attention to emotional intelligence. Also, the role of emotional intelligence started to make inroad into entrepreneurship research. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of emotional intelligence on entrepreneurial behavior in organizations. A sample of 107 managers from a medical science university in Iran participated in the main study. Findings showed that all four dimensions of emotional intel...

  11. Uterine artery embolisation for symptomatic fibroids: the University of Malaya Medical Centre experience

    OpenAIRE

    Subramaniam, RN; Vijayananthan, A; Omar, SZ; Nawawi, O; Abdullah, BJJ

    2010-01-01

    Background: Transcatheter uterine artery embolisation (UAE) for the treatment of symptomatic fibroids has been performed in several centres in the United States, Western Europe and Asia with promising results. This study reports the authors' experience with UAE at the University Malaya Medical Centre. Method: Fifty women with symptomatic uterine fibroids who declined surgery were treated by transcatheter UAE. The uterine arteries were selectively catheterised and embolised with polyvinyl alco...

  12. On-campus physicians witnessing changes in medical problems faced by university students.

    OpenAIRE

    Thorne, S

    1996-01-01

    Most Canadian universities offer on-campus health services for their students. Ten years ago minor health problems such as infections, cuts and bruises were the common causes of visits to student health centres, but today medical staff report that students are seeking help for more serious problems such as sexually transmitted diseases, stress, sports injuries, eating disorders and asthma and allergies. Many are also seeking psychiatric counselling.

  13. Key factors in work engagement and job motivation of teaching faculty at a university medical centre

    OpenAIRE

    van den Berg, B. A. M.; Arnold B. Bakker; ten Cate, Th.J.

    2013-01-01

    This study reports about teacher motivation and work engagement in a Dutch University Medical Centre (UMC). We examined factors affecting the motivation for teaching in a UMC, the engagement of UMC Utrecht teaching faculty in their work, and their engagement in teaching compared with engagement in patient care and research. Based on a pilot study within various departments at the UMCU, a survey on teaching motivation and work engagement was developed and sent to over 600 UMCU teachers. About ...

  14. The analysis of the medical university students’ health condition and lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLGA KHURS

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Significant psychophysiological burdens and unhealthy lifestyle constitute the risk factors leading to students’ health deterioration. Purpose: The purpose of the research was the analysis of students’ health condition and lifestyle in medical university. Material and methods: The objects of the research were 100 third year students of the Faculties of General Medicine and Pediatrics of Grodno State Medical University. For the study of students’ orientation on healthy lifestyle, a special scale-type questionnaire was developed and used. Results: According to the respondents’ opinions it has been detected that the basic factors influencing the state of health are the lifestyle and the living conditions. The students activity is evaluated as very low as well as their rational nutrition. The majority of them smoke and drink alcohol. Conclusions: The peculiarities of studying at a medical university accompanied by imbalanced nutrition might lead to the deterioration of health in the students which are doctors to be. The results ought to lead to the optimization of prophylaxis programs and entire alteration of the students’ lifestyles.

  15. Interdisciplinary Medication Adherence Program: The Example of a University Community Pharmacy in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Lelubre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Community Pharmacy of the Department of Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine (Policlinique Médicale Universitaire, PMU, University of Lausanne, developed and implemented an interdisciplinary medication adherence program. The program aims to support and reinforce medication adherence through a multifactorial and interdisciplinary intervention. Motivational interviewing is combined with medication adherence electronic monitors (MEMS, Aardex MWV and a report to patient, physician, nurse, and other pharmacists. This program has become a routine activity and was extended for use with all chronic diseases. From 2004 to 2014, there were 819 patient inclusions, and 268 patients were in follow-up in 2014. This paper aims to present the organization and program’s context, statistical data, published research, and future perspectives.

  16. Prevalence and Predictors of Anxiety and Depression among Female Medical Students in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    IBRAHIM, Nahla; AL-KHARBOUSH, Dania; EL-KHATIB, Lamis; AL-HABIB, Ahd; ASALI, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medical education & medical profession are among the most challenging and most stressful ones. Anxiety and depression represents an escalating public health problem among medical students. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence & predictors of anxiety and depression among female medical students in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out during 2010–2011. A stratified random sample method was used to sel...

  17. Assessment of the interns’ ability based on Dundee model in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MITRA AMINI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of medical profession and the role of the physician in society is no secret to anyone. Skills and competencies in clinical practice are necessary for the medical profession. In fact, in patient care, doctors require practical skills in addition to scientific knowledge. This study examines the potentials of medical school students in three areas of doing the right thing, doing the right thing in an intermediate range, and doing the right thing by the right person. Methods: This study was done in a descriptive-analytical and sectional model. The population of this study was all interns of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who were passing internship at Internal Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Emergency wards. About 100 persons were selected were selected by simple randomization. In order to collect data, a questionnaire with 12 questions was designed in two parts. The questionnaire was approved by 7 Faculty members of Clinical Medicine and Medical Education, and its reliability was approved by test-retest method on 20 medical students in the form of a pilot study and through Cronbach’s alpha (82%. Collected data were analyzed by SPSS software version 14 using descriptive statistical methods. Results: Results showed that within the inner circle, interns evaluated their skills in surgery, internal medicine, and gynecology wards, intermediate and at other wards as weak. Also within the center circle, interns evaluated adequate educational evidence-based training in the field of medicine, and sufficiency of educational training in the field of clinical decision making and clinical care as suitable. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that medical interns’ skills in performing most medical skills are moderate. So teaching students by new educational methods and workshop techniques, using experienced teachers will be effective. The use of clinical skills training centers and objective

  18. Drug Abuse Prevalence and Risk Factors in Students of Shaheed Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Poormovahed

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Addiction and drug abuse in one of the most important health, social and political problems in the world, especially in developing countries. Nowadays this problem has higher prevalence in young people, and so students of the universities are at risk. The aim of this study was to identify drug abuse prevalence and risk factors in students of Shaheed Sadoughi Medical University, Iran, Yazd Methods: This was a descriptive cross sectional study and 534 students were selected through random sampling from different medical sciences colleges. The data was collected by self-designed questionnaire and interview, and then analyzed using SPSS software and chi-square test. Results: Data showed the prevalence of drug abuse in students to be 21.5%, frequency of drug abuse was as follows: Hookah 15.9%, cigarette 24.13%, opium 2.8%. The major risk factors were amusement 47.4% and unemployment 42.98%. It was higher in single males who lived in university dormitories. Conclusion: According to the study results, it is recommended that families and university managers facilitate student's entertainment, marriage and occupation. The high prevalence of smoking hookah which is usually accompanied by use of other drugs should be considered in educational programs.

  19. The transition from high school to university: a medical student’s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juma FZ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fatema Zehra Juma, Tamkin Abas, Shiria Banu Manchester Medical School, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UKAs medical students from the University of Manchester, we read the study by Siri et al1 with great interest. We believe that the issue raised in this study is of exceptional significance and agree that the transition phase is an important and challenging chapter in one’s life. The move from high school to university life is a difficult one and students must adapt to changes in the style of learning required, adopt financial responsibility, and develop social and personal independence. Struggling in any one of these aspects can influence student experience and potentially prevent students from progressing on the course and may lead to them dropping out of university. It is therefore important that the transition phase is given more attention and targeted with additional support such as the Cursos Probatorios de Ingreso (“preparatory courses for admission” in Paraguay.1View original paper by Siri and colleagues.

  20. E-LEARNING READINESS AMONG MEDICAL EDUCATORS IN UNIVERSITI SAINS ISLAM MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salleha Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in information technology has made e-learning feasible in many fields of education. Medical education is not any different. This survey is conducted among all the medical educators in Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia (USIM assessing their readiness and attitudes towards e-learning. A cross-sectional questionnaires assessing the IT skills, Internet usage, attitude, perceived benefits and usage of e-learning among USIM medical lecturers were used. Data gained were then analyzed. The response rate was 92%. Female (56 made majority of the respondents. 44 of the educators aged 25-34 with 56% had teaching experience of <5 years. Majority of the respondents rate their skills as intermediate in using the software. 56% uses the Internet for more than 3 h per day. Majority agreed that e-learning benefits the students in many ways. Majority also willing to learn and integrate e-learning in their teaching modalities. Despite this, many have not used e-learning in delivering lectures and accepting assignments at time of the survey. Nevertheless, while majority of medical educators are willing to incorporate e-learning in their teaching, many still have not used it. Improvement of infrastructure, training and support to all medical educators are required for successful implementation of e-learning.

  1. Assessing the Oldness and Capacity of Radiography and Ultrasound Equipments in Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintenance of imaging equipment is a very important part of the management of all medical imaging centers. To assess the oldness and capacity of radiography and ultrasound equipment in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The study was performed in 16 hospitals, 4 faculties and three healthcare centers of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. We evaluated all the X-ray equipment (including the simple plain and dental, panorex, mammography, fluoroscopy and C-arm X-Ray devices) and also simple and Doppler ultrasound machines in terms of the type and usage of the device, production year, quantity of utilization, location, brand and current condition. Among fixed X-ray systems, 15 were currently in use, two were junk, two were damaged, and one was not utilized. The mean (SD) of the usage of these was 2151 (2230) cliché/month, and the mean (SD) of the oldness was 16.9 (13.6) years. The oldness of radiography equipment in our study was more than 20 years in 16, between 11 and 20 in 46, and less than 10 years in 76 devices. The mean (SD) usage (patients/month) of simple and color Doppler devices were 234.1 (365.2) and 597.5 (505.3), respectively. The oldness of ultrasonography equipment in our study was more than 11 years in 12 and less than 10 years in 55 devices. We found that 22 (15.9%) of the radiography systems and two (3%) of the ultrasonography systems had been used for more than 20 years. Radiology equipment in Tehran University of Medical Sciences have potential capacity, but they need repair, and better maintenance and management and application of standards for the imaging system needs organized supervisory mechanisms

  2. Good Neighbors: Shared Challenges and Solutions Toward Increasing Value at Academic Medical Centers and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Gerard P

    2015-12-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) and universities are experiencing increasing pressure to enhance the value they offer at the same time that they are facing challenges related to outcomes, controlling costs, new competition, and government mandates. Yet, rarely do the leaders of these academic neighbors work cooperatively to enhance value. In this Perspective the author, a former university regional campus president with duties in an AMC as an academic physician, shares his insights into the shared challenges these academic neighbors face in improving the value of their services in complex environments. He describes the successes some AMCs have had in generating revenues from new clinical programs that reduce the overall cost of care for larger populations. He also describes how several universities have taken a comprehensive approach to reduce overhead and administrative costs. The author identifies six themes related to successful value improvement efforts and provides examples of successful strategies used by AMCs and their university neighbors to improve the overall value of their programs. He concludes by encouraging leaders of AMCs and universities to share information about their successes in value improvements with each other, to seek additional joint value enhancement efforts, and to market their value improvements to the public. PMID:26266460

  3. Predictors of self-reported academic performance among undergraduate medical students of Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gedefaw A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abel Gedefaw,1 Birkneh Tilahun,2 Anteneh Asefa3 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, 3School of Public and Environmental Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia Background: This study was conducted to identify predictors of self-reported academic performance in undergraduate medical students at Hawassa University. Methods: An analytical cross-sectional study involving 592 undergraduate medical students was conducted in November 2012. The academic performance of the study subjects was measured by self-reported cumulative grade point average (GPA using a self-administered questionnaire. Data were entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 software. Pearson's bivariate correlations, multiple linear regression, and multiple logistic regression were used to identify predictors of academic performance. Results: The self-reported academic performance of students had been decreasing as the academic years progressed, with the highest and lowest performance being in the premedicine (mean GPA 3.47 and clinical I (mean GPA 2.71 years, respectively. One hundred and fifty-eight (26.7% of the participants had ever been delayed, 37 (6.2% had ever re-sat for examination, and two (0.3% had ever been warned due to academic failure. The overall variation in self-reported academic performance of the students was 32.8%. Participant age alone explained 21.9% of the variation. On the other hand, university entrance examination results, substance use at university, and medicine as first choice by students were identified as predictors of variation in self-reported academic performance, accounting for 6.9%, 2.7%, and <1% of the variation, respectively. Students who had never used tobacco, alcohol, or khat after starting university were twice as likely to score a self-reported cumulative GPA above 3.0 (adjusted odds ratio 1.95, 95

  4. New Methods of Evaluation for Postgraduate Training in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Jalilian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Revered editor evaluation of medical students in specialized medical fields has great importance in determining the necessary competence to learning clinical environments and necessary ability for functioning in the real environment (1. New specialized medical evaluation focuses on ways that confirm the clinical competence assistant that can point to the students’ experience booklet (log book; assay exams; Multiple Choice Question (MCQ; Objective Structural Clinical Examination (OSCE; observation with check list or rating scale; self-assessment and assessment by peers rating scale general; Portfolio; Direct Observation of Procedure Skill (DOPS; Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX; 360-degree comprehensive assessment of Clinical Skills based on Records assistants (CSR; Objective Structural Practical Examination (OSPE (2. This descriptive-analytical study was performed to evaluate the use of modern methods of evaluation among eleven postgraduate departments in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Data collection tool was a checklist that was prepared by researchers and was completed by clinical group managers. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 software, Chi-square test and analysis of variance. In total of 11 studied groups, 106 full-time board faculty members, 14 co-education, 221 residents were working. The most modern methods to evaluate in %100 of groups were OSCE and MCQ, DOPS in %80 of groups, and Mini-CEX and CSR in% 27 of groups. Assay exams were used in infectious and pathology groups as the use of other modern methods of evaluation was not observed in all groups. Statistically, the most important reasons for the lack of significant new methods of evaluation were: internal decision of the department (P=0.002, unfamiliarity of team members with modern methods of evaluation (P=0.06, and the adequacy of other methods of evaluation according to the decision of the department (P<0.001. Other cited reasons such as lack of

  5. A comparison of attitudes toward euthanasia among medical students at two Polish universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, Wojciech; Gottwald, Leszek; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Kazmierczak-Lukaszewicz, Sylwia; Forycka, Maria; Cialkowska-Rysz, Aleksandra; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study conducted upon completion of obligatory palliative medicine courses among 588 medical students at two universities was to compare their attitudes toward euthanasia. Four hundred ninety-two (84.97 %) students were Catholics; 69 (11.73 %) declared they would practice euthanasia, 303 (51.53 %) would not, and 216 students (36.73 %) were not sure. The idea of euthanasia legalisation was supported by 174 (29.59 %) respondents, opposed by 277 (47.11 %), and 137 (23.30 %) were undecided. Five hundred fifty-six (94.56 %) students did not change their attitudes toward euthanasia after palliative medicine courses. Students from the two universities were found to have different opinions on practicing euthanasia, euthanasia law and possible abuse which might follow euthanasia legalisation, but they shared similar views on the choice of euthanasia if they themselves were incurably ill and the legalisation of euthanasia. Gender and religion influenced students' answers. Differences observed between medical students at the two universities might be related to gender and cultural differences. PMID:23055130

  6. A comparison of attitudes toward euthanasia among medical students at two Polish universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, Wojciech; Gottwald, Leszek; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Kazmierczak-Lukaszewicz, Sylwia; Forycka, Maria; Cialkowska-Rysz, Aleksandra; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study conducted upon completion of obligatory palliative medicine courses among 588 medical students at two universities was to compare their attitudes toward euthanasia. Four hundred ninety-two (84.97 %) students were Catholics; 69 (11.73 %) declared they would practice euthanasia, 303 (51.53 %) would not, and 216 students (36.73 %) were not sure. The idea of euthanasia legalisation was supported by 174 (29.59 %) respondents, opposed by 277 (47.11 %), and 137 (23.30 %) were undecided. Five hundred fifty-six (94.56 %) students did not change their attitudes toward euthanasia after palliative medicine courses. Students from the two universities were found to have different opinions on practicing euthanasia, euthanasia law and possible abuse which might follow euthanasia legalisation, but they shared similar views on the choice of euthanasia if they themselves were incurably ill and the legalisation of euthanasia. Gender and religion influenced students' answers. Differences observed between medical students at the two universities might be related to gender and cultural differences.

  7. Teaching of pharmacology in Universiti Malaya and the other medical schools in Malaysia- a historical perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si Mui SIM

    2004-01-01

    Traditional pharmacology teaching has focused more on drug instead of therapeutics, such that although pharmacological knowledge is acquired, practical skills in prescribing remain weak. In Malaysia many new medical schools (both public and private) have been set up in the last 12 years due to a change in government policy, resulting in a wide spectrum of medical curricula. Universiti Malaya (UM) being the oldest medical school in Malaysia was deep set in its traditional way of teaching-learning, since its inception in 1962, until a visit from the General Medical Council of the United Kingdom in 1984 triggered off a change of tide. Since then the medical curriculum in UM has undergone two major revisions. The first revised curriculum (1988) aimed to inject more clinical relevance into basic science teaching, through introducing clinical lectures and skills in the paraclinical year.Professional behaviour was also addressed. The second revised curriculum (1998) sought to improve further the integration of knowledge as well as to produce a holistic doctor, viewing the patient as a person instead of a clinical entity. The teaching-learning of pharmacology has gradually moved from factual regurgitation to more clinical reasoning, from lab-based to more patient-oriented approach. As more new medical schools are being set up in Malaysia, exchange of experience in this area of learning will hopefully help us find a happy medium between "the old is best" and "the new is better" type approach so that a pedagogically sound and yet logistically practical curriculum can be found in our local setting, to help produce doctors with good prescribing practice.

  8. Teaching of pharmacology in Universiti Malaya and the other medical schools in Malaysia -- a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Si Mui

    2004-09-01

    Traditional pharmacology teaching has focused more on drug instead of therapeutics, such that although pharmacological knowledge is acquired, practical skills in prescribing remain weak. In Malaysia many new medical schools (both public and private) have been set up in the last 12 years due to a change in government policy, resulting in a wide spectrum of medical curricula. Universiti Malaya (UM) being the oldest medical school in Malaysia was deep set in its traditional way of teaching-learning, since its inception in 1962, until a visit from the General Medical Council of the United Kingdom in 1984 triggered off a change of tide. Since then the medical curriculum in UM has undergone two major revisions. The first revised curriculum (1988) aimed to inject more clinical relevance into basic science teaching, through introducing clinical lectures and skills in the paraclinical year. Professional behaviour was also addressed. The second revised curriculum (1998) sought to improve further the integration of knowledge as well as to produce a holistic doctor, viewing the patient as a person instead of a clinical entity. The teaching-learning of pharmacology has gradually moved from factual regurgitation to more clinical reasoning, from lab-based to more patient-oriented approach. As more new medical schools are being set up in Malaysia, exchange of experience in this area of learning will hopefully help us find a happy medium between "the old is best" and "the new is better" type approach so that a pedagogically sound and yet logistically practical curriculum can be found in our local setting, to help produce doctors with good prescribing practice. PMID:15339399

  9. Prevalence of Depression in Medical Students at the Lebanese University and Exploring its Correlation With Facebook Relevance: A Questionnaire Study

    OpenAIRE

    Naja, Wadih J; Kansoun, Alaa H; Haddad, Ramzi S

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of major depression is particularly high in medical students, affecting around one-third of this population. Moreover, online social media, in particular Facebook, is becoming an intrinsic part in the life of a growing proportion of individuals worldwide. Objective Our primary objective is to identify the prevalence of depression in medical students at the Lebanese University Faculty of Medicine, a unique state university in Lebanon, its correlation with the utilizat...

  10. California's county hospitals and the University of California graduate medical education system. Current issues and future directions.

    OpenAIRE

    Jameson, W J; Pierce, K; Martin, D K

    1998-01-01

    California's county hospitals train 45% of the state's graduate medical residents, including 33% of residents in the University of California system. This paper describes the interrelationships of California's county hospitals and the University of California (UC) graduate medical education (GME) programs, highlighting key challenges facing both systems. The mission of California's county health care systems is to serve all who need health care services regardless of ability to pay. Locating ...

  11. The Relationship between Organizational Citizenship Behavior and Performance of the Staff of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences and Health Services

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamreza Memarzadeh Tehran; Masoumeh Sadat Abtahi; Soheila Esmaeili

    2013-01-01

    More than two decades, the first organ and colleagues of OCB have been expressed through the words. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational citizenship behavior and performance of employees of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences and Health Services. The population in this study has included some units to the Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. This study is a descriptive research method will be correlated. In analyzing the data, both descriptive a...

  12. Prevalence and Side Effects of Energy Drink Consumption among Medical Students at Umm Al-Qura University, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Naif A. Bawazeer; Najmah A. AlSobahi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Energy drinks are freely available at markets and shops on the university campus without regulation or proper education regarding its side effects. The caffeine amount within energy drinks is high and could become an addictive substance or cause intoxication. Therefore, this study aims to assess the prevalence of energy drink consumption and its reported side effects among medical students. Methods:A total number of 257 medical students from Umm Al-Qura University completed a ques...

  13. The Dispersal of High Risk Sexual Behaviors in Different Occupations of People Referred to Council Center of Shiraz Medical University

    OpenAIRE

    Pezhman Bagheri; Hossain Faramarzi

    2012-01-01

    Background: High risk sexual behaviors endanger young people and adolescents to HIV infection and other sexual diseases. The objective of this study was to assess the dispersal of high risk sexual behaviors in different in our referred patients to council center of Shiraz medical university.Materials and Method: This descriptive, cross sectional study was done between 2004-2009 years on referred people to council center of Shiraz medical university by census method.Results: Maximum prevalence...

  14. Medical Students’ Clinical Skills Do Not Match Their Teachers’ Expectations: Survey at Zagreb University School of Medicine, Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Sičaja, Mario; Romić, Dominik; Prka, Željko

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate self-assessed level of clinical skills of graduating medical students at Zagreb University School of Medicine and compare them with clinical skill levels expected by their teachers and those defined by a criterion standard. Method: The study included all medical students (n = 252) graduating from the Zagreb University School of Medicine in the 2004-2005 academic year and faculty members (n = 129) involved in teaching clinical skills. The participants completed anonymous qu...

  15. Investigating Awareness Amount of Nursing Students of Medical Sciences University of Bushehr about Ethic in Nursing Profession -2013

    OpenAIRE

    F Jahanpour; A. Khalili; M Ravanipour; L Nourouzi; Khalili, M; F Dehghan

    2014-01-01

    Background & aim: Nurses' ethical responsibility in practice and care is required to be aware of the principles of professional ethics. The aim of this study was to determine nursing students' knowledge of ethics in nursing of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In the present analytical-descriptive sectional study, in which the participants are 4-8 semester nursing students of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences. The research tools for collecting information were tow-...

  16. Social and psychological factors affecting eating habits among university students in a Malaysian medical school: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Ganasegeran Kurubaran; Al-Dubai Sami AR; Qureshi Ahmad M; Al-abed Al-abed AA; AM, Rizal; Aljunid Syed M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Eating habits have been a major concern among university students as a determinant of health status. The aim of this study was to assess the pattern of eating habits and its associated social and psychological factors among medical students. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted among 132 medical students of pre-clinical phase at a Malaysian university. A self-administered questionnaire was used which included questions on socio-demography, anthropometry, eating ha...

  17. Analysis of Multiple Choice Tests Designed by Faculty Members of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Pourmirza Kalhori

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor Multiple choice tests are the most common objective tests in medical education which are used to assess the ind-ividual knowledge, recall, recognition and problem solving abilities. One of the testing components is the post-test analysis. This component includes; first, qualitative analysis of the taxonomy of questions based on the Bloom’s educational objectives and percentage of the questions with no structural problems; and second, the quantitative analysis of the reliability (KR-20 and indices of difficulty and differentiation (1. This descriptive-analytical study was aimed to qualitatively and quan-titatively investigate the multiple-choice tests of the faculty members at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2009-2010. The sample size comprised of 156 tests. Data were analyzed by SPSS-16 software using t-test, chi-squared test, ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests. The mean of reliability (KR-20, difficulty index, and discrimination index were 0.68 (± 0.31, 0.56 (± 0.15 and 0.21 (± 0.15, respectively, which were acceptable. The analysis of the tests at Mashad University of Medical Sciences indicated that the mean for the reliability of the tests was 0.72, and 52.2% of the tests had inappropriate difficulty index and 49.2% of the tests did not have acceptable differentiation index (2. Comparison of the tests at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences for the fields of anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, genetics, statistics and behavioral sciences courses at Malaysia Faculty of Medicine (3 and tests at Argentina Faculty of Medicine (4 showed that while difficulty index was acceptable in all three universities, but differentiation indices in Malaysia and Argentina Medical Faculties were higher than that in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. The mean for the questions with no structural flaws in all tests, taxonomy I, taxonomy II, and taxonomy III were 73.88% (± 14.88, 34.65% (± 15.78, 41.34% (± 13

  18. Comparison of Two Different Curricula in Psychiatry Clerkship at Tehran University of Medical Sciences

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    S. Ali Ahmadi-Abhari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new psychiatry clerkship curriculum which was designed to improve the knowledge and skills of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS, Iran.Methods:This quasi-experimental study was conducted in two consecutive semesters from February 2009 to January 2010. In total, 167 medical students participated in the study. In the first semester, as the control group, the clerks’ training was based on the traditional curriculum. In the next semester, we constructed and applied a new curriculum based on the SPICES model (student-centered, problem-based, integrated, community-based, elective and systematic.At the end of the clerkship, the students were given two exams: Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ to assess their knowledge, and Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE to assess their skills. Baseline data and test performance for each student were analyzed. Results:Compared to the control group, students in the intervention group showed significantly higher OSCE scores (P= 0.01. With respect to MCQ score, no significant difference was found between the two groups.Conclusions:The results suggest that the revised curriculum is more effective than the traditional one in improving the required clinical skills in medical students during their psychiatry clerkship.

  19. Energy drinks consumption practices among medical students of a Private sector University of Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Asma; Bhombal, Swaleha Tariq; Jawaid, Ambreen; Zaki, Samar

    2015-09-01

    Consumption of energy drinks has become popular among students and athletes over the past few years. To explore the phenomenon, a cross-sectional survey was conducted through a self-administered pilot-tested questionnaire. Frequency of energy drinks consumption was found to be 121(52%) in a sample of 233 medical students. Red bull was the most common brand consumed 101(43%). The major reasons reported for its usage were to gain/replenish energy by 36(15.4%), and studying for examination by 34(14.6%). Television was reported as the major source of information 153(66%) followed by friends 113(48%). There was a high frequency of energy drinks' consumption among medical students of a private university. There is a strong need to create awareness regarding these drinks, especially among adolescents and teenagers. PMID:26338750

  20. Barriers and challenges in researches by Iranian students of medical universities

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    Zohreh Anbari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health sciences research (HSR is an essential part of improving health care which plays a critical role in the field of medicine and clinical practice. The aim of the current study was to assess barriers to the research by students of medical sciences as well as to find out effective strategies for management of student researches in Iranian universities. Materials and Methods: This study utilized a hybrid design with quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches conducted on 627 students in six schools of medical sciences in two universities in Central Province in Iran from April to December, 2012. Questionnaires were distributed among researcher and non-researcher students to find barriers to the research. These barriers were approved and validated by similar studies and strategies using the Delphi technique on 36 students. Results: The most important barriers among researcher students were institutional barriers (3.3 ± 1.3, but in non-researcher students they were individual barriers (3.6 ± 1.7. The majority of barriers to involvement in the research among researcher students appeared to be time, lack of access to electronic resources and prolongation of the process of buying equipment. In addition, the greatest barriers among non-researcher students included the lack of time, scientific writing skills, and access to trained assistants. Conclusion: The results showed the issue of attitudes towards compulsory research as a component of critical scholarship in the curriculum of medical courses. Moreover, employment of the research experts can be helpful for research training in schools of medical sciences.

  1. Evaluation of Antidiabetic Prescriptions from Medical Reimbursement Applications at Banaras Hindu University Health Care Facility

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    Dev Priya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is on rapid increase in third world countries undergoing rapid transition in terms of development particularly in India, which is often being referred as Diabetic capital. It is a disease more prevalent at latter part of life of human beings when finances dwindle and social care gets neglected. The medication continues till the whole life on a regular basis. In present study, the objective has been to provide pharmacoeconomic medication to the diabetic pensioners in the backdrop as mentioned in above background.Methods: The data was collected at the medical reimbursement section of pensioners of the University. The data was examined to answer issues of therapeutic decisions in the light of the pharmacoeconomic considerations. In this paper essentially data on choice of prescriptions with the angle of pharmacoeconomic prudence were included. The dichotomy of specialist versus non specialist prescribers at the tertiary center (i.e. medical college hospital was compared. Effort was made to define merit of the prescription based on comprehensive considerations of patient profile, disease profile and therapeutic choice.Results: Total 72 prescriptions were analyzed for the study in which 475 drugs were prescribed to the patients.  Total antidiabetic drugs prescribed to the patients were 169. Out of 72 cases 39 were males and 33 were females with mean age 66.04 ± 5.80 (Mean ± SEM. The average number of drugs per prescription was 6.59 which was very high as per guidelines. Most commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug was Metformin (63.89% followed by Glimepiride (31.95%.Conclusion: This study reflects that there is need to make available the standard therapeutic optionat University Health Care Facility based upon pharmacoeconomic considerations.

  2. A Comparison of Attitudes Toward Euthanasia Among Medical Students at Two Polish Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Leppert, Wojciech; Gottwald, Leszek; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Kazmierczak-Lukaszewicz, Sylwia; Forycka, Maria; Cialkowska-Rysz, Aleksandra; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study conducted upon completion of obligatory palliative medicine courses among 588 medical students at two universities was to compare their attitudes toward euthanasia. Four hundred ninety-two (84.97 %) students were Catholics; 69 (11.73 %) declared they would practice euthanasia, 303 (51.53 %) would not, and 216 students (36.73 %) were not sure. The idea of euthanasia legalisation was supported by 174 (29.59 %) respondents, opposed by 277 (47.11 %), and 137 (23.30 %) were un...

  3. The Effect of Emotional Intelligence on Entrepreneurial Behavior: A Case Study in a Medical Science University

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    Mohammadkarim Bahadori

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays with complex and dynamic environment in organizations, scholars make more attention to emotional intelligence. Also, the role of emotional intelligence started to make inroad into entrepreneurship research. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of emotional intelligence on entrepreneurial behavior in organizations. A sample of 107 managers from a medical science university in Iran participated in the main study. Findings showed that all four dimensions of emotional intelligence have a positive effect on entrepreneurial behavior. This study has theoretical and practical implications for managers and leaders in organizations.

  4. The new medical curriculum at Flinders University, South Australia: from concept to reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Paul; Nicholas, Terry; Prideaux, David

    2001-01-01

    After much discussion and planning, Flinders University in Adelaide, South Australia recently introduced a new Graduate-Entry Medical Program (GEMP) which centres on problem-based learning (PBL). We describe the factors that stimulated the development of this new course, discuss its aims and philosophies and provide a brief outline of its structure. Advice and practical help was freely provided by several institutions who had undertaken similarly radical curricular reform and without this, a difficult task would have been much harder. We hope that our experiences will be of interest and help to others who are considering curricular reform. PMID:11260745

  5. The Prevalence of Pemphigus (Razi Hospital and Department of Oral Pathology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences

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    Eshghyar N

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this retrospective statistical study was to determine the prevalcence and frequency of"nage and sex distributions of pemphigus disease. Pemphigus disease classified as autoimmune bullous"ndermatoses which is a chronic mucocutaneous disease."nThis study was performed in Razi Hospital and department of oral pathology of dental school, Tehran"nUniversity of Medical Sciences. The most frequently effected area was buccal moucosa of oral cavity. The"nmost rate of recurrence was found in oral cavity which being more common in middle age females (25-44"nyears.

  6. An Evaluation of Graduates\\' Theses at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Mozaffari Khosravi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Writing the thesis is one of the first experiences of university students. It is usually conducted satisfactorily under the advice an advisor. Yet, there are some problems in this regard. Objectives : The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the quality of the medical and dental theses at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences. Methods and Materials : This was a qualitative observational study conducted on 30% of medical theses and all the dental theses at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences during 1992-2002. The characteristics and features of the different parts of the theses were recorded in a questionnaire. Then, the quality score was calculated for each thesis. Results : In this study, 215 (76.2% volumes of theses of medical students and 67 (23.8% volumes of theses of dentistry students were studied and reviewed. Most of the theses studied (13.8% related to internal medicine, and least of them (1.8% related to pathology. The majority of the theses (92.7% were of experimental research type, and 2.5% included case studies.95.7% of the theses were appropriate regarding title characteristics. Almost 19% of them lacked the part "Statement of the Problem" and 43.2% were deficient in this part. 40.7% of the theses (52% of medical theses and 6% of dental theses lacked "Review of Literature". Only 51.6% of them (40.7% of medical theses and 86.4% of dental theses possessed a "Review of Literature" that was quite related to the thesis topic. In approximately 5.8% of the theses, there was no direct reference to the objectives. For 12.4% of theses, the objectives have been stated accurately while for 81.8% of them this was not the case. Regarding objectives, the medical theses were in a better state and showed a statistically significant correlation with the dental theses. Regarding the part "Results", in 6.9% of the theses, specific objectives have not been stated clearly. 82.6% reached completely to the preset

  7. An integrated approach to distance learning with digital video in the French-speaking Virtual Medical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, J C; Cuggia, M; Soula, G; Spector, M; Kohler, F

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the French-speaking Virtual Medical University project (UMVF) is to share common resources and specific tools in order to improve medical training. Digital video on IP is an attractive tool for higher education but there are a number of obstacles to widespread implementation. This paper describes the UMVF approach to integrating digital video technologies and services in educational projects.

  8. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 2, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-18

    This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the months of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Radioactive contamination, aging, medical ethics, and environmental risk analysis.

  9. Correlation between Knowledge, Experience and Common Sense, with Critical Thinking Capability of Medical Faculty's Students at Indonesia Christian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeak, Bernadetha

    2015-01-01

    This research discusses correlation between knowledge, experience and common sense with critical thinking of Medical Faculty's Student. As to the objective of this research is to find the correlation between knowledge, experience and common sense with critical thinking of Medical Faculty's Students at Christian University of Indonesia. It is…

  10. Factors Affecting Job Satisfaction among the Faculty Members at Guilan University of Medical Sciences

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    Fardin Mehrabian

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job satisfaction plays a pivotal role in the performance of university faculty members. Identification of the factors influencing job satisfaction can be useful in advancing the educational and research objectives of the university. The aim of the present study was to analyze the factors influencing job satisfaction among the faculty members of Guilan University of medical sciences. Methods: This study was a descriptive cross-sectional research that was conducted in 2012. The statistical population of the research included 139 faculty members at faculties of Guilan University of Medical Sciences selected using stratified random sampling. The instrument of data collection was a questionnaire consisting of two sections; the first section contained 10 questions about demographic information and the second section comprised of 19 questions which was designed based on Herzberg's two-factor theory. The questionnaire was scored according to 5-point Likert scale. Data were analyzed by SPSS 18 software and descriptive statistics indices of frequency, mean, standard deviation and Pearson correlation coefficient reported.Results: 66.2% of the faculty members were male, 62.6% were clinical faculty members and 37.4% basic sciences faculty members. The most important factors affecting the faculty members’ job satisfaction were job security (4.14±0.96, friendly relationship with colleagues (4.01±0.81, and technology and technical knowledge (3.99±0.87. The most important motivational factors influencing job satisfaction were interest in job (4.24+0.71, achievement (3.99±0.87 and equal opportunities for career promotion (3.95±0.99.Conclusion: stability and job satisfaction, creating friendly working environment, proper environmental conditions, professor’s welfare and providing spiritual and material incentives are factors that influence the professor’s job satisfaction.

  11. Body-art practices among undergraduate medical university students in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, 2014

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    Chacha Emmanuel Chacha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Body-art practices are increasing among adolescents and young adults. Although substantial data are available in developed countries, little has been documented about body-art practices in developing countries. Objective: To determine the magnitude, types and reasons for practicing body-art practices among undergraduate medical University students in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducteed among undergraduate University students in Dar es Salaam involving 536 respondents from two Universities. We used a self-administered questionnaire to collect data. Analyses were based on summary measures and bivariate analyses. Results: While 7.5% of undergraduate students reported having tattoos, 20% reported having body puncturing or piercing. Body piercing is reported more among female university undergraduate students than their male counterparts. Reported main reasons for undergoing body-art include "a mark of beauty," 24%, "just wanted one," 18% and "a mark of femininity or masculinity," 17%. The majority (98% of students were aware that unsafe body-art practices may lead to contracting HIV and more than half (52% reported awareness of the risk of Hepatitis B infection. Conclusions: Despite high awareness of the potential risks involved in unsafe body arts that include tattoo and piercing, these practices are increasing among adolescents and young adults. There is need to have educational and counseling efforts so as to minimize associated health risks.

  12. Prevalence of Sleep Deprivation and Relation with Depressive Symptoms among Medical Residents in King Fahd University Hospital, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Esraa M. Al-Maddah; Al-Dabal, Badria K.; Khalil, Mohammad S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Sleep deprivation is common among medical residents of all specialties. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of sleep deprivation and depressive symptoms among medical residents in King Fahd University Hospital (KFUH) in Al Khobar, Saudi Arabia. Furthermore, the association between sleep deprivation, sleepiness and depressive symptoms was examined. Methods: This cross-sectional study took place between February and April 2012 and involved 171 KFUH medical residents of diff...

  13. University receives $1.4 million science education award from Howard Hughes Medical Institute to support innovate undergraduate science education

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Virginia Tech was among 50 top research universities nationwide to receive a Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) that will be used to encourage university faculty to develop new ways to teach and inspire undergraduate students about science and research.

  14. Greek as a Foreign Language for Speakers of Arabic: A Study of Medical Students at the University of Thessaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreou, Georgia; Mitsis, Napoleon

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports our findings and observations on the difficulties of university students learning Greek as a foreign language at the University of Thessaly. A group of medical students, whose native language was Arabic, answered two questionnaires concerning their use of and competence in Greek. The results showed that first and second year…

  15. Coordination of Two On-Line Information Retrieval Services At the University of Minnesota Bio-Medical Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Jan; Foreman, Gertrude

    The Bio-Medical Library at the University of Minnesota has access to two on-line computer systems: the MEDLINE system (MEDLARS ON-LINE) of the National Library of Medicine and the State University of New York (SUNY) Biomedical Communication Network. MEDLINE consists of two files which provide coverage of the "Index Medicus" from 1970 to the…

  16. The 90thanniversary of department of health service, public health and medical law of Saratov state medical university n. a. V.I. Razumovsky

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    Erugina M.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to discuss the main stages of formation and development of Department of Health Service, Public Health and Medical Law of Saratov State Medical University. Scientific and practical contribution to the development of the national health over the years has been determined. The data on the current scientific and educational activities of the department have been highlighted.

  17. Die Medizinische Abteilung der Universitätsbibliothek Kiel / The Medical Department of the Kiel University Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hentschel, Eike

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The Medical Department of the Kiel University Library provides the most comprehensive collection of scientific medical literature in Schleswig-Holstein and serves students, scientists and physicians of the Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein – Campus Kiel. Medical journals – mostly online – are managed by the Kiel University Library in cooperation with the Faculty of Medicine. Due to changes in user behaviour and considerable needs for assistance new services are provided, for example a full-service document delivery – easy to use and free of charge – and specialized training courses. Renovation and modernisation of the building and library are scheduled for the next years.

  18. Evaluation of Board Performance in Iran’s Universities of Medical Sciences

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    Haniye Sajadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The critical role that the board plays in governance of universities clarifies the necessity of evaluating its performance. This study was aimed to evaluate the performance of the boards of medical universities and provide solutions to enhance its performance. Methods The first phase of present study was a qualitative research in which data were collected through face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed by thematic approach. The second phase was a mixed qualitative and quantitative study, with quantitative part in cross-sectional format and qualitative part in content analysis format. In the quantitative part, data were collected through Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MoHME. In the qualitative part, the content of 2,148 resolutions that were selected by using stratified sampling method were analyzed. Results Participants believed that the boards had no acceptable performance for a long time. Results also indicated the increasing number of meetings and resolutions of the boards in these 21 years. The boards’ resolutions were mostly operational in domain and administrative in nature. The share of specific resolutions was more than the general ones. Conclusion Given the current pace of change and development and the need to timely respond them, it is recommended to accelerate the slow pace of improvement process of the boards. It appears that more delegation and strengthening the position of the boards are the effective strategies to speed up this process.

  19. New open source medical imaging tools released by CERN and University of Bath collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Rassat, KT group

    2016-01-01

    New toolbox has applications in medical imaging and cancer diagnosis.   3D X-ray imaging of a patient’s lungs and thorax. The TIGRE toolbox provides a high resolution image with only 1/30th of the radiation for the patient. (Image: Ander Biguri) CERN and the University of Bath have released a new toolbox for fast, accurate 3D X-ray image reconstruction with applications in medical imaging and cancer diagnosis. The software offers a very simple and affordable way to improve imaging and potentially reduce radiation doses for patients. The toolbox is based on Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), a type of scanning process that takes a series of 2D X-ray pictures and that then processes them into a 3D image. As part of the collaborative project between CERN and the University of Bath, Ander Biguri, a PhD student at Bath, has reviewed a broad range of published CBCT algorithms and adapted them to be faster. Ander Biguri modified the algorithms to run on a laptop fitted with a GPU &ndash...

  20. Factors Affecting Academic Failure in Nursing Students of Qom University of Medical Sciences: A Qualitative Study

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    Mohammad Abbasi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Academic failure of students is a major problem of higher education. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the factors causing academic failure in nursing students of Qom University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Methods: This qualitative study was carried out via conventional qualitative content analysis approach. A total of 21 nursing students (18 males and 3 females who had a Grade Point Average (GPA lower than the previous semester and were conditioned (average 12 were selected through purposive sampling from the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Qom University of Medical Sciences. Data were collected through semi-structured face-to-face interviews conducted with each individual. Interviews were continued until data saturation, taking about 45 to 70 minutes. Data analysis was performed simultaneously with data gathering. Results: In this study, the mean age of participants was 21.9±4.1 year. Data analysis demonstrated that individual factors, factors related to curriculum, teaching methods of the faculty, large number of students in class, lack of formative assessment of teachers, lack of interaction between the faculty and students, and failure to comply with lesson plans were major causes of academic failure among students. Conclusion: Based on the results, managers, instructors and counselors can monitor their students' academic achievement by careful planning, active teaching methods and continuous assessment of students, and conduct individual and group counseling sessions to prevent academic failure.

  1. Attitude and Performance of Health Staff Regarding Health Information Resources Kerman University of Medical Sciences

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    Azadeh Sadeghi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Using different media and information resources in the field of health is to achieve three key outcomes as learning correct health information, change in attitudes related to health and creating new healthy behaviors. This study was performed to determine the attitudes and performance of staff regarding health information resources in health centers of Kerman University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, all health personnel working in Kerman University of Medical Sciences were evaluated during 2012-13 (N=223. Data collection tool was a researcher made questionnaire containing demographic characteristics, attitudes, and practices questionnaire (α=0.9. Scores of attitude and practice were categorized into three levels as low (under 50%, moderate (50-75% and good (over 75%. The data was analyzed using SPSS-20 statistical software by Chi-square and Pearson correlation. Results: In total, 42.6% of the study population had a positive attitude and 61.9% had a poor performance score. There was a positive correlation between attitude and practice scores (P0.05. Conclusion: Attitude of most study population regarding health information resources was in moderate level and their performance was weak. Therefore, it is suggested to design and implement educational interventions for more efficient use of health information resources among staff.

  2. Training and education in nuclear medicine at the Medical Faculty of the University of Zagreb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Training for specialization in nuclear medicine in Yugoslavia includes 12 months of training in departments of clinical medicine and 24 months of training in departments of nuclear medicine. Since 1974 many physicians have passed the specialist examination in Zagreb. A postgraduate study in nuclear medicine began at the Medical Faculty of the University of Zagreb in 1979. It includes four semesters of courses and research on a selected subject leading to the degree of Magister (Master of Science). Most of the training is conducted by the Institute of Nuclear Medicine at the University Hospital, Rebro, in Zagreb, which has the necessary teaching staff, equipment and space. Forty-four students have completed this postgraduate study. Nuclear medicine in a developing country faces several problems. Scarcity of expensive equipment and radiopharmaceuticals calls for modifications of methods, home made products and instrument maintenance. These, mostly economic, factors are given special emphasis during training. Nuclear power generation may solve some of the country's energy problems; therefore, specialists in nuclear medicine must obtain additional knowledge about the medical care and treatment of persons who might be subject to irradiation and contamination in nuclear power plants. Lower economic resources in developing countries require better trained personnel, stressing the need for organized training and education in nuclear medicine. With some support the Institute of Nuclear Medicine will be able to offer various forms of training and education in nuclear medicine for physicians, chemists, physicists, technologists and other personnel from developing countries. (author)

  3. The Relationship Between Organizational Culture and Organizational Commitment in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizollah, Arbabisarjou; Abolghasem, Farhang; Amin, Dadgar Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Organizations effort is to achieve a common goal. There are many constructs needed for organizations. Organizational culture and organizational commitment are special concepts in management. The objective of the current research is to study the relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment among the personnel of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive- correlational study. The statistical population was whole tenured staff of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences that worked for this organization in 2012-2013. Random sampling method was used and 165 samples were chosen. Two standardized questionnaires of the organizational culture (Schein, 1984) and organizational commitment (Meyer & Allen, 2002) were applied. The face and construct validity of the questionnaires were approved by the lecturers of Management and experts. Reliability of questionnaires of the organizational culture and organizational commitment were 0.89 and 0.88 respectively, by Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient. All statistical calculations performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 21.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). The level of significance was set at Pculture and organizational commitment (P value=0.027). Also, the results showed that there was a significant relation between organizational culture and affective commitment (P-value=0.009), organizational culture and continuance commitment (P-value=0.009), and organizational culture and normative commitment (P-value=0.009). PMID:26925884

  4. Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and the Success of Educational Managers at Golestan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einollah Mollaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emotional intelligence is a new evolution in the field of thought – excitement relationship, which has a major effect on the success of managers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the relationship between emotional intelligence and the success of educational managers at Golestan University of medical sciences. Methods: This study was conducted with all (n=96 educational managers (45 females and 51 males at Golestan University of Medical Sciences who were selected through census method in 2009. Data collection tools included a demographic data questionnaire, Shring Emotional Intelligence Scale and a success questionnaire. Relationship between emotional intelligence of the educational managers and their success rate was analyzed by spearman correlation coefficient. Results: The findings showed that mean emotional intelligence of successful and unsuccessful managers were 98.74 and 76.74 respectively. The spearman correlation coefficient between emotional intelligence and success of managers was 0.71 which indicates a direct relationship between emotional intelligence and success (P<0.001. Conclusion: With regard to the direct relationship between emotional intelligence of managers and their success demonstrated in this study, organizing some workshops on emotional intelligence are suggested to improve the capabilities of organizational managers.

  5. Quality gap of educational services in viewpoints of students in Hormozgan University of medical sciences

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    Zare Shahram

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Higher education is growing fast and every day it becomes more and more exposed to globalization processes. The aim of this study was to determine the quality gap of educational services by using a modified SERVQUAL instrument among students in Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out at Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences in 2007. In this study, a total of 300 students were selected randomly and asked to complete a questionnaire that was designed according to SERVQUAL methods. This questionnaire measured students' perceptions and expectations in five dimensions of service that consists of assurance, responsiveness, empathy, reliability and tangibles. The quality gap of educational services was determined based on differences between students' perceptions and expectations. Results The results demonstrated that in each of the five SERVQUAL dimensions, there was a negative quality gap. The least and the most negative quality gap means were in the reliability (-0.71 and responsiveness (-1.14 dimensions respectively. Also, there were significant differences between perceptions and expectations of students in all of the five SERVQUAL dimensions (p Conclusion Negative quality gaps mean students' expectations exceed their perceptions. Thus, improvements are needed across all five dimensions.

  6. Investigation of science production in Iran’s type I universities of medical sciences, a 6-year assessment

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    M Yadollahi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Science production is one of the main dimensions of sustainable development in any country. Thus, universities as the major centers for science production play a key role in development. The present study aimed to assess the trend of science production in Iran’s type I universities of medical sciences from 2007 to 2012. Method: In this study, the universities’ scores of empowering, governance and leadership, science production, student researches, and number of published articles were computed based on the evaluations of universities of medical sciences by the Ministry of Health, Treatment, and Medical Education from 2007 to 2012. Then, the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the figures were drawn by Excel software. Results: This study assessed science production in Iran’s type I universities of medical sciences and analyzed each university’s proportion in publication of articles. According to the results, most of the published articles were affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. However, considering the role of number of faculty members, different results were obtained. With respect to the evaluation raw scores, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences showed a considerable reduction of scores in 2012, while other universities had a constant or ascending trend. Besides, indexed articles followed an ascending trend in all the universities and most of the articles had been published in index 1. Conclusion: Similar to other studies, the findings of this study revealed an increase in science productions in Iran through the recent years. Yet, the highest scores of the studied indexes, except for student researches, were related to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This great difference between this university and other universities might be due to accumulation of specific potentials and forces in this region. Overall, science productions followed an ascending trend in all type I universities of

  7. Substance use and its predictors among undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia

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    Azazh Aklilu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substance use remains high among Ethiopian youth and young adolescents particularly in high schools and colleges. The use of alcohol, khat and tobacco by college and university students can be harmful; leading to decreased academic performance, increased risk of contracting HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. However, the magnitude of substance use and the factors associated with it has not been investigated among medical students in the country. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of substance use and identify factors that influenced the behavior among undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study using a pre-tested structured self-administered quantitative questionnaire was conducted in June 2009 among 622 medical students (Year I to Internship program at the School of Medicine. The data were entered into Epi Info version 6.04d and analyzed using SPSS version 15 software program. Descriptive statistics were used for data summarization and presentation. Differences in proportions were compared for significance using Chi Square test, with significance level set at p Results In the last 12 months, alcohol was consumed by 22% (25% males vs. 14% females, p = 0.002 and khat use was reported by 7% (9% males vs. 1.5% females, p Khat use within the past 12 months was strongly and positively associated with alcohol consumption (adjusted OR = 15.11, 95% CI = 4.24-53.91. Similarly, ever use of cigarette was also significantly associated with alcohol consumption (adjusted OR = 8.65, 95% CI = 3.48-21.50. Conclusions Concordant use of alcohol, khat and tobacco is observed and exposure to friends' use of substances is often implicated. Alcohol consumption or khat use has been significantly associated with tobacco use. While the findings of this study suggest that substance use among the medical students was not alarming, but its trend increased among students

  8. Sexual attitudes and behaviors among medical students in Dokuz Eylul university, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozan, S; Aras, S; Semin, S; Orcin, E

    2005-09-01

    Gaining a healthy sexual attitude and behavior and being able to show appropriate approaches to patients in terms of sexual issues are important acquisitions for medical students. The aim of the present study was to determine, compare, and evaluate the sexual attitudes and behaviors of Dokuz Eylul University Faculty of Medicine students. An anonymous questionnaire was filled in by first- and sixth-year students in order to determine their sexual attitudes and behaviors. While information sources in the adolescence period for both genders were friends in the first place, these sources were mostly mothers, books, newspapers--magazines for females, and newspapers--magazines and television for males. The opinion of males about having sexual intercourse before marriage for males was positive, and females were more tolerant about males having this experience before marriage as compared to females having sexual experience before marriage. Rates of expression of having sexual intercourse and masturbation were found to be higher for male students. The first sexual experience with a sex worker or sentimentally insignificant partner was high among males. In general, the rate of condom use was lower, and the rate of coitus interruptus was found to be higher than in foreign studies. All the students declared 'my own will and values' as the most frequent factor affecting their sexual attitudes and behaviors, and high rates for 'social factors', 'religious requirements', 'the expectations of families', and 'protection from sexually transmitted diseases' were observed. The findings lead to the conclusions that gender differences exist in the sexual attitudes and behaviors of medical students; the enhancing effect of the traditional structure on gender discrimination is still continuing; students are not provided with sufficient scientific approach or training prior to the university education; and beyond biomedical training, they should receive more support in those fields during

  9. Assessing quality of education services at Yazd University of Medical Sciences in 2010

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    J Ayatollahi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: According to modern approaches to management, quality is described as consumer’s requests. Thus, recognizing consumers’ perceptions of service quality is one of the first basic steps in formulating any quality improvement program. The objective of this study is assessing the consumers' perceptions of quality in Educational Services at Yazd University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This study was analytic cross-sectional and performed in 1389 in Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd. The study group was medical student in their end period of inter ship which had passed internal, surgical, gynecological and pediatric ward. Questionnaire had been gathered based on SERVQUAL instrument, which proved to be valid and reliable, was used for data collection. Five dimensions of educational services quality (Reliability, Responsiveness, Empathy, Assurance, Tangibles were assessed by this questionnaire. For statistic analysis, descriptive statistic and Friedman and Manvitni tests were applied. Results: The findings showed that the respondents’ choices clearly showed that the reliability dimension of service quality was better and responsiveness dimension was worse. There was a significant difference in quality between five dimensions, and between four wards that we studied, pediatric has better service quality in all dimensions and gynecology was worse. Conclusion: Respondents’ perceptions of service quality in each statement of five dimensions indicated that there were opportunities for quality improvement. In these faculties, thus, in order to improve quality of educational services, considering what stated above, it is necessary to initiate strategies and implement those strategies, since there are significant differences of quality in the five dimensions, when allocating resources, these differences must be taken into consideration.

  10. Nutritional management of enterocutaneous fistula: a retrospective study at a Malaysian university medical center

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    Badrasawi MMH

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Manal MH Badrasawi,1 Suzana Shahar,1 Ismail Sagap2 1Dietetics Program, School of Health Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, UKM Medical Center, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract: Enterocutaneous fistula is a challenging clinical condition with serious complications and considerable morbidity and mortality. Early nutritional support has been found to decrease these complications and to improve the clinical outcome. Location of the fistula and physiological status affect the nutrition management plan in terms of feeding route, calories, and protein requirements. This study investigated the nutritional management procedures at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, and attempted to determine factors that affect the clinical outcome. Nutritional management was evaluated retrospectively in 22 patients with enterocutaneous fistula seen over a 5-year period. Medical records were reviewed to obtain data on nutritional status, biochemical indices, and route and tolerance of feeding. Calories and protein requirements are reported and categorized. The results show that surgery was the predominant etiology and low output fistula was the major physiological category; anatomically, the majority were ileocutaneous. The spontaneous healing rate was 14%, the total healing rate was 45%, and the mortality rate was 22%, with 14% due to fistula-associated complications. There was a significant relationship between body mass index/serum albumin levels and fistula healing; these parameters also had a significant relationship with mortality. Glutamine was used in 50% of cases; however, there was no significant relationship with fistula healing or mortality rate. The nutritional status of the patient has an important impact on the clinical outcome. Conservative management that includes nutrition support is very important in order to improve nutritional status before surgical

  11. Learning styles of medical students at Taibah University: Trends and implications

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    Shaista Salman Guraya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding the learning styles of medical students can drive the institutions to adapt instructional materials to enhance students′ learning of knowledge and skills. This study explored the learning styles of undergraduate medical students, comparing gender variations in terms of their significant preferences. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was performed in 2012-2013, incorporating 1 st -5 th year undergraduate medical students of Taibah University. The instrument used was a Learning Style Questionnaire, with four learning styles (activist, reflector, theorist and pragmatist and 40 items. Results: Of 450 students, 384 responded (response rate; 85%. No single learning style predominated; 96 (25% reflectors, 78 (20% theorists, 68 (17% pragmatists, and 37 (9% activists. Combined reflector and theorist was the predominant dual learning style in 27 (7% students. Among genders, theorist style had a significant result (P = 0.071 indicating that theorists varied among genders due to their different opinions. Learning style preferences of theorists and pragmatists also showed a significant result (P = 0.000 each, depicting that both genders had unique preferences. Males had fewer variations of preferences, when compared with females who showed a significant difference of opinions (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The students in the study preferred diverse learning styles, which were unevenly distributed, reflectors being the most common and activists as the least common. The results reflect the need to promote self-directed learning and modifications of instructional strategies, with expectant tilt in the students′ learning styles towards activists and pragmatists.

  12. Marital Satisfaction, Coping, and Social Support in Female Medical Staff Members in Tehran University Hospitals

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    Jörg Richter

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress significantly influences marital satisfaction. Women tend to be more emotionally involved in problems than men. Furthermore, employed women encounter more stressors especially when their job is stressful which it is often the case in medical professionals. In the present cross-sectional study, relationships were analyzed between marital satisfaction (ENRICH Marital Satisfaction Inventory, ways of coping (Ways of Coping questionnaire with marital stress and social support (Social Support Questionnaire in 100 female medical staff members in Tehran university hospitals. The results revealed a significant negative relationship between subscales of marital satisfaction and using “seeking social support”, “confrontive coping”, “escape avoidance”, “distancing”, and “self-controlling” as ways of coping related to marriage related problems. Furthermore, the analyses showed that job satisfaction, social support, and ways of coping explain between 24% and 38% of the variance in subscales of marital satisfaction. Therefore focusing on these factors could be an effective approach to promote marital satisfaction in female medical staff members.

  13. Sedative Drug Use among King Saud University Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Sampling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayed, Ahmed A; Al-Rashoudi, Abdualltef H; Al-Eisa, Abdulrhman A; Addar, Abdullah M; Al-Hargan, Abdullah H; Al-Jerian, Albaraa A; Al-Omair, Abdullah A; Al-Sheddi, Ahmed I; Al-Nowaiser, Hussam I; Al-Kathiri, Omar A; Al-Hassan, Abdullah H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Medical students experience significant psychological stress and are therefore at higher risk of using sedatives. There are currently no studies describing the prevalence of sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional convenience sampling study gathered data by anonymous questionnaire from students enrolled at the King Saud University College of Medicine in 2011. The questionnaires collected data regarding social and demographic variables, sleep patterns, and the use of stimulant and sedative drugs since enrollment. Sedatives were defined as any pharmaceutical preparations that induce sleep. Results and Discussion. Of the 729 students who returned questionnaires, 17.0% reported sedative drug use at some time since enrollment. Higher academic year, lower grade point average, regular exercise, fewer hours of sleep per day, poorer quality of sleep, and the presence of sleeping disorders were found to be significantly associated with sedative drug use. Conclusions. Further study is required to increase our understanding of sedative drug use patterns in this relatively high-risk group, as such understanding will help in the development of early intervention programs. PMID:24551449

  14. Sedative Drug Use among King Saud University Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Sampling Study

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    Ahmed A. Al-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Medical students experience significant psychological stress and are therefore at higher risk of using sedatives. There are currently no studies describing the prevalence of sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional convenience sampling study gathered data by anonymous questionnaire from students enrolled at the King Saud University College of Medicine in 2011. The questionnaires collected data regarding social and demographic variables, sleep patterns, and the use of stimulant and sedative drugs since enrollment. Sedatives were defined as any pharmaceutical preparations that induce sleep. Results and Discussion. Of the 729 students who returned questionnaires, 17.0% reported sedative drug use at some time since enrollment. Higher academic year, lower grade point average, regular exercise, fewer hours of sleep per day, poorer quality of sleep, and the presence of sleeping disorders were found to be significantly associated with sedative drug use. Conclusions. Further study is required to increase our understanding of sedative drug use patterns in this relatively high-risk group, as such understanding will help in the development of early intervention programs.

  15. Cognitive functions and neuropsychological status of medical students with different attitudes to alcohol use: a study conducted at the Belarusian State Medical University, Minsk, Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcome, Menizibeya O; Razvodovsky, Yury E; Pereverzeva, Elena V; Pereverzev, Vladimir A

    2014-04-10

    This article presents findings on the effects of alcohol use on cognitive performance, functional (well-being, activity, mood) and neuropsychological status and anxiety levels of medical students. A total of 265 medical students (107 males and 158 females) from the Belarusian State Medical University, Minsk (Belarus) were administered questionnaire, containing the AUDIT, CAGE, MAST, and PAS, and other alcohol related questions. Academic Performance questionnaire was administered together with other tests. For analysis of cognitive functions, a "correction probe" test was used. The number of students who reported consumption of alcohol was 74 males and 142 females. Medical students who reported alcohol consumption had lower cognitive performance and academic success, poor self-assessment of their functional and neuropsychological states, compared to the non-alcohol users. The results of this study suggest an inverse dose-dependent relationship between alcohol consumption, and cognitive functions, academic performance and neuropsychological status of medical students.

  16. British medical students suffer an inordinate amount of stress compared to other university students: fact or fiction?

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    Shah S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Savan Shah Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKHigh levels of stress in medical students are a commonly accepted phenomenon within the medical education community and as a result medical schools are often arraigned for not doing enough.1 Several studies in the UK have reported that medical students suffer significantly higher levels of stress than the age-matched general population.1 However, it can be argued that comparisons with the general population are misleading. All university students experience high levels of stress due to the demands of the course, a new environment and learning to manage financially, emotionally, and socially with less parental support. Therefore it is more pertinent to determine if medical students in the UK suffer greater levels of stress compared to age-matched peers in other university courses.

  17. [Clinical pharmacy practice education in master's course of Meijo University in affiliation with medical school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuba, Kazuhisa

    2009-08-01

    In 2003, Meijo University has developed a new program to train students in master's degree in the field of clinical practice. This new curriculum has three big pillars of educational goal: Problem-Based Learning (PBL), communication skill and clinical pharmacy practice training. Before exposing students to clinical training, they must learn first how to solve various patients' problems through PBL and enhance their communication skill. To provide a clinical environment, education and training, the Faculty of Pharmacy cooperated with the School of Medicine of Fujita Health University. Master's students together with other members of the healthcare team observe patient's disease state and most especially monitor pharmacotherapy. At first, students will be trained for a month at the pharmacy division and experience one week-nursing job. Next, they will be trained at the clinical divisions such as General Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Respiratory Medicine, Hematology, Chemotherapy, Gastroenterological Surgery, Psychiatry, and Emergency Unit. Students rotate three-month training on four clinical divisions during one year. The head physicians of the medical department hold concurrent post as professors and share responsibility with the pharmacy faculty in training the students. To have its venue where students, faculty and physicians conduct their discussion on clinical cases, a pharmacy satellite seminar class room was set up at Fujita Health University hospital. Through this, pharmacy students and faculty had more opportunities to exchange knowledge on medicine and pharmacy. Master's students are expected to acquire professionalism, ethical knowledge and pharmaceutical care skills through the clinical pharmacy practice program. PMID:19652496

  18. Educational Needs Assessment of Faculty Members of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz Iran

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    Manouchehr Khoshbaten

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study aimed to determine the educational and research needs of faculty members of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran so that educational priorities can be found and presented to the authorities for the purpose of educational planning.Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in 2013 at aforementioned University. Overall, 250 faculty members were randomly selected from 10 faculties and recruited. Research tool, a researcher-made questionnaire whose validity had been confirmed by a number of experts, was distributed in person, and eventually 230 were completed. Data were analyzed in SPSS-21 software using descriptive statistical tests. Results: Faculty members of the University declared student assessment as their first educational priority. They also considered the following as their educational needs: teaching and learning, writing scientific articles, educational needs assessment, research in education and health systems, teaching methods and techniques, educational planning, program evaluation, educational guidance and counseling, professional ethics, and computer application in education, respectively. Conclusion: This study investigated the educational needs of faculty members in three areas and 50 subjects and prioritized these needs according to each area. Based on these needs, educational planning authorities of faculty members, by appropriate educational planning, can take an effective step in improving scientific knowledge of professors and play an important role in enhancing the overall quality of education.

  19. Medical School Hotline: A History of the University of Hawai‘i Postgraduate Medical Education Program at Okinawa Chubu Hospital, 1966–2012

    OpenAIRE

    Maeshiro, Masao; Izutsu, Satoru; Connolly, Kathleen Kihmm

    2014-01-01

    The University of Hawai‘i (UH) has been collaborating with Okinawa Prefectural Chubu Hospital for over 46 years. This collaboration started as a post-World War II effort to increase the physician workforce. At the initiation of the US Army and State Department, the University of Hawai‘i was recruited, in cooperation with the government of the Ryukyus and USCAR, to initiate a US style postgraduate clinical training program. The Postgraduate Medical Training Program of University of Hawai‘i at ...

  20. A Cross Sectional Study of Sex Differences in Self-Medication Practices among University Students in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Klemenc-Ketiš, Zalika; Hladnik, Žiga; Kersnik, Janko

    2011-01-01

    Self-medication patterns in adults depend on sex. Self-medication among students is very common, but little is known about the influence of sex. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of self-medication college students and to determine the effect of sex on self-medication patterns. A web based incidence study conducted on a sample of Slovenian university students. The main outcome measures were percentages of male and female students reporting the use of self-medicat...

  1. Medical Reform Should Follow Market Rules——Exclusive interview with Professor Hai Wen,Vice President of Peking University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张翼; 孙晨

    2008-01-01

    Hai Wen, economist and vice president of Peking University, has for many years been involved in in-depth investigation and research of China’s medical reform, earning a reputation as one of the foremost economists in the field of medical reform. However, in the recent debate on medical reform policy, Hai Wen deliberately decided to keep a low profile. In his view, some of the ideas coming out of academic circles these days are "too short-sighted and political-motivated." During this interview, he talks about this recent round of medical reform debate, its challenges, and prospects for future reform.

  2. Building a research program in rehabilitation sciences, Part II: case studies: University of Texas Medical Branch, Boston University, University of Pittsburgh, and University of Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Leighton; Jette, Alan M; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Robinson, Lawrence R; Tietsworth, Monica L; Ricker, Joseph H; Boninger, Michael L

    2009-08-01

    This article presents four case studies of rehabilitation science programs that have created enduring research efforts: one in physical therapy, one in interdisciplinary rehabilitation sciences, and two in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Several themes emerge from these case studies. First, building an enduring research program takes time and significant foundational work. Most importantly, it is crucial to have the support of the dean, academic institution, and medical center. This seems to be a prerequisite for success in this area.

  3. Research on Practice Carrier and Method Formed by Medical Humanistic Spirit for Medical Students: Tianjin Medical University as a Case in Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jie; Geng, Xin; Su, Zhenxing; Wang, Yutao

    2014-01-01

    Medical humanistic quality is an indispensable quality that eligible doctors should possess, and medical humanism is strongly advocated and carried forward by contemporary medicine. These are commonly understood worldwide, and formed by reflection on medicine and medical education. Cultivation of medical humanism requires in-depth discussions of…

  4. LMS Moodle in teaching biophysics and medical informatics at Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava

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    Hana Sochorová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the assessment of the current state of use of LMS Moodle for teaching medical biophysics and informatics for students of the Faculty of Medicine, the University of Ostrava. The initial experience with the implementation of blended learning methods (combination of distance and full-time instruction in teaching students in the part-time form of study were used for education and for full-time students. A few survey questions given to first-year students, which are presented in the paper, confirm that this is a move in the positive direction. A well-structured e-learning course and experienced teachers support student´s attention, motivation and results in achieving educational goals.

  5. Benefits and Barriers of E-Learning for Staff Training in a Medical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Stefan; Behrends, Marianne; Haack, Claudia; Marschollek, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Learning Management Systems (LMS) are a feasible solution to fulfill the various requirements for e-learning based training in a medical university. Using the LMS ILIAS, the Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology has designed an e-learning unit about data protection, which has been used by 73% of the department's employees in the first three months. To increase the use of e-learning for staff training, it is necessary to identify barriers and benefits, which encourage the use of e-learning. Therefore, we started an online survey to examine how the employees evaluate this learning opportunity. The results show that 87% of the employees had no technical problems and also competence of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) was no barrier. If anything, reported issues were time shortages and tight schedules. Therefore, short learning modules (less than 20 minutes) are preferred. Furthermore, temporal flexibility for learning is important for 83% of employees. PMID:26152964

  6. Drug abuse among medical students at a Nigerian university: Part 1. Prevalence and pattern of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihezue, U H

    1988-01-01

    Using a structured pro forma, 728 out of 775 medical undergraduates at a Nigerian university were surveyed for the prevalence and pattern of drug use. An operational definition of substance abuse was made, and 28 percent of students fell within that criterion. Male abusers (81 percent) exceeded female abusers (19 percent). Substances most commonly abused were alcohol (60 percent), minor tranquilizers (48 percent), tobacco (35 percent), and narcotics (29 percent), particularly codeine. Only 11 percent abused cannabis. While most students were polydrug users, there was a low frequency of daily drug use. A general lifetime (occasional use) prevalence of substance use of 56 percent was found. Drugs consumed on a daily basis were alcohol (2 percent) and tobacco (6 percent). The prevalence of drug use was highest among the fourth and final year students. The majority of students were occasional abusers; there was no evidence of physical dependence. PMID:3257527

  7. Development of scanning irradiation in Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spot scanning irradiation system of carbon ion beam has been developed in Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center. During 2013, the beam size and position was stabilized with the use of a pattern-excited steering magnet and optimization of the optic parameters. After these improvement, 3-dimensional spherical field uniform irradiation was carried out based on the measurement of pencil beam profile and depth-dose distribution. The irradiated dose distribution agreed with the calculation within 3%. An experiment of rotating energy absorber has been carried out to suppress the range variation in the extraction period. In order to improve the dose linearity and reproducibility in the low dose region less than 1Gy, the response of I/V converter circuit was improved from 3kHz to 50kHz. After these improvement, the uniform box irradiation was utilized routinely for the animal (mice) experiment from April 2014. (author)

  8. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND OTHER LIFESTYLE HABITS OF MEDICAL STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COSTA RICA

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    Sergio Jiménez Morgan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Those engaged in medical sciences are social models. For this reason, their daily habits influence their professional practice and the primary prevention they carry out. The main purpose of this research was to determine whether this group of medicine training students, all from University of Costa Rica, met national and international recommendations regarding health and wellness regulations. In 2014, second semester, anonymous questionnaires were applied to all undergraduate medical students from first year to seniors (n= 216. Based on this information, some personal data was gathered such as smoking habits, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable consumption, and the amount of physical activities they practiced. According to this evidence, 52.91% drank alcohol beverages while the prevalence of active smokers was low (3.39%. Furthermore, although they accomplished the national and international standards related to fruit and vegetable consumption, 40% of the subjects did not exercise in any way. Among those who did exercise daily, 68.9% invested only 7.8 minutes per day. Among other findings, those who performed some physical activity at least once a week devoted more time to studying than to watching television. In brief, fitness and health promotion programs should target these future professionals to prevent risk factors such as overweight, obesity, and chronic diseases associated with a sedentary lifestyle. English translation by Jeannette Soto Segura

  9. Learning styles of students of Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences in 2012

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    Hojat Rashidi-jahan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Understanding the learning styles of students may help educational planning and improve the learning. This study aims to assess learning styles, and relevant determinants, of students who study in various disciplines of medical sciences at Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences (BUMS in 2012. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 180 students from BUMS were selected randomly. Data were collected sing the Kolb learning style questionnaire during April/May 2012. One-way ANOVA, Student t-test, Chi-square or Fisher exact tests were used for analyzing the data. Results: The mean age of participants was 29.3±7.0, majority of them were males. The preferred learning styles were diverger (76.7%, accommodator (12.8%, assimilator (7.8% and converger (2.8% respectively. The results showed that the factors such as age, sex, marriage status, father and mother education, grade point average (GPA and academic degree could be important to determine learning style characteristics of students. The findings also indicate that the preferred learning style among the students with different GPAs or academic degrees are not different considerably. Conclusion: Regarding the most preferred leaning style by the, proper planning to address proper teaching styles according to the preferred learning styles is necessary.

  10. [Factors associated with academic success of medical students at Buenos Aires University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borracci, Raúl A; Pittaluga, Roberto D; Álvarez Rodríguez, Juan E; Arribalzaga, Eduardo B; Poveda Camargo, Ricardo L; Couto, Juan L; Provenzano, Sergio L

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify common factors relating to the academic success of medical students who were distinguished with honors at the Buenos Aires University. In 2011, 142 graduates were surveyed; the questionnaire included 59 questions on their sociodemographic environment, living conditions and social integration, motivation to study, learning capacity and health quality during their career. Compared to other students, these distinguished students more often lived in the city, far from their families; had been educated at private or universitary high schools, their economic needs were financed by their parents, who were on the whole professionals. Most of them were single and childless. The possibility of future employment oportunities (work) did not influence their choice of a medical career, academic success was important to them and they believed that success depended largely on personal effort; they knew how to handle anxiety, were sociable but independent and preferred solid experience to abstract conceptuality in order to obtain information. Our conclusion, within the current system of candidate selection, these results serve to calculate the covert self-selection mechanisms during the career, or in a more restrictive regime, to select those likely to reach academic success due to their privileged ambience. The analysis of demographic factors indicates some degree of inequality for socially disadvantaged students. Perhaps, a selection system based only on intellectual abilities would help identify and support the best candidates regardless of their social context. PMID:25555005

  11. [High frequency of plagiarism in medical thesis from a Peruvian public university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña-Gastulo, J Jhan C; Quezada-Osoria, C Claudia; Peña-Oscuvilca, Américo; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2010-03-01

    An observational study was conducted to describe the presence of plagiarism in medical thesis in 2008 performed at a public university in Peru. Search for plagiarism in 33 thesis introductions using a Google search algorithm, characterizes of the study type and we search in electronic form if the thesis mentor have published articles in scientific journals. We found evidence of plagiarism in 27/33 introductions, 37.3% (171/479) of all the paragraphs analyzed had some degree of plagiarism, literal plagiarism was the most frequent (20/27) and journals were the most common sources of plagiarism (19/27). The characteristics of the studies were observational (32/33), cross-sectional (30/33), descriptive (25/33) and retrospective (19/33). None of the authors had published in a scientific journal, and only nine of his tutors of them had at least one publication. No association was found between the characteristics of the thesis and the presence of plagiarism. In conclusion, we found a high frequency of plagiarism in theses analyzed. Is responsibility of medical schools take the necessary actions to detect and avoid plagiarism among their students.

  12. [The history of medical physics and biophysics at the Humboldt University in Berlin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, P

    2001-01-01

    The present Institute of Medical Physics and Biophysics (former Institute of Radiation Research) was established on September 1st in 1923 by Walter Friedrich (1883-1968). It was after the Institute in Frankfurt A.M. (founded by Friedrich Dessauer in 1921) - the second Institute of its kind in Germany. As a physicist who wrote his dissertation under Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, he did research together with a Gynecologist in Friedburg on problems of radiation therapy and the prevention of radiation injuries. Thus Friedrich became one of the first German Biomedical Physicists and was appointed to a professorship at the university of Berlin and its faculty of medicine. The paper gives a survey of the history of the Institute of Radiation Research in the twenties, in the time of Nazi-rule, the period after the World War II and in the era of GDR until 1990 and up to the present time. The succession of directorship of the Institute and the main research subjects in medical physics and biophysics have been sketched.

  13. Nutritional management of enterocutaneous fistula: a retrospective study at a Malaysian university medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrasawi, Manal Mh; Shahar, Suzana; Sagap, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Enterocutaneous fistula is a challenging clinical condition with serious complications and considerable morbidity and mortality. Early nutritional support has been found to decrease these complications and to improve the clinical outcome. Location of the fistula and physiological status affect the nutrition management plan in terms of feeding route, calories, and protein requirements. This study investigated the nutritional management procedures at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, and attempted to determine factors that affect the clinical outcome. Nutritional management was evaluated retrospectively in 22 patients with enterocutaneous fistula seen over a 5-year period. Medical records were reviewed to obtain data on nutritional status, biochemical indices, and route and tolerance of feeding. Calories and protein requirements are reported and categorized. The results show that surgery was the predominant etiology and low output fistula was the major physiological category; anatomically, the majority were ileocutaneous. The spontaneous healing rate was 14%, the total healing rate was 45%, and the mortality rate was 22%, with 14% due to fistula-associated complications. There was a significant relationship between body mass index/serum albumin levels and fistula healing; these parameters also had a significant relationship with mortality. Glutamine was used in 50% of cases; however, there was no significant relationship with fistula healing or mortality rate. The nutritional status of the patient has an important impact on the clinical outcome. Conservative management that includes nutrition support is very important in order to improve nutritional status before surgical repair of the fistula.

  14. Experience of problem-based learning in nursing education at Kaohsiung Medical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Fan-Hao; Chin, Chi-Chun

    2009-05-01

    Nursing education must keep up with the rapidly changing medical landscape to support the competences of nurses in the areas of critical thinking, problem solving, and creativity. Problem-based learning (PBL) provides an appropriate strategy for nursing education innovation. Nursing curricula based on PBL remain in the growing stage in Taiwan. Kaohsiung Medical University introduced PBL into nursing education in 2002. The critical events in the process included: (1) nurturing key tutors; (2) using PBL teaching methods in an elective course--Oncology Nursing, and designing a new elective course--Symposiums Regarding Clinical Cases; (3) holding conferences inside and outside the school to promote PBL teaching methods; (4) linking e-learning and PBL teaching methods; (5) conducting PBL research; (6) establishing a committee of PBL, objective structured clinical examination, and teaching material review for the College of Nursing; and (7) setting up a required course--Nursing Ethics. We now have 12 key tutors in the College of Nursing. We have also completed two studies to evaluate the ability of students and to explore the experience of tutors. From our studies, we know that PBL can increase learner abilities in self-directed learning, critical thinking, and PBL performance. The approach helps students to cope with the changing medical landscape. Furthermore, tutors and teachers develop adequate PBL teaching skills. Based on the experience above, we believe that we are on the right path in terms of continuing tutor development, gradually increasing the number of PBL courses, and undertaking further research to promote PBL methods in Taiwan.

  15. [Experience of Collaborative Research through Department of Medical Instrumental Research and Technology in Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Both of Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine which offers high, technical and safe medical treatment and Horiba, Ltd. which has small CBC analyzers in a core product established a joint research institute for development of advanced laboratory test analyzer from January 1, 2012 in Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine as the "advanced treatment hospital" where the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has got approved. Clinical needs about analyzer and reagent for a laboratory test are being investigated to the emergency medical care unit and the intensive care unit as well as the laboratory test part in the affiliated hospital and many medical departments of the pediatrics, the internal medicine and the surgery. Developing the new analyzer based on high technology, evaluating the performance of them and spreading them to a medical examination and treatment site is our main target.

  16. Fire Safety Status in the Hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAHRA ZAMANIAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  In today’s world of advanced technology, "nothing is safe" and the fear from painful disasters caused by job accidents always exists. Therefore, hospital preparation for probable accidents, such as fire, and providing safety for both the staff and the patients in these situations are vital necessities. This study aimed to evaluate the fire safety status and level of fire-awareness in the hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. This cross–sectional study was conducted in two parts. 1 Reviewing the fire-safety status in the hospitals of the university and 2 Evaluating the level of fire awareness among the hospital personnel. In evaluating the level of fire awareness, 520 subjects were selected among Radiology, Pharmacy, Laboratory, And Nursing stations staff. The fire-safety status was assessed using a checklist including 54 questions evaluating fire-safety and emergency exit pathways. In addition, a questionnaire including 12 questions was used in order to evaluate the level of fire awareness. The results revealed maximum and minimum fire-safety status in Namazi Hospital (mean=20.36 and Shooshtari Hospital (mean=16, respectively. In addition, the highest and the lowest levels of fire awareness were found in Qotbeddin Hospital (mean=5.85 and Sina Hospital (mean=3.35, respectively. Level of fire-awareness of the study population had association with educational level and job tenure.

  17. Prevalence Rate of Using ٍEcstasy among Medical Sciences Students in Urmia University in 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Miri Ghaffarzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The present study aims to achieve a comprehensive depiction of ecstasy consumption among the students of Urmia University of medical sciences in 2007.Materials & Methods: Totally 950 students were surveyed in this cross-sectional descriptive study. A census was used as a sampling method. A self-report questionnaire regarding demographic details and ecstasy consumption was completed by students. Data was stored in a database and then was analyzed through descriptive tests by SPSS software. Chi square test was used to determine the correlation coefficient.Results: There were 798 subjects of all target population who had never used this drug. However, 132 subjects (18 regularly, 56 occasionally for fun and 58 at least once consumed ecstasy pills. Thus the point prevalence of ecstasy consumption among the students was 14.19 percent. There were 232 subjects who had never heard of the term “ecstasy". Instead, the knowledge source of the rest about ecstasy was books (116 subject, internet (56 subjects, mass media (489 subjects, friends (28 subjects, and family (2 subjects. A significant relation was observed between ecstasy consumption and other variables (parents' education, residence in student campus, attending parties, smoking, canabis and opium consumption. Conclusion: Results of this study revealed that the point prevalence of ecstasy pills consumption among university students was 14.19% that raises the need for purposive intervention and the necessity of planning to prevent and decrease this phenomenon.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;18(4:67-72

  18. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION ON INFECTIOUS DISEASES: A SAUDI UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL EXPERIENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qurashi, Abdulrahman M.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Continuing medical education (CME) is an important and useful activity for updating knowledge in order to improve for outcome of health care. A CME update symposium on Infectious Diseases was therefore organized at the King Fahd Hospital of the University (KFHU), Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia. Participants included clinicians, laboratory personnel and nursing staff from different hospitals and universities in Saudi Arabia. Objectives: To report the proceedings of the first CME on Infectious Diseases in the region and to evaluate it using a questionnaire-based feedback. Methodology: This CME was evaluated on specific feedback obtained on standardized evaluation forms provided during the symposium. The responses of 194 participants were statistically analyzed for the various components of the symposium. Results and Conclusion: Salient important issues covered during the program are presented. The CME included five sessions on: hospital acquired infections, immunology, mycotic diseases, malaria, lesihmaniasis and virology. Some lacunae were also identified. The evaluation of the scientific sessions showed a satisfaction level of 3.98 ± 0.59, on a scale of five. As this CME activity proved successful on many counts, it was concluded that it was worthwhile to conduct updates on infectious diseases on a regular basis. PMID:23008630

  19. Barriers in Implementing E-Learning in Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakbala, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Background: E-learning provides an alternative way for higher educational institutes to deliver knowledge to learners at a distance, rather than the traditional way. The aim of this study is to identify the barrier factors of e-learning programs in Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences (HUMS) in respect of the students and lecturers’ point of view. Methods: A cross-sectional study based on a questionnaire was conducted among 286 of students and lecturers in the nursing, midwifery and paramedic schools of HUMS. Two hundred and eighty-six participants filled in the questionnaire: 256 students, and 30 lecturers. Results: Results of the study showed a lack of proper training in e-learning courses of the university 182 (69.1%), limited communication with the instructor 174 (68%) and the learners dominance of English language 174 (68%) showed the greatest importance for the students. The awareness about e-learning program was 80% and 43% among lecturers and students respectively. The dominance of English language 26 (86.7%) and lack of research grants for e-learning 23 (76.6%) and lack of proper training on e-learning courses from the university 20 (66.7 %) were the most important barrier factors of implementing e-learning for lecturers. E-learning courses to supplement classroom teaching was a solution that mentioned by the majority of students 240 (93.8%) and lecturers 29 (96.7%) in this study. Conclusions: The positive perception of e-learning is an important consequence effect in the future, educational development of nursing, midwifery and paramedic schools. PMID:26925885

  20. A study on the Rate of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Medical Students towards Method of Medical Records Documentation at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences Affiliated Therapeutic and Teaching Centers 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Balaghafari

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: History, clinical findings, procedures undertaken, and patients response to treatment are written in clinical records, hence their contents are indicators of physicians’ evaluation. If clinical records are provided precisely, clear and systematized, they indicate the clinical thinking of the staff and facilitate patients diagnosis process. These records have an important role in coordinating professional staff involved in patient care. Since the physicians and medical students are involved more in medical records documentation than the other hospital staff, thus, a study on their knowledge, attitude and practice towards the principles of medical records documentation is undertaken.Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive study, which is done about the rate of knowledge, attitude and practice of 207 Medical students of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in university hospitals. Descriptive and inferential statistical analytic methods were used for the collected data. For comparison of the hospitals, regarding observing designed principals in the completion of medical files, according to the filled questionnaires the minimum and maximum score designated as 1-5 which is very poor to excellent. Then the mean score was calculated and considered for the comparison of hospitals. For the determination of the relationship between knowledge, attitude, and practice, β Kendall’s Tau Test was used.Results: The majority of the participants had low knowledge (77.8% about medical records documentation. Most of them did not have good attitude (54.1 about completion of medical records and significance and value of medical records documentation in treatment, education, and research.Conclusion: Results indicate that incompletion of medical records at the university affiliated hospitals are due to lack of awareness of the students towards the method of medical records documentation. In addition, not considering the

  1. Factors that influence the choice to work in rural township health centers among 4,669 clinical medical students from five medical universities in Guangxi, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunbo Qing

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To produce competent undergraduate-level medical doctors for rural township health centers (THCs, the Chinese government mandated that medical colleges in Central and Western China recruit rural-oriented, tuition-waived medical students (RTMSs starting in 2010. This study aimed to identify and assess factors that influence the choice to work in rural township health centers among both RTMSs and other students from five medical universities in Guangxi, China. Methods: An internet-based self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted with medical students in Guangxi province. Multinomial logistic regression was used to identify factors related to the attitudes toward work in a rural township health center. Results: Among 4,669 medical students, 1,523 (33% had a positive attitude and 2,574 (55% had a neutral attitude toward working in THCs. Demographic characteristics, personal job concerns, and knowledge of THCs were associated with the choice of a career in THCs. The factors related to a positive attitude included the following: three-year program, a rural-oriented medical program, being male, an expectation of working in a county or township, a focus on medical career development, some perceived difficulty of getting a job, having family support, sufficient knowledge of THCs, optimism toward THC development, seeking lower working pressure, and a lower expected monthly salary. Conclusion: Male students in a three-year program or a rural-oriented tuition-waived medical education program were more likely to work in THCs. Selecting medical students through interviews to identify their family support and intentions to work in THCs would increase recruitment and retention. Establishing favorable policies and financial incentives to improve living conditions and the social status of rural physicians is necessary.

  2. [Lecturers in chemistry at the Medical Faculty of the University of Nagyszombat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabadváry, F; Vámos, E

    1994-01-01

    After a short introduction on the development of the medieval universities at Pécs, Obuda, and Pozsony, and mentioning those who lectured in medicine in Hungary, the authors emphasise that modern chemistry was born during the 16th and 17th century. They stress the role of Paracelsus who invented iatro-chemistry, and that the first independent chairs, were founded in Germany in the beginning of 17th century at Altdorf, Marburg, Jéna, but were followed suit by Paris, when the Jardin des Plantes were erected. The first chemical textbook, the Cours de Chimie (Paris 1665), was also the work of a Frenchman, namely Nicolas Lémery (1645-1715). From the 18th century chemistry was also included in the curriculum of medical education in Hungary. Among the chairs of the newly founded medical faculty at Nagyszombat we find the chemical-botanical department in 1769. Its first professor was an Austrian physician Jakab Winterl (1773-1809), who had been a head physician at Selmecbánya, in Northern Hungary. Owing to a rash and premature publication Winterl's international reputation was unfortunately undermined in the last century by a leading German science historian, Hermann Kopp. The authors stress, however, that Winterl indeed played an important role in organizing the chemical department, and purchasing all the necessary equipment needed for up to date researches and analyses. And above all, in his Prolusiones ad chemiam saeculi decimi noni, he foresaw many forthcoming paths and discoveries of 19th century chemistry. After Winterl's retirement the department was divided into two parts. Pál Kitaibel (1757-1817) led the botanica department and János schuster (1777-1838) the other one for chemistry. Kitaibel made a name for himself by depicting Hungarian flora, but he also made discoveries in chemistry. He discovered chlore lime, before Tennant in 1795, a material which might have been used for whitening textiles. Schuster, on the other hand, introduced a system of Hungarian

  3. [Lecturers in chemistry at the Medical Faculty of the University of Nagyszombat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabadváry, F; Vámos, E

    1994-01-01

    After a short introduction on the development of the medieval universities at Pécs, Obuda, and Pozsony, and mentioning those who lectured in medicine in Hungary, the authors emphasise that modern chemistry was born during the 16th and 17th century. They stress the role of Paracelsus who invented iatro-chemistry, and that the first independent chairs, were founded in Germany in the beginning of 17th century at Altdorf, Marburg, Jéna, but were followed suit by Paris, when the Jardin des Plantes were erected. The first chemical textbook, the Cours de Chimie (Paris 1665), was also the work of a Frenchman, namely Nicolas Lémery (1645-1715). From the 18th century chemistry was also included in the curriculum of medical education in Hungary. Among the chairs of the newly founded medical faculty at Nagyszombat we find the chemical-botanical department in 1769. Its first professor was an Austrian physician Jakab Winterl (1773-1809), who had been a head physician at Selmecbánya, in Northern Hungary. Owing to a rash and premature publication Winterl's international reputation was unfortunately undermined in the last century by a leading German science historian, Hermann Kopp. The authors stress, however, that Winterl indeed played an important role in organizing the chemical department, and purchasing all the necessary equipment needed for up to date researches and analyses. And above all, in his Prolusiones ad chemiam saeculi decimi noni, he foresaw many forthcoming paths and discoveries of 19th century chemistry. After Winterl's retirement the department was divided into two parts. Pál Kitaibel (1757-1817) led the botanica department and János schuster (1777-1838) the other one for chemistry. Kitaibel made a name for himself by depicting Hungarian flora, but he also made discoveries in chemistry. He discovered chlore lime, before Tennant in 1795, a material which might have been used for whitening textiles. Schuster, on the other hand, introduced a system of Hungarian

  4. Information searching habits of Internet users: A case study on the Medical Sciences University of Isfahan, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Asefeh Asemi

    2005-01-01

    This article reports a survey on the search habits of Internet users at the Medical University of Isfahan (MUI), a governmental university in Isfahan city, Iran. Efforts are on to find the search requirements related to the use of the Internet information. Data were collected by using a questionnaire and follow-up interviews with Internet users from five faculties. Results show that all the respondents are using the Internet frequently because all faculties have provided connection to the Int...

  5. Assessment of Entrepreneurial Skills and Its Association with Social Intelligence in Students of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Yahya Safari; Fatemeh Tahmasby; Mohammad Javad Karamafrooz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Social intelligence and entrepreneurship are among features leading to the academic and career achievements. Due to the importance of this issue, the present study was performed to determine the level of entrepreneurial skills in students of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences and its association with social intelligence. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study by using systematic random sampling method, we selected 350 students at Kermanshah University of Me...

  6. Survey of stress, anxiety, depression and self-concept of students of Fasa University of medical sciences, 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Najafi Kalyani; Elaheh Pourjam; Nahid Jamshidi; Shahnaz Karimi; Vahid Najafi Kalyani

    2013-01-01

    Background & Objectives: Studying periods in university is very important for students. Because of the problems, this period is usually accompanied with mental status changes of students. The aim of this study was the assessment of psychological variables (stress, anxiety and depression) and self-concept of students. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study, all the students studying at Fasa University of Medical Sciences in the academic year 89-88 were selected through census s...

  7. Predictors of Life Skills Level of Students in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences in Southeast of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Ansari; Mahmood Khorram; Ali Soleimaninejad; Alireza Ansari-Moghaddam

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Life skills involve a big class of socio-psychological and interpersonal skills which help a person to take conscious decisions, communicate effectively and improve self-management skills. Preparing a plan for all the above mentioned programs, need awareness about life skills level of different groups such as students in universities. Present study was aimed to reveal the predictors of life skills level of Students in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences in southeast of...

  8. Developing an academic medical library core journal collection in the (almost) post-print era: the Florida State University College of Medicine Medical Library experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Barbara S; Nagy, Suzanne P

    2003-07-01

    The Florida State University (FSU) College of Medicine Medical Library is the first academic medical library to be established since the Web's dramatic appearance during the 1990s. A large customer base for electronic medical information resources is both comfortable with and eager to migrate to the electronic format completely, and vendors are designing radical pricing models that make print journal cancellations economically advantageous. In this (almost) post-print environment, the new FSU Medical Library is being created and will continue to evolve. By analyzing print journal subscription lists of eighteen academic medical libraries with similar missions to the community-based FSU College of Medicine and by entering these and selected quality indicators into a Microsoft Access database, a core list was created. This list serves as a selection guide, as a point for discussion with faculty and curriculum leaders when creating budgets, and for financial negotiations in a broader university environment. After journal titles specific to allied health sciences, veterinary medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, library science, and nursing were eliminated from the list, 4,225 unique journal titles emerged. Based on a ten-point scale including SERHOLD holdings and DOCLINE borrowing activity, a list of 449 core titles is identified. The core list has been saved in spreadsheet format for easy sorting by a number of parameters.

  9. Medication errors: classification of seriousness, type, and of medications involved in the reports from a university teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Rejane dos Santos Dalmolin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Medication errors can be frequent in hospitals; these errors are multidisciplinary and occur at various stages of the drug therapy. The present study evaluated the seriousness, the type and the drugs involved in medication errors reported at the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre. We analyzed written error reports for 2010-2011. The sample consisted of 165 reports. The errors identified were classified according to seriousness, type and pharmacological class. 114 reports were categorized as actual errors (medication errors and 51 reports were categorized as potential errors. There were more medication error reports in 2011 compared to 2010, but there was no significant change in the seriousness of the reports. The most common type of error was prescribing error (48.25%. Errors that occurred during the process of drug therapy sometimes generated additional medication errors. In 114 reports of medication errors identified, 122 drugs were cited. The reflection on medication errors, the possibility of harm resulting from these errors, and the methods for error identification and evaluation should include a broad perspective of the aspects involved in the occurrence of errors. Patient safety depends on the process of communication involving errors, on the proper recording of information, and on the monitoring itself.

  10. A Dual Hesitant Fuzzy Multigranulation Rough Set over Two-Universe Model for Medical Diagnoses

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Zhang; Deyu Li; Yan Yan

    2015-01-01

    In medical science, disease diagnosis is one of the difficult tasks for medical experts who are confronted with challenges in dealing with a lot of uncertain medical information. And different medical experts might express their own thought about the medical knowledge base which slightly differs from other medical experts. Thus, to solve the problems of uncertain data analysis and group decision making in disease diagnoses, we propose a new rough set model called dual hesitant fuzzy multigran...

  11. Assessment of Self-Medication Practices Among Medical, Pharmacy, and Health Science Students in Gondar University, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    S.M. Abay; Amelo, W

    2010-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the magnitude and factors of self-medication among medical, pharmacy, and health science students of GCMHS (Gondar College of Medicine and Health Sciences). A cross-sectional study with two-month illness recall was conducted. A Questionnaire consisting of demographic questions and questions on illnesses in the last two months prior to the interview and treatment strategies was prepared and administered to the 414 students, selected as the sample population, fr...

  12. Selecting medical students at the University of Witten/Herdecke: Part I: Evaluation of inter-rater-reliability in the interview selection process

    OpenAIRE

    Ostermann, Thomas; Vermaasen, Wilhelm; Peter F. Matthiessen

    2005-01-01

    Background: The University of Witten/Herdecke was founded in 1983 as the first private university in Germany to teach medicine. The University is not part of the centralized state system of medical placement distribution but rather has its own concept and procedure relating to its choice of students. In order to evaluate reliability and validity of the process of selecting medical students at the University of Witten/Herdecke, the first step was to analyse the interview selection process.Mate...

  13. The impact of preparatory activities on medical school selection outcomes: a cross-sectional survey of applicants to the university of Adelaide medical school in 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Selection into medical school is highly competitive with more applicants than places. Little is known about the preparation that applicants undertake for this high stakes process. The study aims to determine what preparatory activities applicants undertake and what difficulties they encounter for each stage of the application process to medical school and in particular what impact these have on the outcome. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 1097 applicants who applied for a place in the University of Adelaide Medical School in 2007 and participated in the UMAT (Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test) and oral assessment components of the selection process. The main outcome measures were an offer of an interview and offer of a place in the medical school and were analysed using logistic regression. Results The odds of a successful outcome increased with each additional preparatory activity undertaken for the UMAT (odds ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.11 to 1.33; P students most appropriate for medical school and the course they provide. Our results indicate that performance in the selection processes can be improved by training. However, if these preparatory activities may be limited to those who can access them, the playing field is not even and increasing equity of access to medical schools will not be achieved. PMID:24289521

  14. Typical errors in pronouncing medical English terminology made by first and second year students of medicine at the Medical school of Novi Sad university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Vuk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This paper deals with typical errors on the phonological level made by first and second year medical students at Novi Sad University. It presents the results of a continuous survey conducted over a three-year period of teaching medical English. The aim of this study was to determine the most common pronunciation errors in medical English vocabulary, classify them into distinct types, and propose the teaching methods for overcoming them. Material and methods. The authors first made a list of the most frequent medical words used at this level of study. They introduced them by means of audio-visual methods and conducted continual oral practice throughout the whole course. Results. The recorded common pronunciation errors were classified into five types on account of the phonological and other factors which cause them The number of words selected in this paper totals to 67. Discussion. Most of the recorded pronunciation errors are due to the differences between the two phonological systems. The previously acquired knowledge plays an important part as well as the competence level in general English. Other language skills and knowledge of phonological and orthographic rules are important factors as well. Conclusion. A teacher of medical English should adjust his/her teaching methods to the needs of English for Specific Purposes. Medical students should practice pronunciation in class and learn the most important rules of English phonetics; they should also be instructed on how to use computer to improve their pronunciation.

  15. Ionizing radiation in medical education in the National University of Cuyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical irradiations constitute the most important contribution to the human exposure to ionizing radiations of artificial origin. The world-wide statistics indicate an increasing tendency in the annual number of these practices based on the development of new techniques of diagnosis by images, the application of new drugs labeled with diverse isotopes and novel advances in cancer treatments. Due to this widespread use, Radiation Protection (RP) has become an excellent subject for scientific societies and regulating organisms. In this sense, most of the European countries have implemented plans of action for the radiological safety of the patient. An example is the guide RP/116 reported by the European Commission in the year 2000, which recommends including a course about RP in the study programs of Schools of Medicine and Dentistry. Consequently, the general purpose of this research project was to critically describe and to analyze the present situation of educational contents referred to the use of ionizing radiations in the Career of Medicine of the National University of Cuyo. The main results show that there is no curricular subject or area of study which includes in its syllabus minimum compulsory contents about RP or basic knowledge about Radiation Physics. In addition, RP and environmental topics related to the use of ionizing radiations in Medicine are not developed according to the 4 recommendations published by specialized International Organisms. Considering that many methods of diagnosis by images use ionizing radiations, it is suggested that that the curriculum of the Medical Career include contents related to this issue. The aim is to incorporate the culture of RP in the formative process of future professionals and, consequently, to reduce the execution of non-justified practices that threaten both individual and environmental health. (authors)

  16. Information Literacy among Educational Academic Members of Zabol University of Medical Sciences, Zabol, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batul Keykha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Development of information literacy is considered a required factor for instructors of higher education system due to its impact on educational and research activities, and performance of educational academic members is a main factor that affects the output of system. The aim of this study was to report and compare the information literacy among the academic members of departments of clinical and basic biomedical sciences in 2011. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was performed using a valid and reliable questionnaire distributed among 48 full-time equivalent academic members of Zabol University of Medical Sciences in both clinical (19 members and basic biomedical departments (29 members. Data were analyzed using Fisher, Mann-Whitney and Chi-square statistics in SPSS 17. Results: Information literacy of the members was at an average level at both knowledge and attitude levels but it was low at the practice. There was a significant difference between two groups in terms of awareness about information resources; however, the difference was not significant for the utilization of information resources. Conclusion: Members of department of basic biomedical sciences were more aware than those of clinical department about the information resources but such awareness has not resulted in more use of resources in the educational and research activities. Despite positive attitude of all members towards the application of electronic information resources in both educational and research activities, their awareness of information literacy skills and practicing were not satisfying in educational and research sections. As a final point, Information literacy is hence suggested as a part of continuing medical education courses.

  17. Proposal of great eastern Japan earthquake. Message from Fukushima Medical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described are what Fukushima Medical University (FMU) faced and how FMU responded at Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant (FDPP) Accident by hydrogen explosions (Mar. 12 and 14, 2011) following the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake (Mar. 11). The Accident accompanying the forced evacuation of resident in the area 20 km afar from FDPP brought about the concern, fear and anger, different from those in the neighboring Miyagi Prefecture; and strong psychosomatic stress; as well as the significant alteration of composition of generation in population and in sickness proportion in the whole Prefecture. Under these circumstances, FMU decided to hold information in common and make a service window single, to give the top leadership with rough-and-ready practice and a flexible policy, which all were the president's responsibility for making staff work relieved and united. For holding information in common, frequent meetings of the whole FMU personnel were held (42 times from Mar. 11 to Nov.) and of managing staff (81 times until Nov.). During the period, FMU took measures to meet with the situation of patient receiving and transporting, measures against rumor, and cooperation with related medical institutions. Medicare support included the acute phase medicare, and planning and practice of healthcare management for >30 years onward in the Prefecture. The author summarizes 9 lessons proposed from the Disaster to be considered hereafter, like the system perfection at an emergency, more education about radiation for the resident and medicare staff, measures for aging of engineers and scientists related to atomic energy, and so on. As well, 6 lessons are summarized for the next generation using old aphorism and recent commentary in media. The people should follow the excellent leader at crisis; but it's the problem whether there is such a leader on site or in administration at the very time. (T.T.)

  18. Masters theses from a university medical college: Publication in indexed scientific journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaliwal Upreet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The thesis is an integral part of postgraduate medical education in India. Publication of the results of the thesis in an indexed journal is desirable; it validates the research and makes results available to researchers worldwide. Aims: To determine publication rates in indexed journals, of works derived from theses, and factors affecting publication. Settings and Design: Postgraduate theses submitted over a five-year period (2001-05 in a university medical college were analyzed in a retrospective, observational study. Materials and Methods: Data retrieved included name and gender of postgraduate student, names, department and hierarchy of supervisor and co-supervisor(s, year submitted, study design, sample size, and statistically significant difference between groups. To determine subsequent publication in an indexed journal, Medline search was performed up to December 2007. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test was used to compare publication rates based on categorical variables; Student′s t-test was used to compare differences based on continuous variables. Results: One hundred and sixty theses were retrieved, forty-eight (30% were published. Papers were published 8-74 (33.7 ± 17.33 months after thesis submission; the postgraduate student was first author in papers from 26 (54% of the published theses. Gender of the student, department of origin, year of thesis submission, hierarchy of the supervisor, number and department of co-supervisors, and thesis characteristics did not influence publication rates. Conclusions: Rate of publication in indexed journals, of papers derived from postgraduate theses is 30%. In this study we were unable to identify factors that promote publication.

  19. Hepatitis B surface antibodies in medical students from a public university in Puebla, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Perea, María Elena; Gómez-Conde, Eduardo; Santos-López, Gerardo; Pérez-Contreras, Irma; Díaz-Orea, María Alicia; Gándara-Ramírez, José Luís; Cruz Y López, Othón Rafael; Márquez-Domínguez, Luis; Sosa-Jurado, Francisca

    2016-07-01

    Although preventable with vaccination, Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health concern, with ∼400 million people at risk of developing the chronic form of the disease worldwide. The anti-HBV vaccine consists of a recombinant HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), which induces specific anti-HBs antibodies and confers 95% protection for >20 y. The aim of the present study was to analyze the response to HBV vaccination by measuring anti-HBs antibodies in serum samples from medical students of a public university in Puebla, Mexico. HBV infection markers HBsAg and anti-HBs, were also determined. A total of 201 students were included and vaccination coverage was found at 54%. Overall seropositivity for HBsAg, anti-HBc and anti-HBs determined by ELISA was 0.5%, 1.0% and 47%, respectively. Protective levels of anti-HBs >10 mIU/mL were found in 93.2% of subjects vaccinated with 2 or 3 doses and in 40% of those vaccinated with a single dose; while only 4.8% of unvaccinated subjects were anti-HBs positive. The response to the HBV vaccine was different in each participant, despite similar vaccination scheme. A history of blood transfusion/organ transplant or more than 2 sexual partners was significantly associated with anti-HBc positivity, OR = 399 (p = 0.010) and OR = 19.9 (p = 0.044), respectively. HBV immunization coverage was low in our sample compared with reports from countries with similar HBV prevalence, but anti-HBs in vaccinated individuals were in the expected range. It is important to promote HBV vaccination and awareness among medical students, due to their exposure risk. PMID:27171749

  20. Evaluation of Technical, Protective and Technological operation of Radiologists in Hospitals of Mazandaran Medical Science Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Rahimi, M.Sc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: Radiology unit has an important role in the diagnosis of many disorders, along with providing suitable and high quality pictures. A good picture is provided using a correct technical criteria and suitable circumstance of patient. Finally, operation and knowledge of radiology personnels directly has a primary role in the determination of radiography quality.Materials and Methods: This study was done in order to determine personnel operation in the units of hospitals radiologist, related to Universities of Mazandaran Medical Science. Data collection tools, made a researcher a check list that was used after getting suitable letter and validity indices. All of the 73 personnels of the radiology unit related to Mazandaran Medical Science were studied. 35 operations (in technical, protective and technological fields, in any of personnel in three distinct shifts were observed and recorded. All of them were tested about these three fields with 40 questions.Results: The total obtained scores from personnels in technical part in the morning, evening and night shift were 66.4, 53.9 and 60.2 percents. Recived scores from personnels in protective fields were 68.1, 59.5 and 60.2 percents, while recived scores from personnels in Technological operation fields were 47.8, 39.95 and 43.65 percents. Comparison of these three scores in technical, protective and Technological operation fields showed a meaningful difference (p<0.05.Conclusion: The total quality of personnels operations were nearly desirable and in need of continuous education, supervision and evaluation. Emphasizing protection to beams, accessibility of necessary tools and continuous supervision regarding usage of these equipments and respecting other security points have important role in reducing patients absorbed doses.

  1. Trends in attrition among medical teaching staff at universities in Myanmar 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nang Mie Mie Htun; Reyer, Joshua A; Yamamoto, Eiko; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Although lack of human resources for health is becoming a global problem, there are few studies on human resources in Myanmar. This study was conducted to investigate the attrition rates of teaching staff from universities for medical professions in Myanmar from 2009 to 2013. The data were collected from administrative records from Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Health, Myanmar. Numbers of staff and those who permanently left work (attrition) from 2009 to 2013 were counted. The reasons were classified into two categories; involuntary attrition (death or retirement) and voluntary attrition (resignation or absenteeism). Official records of the attrited staff were reviewed for identifying demographic characteristics. The annual attrition rate for all kinds of health workers was about 4%. Among 494 attrited staff from 2009 to 2013, 357 staff (72.3%) left their work by involuntary attrition, while 137 staff (27.7%) left voluntarily. Doctors left their work with the highest annual rate (6.7%), while the rate for nurses was the lowest (1.1%). Male staff attrited with a higher rate (4.6%) than female staff (2.7%). Staff aged 46-60 years had the highest attrition rate. PhD degree holders had the highest rate (5.9%), while basic degree holders had the second highest rate (3.5%). Associate professors and above showed the highest attrition rate (8.1%). Teaching staff from non-clinical subjects had the higher rates (8.2%). Among 494 attrited staff, significant differences between involuntary attrition and voluntary attrition were observed in age, marital status, education, overseas degree, position, field of teaching, duration of services and duration of non-residential service. These findings indicated the need to develop appropriate policies such as educational reforms, local recruitment plans, transparent regulatory and administrative measures, and professional incentives to retain the job. PMID:27019526

  2. Quantitative Assessment of Theses at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences Years–(1995-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaghafari, Azita; Siamian, Hasan; Kharamin, Farideh; Rashida, Seyyedeh Shahrbanoo; Ghahrani, Nassim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Review and evaluation of research for the correct steps towards real progress is essential which is a healthy and dynamic feature of the system. For the correct step toward real progress, evaluation research is essential which is feature of healthy and dynamic system. Considering the importance of scientific thesis in production and development and be aware of as the lack of structured information and qualitative and quantitative assessment at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, therefore we decided to do qualitative stud of theirs prepared 1995-2014. Methods: This study was a descriptive survey, a sample of 325 graduate and PhD thesis and dissertation in clinical and basic science at the university of medical sciences of the population in 2060 is a thesis from 1994 to the end of 2014. To study the population, stratified sampling method was used. The descriptive study was conducted in terms of matching the degree thesis students, theses subjects, specialty of supervisors and Advisers. The data gathering tool was checklist of information (gender, discipline, degree and department education of students, School, year of dependence, title of theses and dissertations, specialty and departments of supervisors and advisers, type of research, grade obtained of students). Statistical analysis of the data was performed using 21 SPSS software. Results: We studied 325 theses; 303 dissertations which 1 researcher; 21 dissertations which 2 researchers and 1 dissertation with 3 researchers. A total of 348 students (174 females and 174 males) researcher had theses. The number of students in the Department of Basic Science 82 (23.5%), 266 (76.5 %) in clinical group; 29(8.33%), 29 (8.33%) master degree; 260 (74.71%) general practitioner; 58 (16.67%) specialty and 1(29) at the PhD level. There was no relationship between research and level of education (p = 0.081). However, it was found that majority of the theses for the general practitioner (59.8%) wryer type 1

  3. Psychosocial problems of pre-clinical students in the University of Ibadan Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omokhodion, F O

    2003-06-01

    Recent changes in the psychosocial environment of the university campus such as the steep rise in student numbers, the high cost of living standards and the increase in violence and cult activities has prompted the need to assess the impact of these changes on the students. A cross sectional study was carried out among pre-clinical medical students to identify their psychosocial problems. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information about socio-demographic variables including age, sex, sources of financial support, type of accommodation, smoking and drinking habits and use of recreational facilities. Causes of insecurity and depression among students were also recorded. The General Health Questionnaire GHQ-12 was used to assess their mental health status. One hundred and seventy-six students responded to the enquiry, 94 males (53%) and 80 females (45%). One hundred and thirty-seven (79%) live on the campus while 37 (21%) live off campus. Only 9 of the students (5%) were smokers and 28 (16%) were drinkers. Monthly pocket money ranged from Naira 1,000 to Naira 25,000. Forty-one (23%) thought their pocket money was adequate, 92 (52%) thought it was fair and 39 (22%) thought it was inadequate. Causes of insecurity on the campus were cultism 34 (19%), lack of money 27 (15%), lack of textbooks 13 (7%) and stealing 10 (6%). Causes of depression include fear of failure of examinations, 62 (35%), lack of money, 48 (27%) and family problems 17 (10%). Mental health scores ranged from 1 to 10. Using a cut off point of 3 to delineate those with traits of poor mental health, 35 (21%) fell into the category 15 boys and 20 girls. Mean mental health score were higher for females, those living on campus, smokers and drinkers but this was not statistically significant. Fear of failure of examinations, cultism and lack of money are major concerns among medical students on the main university campus. Counselling services should be provided to assist students with

  4. Food Safety Awareness and Opinions of the Nursing and Medical Students at Gaziantep University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulendam Karadag

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Food safety is defined as the prevention of any decay or contamination in food substances until they are ready for consumption. Foodborne diseases are a growing public health problem. Our research was conducted as a descriptive study to determine the food awareness and associated opinions of the students at the Faculty of Medicine and the Nursing Department of the Faculty of Medical Sciences at Gaziantep University. METHOD: The research was conducted with the students at the Faculty of Medicine and the Nursing Department of the Faculty of Medical Sciences at Gaziantep University between 8 March and 26 March 2010 and with 175 students who accepted to participate in the research. Verbal consent was obtained from the students before the initiation of the research. Data were collected by the researchers by face-to-face interview technique and by using a questionnaire of 20 questions which was prepared after a review of literature. Collected data were evaluated by using chi-square and student t-test analysis assessed by SPSS 11.0 program. RESULTS: Approximately 62.9% of the students were between 18-20 years of age. It was determined that 56.0% of the students were interested in food safety, 50.9% did not think that the food they consumed was safe, 41.7% paid attention to brand and nutrition values and whether the food is organic when they do food shopping. All students considered safety as a crucial factor in food consumption (100%, 60.0% paid attention to nutrition values, 58.3% paid attention to the expiry date and 41.8% paid attention to the brand on the package of food substances while shopping. Most of the students responded to the statement “food additives are carcinogen” as “yes” (70.9%; while 66.3% of the students responded as “I have no idea” to the statement “Additives with code E are not harmful to health”, and 55.4% of the students responded as “No” to the statement “all additives are harmful to human health

  5. Role of wax model museums in the teaching of dermatovenerology at medical universities of Russia and Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utz S.R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the history and the significance of use of wax masks in the process of visual teaching of dermatology and venereology for students of medical universities in Europe and Russia in the XIX-XX centuries.

  6. Still a Bad Idea. A Critique of Harvard University's Medical Science Partners Proposal. A Harvard Watch Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Robert; Bourke, Jaron

    In 1988, Harvard University unveiled plans for Medical Science Partners (MSP), a venture capital fund intended to invest in and commercialize faculty biomedical projects. Critical of what is perceived as a "15 year long trend" wherein Harvard has "forged deeper and more extensive ties with the biomedical industry," the document asserts that MSP…

  7. Integrating eLearning to Support Medical Education at the New University of Botswana School of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebaetse, Masego B.; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Haverkamp, Cecil

    2014-01-01

    Since the enrolment of its first cohort of students in 2009, the University of Botswana School of Medicine (UB SoM) has employed elearning as a key element to support and strengthen its model of decentralised medical education. Significant investments have been made in setting up the physical infrastructure, and in acquiring relevant expertise to…

  8. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Deliverables: Volume 3, Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-18

    This reference is concerned with the Crossroads of Humanity workshop which is part of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. This workshop was held during the month of June and July 1994. Topics discussed include: Perceived Risk Advisory Committee Meeting, surveys of public opinion about hazardous and radioactive materials, genetics,antibodies, and regulatory agencies.

  9. THE QUANTITATIVE STUDY OF THE FACULTY MEMBERS PERFORMANCE IN DOCUMENTATION OF THE MEDICAL RECORDS IN TEACHING HOSPITALS OF MAZANDARAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari, Zolaykha; Mardanshahi, Alireza; Farahabadi, Ebrahim Bagherian; Siamian, Hasan; Gorji, Ali Morad Heidari; Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Rezazadeh, Esmaeil; Paymard, Seyyed Payam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Documentation of patients’ medical records has been always emphasized because medical records are as a means to be applied by patients, all medical staff, quality evaluations of health care, lawsuits, medical education and, etc. Regarding to this, each of the data elements available in the sheets of medical records has their own values. The rate of completion indicates the importance of the medical recorders for faculty member. So in this article the researcher evaluates the completion of medical records in the teaching hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Methods and Materials: This cross- sectional study has been conducted to review the patients’ medical cases in five teaching university hospitals. To collect data, a check list was mode based on data element arrangement in four main sheets of admission and discharge, summery, patients’ history and clinical examination and progress note sheets. Recorded data were defined as “Yes” with the value 1, not recorded data were defined as “No” with the value 2, and not used data were defined for cases in which the mentioned variable had no use with the value Zero. The overall evaluation of the rate of documentation was considered as %95 -100 equal to “good”, 75-94% equal to average and under 75% was considered as “poor”. Using the sample volume formula, 281 cases were randomly stratified reviewed. The data were analyzed by the software SPSS version 19 and descriptive statistical scales. Results: The results have shown that the overall documentation rate in all the four sheets was 62% and in a poor level. There was no big difference in the average documentation among the hospital. Among the educational group, the gynecology and infection groups are equal to each other and had the highest record average (68%). Within the all groups, the highest rate has belonged to the documentation of signatures (91%). Conclusion: Regarding to the overall assessment that documentation

  10. Community-oriented medical education: bringing perspectives to curriculum planners in Damascus University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashash, Mayssoon

    2013-01-01

    The varying health needs in Syria because of the trend of increasing communicable and noncommunicable diseases necessitate new curricula for all health professions schools in which community health needs, socio-cultural aspects of health and disease can be emphasized. There is a need to produce more primary level healthcare professionals who are trained to apply the principles, policies and strategies of the World Health Organization and achieve better health for all. A new perspective in the Faculty of Dentistry in Damascus University has been suggested and is presented here. Graduates generally are not well prepared to provide primary level healthcare in the community. Community-oriented medical education (COME) can produce health-oriented professionals who are equipped with broad skills and able to work for health promotion, disease prevention, and cure. Health orientation is one of the most radical features of COME, wherein the curriculum is appropriate to learners' future practice in the community. Community orientation enables students to become more people focused so that they can work towards people's self-empowerment, change people's attitudes and behaviors, and improve their self-awareness and esteem. This viewpoint addresses the importance of redesigning the dental curriculum and the need to implement COME in Damascus University. It is proposed as an example of changes needed in all health professions schools in Syria. The call to redesign the curricula to serve the health needs of the Syrian population will be difficult to achieve but is vital. Improving our understanding of the concept of COME and having all sectors of government and society commit to it will make the transition possible and will make the COME a reality. PMID:24200737

  11. Leisure Times Status Amongst Students of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences –Yazd, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Lotfi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A large number of the selected students are admitting for the Iranian University to acquire scientific and insight subjects annually. In this way, exposing to different cultural manners, new conditions of educational and dormitory residence place can affect psycho-social aspects of students where a not good planning for fulfilling times of leisure can produce psycho-social problems. This analytic cross sectional study was planned to evaluate the status of lesiure time amongst students of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd-2008. 254 students selected by stratified sampling method and interviewed by a pre-tested questionnaire including different related items. A significance level of .05 was considered for study results. Out of 254 students, 181 of those were girls and 73 boys. Mean of leisure time was 4.7 hours in a day. 70% of students expressed a planned of lesiure time & 58.6% were satisfied from spending of it. The priorities for filling of times of leisure were personal affairs (28.1%, watching TV (26.3%, non-lesson study (22.4%, being with friends (18% and sport (5.2% respectively.79.3% of students interested in to study story, Roman and Scientifics books. mean of study lessons was found to be 2.14 hours in a day. there was seen a significant relationship between sex and residence place with leisure times status (p<.05. The results of study showed that majorities of students had no planned ways for their leisure times where it may be considered as an important gap in the student curriculum.

  12. Buerger’s Disease in Tehran University of Medical Sciences Hospitals: A Fifteen Years Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salimi Javad

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Buerger's disease is an occlusive inflammatory disease of the small and medium-sized arteries and accounts for a variable proportion of patients with peripheral vascular disease throughout the world. The aim of this study was to review the records of Buerger's disease patients admitted to surgery wards of our university hospitals. 277 patients with Buerger's disease were surgically treated between 1987 and 2002, in affiliated hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, in Iran. Two hundred and seventy three (98.6% of the patients were male, aged 41.5 ± 11 years (mean ± SD; 99.6% of which were smokers with an average of 22.9 pack/years tobacco use. The major complaints included: ischemic ulcers in 203 (73.3%, CI 95%: 0.68-0.77 patients, rest pain in 201 (72.6%, CI 95%: 0.64-0.73, paresthesia in 143 (51.3%, CI 95%: 0.48- 0.58. Vascular bypass, sympathectomy and amputation were performed in 9.7% (CI 95%: 0.08-0.14 and 69.3% (CI 95%: 0.51-0.60 and 59.6% (CI 95%: 0.65-0.73 of the patients, respectively. Lumbar sympathectomy was carried out in 177 (63.9% patients, while 15 (5.4% patients underwent thoracic sympathectomy. In our study, afflicted patients were mostly young males, inveterate tobacco smokers. Patients presented frequently with ischemic ulcers or severe rest pain; thrombophlebitis and Raynaud's phenomenon were infrequent. Vascular reconstruction was rarely possible due to distal and segmental involvement; therefore sympathectomy and amputation were inevitable in a large group of patients in this study.

  13. The Austrian health care reform 2005, new health care structures in Styria, Austria, and the medical training in health care provision at the Medical University Graz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Rasky

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on key principles and objectives of the health care reformin Austria, financing, planning, and decision-making withinthe new structures are discussed. The executive body of the StyrianState Health Fund, the Health Platform, has diverse tasks. ThePlatform is supported by two advisory bodies, one preparing decision-making, the other - unique within the German speaking countries– consulting on women’s health issues. “Health Care” as asubject in the medical curriculum has been integrated in the courseunits of social medicine at the Medical University Graz. The subjectfocuses on social security issues and health care services. Theextent of training, however, does not qualify medical students formanagement functions in health care.

  14. Poorer verbal working memory for a second language selectively impacts academic achievement in university medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Collette; Canny, Benedict J; Reser, David H; Rajan, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    (2) = 0.335). Hierarchical multiple regression was then used to test the ability of three independent variable measures (SNR50, age of acquisition of English and English proficiency) to predict academic performance as the dependent variable in a factor analysis model which predicted significant performance differences in an assessment requiring communications skills (p = 0.008), but not on a companion assessment requiring knowledge of procedural skills, or other assessments requiring factual knowledge. Thus, impaired vWM for an L2 appears to affect specific communications-based assessments in university medical students.

  15. Final Report for The University of Texas at Arlington Optical Medical Imaging Section of Advanced Imaging Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khosrow Behbehani

    2013-02-26

    The goal of this project was to create state-of-the-art optical medical imaging laboratories for the Biomedical Engineering faculty and student researchers of the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) on the campus of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW). This has been successfully achieved. These laboratories provide an unprecedented opportunity for the bioengineers (from UTA) to bring about new breakthroughs in medical imaging using optics. Specifically, three major laboratories have been successfully established and state-of-the-art scientific instruments have been placed in the labs. As a result of this grant, numerous journal and conference publications have been generated, patents for new inventions have been filed and received, and many additional grants for the continuation of the research has been received.

  16. [Medical care for asylum seekers and refugees at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf--A case series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sothmann, Peter; Schmedt auf der Günne, Nina; Addo, Marylyn; Lohse, Ansgar; Schmiedel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    As the number of refugees rises, medical care for refugees, asylum seekers and people with unclear residence status becomes a priority task for our health system. While access to health care is restricted for these groups of people in many German states, Hamburg provides unrestricted access to healthcare for refugees by handing out health insurance cards on arrival. Daily practice shows, however, that adequate medical care is still not always easy to achieve. In this case series we demonstrate that barriers to health care still exist on many levels. We discuss these barriers and further propose strategies to improve and to secure access to adequate health care.

  17. [Epidemiology of Pandemic Influenza (H1N1) 2009 in Aichi Medical University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Hiroya; Yamagishi, Yuka; Fuzimaki, Eriko; Kishi, Takahiko; Goto, Minehiro; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2010-01-01

    We have analyzed epidemiology of pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 in Aichi Medical University hospital. As a result, the characteristics of pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 was as follows. (1) The number of ordered rapid diagnostic test was 2.8 times compared with the seasonal influenza period. The number of ordered rapid diagnostic test of the seasonal influenza period had the peak in January to March. However, the peak in pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 was November. Also, the number of samples on the weekend had been more than that of the weekday. (2) Positive rate of each diagnostic kit did not have the difference between the seasonal influenza (31.3 ± 1.8%) and pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 (29.6%). (3) Age on most ordered samples were less than ten years old, and the number of samples in 11 to 20 years old was twice in comparison with the seasonal influenza. (4) Pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 in influenza A accounted for 96.9%. (5) Sensitivity and specificity of ESPLINE Influenza A&B-N (FUJIREBIO, Inc., Tokyo, Japan) to the pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 were 100% and 100%, respectively. Also, sensitivity and specificity of prorasuto Flu (Mitsubishi Chemical Medience Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) were 77.3%and 98.5%, respectively.

  18. Students’ perception of educational environment at Aga Khan University Medical College, Karachi, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Rehana; Ghias, Kulsoom; Fatima, Syeda Sadia; Hussain, Mehwish; Alam, Faiza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess educational environment in Aga Khan University Medical College (AKUMC) by Dundee Ready Educational Environmental Measure (DREEM) scale. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of students at the AKUMC with simple random sampling was carried out from June 2014 till March 2015. Responses in five subscales were used to calculate DREEM scores. Results: The average DREEM score was 125.77±16.8 with a reliability of 91.3%. With regards to subscales, on the 12-item students’ perceptions of learning (PoL) subscale, the maximum score was 48; 11 items of students’ perceptions of teachers (PoT) had a maximum score of 44; students’ academic self-perceptions (ASP) identified by 8 items showed maximum score of 32; students’ perceptions of atmosphere (PoA) with 12 items obtained maximum score 48 and students’ social self-perceptions (SSP) subscale of 7 items had a maximum score of 28. Conclusion: Students perceived a positive learning environment at AKUMC Karachi. PMID:27375721

  19. Invasive meningococcal disease in the university of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja N

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis remains the leading worldwide cause of acute bacterial meningitis and fatal sepsis in healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 cases of N. meningitidis from patients with invasive meningococcal infections in University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur during the years 1987-2004 were reviewed together with details of age, sex, disease, risk factors treatment and outcome of these patients. Results: Their ages ranged from 10 months to 64 years (median age 29.75 years. The male to female ratio was 1.42:1. Fever, neck stiffness, headache, vomiting and confusion were predominant symptoms. Upper respiratory tract viral infection and Hajj pilgrimage were directly associated with invasive meningococcal disease. Penicillin or ceftriaxone or both in some cases were administered as empirical therapy. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol and rifampicin. The case fatality ratio was 1:4. One Hajj pilgrim died despite having received polyvalent meningococcal vaccine. Amongst the survivors, two patients had neurological deficit, hearing loss and arthritis. Conclusion: Early antimicrobial therapy has been shown to reduce these adverse outcomes. Clinicians need to be alerted to the presence of the disease in the community and the disease should be made notifiable within 24 hours of detection both for early treatment of cases and to facilitate contact tracing, institution of prophylactic treatment and prevention of secondary cases.

  20. Factors Influencing Pediatric Specialty Choice among Pediatric Residents of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Momen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Factors influencing the choice of the subject could strengthen the knowledge and motivation to enter the field to promote the health of society. This study explores factors influencing specialty choice of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences pediatric department residents In this cross-sectional study all 38 pediatric residents were was undertaken using a questionnaire designed to assess their reasons with regard to pediatric course choice. The nameless questionnaire with sixteen questions was completed separately. The reliability and validity of the questionnaires were verified by experts and Cronbach's alpha 0.810. From 38 pediatric residents, including 26 female (71% and 12 male (29%, twenty six (70.3% were married. Mean age was 33.1±4.2 years. participating in the study mentioned factors such as "helping patients", "raising knowledge and skills" and "the ability to do a better service" with the average of 4.32, 4.26 and 4.18 respectively as high priority; and factors such as "lack of heavy duty," "comfortable and effortless" and "lack of urgency", respectively, with an average of 2.18, 2.24 and 2.37 had a low priority in choosing pediatric specialty course. According to the t-test, statistically significant differences were observed between gender, marital status and factors influence specialty choice of pediatric course (P

  1. Impact of 5 years of lean six sigma in a University Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeijer, Gerard C; Trip, Albert; de Jong, Laura J; Wendt, Klaus W; Does, Ronald J M M

    2012-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is an originally industry-based methodology for cost reduction and quality improvement. In more recent years, LSS was introduced in health care as well. This article describes the experiences of the University Medical Center Groningen, the second largest hospital in the Netherlands, with LSS. It was introduced in 2007 to create the financial possibility to develop innovations. In this article, we describe how LSS was introduced, and how it developed in the following years. We zoom in at the traumatology department, where all main processes have been analyzed and improved. An evaluation after 5 years shows that LSS helped indeed reducing cost and improving quality. Moreover, it aided the transition of the organization from purely problem oriented to more process oriented, which in turn is helpful in eliminating waste and finding solutions for difficult problems. A major benefit of the program is that own employees are trained to become project leaders for improvement. Several people from the primary process were thus stimulated and equipped to become role models for continuous improvement.

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Project at the Medical University of South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, Eric R.

    2008-04-25

    Department of Energy funds were used to support the development of a Center for Marine Structural Biology at the Marine Resources Center at Ft. Johnson in Charleston, South Carolina. The Ft. Johnson site is home to five institutions in a unique state/federal/academic partnership whose member institutions include the National Ocean Service (NOS), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), the SC Department of Natural Resources, and the College of Charleston. The Center for Marine Structural Biology sits adjacent to the newly completed Hollings Marine Laboratory and houses a 700 and 800 MHz nuclear magnetic resource instruments. The completed center is operational and meets it goal to provide state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance capabilities to resolve the molecular structures of compounds that have direct relevance to human health, including marine-derived biotoxins that are tested against cancer cell lines through collaborative studies with researchers at the Hollings Cancer Center at MUSC. Funds from the DOE assisted, in part, with the purchase of NMR probes and ancillary equipment for the 800 MHz NMR instrument. In addition, developmental funds was used to support the visit of an Scientific Advisory Board and for the NMR Planning Team to visit currently operational high field NMR facilities to guide their choice of instrumentation and design of the building.

  3. Ethnic Differences And Motivation Based On Maslow’s Theory At a MedicaL University

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    Jagmohni Kaur Sidhu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Motivation in Malaysia is to a largeextent influenced by the value system amongst allMalaysians. Being able to motivate employees is one ofthe important keys to the success of the organization.In this paper, an attempt was made to look into theneeds of employees in organizations and in particular,the needs based on Maslow’s theory on motivation. Subjects and Methods: Employees which consisted ofboth academic and administrative employees of theInternational Medical University (IMU were surveyedusing a standard questionnaire. The aim of this studywas to compare which levels of Maslow’s hierarchy ofneeds theory had been fulfilled and which needs wereyet to be fulfilled in the different ethnic groups at IMU. Results: Amongst the males, the Chinese and Indianethnic groups placed most emphasis on the esteem needsand on self-actualization needs. The Malay males gaveimportance to Safety needs. Amongst the female ethnicgroups, all three groups placed most importance on theesteem needs and self-actualization needs. The Chinesefemales scored the lowest for the Basic needs comparedto the Malay and Indian females. The Indian femalesscored the lowest for Social needs.Conclusion: Organisations should play an importantrole in the motivation of employees. Human resourcedevelopment is an integral part in the development ofits employees.

  4. Key factors in work engagement and job motivation of teaching faculty at a university medical centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, B A M; Bakker, Arnold B; Ten Cate, Th J

    2013-11-01

    This study reports about teacher motivation and work engagement in a Dutch University Medical Centre (UMC). We examined factors affecting the motivation for teaching in a UMC, the engagement of UMC Utrecht teaching faculty in their work, and their engagement in teaching compared with engagement in patient care and research. Based on a pilot study within various departments at the UMCU, a survey on teaching motivation and work engagement was developed and sent to over 600 UMCU teachers. About 50 % responded. Work engagement was measured by the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, included in this survey. From a list of 22 pre-defined items, 5 were marked as most motivating: teaching about my own speciality, noticeable appreciation for teaching by my direct superior, teaching small groups, feedback on my teaching performance, and freedom to determine what I teach. Feedback on my teaching performance showed the strongest predictive value for teaching engagement. Engagement scores were relatively favourable, but engagement with patient care was higher than with research and teaching. Task combinations appear to decrease teaching engagement. Our results match with self-determination theory and the job demands-resources model, and challenge the policy to combine teaching with research and patient care. PMID:24037742

  5. Mental health literacy towards depression among non-medical students at a Malaysian university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tahir M; Sulaiman, Syed A; Hassali, Mohamed A

    2010-03-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the knowledge and perception of depression among students of University Sains Malaysia (USM), in Penang, Peninsular Malaysia.Method Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a pre-validated 21-item questionnaire among students at USM.Results A total of 500 respondents participated in the survey comprising 24.6% (n=123) males and 75.4% (n=377) females. Half (50.0%, n=250) were Malays, followed by Chinese (44.0%, n=220) and Indians (6.0%, n=30). Whilst exploring the respondents' knowledge of the symptoms of depression, it was found that Chinese females had a comparatively better knowledge (P=0.058) of the symptoms of depression in comparison with Malays and Indians. Overall, social issues were attributed as the possible cause of depression. A cursory knowledge level was observed regarding medication for depression. Female students were more inclined towards the use of alternative and traditional medicines. However, with regard to seeking professional help, consultation with a psychiatrist was preferred by the majority.Conclusion Overall, a moderate level of knowledge about the symptoms of depression and a cursory knowledge of its therapy were observed. Those with personal experience of depression had better knowledge of the symptoms and therapy. Alternative treatments and traditional medicines were also favoured. There is a risk that this may affect the ability of Malaysian youths to seek evidence-based mental health care. PMID:22477920

  6. The Study of Relation of Happiness and Performance of Employees at Shahrood Medical Sciences University

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    Morad Ali Bagheri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Happiness and joy as one of the most important human psychological needs, has always occupied the human mind, because of its effect on formation of human personality and in generally on the whole of human life and creation of cheerfull organization is a strategic need for its long term success. The aim of the study was to investigate the relation of happiness and performance of employees at Shahrood Medical Sciences University.Methods: In this research, happiness in 10 key dimensions, including organizational learning, Self- disclosure, participation, organizational justice, positive thinking, flexible structure, meaning ful work, interesting work, security and interaction with colleagues, has been studied with the oxford happiness and hersey and gold smith questionnaire. Pearson correlation coefficient and multi linear regression statistical analysis is used for data analysis at software SPSS 19.Results: Results showed that there are significant correlation between organizational performance with participants with the correlation coefficient equal 0.87, interested in working (0.79, organizational learning (0.78 and justice whith (0.75, respectively, and the next rank is for happiness (0.73.Conclusion: According to the results, managers must look for practical and functional strategies to increase the level of gappiness of employees in which their performance will be imprived.

  7. Fauna aquatic insects in sewage maturation ponds of Kashan University of Medical Science 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Rouhollah; Miranzadeh, Mohhamad Bagher; Yosefzadeh, Mehrnoosh; Zamani, Soheyla

    2007-03-15

    Organic materials in maturation ponds, the personal study was carried out to determine the aquatic insects living in the maturation pond of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2005. This was a descriptive study, 9 series of sampling including 1032 of larva, nymph and adults were collected and sent to a laboratory. Then they were diagnosed using stereo microscope and morphologic identification key. At of 1032 collected samples from 4 maturation ponds, the orders if Diptera (52%), Hempitera (24%), Ciclopodidade (12%), Hydroacarina (9.5%), Coleptera (0.77%), Aranida (0.67%), Hymenoptera (0.58%), Odonata (0.48%), were determined. The families of Chironomidae and Culicidae from Diptera order, Corixidae, Notonectidae, Cupepodae and Copepodidae families from Hemiptera order, Hydrophilidae family from Coleptera order, Aranidae family from Aranida order, Vospidae family from Hymenoptera order, Anizoptera suborder from Odonata order were determined. Maturation ponds are the artificial places where are appropriate for the growth and development of aquatic insects and also for their predators with taking in to account that some of these insects are the carriers of pathogens, make inconvenience for human and also has significant role in the cycle of changing materials, it is recommended that further specialized studies carry out in this regard. PMID:19069891

  8. Key factors in work engagement and job motivation of teaching faculty at a university medical centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, B A M; Bakker, Arnold B; Ten Cate, Th J

    2013-11-01

    This study reports about teacher motivation and work engagement in a Dutch University Medical Centre (UMC). We examined factors affecting the motivation for teaching in a UMC, the engagement of UMC Utrecht teaching faculty in their work, and their engagement in teaching compared with engagement in patient care and research. Based on a pilot study within various departments at the UMCU, a survey on teaching motivation and work engagement was developed and sent to over 600 UMCU teachers. About 50 % responded. Work engagement was measured by the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, included in this survey. From a list of 22 pre-defined items, 5 were marked as most motivating: teaching about my own speciality, noticeable appreciation for teaching by my direct superior, teaching small groups, feedback on my teaching performance, and freedom to determine what I teach. Feedback on my teaching performance showed the strongest predictive value for teaching engagement. Engagement scores were relatively favourable, but engagement with patient care was higher than with research and teaching. Task combinations appear to decrease teaching engagement. Our results match with self-determination theory and the job demands-resources model, and challenge the policy to combine teaching with research and patient care.

  9. Internal Assessment of Department of Radiology at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences during 2011-2012

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    Farhad Nalini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of educational assessment is promoting the quality of education and efficiency in the educational system (1. In every educational system, keeping quality requires awareness of the strengths and weaknesses and measurement of the objectives (2.The internal assessment is carried out as an introduction to perform external assessment in order to do budgeting and ranking of universities. Therefore, in the past two decades different departments embarked on internal assessment (self-assessment (3. The result of the internal assessment of the internal department at Semnan University of Medical Sciences was reported as below average (4. Also, the findings of the internal assessment of the parasitology and mycology department at Urmieh University of Medical Sciences were favorable in terms of management, faculty members, education and students’ conditions. The indices of manpower and logistics, and educational and research facilities, however, were classified as rather favorable (5.The present study was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted according to the objective-based assessment model. The assessment factors comprised of educational objectives, managerial and organi-zational factors, faculty members, research activities, student, facilities and educational environment. First, the factors and indicators were determined and proper strategies to collect the data were unanimously agreed on. Then, the questionnaires and checklists were prepared and filled by the faculty members. The results in each domain were classified into three levels of favorable (the score higher than 75% out of total score, rather favorable (the score between 25% and 75% out of total score and unfavorable (the score lower than 25% out of total score. The data were collected and analyzed by descriptive statistics. The findings indicated that factors associated with management and organization and faculty member domains were in favorable condition (72%, research

  10. Perceptions of students in different phases of medical education of the educational environment: Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin

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    Rahman NIA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nor Iza A Rahman, Aniza Abd Aziz, Zainal Zulkifli, Muhammad Arshad Haj, Farah Hanani Binti Mohd Nasir, Sharvina Pergalathan, Muhammad Ismail Hamidi, Salwani Ismail, Nordin Bin Simbak, Mainul Haque Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia Background: The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM was planned and designed to quantify the educational environment precisely for medical schools and health-related professional schools. DREEM is now considered a valid and reliable tool, which is globally accepted for measuring the medical educational environment. The educational environment encountered by students has an impact on satisfaction with the course of study, perceived sense of well-being, aspirations, and academic achievement. In addition to being measurable, the educational environment can also be changed, thus enhancing the quality of medical education and the environment, and the medical education process. The objective of this study was to assess the educational environment of the Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA undergraduate medical program from the students’ perspective. The study expected to explore UniSZA medical students’ overall perceptions, perceptions of learning, teachers, atmosphere, academic self-perception, and social self-perception using the DREEM questionnaire. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted to study the perceptions of the students toward the educational environment of UniSZA as a new medical school, using the DREEM questionnaire. All medical students of UniSZA from Years I–V enrolled in the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery programs were the target population (n=270. Therefore, the universal sampling technique was used. The data were analyzed using the SPSS 20 software. This study obtained ethical clearance from the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UniSZA. Results: A total of 195 out of 270 students responded

  11. Self-medication in university students from the city of Rio Grande, Brazil

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    Corrêa da Silva Marília

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-medication is the use of medication without prescription, orientation, or supervision of a physician or dentist. Self-medication might become a serious health problem. The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence and factors associated with self-medication among first and last-year students enrolled in healthcare and non-healthcare programs. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Of 830 students in the sample, 95% answered the questionnaire – 789 students enrolled in 10 undergraduate programs. Mean age was 22 ± 6.17 years. The students answered a questionnaire covering socio-economic and demographic variables, use of medication, and medication knowledge. Information was collected on the conditions treated with medication, the medications used, and attitude towards self-medication. Results Of 789 students, 86.4% self-medicated (88.5% of 446 healthcare students. There were no significant differences in self-medication between healthcare and non-healthcare students, nor between first and last-year students. Bivariate and multivariate analyses showed a significant association between self-medication and having children (p = 0.01, having a home pharmacy (p p = 0.01. The most frequently used active ingredients were acetaminophen (paracetamol, dipyrone, aspirin, phytotherapic compounds, and tea. Illicit drug use was significantly associated with self-medication in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion The fact that being a healthcare student was associated with higher medication knowledge, but not with less self-medication, suggests that medication knowledge might contribute to increase self-medication. This should be taken into account when designing educational interventions relating to self-medication.

  12. Curriculum design of emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences

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    Alanazi AF

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah Foraih AlanaziCollege of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: The emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, was adapted from the integrated problem-based learning curriculum of Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss the major adaptations required for adoption of the full-fledged PBL curriculum, use of sequential blocks, and multilayer alignment of the curriculum.Methods: A logical model and step-by-step approach were used to design the curriculum. Several studies using Delphi methods, focus group interviews, and expert opinions were performed to identify the priority health problems; related competencies, learning objectives, and learning strategies; the web-based curriculum for delivery; student assessment; and program evaluation.Results: Sixty priority health problems were identified for inclusion in different blocks of the curriculum. Identified competencies matched the satisfaction of different stakeholders, and ascertained learning objectives and strategies were aligned with the competencies. A full-fledged web-based curriculum was designed and an assessment was created that aligned with a blueprint of the objectives and the mode of delivery.Conclusion: Step-by-step design ensures the multilayer alignment of the curriculum, including priority health problems, competencies, objectives, student assessment, and program evaluation.Keywords: emergency medical services, problem-based learning, logical model, step-by-step approach, multilayer alignment

  13. Accreditation of Emergency Department at a Teaching Hospital in Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2010

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    Fereshteh Farzianpour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Considering the importance of emergency departments in healthcare system and the high mortality rate of patients referred to these departments, it is crucial to provide quality services in emergency departments. Accreditation is a systematic process for improving quality of care and it enables managers to assess and evaluate the healthcare system. Accreditation of an organization provides an obvious commitment for improving quality of safety, quality of patient care, ensuring safety surveillance and continuous activities for reducing dangers which threaten patients and staff. Therefore, given the vital role as well as and the perpetual and indispensable service provided by the emergency departments, it is necessary to re-evaluate the manner of service provision in these departments according to the standards and criteria of accreditation, so that an observance of these criteria will lead to improvement of emergency medicine in Iran. Thus, the present study was undertaken with the purpose of accreditation of emergency department of a teaching hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences according to the standards of Iranian Deputy of Health and the JCI. Approach: This is a descriptive-analytic study with a cross-sectional structure. Our study population consisted of 50 individuals of the healthcare staff (physicians and nurses working in morning and evening work shifts of the emergency department in the teaching hospital. Data collection tools consisted of standard questionnaires of the Deputy of Health (9 series and questionnaires developed by authors based on the standards of the Joint Commission International (JCI regarding patient satisfaction with services provided in emergency departments. In order to determine the reliability and validity of the data collection tools, professors and experts reviewed the questionnaire of quality and patient safety in accordance with standards of quality patient safety from the

  14. A systematic approach of tracking and reporting medication errors at a tertiary care university hospital, Karachi, Pakistan

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    Khurshid Khowaja

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Khurshid Khowaja1, Rozmin Nizar1, Rashida J Merchant2, Jacqueline Dias3, Irma Bustamante-Gavino4, Amina Malik11Division of Nursing Services, 2Nursing Education Services, 3Diploma Programme, Nurudin Jivraj Professorship of Nursing, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan; 4The Ahmed Shivji Professorship of Nursing, The Aga Khan University School of Nursing, Karachi, PakistanIntroduction: Administering medication is one of the high risk areas for any health professional. It is a multidisciplinary process, which begins with the doctor’s prescription, followed by review and provision by a pharmacist, and ends with preparation and administration by a nurse. Several studies have highlighted a high medication incident rate at several healthcare institutions.Methods: Our study design was exploratory and evaluative and used methodological triangulation. Sample size was of two types. First, a convenient sample of 1000 medication dosages to estimate the medication error (95% CI. We took another sample from subjects involved in medication usage processes such as physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and patients. Two sets of instruments were designed via extensive literature review: a medication tracking error form and a focus group interview questionnaire.Results: Our study findings revealed 100% compliance with a computerized physician order entry (CPOE system by physicians, nurses, and pharmacists. The main error rate was 5.5% and pharmacists contributed an higher error rate of 2.6% followed by nurses (1.1% and physicians (1%. Major areas for improvement in error rates were identified: delay in medication delivery, lab results reviewed electronically before prescription, dispension, and administration.Keywords: medication error rate, associate error rate, physician, nurse, pharmacist

  15. Qualitative evaluation of general practitioner training program as viewed by graduates from Shiraz, Fasa and Jahrom Medical Universities

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    FATEMEH SHAHIDI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The majority of countries have brought the quality of higher education into focus in the past few years. They have tried to improve the quality of their own higher education. The studies show that Iranian Universities are not at an accepted level in terms of quality. They have encountered several problems which have diminished their quality level. This study aimed at assessing the quality of medical education program as viewed by general practitioners graduated from Shiraz, Fasa and Jahrom Medical Universities. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. 215 subjects were selected based on a census of all the general practitioners graduated from Shiraz, Fasa and Jahrom Universities during 2011- 2013. The questionnaire used for collecting the data was that of the Association of Graduates from American Medical Colleges. The collected data were then analyzed using SPSS 14 through which such descriptive and bivariate statistics as percentage, means, Standard Deviation and ANOVA were used. The level of significance was set to 0.05. Results: The questionnaire return rate was 97%. As to the graduates’ preclinical experiences, five indices were studied which were assessed as “average” in graduates’ views. However, with respect to their clinical experiences five indices were equally studied, among which such indices as “Communication” were evaluated as “desirable” in view of the graduates from the very three universities. On the contrary, the quality of clinical experiences and technological skills was evaluated as “almost weak”; furthermore, the integration of basic science with required clinical experience was also considered “weak”. Conclusion: It seems essential to set up an annual assessment of general practitioner education program and a review of the medical education program in Iran based on the global medical advancement and international standards.

  16. Self-medication in university students from the city of Rio Grande, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Corrêa da Silva Marília; Soares Maria Cristina; Muccillo-Baisch Ana

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Self-medication is the use of medication without prescription, orientation, or supervision of a physician or dentist. Self-medication might become a serious health problem. The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence and factors associated with self-medication among first and last-year students enrolled in healthcare and non-healthcare programs. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), state of Rio Grande do S...

  17. Development and evaluation of a community immersion program during preclinical medical studies: a 15-year experience at the University of Geneva Medical School

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    Chastonay P

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available P Chastonay,1,2 V Zesiger,1 A Klohn,1 L Soguel,3 E K Mpinga,1,4 NV Vu,2 L Bernheim5 1Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, 2Unit of Development and Research in Medical Education, University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, 3Nutrition and Dietetics Department, University of Applied Sciences, Geneva, 4Swiss School of Public Health, Zurich, 5Department of Neurosciences, University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland Background: Significant changes in medical education have occurred in recent decades because of new challenges in the health sector and new learning theories and practices. This might have contributed to the decision of medical schools throughout the world to adopt community-based learning activities. The community-based learning approach has been promoted and supported by the World Health Organization and has emerged as an efficient learning strategy. The aim of the present paper is to describe the characteristics of a community immersion clerkship for third-year undergraduate medical students, its evolution over 15 years, and an evaluation of its outcomes. Methods: A review of the literature and consensus meetings with a multidisciplinary group of health professionals were used to define learning objectives and an educational approach when developing the program. Evaluation of the program addressed students' perception, achievement of learning objectives, interactions between students and the community, and educational innovations over the years. Results: The program and the main learning objectives were defined by consensus meetings among teaching staff and community health workers, which strengthened the community immersion clerkship. Satisfaction, as monitored by a self-administered questionnaire in successive cohorts of students, showed a mean of 4.4 on a five-point scale. Students also mentioned community immersion clerkship as a unique community experience. The learning objectives were reached by a

  18. Prevalence of depressive symptoms and its correlates among medical students in China: a national survey in 33 universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiong-Fei; Wen, Ying; Zhao, Yun; Hu, Jun-Mei; Li, Si-Qi; Zhang, Shao-Kai; Li, Xiang-Yun; Chang, Hong; Xue, Qing-Ping; Zhao, Zhi-Mei; Gu, Yan; Li, Chang-Chang; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Sun, Xiao-Wei; Yang, Chun-Xia; Fu, Christine

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a national survey among medical students in China to estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms and explore associated risk factors based on an established questionnaire composed of demographic information, life events in the past four weeks before survey, and the validated Chinese version of the 21-item Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). The mean age of enrolled 9010 students was 20.7 (standard deviation: 1.6) years. BDI scores indicated that 19.9% had depressive symptoms based on the cut-off score of 14. Socioeconomic factors and student characteristics such as male sex, low monthly income per capita, father's poor education background, and higher year of study were associated with higher prevalence of depressive symptoms among medical students. Students who studied in comprehensive universities were more likely to have depressive symptoms compared with those from medical universities. Habitual smoking and alcohol drinking, sleep deprivation, and hospitalization or medication for one week or more in the last four weeks also predisposed students to higher risk of depressive symptoms. Our results indicate that depressive symptoms are becoming a highly prevalent health problem among Chinese medical students. Primary and secondary prevention should be prioritized to tackle this issue based on potential risk factors. PMID:26691910

  19. The summer school students’ viewpoints about important factors in learning, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

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    LEILA BAZRAFCAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The main goal of education is learning and change in behavior which has been revolutionized in the 21st century due to the rapid and widespread changes in science. The traditional approach to education does no longer meet the learners’ needs, necessitating new changes in educational curricula. This study was designed to determine the factors influencing learning in the 21st century and find out the students’ viewpoints on this issue. Methods: This is a descriptive study aiming at determining the students’ views on new approaches to learning in the 21st century. To do so, a researcher-made questionnaire was designed. It contained 30 questions in 3 sections including demographic data, background questions and two open questions about their suggestions and criticisms. The reliability and validity of the questionnaire was pilot-tested and measured, which proved to be describable. 150 students participating in university summer schools in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences were enrolled. The questionnaires were sent to the students in person and through electronic mails. The students were asked to return the completed questionnaires to the given email address. The data were analyzed in SPSS, version 14, using descriptive statistics of frequency, mean, percentage and standard deviation and t-test. P<0. 05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: 150 questionnaires were appropriately filled out and given to the researchers. The results indicated that, according to the students, 6 factors including the use of computer in teaching, enhancement of virtual learning, the use of mobile in relations, enjoyment of electronic learning contexts, the learning focus on attitudes and the facilitating role of the lectures were the most influential factors in learning. On the other hand, the government’s responsibility and responsiveness, creativity and risk taking, increase in the social relationship among the learners, focus on

  20. Performance evaluation of non-incineration treatment facilities for disinfection of medical infectious and sharps wastes in educational hospitals of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in 2013

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    Anooshiravan Mohseni Band-pay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2007, a rule prohibiting the use of incinerators was ratified by the Iranian Islamic Parliament. Based on this rule, the Ministry of Health emphasized the sterilization of infectious waste at its production source by means of non-incineration equipment and methods. This research examined the performance of non-incineration technologies in treating medical infectious and sharps wastes at educational hospitals affiliated with Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in 12 educational hospitals of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. First, a questionnaire was designed and its validity approved. Then the required data was gathered during visits to participating hospitals. Finally, the collected data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel and SPSS version 16. Results: Findings showed that the daily production of infectious and sharps wastes in the studied hospitals generally equaled 3387 kg. All hospitals were equipped with non-incineration systems; however, only 83.3% of them were active. Some infectious waste was disposed of along with urban wastes without being sterilized. Monthly biological assessments of treatment equipment were implemented for only 41.7% of the equipment. Conclusion: The failures of the non-incineration systems demand that appropriate investigations be conducted prior to the purchase of these devices. Monthly biological assessments are essential to ensure the accuracy of the systems’ performance in hospitals.

  1. Genetics in medical school curriculum: A look at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deanne M. ROBINSON; Chin-To FONG

    2008-01-01

    Genetics is assuming an increasingly important role in medicine. As a result, the teaching of genetics should also be increased proportionally to ensure that future physicians will be able to take advantage of the new genetic technology, and to understand the associated ethical, legal and social issues. At the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, we have been able to incorporate genetic education into a four-year medical curriculum in a fully integrated fashion. This model may serve as a template for other medical curriculum still in development.

  2. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 6: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. This report addresses the Department of Environmental Health Science, education and training initiative.

  3. Department of Pediatric Disease, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Isfahan

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    R IRAN POUR

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. All neonates should be screened for congenital hypothyroidism in the first week of their lives. To evaluate the reliability of thyroid function tests in neonates who undergone exchange transfusion (ET, we studied the alteration of thyroid hormones after ET in neonates. Methods. Eighteen full term neonates (gestation age> 37 weeks undergoing ET due to heperbilirubinemia at neonatal wards of AI-Zahra and Shahid-Beheshti hospitals (affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences were studied. All ETs were performed using a double volume exchange of adult donor blood. The age of subjects was five days or more. The patients had not Rh disease and seemed well. Thyroid function was evaluated before the exchange (pre-ET, at the conclusion of the ET (post-ET and seven days later (by assessment of T3, T4, TSH. Results. The mean pre-ET, T4 and TSH concentrations were significantly higher than in donor blood. The mean pre-ET, T3 concentration was not statistically different from donor blood. At the end of exchange (post-ET, the mean T4 and TSH concentrations dropped and statistically differed from pre-ET values, whereas the mean post-ET, T 4 and TSH were still significantly higher than the donor blood. The post-ET value was not significantly different from pre-ET, T3 and T3 of donor blood. After 7 days, T 4 and TSH concentrations increased and statistically reached to pre-ET, T 4 and TSH but at this time the mean T3 concentration was significantly higher than pre-ET value. Discussion. There was significant decrease in concentrations of T 4 and TSH at the end of ET but no difference at seven days later. Therefore, we suggest that the screening of congenital hypothyroidism should be performed either before the ET or after one-week Post Exchange transfusion.

  4. ANTIHYPERTENSIVE MEDICATION PRESCRIBING PATTERNS IN A UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL IN SOUTH DELHI

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    Fowad Khurshid et al.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Study objective: To investigate the use of antihypertensive drugs in hypertensive patients and to identify whether such pattern of prescription is appropriate in accordance with international guidelines for management of hypertension. Methods: This was a prospective analysis. A prescription based survey among patients with established hypertension was conducted at the Medicine Out-Patient Department of University Teaching Hospital in South Delhi, India. Data were collected from patients’ medical records as well as patients’ interviews.Results: A total of 192 hypertensive patients fulfilled the criteria for inclusion in the study analysis. Combination therapy was used more commonly than monotherapy (54.6% vs 45.4. Among the monotherapy category, the various classes of drugs used were as follows: beta- blockers (28.8%, diuretics (24.1%, calcium channel blockers (21.8%, ACE inhibitors (18.4%, angiotensin II receptor blockers (5.7% and α 1- blocker (1.1%. With respect to overall utilization pattern, diuretics (42.2% were the most frequently prescribed class, beta- blockers (41.2% ranked second followed by calcium channel blockers (39.1%, ACE inhibitors (26.0%, angiotensin II receptor blockers (23.4% and α 1- blocker (9.4%. As for individual medicines, amlodipine (35.4% was the most commonly prescribed antihypertensive drug followed by atenolol (17.8%, ramipril (17.2 % and furosemide (13.0 %. Among the combination therapies, 2- drug treatment was preferred for 75% of the hypertensive patients with CCB and β-blocker being the most frequent drug combination (22.4%.Conclusion: The general pattern of antihypertensive utilization seems to be in accordance with the international guidelines for management of hypertension.

  5. Drug prescription based on WHO indicators: Tehran university of medical sciences facilities with pharmacy

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    Mosleh A.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rationalize of drug use in societies is one of the main responsibilities of health policy makers. In our country irrational use of dugs has increased in the recent years, for example one study in 1998 has shown that average number of medicines per prescription was 3.6, percentage of prescriptions containing antibiotics was 43% and percentage of prescriptions containing Injections was 39%. One of the best tools for evaluation of drug use is the WHO guideline for calculating prescribing indicators. In this study, we had an assessment about prescribing patterns in South of Tehran, Islamshahr and Rey Health Centers.Methods: In order to evaluating prescribing indicators in Tehran University of Medical Sciences region 35 facilities which had pharmacy were selected according to WHO gridline and 4190 prescription from these facilities were studied. Indicators were calculated according to formulas has explained in article. Results: The average number of drug per prescription was 2.58, percentage of drug prescribed by generic name: 99.8%, percentage of encounters prescribed Antibiotics: 62.39% percentage of encounters prescribed Injection: 28.96% & the percentage of drugs prescribed from PHC formulary 99.46%. These findings were almost similar in the three Health Centers.Conclusions: Health facilities are one of the most important bases to improve rational use of Drugs and general practitioners are the major chain in RUD cycle. Results show that we need to design intervention especially educational interventions to improve two WHO prescribing indicators, percentage of encounters prescribed Antibiotics & Injections in this region. For reaching this goals we need to design educational programs for physicians, pharmacists and people too. These educations can be as workshops, seminars, conferences or printed materials such as books, leaflets and etc.

  6. Radiation survey on Fukushima Medical University premises about four years after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Yasutaka; Wakamatsu, Hiroaki; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted on the Fukushima Medical University (FMU) premises (in Fukushima City, Fukushima Prefecture) about four years after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Its objectives were (1) to create a map of the ambient gamma dose rate (air-kerma rate) distribution, (2) to evaluate the air-kerma rate originating from natural radionuclides, and (3) to investigate the effects of snow cover on changes in the air-kerma rate. This man-borne survey revealed that the air-kerma rate varies widely, ranging from 0.038 μGy h(-1) to 0.520 μGy h(-1), and is higher on grass than on the other investigated surface types, such as soil, asphalt, and bricks. In this area, the mean air-kerma rate from natural radiation was evaluated to be 0.03 ± 0.01 μGy h(-1), which is close to 0.04 μGy h(-1), which was measured in central Fukushima City by a local authority.Furthermore, snowfall was found to reduce the air-kerma rate by 5%-30%. This reduction was attributed to attenuation of the primary radiation while passing through the snow cover, and the measured contribution of scattered radiation to the air-kerma rate reduction was small. The reduction rate was found to depend on the initial snow depth but to maintain a similar value for a couple of days, after the snow had partially melted and its depth had decreased. Finally, analysis of the daily dose due to external exposure received on the FMU premises revealed that no further health effects due to chronic radiation exposure at this site are to be expected.

  7. Radiation survey on Fukushima Medical University premises about four years after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Yasutaka; Wakamatsu, Hiroaki; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted on the Fukushima Medical University (FMU) premises (in Fukushima City, Fukushima Prefecture) about four years after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Its objectives were (1) to create a map of the ambient gamma dose rate (air-kerma rate) distribution, (2) to evaluate the air-kerma rate originating from natural radionuclides, and (3) to investigate the effects of snow cover on changes in the air-kerma rate. This man-borne survey revealed that the air-kerma rate varies widely, ranging from 0.038 μGy h(-1) to 0.520 μGy h(-1), and is higher on grass than on the other investigated surface types, such as soil, asphalt, and bricks. In this area, the mean air-kerma rate from natural radiation was evaluated to be 0.03 ± 0.01 μGy h(-1), which is close to 0.04 μGy h(-1), which was measured in central Fukushima City by a local authority.Furthermore, snowfall was found to reduce the air-kerma rate by 5%-30%. This reduction was attributed to attenuation of the primary radiation while passing through the snow cover, and the measured contribution of scattered radiation to the air-kerma rate reduction was small. The reduction rate was found to depend on the initial snow depth but to maintain a similar value for a couple of days, after the snow had partially melted and its depth had decreased. Finally, analysis of the daily dose due to external exposure received on the FMU premises revealed that no further health effects due to chronic radiation exposure at this site are to be expected. PMID:26911302

  8. Determinants of Educational Service Quality in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences using Servqual and Kano Models

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    Hamed Rahimi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The quality of education sector is worth considering as this system has a significant effect on the economic growth of the country. This study aimed to determine the quality gap and rank the student’s expectation of educational services provided in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Method: This research included two cross-sectional phases. The sample size of both phases included 220 students selected using multistage sampling. Servqual questionnaire was used in the first study which was designed to find the quality gap of the education system’s services. The data were entered into the SPSS statistical software and analyzed using descriptive statistics and Paired-Sample T-Test. Kano’s two-dimensional questionnaire was used in the second phase. Each indicator of quality which had a negative gap at a significance level of 5% in the first study was introduced to Kano’s two-dimensional questionnaire. Finally, better value and worse value formulas were used to analyze the data obtained in this step. Results: The results revealed that all quality items had a significance negative gap which were recognized as the voice of customers (P<0.05. Frequency analysis was done to determine the frequency of repetition. Accordingly, 11 out of the 30 requirements were identified as must be requirements and 19 as one-dimensional requirements. Conclusion: This study can help the authorities prioritize their policies, strategies and decisions in order to improve and guarantee the higher education quality and extremity obtains customer satisfaction.

  9. Evaluating the immunity against hepatitis B virus among Yasuj University of Medical Sciences students-2014

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    F Tarkhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim:  Hepatitis B virus vaccination, Ab titer of particular importance in health care workers is high. Due to the fact that the rate of immunization against the disease is not directly measurable, the presence of detectable levels of antibody in the serum of the vaccinated individual, the individual's immunity against disease is considered to be equivalent. The aim of this study was to evaluating the immunity against hepatitis B virus among Yasuj University of Medical Sciences students. Methods: In this cross - sectional study using purposive sampling 120 students input 2007-2010 were selected. After completing a questionnaire including demographic information and immunization records 5 ml of blood was taken. After separating serum using an ELISA kit specific antibody levels were measured against hepatitis B virus. The data collected was analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi-square test and analysis of variance. Results: In 74.16% of students the specific IgG Ab against the hepatitis B virus surface Ag were more than 20 IU/L, which is secure and in 19.16% of  them the Ab titer was below 10 IU/L which is non immune and  in 6.68% of students the Ab titer was between 10-20 IU/L that were borderline. Also in those who had received complete vaccination, immunization rates were     96.67 %. Conclusion: This study showed if vaccination against hepatitis B was complete, would be a high degree of immunity.

  10. Gamma irradiation and red cell haemolysis: a study at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Rabeya; Mobin, Mohd Herman; Leong, Chooi Fun

    2015-08-01

    Gamma-irradiation of blood components is regarded a safe procedure used for prevention of transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease. However, reports showed that irradiation can cause erythrocyte haemolysis and damage to the RBC membrane. In University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC), a number of suspected transfusion reactions (TR) featured unusual isolated episodes of red-coloured-urine or haemoglobinuria among paediatric patients without clinical features of acute haemolytic TR. Haemolysis of irradiated red cells was suspected as a cause. This study was conducted to evaluate haemolytic changes of RBC components following irradiation. A prospective, pre- and post- irradiation comparative study was conducted on 36 paired RBC-components in the blood-bank, UKMMC in the year 2013. Samples were tested for plasma-Hb, percent-haemolysis, plasma-potassium (K⁺) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level. Post-irradiation mean plasma-Hb and percent-haemolysis were significantly higher than pre-irradiation values at 0.09 ±0.06g/dl VS 0.10 ± 0.06g/dl and 0.19 ± 0.13% VS 0.22 ± .13% respectively, while plasma-K⁺ and LDH values did not show significant difference. However, the mean percent-haemolysis level was still within recommended acceptable levels for clinical use, supporting that irradiated RBC units were safe and of acceptable quality for transfusion. There was no conclusive reason for isolated haemoglobinuria following transfusion of irradiated red-cell products. Further research is suggested to investigate the other possible causes. PMID:26277664

  11. Poorer verbal working memory for a second language selectively impacts academic achievement in university medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Collette; Canny, Benedict J; Reser, David H; Rajan, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    results showing that the variance in SNR50 was significantly predicted by this model (r (2) = 0.335). Hierarchical multiple regression was then used to test the ability of three independent variable measures (SNR50, age of acquisition of English and English proficiency) to predict academic performance as the dependent variable in a factor analysis model which predicted significant performance differences in an assessment requiring communications skills (p = 0.008), but not on a companion assessment requiring knowledge of procedural skills, or other assessments requiring factual knowledge. Thus, impaired vWM for an L2 appears to affect specific communications-based assessments in university medical students. PMID:23638357

  12. Poorer verbal working memory for a second language selectively impacts academic achievement in university medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collette Mann

    2013-02-01

    carried out to assess the relationship between language proficiency and verbal working memory (SNR50 using 5 variables of L2 proficiency, with the results showing that the variance in SNR50 was significantly predicted by this model (r2 = 0.335. Hierarchical multiple regression was then used to test the ability of three independent variable measures (SNR50 , age of acquisition of English and English proficiency to predict academic performance as the dependent variable in a factor analysis model which predicted significant performance differences in an assessment requiring communications skills (p = 0.008, but not on a companion assessment requiring knowledge of procedural skills, or other assessments requiring factual knowledge. Thus, impaired vWM for an L2 appears to affect specific communications-based assessments in university medical students.

  13. Die Fachbibliothek Medizin (FBMed am Universitätsklinikum Essen / The Medical Branch Library at the University Hospital Essen

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    Wibker, Katrin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The branch library ‘Medizin’ provides the faculty of medicine and the university hospital (about 943 professors and scientific assistants; about 1665 medical students with literature and information and fulfils important tasks regarding research, teaching and patient care.Along with matters of use of the library (lending, advice, interlibrary loan, reserved semester collections, training courses, there is also certain work concerning the processing of literature (for example acquisition and binding of journals that is carried out on the spot. Furthermore the branch library ‘Medizin’ looks after and advises several libraries in various institutes of the university hospital.

  14. Research barriers from the viewpoint of faculty members and students of Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Iran, 2014

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    Esmaeil Farzaneh

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Organizational barriers and personal barriers have an important role in doing the research in the Medical Sciences University of Ardabil; these barriers can be passed through. The availability of consulting forces and sufficient and necessary counseling, teaching know-how and attitude correction, compensating the lack of facilities and equipment, creating the motivation by the authorities and educating and empowering as executive working procedures are recommended for overcoming the research barriers in the universities. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 1926-1932

  15. [Bioethics in medical institutions--new custom or help? The example of clinical ethics consultation at a University Medical Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, G

    2014-08-01

    Although ethics committees are well established in the medical sciences for human clinical trials, animal research and scientific integrity, the development of clinical ethics in German hospitals started much later during the first decade of the twenty-first century. Clinical ethics consultation should be pragmatic and problem-centered and can be defined as an ethically qualified and informed conflict management within a given legal framework to deal with and resolve value-driven, normative problems in the care of patients. Clinical ethics consultations enable shared clinical decision-making of all parties (e.g. clinicians, patients, family and surrogates) involved in a particular patient's care. The clinical ethicist does not act as an ethics expert by making independent recommendations or decisions; therefore, the focus is different from other medical consultants. Ethics consultation was first established by healthcare ethics committees (HEC) or clinical ethics consultation (CEC) groups which were called in to respond to an ethically problematic situation. To avoid ethical dilemmas or crises and to act preventively with regard to ethical issues in individual patients, an ethics liaison service is an additional option to ethics case consultations which take place on a regular basis by scheduled ethics rounds during the normal ward rounds. The presence of the ethicist offers some unique advantages: it allows early recognition of even minor ethical problems and accommodates the dynamics of ethical and clinical goal-setting in the course of patient care. Most importantly, regular and non-authoritative participation of the ethicist in normal ward rounds allows continuous ethical education of the staff within the everyday clinical routine. By facilitating clinical ethical decision-making, the ethicist seeks to empower physicians and medical staff to deal appropriately with ethical problems by themselves. Because of this proactive approach, the ethics liaison service

  16. Nivel de conocimientos sobre emergencias médicas en estudiantes de medicina de universidades peruanas Level of knowledge in medical emergencies among medical students of peruvian universities

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    Christian R. Mejia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos. Evaluar el nivel de conocimientos de los estudiantes de medicina de once universidades peruanas sobre emergencias médicas. Materiales y métodos. Estudio transversal analítico, multicéntrico desarrollado entre 2007- 2008. Se utilizó un cuestionario de respuesta nominal autoaplicado con preguntas socio-educativas y diez de opción múltiple sobre emergencias médicas. Se obtuvo una muestra no probabilística de los matriculados en universidades participantes. Se obtuvieron el chi-cuadrado, los OR crudos y ajustados, con intervalos de confianza al 95% y análisis multivariado posterior. Resultados. Participaron 2109 estudiantes de medicina, la edad promedio fue 21 años (rango: 15-32, el 51% de género masculino. El 53% habían realizado un curso previo relacionado con emergencias médicas. El 60,4% desaprobó el cuestionario, la nota promedio fue 4,95 sobre 10 puntos posibles y 5,9% obtuvieron de 8-10 puntos. Se encontró una fuerte asociación entre la universidad de procedencia (OR: 0,45, IC95% 0,38-0,54, la etapa académica (OR: 1,55, IC95% 1,28-1,87, cuándo recibieron un curso del tema (OR: 0,62, IC95% 0,50-0,77 y el género (OR: 1,38, IC95% 1,15-1,65. Conclusiones. El nivel de conocimiento sobre emergencias médicas de los estudiantes de las once universidades evaluadas no es bueno, se sugiere evaluar y mejorar la formación práctica que brindan las universidades en temas de manejo de emergencias médicas.Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge about medical emergencies of medical students from eleven Peruvian universities. Materials and methods. Multicenter, cross-sectional study, conducted between 2007- 2008. We used a nominal response, self-administered questionnaire with socio-educational questions and ten multiple choice questions on medical emergencies. We obtained a nonrandom sample of participants enrolled in universities. We obtained the chi2, crude and adjusted ORs with 95% confidence

  17. Study of Patterns and Subjective Quality of Sleep and Their Correlation with Personality Traits among Medical Students of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences

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    A. Farhadi Nasab

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Sleep quality can affect human health and daily function. On the other hand, every person has relatively stable personality trait which lives with and has occupational, social and interpersonal interaction. Regarding the importance of sleep quality, and because less considerations have been devoted to correlation between sleep disturbances and personality traits, the present investigation was done. The purpose of this study was to determine personality traits and sleep patterns among medical students in Hamadan medical university and the relationship between traits inquestion sleep patterns as well. Materials & Methods: This descriptive and Cross – Sectional study involving 150 randomly selected medical students. Pittsburgh questionnaire, MMPI and a checking list for demographic information were employed. Data processing and statistical analysis were performed using SPSS10.Results: The findings of this study have showed that 48 percent of our cases have suffered from sleep disturbances. The number of personality traits such as narcissistic, histrionic and borderline (cluster B observed among students had greater frequencies than other traits. The average of night and day sleep time was 8.95±2.01. No meaningful correlation has been found between sleep disturbances and personality traits in our cases.Conclusion: A great number of medical students suffer from sleep disturbances, because it may highly affect student’s health and their daily function. More and wider studies should be done.

  18. [The concept of the organ, as a hierarchal unit of human body, and its place in teaching histology at the medical university and medical college].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miadelets, O D; Miadelets, N Ia; Miadelets, V O

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the methodological aspects of teaching histology at the medical university and medical college. The authors raise the issue of the necessity of teaching of the topic "Introduction to Special Histology" and the inclusion of the appropriate chapter into the textbooks. This is important for the students, as the formation of the general concepts of organ structure and function, components, and classification will aid in the further study of specific organs during the course of Special Histology. The authors describe their own experience in teaching of the section, dedicated to the general regularities of organ structure, present some definitions and classifications that are used by them for a number of years.

  19. Sexism and anatomy, as discerned in textbooks and as perceived by medical students at Cardiff University and University of Paris Descartes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Susan; Plaisant, Odile; Lignier, Baptiste; Moxham, Bernard J

    2014-03-01

    Contemporary textbooks of anatomy and surface anatomy were evaluated to ascertain whether they were gender-neutral. The evidence of this, and previous studies, suggests that, both in terms of imagery and text, many textbooks lack neutrality. To further investigate such matters, we provided second-year medical students studying at Cardiff University (n = 293) and at the Paris Descartes University (n = 142) during the 2011-2012 academic year with a questionnaire inviting them to address the possibility that social/gender factors hinder the dispassionate representation of anatomy. Ethical approval was obtained from both Cardiff and Paris universities. Eighty-six percent of the students at Cardiff and 39% at Paris Descartes responded and provided data for analysis. The hypothesis tested is that medical students perceive a gender bias that is reflected in the books they read and the tuition they receive. Our findings suggest that, while students recognise the importance of gender issues and do not wish to associate with sexism, most are unaware of the possible negative aspects of sexism within anatomy. In this respect, the findings do not support our hypothesis. Nevertheless, we recommended that teachers of anatomy and authors of anatomy textbooks should be aware of the possibility of adverse effects on professional matters relating to equality and diversity issues. PMID:23781866

  20. Sexism and anatomy, as discerned in textbooks and as perceived by medical students at Cardiff University and University of Paris Descartes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Susan; Plaisant, Odile; Lignier, Baptiste; Moxham, Bernard J

    2014-03-01

    Contemporary textbooks of anatomy and surface anatomy were evaluated to ascertain whether they were gender-neutral. The evidence of this, and previous studies, suggests that, both in terms of imagery and text, many textbooks lack neutrality. To further investigate such matters, we provided second-year medical students studying at Cardiff University (n = 293) and at the Paris Descartes University (n = 142) during the 2011-2012 academic year with a questionnaire inviting them to address the possibility that social/gender factors hinder the dispassionate representation of anatomy. Ethical approval was obtained from both Cardiff and Paris universities. Eighty-six percent of the students at Cardiff and 39% at Paris Descartes responded and provided data for analysis. The hypothesis tested is that medical students perceive a gender bias that is reflected in the books they read and the tuition they receive. Our findings suggest that, while students recognise the importance of gender issues and do not wish to associate with sexism, most are unaware of the possible negative aspects of sexism within anatomy. In this respect, the findings do not support our hypothesis. Nevertheless, we recommended that teachers of anatomy and authors of anatomy textbooks should be aware of the possibility of adverse effects on professional matters relating to equality and diversity issues.

  1. The Dispersal of High Risk Sexual Behaviors in Different Occupations of People Referred to Council Center of Shiraz Medical University

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    Pezhman Bagheri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: High risk sexual behaviors endanger young people and adolescents to HIV infection and other sexual diseases. The objective of this study was to assess the dispersal of high risk sexual behaviors in different in our referred patients to council center of Shiraz medical university.Materials and Method: This descriptive, cross sectional study was done between 2004-2009 years on referred people to council center of Shiraz medical university by census method.Results: Maximum prevalence of high risk sexual behaviors observed in women’s barber (36%, unemployed individuals (9.51% and painters (8.53%; and the maximum referred pepole observed in drivers (28.81%, unemployed individuals (22.93% and school students (14.15%.Conclusions: Totally, according to our results, we can conclude that media and health ministry must be looking for different socio-economic groups and occupations providing special training structure

  2. [Ways of spending free time by students of the Medical University of Gdansk in relation to their health behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdak-Haasa, Ewa; Zarzeczna-Baran, Marzena; Pegiel-Kamrat, Jolanta

    2002-01-01

    Problems connected with the issue of free time are the field of interest for social, and medical scientists and economists. Medical students are perceived by others as well as by themselves as the group with free time deficiency. An inquiry was conducted on subject of some aspects of free time and healthy lifestyle in practice of VIth year students of Faculty of Medicine and 1st year students of Medical Analysis at the Medical University of Gdansk. One of the questions in the inquiry was direct question about the ways of spending free time. There were differences in forms of spending free time between students of Faculty of Medicine and students of Medical Analysis. Among the first group examined the most, about 46%, points to recreational sport as the form of spending free time; quite a lot people read books, and about 40% of them sleep. Medical Analysis students asked the same question answer that they study during their free time--almost 41%, they also go for walks and listen to the radio. On the grounds of the answer about practicing recreational sport we can assume that for the greatest part of the students such activities have become an obligatory part of their lifestyle and not everybody classifies them among free time activities. Students of both inquired groups fill their free time with number of activities, among which we can find those involving rest, health or entertainment. PMID:15002303

  3. Evaluation of the implementation of the knowledge management processes in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences teaching hospitals, 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Roxana Sharifian; Nasrin Shokrpour; Fahimeh Salehpour

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Recognition and implementation of knowledge management have an important effect on improving the quality of hospital activities. According to the direct relationship with the society’s health, health and treatment departments need knowledgeable and skillful staff. Thus, this research investigated different dimensions of the knowledge management processes in teaching hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2014. Method: This cross-sectional analytical st...

  4. Evaluation of the Young Children with Neurodevelopmental Disability: A Prospective Study at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    FAYYAZI, Afshin; Leila KHEZRIAN; Zohreh KHERADMAND; DAMADI, Somayeh; Ali KHAJEH

    2013-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Fayyazi A, Kheizrian L, Kheradmand Z, Damadi S, Khajeh A. Evaluation of the Young Children with Neurodevelopmental Disability: A Prospective Study at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences Clinics. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Winter; 7 (1):29-33. ObjectiveDevelopmental impairment is a common problem in children health that occurs in approximately 5–10% of the childhood population. The aim of this study was to determine the etiologic yield of subspecialists’ evaluation ...

  5. Review of Ten Years' Use of St. Jude Medical Prosthetic Valve Replacement and Postoperative Management at Niigata University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Jun-Ichi; Oguma, Fumiaki; Tsuchida, Sho-ichi; Fujita, Yasuo; Nakazawa, Satoshi; Miyamura, Haruo; Eguchi, Shoji

    1993-01-01

    A ten-year period of using St. Jude Medical (SJM) prosthetic heart valves at Niigata University Hospital was reviewed. Between December 1979 and August 1990, 261 patients, 118 males and 143 females, ages ranging 6-75 years, underwent SJM prosthetic valve replacement. Aortic valve replacement was performed in 72 patients, mitral valve replacement in 140 patients, combined aortic and mitral valve replacement in 37 patients, and miscellaneous valve replacement in 12 patients. The actuarial survi...

  6. Psychological Characteristics of 7-Year Schooling Students in Military Medical University and Cultivation on Their Learning Motivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jing; QIAN Guisheng; YIN Cui'e

    2002-01-01

    By investigation and analysis on psychological characteristics of 7 - year schooling students in military medical university, we knew that their learning motivation needed to be initiated and cultivated. In association with psychological theory, this study discussed the way to initiate and cultivate learning motivation in eight aspects such as cognition, application of course goal, diversity of teaching methods, feedback of teaching effect and enriching the second class.

  7. Raising Medical Students’ Awareness of Nutrition and Fitness in Disease Prevention: Nutrition and Fitness Program at the University of Iowa

    OpenAIRE

    Snetselaar, Linda; Malville-Shipan, Katherine; Ahrens, Lois; Smith, Karen; Chenard, Cathy; Stumbo, Phyllis; Gordon, Joel; Thomas, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    At the University of Iowa we devised a learning experience, called the Nutrition and Fitness Program, for third-year medical students. The program was designed to raise awareness of the role of nutrition and exercise in the prevention and treatment of disease. Students spent one af-ternoon learning about their personal health risk factors, such as body mass index, percent body fat, other anthropometric measures such as waist, hip and mid-arm circumference, blood lipids, bone-mass density, die...

  8. Studying in Australia at The University of Sydney:Bachelor of Applied Science(Medical Radiation Sciences) Diagnostic Radiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria; Fang

    2012-01-01

    <正>The University of Sydney offers a range of undergraduate courses in the area of health sciences,including the Bachelor of Applied Science(MRS) Diagnostic Radiography.The degree prepares students for clinical practice as diagnostic radiographers, working in places such as emergency wards or private clinics.According to a medical practitioner’s request, radiographers aim to work closely with radiologists to

  9. Evaluation of Scientific Output of Researchers at Birjand University of Medical Sciences in Web of Science during 2000-2011

    OpenAIRE

    Hamideh Ehtesham

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Science production is the main basis of all programs to achieve sustainable development. Currently, the most important indicators of science production are the number of articles indexed in databases. In the present research, the scientific output of the work of researchers at Birjand University of medical sciences, manifested in the "Web of Science" database were taken into consideration by means of scientometrics indicators. Materials and Methods: This work is a desc...

  10. VIEWPOINTS OF SUPERVISORS ABOUT THE PROCESS OF DISSERTATIONS FOR GENERAL MEDICINE PROGRAM SHAHID SADOUGHI UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    OpenAIRE

    J Ayatollahi; M.H Mirshamsi; S.M Hoseini zade

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: It is important to know the viewpoints of supervisors about different issues and problems in preparing dissertations (as a mandatory course) in general medicine (MD) program such as the objectives of the course, improving learning methods, problems of the practical phase, and their ideas about the course efficacy. This study explores supervisors’ views concerning the thesis process and its related problems in Shaheed Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In total 119...

  11. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence, Happiness and Mental Health in Students of Medical Sciences of Isfahan University

    OpenAIRE

    Sasanpour M; Khodabakhshi M; Nooryan Kh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, many professionals consider necessary conditions for progress in developing emotional intelligence. A person who has a high emotional intelligence will experience less negative events in his/her life. The main purpose of this study is to answer this question: Is emotional intelligence related to happiness and mental health? Method and material: Statistical community in this study is all the students of Medical sciences of Isfahan University in 2009, among whom 120 pe...

  12. Survey of the Relationship Between Metabolic Syndrome and Myocardial Infarction in Hospitals of Urmia University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Khademvatan, K.; Alinejad, V.; Eghtedar, S.; Rahbar, N.; Agakhani, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between metabolic syndrome and myocardial infarction in patients admitted to the hospitals of Urmia University of medical sciences. Methods: A case-control study population consisted of 172 patients with heart failure who were admitted to Seyedolshohada Hospital. In this method, the researchers present in the units and along with demographic questionnaire of patients, laboratory results needed for the survey (fasting ...

  13. Acceptability of Male Circumcision among College Students in Medical Universities in Western China: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Jiang

    Full Text Available Male circumcision (MC has been shown to reduce the risk of female to male transmission of HIV. The goal of this survey was to explore MC's acceptability and the factors associated with MC among college students in medical universities in western China.A cross-sectional study was carried out in three provinces in western China (Guangxi, Chongqing and Xinjiang to assess the acceptability of MC as well as to discover factors associated with the acceptability among college students in medical universities. A total of 1,790 uncircumcised male students from three medical universities were enrolled in this study. In addition, 150 students who had undergone MC were also enrolled in the survey, and they participated in in-depth interviews.Of all the uncircumcised participants (n = 1,790, 55.2% (n = 988 were willing to accept MC. Among those who accepted MC, 67.3% thought that MC could improve their sexual partners' hygiene, 46.3% believed that HIV and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs could be partially prevented by MC. The multivariable logistic regression indicates that MC's acceptability was associated with three factors: the redundant foreskin (OR = 10.171, 95% CI = 7.629-13.559, knowing the hazard of having a redundant foreskin (OR = 1.597, 95% CI = 1.097-2.323, and enhancing sexual pleasure (OR = 1.628, 95% CI = 1.312-2.021. The in-depth interviews for subjects who had undergone MC showed that the major reason for having MC was the redundant foreskin (87.3%, followed by the benefits and the fewer complications of having MC done. In addition, most of these participants (65.3% said that the MC could enhance sexual satisfaction.MC's acceptance among college students in medical universities is higher than it is among other populations in western China. An implementation of an MC programme among this population is feasible in the future.

  14. Psychological Health of First-Year Health Professional Students in a Medical University in the United Arab Emirates

    OpenAIRE

    Gomathi, Kadayam G.; Soofia Ahmed; Jayadevan Sreedharan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the psychological health of first-year health professional students and to study sources of student stress. Methods: All first-year students (N = 125) of the Gulf Medical University (GMU) in Ajman, United Arab Emirates (UAE), were invited to participate in a voluntary, anonymous, self-administered, questionnaire-based survey in January 2011. Psychological health was assessed using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. A 24-item questionnaire...

  15. The Quality of Collaboration among Medical Research Centers, Universities, Health Executives and the Community in İran

    OpenAIRE

    Asefzadeh, Saeed

    2005-01-01

    A health research system is defined as a system for planning, coordinating, monitoring and managing health research resources and activities, and for promoting research aimed at effective and equitable national health development. This study was conducted to describe the quality of mutual collaboration among medical research centers, universities, executive organizations and the community. In this situation analysis qualitative methods were applied. In-depth interviews were held with the ...

  16. The drug thief at Georgetown University Medical Center: anatomy of a $2 billion class-action lawsuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Separate lawsuits filed on behalf of plaintiff patients at Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, have been consolidated under a District of Columbia judge who is scheduled to rule soon on whether to certify them as a class-action suit against the medical center. The case involves a drug-abusing worker in the interventional radiology unit at Georgetown University Hospital who may have exposed up to 500 patients to HIV, hepatitis, and other viruses during his period of employment from September 8, 1999 to February 2, 2000. The lawsuits allege that the med center failed to protect patients by not adopting American Hospital Association guidelines that call for universal pre-employment drug screening. The hospital currently is in the final stages of being sold to Medstar Health, Columbia, MD, which may eventually change the drug-screening policy. The episode not only has been embarrassing for the prestigious medical center, but also has focused attention on the potential consequences for hospitals that do not screen employees for drug use.

  17. Sedative Drug Use among King Saud University Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Sampling Study

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Sayed, Ahmed A.; Abdualltef H. Al-Rashoudi; Al-Eisa, Abdulrhman A.; Addar, Abdullah M.; Al-Hargan, Abdullah H.; Albaraa A. Al-Jerian; Al-Omair, Abdullah A.; Al-Sheddi, Ahmed I.; Hussam I. Al-Nowaiser; Al-Kathiri, Omar A.; Al-Hassan, Abdullah H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Medical students experience significant psychological stress and are therefore at higher risk of using sedatives. There are currently no studies describing the prevalence of sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with sedative drug use among medical students in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional convenience sampling study gathered data by anonymous questionnaire fro...

  18. [Xu Ding-chao and the Medical College of the Peking (Capital) University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze-Sheng

    2003-01-01

    Xu Ding-chao, being a Jinshi, (examinee passing through palace examination) was assigned as a teacher at this medical College. He experienced the whole process of inauguration and development of the medical College and witnessed the reform of educational system of the late Qing dynasty, especially the medical educational reform. He was a famous educationist at the turn of the Qing and Republican periods, and made important contributions to the education of TCM. PMID:12921593

  19. Preparing an Academic Medical Center to Manage Patients Infected with Ebola: Experiences of a University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, Ch.; Koenig, KL; Alassaf, W

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc. As Ebola has spread beyond West Africa, the challenges confronting health care systems with no experience in managing such patients are enormous. Not only is Ebola a significant threat to a population's health, it can infect the medical personnel trying to treat it. As such, it represents a major challenge to those in public health, emergency medical services (EMS), and acute care hospitals. Our academic medical center volunteered t...

  20. Radiation exposure received by the medical radiation workers in Lithuania at the Institute of Oncology, Vilnius University, 2004-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occupational radiation exposure of medical radiation workers at the Institute of Oncology, Vilnius University (IOVU) was analysed. Quartile dose measurements were collected and routinely analysed for a period of 8 y from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2011. A total of 193 medical radiation workers were monitored, comprising 34 % physicians (radiologists and radio-therapists), 8 % physicists, 42 % radiological technologists and 16 % ancillary staff. A statistically significant decrease by 18 % has been detected when comparing the annual average effective doses (AAEDs) received by medical radiation workers at the IOVU during periods 2004-2007 and 2008-2011 (p < 0.0001). The main occupation categories responsible for this reduction were of Nuclear Medicine (p < 0.028) and Radiology (p < 0.0001) departments. The values of AAED in Radiology, Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine departments are quite low and well below the annual limit of 20 mSv, averaged over a period of 5 consecutive years. (authors)

  1. Assessment of informatization for the dispensing of medications at a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Aparecida Dias Serafim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Informatics and automation are important tools for the reduction of work, errors and costs in a hospital pharmacy. OBJECTIVES: To describe the structuring and function of an informatized system for the dispensing of medications and to assess its effect on nursing and pharmacy services during the period from 1997 to 2003. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this descriptive and retrospective study, we performed an analysis of documents addressing the structuring and implementation of the informatized medication dispensing system. In addition, we analyzed the perceptions of nurses, pharmacists and pharmacy assistants who participated in the structuring phase of the system when interviewed about the effect of informatization on administrative aspects (e.g., requisition of medications, presentation of the dispensed medication and system operationalization. RESULTS: The major advantages provided by the new system were 1 the elimination of manual transcripts for prescribed medications, 2 increased speed, 3 better identification of the doses prescribed by physicians, 4 medication labels containing all necessary identification and 5 practicality and safety of optical bar code-based verification of the requested and dispensed medications. CONCLUSIONS: The great majority of the interviewees considered the informatized medication supply system to be of good quality. Analysis of the data provided information that could contribute to the expansion and refinement of the system, provide support for studies regarding the utilization of medications and offer new perspectives for work and productivity.

  2. Medical students are from Mars--business and psychology students are from Venus--- University teachers are from Pluto?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Keith; Sander, Paul

    2002-01-01

    This study explores further the reasons given by the first year medical students in comparison with first year business and first year psychology students for their selection of lectures, student role play, and student presentations as their least preferred teaching method. The reasons were originally given in a questionnaire exploring student expectations of university teaching completed by 195 medical, 128 business and 72 psychology students in their first week at university (Sander et al, 2000). The analysis reported here suggests that whilst students irrespective of course gave similar reasons for not liking lectures, there were subtle differences between medical students and business and psychology students in the reasons they gave for not liking student role play and student presentations. These differences suggest that many first year medical students can be suspicious of the value of student centred learning methods. Teachers hoping to use these methods should acknowledge student suspicion and work to help students see the value of these techniques to encourage their full participation.

  3. WHAT PATIENTS WANT TO KNOW ABOUT THEIR MEDICATION? : A SURVEY OF INPATIENTS AND OUTPATIENTS AT GONDAR UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemayehu Berhane*, Abiey Getahun, Asfaw Azanaw and Sherefedin Hamza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients want and are seeking more information about drug and nondrug treatment options. While a great deal of patient information about medications, treatments, and diseases exists, much of it contains conflicting, inaccurate, poorly written, or non–evidence-based information. The objective of the study was thus, to assess what patients want to know about their medications at Gondar University Hospital. The study was conducted in Gondar University Hospital over 1 month period from March 1- 30, 2012. Data was collected using convenience sampling technique from 384 respondents using structured questionnaire which consists of 40 items. All data collected were then analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS, v19 software. In the study 238 (68% male and 146(32% female patients were included. From the total questions forwarded for the total population 165(43% responded drug information as very relevant, 156(40.6% responded drug information as relevant, 40(10.4% responded drug information as somewhat relevant and 23(6% answered drug information as not relevant. Concerning drug information source the result showed that 49%, 49% and 2% of the patients got drug information from pharmacists, doctors and nurses respectively. Physicians, pharmacists and other health professionals should provide both written and oral information with their medication in order to meet the need what patients want to know about their medication.

  4. Josephinische Bibliothek und medizinhistorische Bestände der Universitätsbibliothek der Medizinischen Universität Wien [The Josephinian Library and the medical-historic stock of the University Library of the Medical University of Vienna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht, Harald

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available [english] The University Library of the Medical University of Vienna, founded in 2004, is the most extensive medical library in Austria. It possesses an outstanding medical-historic stock which is basically stored in its Branch Library of Medical History. This unique stock also is a historical source itself because it represents the development of the supply of the Medical Faculty of Vienna, Viennese hospitals and medical societies with scientific literature and information during the last centuries. The brunch library contains several remarkable special-collections such as the Josephinian Library, the Library of Neurology (Obersteiner-Library, the Library of the Society of Physicians in Vienna or the Library of the Austrian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.In order to deal with its own history the University Library runs a provenance-research project to identify expropriated goods transferred to its stock during the Nazi-regime and restores them to their rightful owners. It also runs a weblog-series “Displaced 1938”, which is about displaced members of the Medical Faculty of Vienna during World . Currently it establishes a bio-bibliographical online-portal about exponents of the so called “Vienna Medical School(s” between 1750 and 1950 as well as an online bookplate database.To improve the access to large parts of the stock the ancient card indexes got digitalized (including OCR-reading and have been online since 2010. Supplementary the University Library of the Medical University of Vienna engages in the European cooperation on E-books on Demand (EOD.[german] Die Universitätsbibliothek der 2004 errichteten Medizinischen Universität Wien ist die größte medizinische Fachbibliothek in Österreich. Sie verfügt auch über bedeutende medizinhistorische Bestände, die überwiegend in der Zweigbibliothek für Geschichte der Medizin untergebracht sind und auch eine Quelle für die Entwicklung der Literatur- und

  5. Use of indexing rules and filing of MPI in hospitals of Mazandaran university of medical sciences, 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kabirzadeh

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and purpose : The master patient’s index (MPI card is the key to locate the patient’s record in medical records department. Use of MPI in hospital information systems is important. An accurate MPI is noted in evaluation and accreditation program. Our study was done on MPI at medical records depatment of teaching hospitals in Mazandaran medical university in respect of using indexing rules and arrangement of cards for filing.Materials and methods : This survey was done on patient’s cards in 5 teaching hospitals of Mazandaran medical university and 1999 MPI cards were checked. A part of data related to using indexing rules and filing was gathered with checklist and factors associated with management of department collected in questionnaire. Data processed with SPSS software and analyzed with descriptive and inference statistics.Results : Findings showed that 20% of staff responsible for indexing and filing of MPI were technician (post diploma course in medical records. In 100% of hospitals, guide card and cross-index card wasn’t use. Indexing error increased with the increasing the number of admitted patients (p= 0.003, low experience (p= 0.001 and degree and no course study relation of medical records department managers (X2= 9./03 , p = 0.000. In addition, indexing error increased in staff with no academic training (X2= 3.84 , p = 0.05. Also results showed that there is 64.2% indexing error and 9% of cards are misfiled.Conclusion: According to the findings, staffing professional personnel, training them with up dated knowledge, periodic control of issued cards, creating needed rules and regulation based on new scientific materials, exact indexing and filling rules suggested.

  6. [Designing and Operating a Comprehensive Mental Health Management System to Support Faculty at a University That Contains a Medical School and University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Chiaki

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, healthcare professionals and healthcare workers typically practice a culture of self-assessment when it comes to managing their own health. Even where this background leads to instances of mental health disorders or other serious problems within a given organization, such cases are customarily addressed by the psychiatrists or psychiatric departments of the facilities affected. Organized occupational mental health initiatives for professionals and workers within the healthcare system are extremely rare across Japan, and there is little recognition of the need for such initiatives even among those most directly affected. The author has some experience designing and operating a comprehensive health management system to support students and faculty at a university in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area that contains a medical school and university hospital. At this university, various mental health-related problems were routinely being allowed to develop into serious cases, while the fundamental reforms required by the health management center and the mental health management scheme organized through the center had come to represent a challenge for the entire university. From this initial situation, we undertook several successive initiatives, including raising the number of staff in the health management center and its affiliated organizations, revising and drafting new health management rules and regulations, launching an employment support and management system, implementing screenings to identify people with mental ill-health, revamping and expanding a counselling response system, instituting regular collaboration meetings with academic affairs staff, and launching educational and awareness-raising activities. This resulted in the possibility of intervention in all cases of mental health crisis, such as suicidal ideation. We counted more than 2,400 consultations (cumulative total number; more than half of consultations was from the medical school, postgraduate

  7. Uterine artery embolisation for symptomatic fibroids: the University of Malaya Medical Centre experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, RN; Vijayananthan, A; Omar, SZ; Nawawi, O; Abdullah, BJJ

    2010-01-01

    Background: Transcatheter uterine artery embolisation (UAE) for the treatment of symptomatic fibroids has been performed in several centres in the United States, Western Europe and Asia with promising results. This study reports the authors' experience with UAE at the University Malaya Medical Centre. Method: Fifty women with symptomatic uterine fibroids who declined surgery were treated by transcatheter UAE. The uterine arteries were selectively catheterised and embolised with polyvinyl alcohol particles. Post-procedure analgesia was administered via patient-controlled analgesic pump. The patients were followed up at an interval of 6/12 clinically and with MRI. Results: Transcatheter UAE was performed on all 50 patients with no major complications. 49 patients had both uterine arteries embolised while 1 patient had only the right uterine artery embolised on account of hypoplasia of the left uterine artery due to previous myomectomy. The mean hospital stay was 3.5 days (range, 2 to 7). At a mean follow-up of 24/52, all patients reported improvements in their presenting symptoms. Objective improvement in terms of reduction of uterine and fibroid sizes was determined on MRI. One patient, who initially responded with a decrease in uterine and dominant fibroid size, became symptomatic (menorrhagia) after 6 months and subsequent endometrial sampling revealed cystic glandular hyperplasia for which total abdominal hysterectomy was performed. Two other patients had no change in symptoms and after hysterectomy, the pathology revealed concurrent adenomyosis. Another 2 patients with cervical fibroids were treated with hysterectomy as there was no gross reduction in the size of fibroid following UAE. Overall, 90% of the patients had dramatic improvement of anaemia and symptoms at 1 year follow-up. Conclusion: Out of the 50 patients, 17 patients had total disappearance of their fibroids and 28 patients had more than 50% reduction in the size of fibroids after 1 year. 5 patients

  8. [Projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Shingo; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iseki, Hiroshi; Harada, Hiroshi Kasanuki Noboru; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Kitamori, Takehiko; Tei, Yuichi; Nakaoka, Ryusuke; Haishima, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Division of Medical Devices has been conducting the projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo. The TWIns has been studying to aim at establishment of preclinical evaluation methods by "Engineering Based Medicine", and established Regulatory Science Institute for Medical Devices. School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo has been studying to aim at establishment of assessment methodology for innovative minimally invasive therapeutic devices, materials, and nanobio diagnostic devices. This report reviews the exchanges of personnel, the implement systems and the research progress of these projects.

  9. [Modern referral-information service in the Central Medical Library of the University of Zagreb Medical School].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjina, G; Granić, D; Bekavac, A

    1990-01-01

    New technologies in information and retrieval services of the Central Medical Library are presented, as well as comparison between traditional search of biomedical literature and search of biomedical bases available on CD-ROM and on-line. MeSH thesaurus represents the basis for all modes of searches, either through published indexes (Index Medicus, Biomedicina Iugoslavica), searches through on-line, or via CD-ROM technology. Experience in indexing according to MeSH structure helps us to search and retrieve biomedical literature on new media too. Great interest in new media for search and retrieval of biomedical literature among our users (100%) justifies their introduction into the Library. In the period of four months, 75% of our users chose CD-ROM technology in their search, 25% chose on-line search, and both technologies were combined by 33% of the users. Having these new media in our library we have reached the point from which we join the world biomedical information network and successfully meet the growing need for information in the field of biomedicine.

  10. Accreditation status of hospital pharmacies and their challenges of medication management: A case of south Iranian largest university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Omid; Dorosti, Hesam; Talebzadeh, Alireza; Bastani, Peivand

    2016-01-01

    Considering the importance of accreditation for hospital pharmacies, this study was to determine the challenges of medication management in hospital pharmacies affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The study was a mix-method research conducted in two qualitative and quantitative phases during the years 2014-2015 in Shiraz, Iran. National Accreditation Standard checklist for hospitals was used for data collection in the first phase, and Delphi method was applied in three rounds to achieve the most challenges of medication management and the related solutions. Results indicated a medium status of accreditation for all three dimensions in the above hospital pharmacies (3.53, 42.15 and 7, respectively). Lack of clinical pharmacists, nonparticipation of the pharmacy director in annual budgeting, lack of access to patient information, discontinuity of pharmaceutical care for patients discharged, defects in pharmacy staff training, lack of legislation in support of pharmacists and lack of adequate access to physicians' prescriptions, shortages in reporting medication errors, and lack of evidence related to microbial contamination are the most challenges extracted from the second phase. It seems that the studied hospital pharmacies encounter numerous problems regarding accreditation, pharmaceutical care as well as appropriate medication management and supply chain. Attempts to solve these problems can play an important role in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of pharmacies in Iran. PMID:27429924

  11. Accreditation status of hospital pharmacies and their challenges of medication management: A case of south Iranian largest university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Barati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of accreditation for hospital pharmacies, this study was to determine the challenges of medication management in hospital pharmacies affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The study was a mix-method research conducted in two qualitative and quantitative phases during the years 2014–2015 in Shiraz, Iran. National Accreditation Standard checklist for hospitals was used for data collection in the first phase, and Delphi method was applied in three rounds to achieve the most challenges of medication management and the related solutions. Results indicated a medium status of accreditation for all three dimensions in the above hospital pharmacies (3.53, 42.15 and 7, respectively. Lack of clinical pharmacists, nonparticipation of the pharmacy director in annual budgeting, lack of access to patient information, discontinuity of pharmaceutical care for patients discharged, defects in pharmacy staff training, lack of legislation in support of pharmacists and lack of adequate access to physicians' prescriptions, shortages in reporting medication errors, and lack of evidence related to microbial contamination are the most challenges extracted from the second phase. It seems that the studied hospital pharmacies encounter numerous problems regarding accreditation, pharmaceutical care as well as appropriate medication management and supply chain. Attempts to solve these problems can play an important role in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of pharmacies in Iran.

  12. Accreditation the Education Development Centers of Medical-Sciences Universities: Another Step toward Quality Improvement in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mohagheghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: : In order to improve the quality of education in universities of medical sciences (UMS, and because of the key role of education development centers (EDCs, an accreditation scheme was developed to evaluate their performance.Method: A group of experts in the medical education field was selected based on pre-defined criteria by EDC of Ministry of Health and Medical education. The team, worked intensively for 6 months to develop a list of essential standards to assess the performance of EDCs. Having checked for the content validity of standards, clear and measurable indicators were created via consensus. Then, required information were collected from UMS EDCs; the first round of accreditation was carried out just to check the acceptability of this scheme, and make force universities to prepare themselves for the next factual round of accreditation.Results: Five standards domains were developed as the conceptual framework for defining main categories of indicators. This included: governing and leadership, educational planning, faculty development, assessment and examination and research in education. Nearly all of UMS filled all required data forms precisely with minimum confusion which shows the practicality of this accreditation scheme.Conclusion: It seems that the UMS have enough interest to provide required information for this accreditation scheme. However, in order to receive promising results, most of universities have to work intensively in order to prepare minimum levels in all required standards. However, it seems that in long term, implementation of a valid accreditation scheme plays an important role in improvement of the quality of medical education around the country.

  13. Perspectives on gender-specific medicine, course and learning style preferences in medical education: a study among students at the Medical University of Vienna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harreiter, Jürgen; Wiener, Hubert; Plass, Herbert; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra

    2011-03-01

    In the study for the thesis Web Based Training with Moodle: Gender-differences in Action of Drugs, a survey among students of the Medical University of Vienna (MUV) concerning the implementation of gender-specific medicine in the curriculum and students' learning styles was performed. Data analysis (given as mean±sem) showed that students (n = 642) rated (Likert scale, 1-6) the importance of gender-specific medicine fairly high (4.02±0.06), and rated the importance of knowing about gender-specific medicine as a medical doctor even higher (4.49±0.05). Further implementation of gender-relevant topics into the curriculum appeared less important (3.64±0.06). Students rated their own knowledge on gender-specific medicine neutrally (3.40±0.05). For some items significant differences between males and females as well as the old and new curriculum were found. Students considered gender-specific medicine as important but sufficiently covered in their medical education at the MUV. PMID:21360294

  14. Investigating Knowledge Management Status among Faculty Members of Kerman University of Medical Sciences based on the Nonaka Model in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vali, Leila; Izadi, Azar; Jahani, Yunes; Okhovati, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Education and research are two major functions of universities, which require proper and systematic exploitation of available knowledge and information. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the knowledge management status in an education system by considering the function of faculty members in creation and dissemination of knowledge. This study was conducted to investigate the knowledge management status among faculty members of the Kerman University of Medical Sciences based on the Nonaka and Takeuchi models in 2015. Methods This was a descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study. It was conducted on 165 faculty members at the Kerman University of Medical Sciences, who were selected from seven faculties as weighted using a random stratified sampling method. The Nonaka and Takeuchi knowledge management questionnaire consists of 26 questions in four dimensions of socialization, externalization, internalization, and combination. Scoring of questions was conducted using the five-point Likert scale. To analyze data, independent t-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson correlation coefficients, and the Kruskal-Wallis test were employed. Results The four dimensions in the Nonaka and Takeuchi model are based on optimal indicators (3.5), dimensions of combination, and externalization with an average of 3.3 were found in higher ranks and internalization and socialization had averages of 3.1 and 3. According to the findings of this study, the average knowledge management among faculty members of the Kerman University of Medical Sciences was estimated to be 3.1, with a bit difference compared to the average. According to the results of t-tests, there was no significant relationship between gender and various dimensions of knowledge management (p>0.05). The findings of Kruskal-Wallis showed that there is no significant relationship between variables of age, academic rank, and type of faculty with regard to dimensions of knowledge management (p>0.05). In addition

  15. Prevalence and Predictors of Anxiety and Depression among Female Medical Students in King Abdulaziz University Jeddah Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical education & medical profession are among the most challenging and most stressful ones. Anxiety and depression represents an escalating public health problem among medical students. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence & predictors of anxiety and depression among female medical students in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Methods: A cross- sectional study was carried out during 2010-2011. A stratified random sample method was used to select 450 medical students. A confidential, anonymous & self administered questionnaire included Standardized Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale was used.Results: The mean scores for anxiety and depression were 9.32 ± 3.77 & 6.59 ± 3.62, respectively. There is a positive correlation between anxiety & depression scores (r= 0.52, P< 0.001. Prevalence of morbid anxiety and depression were 34.9% and 14.7%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the first predictor of morbid anxiety was depression (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR = 3.28; 95% Confidence Interval (CI: 1.85-5.82, P < 0.001. Students complained from condensed academic course, had academic and emotional failures during the 6 months preceded the study were about 2 times more prone to anxiety. Predictors of depression were having anxiety, nationality (being non-Saudi & having emotional failure.Conclusion: Medical students encountered high rates of anxiety & depression compared to others. Academic problems and major life events were the main predictors. Enhancing faculty preventive & curative mental health services is recommended. Initiation of stress management courses & enhancing academic advising services are required since the start of medical education.

  16. Self-Medication Practice Among Allied and Non-Allied Health Students of the University of Santo Tomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAY P. JAZUL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available – Self-medication is presumed to be widely practiced around the world. This can be defined as the use of drugs to treat self-diagnosed disorders or symptoms, or the intermittent or continued use of a prescribed drug for chronic or recurrent disease or symptoms. High level of education and professional status has also been mentioned as predictive factors for self-medication. Students from the allied and nonallied health institutions of the University of Santo Tomas were assessed for the factors of self-medication practices.A total of 66 graduating students were asked to accomplish the questionnaire. To ensure valid responses, the researchers supervised the respondents on accomplishing the questionnaires. Mean and range summarized the age while counts and percentages summarized the gender, school, practice of selfmedication, therapeutic classes, health conditions, reasons and sources of self-medication. A total of 55 reported that they practice self-medication. On the total 66 respondents practicing self-medication is antibiotics, anti-allergic and antihistamine, and decongestants. The 55 respondents documented headache to be the most self-treated health condition followed by cough and cold, toothache, muscle pain pimples, back/chest pain, dizziness, and diarrhea/constipation. Significantly greater percentage of females (p=0.038 use antibiotics. Respondents with high self-care orientation are self-medicating on antibiotics (p=0.027, anti-allergic (p<0.001, and herbal medicine (p=0.001 than respondents with low self-care orientation.

  17. History and Guideline of Emergency Medicine Residency Discipline in Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran; Review of 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Shojaee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since many years ago several problems have been felt in emergency departments (ED of hospitals. In fact, none of physicians in the hospital have accepted the direct responsibility of patients’ management in the EDs and emergency wards of University centers have been managed by residents of various disciplines. Thus, the first line of therapy does not have guardian and several consultants with various specialists have been performed regarding patient’s management. The necessity of physician training was noticed for the first time in 1950 and after 24 years in 1974, the academic emergency medicine was established in United States of America (USA in response to people expectations for overnight accessibility to specialized and quality medical cares. It was performed with foundation of the first period of resident’s training in emergency medicine discipline at University of Cincinnati, Ohio. At beginning, specialists of different fields such as internal medicine, surgery, anesthesia, orthopedics, and neurosurgery initiated the training of emergency medicine residents together which could be responsible to most of referees. Finally, with formal accepting the specialty board in 1978, this field has been officially identified as the 23th discipline in USA. Today the EDs of most hospitals in European and American countries has been managing by emergency medicine specialists which leads to improve the quality of education and treatment, significantly. Also in Iran the request of establishing this major has been presented in the secretariat of the council for graduate medical education for the first time in 1996. This request was approved and principles of its initiating recognized officially by the ministry of health. But, considering to lack of an appropriate infrastructure, it postponed until 2000 that again this discipline was missioned for initiating to the council for graduate medical education by the minister and its outcome was

  18. Psychological Variables for Identifying Susceptibility to Mental Disorders in Medical Students at the University of Barcelona

    OpenAIRE

    Sender, Rosa; Salamero, Manel; Vallés, Antoni; Valdés, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: This study analyses some psychological variables related to susceptibility to mental disorders in medical students. Methods: A sample of 209 first- and second-year medical students was evaluated using the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and three questionnaires: Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) and UNCAHS scale of STRAIN. Results: Thirty percent of the students suffered from emotional distr...

  19. Emotional intelligence and related factors in medical sciences students of an Iranian university

    OpenAIRE

    Lolaty, Hamideh Azimi; Tirgari, Abdolhakim; Fard, Jabbar Heydari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Emotional intelligence has evolved lot of interest in a variety of fields. The aim of this study was to determine the emotional intelligence and its related factors among junior medical sciences students. Materials and Methods: The research design was a descriptive — analytic analysis. Based on a census sampling method, the emotional intelligence of 322 junior medical sciences students was evaluated using the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory. This study was done from 2008 to 20...

  20. Social and psychological factors affecting eating habits among university students in a Malaysian medical school: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganasegeran Kurubaran

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eating habits have been a major concern among university students as a determinant of health status. The aim of this study was to assess the pattern of eating habits and its associated social and psychological factors among medical students. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted among 132 medical students of pre-clinical phase at a Malaysian university. A self-administered questionnaire was used which included questions on socio-demography, anthropometry, eating habits and psychosocial factors. Results Mean (±SD age of the respondents was 22.7 (±2.4 years and (the age ranged from 18 to 30 years. More than half had regular meals and breakfast (57.6% &, 56.1% respectively. Majority (73.5% consumed fruits less than three times per week, 51.5% had fried food twice or more a week and 59.8% drank water less than 2 liters daily. Eating habits score was significantly low among younger students (18–22 years, smokers, alcohol drinkers and those who did not exercise. (ppp Conclusion Most of the students in this study had healthy eating habits. Social and psychological factors were important determinants of eating habits among medical students.

  1. [THE CANCELED FACULTY: ON THE ISSUE OF ESTABLISHMENT OF MEDICAL FACULTY OF THE PETROGRAD UNIVERSITY DURING THE FIRST WORLD WAR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostovtsev, E A; Sidortchuk, I V

    2015-01-01

    The article considers history of attempts to organize medicalfaculty in the Petrograd university on the eve and during the First World War The actuality of issue is in both insufficient investigation of this page of history of national medicine and medical education and history of development of national medicine in the period of the First World War which centenary is observed this year On the basis of large spectrum of published and archive sources the article considers the prerequisites of organization of medical faculty in St. Petersburg-Petrograd The discussions around its organization, positioning and augmentation of its supporters and opponents are called to mind The attempt is cited concerning organization offaculty in context of existed relationship between professional and teaching staff corporation of the Petrograd university and authorities. The separate attention is paid to the issue of corporative aspiration of professorate which determined model of their behavior and in spite of all social politic alterations provide no permission to compromise with authorities. The similar behavior model continued and after the February Revolution and this became the cause of giving up the idea of organization of medical faculty after overthrow of czarism.

  2. Epidemiology of sports injuries referring to Kashan University of Medical Sciences Trauma Research Center from 2005 to 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Reza Sharif; Ali Akbarnejad; Alireza Moravveji; Rasool Hamayattalab; Mansour Sayyah

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Among the injury types, sports ones constitute a considerable proportion of patients who refer to the medical centers. This research was conducted to examine the frequency of sports-related injuries referring to Kashan University of Medical Sciences Trauma Research Center from 2005 to 2011. Methods: This was a retrospective research in which existing data from the data bank of Kashan University of Medical Sciences Trauma Research Center were employed. The data were extracted from the main source by SPSS version 16.0. Variables such as age, education, occupation and gender were analyzed. Results: The highest proportion of injuries was observed in students (59.4%) followed by workers (11.8%). Upper and lower extremities were most commonly injured. The most frequent injury was strain (35.4%), followed by sprain (27.7%). Conclusion: The results of this research showed that the majority of the sports trauma occurrs in students;therefore, they need more attention in regard to sports injuries. Preventive measures such as informing the coaches and teachers as well as increasing the students’ awareness about the injury risk can decrease the incidences of sports injuries.

  3. Oral health knowledge among pre-clinical students of International Branch of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Oral health is an important issue in public health with a great impact on individuals’ general health status. A good access to oral healthcare services and a good knowledge of it play a key role in the oral disease prevention. A better health attitude and practice require a better knowledge. The aims of this study was to evaluate the oral health knowledge among the International students branch (Kish of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2011-12.   Materials and Methods: 159 pre-clinical students in medicine (54 students, dentistry (69 students and pharmacy (36 students participated in this research. A standard questionnaire was used as the main tool of research to evaluate the attitude and knowledge of students about the oral health. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test.   Results: According to the results, dental students had the best level of knowledge and pharmacy students had a better knowledge level compared to the medical students. The results also showed a significant relationship between students’ oral health knowledge and their field and duration of study and the place of their secondary school (P0.05.   Conclusion: The results showed that the students at the International Branch of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences had a relatively good knowledge of oral health. Students’ knowledge level can be improved by providing students with educational materials, organized workshops and seminars.

  4. Environmental health engineering students\\' attitudes toward their education program and career in Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mirnasab

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increasing numbers of medical sciences graduates is counted to be one of the problems in the society, so that there is concerning about their majors and future careers among them. This study was performed with the aim of determining environmental health students' attitude toward their majors and future careers, which was carried out in Yazd University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Method: This analytical, descriptive study was performed in 2015. The samples were Environmental Health students of Yazd University of Medical Sciences. The sample size was 102. Data were collected using a questionnaire containing 20 questions and analyzed by SPSS software version 21, multiple linear regression test, one-sample t-test and Chi-Square test. Results: The mean and standard deviation of environmental students' attitude toward their majors and future careers were 3.16 and 0.66, respectively. Attitude scores more than 3 were considered positive and less than 3 were negative. The mean scores of attitude was significantly higher than 3 (P=0.012. In this study, there was a significant relationship between students’ attitude and location status (P=0.003. Conclusion: According to the obtained results, the students of environment health had a good perspective towards their future careers and majors of study. A proper distribution of human resources, providing financial support of employment, establishing counselling and supporting centers among students for future career is recommended to improve their attitudes.

  5. Beliefs and Attitudes of Medical Students from Public and Private Universities in Malaysia towards Individuals with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Kwee Choy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the findings from a survey assessing the beliefs regarding testing, confidentiality, disclosure, and environment of care and attitudes towards care of people with HIV/AIDS (PLHWA, in 1020, 4th and 5th year medical students, from public and private medical universities in Malaysia. A self-administered validated questionnaire based on the UNAIDS Model Questionnaire with a 5-point Likert scale (5, strongly disagree; 4, disagree; 3, neutral; 2, agree; 1, strongly agree was used as a survey tool. The survey included demographic data and data on undergraduate training received on HIV/AIDS. Statistical significance in the demographic data and training received by respondents was evaluated using the chi-square test while the independent Student’s t-test was used for comparison of means between public and private universities. A value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant with 95% confidence interval. Our study revealed less than 20% of medical students received adequate training to care for PLHWA. They had prevalent negative beliefs regarding testing, confidentiality, disclosure and environment of care towards PLHWA although in giving care to PLHWA, their attitudes were largely positive and nondiscriminatory.

  6. Measuring the impact of a live, case-based, multiformat, interactive continuing medical education program on improving clinician knowledge and competency in evidence-based COPD care

    OpenAIRE

    Drexel C; Jacobson A; Hanania NA; Whitfield B; Katz J; Sullivan T

    2011-01-01

    Carole Drexel1, Anne Jacobson2, Nicola A Hanania3, Ben Whitfield4, Jay Katz5, Thomas Sullivan51Potomac Center for Medical Education, Columbia, MD, USA; 2Potomac Center for Medical Education, Port St John, FL, USA; 3Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 4CE Outcomes, LLC, Birmingham, AL, USA; 5Rockpointe, Columbia, MD, USABackground: Major clinical gaps impede the evidence-based treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the primary care setting. Studies are needed to...

  7. Factors Affecting Teachers’ Evaluation from the Viewpoint of the Students’ at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Vida Sepahi; Behzad Karami Matin; Lida Memar Eftekhary; Mansour Rezaei; Bijan Sabour; Ehsan Sadeghi; Babak Gholamine; Ramin Abiri

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluation of teachers is considered among top priorities in an educational institution. Most of the universities around the world including universities in Iran have considered feedback from students as the only or main source of assessment of the quality of teaching process for many years. Regarding the existing disagreements in evaluation, the purpose of this study is to investigate the factors affecting teachers’ evaluation from the viewpoint of the students’ at Kermanshah U...

  8. Patient satisfaction- comparison of the comprehensive care model with traditional model of delivering dental services in Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Afsaneh Pakdaman; Ahmad Khormali; Ahmad Reza Shamshiri

    2013-01-01

      Background and Aims: One of the important aspects for evaluating an organization is assessing the level of satisfaction of the clients. This study was conducted to compare the level of satisfaction between traditional and new methods of delivering dental care in the clinic of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.   Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 308 patients received dental care at the dental clinics of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in spring 2010. ...

  9. Assessment of Female Student’s Satisfaction with the Quality of Food And Environmental Health at Food Services in Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamreza Jahed Khaniki; Sara Yavari; Abbas Rahimi Foroushani; Mohammad Rezaei

    2016-01-01

    ensure students are satisfied with the quantity and quality of food as well as hygienic condition in the university’s food services. For this reason, the present study was conducted to investigate female student’s satisfaction with the quality of food and environmental health at food services in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. A number of one hundred of female students, studying at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, were randomly selected. All the selected students were proved...

  10. Improving diversity through strategic planning: a 10-year (2002-2012) experience at theMedical University of South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deas, Deborah; Pisano, Etta D; Mainous, Arch G; Johnson, Natalie G; Singleton, Myra Haney; Gordon, Leonie; Taylor, Wanda; Hazen-Martin, Debra; Burnham, Willette S; Reves, J G

    2012-11-01

    The Medical University of South Carolina launched a systematic plan to infuse diversity among its students, resident physicians, and faculty in 2002. The dean and stakeholders of the College of Medicine (COM) embraced the concept that a more population-representative physician workforce could contribute to the goals of providing quality medical education and addressing health care disparities in South Carolina. Diversity became a central component of the COM's strategic plan, and all departments developed diversity plans consistent with the overarching plan of the COM. Liaisons from the COM diversity committee facilitated the development of the department's diversity plans. By 2011, the efforts resulted in a doubling of the number of underrepresented-in-medicine (URM, defined as African American, Latino, Native American) students (21% of student body); matriculation of 10 African American males as first-year medical students annually for four consecutive years; more than a threefold increase in URM residents/fellows; expansion of pipeline programs; expansion of mentoring programs; almost twice as many URM faculty; integration of cultural competency throughout the medical school curriculum; advancement of women and URM individuals into leadership positions; and enhanced learning for individuals from all backgrounds. This article reports the implementation of an institutional plan to create a more racially representative workforce across the academic continuum. The authors emphasize the role of the stakeholders in promoting diversity, the value of annual assessment to evaluate outcomes, and the positive benefits for individuals of all backgrounds. PMID:23018331

  11. The evolution of integrative medical education:the influence of the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria Maizes; Randy Horwitz; Patricia Lebensohn; Hilary McClafferty; James Dalen; Andrew Weil

    2015-01-01

    The University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine (AzCIM) was founded in 1994 with a primary focus of educating physicians in integrative medicine (IM). Twenty years later, IM has become an international y recognized movement in medicine. With 40% of United States’ medical schools having membership in the Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health it is foreseeable that al medical students and residents wil soon receive training in the principles and practices of IM. The AzCIM has the broadest range and depth of IM educational programs and has had a major influence on integrative medical education in the United States. This review describes the fel owship, residency and medical student programs at AzCIM as wel as other significant national drivers of IM education; it also points out the chal enges faced in developing IM initiatives. The field of IM has matured with new national board certification in IM requiring fel owship training. Al ied health professional IM educational courses, as wel as integrative health coaching, assure that al members of the health care team can receive training. This review describes the evolution of IM education and wil be helpful to academic centers, health care institutions, and countries seeking to introduce IM initiatives.

  12. 基本医疗权的法律属性刍议%Legal Attribute of Basic Medical Right University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王裔端; 沈春明

    2011-01-01

    Citizens' basic medical right is "Universal Declaration of Human Rights" and international law documents confirm and security of an important right. The main body is its own citizens, compulsory undertaker is the national, and the object is the national positive behavior; It has the natural human rights, democracy and the rule of law. The contents include of distribution of medical resources, the right to health care, emergency treatment of rights and medical informed consent, the right Citizens' basic medical right is legal attribute, is the a component basic human rights.%公民基本医疗权是《世界人权宣言》等国际法文件确认和保障的一项重要权利.其主体是本国公民,义务承担者是国家,客体是国家的积极行为;它具有人权的自然性、民主性和法治性;其内容包括医疗资源的分配权、医疗照顾权、紧急救治权利和医疗知情同意权;公民的基本医疗权是具有法律属性的,是基本人权的一个组成部分.

  13. Preparation for shipment of spent TRIGA fuel elements from the research reactor of the Medical University of Hannover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early seventies a research reactor of type TRIGA Mark I was installed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Medical University of Hannover (MHH) for the production of isotopes with short decay times for medical use. Since new production methods have been developed, the reactor has become obsolete and the MHH decided to decommission it. Probably in the second quarter of 1999 all 76 spent TRIGA fuel elements will be shipped to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), USA, in one cask of type GNS 16. Due to technical reasons within the MHH a special Mobile Transfer System, which is being developed by the company Noell-KRC, will be used for reloading the fuel elements and transferring them from the reactor to the cask GNS 16. A description of the main components of this system as well as the process for transferring the fuel elements follows. (author)

  14. Reciprocal benefit to senior and junior peers: An outcome of a pilot research workshop at medical university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsin, Sadia; Abbas, Seyyeda; Zaidi, Noshin; Azad, Nadia; Kaleem, Fatima

    2015-08-01

    A study was planned to explore and evaluate the role of senior peers in the learning process of their juniors during a Research Methodology workshop, and to assess educational advantages for seniors in leading roles. Twenty medical students participated with 15 juniors (1st to 3rd year) and 5 seniors (final/fourth year) divided into 5 groups with one senior student each at Foundation University Medical College, Islamabad, Pakistan. The seniors supervised and engaged the groups to develop research questions, formulate objectives, review literature, outline study designs, develop study tools/questionnaire and finally shape their projects in synopsis. Overall advantages to both juniors and seniors through this peer-assisted learning model were assessed by feedback proformas with open and closed-ended questions. Senior peers' facilitation was effective in the learning process of junior peers. Senior peers also gained academic benefit by exercising their leadership qualities through teaching and maintaining group dynamics.

  15. Attitudes and views of medical students toward anatomy learnt in the preclinical phase at King Khalid University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A Kemeir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the present study was to determine the views and attitude of clinical medical students toward gross anatomy courses taught to them in preclinical years and their relevance to their medical practice. Materials and Methods: A structured questionnaire of 16 items was distributed to 146 clinical students. The study group included both genders (104 males and 42 females. A total of 121 students (83% responded to the questionnaire. Results: The responses obtained in relation to the clarity of the anatomy course outline its impact on their ability to think and solve problems, develop their skills as members of a team, and its relevance to their clinical practice and their ability to engage in common clinical practices were negative. Conclusion : There is an urgent need to redesign the anatomy curriculum in King Khalid University in order to enable the graduates to deliver adequate health care to the community.

  16. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 5: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirement of EHAP. The following topics are addressed in this report: environmental medicine and risk communication: curriculum and a professional support network-Department of Family Medicine; environmental hazards assessment and education program in pharmacy graduate education in risk assessment; and graduate education risk assessment.

  17. Preparation for shipment of spent TRIGA fuel elements from the research reactor of the Medical University of Hannover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, Gabriele; Cordes, Harro [Medical University of Hannover, D-30625 Hannover (Germany); Ebbinghaus, Kurt; Haferkamp, Dirk [NOELL-KRC, D-97064 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    In the early seventies a research reactor of type TRIGA Mark I was installed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Medical University of Hannover (MHH) for the production of isotopes with short decay times for medical use. Since new production methods have been developed, the reactor has become obsolete and the MHH decided to decommission it. Probably in the second quarter of 1999 all 76 spent TRIGA fuel elements will be shipped to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), USA, in one cask of type GNS 16. Due to technical reasons within the MHH a special Mobile Transfer System, which is being developed by the company Noell-KRC, will be used for reloading the fuel elements and transferring them from the reactor to the cask GNS 16. A description of the main components of this system as well as the process for transferring the fuel elements follows. (author)

  18. A Study on the Organizational Entrepreneurship: A Case Study in Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torabipour

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Organizational entrepreneurship focuses on proactive actions, which may lead to the new productions, new services and/or new processes. Implementation of organizational entrepreneurship plans has many benefits including organizational cost reduction and the increase of organizational capital assets. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the organizational entrepreneurship status in view of the managers of Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was performed on 67 of the managers of Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences. Data were gathered by a 30-item standard questionnaire. Reliability efficient of the questionnaire was 0.77. Ten dimensions of organizational entrepreneurship including innovation, conditions for demonstration of entrepreneurial behavior, detection and discovery of opportunities, level of flexibility, decision-making system, organizational learning, organizational culture, staff training, reward and incentive system and managerial support system for innovative ideas were studied. Finally, the data were analyzed by using the SPSS version 18. Data analyzing was performed by one-way ANOVA and χ² tests. Results Among the 10 dimensions studies in this study, innovation (with mean score 11.47 ± 2.56 and decision making system (with mean score 11.47 ± 2.65 score had the highest rank. The dimension of managerial support system for innovative ideas and organizational culture had the lowest ranks, respectively. Overall status of organizational entrepreneurship was desirable (with mean score 104.9 ± 24.4. In addition, the results showed that there was not a significant relationship between organizational entrepreneurship status and demographic and job characteristics of the managers, except educational level (P > 0.05. Conclusions The status of the organizational entrepreneurship was assessed in view of managers in Ahvaz University of Medical Sciences. The overall

  19. A Three Year Undergraduate Program (B.SC) in Medical Radiation Physics in the Ariel University Center of Samaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three year undergraduate program (B.Sc.) in Medical Radiation Physics was established in the Ariel University Center of Samaria. The program was submitted to the Council of Higher Education (MALAG) in 2003 and was finally approved by the Council on October 2005. Registration for the first class was announced in January 2006. Studies started on October 2006. Of 24 candidates who applied, 16 were admitted. 12 of the 16 students completed their study duties in the first year. All of them started their second year studies in October 2007

  20. The Perceived long-term impact of the radiological curriculum innovation in the medical doctors training at Ghent University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V., E-mail: elena.kourdioukova@ugent.be [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Valcke, Martin [Department of Educational Studies, Ghent University, H. Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    Objectives: How do students experience and perceive the innovative undergraduate radiology curriculum at Ghent University, and what explains differences in student perception? Methods: A survey was presented to the 2008 cohort of students enrolled in the undergraduate medical curriculum at Ghent University. The survey focused on their experiences and perceptions in relation to the innovative undergraduate radiology teaching. Results and conclusion: The present research results point at a favorable perception of the innovative radiology curriculum components. The study points - both during pre-clinical and clinical years - at the appreciation for curriculum components that combine traditional curriculum components (ex-cathedra lessons with syllabus) with distance learning components such as E-learning and E-testing. In clinical years - as expected - students switch to the application of knowledge and skills and therefore heavily appreciate practice linked curriculum components.

  1. [Medical university teaching staff training for formation of communicative competence in dentists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopanova, E V; Lomiashvili, L M

    2015-01-01

    Psychology and pedagogical preparation provides improvement of the ability of psychological interaction with the patient, promotes deepening of constructive cooperation between them. It facilitates collecting and analysis of clinical data and has direct impact on efficiency of treatment and prophylactic actions. Formation of communicative competence becomes one of key problems of continuous medical education. Introduction of the Medical Communication module in the program of professional development will provide modern technologies of training in technics of active hearing, effective communication, adjustment of contact, feedback, behavior in a stress situation.

  2. Needlestick Injuries Among Medical and Dental Students at the University of Kerman. A Questionnaire Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hashemipour, M.; A.Sadeghi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of needlestick injury (NSI) and the factors associated with it among medical and dental students in Kerman province during the 2006 year.Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 269 medical and dental students to evaluate NSIs and practices regarding the protective strategies. These students were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire. The data were ana-lyzed by t-test and chi-square test.R...

  3. The department of infectious diseases North-Western State Medical University named after I.I. Mechnikov. From the Past to the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The history of the department of infectious diseases at North-Western State Medical University named after I.I. Mechnikov since its foundation to the present day is presented in this article. Key issues of educational-methodical, scientific and medical work of the department in different historical periods are highlighted.

  4. Assessment of the Required Manpower for Shiraz University of Medical Sciences hospitals based on Ministry of Health and Medical Education Method, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Kavosi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: New organization’s success depends on the efficient use of human resources In this study, we aimed to estimate the staffing needs in hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS according to model proposed by the Ministry of Health and Medical Education in 2012. Method: This is a cross-sectional definitive study conducted in three general and six specialized SUMS hospitals. The research tool used was a checklist that determines the number of nurses, paraclinic and service employees and finally the decrease and increase of human resources in the departments of the hospitals regarding Iranian Ministry of Health (MOH issues. The data were collected and analyzed using SPSS software to determine the differences between the current situation in accordance to MOH issues. Results: Results showed that of the nine teaching hospitals of SUMs in 2012, Namazi hospital had 288 redundant staff and Khalili hospital had a shortage of manpower in 8 places . We observeda deficiency in human resources in all the studied hospitals. Also, the distribution of human resources among most of the hospital departments was not conform with MOH issues. Conclusion: Various models have been proposed for estimating human resources of hospitals. Because of better ergometer and time to estimate the correct manpower, the model introduced by the Department of Health is suitable for planning to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the hospitals.

  5. Achieving Educational Goals in Neurology Ward from the Viewpoint of Clinical Clerkship at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Razazian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In medical education, setting goals for clinical clerkship is the responsibility of educational groups. Taking the students' opinions into account, it is possible to study the efficacy of education in terms of learning and achieving educational goals. (1In periodontics and restorative departments of Shahed and Tehran University of Medical Sciences, it is reported that, achieving educational goals is not poss-ible (2. Also, some studies have reported the inadequacy of educational objectives in anesthesia clerkship from the viewpoint of medical students (3. In this descriptive-analytic study, 166 medical students of neurology wards at Imam Reza Hospital in Kermanshah during 2011- 2012 were selected via a survey to study the achievement rate of educational goals. We used a questionnaire to collect data. Reliability of the questionnaire (including content and face validity was obtained via consulting with ten faculty members of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences.The mean age of the participants was 21.34 (±1.43 years. 60.5% of them were females. 3.6% were freshmen and 49.9% were sophomores. 79.5% knew the goals before the start of clinical clerkship and 76.5% took part in the justification session in which their responsibility and method of evaluation were presented. 78.3% of them received the emergency protocol of Neurology. Overall, the participants ranked the goal achievement as high (41.6%, well (45.2% and medium (23.3%. There was no statistically significantly association between achieving educational goals and age and clinical clerkship period. However, there was a statis¬tically significantly association between the increase rate of achieving educational goals and introducing the objectives at the beginning of clinical clerkship period (p=0.011, justification session at the beginning of clinical clerkship (p=0.019 being familiar with emergency protocols of Neurology (p=0.04 and the season (winter in comparison with fall and spring in

  6. The Reasons for Choosing Medical Education and Expectations of the First Year Students in Ataturk University Faculty of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeliha Cansever

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the reasons for choosing medical education and the expectations of the new students of the first year of medical school that began in the academic year 2012-2013. Method: A questionnaire was given to the first year students, which consisted of questions concerning gender, place of residence, high school from which she/he graduated, socio-demographic characteristics, such as education level of parents, whether the parents played a role in preferring medical education, reasons for choosing medical school and the expectations related to medical education. A total of 31 questions were asked, some of which were open-ended. The students responded to the survey on a voluntary basis. Results: A total of 213 students participated in the study. The mean age was 18.71±1.32 years. Of all the students, 53.5% (n=114 was female. The place of residence of the students’ families was mostly in the Eastern Anatolia Region, the majority of which were in the town center. Of all the parents, 50.0% (n=106 of the fathers and only 20% (n=42 of the mothers had a university degree. The parents played a role in making the choice of the students. There were no other physicians in the family in most of the cases. Of all the students, 94.8% (n=202 had preparation courses for university entrance exams. Violence towards the physicians affected the students’ choice in only 7% (n=15 of the cases. For 99% (n=208 of respondents, medical education was the first choice. Of all the students, 34.2% had this preference, as this was their dream career. Conclusion: Studying medicine is still popular despite the recently increased adverse events such as violence towards physicians, and most of the students study medicine on their own volition. It is encouraging and promising for the future that the students voluntarily choose for this difficult and long-term training.

  7. A survey of quality and quantity indexes of multiple choice question (MCQ exams of medical residents at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences: 2008-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R pourmirza kalhori

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multiple choice questions (MCQs are widely used to assess medical residents. The study aims to analyse MCQ exams of medical residents administered at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences during 2008-2012. Method: Data of this retrospective study were extracted from 63 MCQ exams including 9600 tests. Quantity related variables included discrimination index, difficulty level, reliability of test index (KR20. Quality related variables included proportion of questions without structural defect and proportion of taxonomy 1, 2 and 3 questions. Data were collected using MCQs from question bank and analyzed by SPSS V.16 software. Results: Over the specified five years, the average difficulty level was %0.62, the average discrimination index was 0.27 and the average of reliability coefficient (KR20 in total exams was 0.88. The average of questions in Taxonomy 1 over the specified years was 33.5% and questions with taxonomy 2 and 3 were66.5%. The average of questions without structural defect was 62.6% which fell in the unacceptable range. A significant difference was observed in reliability coefficient (KR20- (P=0.017, difficulty level (P=0.001, taxonomy 1 (P=0.001 and Taxonomy 2 and 3 (P=0.006. Conclusion: According to findings of this study, taxonomy 2 and 3 were decreased and taxonomy 1 was increased over the specified five years. We recommend the specialist board members and the Deputy for Education of the Ministry of Health to consider the results of this study and react to them by improving MCQ quality of future exams.

  8. Medical students' experiences of diseases in internal medicine in university and community hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar-Krieger, HMJ; Bender, W; Kreeftenberg, HG; Stewart, RE; Sleijfer, DT

    2002-01-01

    Because medical students in The Netherlands should achieve common national objectives, it is important to know whether clinical experiences in different hospitals are comparable. The research questions were: (1) Do students achieve learning experiences of the required diseases during the internship

  9. Prevalence of Sleep Deprivation and Relation with Depressive Symptoms among Medical Residents in King Fahd University Hospital, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esraa M. Al-Maddah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Sleep deprivation is common among medical residents of all specialties. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of sleep deprivation and depressive symptoms among medical residents in King Fahd University Hospital (KFUH in Al Khobar, Saudi Arabia. Furthermore, the association between sleep deprivation, sleepiness and depressive symptoms was examined. Methods: This cross-sectional study took place between February and April 2012 and involved 171 KFUH medical residents of different specialties. Data were collected using a specifically designed questionnaire eliciting demographic information, working hours and number of hours of sleep. In addition, validated Arabic versions of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory-2 (BDI-2 were used. Results: The prevalence of acute sleep deprivation and chronic sleep deprivation among residents in KFUH was 85.9% and 63.2%, respectively. The prevalence of overall sleepiness was 52%; 43.3% reported being excessively sleepy in certain situations while 8.8% reported being excessively sleepy regardless of the situation. Based on the BDI-2, the prevalence of mild, moderate and severe depressive symptoms was 43.3%, 15.2% and 4.7%, respectively. Significant associations were found between sleep deprivation and depressive symptoms; depressive symptoms and sleepiness, and depressive symptoms and being a female resident. Conclusion: The vast majority of medical residents had acute sleep deprivation, with more than half suffering from chronic sleep deprivation. The number of hours and quality of sleep among the residents were strongly associated with depressive symptoms. New regulations are recommended regarding the number of working hours and night duties for medical residents. Further studies should assess these new regulations on a regular basis.

  10. Prevalence and correlates of HIV-risky sexual behaviors among students attending the Medical and Social Welfare Center of the University of Maroua, Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Nansseu, Jobert Richie N; Ndoula, Shalom Tchokfe; Wang, Binhuan; Jingi, Ahmadou M; Bigna, Jean Joel R; Aminde, Leopold N.; Youmbi, Rosette Amélie; Fokom-Domgue, Joël

    2015-01-01

    Background Data on sexual behaviors in Cameroonian youths are needed to design and implement effective preventive strategies against HIV/AIDS. This study aimed at assessing sociodemographic and religious factors associated with sexual behaviors among university students in Cameroon. Methods In 2011, 411 university students were surveyed by a self-administered questionnaire at the Medical and Social Welfare Center of the University of Maroua. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine...

  11. Information Literacy among Medical Students in the College of Health Sciences in Niger Delta University, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baro, Emmanuel E.; Endouware, Benake-ebide C.; Ubogu, Janet O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to investigate whether undergraduate students in the College of Health Sciences in Niger Delta University are information literate, and to determine whether they are aware of and use different information resources including electronic ones, and to assess their ability to evaluate information before use.…

  12. Investigation of the Relationship Between Mental Health and Organizational Employees’ work Fatigue and Deputyships of Yasouj Medical Science University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mahmoodi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Peoples’ mental health in improvement of society’s national and ideal aims have the main and most importance such as thriftiness in material and spiritual costs. Work fatigue is the result of severe decrease of person’s capabilities sources that counter with long –time stress, especially work stress. This study was designed with the aim of investigating the relationship between mental health and work fatigue at Yasuj University of Medical Sciences. Method of investigation: The present co-operation – descriptive study was conducted on 274 participants from 961 organization employees and deputyships of Yasuj University of Medical Sciences in 2013-2014 who were chosen randomly. In order to collect data, Maslach questionnaire of mental health condition and work fatigue was used. Data were analysed with statistical tests of the interconnection index Pearson and Friedman’s test. Findings: There was no significant relationship between mental health and work fatigue dimensions (p<0/05. A meaningful relationship was observed between studied models after usage. High attention and metamorphosis of personality had the least importance. Conclusion: When employees have full mental health and job satisfaction, the ability to achieve maximum efficiency in the organization is reachable.

  13. The Relationship between Organizational Citizenship Behavior and Performance of the Staff of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences and Health Services

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    Gholamreza Memarzadeh Tehran

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available More than two decades, the first organ and colleagues of OCB have been expressed through the words. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational citizenship behavior and performance of employees of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences and Health Services. The population in this study has included some units to the Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. This study is a descriptive research method will be correlated. In analyzing the data, both descriptive and inferential statistics were used. Descriptive statistics including frequency tables is the mean level of analytic structural equation modeling, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA and path analysis (Path Analysis is used. Software used for data analysis software package SPSS version 18 software package LISREL 8.54 version of Windows are. The results show that, in general purpose, due to the OCB altruism, work ethics, sportsmanship and civic behavior has increased the performance. So after, polite and considerate of OCB on employee performance was not affected. So over all research hypothesis is accepted.

  14. Prevalence and risk factors of poor sleep quality among Inner Mongolia Medical University students: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Qin, Peng; Zhao, Yunshan; Duan, Shengyun; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Ying; Hu, Yueling; Sun, Juan

    2016-10-30

    Medical students face new challenges at the beginning of college life, such as being responsible for oneself, an unfamiliar environment, social obligations, and academic stress, all of which influence or even heavily change their sleep quality and life, leading to sleep-related problems to some degree. This study investigated the relationship between sleep quality and behavior among students at the Inner Mongolia Medical University in China. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect information on sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle habits. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was also used. A total of 6044 and 6085 students completed the questionnaires in 2011 and 2013. According to the index, 27.8% (1694) of students had poor sleep quality with major risk factors being poor academic performance and interpersonal relationships in 2013. Among others, regular exercise less than three times a week, skipping breakfast, and studying in higher grades were associated with poor sleep quality. These results will help university administrators understand the risk factors of poor sleep quality among students, which can be improved through individual efforts, and provide adequate counseling and systematic education to improve their behavior and lifestyle. PMID:27500455

  15. Experiences with the implementation of a national teaching qualification in university medical centres and veterinary medicine in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Willemina M Ineke; Zanting, Anneke

    2015-02-01

    In 2008, a compulsory national basic teaching qualification was introduced for all university teachers in the Netherlands. At that time all eight University Medical Centres (UMCs) and the only Faculty of Veterinary Medicine had adopted or were setting up teacher development programmes. This study explores how these programmes relate to each other and to the basic teaching qualification. To gather information on teacher development programmes in the UMCs and the Veterinary Medicine Faculty an online survey was filled out by teacher development representatives from each of them. The programmes had main features in common (e.g. competency based and portfolio assessment), but differed somewhat in contents according to the local situation. Importantly, they had all been formally accepted as equivalent to the basic teaching qualification. We consider the freedom to tailor the qualifications to the medical context as well as to the local situation of the UMCs and the Veterinary Medicine Faculty one of the major success factors and the well-established collaboration between teacher development representatives of the UMCs and the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine as another. Challenges for the future include embedding the teacher development programmes in the institutional organizations and maintaining and further developing the programmes and the competencies of the qualified teachers, e.g. in a senior qualification.

  16. Investigating Awareness Amount of Nursing Students of Medical Sciences University of Bushehr about Ethic in Nursing Profession -2013

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    F Jahanpour

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Nurses' ethical responsibility in practice and care is required to be aware of the principles of professional ethics. The aim of this study was to determine nursing students' knowledge of ethics in nursing of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In the present analytical-descriptive sectional study, in which the participants are 4-8 semester nursing students of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences. The research tools for collecting information were tow-section questionnaires consisting of demographic data and specialized questions about ethic and rules in the nursing profession. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS software by using independent t-tests and chi-square. Results: Total awareness of 4-8 semester nursing students about ethic and rules in nursing profession was intermediate (53.78 percent. There was a considerable relation between sexuality and satisfaction (p.436. A considerable relation between students' educational semester and satisfaction amount was not also not observed (p>.927. Conclusions: Students' awareness about professional ethic wasn't very desirable so it is suggested that by holding moral workshops in nursing or settling moral courses in nursing students curriculum will increase the amount of nursing students' awareness about nursing ethics.

  17. Assessment of Entrepreneurial Skills and Its Association with Social Intelligence in Students of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

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    Yahya Safari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social intelligence and entrepreneurship are among features leading to the academic and career achievements. Due to the importance of this issue, the present study was performed to determine the level of entrepreneurial skills in students of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences and its association with social intelligence. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study by using systematic random sampling method, we selected 350 students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. Data were collected using entrepreneurial skills standard and social intelligence questionnaires. Reliability and validity of two questionnaires have been already assessed in previous studies. Results analyzed by descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation coefficient test. Results: Students’ entrepreneurial skill was totally 255.69 which is assessed at poor scores range. Research findings also indicated the presence of a statistically significantly positive association between social intelligence and risk-taking (r=0.14 P=0.035, locus of control (r=0.72, P=0.019, need to achievement (r=0.54, P=0.012, mental health (r=0.53, P=0.033, pragmatism (r=0.45, P=0.04, ambiguity toleration (r=0.58, P=0.029, positive thinking (r=0.72, P=0.019, and challenging (r=0.29, P=0.016. Conclusion: Given the students’ poor entrepreneurial skills and the correlation between social intelligence and entrepreneurial components, it is recommended to strengthen social intelligence and consequently promote entrepreneurial skills.

  18. Relationship between organizational effectiveness and the personnel managers’ position of control in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIDA KESHTKARAN

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The main objective of all organizations is to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the personnel’s performance and this partly depends on effective management. Managers are valuable assets and studying their behavior and personality dimensions may provide important guide for effectiveness and efficiency improvement. In this connection, the objective of this research is to determine the association between organizational effectiveness and the personnel managers’ position of control in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: The present research is a cross-sectional study. The statistical societies of this research included all personnel and personnel managers in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. 168 subjects of 8 departments were selected through accidental-stratified sampling and the data for the managers of these departments were also collected. Two questionnaires, organizational effectiveness and Ratters’ position of control, were used for data collection. Results: The results of this research showed that there was a significant association between organizational effectiveness and managers’ position of control. However, we didn’t find a statistically significant association between organizational effectiveness and managers’ position of control in terms of their sex, managerial experience and education. Conclusion: As managers with internal position of control are more effective than those with external position of control, we can appoint individuals with internal control position to managerial posts. Furthermore, we can train managers to shift their external position of control to the internal one.

  19. Assessment of Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative in Three Hospitals Affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences

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    Firoozeh Bairami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the status of patient safety in three hospitals, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, based on the critical standards of Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative (PSFHI. Materials and Methods:In this cross-sectional study, conducted in 2014, we used PSFHI assessment tool to evaluate the status of patient safety in three hospitals, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences; these general referral hospitals were selected purposefully. PSFHI assessment tool is comprised of 140 patient safety standards in five domains, categorized in 24 sub-domains. The five major domains include leadership and management, patient and public involvement, safe evidence-based clinical practices, safe environment, and lifelong learning. Results: All three hospitals met more than 70% of the critical standards. The highest score in critical standards (> 80% was related to the domain of leadership and management in all hospitals. The average score in the domain of safe evidence-based clinical practices was 70% in the studied hospitals. Finally, all the hospitals met 50% of the critical standards in the domains of patient and public involvement and safe environment. Conclusion: Based on the findings, PSFHI is a suitable program for meeting patient safety goals. The selected hospitals in this survey all had a high managerial commitment to patient safety; therefore, they could obtain high scores on critical standards.

  20. Stress and symptoms of depression among medical students at the University of Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldorsen, Hilde; Bak, Nanna Hasle; Dissing, Agnete;

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to assess the levels of stress and symptoms of depression among Danish medical students, as well as explore the effect of social support on psychological distress. The results are based on numbers from the follow-up study 'From Student to Graduate' (j.nr 2006-41-6876). Materials......: 30.5% of the students reported depressive symptoms. Stress frequency measured a mean of 2.26 (SD = 1.35). The mean for stress perception was 2.85 (SD = 1.30). Women reported higher levels of stress and depression compared to male medical students, but the differences were not significant (p > 0.......05). Only the dimensions of stress and coping alone were significantly associated with reporting symptoms of depression (p Students coping alone had a two times higher odds ratio for reporting depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Nearly one third of the participants reported feeling depressed. Stress...

  1. [Consultation per video-conferencing with regional hospitals: the MEDKOM project of the Hannover Medical University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, H; Poliwoda, H

    1999-01-01

    Consultations between doctors are necessary tools for decisions in diagnosis and treatment of patients. The mainstay is a sound communication between the participants, using verbal and audio-visual means. Usually clinical findings and imaging results are included. Using video technology with ISDN (integrated services digital network), such consulting can be performed across any distance. The department of hematology and oncology of the Medical School Hanover has introduced such a system in 1989 for conferencing with 12 regional hospitals and two private practices. It is now a well recognized and established system being applied for 270 sessions and for 1100 Patients per year. It is an integrated part of the co-operation, also allows medical education and quality improvement. PMID:10091308

  2. Medical and surgical ward rounds in teaching hospitals of Kuwait University: students’ perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Marwan, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Sara AlMutar,1 Lulwa AlTourah,1 Hussain Sadeq,2 Jumanah Karim,2 Yousef Marwan3 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pediatrics, Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Al-Razi Orthopedic Hospital, Kuwait City, Kuwait Background: Teaching sessions for medical students during ward rounds are an essential component of bedside teaching, providing students with the opportunity to regard patients as actual people, and to observe their physical conditions directly, allowin...

  3. Assessment of students’ satisfaction with nursing studies at the Faculty of Health Science, Warsaw Medical University. Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Gotlib

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:: The analysis of the opinions of students regarding their level of satisfaction with their studies constitutes one of the basic elements of global assessment of the quality of teaching at university-level schools. Aim of the research: : To analyse the assessment of satisfaction of students with the learning content and teaching methods in the field of nursing at the Faculty of Health Science, Medical University of Warsaw. Material and methods:: The study enrolled 200 full-time (ST and part-time (NST students, including 195 women (F and 5 men (M. The mean age was 34 years and the questionnaire return rate was 55%. This was a voluntary and anonymous questionnaire study, with a questionnaire developed by the authors including 27 close-ended questions. The students received the questionnaire in the form of a link to an e-form. Statistical analysis was performed using Statsoft Statistica 10.0 (licensed to Medical University of Warsaw and Mann-Whitney U test (significance level: p < 0.05. Results:: The majority of ST and NST students were satisfied with studying Nursing at Medical University of Warsaw. The vast majority of the study participants reported that the number of hours of lectures was sufficient, with ST students reporting thois significantly more often (p < 0.05. The students from both groups reported that the number of hours of seminars, classes and professional training sessions was sufficient (p = NS. The vast majority of the ST and NST students expressed a preference to choose theoretical classes and seminars on their own, in accordance with their interests and the character of their job. Compared to the ST students, the NST students significantly more often (p < 0.05 declared that the curriculum did not include a sufficient number of hours of the following courses: Contracting Health Benefits, Law in Health Protection and European Nursing. Conclusions: : Teaching in the field in Nursing met with the expectations of

  4. An Internet supported workflow for the publication process in UMVF (French Virtual Medical University).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Jean-Marie; Bourde, Annabel; Cuggia, Marc; Garcelon, Nicolas; Souf, Nathalie; Darmoni, Stephan; Beuscart, Régis; Brunetaud, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    The " Université Médicale Virtuelle Francophone" (UMVF) is a federation of French medical schools. Its main goal is to share the production and use of pedagogic medical resources generated by academic medical teachers. We developed an Open-Source application based upon a workflow system, which provides an improved publication process for the UMVF. For teachers, the tool permits easy and efficient upload of new educational resources. For web masters it provides a mechanism to easily locate and validate the resources. For librarian it provide a way to improve the efficiency of indexation. For all, the utility provides a workflow system to control the publication process. On the students side, the application improves the value of the UMVF repository by facilitating the publication of new resources and by providing an easy way to find a detailed description of a resource and to check any resource from the UMVF to ascertain its quality and integrity, even if the resource is an old deprecated version. The server tier of the application is used to implement the main workflow functionalities and is deployed on certified UMVF servers using the PHP language, an LDAP directory and an SQL database. The client tier of the application provides both the workflow and the search and check functionalities. A unique signature for each resource, was needed to provide security functionality and is implemented using a Digest algorithm. The testing performed by Rennes and Lille verified the functionality and conformity with our specifications. PMID:17344092

  5. Prevalence and Side Effects of Energy Drink Consumption among Medical Students at Umm Al-Qura University, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif A. Bawazeer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Energy drinks are freely available at markets and shops on the university campus without regulation or proper education regarding its side effects. The caffeine amount within energy drinks is high and could become an addictive substance or cause intoxication. Therefore, this study aims to assess the prevalence of energy drink consumption and its reported side effects among medical students. Methods:A total number of 257 medical students from Umm Al-Qura University completed a questionnaire about energy drinks that was administrated electronically from September through November, 2012. Results:Out of the 257 participants, 27.2% (n=70 reported consuming at least one energy drink per month, with 61.5% (n=48 being males. Males consume significantly more energy drinks than females (p=0.0001. The students consumed energy drinks to get energy in general (32.8% and while studying for exams or finishing a project (31.4%. Other reasons given include, lack of sleep (12.8%, just to be like friends (11.4%, or driving (8.5%. Heart palpitations are the most common side effect in our sample (20%, followed by insomnia (10%, headache and tremors (5.7%, nausea and vomiting (4.2% and nervousness (2.8%. Conclusion: Energy drinks consumption is common practice among medical students and the main reason cited for consumption is the need for energy during general activities. Approximately one-third of the consumers manifested some side effect after consumption. We recommend the need to create public awareness about energy drinks. Further studies are recommended to assess the educational level of students consuming energy drinks, about the dangerous side effects.

  6. Patients' satisfaction with inpatient services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarem, Jalil; Larijani, Bagher; Joodaki, Kobra; Ghaderi, Sahar; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Mohammadpoor, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of patient feedback is considered as a critical part of effective and efficient management in developed countries. The main objectives of this study were to assess patient satisfaction with the services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, identify areas of patient dissatisfaction, and find ways to improve patient satisfaction with hospital services. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 phases. After 2 initial preparation phases, the valid instrument was applied through telephone interviews with 21476 participants from 26 hospitals during August, 2011 to February, 2013.Using the Satisfaction Survey tool, information of patient's demographic characteristics were collected and patient satisfaction with 15 areas of hospital services and the intent to return the same hospitals were assessed. The mean score of overall satisfaction with hospital services was 16.86 ± 2.72 out of 20. It was found that 58% of participants were highly satisfied with the services provided. Comparison of mean scores showed physician and medical services (17.75 ± 4.02), laboratory and radiology services (17.67 ± 3.66), and privacy and religious issues (17.55 ± 4.32) had the highest satisfaction. The patients were the most dissatisfied with the food services (15.50 ± 5.54). It was also found that 83.7% of the participants intended to return to the same hospital in case of need, which supported the measured satisfaction level. Patient satisfaction in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences was high. It seems that the present study, with its large sample size, has sufficient reliability to express the patient satisfaction status. Moreover, appropriate measures should be taken in some areas (food, cost, and etc.) to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:27471589

  7. Patients' satisfaction with inpatient services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2011-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarem, Jalil; Larijani, Bagher; Joodaki, Kobra; Ghaderi, Sahar; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Mohammadpoor, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of patient feedback is considered as a critical part of effective and efficient management in developed countries. The main objectives of this study were to assess patient satisfaction with the services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, identify areas of patient dissatisfaction, and find ways to improve patient satisfaction with hospital services. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 phases. After 2 initial preparation phases, the valid instrument was applied through telephone interviews with 21476 participants from 26 hospitals during August, 2011 to February, 2013.Using the Satisfaction Survey tool, information of patient's demographic characteristics were collected and patient satisfaction with 15 areas of hospital services and the intent to return the same hospitals were assessed. The mean score of overall satisfaction with hospital services was 16.86 ± 2.72 out of 20. It was found that 58% of participants were highly satisfied with the services provided. Comparison of mean scores showed physician and medical services (17.75 ± 4.02), laboratory and radiology services (17.67 ± 3.66), and privacy and religious issues (17.55 ± 4.32) had the highest satisfaction. The patients were the most dissatisfied with the food services (15.50 ± 5.54). It was also found that 83.7% of the participants intended to return to the same hospital in case of need, which supported the measured satisfaction level. Patient satisfaction in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences was high. It seems that the present study, with its large sample size, has sufficient reliability to express the patient satisfaction status. Moreover, appropriate measures should be taken in some areas (food, cost, and etc.) to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:27471589

  8. VIEWPOINTS OF SUPERVISORS ABOUT THE PROCESS OF DISSERTATIONS FOR GENERAL MEDICINE PROGRAM SHAHID SADOUGHI UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Ayatollahi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is important to know the viewpoints of supervisors about different issues and problems in preparing dissertations (as a mandatory course in general medicine (MD program such as the objectives of the course, improving learning methods, problems of the practical phase, and their ideas about the course efficacy. This study explores supervisors’ views concerning the thesis process and its related problems in Shaheed Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In total 119 academic members as supervisors from medical school participated in this cross sectional descriptive study. A self administered questionnaire, which proved to be valid and reliable, was used for data collection. The questionnaires were completed individually in the participants’ office or school. SPSS software was used for data analysis. Results were analyzed according to the frequency distribution of variables and compared by t-test and ANOVA. Results: Of those 42.3% of supervisors believed that thesis is necessary for Medical students but according to the supervisors, the most important problems were access to statistical guide masters allocating appropriate budget, and suitable time's allocation for student's guidance. Conclusion: Our results showed that dissertations in general medicine program are facing some problems, and revising the course plane may improve the quality of dissertations.

  9. HEPATITIS B VACCINATION COVERAGE AND POSTVACCINATION SEROLOGIC TESTING AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS AT A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY IN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pernambuco de Souza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the hepatitis B vaccination coverage among medical students at a public university in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and their compliance with the postvaccination serologic testing recommendations. Of the total of 858 students, 675 (78.7% participated in the study. Among the participants, 48.9% (95% CI: 45.1% to 52.7% were vaccinated against hepatitis B (received ≥ 3 doses of the vaccine, 31.6% were not (received 0, 1 or 2 doses, and 19.6% did not know their vaccination status. Hepatitis B vaccination coverage increased from 26.0% among first-year students to 70.6% among sixth-year students while the prevalence of unknown vaccination status decreased from 39.7% among first-year students to 2.4% among sixth-year students. The frequency of unvaccinated students ranged from 23.7% among fifth-year students to 34.4% among first-year students. Only 34.8% of the vaccinated students performed the anti-HBs testing after vaccination. Among these medical students, we found a low adherence to the hepatitis B vaccination and to the postvaccination serologic testing. A comprehensive hepatitis B immunization program should be offered to students at this medical school.

  10. Mini clinical evaluation exercise in undergraduate dermatovenereology education: an experience of University of Pamukkale, Medical Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeniz Ergin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX is being widely used in medical education and is a reliable and valid method for the assessment of residents’ competency in medical interviewing, physical examination, humanistic qualities/professionalism, clinical judgment, counseling skills, organization, and efficiency. In order to enhance formative evaluation methods in our faculty, we planned to apply the method to students on dermatovenereology training. Materials and Methods: The Mini-CEX was performed by residents to 42 medical students. At first, 5 residents were evaluated by a faculty member with Mini-CEX and were informed about their application-oriented evaluator roles. The students were informed prior to conducting the assessment. Standard Mini-CEX form was used for the assessment. The participants were rated in 7 competencies and each was rated using a 9-point Likert scale. At the end of each encounter, students and evaluators rated their satisfaction with Mini-CEX using a 9-point Likert scale. Student’s t-test and one-way ANOVA were used for statistical analysis. Student feedback was evaluated with “grounded theory”. Results: A total of 50 assessments, 44 in outpatient and 6 in inpatient clinic, were performed. Satisfaction with the Mini-CEX was rated by the evaluators and the students as 7,16 and 7,98, respectively. There was no significant difference between the evaluators in terms of student satisfaction. Average time spent on observing the encounter and in giving feedback was 16.5 and 6.5 minutes, respectively. There was no significant difference between assessors in terms of time spent observing and giving feedback. Average scores of assessed clinical competencies were between 4,28 and 8,14. The highest scores were reported on humanistic qualities/ professionalism whereas the lowest were reported on clinical judgment skills. Discussion: According to our data, we believe that Mini-CEX may be used as an

  11. Environmental Risk Perception of Last Grade Students in Hacettepe University Medical Faculty Within 2005-2006 Education Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazim Ercument Beyhun

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the the level of environmental risk perception and its some determinants of last grade students in Hacettepe University Medical Faculty within 2005-2006 education period. The universe of this cross-sectional study were last grade students of Hacettepe University Medical Faculty within 2005-2006 education period. The data was collected with a structured questionnaire (Environment Awareness Questionnairre via face to face interview. Environment Awareness Questionnairre is a structured Lickert scale including 47 questions which measures the perception levels of environmental risks. The 55.9% of the last grade students who participated to the study were male and the median age was 23. The first three prior environmental risk factors which were perceived as high/very high risks were stres (79.8%, damage of ozone layer (76.9% and motor vehicle accidents (70.2%. The first three prior environmental risk factors which were perceived as low/very low risks were bottled water (57.6%, climatic change (42.9% and lack of house to live in (39.9%. The main source of information about environmental risks for students were physicians and scientific journals and books.It was determined that most of environmental risk factor were not perceived as risk factors by students. The evolution of environmental risk perception and the increase of educations about environmental risks towards doctors who are the important sources of knowledge and counselling for the public will be beneficial. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(5.000: 345-350

  12. Environmental Risk Perception of Last Grade Students in Hacettepe University Medical Faculty Within 2005-2006 Education Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazim Ercument Beyhun

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the the level of environmental risk perception and its some determinants of last grade students in Hacettepe University Medical Faculty within 2005-2006 education period. The universe of this cross-sectional study were last grade students of Hacettepe University Medical Faculty within 2005-2006 education period. The data was collected with a structured questionnaire (Environment Awareness Questionnairre via face to face interview. Environment Awareness Questionnairre is a structured Lickert scale including 47 questions which measures the perception levels of environmental risks. The 55.9% of the last grade students who participated to the study were male and the median age was 23. The first three prior environmental risk factors which were perceived as high/very high risks were stres (79.8%, damage of ozone layer (76.9% and motor vehicle accidents (70.2%. The first three prior environmental risk factors which were perceived as low/very low risks were bottled water (57.6%, climatic change (42.9% and lack of house to live in (39.9%. The main source of information about environmental risks for students were physicians and scientific journals and books.It was determined that most of environmental risk factor were not perceived as risk factors by students. The evolution of environmental risk perception and the increase of educations about environmental risks towards doctors who are the important sources of knowledge and counselling for the public will be beneficial. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(5: 345-350

  13. Universality

    OpenAIRE

    Marinchev, Emil

    2002-01-01

    This article is an attempt for a new vision of the basics of Physics, and of Relativity, in particular. A new generalized principle of inertia is proposed, as an universal principle, based on universality of the conservation laws, not depending on the metric geometry used. The second and the third principles of Newton's mechanics are interpreted as logical consequences. The generalization of the classical principle of relativity made by Einstein as the most basic postulate in the Relativity i...

  14. Osteoradionecrosis of the jaw bones at the University of Kentucky Medical Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, P.; Raybould, T.; Maruyama, Y.

    1989-07-01

    There is disagreement over the management of teeth in irradiated head and neck cancer patients. Some oral surgeons support preirradiation extraction; others favor maintaining teeth. Before 1974, The University of Kentucky Department of Radiation Medicine found osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the jaw in 10.9% of 220 irradiated cancer patients. After a program of oral care was instituted, the incidence declined to 2.7%. Of 109 patients who received radiotherapy between 1976 and 1985, only three (2.7%) developed ORN of the mandible. There was also a reduction in patients treated with interstitial therapy during this time. A review of the most recent experiences shows that, with present management methods at the University of Kentucky, ORN is not a significant problem. Of 30 patients treated in 1986, only one had ORN, and this was of the maxilla. Post-irradiation extractions were not identified as a significant risk for necrosis. Hyperbaric oxygen is used as a treatment for persistent ORN.

  15. Information and communications technology, culture, and medical universities; organizational culture and netiquette among academic staff

    OpenAIRE

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Iravani, Hoorsana; Abzari, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Netiquette is appropriate behavioral etiquette when communicating through computer networks or virtual space. Identification of a dominant organizational culture and its relationship with a network culture offers applied guidelines to top managers of the university to expand communications and develop and learn organization through the use of the internet. The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between netiquette and organizational culture among faculty members...

  16. Internal Assessment of Department of Radiology at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences during 2011-2012

    OpenAIRE

    Farhad Nalini; Vida Sepahi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of educational assessment is promoting the quality of education and efficiency in the educational system (1). In every educational system, keeping quality requires awareness of the strengths and weaknesses and measurement of the objectives (2).The internal assessment is carried out as an introduction to perform external assessment in order to do budgeting and ranking of universities. Therefore, in the past two decades different departments embarked on internal assessment (self-assessm...

  17. Medical Database for the Atomic-Bomb Survivors at Nagasaki University

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Hiroyuki; Mine, Mariko; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Okumura, Yutaka

    1992-01-01

    The Scientific Data Center for Atomic-Bomb Disasters at Nagasaki University was established in 1974. The database of atomicbomb survivors has been in operation since 1977. The database is composed of following 6 physical database : (1) Fundamental information database. (2) Atomic-Bomb Hospital database, (3) Pathological database, (4) Household reconstruction database, (5) Second generation database, and (6) Address database. We review the current contents of the database for its further appli...

  18. Internal Evaluation of Audiology Department, Faculty of Rehabilitation, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mahin Sedaie; Fereshteh Farzianpour; Mansoureh Adel Ghahraman; Ghasem Mohammad Khani; Jamileh Fattahi; Saeed Sarough Farahani; Nematollah Rouhbakhsh; Mahnaz Ahmadi

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aim: Internal Evaluation means assessment of abilities and potentials. To promote the quality of education, research, health and finally rehabilitation is one of the most important roles and responsibilities of the universities. Promotion of quality of the theoretical and practical education for the Audiology students provides this major with its final goal that is to serve society. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the strength, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (...

  19. ANTIHYPERTENSIVE MEDICATION PRESCRIBING PATTERNS IN A UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL IN SOUTH DELHI

    OpenAIRE

    Fowad Khurshid et al.

    2012-01-01

    Study objective: To investigate the use of antihypertensive drugs in hypertensive patients and to identify whether such pattern of prescription is appropriate in accordance with international guidelines for management of hypertension. Methods: This was a prospective analysis. A prescription based survey among patients with established hypertension was conducted at the Medicine Out-Patient Department of University Teaching Hospital in South Delhi, India. Data were collected from patients’ medi...

  20. 10 years of the Urology Chair of the Siberian State Medical University. History of urology in Tomsk

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    Gudkov A.V. Gudkov A.V. Gudkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the history of development of urology in Tomskand the Tomsk Region. After the foundation of the ImperialTomskUniversity, the first university behind the Ural Mountains, in 1878, urology began to develop at the Chair of Hospital Surgery. University professors E.G. Salishchev, P.I. Tikhov, N.I. Berezganovskii, N.A. Bogoraz, V.M. Mysh, A.G. Savinykh, V.M. Voskresenskii and others contributed a tremendous contribution to the development of urology. Since the course of urology was opened in 1959 by Prof. I.S. Petrov, the Clinic of the MedicalUniversitybecame an organizational-methodical center of the urological service of the Tomsk Region. The Clinic trained urologists for the municipal and regional health services. In 1976, and the independent course of urology was organized, and in 2002 the Urology Chair headed by Prof. A.V. Gudkov was founded.

  1. Study of Hospital Records Registration in Teaching Hospitals of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences in 2009

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    M. Shokouhee Solgi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objectives: Hospital records are representative evidences of medical team activities. In this study, we analyzed hospital records in Hamadan teaching hospitals to find out the problem extent and possible solutions for the problem.Materials & Methods: In a cross-sectional study, hospital records from teaching hospitals were gathered and put in check lists. We used convenient sampling from all departments, so that by referring to hospital achieve, all new discharged cases from different wards were extracted. We used a 16 item check list which targeted some basic questions like: admission order, discharge order, early and final diagnosis and so on. In each case perfect answer was registered in yes or no boxes. Collected data were analyzed by SPSS16 hardware.Results: We achieved the following results after analyzing 457 records from 4 teaching hospitals; there were admission note in 94% of the patients' files. 93% of physicians and residents had signed the orders. 88% of the history sheets were being singed by medical students and/or residents. Differential diagnoses were present in only 75% of cases. Final diagnoses were found in 90% and discharge notes in 84% of the files. 86% of physicians had recorded therapeutic and/or surgical procedures. Paraclinical procedure recordings were present in 83% of the files. Only 63% of residents and/or interns had signed their progress notes. And nursing papers were signed in 99% of records. There was exact counseling information in 83% of the files which needed to be consulted; meanwhile 82% of the consulted files had been signed by physicians. Conclusion: This study shows that, there are important defects in hospital records. It seems that there are multiple factors contributing to the problem, such as overcrowding of the hospitals, careless medical students and the most important factors is insufficient training about the problem.

  2. Experimentation with and knowledge regarding water-pipe tobacco smoking among medical students at a major university in Brazil

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    Stella Regina Martins

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Water-pipe tobacco smoking is becoming increasingly more common among young people. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of the use of water pipes and other forms of tobacco use, including cigarette smoking, among medical students, as well as to examine the attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge of those students regarding this issue. METHODS: We administered a questionnaire to students enrolled in the University of São Paulo School of Medicine, in São Paulo, Brazil. The respondents were evaluated in their third and sixth years of medical school, between 2008 and 2013. Comparisons were drawn between the two years. RESULTS: We evaluated 586 completed questionnaires. Overall, the prevalence of current cigarette smokers was low, with a decline among males (9.78% vs. 5.26% and an increase among females (1.43% vs. 2.65% in the 3rd and 6th year, respectively. All respondents believed that health professionals should advise patients to quit smoking. However, few of the medical students who smoked received physician advice to quit. Experimentation with other forms of tobacco use was more common among males (p<0.0001. Despite their knowledge of its harmful effects, students experimented with water-pipe tobacco smoking in high proportions (47.32% and 46.75% of the third- and sixth-year students, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of experimentation with water-pipe tobacco smoking and other forms of tobacco use is high among aspiring physicians. Our findings highlight the need for better preventive education programs at medical schools, not only to protect the health of aspiring physicians but also to help them meet the challenge posed by this new epidemic.

  3. Flinders University School of Medicine, Northern Territory, Australia: Achieving Educational Excellence along with a Sustainable Rural Medical Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Paul

    2008-10-01

    Introduction Medical schools today are being challenged to educate doctors who are willing and able to practice in areas of poverty and workforce need. In many countries, there is a shortage of doctors practicing in rural and remote communities. There is evidence that locating undergraduate medical education in rural areas increases the likelihood that graduates will choose to practice in underserved areas. Through its Parallel Rural Community Curriculum (PRCC), Flinders University School of Medicine (FUSM) now enables over 25% of its students to undertake an entire clinical year based in small rural communities supervised principally by rural family physicians. Objective The PRCC was conceived to provide a high quality educational intervention that would result in an increased number of students choosing to practice in rural and remote Australia. It was also designed to test the hypothesis that small rural and remote practices were capable of facilitating a full year of medical training at a standard comparable to that provided at a major tertiary hospital. Intervention Starting with eight students in four towns in 1997, the PRCC now places 30 students across 18 towns in rural Australia. The students simultaneously learn the disciplines of medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and family medicine. At the end of the year, all Flinders students, regardless of training location, take the same comprehensive exam. Outcomes PRCC students improved their academic performance in comparison to their tertiary trained peers. This improvement has been consistent over the ten years studied. Seventy percent of the PRCC students have chosen to practice in rural locations, compared to 18 percent of tertiary-trained students. Over twelve years, the program has proved to be sustainable in a private practice environment with a workforce shortage. Conclusions Evaluation of the PRCC indicates that a rural community-based clinical education can provide a

  4. Evaluation of Bacterial Contamination on Pre Hospital Ambulances in Qom University of Medical Sciences of Iran in 2015

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    Roohollah Farhadloo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Aims of the Study: When the issue of the quality of the patient's care is addressed, determination of infection degrees in reference to the quality of such cares has gained a high priority. Therefore, infections in ambulance equipment might play a significant role in reduction of the quality of the hospital cares. This study was conducted wishing to determine bacterial infection degrees in ambulances servicing in pre-hospital emergency medical services of Qom University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this analytical cross-sectional study, 132 sampling of the equipments of 12 ambulances were done. Samples were stored on BHI broth as an amplifier for 24 hours. Then, they were introduced to blood agar and Eosin Methylene Blue (EMB agar culture environments. After 24 hours, negative staphylococcus coagulase and bacillus were specified by different environments, solutions, diagnostic discs, gram staining, catalase test, oxidase test and coagulase test. Then data were analyzed by SPSS16. Results: The results showed that the highest infection prevalence rate was observed in stretchers (12 samples, 100% and the lowest in oxygenation moisturizers (1 sample, 8.4%. From infected equipments, in addition, four instruments (37% were mobile and eight of them (63% were immobile. Conclusion: Results indicated that an infection degree of the utensils and instruments which were used in ambulances employed servicing in the Qom Province Medical Emergency Response Center of Iran is high, that might have their roots in non-application of disinfectants for disinfecting ambulance surfaces and equipment. This is a mandatory for healthcare agents to utilize the protective covers, especially medical gloves.

  5. Experience of the Flexible Internship in University of Rosario-Medical School

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    Ángela María Ruiz Sternberg

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the flexible programimplemented for the medical internship at Schoolof Medicine, Universidad del Rosario during theperiod 1997-2002.Methodology: A descriptive study was performedto summarize the choices of medicalclerkships made by the interns during the wholeRecibido: Marzo 22 de 2006.Aceptado: Abril 18 de 2006.* M.D. Ginecobstetra, Epidemióloga. Profesora Principal.Jefe de Educación Médica de la Facultad deMedicina de la Universidad del Rosario.** M.D. Epidemiólogo, Coordinador del Centro deInvestigaciones Clínicas de la Universidad del RosarioCICUR.+ M.D. Neurólogo. Profesor Principal. Decano de laFacultad de Medicina de la Universidad del Rosario.Artículo originalstudied period. The coincidence with the furtherchoice of a determined medical specialty wasassessed.Conclusions: Most of the last year’s studentsremain preferring a conservative approach totheir career, by choosing clerkships in a basicarea, such as internal medicine, pediatrics, gynecologyand obstetrics or general surgery. Thecoincidence between the type of internship orclerkships a student performs and the futureelection of a specialty is high.

  6. An investigation of the challenges of e-Learning in medical sciences from the faculty members’ viewpoints of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Asghari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Regarding the numerous benefits of e-learning, an investigation of its barrier and potential solutions to resolve them will be helpful. This will enable universities to implement this method and convert their traditional teaching-learning methods and approaches to e-learning. Methods: In this descriptive study a total of 242 faculty members at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences were selected randomly. A questionnaire was used to collect data on their attitudes towards barriers of e-Learning. The data were analyzed using SPSS15. Results: The barriers were classified into six categories and twenty-four cases. The average score of the administrative category was 13.18±1.96, electronic categories was 11.66±2.32, educational category was 13.39±2.22, economical category was 9.62±2.09, cultural and psychological categories was 20.43±2.53, and finally, social and cooperative category was 10.09±1.97. The cultural and psychological categories were found as the most important barrier and the electronic category the least important one. Conclusion: The academics believed that they did not have enough time or skills for compiling and evaluating e-learning materials and that there was no proper culture for this. Not only the academics should learn how to compile, use and to take rapid feedback, but also it is essential that they recognize their new roles (as learning facilitators in realizing and expanding their mode of education by their innovations.

  7. An assessment of the relationship between the meta-cognitive awareness of reading strategies and students\\' achievement in Iran University of Medical Sciences in 2012-2013

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    HR Baradaran

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Achieving meaningful learning is an important educational goal of medical students. Therefore, it is necessary to design and implement more effective methods and strategies to achieve the goal. This study aims to investigate the relationship between the meta-cognitive awareness of reading strategies in student and their achievement in Iran University of Medical Sciences. Methods : This cross sectional- analytic study was carried out on students of Iran University of Medical Science during the 2012-2013 academic years. Three hundred seventeen students were selected through stratified random sampling from all students studied in basic sciences, physiopathology and clerkship stages of the medical program. The tool used was meta-cognitive awareness of reading strategies Inventory (MARSI. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 software and Pearson correlation-coefficients, variance analysis tests and independent T-tests were administered. Results: In this study the mean score of medical students' awareness of reading strategies showed optimal situation, the mean score of medical students' awareness of reading strategies and its three categories showed a significant relationship with students' score of academic achievement. Conclusion: Based on our findings it is concluded the medical students awareness of planning strategy and setting the purpose of reading have more influence on academic achievement than meta-cognition strategies, therefore medical education curriculum should be emphasized on these strategies to empower medical students to be independent in learning and to be self-regulating in their learning process .

  8. Association between Organizational Citizenship Behavior and Educational Performance of Faculty Members in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences- 2014

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    Hazratian Teimour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Regarding the educational goals of university and academic performance, it seems that organizational citizenship behavior (OCB is one of the effective variables in increasing the educational performance of university faculty members. The present study aims to investigate the relationship between organizational citizenship behavior (OCB and educational performance of the faculty members of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in 2013-14. Methods: Researchers selected 127 faculty members and 1,120 students from different grades in order to investigate the relationship between altruism, conscientiousness, sportsmanship, civic virtue and respect and the educational performance of faculty members. Generalized estimating equations (GEE were used in this method. Data were analyzed using SPSS 21 software and the significance level of 0.05. Results: There was a significant relationship between altruism and educational performance (P =0.043. There was a significant relationship between conscientiousness and educational performance (p=0.046. A significant relationship was observed between sportsmanship and educational performance (p=0.004. There was no significant relationship between civic virtue and educational performance (p=0.98. A significant relationship was observed between respect and educational performance (P>0.001. There was no relationship between citizenship behavior and gender of the faculty members (P> 0.05.Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the more faculty members have the spirit of cooperation and assistance to colleagues and students and try to understand the specific situations that students face, the more effective they are in increasing the educational performance at the university level.

  9. Shift Work and Related Health Problems among Medical and Diagnostic Staff of the General Teaching Hospitals Affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 2012

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    Zahra Sajjadnia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Today, shift work is considered as a necessity in many jobs and for some 24-hour services the use of shift-work is growing. However, shift work can lead to physiological and psycho-social problems for shift workers. This study aimed to determine the effects of shift work on the associated health problems, together with the demographic and job characteristics underlying the problems, among the medical and diagnostic staff of the general teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Method:This study was an applied, cross-sectional and descriptive-analytical one. The study employed a sample of 205 employees from the medical and diagnostic staff using stratified sampling proportional to the size and simple random sampling methods. Data were collected using the Survey of Shift workers (SOS questionnaire, validity and reliability of which have already been confirmed. Finally, the collected data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 software through ANOVA, Chi-square, Independent-Samples T-Test, as well as Pearson Correlation Coefficient. A P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The results showed that among the demographic and job characteristics studied, the individual, family and social problems had significant associations with work schedules, shift work and job satisfaction. In addition, there were significant associations between musculoskeletal disorders and the satisfaction of shift work; cardiovascular disorders and marital status and occupation; digestive disorders and the work schedules; sleep disorders and the satisfaction of shift work; musculoskeletal disorders, cardiovascular disorders and sleep disorders and age, job experience and shift work experience. And finally, there were significant associations among sleep disorders and age, job experience and the shift work experience. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, demographic characteristics such as age, marital

  10. [Patients as customers? The term "customer" in the perception of medical students at the end of their university training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, L; Körner, M; Geppert, E; Siegel, A; Stöbel, U; Bengel, J

    2012-01-01

    In the preceding decades a new perspective on the role of patients in the health-care system has gained ground, considering patients not merely as "suffering persons" but additionally as "customers". Physicians, however, tend to disagree with this approach because of the economic connotation of the term customer. Until now, there is only poor evidence of whether students of medicine - who are going to work as physicians in the future - agree or disagree with that approach and whether they are ready to accept patients as customers. In the following study students of medicine were interviewed on their perspectives towards that approach, in particular on their attitudes towards the idea of "the patient as customer", the appropriateness of the term consumer in different clinical settings and sectors of health care, the implementation of consumer orientation in clinical routine, and their favoured model of physician-patient relationship.As the study could not build upon data of prior similar studies, a quantitative and qualitative cross-sectional study with a descriptive-explorative design was conducted. Using a semi-standardised questionnaire, 313 medical students (response rate: 95%) were interviewed in Spring 2010. At the time of the survey, the students were enrolled at the faculty of medicine at Freiburg University, Germany, and were in their last semester which immediately preceded their exam.The future physicians do not consider patients primarily as customers. More than 80% of the respondents "absolutely" or "largely" supported the idea that patients are considerably more than customers. The analysis of the qualitative data of the study shows different results. Here, more statements were made that patients could equally be seen as customers (449 students supported this idea, 298 did not). Statements contradicting the customer approach referred mostly to the asymmetry of the physician-patient relationship and the special role of the patient. The highest level of

  11. Opfer des NS-Bücherraubes – 10 Fälle aus medizinischen Bibliotheken in Wien: Provenienzforschungsprojekt an der Universitätsbibliothek der Medizinischen Universität Wien / Victims of book expropriation during nazi regime – 10 examples from medical libraries in Vienna: provenance research project at the university library at the Medical University Vienna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007 the university library at the Medical University Vienna runs a provenance research project. Books, stolen between 1938 and 1945, were acquired by at that time discrete libraries at institutions and clinics of the former medical faculty at Vienna University. A systematic survey of the now centralised book collection should bring to light these misgotten book acquisitions. Aim of the project is to document such cases and to restitute books to their lawful owners or their legal successors. Until Novemver 2008 about 80,000 volumes were scrutinised directly at the shelves by so-called autopsy. So far about 200 definitely stolen books and approximately 1800 suspicious books were dedected. This paper describes the initial position, method and hitherto existing results of the provenance research project. Ten cases of such book theft, recorded in the now centralised collection of the university library of the Medical University Vienna (former medical faculty, should depict victims of book expropiation during nazi regime. These cases include second-hand bookshops (Alois Fantl, Hans Peter Kraus, an university professor from the former medical faculty at Vienna University (Markus Hajek, general practitioners not associated with the former medical faculty (Adolf Kronfeld, Richard Löwi, private persons (Lily Fuchs, Raoul Fernand Jellinek-Mercedes and books from public and private libraries (Akademischer Verein jüdischer Mediziner, Bibliothek Sassenbach, Ortskrankenkasse Dresden.

  12. Prevalence of Depression in Medical Students at the Lebanese University and Exploring its Correlation With Facebook Relevance: A Questionnaire Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Ramzi S

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of major depression is particularly high in medical students, affecting around one-third of this population. Moreover, online social media, in particular Facebook, is becoming an intrinsic part in the life of a growing proportion of individuals worldwide. Objective Our primary objective is to identify the prevalence of depression in medical students at the Lebanese University Faculty of Medicine, a unique state university in Lebanon, its correlation with the utilization of the interactive features of Facebook, and the way students may resort to these features. Methods Students of the Lebanese University Faculty of Medicine were assessed for (1) depression and (2) Facebook activity. To screen for major depression, we used the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scale. To test for Facebook activity, we developed the Facebook Resorting Questionnaire (FbRQ), which measures the degree to which students resort to Facebook. Results A total of 365 out of 480 students (76.0%) participated in the survey. A total of 25 students were excluded, hence 340 students were included in the final analysis. Current depression was reported in 117 students out of 340 (34.4%) and t tests showed female predominance. Moreover, PHQ-9 score multiple regression analysis showed that feeling depressed is explained 63.5% of the time by specific independent variables studied from the PHQ-9 and the FbRQ. Depression varied significantly among the different academic years (P<.001) and it peaked in the third-year students. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that depression and resorting to Facebook had a positive and significant relationship (P=.003) and the different FbRQ categories had significant differences in resorting-to-Facebook power. The like, add friend, and check-in features students used when resorting to Facebook were significantly associated with depression. Conclusions This study showed that depression was highly prevalent among students of the

  13. Nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among medical students of Belgrade University

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    Ćirković Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA present the growing problem in the whole world. Carriage of MRSA is most frequent in the nose, and medical students come in contact both with patients and different persons in the community. Therefore, they may be significant for the transmission of MRSA from hospitals to out- of-hospital communities and vice versa. Objective. The aim of this study was to establish the carriage rate among students of the second, third and fourth year of study at the School of Medicine in Belgrade and to analyze their genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. Methods. In total 533 nasal samples were taken. The samples were incubated in Trypcase-soy broth supplemented with 6.5% NaCl, and thereafter the swabs were inoculated on mannitol salt agar supplemented with 2 µg/mL of oxacillin. The presence of nuc, mecA and Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes was examined by PCR. The characteristics of the MRSA strains were determined using: antibiotic susceptibility testing by Vitek2 System, SCCmec, agr typing and MLST. Results. MRSA was isolated from two of 533 investigated samples (0.37%. MRSA were isolated from the students of the second and third year of study. Profiles of strains were: ST80 (SCCmec type IV, agr type 3 and ST152 (SCCmec type V, agr type 1. MRSA strains were multiresistant. Conclusion. The nasal carriage rate of MRSA in population of medical students of the first year of study in Belgrade is low. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of MRSA strains indicate their community origin. MLST typing revealed that isolates belong to ST80 and ST152. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON175039

  14. [Archival materials collected by Prof. Wiktor Dega in the Department of the History of Medical Sciences, Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences - general characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hłyń, M

    2000-01-01

    Interesting archival materials collected by Prof. Wiktor Dega are held in the Department of the History of Medical Sciences belonging to Karol Marcinkowski University. There are mainly personal documents including: a military booklet, passport and different identity cards. They are also the diary from 1913. Noteworthy are the notebooks from his student period and diaries full of reflections from his scientific journeys abroad and chrestomathy from the professional literature. Moreover, the archival material about Prof. Degas' pre-war activity and a organiser of cost-free gymnastic courses for children with posture defects should be mentioned in Poznań. After the Second World War Prof. Dega worked on the Committee of Rehabilitation and Adaptation of Human Beings and organised the Polish Branch of the International College of Surgeons, and materials from that time are also available. Also important are documents associated with Prof. Dega's the Order of Smile from the St. Maria Magdelena secondary school in Poznań. His letters are extremely valuable and the interesting press articles, photos and diplomas are also noteworthy. PMID:11765756

  15. [Hair vanadium content and nutritional status of students of the Medical University of Białystok].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefańska, Ewa; Ostrowska, Lucyna; Czapska, Danuta; Karczewski, Jan; Borawska, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the vanadium content in the hair of students of the Medical University of Białystok and to find out whether its level in the organism measured basing on its hair content correlates with the nutritional status. The study involved 134, 127 and 125 students in the years 2000-2003, respectively. Hair vanadium content was determined using the atomic absorption spectrophotometry method with atomization in a graphite cuvette (ET AAS) on a Hitachi Z-5000 apparatus. The nutritional status was evaluated based on the body mass index BMI. Higher vanadium content was detected in the hair of female students compared to male students. Negative correlation was noted between vanadium content in the hair of female students and their nutritional status.

  16. Awareness and knowledge of common eye diseases among the academic staff (non-medical faculties) of University of Malaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Y K; Reddy, S C; Karina, R

    2004-08-01

    A cross sectional study was conducted to assess the level of awareness and knowledge of common eye diseases (cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and refractive errors) among 473 academic staff (non-medical faculties) of University Malaya. The awareness of cataract was in 88.2%, diabetic retinopathy in 83.5%, refractive errors in 75.3% and glaucoma in 71.5% of the study population. The knowledge about all the above common eye diseases was moderate, except presbyopia which was poor. Multivariate analysis revealed that females, older people, and those having family history of eye diseases were significantly more aware and more knowledgeable about the eye diseases. Health education about eye diseases would be beneficial to seek early treatment and prevent visual impairment in the society.

  17. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 84-004-1568, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, R.; Seligman, P.J.

    1985-03-01

    Area air samples were analyzed for organic solvent vapors and aldehydes at the Biochemistry Department, George Washington University, Washington, DC in October 1983, and February and August 1984. The evaluation was requested by the Safety Director because of employee complaints of eye and respiratory irritation. Questionnaires were administered to 75 employees in the Biochemistry Department and 24 employees in the Pharmacology Department who served as comparisons. Humidity measurements were made. The authors note that the complaints subsided during the spring of 1984, with no explanation. They conclude that the complaints among the employees, especially on the fifth floor, were due to eye irritation. The causative agent could not be identified. Recommendations include evaluating all ventilation systems and repeating the air sampling if complaints of irritation recur.

  18. Management of ionizing radiation sources in university, medical and industrial environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference treats several subjects relative to the use of radioactive sources. The first session comprises three articles about ionizing sources and regulation. The second session, with three articles, tackles the question of radiation protection in the use of sources in industrial field. The third session, four articles, treats the same question but in the medicine and university media. The fourth session (three articles) is devoted to the organisation of radiation protection in the case of accidents. The fifth session concerns the management of spent sources (three articles). The sixth session studies the radiation protection of sources in Europe. The seventh and final session ends with the part and coordination of actors in radiation protection in the sources management (three articles). (N.C.)

  19. [Plagiarism. Document from the Ethics Commission of the Medical School, University of Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselot Jaramillo, Eduardo; Bravo Lechat, Mireya; Kottow Lang, Miguel; Valenzuela Yuraidini, Carlos; O'Ryan Gallardo, Miguel; Thambo Becker, Sergio; Horwitz Campos, Nina; Acevedo Pérez, Irene; Rueda Castro, Laura; Sotomayor, María Angélica

    2008-05-01

    Plagiarism is defined as the intellectual fraud in which an individual attempts to unduly appropriate, for his/her own benefit, the knowledge, ideas or discoveries of someone else. It is not uncommon in academic settings where research is conducted and a creative work is carried out. Due to the dismal consequences of plagiarism, cautionary measures and sanctions are required to avoid it. This paper is intended to warn and promote a discussion about plagiarism. The Faculty of Medicine of the University of Chile and its ethics committee believe that a fight against these type of actions will contribute to prevent their detrimental effects on the moral and intellectual patrimony of our society. PMID:18769815

  20. Postgraduate studies (1978-1985 at the Medical Faculty of the University of Tuzla, Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husref Tahirović

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Postgraduate studies (PS at the Medical Faculty (MF of the University of Tuzla (UT were founded with the aim of training future staff of the MF in scientific research work. The course lasted four semesters. Up to 1986, classes were attended by five generations or 141 postgraduate students, and 57 of them received their Master’s degree (MSc’s. Classes were held every week on Fridays and Saturdays. One part of the classes was taught at the MF in Szeged (Hungary. Besides teachers from the UT, classes were also taught by teachers from other universities from the former Yugoslavia and abroad. The most important textbooks were: Cell and Molecular Biology by de Robertisa, Mathematics and statistics for use in pharmacy, biology, and chemistry by Saunders & Fleming, and Kako se pišu saopštenja o medicinskim istraživanjima (How to write reports of medical research by Rajko Igić. Searching the index base Pub Med at the end of 2014, by the surnames and initials of the names of the 57 masters, we found that they had published 14 articles before completing their MSc’s and 821 articles after completing their Master of Science. Later, 35 masters received PhDs and were appointed assistant professors, and later they were also appointed to higher ranks. Conclusion: Looking at the results of the PS, MF of the UT in the above mentioned period, it can be said that the PS was the place where the formation began of the future scientific and teaching staff of the MF in Tuzla.

  1. Antibiotic prescribing and resistance: knowledge level of medical students of clinical years of University Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia

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    Haque M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mainul Haque, Nor Iza A Rahman, Zainal Zulkifli, Salwani Ismail Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia Abstract: The innovation of penicillin by Dr Alexander Fleming in 1928 and its use in clinical practice saved many lives, especially during the Second World War. Tuberculosis still carries a significant public health threat and has re-emerged over the past two decades, even in modern countries where tuberculosis was thought to be eliminated. The World Health Organization defines antimicrobial resistance as the resistance of a microorganism to an antimicrobial drug that was initially effective for treatment of infections caused by the microbe. Therefore, the findings of the current study will provide data to enable the design of a new educational program to better equip our students in confronting antimicrobial resistance. This study was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey, which was undertaken in the Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia. The study participants were students of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program (MBBS of Year III, IV, and V. A total of 142 out of 164 (86% medical students returned the questionnaire. Specifically, the year-wise breakdown of responses was 29% (41, 39% (55, and 32% (45 for Year III, IV, and V, respectively. Among the study respondents, 28% (40 were male, and the remaining 72% (102 were female. In all, 67% of the participants felt more confident in “making an accurate diagnosis of infection/sepsis.” The majority (88% of the study participants stated that they would like more training on antibiotic selection. This research has found that there is a gap between theoretical input and clinical practice; the students are demanding more educational intervention to face the threat of antimicrobial resistance. Keywords: antibiotic, prescribing, resistance, medical students, knowledge

  2. The relationship of centralization, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasirpour, Amir Ashkan; Gohari, Mahmoud Reza; Moradi, Saied

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in the efficiency and efficacy of an organization is its structural issue. Organizational culture is also considered as an effective factor in the performance of many organizations. The main goal of the present study was to determine the relationship of Centralization and organizational culture and performance indexes in Teaching Hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This correlation study was performed in the year 2007. The population studied consisted of 4408 personnel from 13 hospitals among whom 441 subjects were selected and studied via a class sampling method. Data was compiled using a check list concerning the evaluation status of Centralization and another form concerning performance indexes as well as Robbin's organizational culture questionnaire. Data were obtained from the subjects by self answering and analyzed by using descriptive statistical indexes, T- test and Fisher's exact tests. Among the organizational culture indexes of the hospitals studied, control and organizational identity was better as compared to others (mean=3.32 and 3.30). Concerning the extent of Centralization in the hospitals studied, 53.85 % and 46.15 % were reported to have upper and lower organizational Centralization, respectively. Mean ratio of surgical operations to inpatients was 40%, the mean rate of admissions per active bed was 60.83, mean bed occupancy coefficient was 70.79%, average length of stay was 6.96 days, and mean net death rate was 1.41%. No significant correlation was seen between Centralization degree, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals Tehran university of medical sciences. (with 95% confidence interval). Due to the fact that first grade Teaching hospitals use board certified members, expert personnel, and advanced equipments and because of the limitation of patients choice and, the extent of Centralization and many organizational culture components have no significant

  3. Association between eating disorders and body image in athletes and non-athlete students in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Miri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Body image dissatisfaction and eating disorders are of common problems in adolescence and adulthood especially among athletes. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the association of eating disorders and body image in athletes and non-athlete students in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 226 athlete students and 350 non-athlete students of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences during 2013-2014. Students who followed a specific sport field and had participated in at least one sport event were considered as athlete students. All athlete students were entered the study by census method. Non-athlete students were selected among students who had not any exercise activity and by random sampling method. Data were collected through demographic questionnaire, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26, and Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ. Data were analyzed using T-test and Chi-square test. Results: Mean age was 21.92±3.19 years and mean body mass index (BMI was 22.24±3.18 kg/m2. The frequency of eating disorders was 11.5% among the athlete students and 11.2% among the non-athlete students. Anorexia nervosa was found to be more prevalent than bulimia nervosa in both groups. The students with normal BMI had better body image perception and less eating disorders symptoms than other students. The association of age, educational level, and gender with eating disorders and body image was not statistically significant. The association of eating disorders and body image was not statistically significant. Eating disorders were more prevalent in males than females but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: With regards to the results, it seems that eating disorders and body image dissatisfaction are relatively prevalent among both athletes and non-athlete students and BMI is predictor of eating disorders.

  4. The Relationship of Centralization, Organizational Culture and Performance Indexes in Teaching Hospitals Affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ashkan Nasirpour

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems in the efficiency and efficacy of an organization is its structural issue. Organizational culture is also considered as an effective factor in the performance of many organizations. The main goal of the present study was to determine the relationship of Centralization and organizational culture and performance indexes in Teaching Hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This correlation study was performed in the year 2007. The population studied consisted of 4408 personnel from 13 hospitals among whom 441 subjects were selected and studied via a class sampling method. Data was compiled using a check list concerning the evaluation status of Centralization and another form concerning performance indexes as well as Robbin's organizational culture questionnaire. Data were obtained from the subjects by self answering and analyzed by using descriptive statistical indexes, T- test and Fisher's exact tests. Among the organizational culture indexes of the hospitals studied, control and organizational identity was better as compared to others (mean=3.32 and 3.30. Concerning the extent of Centralization in the hospitals studied, 53.85 % and 46.15 % were reported to have upper and lower organizational Centralization, respectively. Mean ratio of surgical operations to inpatients was 40%, the mean rate of admissions per active bed was 60.83, mean bed occupancy coefficient was 70.79%, average length of stay was 6.96 days, and mean net death rate was 1.41%. No significant correlation was seen between Centralization degree, organizational culture and performance indexes in teaching hospitals tehran university of medical sciences. (with 95% confidence interval. Due to the fact that first grade Teaching hospitals use board certified members, expert personnel, and advanced equipments and because of the limitation of patients choice and, the extent of Centralization and many organizational culture components have no

  5. The Knowledge Level of Interns of Medical Faculty in Ondokuz Mayis University about Avian Influenza

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    Ozlem Terzi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: It is predictable that our country, especially Samsun city will be affect by a probable avian influenza epidemic because of is location that takes place in the region of wild birds migration way. The aim of this study is to ascertain the knowledge level of interns of medical faculty about avian influenza. METHODS: This descriptive study was conducted on 175 (81.7% of 214 intern of medical faculty between 1 and 30 May 2008. A questionnaire included six questions related with the agent, group of the agent and therapy of avian influenza and source of information about avian influenza, was applied to the participants. The questionnaire also included 10 questions, which should be answered as true/false for each the following subjects transmission ways, risk groups, symptoms and protection methods of the disease. Each correct answer is scored as one point and a knowledge score was calculated for each subject. RESULTS: In all, 79 students (45.1% were girls, 96(54.9% were boys. The median age was 24.6±1.1 years. While the proportion of true response was 73.7% about the avian influenza agent, 55.3% of the whole group knew the group of the agent. The median points for knowing the transmission ways of virus, risk groups and prevention were 7.0, 6.0 and 7.0 respectively. The median point of the participants was 9,0 for the question related with the symptoms of the disease and this question was the most correctly answered one. Although 56.4% of the participants knew the treatment of the disease, 33.5% of them stated that vaccination is protective. The information sources about disease were television (74.2%, newspapers/magazine (46.8% and the internet (36.0%. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, it’s found that interns have a medium level of knowledge about avian influenza. Lessons about, the diseases those can cause epidemics and important health problems in the future should be integrated in to the education programs to improve the knowledge level of interns

  6. A Comparison of Online Search Skills among Public Medical Science Students of Bandar Abbas and Rafsanjan Universities in 2008- 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Mahmoodi maybonde

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to review and compare online search skills and determine the factors affecting familiarity with these skills among the medical students studying at two State Universities (Bandar Abbas and Rafsanjan.The sample consisted of 545 students and data was collected by using questionnaires. The gathered data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and SPSS software. Using 7 online search skills and factors affecting familiarity with these skills, attempt was made to identify the most influential factors and also assess the students' familiarity with these skills utilizing specialized questions. Moreover, the findings of the research indicated that the overall assessment of students at Bandar Abbas was higher than that of Rafsanjan. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding specialized questions about online search skills. Factors such as English proficiency, the students' ideas about their ability in information retrieval, interest in medical digital library and obtaining new information using databases, their previous experience, whether the students agree with offering a course in online search skills, seeking others help familiarity with databases and interest in presenting articles in congresses. All had a significant effect on familiarity and identification of online search skills. Furthermore, gender, stage of study (basic sciences, pathophysiology or clinical, English proficiency, previous experience, and familiarity with databases had a significant effect on the effectiveness of online search skills.

  7. Strong leadership and teamwork drive culture and performance change: Ohio State University Medical Center 2000-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Fred; Bendapudi, Neeli; Rucci, Anthony; Schlesinger, Leonard

    2008-09-01

    Several characteristics of academic health centers have the potential to create high levels of internal conflict and misalignment that can pose significant leadership challenges. In September 2000, the positions of Ohio State University (OSU) senior vice president for health sciences, dean of the medical school, and the newly created position of chief executive officer of the OSU Medical Center (OSUMC) were combined under a single leader to oversee the OSUMC. This mandate from the president and trustees was modeled after top institutions with similar structures. The leader who assumed the role was tasked with improving OSUMC's academic, clinical, and financial performance. To achieve this goal, the senior vice president and his team employed the service value chain model of improving performance, based on the premise that leadership behavior/culture drives employee engagement/satisfaction, leading to customer satisfaction and improved organizational performance. Implementing this approach was a seven-step process: (1) selecting the right leadership team, (2) assessing the challenges and opportunities, (3) setting expectations for performance and leadership behavior, (4) aligning structures and functions, (5) engaging constituents, (6) developing leadership skills, and (7) defining strategies and tracking goals. The OSUMC setting during this period provides an observational case study to examine how these stepwise changes, instituted by strong leadership and teamwork, were able to make and implement sound decisions that drove substantial and measurable improvements in the engagement and satisfaction of faculty and staff; the satisfaction of students and patients; and academic, clinical, and financial performance. PMID:18728440

  8. ANALYTICAL STUDY OFDENTAL STATUS OFPATIENTSWITH CHRONIC GENERALIZED PERIODONTITIS DENTAL CLINIC OF KRASNOYARSK STATE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marugina Tatyana Leonidovna

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To make distinct approaches in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of chronic generalized periodontitis the analysis of case rate of the disease during the period of 2010-2012 years was carried out in the dental clinic of Krasnoyarsk State Medical Academy. In order to divide patients into several groups according to severity of the disease the review of case history of 4390 patients aged 20 to 65 was made. 684 patients (15.6 % were diagnosed with mild degree of the disease, 2608 (59.4% with an average degree and 1908 patients (25% with severe degree of the disease. The low percentage of number of patients with mild degree of the disease is the result of late diagnosis of the disease. During the analysis of the structure of providing periodontal care at the stages of examination, periodontal and surgical help the lack of an objective assessment of the condition ofalveolar mucosa isnoted. Therefore, during the initial examination, we suggest to use Schiller-Pisarev method. As a crucial step in the identification of early forms of periodontal disease is a health education outreach.

  9. [THE NUTRITIONAL SUPPORT OF STUDENTS--ATHLETES OF THE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY IN THE PRECOMPETITIVE PERIOD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, N V; Blinova, E G

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was the assessment of the protein-vitamin correction of the food ration of student-athletes in the precompetitive period The relevance of nutritional support was determined by irrational and unbalanced nutrition and comorbidities in students, not infrequently due to insufficient material support of students, the schedule drawn up without taking in account their biorythmological activity. Enrichment of the diet of student-athletes was performed with the use of normoprotein--dry composite protein mixture (DCPM) in daily dose of 30 g). Normoprotein is a source of highly digestible proteins, dietary fibers, vitamins, minerals, taxifolin, which is recommended, also for the dietary (medical and preventive) nutrition of children in organized collectives. A prerequisite for the administration of the drug was the assessment of the health in 50 student-athletes in the Health Center questioning of students for the acquisition of information concerning the presence or absence of complaints, allergic reactions, evaluation of the life quality, and also written consent for the use of normoprotein. PMID:27029163

  10. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence, Happiness and Mental Health in Students of Medical Sciences of Isfahan University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasanpour M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, many professionals consider necessary conditions for progress in developing emotional intelligence. A person who has a high emotional intelligence will experience less negative events in his/her life. The main purpose of this study is to answer this question: Is emotional intelligence related to happiness and mental health? Method and material: Statistical community in this study is all the students of Medical sciences of Isfahan University in 2009, among whom 120 people were randomly selected and these three questionnaires were administered to them: 1 Bar-On Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire, 2 Goldberg and Williams's Mental Health Questionnaire (GHQ, and 3 Argyl and Lou's Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (1989. This study design is correlative that has been used to evaluate significance of the relationship of variables by using Pearson correlation coefficient and to compare the scores of male and female using T-test. Result: The results show that there is a positive and meaningful relation between emotional intelligence, happiness and mental health. Besides, students with high emotional intelligence have more happiness and mental health. Therefore it is recommended that techniques of increasing emotional intelligence should be trained in school and universities. Conclusion: The Overall EQ-I score was high indicating a group that has good Emotional Intelligence. There are fairly large differences in the scores for the 15 content scales indicating areas of relative strengths and areas of improvement and relation between mental healths in students. Emotional Intelligence will contribute to success in most endeavors.

  11. The impact of university provided nurse electronic medical record training on health care organizations: an exploratory simulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Anderson, James G; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Kushniruk, Andre W; Malovec, Shannon; Espejo, Angela; Anderson, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Training providers appropriately, particularly early in their caregiving careers, is an important aspect of electronic medical record (EMR) implementation. Considerable time and resources are needed to bring the newly hired providers 'up to speed' with the actual use practices of the organization. Similarly, universities lose valuable clinical training hours when students are required to spend those hours learning organization-specific EMR systems in order to participate in care during clinical rotations. Although there are multiple real-world barriers to university/health care organization training partnerships, the investment these entities share in training care providers, specifically nurses, to use and understand EMR technology encourages a question: What would be the cumulative effect of integrating a mutually agreed upon EMR system training program in to nursing classroom training on downstream hospital costs in terms of hours of direct caregiving lost, and benefits in terms of number of overall EMR trained nurses hired? In order to inform the development of a large scale study, we employed a dynamic systems modeling approach to simulate the theoretical relationships between key model variables and determine the possible effect of integrating EMR training into nursing classrooms on hospital outcomes. The analysis indicated that integrating EMR training into the nursing classroom curriculum results in more available time for nurse bedside care. Also, the simulation suggests that efficiency of clinical training can be potentially improved by centralizing EMR training within the nursing curriculum. PMID:25676937

  12. Evaluating Motivational Barriers of Talented Students & Providing Motivational Strategies in Kerman University of Medical Sciences in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mirzaee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Human capital is regarded as an important tool for development. In fact, human talents involve one of the important human resources in Iran sporadically in higher education and research institutions. Within the measures taken in this regard in Iran, establishing the Office of Gifted and Talented can be mentioned aiming to identify the top talents. Therefore, the role of university as an organization, in which scholars are engaged in scientific activities, is taken significantly in to account. The present study aims to investigate the barriers and factors motivating the students are in Kerman University of Medical Sciences. Method : This qualitative cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013. The study Sample was via convenience sampling method and the study data was gleaned by a semi-structured interview with 30 persons. Moreover, the study data was analyzed by framework analysis. Results : The findings of this study involve the two original codes of motivational barriers as well as motivational factors. In the first section motivational barriers with three codes including structural problems, poor communication, performance problems as well as 8 minor codes were proposed. Moreover, in The second secti o n of this study, motivational strategies were mentioned intended to ameliorate the functioning of the Office in terms of the individuals, attitude participating in this study. Conclusion : The Talented Office necessitates to be reformed identify the top talents and to alter such talents into elite talents.

  13. Survey of stress, anxiety, depression and self-concept of students of Fasa University of medical sciences, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Najafi Kalyani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Studying periods in university is very important for students. Because of the problems, this period is usually accompanied with mental status changes of students. The aim of this study was the assessment of psychological variables (stress, anxiety and depression and self-concept of students. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study, all the students studying at Fasa University of Medical Sciences in the academic year 89-88 were selected through census sampling method. The DASS-21 was used to assess stress, anxiety and depression of students and in order to evaluate the status of their self-concept; the Carl Rogers questionnaire was used. Data analysis was performed with SPSS software using descriptive and inferential statistics (t test, ANOVA, Chi square and Pearson correlation. Results: The results of this study showed that 76% of students had stress, 56.4% anxiety and 53.1% depression, and 69/3% had weak or negative self-concepts. There was a statistically significant correlation between high stress, anxiety and depression with negative self-concept (P<0.001.Conclusion: High stress, anxiety and depression and also a significant correlation between increased stress, anxiety and depression with negative and weak self-concept of students were found. It is necessary to devote more careful attention to mental health issues of students and have appropriate interventions.

  14. Prevalence, impacts and medical managements of premenstrual syndrome among female students: cross-sectional study in college of health sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Northern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Tolossa, Fikru Wakjira; Bekele, Mebratu Legesse

    2014-01-01

    Background Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is used to describe physical, cognitive, affective, and behavioral symptoms that occur cyclically during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and resolve quickly at or within a few days of the onset of menstruation. The primary aim of the study was to assess the prevalence, impacts and medical managements of PMS on female medical students of Mekelle University College of Health Sciences. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among systematical...

  15. Challenges and strategies for the promotion of research in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences: The Analysis of stakeholders’ views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Rashidi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The intention of this study was to identifying and prioritizing challenges in research in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (TUMS, Iran, and giving exact solutions to remove those challenges from the perspective of stakeholders (the members of faculty board, students, administrators, and research staff of the university. Methods: This mix-method study (quantitative-qualitative conducted in summer-2014 in TUMS. The participants of this study included 139 of the members of faculty board, 349 of the students, and 39 of administrators and research staff (in total, 525 individuals. The data collection tool in the qualitative section was an open-ended questionnaires (3 questions, and in the quantitative section it consists close question questionnaires (26 questions. For prioritizing these challenges, it was used by prioritization matrix that it had four criteria: Importance, the ability to solve, cost-effectiveness and immediacy. Results: The important challenges from the perspective of participant included: Lack of co-operations of administrative centers with researchers, the existence of cumbersome rules, lack of motivation in researchers from authorities, being non-economic of doing a research to the professors and students, The lack of research result in decision-making, the low capacity and ability of members of faculty board, students, and staff on issues related to research procedures, and lack of attention to the quality of research. Conclusion: Lack of attention to the quality of research, and the existence of cumbersome rules in research area have the most priority in challenging research in TUMS, which they need more attention and planning to resolve these challenges of the authorities and managers of this university.

  16. Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-04-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers. PMID:23425986

  17. The Interdisciplinary Generalist Project at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, D; Susman, J; McCurdy, F; O'Dell, D; Paulman, P; Stott, J

    2001-04-01

    The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum (IGC) Project at the University of Nebraska College of Medicine (Nebraska) had three goals: (1) to increase first- and second-year students' exposure to primary care practice in the community; (2) to develop specific educational programs introducing these students to the principles and practices of primary care medicine; and (3) to establish a generalist coordinating council to provide leadership and to nurture generalist educational initiatives in the College of MEDICINE: Students at Nebraska were already required to spend three half-days a semester in a longitudinal clinical experience (LCE) and to complete a three-week primary care block experience in the summer between the first and second years. IGC Project funds were used increase the number of required LCE visits to five a semester and to develop curricular enhancements that would maximize the educational potential of community-based clinical experiences for first- and second-year students. Curricular elements developed included a focus on faculty development for preceptors and development of the Primary Care Introduction to Medicine Curriculum, an eight-week, interdisciplinary module scheduled late in the first year to help prepare students for intensive summer rotations. Other developments were the implementation of a pediatric physical examination experience for first-year students and the implementation of instruction in community-oriented primary care in the second year. Lessons learned are related to: (1) the value and power of early clinical experiences; and (2) the enhancing effect of a holistic, longitudinal view of the curriculum on the planning of early clinical experiences.

  18. Daytime sleepiness and academic performance of medical students in a Colombian public university

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    Ulloque-Caamaño Liezel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sleep is an important physiological function for the adequate physical,psychological, cognitive and intellectual performance. Excessive daytime sleepinessclassified as moderate or severe is a sleep disorder and its presence in medical studentscould affect in the academic performance.Objective: Establish the prevalence of normal and pathological daytime sleepiness inmedical students.Methods: Prospective and cross-sectional study. Medical students of Medicine of theUniversidad de Cartagena, Colombia in the second academic period of 2011 wereincluded. A survey for the compilation of socio-demographic and academic data andthe Epworth Scale for the assessment of daytime sleepiness were applied. The higherthe score indicates higher daytime sleepiness of the respondent. The participation wasvoluntary and anonymous. A stratified sample by gender and semester was chosen. Dataanalysis was performed using the EPI-INFO statistical program (Version 3.5.1. A p value< 0.05 was considered as statistically significant.Results: 210 medical students filled completely the surveys. The mean age was 19.7±2.0years. 51.0% [CI 95%: 44.0-57.9%] were women and 49.0% [CI95%: 42.1-56.0%]were men. 69% [CI95%: 62.3-75.2%] came from Cartagena and the remaining 31%[CI95%: 24.8-37.7%] came from different provinces. 53.8% [CI95%: 49.8%-60.7%]had sexually active life. The academic mean of all population of students was 3.8±0.28.31.4% [CI95%: 25.2%-38.2%] had high grades, 50.5% [CI95%: 43.5%-57.4%] hadaverage grades and 18.1% [CI95%: 13.1%-24.0%] had regular grades. 19.0% [IC95%:14.0%-25.0%] did not have abnormal daytime sleepiness, 21.4% [CI95%: 16.1%-27.0%] had mild daytime sleepiness, 49.0% [CI95%: 42.1%-56.0%] moderate daytimesleepiness and 10.5% [CI95%: 6.7%-15.4%] had severe daytime sleepiness. 60% ofthe students had pathological daytime sleepiness. The average score of Epworth scale inthe population was 10.6±3.7. Significant difference of diurnal somnolence

  19. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, the Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  20. The correlation between effective factors of e-learning and demographic variables in a post-graduate program of virtual medical education in Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golband, Farnoosh; Hosseini, Agha Fatemeh; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita; Mirhosseini, Fakhrossadat; Bigdeli, Shoaleh

    2014-01-01

    E-learning as an educational approach has been adopted by diverse educational and academic centers worldwide as it facilitates learning in facing the challenges of the new era in education. Considering the significance of virtual education and its growing practice, it is of vital importance to examine its components for promoting and maintaining success. This analytical cross-sectional study was an attempt to determine the relationship between four factors of content, educator, learner and system, and effective e-learning in terms of demographic variables, including age, gender, educational background, and marital status of postgraduate master's students (MSc) studying at virtual faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The sample was selected by census (n=60); a demographic data gathering tool and a researcher-made questionnaire were used to collect data. The face and content validity of both tools were confirmed and the results were analyzed by descriptive statistics (frequency, percentile, standard deviation and mean) and inferential statistics (independent t-test, Scheffe's test, one-way ANOVA and Pearson correlation test) by using SPSS (V.16). The present study revealed that There was no statistically significant relationship between age and marital status and effective e-learning (P>0.05); whereas, there was a statistically significant difference between gender and educational background with effective e-learning (Pmanagers and designers to make the right decisions about educational components of e-learning, i.e. content, educator, system and learner and improve them to create a more productive learning environment for learners. PMID:25415821