WorldWideScience

Sample records for bayard-alpert gages

  1. Storage Gage Precipitation Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A storage gage is a precipitation gage that requires reading and maintenance only monthly or seasonal intervals. This library includes reports from such gages,...

  2. GAGES-II: Geospatial Attributes of Gages for Evaluating Streamflow

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset, termed "GAGES II", an acronym for Geospatial Attributes of Gages for Evaluating Streamflow, version II, provides geospatial data and classifications...

  3. GAGES-II: Geospatial Attributes of Gages for Evaluating Streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, James A.

    2011-01-01

    This dataset, termed "GAGES II", an acronym for Geospatial Attributes of Gages for Evaluating Streamflow, version II, provides geospatial data and classifications for 9,322 stream gages maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). It is an update to the original GAGES, which was published as a Data Paper on the journal Ecology's website (Falcone and others, 2010b) in 2010. The GAGES II dataset consists of gages which have had either 20+ complete years (not necessarily continuous) of discharge record since 1950, or are currently active, as of water year 2009, and whose watersheds lie within the United States, including Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Reference gages were identified based on indicators that they were the least-disturbed watersheds within the framework of broad regions, based on 12 major ecoregions across the United States. Of the 9,322 total sites, 2,057 are classified as reference, and 7,265 as non-reference. Of the 2,057 reference sites, 1,633 have (through 2009) 20+ years of record since 1950. Some sites have very long flow records: a number of gages have been in continuous service since 1900 (at least), and have 110 years of complete record (1900-2009) to date. The geospatial data include several hundred watershed characteristics compiled from national data sources, including environmental features (e.g. climate – including historical precipitation, geology, soils, topography) and anthropogenic influences (e.g. land use, road density, presence of dams, canals, or power plants). The dataset also includes comments from local USGS Water Science Centers, based on Annual Data Reports, pertinent to hydrologic modifications and influences. The data posted also include watershed boundaries in GIS format. This overall dataset is different in nature to the USGS Hydro-Climatic Data Network (HCDN; Slack and Landwehr 1992), whose data evaluation ended with water year 1988. The HCDN identifies stream gages which at some point in their history had

  4. Streamflow Gaging Stations of the United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer shows selected streamflow gaging stations of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, in 2013. Gaging stations, or gages, measure...

  5. 46 CFR 197.458 - Gages and timekeeping devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gages and timekeeping devices. 197.458 Section 197.458... § 197.458 Gages and timekeeping devices. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) Each depth gage and timekeeping device is tested or calibrated against a master reference gage or time-keeping...

  6. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  7. A Fast Response Thermal Conductivity Gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    NUMBER(s) N.ATOR(&) IM JAME~S 0. PILCiEIR, 11 MELINDA B. KRUZMPICH 9LPERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK AREA 6... area of the temperature gage. The gage was then removed and the beam 15 placed in im.ltipulse mode. The energy delivered by each pulse was calculated...Army AMCCOM, ARDC HQDA ATTN: SMCAR-SCMI- DAMA-ART-M SMCAR-SCS, B. Brodman Washington, D.C. 20310 SMCAR-SCS, T. Hung SMCAR-SCA, W. Cadomski Commander

  8. Sensitivity of hot-cathode ionization vacuum gages in several gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R.

    1972-01-01

    Four hot-cathode ionization vacuum gages were calibrated in 12 gases. The relative sensitivities of these gages were compared to several gas properties. Ionization cross section was the physical property which correlated best with gage sensitivity. The effects of gage accelerating voltage and ionization-cross-section energy level were analyzed. Recommendations for predicting gage sensitivity according to gage type were made.

  9. High temperature static strain gage development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, C. O.; Bailey, R. S.; Grant, H. P.; Anderson, W. L.; Przybyszewski, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Final results are presented from a program to develop a thin film static strain gage for use on the blades and vanes of running, test stand gas turbine engines with goals of an 3 x 3 mm gage area and total errors of less than 10 pct. of + or - 2,000 microstrain after 50 hrs at 1250 K. Pd containing 13 Wt. pct. Cr was previously identified as a new strain sensor alloy that appeared to be potentially usable to 1250 K. Subsequently, it was discovered, in contrast with its behavior in bulk, that Pd-13Cr suffered from oxidation attack when prepared as a 4.5 micron thick thin film. Continuing problems with electrical leakage to the substrate and the inability of sputtered alumina overcoats to prevent oxidation led to the discovery that sputtered alumina contains appreciable amounts of entrapped argon. After the argon has been exsolved by heating to elevated temperatures, the alumina films undergo a linear shrinkage of about 2 pct. resulting in formation of cracks. These problems can be largely overcome by sputtering the alumina with the substrate heated to 870 K. With 2 micron thick hot sputtered alumina insulation and overcoat films, total 50 hr drifts of about 100 microstrain (2 tests) and about 500 microstrain (1 test) were observed at 1000 and 1100 K, respectively. Results of tests on complete strain gage systems on constant moment bend bars with Pd temperature compensation grids revealed that oxidation of the Pd grid was a major problem even when the grid was overcoated with a hot or cold sputtered alumina overcoat.

  10. Strain Gage Selection Criteria for Textile Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, John E.

    1996-01-01

    This report will provide a review of efforts to establish a set of strain gage selection guidelines for textile reinforced composite materials. A variety of strain gages were evaluated in the study to determine the sensitivity of strain measurements to the size of the strain gage. The strain gages were chosen to provide a range of gage lengths and widths. The gage aspect ratio (the length-to-width ratio) was also varied. The gages were tested on a diverse collection of textile composite laminates. Test specimens featured eleven different textile architectures: four 2-D triaxial braids, six 3-D weaves, and one stitched uniweave architecture. All specimens were loaded in uniaxial tension. The materials' moduli were measured in both the longitudinal (parallel to the O deg. yarns) and the transverse (perpendicular to the O deg. yarns) directions. The results of these measurements were analyzed to establish performance levels for extensometers and strain gages on textile composite materials. Conclusions are expressed in a summary that discusses instrumentation practices and defines strain gage selection criteria.

  11. Buried wire gage for wall shear stress measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, V. S.; Rose, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    A buried wire gage for measuring wall shear stress in fluid flow was studied and further developed. Several methods of making this relatively new type of gage were examined to arrive at a successful technique that is well-suited for wind-tunnel testing. A series of measurements was made to demonstrate the adequacy of a two-point calibration procedure for these gages. The buried wire gage is also demonstrated to be ideally suited for quantitative measurement of wall shear stress in wind-tunnel testing.

  12. 49 CFR 179.400-19 - Valves and gages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valves and gages. 179.400-19 Section 179.400-19...-19 Valves and gages. (a) Valves. Manually operated shut-off valves and control valves must be... liquid flow rates. All valves must be made from approved materials compatible with the lading and...

  13. 46 CFR 197.318 - Gages and timekeeping devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gages and timekeeping devices. 197.318 Section 197.318... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.318 Gages and timekeeping devices... timekeeping device must be at each dive location....

  14. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Streamflow Gaging Stations of the United States 201403 Shapefile

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer shows selected streamflow gaging stations of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, in 2013. Gaging stations, or gages, measure...

  15. The role of GAGE cancer/testis antigen in metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Terp, Mikkel Green; Hansen, Malene Bredahl;

    2016-01-01

    with migratory and invasive properties and were found to be upregulated in cancer cells with metastasizing potential in a gastric cancer model. METHODS: We have addressed the direct role of GAGE proteins in supporting metastasis using an isogenic metastasis model of human cancer, consisting of 4 isogenic cell......) and moderately metastatic clones (LM3), stable downregulation of GAGE expression did not affect the ability of CL16 cells to establish primary tumors and form metastasis in the lungs of immunodeficient mice. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that GAGE proteins per se do not support metastasis and that further...

  16. Manual for leveling at gaging stations in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N.O.; Jackson, N.M.

    1981-01-01

    This manual was prepared to serve several purposes in the U.S. Geological Survey North Carolina District. This manual sets forth District policy as to frequency of levels, accuracy criteria, procedures for checking the datum and setting of the various types of gages, general rules to follow in establishing the original datum of a gage, and contains sample notes to be used as guides in level notekeeping. The manual also serves as a training tool in that the reasoning behind District policy is explained and reasons are given for following the recommended techniques to assist in a better understanding of the purpose of levels and maintaining gage datum.

  17. Theory and Practice of Shear/Stress Strain Gage Hygrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Fenner, Ralph L.

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical hygrometry has progressed during the last several decades from crude hygroscopes to state-of-the art strain-gage sensors. The strain-gage devices vary from different metallic beams to strain-gage sensors using cellulose crystallite elements, held in full shear restraint. This old technique is still in use but several companies are now actively pursuing development of MEMS miniaturized humidity sensors. These new sensors use polyimide thin film for water vapor adsorption and desorption. This paper will provide overview about modern humidity sensors.

  18. Vision system for dial gage torque wrench calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Doiron, Theodore D.; Sanghera, Paramjeet S.

    1993-11-01

    In this paper, we present the development of a fast and robust vision system which, in conjunction with the Dial Gage Calibration system developed by AKO Inc., will be used by the U.S. Army in calibrating dial gage torque wrenches. The vision system detects the change in the angular position of the dial pointer in a dial gage. The angular change is proportional to the applied torque. The input to the system is a sequence of images of the torque wrench dial gage taken at different dial pointer positions. The system then reports the angular difference between the different positions. The primary components of this vision system include modules for image acquisition, linear feature extraction and angle measurements. For each of these modules, several techniques were evaluated and the most applicable one was selected. This system has numerous other applications like vision systems to read and calibrate analog instruments.

  19. An Elastic Tube Gage for Measuring Static and Dynamic Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1948-05-01

    25 grams of granulated celluloid No. 2346 dissolved ; on one pound of ethyl acetate. + For maximum stability of operation, gage current should be...Compounds such as beeswax or ceresin wax were first employed for waterproofing, but their brittleness at low temperatures was found to be ob- jectionable...Bitumastics such, as Qzite B Jhave sbeen superior in that respect, but are dissolved by hydraulic- fluids and oils, to which strain gages .may Be

  20. Strain gage selection in loads equations using a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally, structural loads are measured using strain gages. A loads calibration test must be done before loads can be accurately measured. In one measurement method, a series of point loads is applied to the structure, and loads equations are derived via the least squares curve fitting algorithm using the strain gage responses to the applied point loads. However, many research structures are highly instrumented with strain gages, and the number and selection of gages used in a loads equation can be problematic. This paper presents an improved technique using a genetic algorithm to choose the strain gages used in the loads equations. Also presented are a comparison of the genetic algorithm performance with the current T-value technique and a variant known as the Best Step-down technique. Examples are shown using aerospace vehicle wings of high and low aspect ratio. In addition, a significant limitation in the current methods is revealed. The genetic algorithm arrived at a comparable or superior set of gages with significantly less human effort, and could be applied in instances when the current methods could not.

  1. 49 CFR 213.355 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.355... Higher § 213.355 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs... distance between the gage line of a frog to the guard line 1 of its guard rail or guarding face,...

  2. Skin Friction Gage for Measurements in Hypersonic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francois Falempin; Marat Goldfeld; Roman Nestoulia

    2003-01-01

    A description and results of tests of a new small-scale gage for direct measurement of skin friction force are presented in the paper. The gage design provides separated measurement of longitudinal and transversal component of friction force. Application of this scheme provides high sensitivity and necessary high-frequency response of the gage. The tests of the gage were carried out in a blow down wind tunnel at Mach numbers of 2 and 4 within the range of Reynolds numbers Rex from 0.8 to 5 million and in the hot-shot wind tunnel at Mach number 6 and Reynolds numbers Rex= 2.5-10 million. The measurements of skin friction were carried out on a flat plate and on a ramp beyond the shock wave. Simultaneously with the direct measurement of friction in the blow down wind tunnel, the measurements of profiles of average velocities and mass flow rate pulsations were realised. Analysis of measurement errors has shown that the friction gage permits to measure skin friction coefficient on a flat plate with mistake not more than 10%.

  3. Restriction of GAGE protein expression to subpopulations of cancer cells is independent of genotype and may limit the use of GAGE proteins as targets for cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, M F; Johansen, L E; Nielsen, O

    2006-01-01

    The GAGE cancer testis antigen gene family encodes products that can be recognized by autologous T cells, and GAGE proteins have been suggested as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Analysis of GAGE expression in tumours has primarily been performed at the level of gene transcription......, whereas little is known about GAGE expression at the protein level. To evaluate the potential of GAGE proteins as targets for cancer-specific immunotherapy, we studied the expression of these proteins in normal and malignant cells/tissues using a novel panel of monoclonal antibodies. Immunohistochemical...... analysis of more than 250 cancer specimens demonstrated that GAGE proteins were frequently expressed in numerous cancer types and correlated with the expression of the cancer testis antigens MAGE-A1 and NY-ESO-1. Significant intercellular and subcellular differences in GAGE protein levels were observed...

  4. GAGE12 mediates human gastric carcinoma growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Song, Kyung-A; Chae, Ji-Hye; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2015-05-15

    The spontaneous metastasis from human gastric carcinoma (GC) remains poorly reproduced in animal models. Here, we established an experimental mouse model in which GC progressively developed in the orthotopic stomach wall and metastasized to multiple organs; the tumors colonized in the ovary exhibited typical characteristics of Krukenberg tumor. The expression of mesenchymal markers was low in primary tumors and high in those in intravasating and extravasating veins. However, the expression of epithelial markers did not differ, indicating that the acquisition of mesenchymal markers without a concordant loss of typical epithelial markers was associated with metastasis. We identified 35 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in GC cells metastasized to ovary, among which overexpression of GAGE12 family genes, the top-ranked DEGs, were validated. In addition, knockdown of the GAGE12 gene family affected transcription of many of the aforementioned 35 DEGs and inhibited trans-well migration, tumor sphere formation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. In accordance, GAGE12 overexpression augmented migration, tumor sphere formation and sustained in vivo tumor growth. Taken together, the GAGE12 gene family promotes GC growth and metastasis by modulating the expression of GC metastasis-related genes.

  5. High temperature strain gage technology for gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, Edward J.; McDaniel, Amos D.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of a six month study that addressed specific issues to transfer the Pd-13Cr static strain sensor to a gas turbine engine environment. The application issues that were addressed include: (1) evaluation of a miniature, variable potentiometer for use as the ballast resistor, in conjunction with a conventional strain gage signal conditioning unit; (2) evaluation of a metal sheathed, platinum conductor leadwire assembly for use with the three-wire sensor; and (3) subjecting the sensor to dynamic strain cyclic testing to determine fatigue characteristics. Results indicate a useful static strain gage system at all temperature levels up to 1350 F. The fatigue characteristics also appear to be very promising, indicating a potential use in dynamic strain measurement applications. The procedure, set-up, and data for all tests are presented in this report. This report also discusses the specific strain gage installation technique for the Pd-13Cr gage because of its potential impact on the quality of the output data.

  6. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Streamflow Gaging Stations of the United States 201403 FileGDB 10.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer shows selected streamflow gaging stations of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, in 2013. Gaging stations, or gages, measure...

  7. Development and characterization of PdCr temperature-compensated wire resistance strain gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1989-01-01

    A temperature-compensated resistance static strain gage with potential to be used to 600 C was recently developed. Gages were fabricated from specially developed palladium-13 w/o chromium (Pd-13Cr) wire and platinum (Pt) compensator. When bonded to high temperature Hastelloy X, the apparent strain from room temperature to 600 C was within 400 microstrain for gages with no preheat treatment and within 3500 microstrain for gages with 16 hours prestabilization at 640 C. The apparent strain versus temperature relationship of stabilized PdCr gages were repeatable with the reproducibility within 100 microstrain during three thermal cycles to 600 C and an 11 hours soak at 600 C. The gage fabrication, construction and installation is described. Also, the coating system used for this compensated resistance strain gage is explained. The electrical properties of the strain sensing element and main characteristics of the compensated gage including apparent strain, drift and reproducibility are discussed.

  8. Development and calibration of buried wire gages for wall shear stress measurements in fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Sreedhara V.; Steinle, Frank W.

    1988-01-01

    Special methods were developed to arrange 'Buried Wire Gage' inserts flush to the contoured flow surfaces of instrument plugs of a boundary-layer flow apparatus. The fabrication process was aimed at producing proper bonding of the sensor wire to the substrate surface, without causing excessive surface waviness. A large number of gages were built and first calibrated for the resistance-temperature characteristics. The gages were then installed in a flow calibration apparatus and operated from a constant temperature anemometer system for a series of flow settings to derive the calibration constants of each of the gages. The flow settings included a range of subsonic freestream Mach numbers in order to help establish the gage calibration characteristics for compressible flow fields. This paper provides a description of the buried wire gage technique, an explanation of the method evolved for making proper gages, the procedure for calibrating the gages and the results of measurements performed for determining the calibration constants.

  9. Development and characterization of PdCr temperature-compensated wire resistance strain gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1989-10-01

    A temperature-compensated resistance static strain gage with potential to be used to 600 C was recently developed. Gages were fabricated from specially developed palladium-13 w/o chromium (Pd-13Cr) wire and platinum (Pt) compensator. When bonded to high temperature Hastelloy X, the apparent strain from room temperature to 600 C was within 400 microstrain for gages with no preheat treatment and within 3500 microstrain for gages with 16 hours prestabilization at 640 C. The apparent strain versus temperature relationship of stabilized PdCr gages were repeatable with the reproducibility within 100 microstrain during three thermal cycles to 600 C and an 11 hours soak at 600 C. The gage fabrication, construction and installation is described. Also, the coating system used for this compensated resistance strain gage is explained. The electrical properties of the strain sensing element and main characteristics of the compensated gage including apparent strain, drift and reproducibility are discussed.

  10. 49 CFR 213.143 - Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. 213.143... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.143 Frog guard rails and guard faces; gage. The guard check and guard face gages in frogs shall be within the...

  11. Method of predicting ionization-type vacuum gage sensitivity for various gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R.

    1973-01-01

    Sensitivity of gage for one gas can be correlated to its sensitivity for other gases by the ratio of gas ionization cross sections. Ionization cross sections which best correlate with gage sensitivites vary according to gage type and ionization cross section energy level.

  12. Alumina Encapsulated Strain Gage Not Mechanically Attached To The Substrate, Used to Temperature Compensate an Active High Temperature Gage In A Half-Bridge Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Anthony (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A temperature compensation element for a high-temperature strain gage and the method of fabricating the same. Preferably, the element is a "dummy" strain gage not mechanically attached to the substrate. The element is encapsulated in an insulative material and used to compensate an active high-temperature strain gage and wired in a half-bridge configuration. The temperature compensation element and high-temperature strain gage are fabricated using the method of the present invention. This method includes temporarily adhering the element to a heat sink, encapsulated in an insulative material and then removed from the heat sink. Next, the element is either stacked or placed near the active gage. Ideally, the element and the active gage have substantially similar heat transfer and electrical properties.

  13. Analysis of strain gage reliability in F-100 jet engine testing at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R.

    1983-01-01

    A reliability analysis was performed on 64 strain gage systems mounted on the 3 rotor stages of the fan of a YF-100 engine. The strain gages were used in a 65 hour fan flutter research program which included about 5 hours of blade flutter. The analysis was part of a reliability improvement program. Eighty-four percent of the strain gages survived the test and performed satisfactorily. A post test analysis determined most failure causes. Five failures were caused by open circuits, three failed gages showed elevated circuit resistance, and one gage circuit was grounded. One failure was undetermined.

  14. Differences between nipher and slter shielded rain gages at two Colorado deposition monitoring sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, David S.; Denning, A. Scott

    1990-01-01

    In the last decade the United States and Canada have made significant progress in establishing spatial ad temporal estimates of atmospheric deposition throughout North America. Fundamental to the wet-deposition portion of these estimates is the accurate and precise measurement of precipitation amount. Goodison and others (I-3) have reported on a new type of shielded snow gage known as the Canadian MSC Nipher shielded snow gage. Because this shielded snow gage has been shown to be superior to other precipitation gages for the estimation of snowfall amount, its design was adapted to the Universal Belfort precipitation gage (4), the dominant precipitation gage used at deposition monitoring sites in the United States. Favorable results taken from monitoring sites using this modified Nipher shielded snow gage (3-6) have prompted the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Electric Power Research Institute to adopt the Nipher shielded Belfort gage as a standard piece of equipment in the Acid MODES and Operational Evaluation Network (OEN) monitoring programs and to propose that is be included as a standard snow gage in other North American deposition monitoring programs. This communication details preliminary results from two of nine NADP/NTN deposition monitoring sites selected by the Environmental Protection Agency to compare Nipher shielded Belfort precipitation gage volumes to volumes obtained from the standard Belfort gage used in the NADP/NTN monitoring program.

  15. Standard test method for ambient temperature fatigue life of metallic bonded resistance strain gages

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a uniform procedure for the determination of strain gage fatigue life at ambient temperature. A suggested testing equipment design is included. 1.2 This test method does not apply to force transducers or extensometers that use bonded resistance strain gages as sensing elements. 1.3 Strain gages are part of a complex system that includes structure, adhesive, gage, leadwires, instrumentation, and (often) environmental protection. As a result, many things affect the performance of strain gages, including user technique. A further complication is that strain gages, once installed, normally cannot be reinstalled in another location. Therefore, it is not possible to calibrate individual strain gages; performance characteristics are normally presented on a statistical basis. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices ...

  16. Strain gage installation and survivability on geosynthetics used in flexible pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jeremy A.

    The use of foil type strain gages on geosynthetics is poorly documented. In addition, very few individuals are versed in proper installation techniques or calibration methods. Due to the limited number of knowledgeable technicians there is no information regarding the susceptibility of theses gages to errors in installation by inexperienced installers. Also lacking in the documentation related to the use of foil type strain gages on geosynthetics is the survivability of the gages in field conditions. This research documented procedures for installation, calibration, and survivability used by the project team to instruments a full scale field installation in Marked Tree, AR. This research also addressed sensitivity to installation errors on both geotextile and geogrid. To document the process of gage installation an experienced technician, Mr. Joe Ables, formerly of the UASCE Waterways Experiment Station, was consulted. His techniques were combined with those discovered in related literature and those developed by the research team to develop processes that were adaptable to multiple gage geometries and parent geosynthetics. These processes were described and documented in a step by step manner with accompanying photographs, which should allow virtually anyone with basic electronics knowledge to install these gages properly. Calibration of the various geosynthetic / strain gage combinations was completed using wide width tensile testing on multiple samples of each material. The tensile testing process was documented and analyzed using digital photography to analyze strain on the strain gage itself. Calibration factors for each geosynthtics used in the full scale field testing were developed. In addition, the process was thoroughly documented to allow future researchers to calibrate additional strain gage and geosynthetic combinations. The sensitivity of the strain gages to installation errors was analyzed using wide width tensile testing and digital photography to

  17. Near Net Manufacturing Using Thin Gage Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Jennifer; Potter, David; Holquin, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) and near net spin forming of FSW aluminumn blanks were investigated for large-scale pressure vessel applications. With a specific focus on very thin gage 2xxx and 7xxx aluminum alloys, the program concentrated on the following: the criteria used for material selection, a potential manufacturing flow, and the effectiveness and associated risks of near net spin forming. Discussion will include the mechanical properties of the friction stir welds and the parent material from before and after the spin forming process. This effort was performed under a NASA Space Exploration initiative focused on increasing the affordability, reliability and performance of pressure vessels larger than 10 ft. diameter.

  18. Development of buried wire gages for measurement of wall shear stress in Blastane experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, S. V.; Steinle, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    Buried Wire Gages operated from a Constant Temperature Anemometer System are among the special types of instrumentation to be used in the Boundary Layer Apparatus for Subsonic and Transonic flow Affected by Noise Environment (BLASTANE). These Gages are of a new type and need to be adapted for specific applications. Methods were developed to fabricate Gage inserts and mount those in the BLASTANE Instrumentation Plugs. A large number of Gages were prepared and operated from a Constant Temperature Anemometer System to derive some of the calibration constants for application to fluid-flow wall shear-stress measurements. The final stage of the calibration was defined, but could not be accomplished because of non-availability of a suitable flow simulating apparatus. This report provides a description of the Buried Wire Gage technique, an explanation of the method evolved for making proper Gages and the calibration constants, namely Temperature Coefficient of Resistance and Conduction Loss Factor.

  19. In-situ shear stress indicator using heated strain gages at the flow boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chi-An; Yang, Fuling

    2011-11-01

    This work borrows the concept of hot-wire anemometry and sketch a technique that uses local heat transfer to infer the flow field and the corresponding stress. Conventional strain gages were mounted at the flow solid boundary as the heat source and acrylic boundary was chosen for its low thermal conductivity ensuring heat accumulation when a gage is energized. The gage would now work in slightly overheated state and its self-heating leads to an additional thermal strain. When exposed to a flow field, heat is brought away by local forced convection, resulting in deviations in gage signal from that developed in quiescent liquid. We have developed a facility to achieve synchronous gage measurements at different locations on a solid boundary. Three steady flow motions were considered: circular Couette flow, rectilinear uniform flow, and rectilinear oscillating flow. Preliminary tests show the gage reading does respond to the imposed flow through thermal effects and greater deviation was measured in flows of higher shear strain rates. The correlation between the gage signals and the imposed flow field is further examined by theoretical analysis. We also introduced a second solid boundary to the vicinity of the gage in the two rectilinear flows. The gage readings demonstrate rises in its magnitudes indicating wall amplification effect on the local shear strain, agreeing to the drag augmentation by a second solid boundary reported in many multiphase flow literatures.

  20. Field manual for the collection of Navajo Nation streamflow-gage data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert J.; Fisk, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    The Field Manual for the Collection of Navajo Nation Streamflow-Gage Data (Navajo Field Manual) is based on established (standard) U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging methods and provides guidelines specifically designed for the Navajo Department of Water Resources personnel who establish and maintain streamflow gages. The Navajo Field Manual addresses field visits, including essential field equipment and the selection of and routine visits to streamflow-gaging stations, examines surveying methods for determining peak flows (indirect measurements), discusses safety considerations, and defines basic terms.

  1. Matilda Joslyn Gage: A Nineteenth-Century Women's Rights Historian Looks at Witchcraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Explores the ideas of the nineteenth century female historian, Matilda Joslyn Gage, who authored the book, "Woman, Church, and State." Focuses on Gage's ideas about women's history, particularly related to the role of the church and women persecuted for witchcraft. (CMK)

  2. An evaluation of Idaho stream-gaging networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillian, E.W.; Harenberg, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    Network Analysis for Regional Information (NARI) and the Cost-Effectiveness Procedure were tested by applying them to stream-gaging networks in Idaho. NARI was used to determine network design strategies that would maximize the value of additional data. Value of data was measured as the decrease in the probable true standards error of regional regression equations. NARI indicated that no significant decrease in regression error can be achieved by the collection of additional data and that better models should be sought. No major modifications to NARI are necessary to make it widely applicable. The Cost-Effectiveness Procedure was used to determine optimal network operation strategies. It showed network uncertainty can be reduced when six- or one-visit per year minimum constraints are in force. Sensitivity to various cost factors was examined. Attempts to model networks that included sites for collection of groundwater and water-quality data were unsuccessful. (USGS)

  3. Durability investigation of a group of strain gage pressure transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, P. S.; Hilten, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A durability investigation was conducted on a group of eighteen bonded-wire strain gage pressure transducers with ranges of 0 to 15 psig and 0 to 100 psig using an improved version of a previously developed technique. Some of the transducers were subjected to 40 million pressure cycles at a 5-Hz rate at laboratory ambient conditions, others were cycled at a temperature of 150 F (65.6 C). The largest change in sensitivity observed was 0.22% for a 100-psig transducer subjected to 40 million pressure cycles at 150 F. The largest change in zero pressure output observed was 0.91% FS for the same transducer. None of the transducers failed completely as a result of cycling at or below full scale pressure.

  4. Response of hot element wall shear stress gages in laminar oscillating flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Murphy, J. D.; Giddings, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the time-dependent response of hot element wall shear stress gages in unsteady periodic air flows is reported. The study has focused on wall shear stress in laminar oscillating flows produced on a flat plate by a free stream velocity composed of a mean component and a superposed sinusoidal variation. Two types of hot element gages, platinum film and flush wire, were tested for values of reduced frequency ranging from 0.14 to 2.36. Values of the phase angle of the wall shear stress variation relative to the free stream velocity, as indicated by the hot element gages, are compared with numerical prediction. The comparisons show that the gages indicate a wall shear stress variation that lags the true variation, and that the gages will also not indicate the correct wall shear stress variation in periodic turbulent flows.

  5. A Systematic Cathode Study-Activation of a Thermionic Cathode, and Measuring Cesium Evaporation from a Dispenser Photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    John R. Harris THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this...June 2010 Author: Justin C. Jimenez Approved by: John W. Lewellen, PhD Thesis Co-Advisor John R. Harris , PhD Thesis Co...36 Figure 21. Nude Bayard- Alpert Gauge

  6. High-Temperature Extensometry and PdCr Temperature-Compensated Wire Resistance Strain Gages Compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A detailed experimental evaluation is underway at the NASA Lewis Research Center to compare and contrast the performance of the PdCr/Pt dual-element temperature-compensated wire resistance strain gage with that of conventional high-temperature extensometry. The advanced PdCr gage, developed by researchers at Lewis, exhibits desirable properties and a relatively small and repeatable apparent strain to 800 C. This gage represents a significant advance in technology because existing commercial resistance strain gages are not reliable for quasi-static strain measurements above approx. 400 C. Various thermal and mechanical loading spectra are being applied by a high-temperature thermomechanical uniaxial testing system to evaluate the two strain-measurement systems. This is being done not only to compare and contrast the two strain sensors, but also to investigate the applicability of the PdCr strain gage to the coupon-level specimen testing environment typically employed when the high-temperature mechanical behavior of structural materials is characterized. Strain measurement capabilities to 800 C are being investigated with a nickel-base superalloy, Inconel 100 (IN 100), substrate material and application to TMC's is being examined with the model system, SCS-6/Ti-15-3. Furthermore, two gage application techniques are being investigated in the comparison study: namely, flame-sprayed and spot welding. The apparent strain responses of both the weldable and flame-sprayed PdCr wire strain gages were found to be cyclically repeatable on both IN 100 and SCS-6/Ti-15-3 [0]_8. In general, each gage exhibited some uniqueness with respect to apparent strain behavior. Gages mounted on the IN 100 specimens tended to show a repeatable apparent strain within the first few cycles, because the thermal response of IN 100 was stable. This was not the case, however, for the TMC specimens, which typically required several thermal cycles to stabilize the thermal strain response. Thus

  7. Drainage basin delineations for selected USGS streamflow-gaging stations in Virginia (Drainage_Basin)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Drainage_Basin polygon feature class was created as a digital representation of drainage basins for more than 1,650 continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations,...

  8. U.S. Geological Survey Stream Gages located in the Central Valley, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the locations of, and links to USGS gages on the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central...

  9. Levels at Streamflow Gaging Stations--A CD-ROM Based Training Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, K. Michael; Jacobson, Nathan; Erickson, Robert; Landon, Stanley

    2003-01-01

    Streamgages record the elevation of the water surface above some reference surface, or datum. This datum is assumed to remain unchanged throughout the life of the gage. However, the elevation of gages and their supporting structures often change over time as a result of earthmovement, floods, ice, and debris. The surveying practice of leveling is used to establish datum for new gage structures and to check for vertical movement of those structures over time. Vertical changes in gage structures can affect stage-discharge relations and, thus, could result in incorrect discharge determinations. Datum checks are used to correct stage-discharge relations and allow the USGS to document gage datum throughout the life of a gage. This training presentation describes methods currently used by the U.S. Geological Survey to run levels at gaging stations. The presentation is narrated, but you control the pace of the presentation. If the computer you are using can view 'MPEG' videos you will be able to take advantage of videos found within the presentation. A test, found at the end of the presentation, can be taken to assess how well you understood the training material. The class is registered as class SW1307 with the National Training Center of the U.S. Geologcial Survey. The presentation was developed using Macromedia Director 8.5(1) and is contained in the file 'WRI-4002.exe', which should auto-launch after the CD-ROM is inserted in the PC. The program only runs on a windows-based personal computer (PC). A sound card and speakers are necessary to take advantage of the narration that accompanies the presentation. Text of narrations is provided, if you are unable to listen to the narrations. Instructions for installing and running the presentation are included in the file ' Intro.html'. The file 'Intro.html' is on the CD-ROM containing the presentation and is available from the presentation's help menu.

  10. Expression, purification and characterization of the cancer-germline antigen GAGE12I: a candidate for cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Besir, Hüseyin; Larsen, Martin R

    2010-01-01

    for immunotherapy and candidates for cancer vaccines. Recombinant proteins may be superior to peptides as immunogens, since they have the potential to prime both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and are not dependent on patient HLA-type. We have developed a method for production of highly pure recombinant GAGE12I......GAGE cancer-germline antigens are frequently expressed in a broad range of different cancers, while their expression in normal tissues is limited to the germ cells of the immune privileged organs, testis and ovary. GAGE proteins are immunogenic in humans, which make them promising targets...... filtration and formaldehyde cross-linking indicated that GAGE12I forms tetramers. The purified recombinant GAGE12I represents a candidate molecule for vaccination of cancer patients and will form the basis for further structural analysis of GAGE proteins....

  11. An overview of the GAGE cancer/testis antigen family with the inclusion of newly identified members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, M F; Ditzel, H J

    2008-01-01

    GAGE cancer/testis antigens are frequently expressed in many different types of cancer, whereas their expression in normal tissues is limited to the germ cells of the immune-privileged organs, testis and ovary. Thus, GAGE proteins may be attractive candidates for immunotherapy of cancer....... This review describes the structure and phylogeny of the GAGE family members and presents a revised nomenclature, which will enable a more clear distinction of genes and gene products. The GAGE gene locus at chromosome X p11.23 consists of at least 16 genes, each of which is located in one of an equal number...... cell biology. When expressed in tumor cells, GAGE proteins can elicit both cellular and humoral immune responses, indicating that they are appropriate targets for cancer immunotherapy. The potential use of GAGE proteins in cancer immunotherapy, including possible limitations, is also discussed....

  12. Vacuum gage calibration system for 10 to the minus 8th power to 10 torr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R.

    1969-01-01

    Calibration system consists of a gas source, a source pressure gage, source volume, transfer volume and test chamber, plus appropriate piping, valves and vacuum source. It has been modified to cover as broad a range as possible while still providing accuracy and convenience.

  13. Nuclear Technology. Course 27: Metrology. Module 27-3, Gage Blocks, Mechanical Comparators and Electronic Comparators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selleck, Ben; Espy, John

    This third in a series of eight modules for a course titled Metrology describes gage blocks and mechanical and electronic comparators. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject matter, (6) materials needed, (7)…

  14. Nuclear Technology. Course 27: Metrology. Module 27-2, Fixed Gages, Dividers, Calipers, and Micrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selleck, Ben; Espy, John

    This second in a series of eight modules for a course titled Metrology dscribes fixed gages, dividers, calipers, vernier and dial calipers, and micrometers. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (l) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject matter, (6)…

  15. Combined Load Diagram for a Wind Tunnel Strain-Gage Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2010-01-01

    Combined Load Diagrams for Direct-Read, Force, and Moment Balances are discussed in great detail in the paper. The diagrams, if compared with a corresponding combined load plot of a balance calibration data set, may be used to visualize and interpret basic relationships between the applied balance calibration loads and the load components at the forward and aft gage of a strain-age balance. Lines of constant total force and moment are identified in the diagrams. In addition, the lines of pure force and pure moment are highlighted. Finally, lines of constant moment arm are depicted. It is also demonstrated that each quadrant of a Combined Load Diagram has specific regions where the applied total calibration force is at, between, or outside of the balance gage locations. Data from the manual calibration of a Force Balance is used to illustrate the application of a Combined Load Diagram to a realistic data set.

  16. High temperature static strain gage development contract, tasks 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, C. O.; Bailey, R. S.; Grant, H. P.; Przybyszewski, J. S.

    1987-07-01

    Results are presented for the first two tasks to develop resistive strain gage systems for use up to 1250 K on blades and vanes in gas turbine engines under tests. The objective of these two tasks was to further improve and evaluate two static strain gage alloys identified as candidates in a previous program. Improved compositions were not found for either alloy. Further efforts on the Fe-11.9Al-10.6Cr weigth percent alloy were discontinued because of time dependent drift problems at 1250 K in air. When produced as a 6.5 micrometer thick sputtered film, the Pd-13Cr weight percent alloys is not sufficiently stable for this use in air at 1250 K and a protective overcoat system will need to be developed.

  17. Solar furnace for flux gage calibration and thermal-effects testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, R. M.; Richards, E. H.; Mulholland, G. P.

    A solar furnace to calculate gauge flux and thermal effects was studied. The solar furnace consists of a 7.4 m square heliostat, a 6.7 m diameter concentrator, an attenuator designed to vary the flux density at the test area, and a three axis positioning table at the test area. Its primary function is the calibration of flux gages but other tasks and/or experiments will be considered as time permits.

  18. Design, analysis, and initial testing of a fiber-optic shear gage for three-dimensional, high-temperature flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Matthew W.

    This investigation concerns the design, analysis, and initial testing of a new, two-component wall shear gage for 3D, high-temperature flows. This gage is a direct-measuring, non-nulling design with a round head surrounded by a small gap. Two flexure wheels are used to allow small motions of the floating head. Fiber-optic displacement sensors measure how far the polished faces of counterweights on the wheels move in relation to a fixed housing as the primary measurement system. No viscous damping was required. The gage has both fiber-optic instrumentation and strain gages mounted on the flexures for validation of the newer fiber optics. The sensor is constructed of Haynes RTM 230RTM, a high-temperature nickel alloy. The gage housing is made of 316 stainless steel. All components of the gage in pure fiber-optic form can survive to a temperature of 1073 K. The bonding methods of the backup strain gages limit their maximum temperature to 473 K. The dynamic range of the gage is from 0--500 Pa (0--10g) and higher shears can be measured by changing the floating head size. Extensive use of finite element modeling was critical to the design and analysis of the gage. Static structural, modal, and thermal analyses were performed on the flexures using the ANSYS finite element package. Static finite element analysis predicted the response of the flexures to a given load, and static calibrations using a direct force method confirmed these results. Finite element modal analysis results were within 16.4% for the first mode and within 30% for the second mode when compared with the experimentally determined modes. Vibration characteristics of the gage were determined from experimental free vibration data after the gage was subjected to an impulse. Uncertainties in the finished geometry make this level of error acceptable. A transient thermal analysis examined the effects of a very high heat flux on the exposed head of the gage. The 100,000 W/m2 heat flux used in this analysis is

  19. A New Load Residual Threshold Definition for the Evaluation of Wind Tunnel Strain-Gage Balance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.; Volden, T.

    2016-01-01

    A new definition of a threshold for the detection of load residual outliers of wind tunnel strain-gage balance data was developed. The new threshold is defined as the product between the inverse of the absolute value of the primary gage sensitivity and an empirical limit of the electrical outputs of a strain{gage. The empirical limit of the outputs is either 2.5 microV/V for balance calibration or check load residuals. A reduced limit of 0.5 microV/V is recommended for the evaluation of differences between repeat load points because, by design, the calculation of these differences removes errors in the residuals that are associated with the regression analysis of the data itself. The definition of the new threshold and different methods for the determination of the primary gage sensitivity are discussed. In addition, calibration data of a six-component force balance and a five-component semi-span balance are used to illustrate the application of the proposed new threshold definition to different types of strain{gage balances. During the discussion of the force balance example it is also explained how the estimated maximum expected output of a balance gage can be used to better understand results of the application of the new threshold definition.

  20. Detection of serum autoantibody against GAGE-7 in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma%GAGE-7自身抗体在食管鳞状细胞癌中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王皓; 钟理; 徐家馨; 张小刚; 王建飞

    2010-01-01

    目的:检测癌-睾丸抗原GAGE-7的自身抗体在食管鳞状细胞癌患者和正常人血清中表达的差异,评价GAGE家族作为肿瘤诊断标志物的可行性.方法:在原核细菌中表达并纯化重组GAGE-7蛋白.采用ELISA检测GAGE-7自身抗体在105份食管鳞状细胞癌患者血清和86份正常人血清中的表达水平.同时检测各血清中总IgG的表达量,计算GAGE-7自身抗体在总IgG中所占比例的差异.结果:血清中GAGE-7抗体在食管鳞状细胞癌中的含量与正常组比较差异显著(P<0.001),而GAGE-7抗体与总IgG比例,患者组明显高于正常组,逻辑回归模型分析c值为0.717,敏感性和特异性分别达到0.72和0.62,且差异显著(P<0.0001).结论:癌-睾丸抗原GAGE-7的自身抗体在食管鳞状细胞癌血清中有较高表达,且与正常组比较有显著差异,其表达特性可被看做是较为理想的癌症检测标志物.

  1. Rapid Binary Gage Function to Extract a Pulsed Signal Buried in Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagaria William J

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The type of signal studied in this paper is a periodic pulse, with the pulse length short compared to the period, and the signal is buried in noise. If standard techniques such as the fast Fourier transform are used to study the signal, the data record needs to be very long. Additionally, there would be a very large number of calculations. The rapid binary gage function was developed to quickly determine the period of the signal, and the start time of the first pulse in the data. Once these two parameters are determined, the pulsed signal can be recovered using a standard data folding and adding technique.

  2. A curvature based approach using long-gage fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliewer, Kaitlyn; Glisic, Branko

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors offer a significant advantage for structural health monitoring due to their ability to simultaneously monitor both static and dynamic strain while being durable, lightweight, capable of multiplexing, and immune to electro-magnetic interference. Drawing upon the benefits of FBG sensors, this research explores the use of a series of long-gage fiber optic sensors for damage detection of a structure through dynamic strain measurements and curvature analysis. Typically structural monitoring relies upon detecting structural changes through frequency and acceleration based analysis. However, curvature and strain based analysis may be a more reliable means for structural monitoring as they show more sensitivity to damage compared to modal parameters such as displacement mode shapes and natural frequency. Additionally, long gage FBG strain sensors offer a promising alternative to traditional dynamic measurement methods as the curvature can be computed directly from the FBG strain measurements without the need for numerical differentiation. Small scale experimental testing was performed using an aluminum beam instrumented with a series of FBG optical fiber sensors. Dynamic strain measurements were obtained as the aluminum beam was subjected to various loading and support conditions. From this, a novel normalized parameter based on the curvature from the dynamic strain measurements has been identified as a potential damage sensitive feature. Theoretical predictions and experimental data were compared and conclusions carried out. The results demonstrated the potential of the novel normalized parameter to facilitate dynamic monitoring at both the local and global scale, thus allowing assessment of the structures health.

  3. Les objets sous contrainte. Gages, saisies, confiscations, vols,pillages, recel au Moyen Âge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Feller

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Du jeudi 20 au samedi 21 novembre 2009, à l’initiative d’Ana Rodriguez et de Laurent Feller, s’est tenu à Auxerre, dans la maison du Coche d’Eau, un séminaire d’études international portant sur Les objets sous contrainte. Gages, saisies, confiscation, vol, pillage, recel au Moyen Âge. Organisée conjointement par le Lamop, l’université de Paris 1 et le CCHS (CSIC de Madrid, partiellement financée par un projet Picasso de l’association Égide, l’opération a bénéficié du soutien de l’université ...

  4. Review of Trackside Monitoring Solutions: From Strain Gages to Optical Fibre Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Kouroussis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent research on structural monitoring in railway industry is proposed in this paper, with a special focus on stress-based solutions. After a brief analysis of the mechanical behaviour of ballasted railway tracks, an overview of the most common monitoring techniques is presented. A special attention is paid on strain gages and accelerometers for which the accurate mounting position on the track is requisite. These types of solution are then compared to another modern approach based on the use of optical fibres. Besides, an in-depth discussion is made on the evolution of numerical models that investigate the interaction between railway vehicles and tracks. These models are used to validate experimental devices and to predict the best location(s of the sensors. It is hoped that this review article will stimulate further research activities in this continuously expanding field.

  5. Assessment of the Uniqueness of Wind Tunnel Strain-Gage Balance Load Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2016-01-01

    A new test was developed to assess the uniqueness of wind tunnel strain-gage balance load predictions that are obtained from regression models of calibration data. The test helps balance users to gain confidence in load predictions of non-traditional balance designs. It also makes it possible to better evaluate load predictions of traditional balances that are not used as originally intended. The test works for both the Iterative and Non-Iterative Methods that are used in the aerospace testing community for the prediction of balance loads. It is based on the hypothesis that the total number of independently applied balance load components must always match the total number of independently measured bridge outputs or bridge output combinations. This hypothesis is supported by a control volume analysis of the inputs and outputs of a strain-gage balance. It is concluded from the control volume analysis that the loads and bridge outputs of a balance calibration data set must separately be tested for linear independence because it cannot always be guaranteed that a linearly independent load component set will result in linearly independent bridge output measurements. Simple linear math models for the loads and bridge outputs in combination with the variance inflation factor are used to test for linear independence. A highly unique and reversible mapping between the applied load component set and the measured bridge output set is guaranteed to exist if the maximum variance inflation factor of both sets is less than the literature recommended threshold of five. Data from the calibration of a six{component force balance is used to illustrate the application of the new test to real-world data.

  6. A Universal Threshold for the Assessment of Load and Output Residuals of Strain-Gage Balance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.; Volden, T.

    2017-01-01

    A new universal residual threshold for the detection of load and gage output residual outliers of wind tunnel strain{gage balance data was developed. The threshold works with both the Iterative and Non{Iterative Methods that are used in the aerospace testing community to analyze and process balance data. It also supports all known load and gage output formats that are traditionally used to describe balance data. The threshold's definition is based on an empirical electrical constant. First, the constant is used to construct a threshold for the assessment of gage output residuals. Then, the related threshold for the assessment of load residuals is obtained by multiplying the empirical electrical constant with the sum of the absolute values of all first partial derivatives of a given load component. The empirical constant equals 2.5 microV/V for the assessment of balance calibration or check load data residuals. A value of 0.5 microV/V is recommended for the evaluation of repeat point residuals because, by design, the calculation of these residuals removes errors that are associated with the regression analysis of the data itself. Data from a calibration of a six-component force balance is used to illustrate the application of the new threshold definitions to real{world balance calibration data.

  7. The effect of machining the gage section on Biaxial Tension/Shear plasticity experiments of DP780 sheet steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walters, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental approach for determining the effect of machining the gage section of specimens for quasi-static, biaxial tension/shear testing of sheet steels is described. This method is demonstrated by comparing the results found by an existing testing method with a reduced thickness (Mohr and Osw

  8. Nuclear Technology. Course 27: Metrology. Module 27-4, Angle Measurement Instruments, Optical Projections and Surface Texture Gages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selleck, Ben; Espy, John

    This fourth in a series of eight modules for a course titled Metrology describes the universal bevel protractor and the sine bar, the engineering microscope and optical projector, and several types of surface texture gages. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3)…

  9. MAGE-A1, GAGE and NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen expression during human gonadal development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Ole;

    2007-01-01

    by single and double immunohistochemical staining. RESULTS: We found that GAGE was expressed in the primordial germ cells of the gonadal primordium, whereas MAGE-A1 and NY-ESO-1 were first detected in germ cells of both testis and ovary after sexual differentiation was initiated. The number of positive germ...

  10. In situ measurements of atmospheric methane at GAGE/AGAGE sites during 1985-2000 and resulting source inferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnold, D. M.; Steele, L. P.; Fraser, P. J.; Simmonds, P. G.; Prinn, R. G.; Weiss, R. F.; Porter, L. W.; O'Doherty, S.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Krummel, P. B.; Wang, H. J.; Emmons, L.; Tie, X. X.; Dlugokencky, E. J.

    2002-07-01

    Continuous measurements of methane since 1986 at the Global Atmospherics Gases Experiment/Advanced Global Atmospherics Gases Experiment (GAGE/AGAGE) surface sites are described. The precisions range from approximately 10 ppb at Mace Head, Ireland, during GAGE to better than 2 ppb at Cape Grim, Tasmania, during AGAGE (i.e., since 1993). The measurements exhibit good agreement with coincident measurements of air samples from the same locations analyzed by Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) except for differences of approximately 5 ppb before 1989 (GAGE lower) and about 4 ppb from 1991 to 1995 (GAGE higher). These results are obtained before applying a factor of 1.0119 to the GAGE/AGAGE values to place them on the Tohoku University scale. The measurements combined with a 12-box atmospheric model and an assumed atmospheric lifetime of 9.1 years indicates net annual emissions (emissions minus soil sinks) of 545 Tg CH4 with a variability of only +/-20 Tg from 1985 to 1997 but an increase in the emissions in 1998 of 37 +/- 10 Tg. The effect of OH changes inferred by Prinn et al. [2001] is to increase the estimated methane emissions by approximately 20 Tg in the mid-1980s and to reduce them by 20 Tg in 1997 and by more thereafter. Using a two-dimensional (2-D), 12-box model with transport constrained by the GAGE/AGAGE chlorofluorocarbon measurements, we calculate that the proportion of the emissions coming from the Northern Hemisphere is between 73 and 81%, depending on the OH distribution used. However, this result includes an adjustment of 5% derived from a simulation of the 2-D estimation procedure using the 3-D MOZART model. This adjustment is needed because of the very different spatial emission distributions of the chlorofluorocarbons and methane which makes chlorofluorocarbons derived transport rates inaccurate for the 2-D simulation of methane. The 2-D model combined with the annual cycle in OH from Spivakovsky et al. [2000] provide an acceptable

  11. Flexible Riser Monitoring Using Hybrid Magnetic/Optical Strain Gage Techniques through RLS Adaptive Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipa Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible riser is a class of flexible pipes which is used to connect subsea pipelines to floating offshore installations, such as FPSOs (floating production/storage/off-loading unit and SS (semisubmersible platforms, in oil and gas production. Flexible risers are multilayered pipes typically comprising an inner flexible metal carcass surrounded by polymer layers and spiral wound steel ligaments, also referred to as armor wires. Since these armor wires are made of steel, their magnetic properties are sensitive to the stress they are subjected to. By measuring their magnetic properties in a nonintrusive manner, it is possible to compare the stress in the armor wires, thus allowing the identification of damaged ones. However, one encounters several sources of noise when measuring electromagnetic properties contactlessly, such as movement between specimen and probe, and magnetic noise. This paper describes the development of a new technique for automatic monitoring of armor layers of flexible risers. The proposed approach aims to minimize these current uncertainties by combining electromagnetic measurements with optical strain gage data through a recursive least squares (RLSs adaptive filter.

  12. A stream-gaging network analysis for the 7-Day, 10-year annual low flow in New Hampshire streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    The 7-day, 10-year (7Q10) low-flow-frequency statistic is a widely used measure of surface-water availability in New Hampshire. Regression equations and basin-characteristic digital data sets were developed to help water-resource managers determine surface-water resources during periods of low flow in New Hampshire streams. These regression equations and data sets were developed to estimate streamflow statistics for the annual and seasonal low-flow-frequency, and period-of-record and seasonal period-of-record flow durations. generalized-least-squares (GLS) regression methods were used to develop the annual 7Q10 low-flow-frequency regression equation from 60 continuous-record stream-gaging stations in New Hampshire and in neighboring States. In the regression equation, the dependent variables were the annual 7Q10 flows at the 60 stream-gaging stations. The independent (or predictor) variables were objectively selected characteristics of the drainage basins that contribute flow to those stations. In contrast to ordinary-least-squares (OLS) regression analysis, GLS-developed estimating equations account for differences in length of record and spatial correlations among the flow-frequency statistics at the various stations. A total of 93 measurable drainage-basin characteristics were candidate independent variables. On the basis of several statistical parameters that were used to evaluate which combination of basin characteristics contribute the most to the predictive power of the equations, three drainage-basin characteristics were determined to be statistically significant predictors of the annual 7Q10: (1) total drainage area, (2) mean summer stream-gaging station precipitation from 1961 to 90, and (3) average mean annual basinwide temperature from 1961 to 1990. To evaluate the effectiveness of the stream-gaging network in providing regional streamflow data for the annual 7Q10, the computer program GLSNET (generalized-least-squares NETwork) was used to analyze the

  13. A preliminary biomechanical assessment of a polymer composite hip implant using an infrared thermography technique validated by strain gage measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougherara, Habiba; Rahim, Ehsan; Shah, Suraj; Dubov, Anton; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Rad

    2011-07-01

    With the resurgence of composite materials in orthopaedic applications, a rigorous assessment of stress is needed to predict any failure of bone-implant systems. For current biomechanics research, strain gage measurements are employed to experimentally validate finite element models, which then characterize stress in the bone and implant. Our preliminary study experimentally validates a relatively new nondestructive testing technique for orthopaedic implants. Lock-in infrared (IR) thermography validated with strain gage measurements was used to investigate the stress and strain patterns in a novel composite hip implant made of carbon fiber reinforced polyamide 12 (CF/PA12). The hip implant was instrumented with strain gages and mechanically tested using average axial cyclic forces of 840 N, 1500 N, and 2100 N with the implant at an adduction angle of 15 deg to simulate the single-legged stance phase of walking gait. Three-dimensional surface stress maps were also obtained using an IR thermography camera. Results showed almost perfect agreement of IR thermography versus strain gage data with a Pearson correlation of R(2) = 0.96 and a slope = 1.01 for the line of best fit. IR thermography detected hip implant peak stresses on the inferior-medial side just distal to the neck region of 31.14 MPa (at 840 N), 72.16 MPa (at 1500 N), and 119.86 MPa (at 2100 N). There was strong correlation between IR thermography-measured stresses and force application level at key locations on the implant along the medial (R(2) = 0.99) and lateral (R(2) = 0.83 to 0.99) surface, as well as at the peak stress point (R(2) = 0.81 to 0.97). This is the first study to experimentally validate and demonstrate the use of lock-in IR thermography to obtain three-dimensional stress fields of an orthopaedic device manufactured from a composite material.

  14. Estimating Low-Flow Frequency Statistics and Hydrologic Analysis of Selected Streamflow-Gaging Stations, Nooksack River Basin, Northwestern Washington and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Christopher A.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2009-01-01

    Low-flow frequency statistics were computed at 17 continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations and 8 miscellaneous measurement sites in and near the Nooksack River basin in northwestern Washington and Canada, including the 1, 3, 7, 15, 30, and 60 consecutive-day low flows with recurrence intervals of 2 and 10 years. Using these low-flow statistics, 12 regional regression equations were developed for estimating the same low-flow statistics at ungaged sites in the Nooksack River basin using a weighted-least-squares method. Adjusted R2 (coefficient of determination) values for the equations ranged from 0.79 to 0.93 and the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) expressed as a percentage ranged from 77 to 560 percent. Streamflow records from six gaging stations located in mountain-stream or lowland-stream subbasins of the Nooksack River basin were analyzed to determine if any of the gaging stations could be removed from the network without significant loss of information. Using methods of hydrograph comparison, daily-value correlation, variable space, and flow-duration ratios, and other factors relating to individual subbasins, the six gaging stations were prioritized from most to least important as follows: Skookum Creek (12209490), Anderson Creek (12210900), Warm Creek (12207750), Fishtrap Creek (12212050), Racehorse Creek (12206900), and Clearwater Creek (12207850). The optimum streamflow-gaging station network would contain all gaging stations except Clearwater Creek, and the minimum network would include Skookum Creek and Anderson Creek.

  15. Internships and UNAVCO: Training the Future Geoscience Workforce Through the NSF GAGE Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. R.; MacPherson-Krutsky, C. C.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Bartel, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Facilities are uniquely positioned to both serve a broad, national audience and provide unique workforce experience to students and recent graduates. Intentional efforts dedicated to broadening participation in the future geoscience workforce at the NSF GAGE (Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope) Facility operated by UNAVCO, are designed to meet the needs of the next generation of students and professionals. As a university-governed consortium facilitating research and education in the geosciences, UNAVCO is well-situated to both prepare students for geoscience technical careers and advanced research positions. Since 1998, UNAVCO has offered over 165 student assistant or intern positions including engineering, data services, education and outreach, and business support. UNAVCO offers three formal programs: the UNAVCO Student Internship Program (USIP), Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS), and the Geo-Launchpad (GLP) internship program. Interns range from community college students up through graduate students and recent Masters graduates. USIP interns gain real-world work experience in a professional setting, collaborate with teams toward a common mission, and contribute their knowledge, skills, and abilities to the UNAVCO community. RESESS interns conduct authentic research with a scientist in the Front Range area as well as participate in a structured professional development series. GLP students are in their first 2 years of higher education and work alongside UNAVCO technical staff gaining valuable work experience and insight into the logistics of supporting scientific research. UNAVCO's efforts in preparing the next generation of scientists largely focuses on increasing diversity in the geosciences, whether continuing academic studies or moving into the workforce. To date, well over half of our interns and student assistants come from backgrounds historically underrepresented in the geosciences. Over 80% of former interns

  16. Flight Test Results from the Rake Airflow Gage Experiment on the F-15B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Michael; Ratnayake, Nalin

    2011-01-01

    The results are described of the Rake Airflow Gage Experiment (RAGE), which was designed and fabricated to support the flight test of a new supersonic inlet design using Dryden's Propulsion Flight Test Fixture (PFTF) and F-15B testbed airplane (see figure). The PFTF is a unique pylon that was developed for flight-testing propulsion-related experiments such as inlets, nozzles, and combustors over a range of subsonic and supersonic flight conditions. The objective of the RAGE program was to quantify the local flowfield at the aerodynamic interface plane of the Channeled Centerbody Inlet Experiment (CCIE). The CCIE is a fixed representation of a conceptual mixed-compression supersonic inlet with a translating biconic centerbody. The primary goal of RAGE was to identify the relationship between free-stream and local Mach number in the low supersonic regime, with emphasis on the identification of the particular free-stream Mach number that produced a local Mach number of 1.5. Measurements of the local flow angularity, total pressure distortion, and dynamic pressure over the interface plane were also desired. The experimental data for the RAGE program were obtained during two separate research flights. During both flights, local flowfield data were obtained during straight and level acceleration segments out to steady-state test points. The data obtained from the two flights showed small variations in Mach number, flow angularity, and dynamic pressure across the interface plane at all flight conditions. The data show that a free-stream Mach number of 1.65 will produce the desired local Mach number of 1.5 for CCIE. The local total pressure distortion over the interface plane at this condition was approximately 1.5%. At this condition, there was an average of nearly 2 of downwash over the interface plane. This small amount of downwash is not expected to adversely affect the performance of the CCIE inlet.

  17. Direct measurements of wall shear stress by buried wire gages in a shock-wave boundary-layer interaction region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, V. S.; Rose, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed measurements of wall shear stress (skin friction) were made with specially developed buried wire gages in the interaction regions of a Mach 2.9 turbulent boundary layer with externally generated shocks. Separation and reattachment points inferred by these measurements support the findings of earlier experiments which used a surface oil flow technique and pitot profile measurements. The measurements further indicate that the boundary layer tends to attain significantly higher skin-friction values downstream of the interaction region as compared to upstream. Comparisons between measured wall shear stress and published results of some theoretical calculation schemes show that the general, but not detailed, behavior is predicted well by such schemes.

  18. Force Reconstruction from Ejection Tests of Stores from Aircraft Used for Model Predictions and Missing/Bad Gages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Michael; Cap, Jerome S.; Starr, Michael J.; Urbina, Angel; Brink, Adam Ray

    2015-12-01

    One of the more severe environments for a store on an aircraft is during the ejection of the store. During this environment it is not possible to instrument all component responses, and it is also likely that some instruments may fail during the environment testing. This work provides a method for developing these responses from failed gages and uninstrumented locations. First, the forces observed by the store during the environment are reconstructed. A simple sampling method is used to reconstruct these forces given various parameters. Then, these forces are applied to a model to generate the component responses. Validation is performed on this methodology.

  19. 电阻应变计用UV胶盖面方案浅析%Shallowly talking about using spraying UV cured resin to encapsulate the stain gage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁昌锐

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays when people produce resistance strain gages, the encapsulating process is very complex, and to cure the encapsulating resin using the clip will produce internal stress, will take a long time to be released. Our new concept using spraying UV cured resin to encapsulate the strain gage facilitates the automation of production, not only greatly enhance the production efficiency, reduce the cost, but also can reduce the internal stress of the strain gage. Choosing good UV cured resin can also improve the protective performance of the encapsulated strain gage, improve the quality of strain gage.%现在生产电阻应变计盖面时工艺很复杂,而且固化时要上夹子会产生应力,需要一定的时日才能释放出来,新概念改用喷Uv胶的方法盖面,便于自动化大生产,不仅大大提高了生产效率,降低了成本,还可以减小盖面时应变计的内部应力,选择良好的Uv胶还可以改进盖面胶的防护性能,提高应变计的质量。

  20. Reliability analysis of forty-five strain-gage systems mounted on the first fan stage of a YF-100 engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R.; Frause, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    The reliability of 45 state-of-the-art strain gage systems under full scale engine testing was investigated. The flame spray process was used to install 23 systems on the first fan rotor of a YF-100 engine; the others were epoxy cemented. A total of 56 percent of the systems failed in 11 hours of engine operation. Flame spray system failures were primarily due to high gage resistance, probably caused by high stress levels. Epoxy system failures were principally erosion failures, but only on the concave side of the blade. Lead-wire failures between the blade-to-disk jump and the control room could not be analyzed.

  1. The development of a bearing spectral analyzer and algorithms to detect turbopump bearing wear from deflectometer and strain gage data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Carol L.

    1992-07-01

    Over the last several years, Rocketdyne has actively developed condition and health monitoring techniques and their elements for rocket engine components, specifically high pressure turbopumps. Of key interest is the development of bearing signature analysis systems for real-time monitoring of the cryogen-cooled turbopump shaft bearings, which spin at speeds up to 36,000 RPM. These system elements include advanced bearing vibration sensors, signal processing techniques, wear mode algorithms, and integrated control software. Results of development efforts in the areas of signal processing and wear mode identification and quantification algorithms based on strain gage and deflectometer data are presented. Wear modes investigated include: inner race wear, cage pocket wear, outer race wear, differential ball wear, cracked inner race, and nominal wear.

  2. Evaluating a slope-stability model for shallow rain-induced landslides using gage and satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatheendradas, S.; Kirschbaum, D.; Baum, Rex L.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    Improving prediction of landslide early warning systems requires accurate estimation of the conditions that trigger slope failures. This study tested a slope-stability model for shallow rainfall-induced landslides by utilizing rainfall information from gauge and satellite records. We used the TRIGRS model (Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-based Regional Slope-stability analysis) for simulating the evolution of the factor of safety due to rainfall infiltration. Using a spatial subset of a well-characterized digital landscape from an earlier study, we considered shallow failure on a slope adjoining an urban transportation roadway near the Seattle area in Washington, USA.We ran the TRIGRS model using high-quality rain gage and satellite-based rainfall data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Preliminary results with parameterized soil depth values suggest that the steeper slope values in this spatial domain have factor of safety values that are extremely close to the failure limit within an extremely narrow range of values, providing multiple false alarms. When the soil depths were constrained using a back analysis procedure to ensure that slopes were stable under initial condtions, the model accurately predicted the timing and location of the landslide observation without false alarms over time for gage rain data. The TRMM satellite rainfall data did not show adequately retreived rainfall peak magnitudes and accumulation over the study period, and as a result failed to predict the landslide event. These preliminary results indicate that more accurate and higher-resolution rain data (e.g., the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission) are required to provide accurate and reliable landslide predictions in ungaged basins.

  3. Bayesian WLS/GLS regression for regional skewness analysis for regions with large crest stage gage networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Andrea G.; Stedinger, Jery R.; Eash, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes methodological advances in regional log-space skewness analyses that support flood-frequency analysis with the log Pearson Type III (LP3) distribution. A Bayesian Weighted Least Squares/Generalized Least Squares (B-WLS/B-GLS) methodology that relates observed skewness coefficient estimators to basin characteristics in conjunction with diagnostic statistics represents an extension of the previously developed B-GLS methodology. B-WLS/B-GLS has been shown to be effective in two California studies. B-WLS/B-GLS uses B-WLS to generate stable estimators of model parameters and B-GLS to estimate the precision of those B-WLS regression parameters, as well as the precision of the model. The study described here employs this methodology to develop a regional skewness model for the State of Iowa. To provide cost effective peak-flow data for smaller drainage basins in Iowa, the U.S. Geological Survey operates a large network of crest stage gages (CSGs) that only record flow values above an identified recording threshold (thus producing a censored data record). CSGs are different from continuous-record gages, which record almost all flow values and have been used in previous B-GLS and B-WLS/B-GLS regional skewness studies. The complexity of analyzing a large CSG network is addressed by using the B-WLS/B-GLS framework along with the Expected Moments Algorithm (EMA). Because EMA allows for the censoring of low outliers, as well as the use of estimated interval discharges for missing, censored, and historic data, it complicates the calculations of effective record length (and effective concurrent record length) used to describe the precision of sample estimators because the peak discharges are no longer solely represented by single values. Thus new record length calculations were developed. The regional skewness analysis for the State of Iowa illustrates the value of the new B-WLS/BGLS methodology with these new extensions.

  4. Influence of the Testing Gage Length on the Strength, Young's Modulus and Weibull Modulus of Carbon Fibres and Glass Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Claudio Pardini

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibres and glass fibres are reinforcements for advanced composites and the fiber strength is the most influential factor on the strength of the composites. They are essentially brittle and fail with very little reduction in cross section. Composites made with these fibres are characterized by a high strength/density ratio and their properties are intrisically related to their microstructure, i.e., amount and orientation of the fibres, surface treatment, among other factors. Processing parameters have an important role in the fibre mechanical behaviour (strength and modulus. Cracks, voids and impurities in the case of glass fibres and fibrillar misalignments in the case of carbon fibres are created during processing. Such inhomogeneities give rise to an appreciable scatter in properties. The most used statistical tool that deals with this characteristic variability in properties is the Weibull distribution. The present work investigates the influence of the testing gage length on the strength, Young's modulus and Weibull modulus of carbon fibres and glass fibres. The Young's modulus is calculated by two methods: (i ASTM D 3379M, and (ii interaction between testing equipment/specimen The first method resulted in a Young modulus of 183 GPa for carbon fibre, and 76 GPa for glass fibre. The second method gave a Young modulus of 250 GPa for carbon fibre and 50 GPa for glass fibre. These differences revelead differences on how the interaction specimen/testing machine can interfere in the Young modulus calculations. Weibull modulus can be a tool to evaluate the fibre's homogeneity in terms of properties and it is a good quality control parameter during processing. In the range of specimen gage length tested the Weibull modulus for carbon fibre is ~ 3.30 and for glass fibres is ~ 5.65, which indicates that for the batch of fibres tested, the glass fibre is more uniform in properties.

  5. Analysis of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigen expression in early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen E;

    2013-01-01

    NSCLC has shown promising results. However, little is known about the expression of other cancer/testis antigens in NSCLC. In the present study the expression of cancer/testis antigens GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was investigated in patients with completely resected, early stage, primary NSCLC....

  6. Streamflow characteristics based on data through water year 2009 for selected streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana: Chapter E in Montana StreamStats

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Peter M.

    2016-04-05

    Chapter E of this Scientific Investigations Report documents results from a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality and the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, to provide an update of statewide streamflow characteristics based on data through water year 2009 for streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana. Streamflow characteristics are presented for 408 streamflow-gaging stations in Montana and adjacent areas having 10 or more years of record. Data include the magnitude and probability of annual low and high streamflow, the magnitude and probability of low streamflow for three seasons (March–June, July–October, and November–February), streamflow duration statistics for monthly and annual periods, and mean streamflows for monthly and annual periods. Streamflow is considered to be regulated at streamflow-gaging stations where dams or other large-scale human modifications affect 20 percent or more of the contributing drainage basin. Separate streamflow characteristics are presented for the unregulated and regulated periods of record for streamflow-gaging stations with sufficient data.

  7. Quantification of uncertainties in the 100-year flow at an ungaged site near a gaged station and its application in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Huidae; Bones, Emma

    2016-08-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency has introduced the concept of the "1-percent plus" flow to incorporate various uncertainties in estimation of the 100-year or 1-percent flow. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no clear directions for calculating the 1-percent plus flow have been defined in the literature. Although information about standard errors of estimation and prediction is provided along with the regression equations that are often used to estimate the 1-percent flow at ungaged sites, uncertainty estimation becomes more complicated when there is a nearby gaged station because regression flows and the peak flow estimate from a gage analysis should be weighted to compute the weighted estimate of the 1-percent flow. In this study, an equation for calculating the 1-percent plus flow at an ungaged site near a gaged station is analytically derived. Also, a detailed process is introduced for calculating the 1-percent plus flow for an ungaged site near a gaged station in Georgia as an example and a case study is performed. This study provides engineers and practitioners with a method that helps them better assess flood risks and develop mitigation plans accordingly.

  8. Flood of April 2007 and Flood-Frequency Estimates at Streamflow-Gaging Stations in Western Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    A spring nor'easter affected the East Coast of the United States from April 15 to 18, 2007. In Connecticut, rainfall varied from 3 inches to more than 7 inches. The combined effects of heavy rainfall over a short duration, high winds, and high tides led to widespread flooding, storm damage, power outages, evacuations, and disruptions to traffic and commerce. The storm caused at least 18 fatalities (none in Connecticut). A Presidential Disaster Declaration was issued on May 11, 2007, for two counties in western Connecticut - Fairfield and Litchfield. This report documents hydrologic and meteorologic aspects of the April 2007 flood and includes estimates of the magnitude of the peak discharges and peak stages during the flood at 28 streamflow-gaging stations in western Connecticut. These data were used to perform flood-frequency analyses. Flood-frequency estimates provided in this report are expressed in terms of exceedance probabilities (the probability of a flood reaching or exceeding a particular magnitude in any year). Flood-frequency estimates for the 0.50, 0.20, 0.10, 0.04, 0.02, 0.01, and 0.002 exceedance probabilities (also expressed as 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2- percent exceedance probability, respectively) were computed for 24 of the 28 streamflow-gaging stations. Exceedance probabilities can further be expressed in terms of recurrence intervals (2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year recurrence interval, respectively). Flood-frequency estimates computed in this study were compared to the flood-frequency estimates used to derive the water-surface profiles in previously published Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Flood Insurance Studies. The estimates in this report update and supersede previously published flood-frequency estimates for streamflowgaging stations in Connecticut by incorporating additional years of annual peak discharges, including the peaks for the April 2007 flood. In the southwest coastal region of Connecticut, the

  9. Hydrography - HYDROGRAPHY_HIGHRES_POINT_NHD_USGS: Gaging Stations, Gates, Lock Chambers, Reservoirs, Springs, Seeps, Sinks, Rises, Waterfalls, and Wells in Watersheds of Indiana (U.S. Geological Survey, 1:24,000, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — HYDROGRAPHY_HIGHRES_POINT_NHD_USGS.SHP is a point shapefile that contains locations of gaging stations, gates, lock chambers, reservoirs, springs, seeps, sinks,...

  10. Merenje torzionih oscilacija pomoću mernih traka / Measurement of torsional vibrations by using strain gages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Trifković

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available U ovom radu prikazan je metod merenja torzionih oscilacija mehaničkih sistema na osnovu merenja torzionog napona pomoću mernih traka. Ovaj metod naročito je pogodan za proveru nivoa naprezanja elemenata sistema, koji prenose promenljive obrtne momente i torziono osciluju. Osim toga, mogu se određivati i kritične brzine obrtanja elemenata sistema, pri kojima se javljaju rezonantna naprezanja i otkazi sistema, kao što su: pojačana buka, trošenje zupčanika, zamor materijala, oštećenja i lomovi vratila, spojnica i si. Predložen je merni lanac u kojem centralno mesto zauzima suvremeni mobilni merni sistem Spider 8, koji omogućava merenje, obradu i prikaz rezultata pomoću računara. / In this work the measuring method of torsion vibrations is presented according to the measurement of torsion stress using strain gages. This method is particularly suitable in checking the system elements strain level that transfers changeable torsion moments and oscillate torsionally. Besides that, the system elements critical velocity rotation can be estimated, folio-wed by the resonant strain and problems in the function of that system such as: amplified noise, -wearing-out of gears, fatigue crack, damage and break of shafts and junctions etc. The measuring chain is proposed in -which the central part is a contemporary mobile system Spider 8, -which enables measurement, processing and displays measured results on a computer.

  11. Pre-Test Assessment of the Use Envelope of the Normal Force of a Wind Tunnel Strain-Gage Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the aerodynamic lift force generated by a wind tunnel model, the model weight, and the measured normal force of a strain-gage balance is investigated to better understand the expected use envelope of the normal force during a wind tunnel test. First, the fundamental relationship between normal force, model weight, lift curve slope, model reference area, dynamic pressure, and angle of attack is derived. Then, based on this fundamental relationship, the use envelope of a balance is examined for four typical wind tunnel test cases. The first case looks at the use envelope of the normal force during the test of a light wind tunnel model at high subsonic Mach numbers. The second case examines the use envelope of the normal force during the test of a heavy wind tunnel model in an atmospheric low-speed facility. The third case reviews the use envelope of the normal force during the test of a floor-mounted semi-span model. The fourth case discusses the normal force characteristics during the test of a rotated full-span model. The wind tunnel model's lift-to-weight ratio is introduced as a new parameter that may be used for a quick pre-test assessment of the use envelope of the normal force of a balance. The parameter is derived as a function of the lift coefficient, the dimensionless dynamic pressure, and the dimensionless model weight. Lower and upper bounds of the use envelope of a balance are defined using the model's lift-to-weight ratio. Finally, data from a pressurized wind tunnel is used to illustrate both application and interpretation of the model's lift-to-weight ratio.

  12. Determination of Baseline Periods of Record for Selected Streamflow-Gaging Stations in New Jersey for Determining Ecologically Relevant Hydrologic Indices (ERHI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esralew, Rachel A.; Baker, Ronald J.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrologic changes in New Jersey stream basins resulting from human activity can affect the flow and ecology of the streams. To assess future changes in streamflow resulting from human activity an understanding of the natural variability of streamflow is needed. The natural variability can be classified using Ecologically Relevant Hydrologic Indices (ERHIs). ERHIs are defined as selected streamflow statistics that characterize elements of the flow regime that substantially affect biological health and ecological sustainability. ERHIs are used to quantitatively characterize aspects of the streamflow regime, including magnitude, duration, frequency, timing, and rate of change. Changes in ERHI values can occur as a result of human activity, and changes in ERHIs over time at various stream locations can provide information about the degree of alteration in aquatic ecosystems at or near those locations. New Jersey streams can be divided into four classes (A, B, C, or D), where streams with similar ERHI values (determined from cluster analysis) are assigned the same stream class. In order to detect and quantify changes in ERHIs at selected streamflow-gaging stations, a 'baseline' period is needed. Ideally, a baseline period is a period of continuous daily streamflow record at a gaging station where human activity along the contributing stream reach or in the stream's basin is minimal. Because substantial urbanization and other development had already occurred before continuous streamflow-gaging stations were installed, it is not possible to identify baseline periods that meet this criterion for many reaches in New Jersey. Therefore, the baseline period for a considerably altered basin can be defined as a period prior to a substantial human-induced change in the drainage basin or stream reach (such as regulations or diversions), or a period during which development did not change substantially. Index stations (stations with minimal urbanization) were defined as streamflow-gaging

  13. Peak-Flow Frequency Estimates Based on Data through Water Year 2001 for Selected Streamflow-Gaging Stations in South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Steven K.; Driscoll, Daniel G.; Parrett, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Numerous users, including the South Dakota Department of Transportation, have continuing needs for peak-flow information for the design of highway infrastructure and many other purposes. This report documents results from a cooperative study between the South Dakota Department of Transportation and the U.S. Geological Survey to provide an update of peak-flow frequency estimates for South Dakota. Estimates of peak-flow magnitudes for 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals are reported for 272 streamflow-gaging stations, which include most gaging stations in South Dakota with 10 or more years of systematic peak-flow records through water year 2001. Recommended procedures described in Bulletin 17B were used as primary guidelines for developing peak-flow frequency estimates. The computer program PEAKFQ developed by the U.S. Geological Survey was used to run the frequency analyses. Flood frequencies for all stations were initially analyzed by using standard Bulletin 17B default procedures for fitting the log-Pearson III distribution. The resulting preliminary frequency curves were then plotted on a log-probability scale, and fits of the curves with systematic data were evaluated. In many cases, results of the default Bulletin 17B analyses were determined to be satisfactory. In other cases, however, the results could be improved by using various alternative procedures for frequency analysis. Alternative procedures for some stations included adjustments to skew coefficients or use of user-defined low-outlier criteria. Peak-flow records for many gaging stations are strongly influenced by low- or zero-flow values. This situation often results in a frequency curve that plots substantially above the systematic record data points at the upper end of the frequency curve. Adjustments to low-outlier criteria reduced the influence of very small peak flows and generally focused the analyses on the upper parts of the frequency curves (10- to 500-year

  14. Adjusted peak-flow frequency estimates for selected streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana based on data through water year 2011: Chapter D in Montana StreamStats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Steven K.; Sando, Roy; McCarthy, Peter M.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2016-04-05

    The climatic conditions of the specific time period during which peak-flow data were collected at a given streamflow-gaging station (hereinafter referred to as gaging station) can substantially affect how well the peak-flow frequency (hereinafter referred to as frequency) results represent long-term hydrologic conditions. Differences in the timing of the periods of record can result in substantial inconsistencies in frequency estimates for hydrologically similar gaging stations. Potential for inconsistency increases with decreasing peak-flow record length. The representativeness of the frequency estimates for a short-term gaging station can be adjusted by various methods including weighting the at-site results in association with frequency estimates from regional regression equations (RREs) by using the Weighted Independent Estimates (WIE) program. Also, for gaging stations that cannot be adjusted by using the WIE program because of regulation or drainage areas too large for application of RREs, frequency estimates might be improved by using record extension procedures, including a mixed-station analysis using the maintenance of variance type I (MOVE.1) procedure. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Transportation and the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, completed a study to provide adjusted frequency estimates for selected gaging stations through water year 2011.The purpose of Chapter D of this Scientific Investigations Report is to present adjusted frequency estimates for 504 selected streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana based on data through water year 2011. Estimates of peak-flow magnitudes for the 66.7-, 50-, 42.9-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities are reported. These annual exceedance probabilities correspond to the 1.5-, 2-, 2.33-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals, respectively.The at-site frequency estimates were

  15. Research on the Traceability Value Methord of Tyre Pattern Depth Gage%轮胎花纹深度检测尺量值溯源方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建群; 林景星

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there is no domestic specification of verification or calibration on the tyre pattern depth gage (hereinafter referred as the" depth gage "). In order to ensure an accurate and reliable traeebility value of the depth gage and its testing data, according to its working principle and measurement characteristics, this paper puts forward a calibration method on it and an uncertainty evaluation method of the depth gage, thus as a technical referrence of calibration of the depth gage.%目前国内尚无检定或校准轮胎花纹深度检测尺(以下简称“深度尺”)的计量检定规程或校准技术规范,为了确保开展深度尺量值溯源与检测数据准确可靠,根据其工作原理与计量特性,本文提出深度尺的校准方法及其校准结果的不确定度评定方法,作为开展深度尺校准使用的技术依据。

  16. Statistical summaries of streamflow data for selected gaging stations on and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, through September 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M.A.J.; Mann, L.J.; Kjelstrom, L.C.

    1993-11-01

    Statistical summaries and graphs of streamflow data were prepared for 13 gaging stations with 5 or more years of continuous record on and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Statistical summaries of streamflow data for the Big and Little Lost Rivers and Birch Creek were analyzed as a requisite for a comprehensive evaluation of the potential for flooding of facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The type of statistical analyses performed depended on the length of streamflow record for a gaging station. Streamflow statistics generated for stations with 5 to 9 years of record were: Magnitudes of monthly and annual flows; duration of daily mean flows; and maximum, median, and minimum daily mean flows. Streamflow statistics generated for stations with 10 or more years of record were: Magnitudes of monthly and annual flows; magnitudes and frequencies of daily low, high, instantaneous peak (flood frequency), and annual mean flows; duration of daily mean flows; exceedance probabilities of annual low, high, instantaneous peak, and mean annual flows; maximum, median, and minimum daily mean flows; and annual mean and mean annual flows.

  17. Temporal trends and stationarity in annual peak flow and peak-flow timing for selected long-term streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana through water year 2011: Chapter B in Montana StreamStats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Steven K.; McCarthy, Peter M.; Sando, Roy; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2016-04-05

    A large-scale study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Transportation and the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, was done to investigate general patterns in peak-flow temporal trends and stationarity through water year 2011 for 24 long-term streamflow-gaging stations (hereinafter referred to as gaging stations) in Montana. Hereinafter, all years refer to water years; a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the year in which it ends. The primary focus of the study was to identify general patterns in peak-flow temporal trends and stationarity that are relevant to application of peak-flow frequency analyses within a statewide gaging-station network.

  18. 一款微型汽车塑料保险杠专用检具通用化设计%Universal design A miniature car plastic bumper special gage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄好; 谭克京

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the basis of a miniature car plastic rear bumper special gage, combined with the inspection requirements of the new rear bumper design, universal design and alteration for the existing special gage to meet the gage design and manufacturing requirements, shorten new product development cycle, reduce the cost of new product develop- ment%本文重点分析了在现有的一款微型汽车塑料后保险杠专用检具的基础上,结合新设计的保险杠产品检测要求,对现有的专用检具进行通用化设计和改造,满足检具的设计和制造要求,缩短新产品开发周期,降低新产品开发成本。

  19. Estimating peak-flow frequency statistics for selected gaged and ungaged sites in naturally flowing streams and rivers in Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Molly S.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Skinner, Kenneth D.; Veilleux, Andrea G.

    2016-06-27

    -central Idaho (average standard error of prediction=46.4 percent; pseudo-R2>92 percent) and region 5 in central Idaho (average standard error of prediction=30.3 percent; pseudo-R2>95 percent). Regression model fit was poor for region 7 in southern Idaho (average standard error of prediction=103 percent; pseudo-R2equations if peak-flow estimates are desired at an ungaged site that is close to a streamgage selected for inclusion in this study. The alternative drainage area ratio-adjustment method is appropriate for use when the drainage area ratio between the ungaged and gaged sites is between 0.5 and 1.5.The updated regional peak-flow regression equations had lower total error (standard error of prediction) than all regression equations presented in a 1982 study and in four of six regions presented in 2002 and 2003 studies in Idaho. A more extensive streamgage screening process used in the current study resulted in fewer streamgages used in the current study than in the 1982, 2002, and 2003 studies. Fewer streamgages used and the selection of different explanatory variables were likely causes of increased error in some regions compared to previous studies, but overall, regional peak‑flow regression model fit was generally improved for Idaho. The revised statistical procedures and increased streamgage screening applied in the current study most likely resulted in a more accurate representation of natural peak-flow conditions.The updated, regional peak-flow regression equations will be integrated in the U.S. Geological Survey StreamStats program to allow users to estimate basin and climatic characteristics and peak-flow statistics at ungaged locations of interest. StreamStats estimates peak-flow statistics with quantifiable certainty only when used at sites with basin and climatic characteristics within the range of input variables used to develop the regional regression equations. Both the regional regression equations and StreamStats should be used to estimate peak

  20. Estimating peak-flow frequency statistics for selected gaged and ungaged sites in naturally flowing streams and rivers in Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Molly S.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Skinner, Kenneth D.; Veilleux, Andrea G.

    2016-06-27

    -central Idaho (average standard error of prediction=46.4 percent; pseudo-R2>92 percent) and region 5 in central Idaho (average standard error of prediction=30.3 percent; pseudo-R2>95 percent). Regression model fit was poor for region 7 in southern Idaho (average standard error of prediction=103 percent; pseudo-R2<78 percent) compared to other regions because few streamgages in region 7 met the criteria for inclusion in the study, and the region’s semi-arid climate and associated variability in precipitation patterns causes substantial variability in peak flows.A drainage area ratio-adjustment method, using ratio exponents estimated using generalized least-squares regression, was presented as an alternative to the regional regression equations if peak-flow estimates are desired at an ungaged site that is close to a streamgage selected for inclusion in this study. The alternative drainage area ratio-adjustment method is appropriate for use when the drainage area ratio between the ungaged and gaged sites is between 0.5 and 1.5.The updated regional peak-flow regression equations had lower total error (standard error of prediction) than all regression equations presented in a 1982 study and in four of six regions presented in 2002 and 2003 studies in Idaho. A more extensive streamgage screening process used in the current study resulted in fewer streamgages used in the current study than in the 1982, 2002, and 2003 studies. Fewer streamgages used and the selection of different explanatory variables were likely causes of increased error in some regions compared to previous studies, but overall, regional peak‑flow regression model fit was generally improved for Idaho. The revised statistical procedures and increased streamgage screening applied in the current study most likely resulted in a more accurate representation of natural peak-flow conditions.The updated, regional peak-flow regression equations will be integrated in the U.S. Geological Survey StreamStats program to allow

  1. Vertical datum conversion process for the inland and coastal gage network located in the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and South Atlantic-Gulf hydrologic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlund, Jr., Paul H.; Noll, Michael L.

    2017-03-07

    Datum conversions from the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 to the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 among inland and coastal gages throughout the hydrologic regions of New England, the Mid-Atlantic, and the South Atlantic-Gulf have implications among river and storm surge forecasting, general commerce, and water-control operations. The process of data conversions may involve the application of a recovered National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929–North American Vertical Datum of 1988 offset, a simplistic datum transformation using VDatum or VERTCON software, or a survey, depending on a gaging network datum evaluation, anticipated uncertainties for data use among the cooperative water community, and methods used to derive the conversion. Datum transformations from National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 to North American Vertical Datum of 1988 using VERTCON purport errors of ± 0.13 foot at the 95 percent confidence level among modeled points, claiming more consistency along the east coast. Survey methods involving differential and trigonometric leveling, along with observations using Global Navigation Satellite System technology, afford a variety of approaches to establish or perpetuate a datum during a survey. Uncertainties among leveling approaches are generally process is initiated with an evaluation of the inland and coastal gage network datum, beginning with altitude datum components and the history of those components queried through the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Site Inventory database. Subsequent edits to the Groundwater Site Inventory database may be required and a consensus reached among the U.S. Geological Survey Water Science Centers to identify the outstanding workload categorized as in-office datum transformations or offset applications versus out-of-office survey efforts. Datum conversions or datum establishment for the inland or coastal gaging network should meet datum uncertainty requirements among other Federal agencies

  2. Design of a sediment-monitoring gaging network on ephemeral tributaries of the Colorado River in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Ronald E.; Topping, David J.; Anderson, Robert S.; Hancock, Gregory S.; Melis, Theodore S.

    2014-01-01

    Management of sediment in rivers downstream from dams requires knowledge of both the sediment supply and downstream sediment transport. In some dam-regulated rivers, the amount of sediment supplied by easily measured major tributaries may overwhelm the amount of sediment supplied by the more difficult to measure lesser tributaries. In this first class of rivers, managers need only know the amount of sediment supplied by these major tributaries. However, in other regulated rivers, the cumulative amount of sediment supplied by the lesser tributaries may approach the total supplied by the major tributaries. The Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon has been hypothesized to be one such river. If this is correct, then management of sediment in the Colorado River in the part of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area downstream from the dam and in Grand Canyon National Park may require knowledge of the sediment supply from all tributaries. Although two major tributaries, the Paria and Little Colorado Rivers, are well documented as the largest two suppliers of sediment to the Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, the contributions of sediment supplied by the ephemeral lesser tributaries of the Colorado River in the lowermost Glen Canyon, and Marble and Grand Canyons are much less constrained. Previous studies have estimated amounts of sediment supplied by these tributaries ranging from very little to almost as much as the amount supplied by the Paria River. Because none of these previous studies relied on direct measurement of sediment transport in any of the ephemeral tributaries in Glen, Marble, or Grand Canyons, there may be significant errors in the magnitudes of sediment supplies estimated during these studies. To reduce the uncertainty in the sediment supply by better constraining the sediment yield of the ephemeral lesser tributaries, the U.S. Geological Survey Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center established eight sediment-monitoring gaging

  3. A new crank arm based load cell, with built-in conditioning circuit and strain gages, to measure the components of the force applied by a cyclist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigatto, Andre V; Moura, Karina O A; Favieiro, Gabriela W; Balbinot, Alexandre; Pigatto, Andre V; Moura, Karina O A; Favieiro, Gabriela W; Balbinot, Alexandre; Moura, Karina O A; Favieiro, Gabriela W; Balbinot, Alexandre; Pigatto, Andre V

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the development of a force platform based on instrumented load cells with built-in conditioning circuit and strain gages to measure and acquire the components of the force that is applied to the bike crank arm during pedaling in real conditions, and save them on a SD Card. To accomplish that, a complete new crank arm 3D solid model was developed in the SolidWorks, with dimensions equivalent to a commercial crank set and compatible with a conventional road bike, but with a compartment to support all the electronics necessary to measure 3 components of the force applied to the pedal during pedaling. After that, a 6082 T6 Aluminum Crankset based on the solid model was made and instrumented with three Wheatstone bridges each. The signals were conditioned on a printed circuit board, made on SMD technology, and acquired using a microcontroller with a DAC. Static deformation analysis showed a linearity error below 0.6% for all six channels. Dynamic analysis showed a natural frequency above 136Hz. A one-factor experiment design was performed with 5 amateur cyclists. ANOVA showed that the cyclist weight causes significant variation on the force applied to the bicycle pedal and its bilateral symmetry.

  4. Peak-flow frequency analyses and results based on data through water year 2011 for selected streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana: Chapter C in Montana StreamStats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, Steven K.; McCarthy, Peter M.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2016-04-05

    Chapter C of this Scientific Investigations Report documents results from a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Transportation and the Montana Department of Natural Resources, to provide an update of statewide peak-flow frequency analyses and results for Montana. The purpose of this report chapter is to present peak-flow frequency analyses and results for 725 streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana based on data through water year 2011. The 725 streamflow-gaging stations included in this study represent nearly all streamflowgaging stations in Montana (plus some from adjacent states or Canadian Provinces) that have at least 10 years of peak-flow records through water year 2011. For 29 of the 725 streamflow-gaging stations, peak-flow frequency analyses and results are reported for both unregulated and regulated conditions. Thus, peak-flow frequency analyses and results are reported for a total of 754 analyses. Estimates of peak-flow magnitudes for 66.7-, 50-, 42.9-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities are reported. These annual exceedance probabilities correspond to 1.5-, 2-, 2.33-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals.

  5. Erosion of Copper Target Irradiated by Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Polosatkin, S V; Grishnyaev, E S; Konstantinov, S G; Shoshin, A A

    2012-01-01

    Erosion of copper target irradiated by deuterium ion beam with ultimate fluence is studied. The target originally destined for neutron generation represents bulk copper substrate covered by 3-\\mum titanium layer. The target was irradiated by deuterium ion beam generated in Bayard-Alpert type ion source with energy of ions 17.5 keV/nuclear. Maximal fluence in the center of the target achieves 2.5x10^23atoms/cm^2. Measurements of the profile of irradiated target and estimation of fluence shows that physical sputtering is a dominating process that determines the target erosion Most interesting feature is growth of \\mum-size tadpole-shaped structures, localized in the cracks of the surface. RFA analysis of these structures showed extremely large (up to 60%at.) carbon content.

  6. A simple design for a helium scattering apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, F.; Kneitz, S.; Koschel, H.; Steinrück, H.-P.

    1997-04-01

    We have designed a simple helium scattering apparatus for gas-surface scattering experiments. The effusive source is a glass multicapillary array, operated at large Knudsen numbers which produces a highly collimated thermal He beam (FWHM ≈ 3°) with a Maxwellian velocity distribution. The detector is a Bayard Alpert ionization gauge, mounted in a tube that is separated from the main UHV chamber via a second multicapillary array. This setup allows one to select only those He atoms that are reflected by the sample in the specular direction and thus to measure the reflectivity of the surface. Examples of its performance are presented for the adsorption of CO on Ru(001), and for thermal annealing of a Ru(001) surface sputtered with argon ions at different energies.

  7. Investigation of the sensitivity of ionization-type vacuum gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, R.

    1973-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of a large and representative sample of available data has been made to determine the best criteria for predicting the relative sensitivities of ionization-type vacuum gauges to different gases. The molecular property of the gas that correlates best with relative sensitivity is the ionization cross section (eV). For high-pressure ionization gauges, a cross section evaluated at 2/3 of the accelerating potential of the gauge is the best choice. For Bayard-Alpert and triode gauges, any of three choices are of approximately equal value. These are 100 eV cross section values, maximum cross section value for each gas, and a cross section evaluated at 2/3 of the accelerating potential for each gauge. For the Alphatron gauge, cross section values in the range 5000-10,000 eV provide the best correlation.

  8. Low-flow analysis and selected flow statistics representative of 1930-2002 for streamflow-gaging stations in or near West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Jeffrey B.

    2006-01-01

    Five time periods between 1930 and 2002 are identified as having distinct patterns of annual minimum daily mean flows (minimum flows). Average minimum flows increased around 1970 at many streamflow-gaging stations in West Virginia. Before 1930, however, there might have been a period of minimum flows greater than any period identified between 1930 and 2002. The effects of climate variability are probably the principal causes of the differences among the five time periods. Comparisons of selected streamflow statistics are made between values computed for the five identified time periods and values computed for the 1930-2002 interval for 15 streamflow-gaging stations. The average difference between statistics computed for the five time periods and the 1930-2002 interval decreases with increasing magnitude of the low-flow statistic. The greatest individual-station absolute difference was 582.5 percent greater for the 7-day 10-year low flow computed for 1970-1979 compared to the value computed for 1930-2002. The hydrologically based low flows indicate approximately equal or smaller absolute differences than biologically based low flows. The average 1-day 3-year biologically based low flow (1B3) and 4-day 3-year biologically based low flow (4B3) are less than the average 1-day 10-year hydrologically based low flow (1Q10) and 7-day 10-year hydrologic-based low flow (7Q10) respectively, and range between 28.5 percent less and 13.6 percent greater. Seasonally, the average difference between low-flow statistics computed for the five time periods and 1930-2002 is not consistent between magnitudes of low-flow statistics, and the greatest difference is for the summer (July 1-September 30) and fall (October 1-December 31) for the same time period as the greatest difference determined in the annual analysis. The greatest average difference between 1B3 and 4B3 compared to 1Q10 and 7Q10, respectively, is in the spring (April 1-June 30), ranging between 11.6 and 102.3 percent

  9. Estimating flood magnitude and frequency at gaged and ungaged sites on streams in Alaska and conterminous basins in Canada, based on data through water year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Janet H.; Barth, Nancy A.; Veilleux, Andrea G.; Ourso, Robert T.

    2016-03-16

    -based geographic information system application that facilitates retrieval of streamflow statistics and associated information. StreamStats retrieves published data for gaged sites and, for user-selected ungaged sites, delineates drainage areas from topographic and hydrographic data, computes basin characteristics, and computes flood frequency estimates using the regional regression equations.

  10. Analysis on Management of Tank Ullage Gaging under Marketing-by-Liter Mode%升进升出管理模式下罐车空高的计量管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵兴伟

    2011-01-01

    Oil tank ullage gaging plays an important role in the process of oil product loading, handover, and discharging. Because of the characteristics of oil product, the temperature and density can affect it greatly. Based on the consideration of some issues ab%为了使经油罐车运送到加油站油品的数量得到保证,在升进升出的计量管理模式下,探索了油罐车在油库装油后采用油罐车空高计量的管理方法,介绍了在某油库实施该方法所做的数据采集、整理、汇总等基础工作和计算机程序的编写、数据库的建立以及相应的油罐车空高计量管理办法等,经过两年的工作,相关加油站反映效果不错,但仍需对相关制度进行强化和完善。

  11. DETAILED HYDROLOGY, GAGE COUNTY,NE USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  12. Development of High-Temperature Strain Gages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-03-17

    lengths the article is either dipped in a slip (finely divided tend to require a support for the grid, while shorter coating material suspended in a...liquid) or the lengths require too many loops to achieve the slip is sprayed onto the article , followed in both cases by high-temperature fusion. An...Electrochemistry. Electrical Instruments. Magnetic Measurements. Dielectrics. Metrology. Photometry and Colorimetry. Refractometry . Photographic Research

  13. LHC : The World's Largest Vacuum Systems being commissioned at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, J M

    2008-01-01

    When it switches on in 2008, the 26.7 km Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, will have the world's largest vacuum system operating over a wide range of pressures and employing an impressive array of vacuum technologies. This system is composed by 54 km of UHV vacuum for the circulating beams and 50 km of insulation vacuum around the cryogenic magnets and the liquid helium transfer lines. Over the 54 km of UHV beam vacuum, 48 km of this are at cryogenic temperature (1.9 K). The remaining 6 km of beam vacuum containing the insertions for "cleaning" the proton beams, radiofrequency cavities for accelerating the protons as well as beam-monitoring equipment is at ambient temperature and uses non-evaporable getter (NEG) coatings - a vacuum technology that was born and industrialized at CERN. The pumping scheme is completed using 780 ion pumps to remove noble gases and to provide pressure interlocks to the 303 vacuum safety valves. Pressure readings are provided by 170 Bayard-Alpert gauges and 1084 gauges (Pirani a...

  14. 统一螺纹量规标准研究及其在AP1000反应堆压力容器主螺栓制造中的应用%Study on Standard of Gages for Unified Screw Threads and Application on AP1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel Main Stud Manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易飞; 杨杰

    2015-01-01

    研究了按ASME B1. 2标准规定的统一螺纹量规(通、 止规)的设计原则, 介绍了统一螺纹量规功能、 公差设置、 量规尺寸确定等, 并针对AP1000反应堆压力容器主螺栓螺纹制造和检测提出建议, 为业内及其他统一螺纹制造和检测提供参考.%This paper studies the design principles, function and determination of tolerances and dimensions of gages for unified inch screw thread according to ASME B1. 2 standard, based on which some suggestions are given for AP1000 reactor pressure vessel main studs manufacturing and testing, as reference for in industry sectors.

  15. Terrain, BIG BLUE RIVER TRIBUTARY NO 44, GAGE COUNTY, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. Alfred P. Gage and the Introductory Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    This article is about a late 19th-century teacher of secondary school physics. I was originally interested in the apparatus that he sold. This led me to the physics books that he wrote, and these took me to his unusual ideas about ways to use laboratory time to introduce students to the phenomena of physics. More than 100 years later educational…

  17. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, GAGE COUNTY, NEBRASKA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  18. Wireless Zigbee strain gage sensor system for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Abdi, Frank; Miraj, Rashid; Dang, Chau; Takahashi, Tatsuya; Sauer, Bruce

    2009-05-01

    A compact cell phone size radio frequency (ZigBee) wireless strain measurement sensor system to measure the structural strain deformation was developed. The developed system provides an accurate strain measurement data stream to the Internet for further Diagnostic and Prognostic (DPS) correlation. Existing methods of structural measurement by strain sensors (gauges) do not completely satisfy problems posed by continuous structural health monitoring. The need for efficient health monitoring methods with real-time requirements to bidirectional data flow from sensors and to a commanding device is becoming critical for keeping our daily life safety. The use of full-field strain measurement techniques could reduce costly experimental programs through better understanding of material behavior. Wireless sensor-network technology is a monitoring method that is estimated to grow rapidly providing potential for cost savings over traditional wired sensors. The many of currently available wireless monitoring methods have: the proactive and constant data rate character of the data streams rather than traditional reactive, event-driven data delivery; mostly static node placement on structures with limited number of nodes. Alpha STAR Electronics' wireless sensor network system, ASWN, addresses some of these deficiencies, making the system easier to operate. The ASWN strain measurement system utilizes off-the-shelf sensors, namely strain gauges, with an analog-to-digital converter/amplifier and ZigBee radio chips to keep cost lower. Strain data is captured by the sensor, converted to digital form and delivered to the ZigBee radio chip, which in turn broadcasts the information using wireless protocols to a Personal Data Assistant (PDA) or Laptop/Desktop computers. From here, data is forwarded to remote computers for higher-level analysis and feedback using traditional cellular and satellite communication or the Ethernet infrastructure. This system offers a compact size, lower cost, and temperature insensitivity for critical structural applications, which require immediate monitoring and feedback.

  19. Productive Discomfort: Dialogue, Reproductive Choice and Social Justice Education at the Matilda Joslyn Gage Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch Wagner, Sally; Eckler, Tori; Leighton, Maxinne Rhea

    2013-01-01

    Museums in the past have been static institutions, exhibiting their collections as public displays. Today, the public has come to expect more from these institutions, seeing them as safe havens where conversations can begin. As reproductive rights have moved to the forefront of political and social debate, dialogue seems to be a step in the right…

  20. Water resource inventory and assessment, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, 1989 stream discharge gaging data

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This progress report provides an accounting of the accomplishments made during the second year of a multi-year water resource inventory in the coastal plain (1002...

  1. Calibration of Breech Erosion Gage for 5.56mm Chrome-Plated Bores

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    34 tft.. CantoiIlate Olft.) Ill TEUIy CLASS. (of ffile .oepot) Unclassified ISO . DECL ASSi VIC ATION’DOW94GRADING 16. DISTRIOUTION STATEMENT (of Wit9...6.3 8.9 13.4 7.6 7.3 6.3 6.2 7.1 26000 16.1 9.1 10.9 13.9 8.9 6.4 6.3 3.1 4.9 27000 12.4 8.4 11.2 13.1 8.3 6.5 7.3 3.4 4.3 28000 12.1 6.9 19.3 11.4

  2. International Students' Social Network: Network Mapping to Gage Friendship Formation and Student Engagement on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFaul, Susannah

    2016-01-01

    Addressing the importance of international student engagement on campus and creating friendships with host-country nationals during their time abroad, this small-scale study explores the question of, "Are there trends in how or through what means international students are making connections with co-national, multi-national, or host-national…

  3. Use of Precious Metal-Modifed Nickel-Base Superalloys for Thin Gage Applications (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Historically, sandwich construction MTPS (outer surface-Alloy 617 nickel-base superalloy honeycomb core and face sheets; inner surface titanium alloy honeycomb ...National Aeronautics and Space Administration ( NASA ) X-33 vehicle2, a wedged-shaped subscale prototype of a reusable launch vehicle4 designed by...MTPS, materials under consideration must be very thin, 0.17 mm-0.25 mm for a typical face sheet and 0.05mm-0.10 mm for honeycomb core. One

  4. Study of Six-Component Internal Strain Gage Balances for Use in the HIRT Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    bridges, also provides a backlog of s t ress information on which to base this study. The two-shell balance has been an important instrument in the...Reference 1) Ftu (ksi) 300 Fty (ksi) 280 Fsu (ksi) 170 Elongation (%) 5 E (106 psi) 27,0 G (106psi) 10.2 Charpy V-notch (ft-lb) 17 KIC (ksi ~-n...varying BMC location can be used to attain higher normal force for given runs, thus allowing for more test points. Figure 7 is a graphic

  5. Design of Gages for Direct Skin Friction Measurements in Complex Turbulent Flows with Shock Impingement Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-07

    www.ansys.com/ 30 Figliola, p. 87-91. 31 Pilkey, p. 564. 32 Fogiel, p. 1112. 33 Hibbeler , R.C. Engineering Mechanics Static and Dynamics 5th Edition...Macmillan Publishing Company, Inc., New York, 1989 pp. 486, 511. 34 Hibbeler , pp. 486, 511. 35 Figliola, p. 89. 36 Fogiel, p. 258. 37

  6. ELECTROHYDRAULIC SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATIC GAGE CONTROL (AGC FOR TANDEM COLD MILL PLANT IN SARTID SMEDEREVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Stefanovic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electro hydraulic servosystem for the AGC has better characteristics than electromechanic (fivetimesgreater speed of rolling, greater speed of positioning ,smaller dead–zone, smaller time of roll gap adjusting start, smaller time of maximum speed reaching,greater unloading speed.

  7. A Multiple Bridge for Elimination of Contact-Resistance Errors in Resistance Strain-Gage Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-03-01

    g@ge. ‘ ,, 3. If’&’ ms a,b or h)k are used and a m&ing-coil galva- nometersis the’detector, an appreciable &Gsistance is introductid ‘into this...denoglnator because]it would oontrihuto only third-order % ms .” I;merting equation (39) into the identity- . . iGl ( )‘iG2””b ‘Gl”- ‘G2 (40) (37) may...measurement of alternating strains through slip .rings. --- Ii .,+- ● A A s r r Rh s Two-pole multipla -” position switch R Single-pole multiple

  8. Standard test method for determining residual stresses by the hole-drilling strain-gage method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 Residual Stress Determination: 1.1.1 This test method specifies a hole-drilling procedure for determining residual stress profiles near the surface of an isotropic linearly elastic material. The test method is applicable to residual stress profile determinations where in-plane stress gradients are small. The stresses may remain approximately constant with depth (“uniform” stresses) or they may vary significantly with depth (“non-uniform” stresses). The measured workpiece may be “thin” with thickness much less than the diameter of the drilled hole or “thick” with thickness much greater than the diameter of the drilled hole. Only uniform stress measurements are specified for thin workpieces, while both uniform and non-uniform stress measurements are specified for thick workpieces. 1.2 Stress Measurement Range: 1.2.1 The hole-drilling method can identify in-plane residual stresses near the measured surface of the workpiece material. The method gives localized measurements that indicate the...

  9. The Strain Gage Method for Determination of Input Working Life Parameters of Pipes in Compressor Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trebuňa, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available For determination of safety operation of compressor stations and assessment of their residual working life is necessary to know the levels of residual stresses, operational loading as well as functionality of real support elements and influence of history of previous loading. The method described in the paper was verified several times during solution of problems concerning safety operation of piping yards. The method was also verified by the numerical methods of mechanics.

  10. Standard test methods for performance characteristics of metallic bonded resistance strain gages

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1992-01-01

    1.1 The purpose of this standard is to provide uniform test methods for the determination of strain gauge performance characteristics. Suggested testing equipment designs are included. 1.2 Test Methods E 251 describes methods and procedures for determining five strain gauge parameters: Section Part I—General Requirements 7 Part II—Resistance at a Reference Temperature 8 Part III—Gauge Factor at a Reference Temperature 9 Part IV—Temperature Coefficient of Gauge Factor\t10 Part V—Transverse Sensitivity\t11 Part VI—Thermal Output\t12 1.3 Strain gauges are very sensitive devices with essentially infinite resolution. Their response to strain, however, is low and great care must be exercised in their use. The performance characteristics identified by these test methods must be known to an acceptable accuracy to obtain meaningful results in field applications. 1.3.1 Strain gauge resistance is used to balance instrumentation circuits and to provide a reference value for measurements since all data are...

  11. LA OBRA DE THOMAS GAGE: UNA MIRADA HACÍA AMÉRICA DESDE AFUERA.

    OpenAIRE

    Méndez González, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    En 1492 el encuentro con América vendría a cambiar desde ese año las relaciones, que tenían los países de Europa entre si y con el Oriente asiático. Dicho acontecimiento vendría a transformar el desarrollo de los nexos políticos que hasta entonces se sostenían entre las potencias hegemónicas del Viejo Mundo, por la entrada en escena de un nuevo y vastísimo continente. El descubrimiento de América vino a trastocar y polemizar todos los ámbitos que la cultura Occidental tenía ...

  12. Continuous Tidal Streamflow and Gage-Height Data for Bass and Cinder Creeks on Kiawah Island, South Carolina, September 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, Paul A.; Erbland, John W.

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of Bass and Cinder Creeks on Kiawah Island, South Carolina, was developed to evaluate methodologies for determining fecal coliform total maximum daily loads for shellfish waters. To calibrate the model, two index-velocity sites on the creeks were instrumented with continuous acoustic velocity meters and water-level sensors to compute a 21-day continuous record of tidal streamflows. In addition to monitoring tidal cycles, streamflow measurements were made at the index-velocity sites, and tidal-cycle streamflow measurements were made at the mouth of Bass Creek and on the Stono River to characterize the streamflow dynamics near the ocean boundary of the three-dimensional model at the beginning, September 6, 2007, and end, September 26, 2007, of the index-velocity meter deployment. The maximum floodtide and ebbtide measured on the Stono River by the mouth of Bass Creek for the two measurements were -155,000 and 170,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s). At the mouth of Bass Creek, the maximum floodtide and ebbtide measurements during the 2 measurement days were +/-10,200 ft3/s. Tidal streamflows for the 21-day deployment on Bass Creek ranged from -2,510 ft3/s for an incoming tide to 4,360 ft3/s for an outgoing tide. On Cinder Creek, the incoming and outgoing tide varied from -2,180 to 2,400 ft3/s during the same period.

  13. Magnitude, frequency, and trends of floods at gaged and ungaged sites in Washington, based on data through water year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Mark C.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Veilleux, Andrea G.; Tecca, Alison E.

    2016-09-20

    An investigation into the magnitude and frequency of floods in Washington State computed the annual exceedance probability (AEP) statistics for 648 U.S. Geological Survey unregulated streamgages in and near the borders of Washington using the recorded annual peak flows through water year 2014. This is an updated report from a previous report published in 1998 that used annual peak flows through the water year 1996. New in this report, a regional skew coefficient was developed for the Pacific Northwest region that includes areas in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and western Montana within the Columbia River drainage basin south of the United States-Canada border, the coastal areas of Oregon and western Washington, and watersheds draining into Puget Sound, Washington. The skew coefficient is an important term in the Log Pearson Type III equation used to define the distribution of the log-transformed annual peaks. The Expected Moments Algorithm was used to fit historical and censored peak-flow data to the log Pearson Type III distribution. A Multiple Grubb-Beck test was employed to censor low outliers of annual peak flows to improve on the frequency distribution. This investigation also includes a section on observed trends in annual peak flows that showed significant trends (p-value publication of this report. StreamStats is the interactive Web-based map tool created by the U.S. Geological Survey to allow the user to choose a streamgage and obtain published statistics or choose ungaged locations where the program automatically applies the regional regression equations and computes the estimates of the AEP statistics.

  14. Magnitude, frequency, and trends of floods at gaged and ungaged sites in Washington, based on data through water year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Mark C.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Veilleux, Andrea G.; Tecca, Alison E.

    2016-09-20

    An investigation into the magnitude and frequency of floods in Washington State computed the annual exceedance probability (AEP) statistics for 648 U.S. Geological Survey unregulated streamgages in and near the borders of Washington using the recorded annual peak flows through water year 2014. This is an updated report from a previous report published in 1998 that used annual peak flows through the water year 1996. New in this report, a regional skew coefficient was developed for the Pacific Northwest region that includes areas in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and western Montana within the Columbia River drainage basin south of the United States-Canada border, the coastal areas of Oregon and western Washington, and watersheds draining into Puget Sound, Washington. The skew coefficient is an important term in the Log Pearson Type III equation used to define the distribution of the log-transformed annual peaks. The Expected Moments Algorithm was used to fit historical and censored peak-flow data to the log Pearson Type III distribution. A Multiple Grubb-Beck test was employed to censor low outliers of annual peak flows to improve on the frequency distribution. This investigation also includes a section on observed trends in annual peak flows that showed significant trends (p-value equations to estimate AEP statistics at ungaged basins. Washington was divided into four regions to improve the accuracy of the regression equations; a set of equations for eight selected AEPs and for each region were constructed. Selected AEP statistics included the annual peak flows that equaled or exceeded 50, 20, 10, 4, 2, 1, 0.5 and 0.2 percent of the time equivalent to peak flows for peaks with a 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals, respectively. Annual precipitation and drainage area were the significant basin characteristics in the regression equations for all four regression regions in Washington and forest cover was significant for the two regression regions in eastern Washington. Average standard error of prediction for the regional regression equations ranged from 70.19 to 125.72 percent for Regression Regions 1 and 2 on the eastern side of the Cascade Mountains and from 43.22 to 58.04 percent for Regression Regions 3 and 4 on the western side of the Cascade Mountains. The pseudo coefficient of determination (where a value of 100 signifies a perfect regression model) ranged from 68.39 to 90.68 for Regression Regions 1 and 2, and 92.35 to 95.44 for Regions 3 and 4.The calculated AEP statistics for the streamgages and the regional regression equations are expected to be incorporated into StreamStats after the publication of this report. StreamStats is the interactive Web-based map tool created by the U.S. Geological Survey to allow the user to choose a streamgage and obtain published statistics or choose ungaged locations where the program automatically applies the regional regression equations and computes the estimates of the AEP statistics.

  15. Response of Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panel with Minimum Gage GFRP Face-Sheets to Compression Loading After Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Walker, Sandra P.

    2011-01-01

    A compression after impact study has been conducted to determine the residual strength of three sandwich panel constructions with two types of thin glass fiber reinforced polymer face-sheets and two hexagonal honeycomb Nomex core densities. Impact testing is conducted to first determine the characteristics of damage resulting from various impact energy levels. Two modes of failure are found during compression after impact tests with the density of the core precipitating the failure mode present for a given specimen. A finite element analysis is presented for prediction of the residual compressive strength of the impacted specimens. The analysis includes progressive damage modeling in the face-sheets. Preliminary analysis results were similar to the experimental results; however, a higher fidelity core material model is expected to improve the correlation.

  16. Stream-gage locations where streamflow gains/losses were quantified along the Central Valley surface-water network

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the name and location for the diversions from the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central...

  17. 75 FR 12674 - Amendment of Jet Routes and VOR Federal Airways in the Vicinity of Gage, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, via El Paso, TX; INT El Paso 070 and Pinon, NM, 219 radials; Pinon; Chisum, NM... September 15, 2009, is amended as follows: Paragraph 2004 Jet Routes. * * * * * J-26 From Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, via El Paso, TX; INT of El Paso 070 and Chisum, NM, 215 radials; Chisum; Panhandle, TX;...

  18. Preliminary Estimates of Frequency-Direction Spectra Derived from the SAMSON Pressure Gage Array, November 1990 to May 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    collection after the primary SAMSON experiment is credited to Dr. C. Linwood Vincent, CERC. The efforts of Ms. Janean Shirley, Information Technology ...Wave HeLsht DjLreStL2M. Periodaflet talen Date TUme8 ..im 8 p pi Tpt le Xpi 4.r D*Pth - -- 2 A MU. AML 411L. -JM -M5 - - - 0U. 910203 1900 0.54 0.50

  19. Distinct GAGE and MAGE-A expression during early human development indicate specific roles in lineage differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Harkness, Linda; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    and RT-PCR, we investigated the expression of CTAs in differentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and in late embryos and early fetuses. RESULTS: We found that melanoma antigen A (MAGE-A) family members were expressed during differentiation of hESC to embryoid bodies and in teratomas, and overlapped...

  20. A study on the ultrasonic application for the efficiency elevation of the hydrogen fuel production: by the pressure sensor gage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Eun Sun; Song, Min Guen; Son, Seung Woo [Gyeongsang National Univ., Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    The production of hydrogen fuel depends basically on the water electrolysis. The ultrasonic effects the decrease of the overpotential in a water electrolysis. A study on the overpotential which activates the hydrogen production is the core to elevate the hydrogen production efficiency on the principle. A pressure sensor system by a new idea is developed and applied. Solutions are 4 kinds of KOH concentration such as 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30%. Two frequency bands of the ultrasonic transducer are 28kHz and 2MHz. The directions of ultrasonic forcing are the vertical direction and the horizontal direction. The temperatures are two states, i.e., no constant and constant. Experiments are carried out sequentially in order in three cases of no ultrasonic forcing, ultrasonic forcing, and ultrasonic discontinuation. In results, it is clarified that the ultrasonic effects the decrease of overpotential to elevate the efficiency of hydrogen production.

  1. Design of Mass Strain Gages Information Management Systems based on Delphi%基于Delphi的海量应变片信息管理系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左佳; 张建锋

    2013-01-01

    为了对静力试验中海量应变片信息进行有效的管理,基于Delphi开发平台,结合SQL Server 2000数据库,开发了海量应变片管理系统程序.实践验证,该系统结构合理、界面简洁美观,能够大大促进工作积极性,提高工作效率.

  2. Annual Estimates of Water-Budget Components Based on Hydrograph Separation and PRISM Precipitation for Gaged Basins in the Appalachian Plateaus Region, 1900-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Groundwater Resources Program study of the Appalachian Plateaus aquifers, estimates of annual water-budget components were...

  3. Static Force and Moment Test of the Holloman Narrow-Gage Rocket Sled at Mach Numbers from 3.5 to 5.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    N 4NN Lc t- * * -~~ c. 2 0 0 a CL v W" *7 m V4 r4 𔃾A r4N r14.O 4 .F- X .b .b . .. CC!I a. . . -t- 9.9.. L2 In V Lobbl Ul dd lbI a.. 0. 418n nInI - F...00 0 U2 *SSSIC d in cot N 4r ~ 0 ~300 00 00 NI , 61’ AinI *V- -n r-0. wo W) a, C𔃾N 4-~~ O0 0 Uk r. In 0 0 01000c 100 ninI u I- CLa a *Z * 4a 4 C4 t

  4. How To Increase Use Life of Whorl Cirque Gages%如何提高螺纹环规使用寿命

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜娟

    2010-01-01

    本文阐述了我们公司现在检验螺纹环规所使用的校对量规的偏差不合理,造成新人厂螺纹环规的使用周期短,使用中的螺纹环规报废量大,以及如何配备科学合理的校对量规来提高螺纹环规的使用寿命.

  5. Estimating flood magnitude and frequency at gaged and ungaged sites on streams in Alaska and conterminous basins in Canada, based on data through water year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Janet H.; Barth, Nancy A.; Veilleux, Andrea G.; Ourso, Robert T.

    2016-03-16

    Estimates of the magnitude and frequency of floods are needed across Alaska for engineering design of transportation and water-conveyance structures, flood-insurance studies, flood-plain management, and other water-resource purposes. This report updates methods for estimating flood magnitude and frequency in Alaska and conterminous basins in Canada. Annual peak-flow data through water year 2012 were compiled from 387 streamgages on unregulated streams with at least 10 years of record. Flood-frequency estimates were computed for each streamgage using the Expected Moments Algorithm to fit a Pearson Type III distribution to the logarithms of annual peak flows. A multiple Grubbs-Beck test was used to identify potentially influential low floods in the time series of peak flows for censoring in the flood frequency analysis.For two new regional skew areas, flood-frequency estimates using station skew were computed for stations with at least 25 years of record for use in a Bayesian least-squares regression analysis to determine a regional skew value. The consideration of basin characteristics as explanatory variables for regional skew resulted in improvements in precision too small to warrant the additional model complexity, and a constant model was adopted. Regional Skew Area 1 in eastern-central Alaska had a regional skew of 0.54 and an average variance of prediction of 0.45, corresponding to an effective record length of 22 years. Regional Skew Area 2, encompassing coastal areas bordering the Gulf of Alaska, had a regional skew of 0.18 and an average variance of prediction of 0.12, corresponding to an effective record length of 59 years. Station flood-frequency estimates for study sites in regional skew areas were then recomputed using a weighted skew incorporating the station skew and regional skew. In a new regional skew exclusion area outside the regional skew areas, the density of long-record streamgages was too sparse for regional analysis and station skew was used for all estimates. Final station flood frequency estimates for all study streamgages are presented for the 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities.Regional multiple-regression analysis was used to produce equations for estimating flood frequency statistics from explanatory basin characteristics. Basin characteristics, including physical and climatic variables, were updated for all study streamgages using a geographical information system and geospatial source data. Screening for similar-sized nested basins eliminated hydrologically redundant sites, and screening for eligibility for analysis of explanatory variables eliminated regulated peaks, outburst peaks, and sites with indeterminate basin characteristics. An ordinary least‑squares regression used flood-frequency statistics and basin characteristics for 341 streamgages (284 in Alaska and 57 in Canada) to determine the most suitable combination of basin characteristics for a flood-frequency regression model and to explore regional grouping of streamgages for explaining variability in flood-frequency statistics across the study area. The most suitable model for explaining flood frequency used drainage area and mean annual precipitation as explanatory variables for the entire study area as a region. Final regression equations for estimating the 50-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability discharge in Alaska and conterminous basins in Canada were developed using a generalized least-squares regression. The average standard error of prediction for the regression equations for the various annual exceedance probabilities ranged from 69 to 82 percent, and the pseudo-coefficient of determination (pseudo-R2) ranged from 85 to 91 percent.The regional regression equations from this study were incorporated into the U.S. Geological Survey StreamStats program for a limited area of the State—the Cook Inlet Basin. StreamStats is a national web-based geographic information system application that facilitates retrieval of streamflow statistics and

  6. Average Estimates of Water-Budget Components Based on Hydrograph Separation and PRISM Precipitation for Gaged Basins in the Appalachian Plateaus Region, 1900-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Groundwater Resources Program study of the Appalachian Plateaus aquifers, estimates of annual water-budget components were...

  7. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_5: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 33,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  8. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_8: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 62,300 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  9. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_2: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 15,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  10. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_3: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 21,450 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  11. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_6: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 39,900 at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  12. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_7: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 46,800 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  13. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_4: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 27,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  14. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_1: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 12,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  15. Towards the determination of deformation rates - pinch-and-swell structures as a natural and simulated paleo-strain rate gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Max; Poulet, Thomas; Karrech, Ali; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Herwegh, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Layered rocks deformed under viscous deformation conditions frequently show boudinage, a phenomenon that results from differences in effective viscosity between the involved layers. In the case of continuous necking of a mechanically stiffer layer embedded in a weaker matrix, symmetric boudins are interpreted as the result of dominant visco-plastic deformation (Goscombe et al., 2004). However, information on the physical conditions, material properties and deformation processes are yet unknown. Natural samples deformed under low-grade (Tphysical deformation conditions by either grain growth or grain size reduction following the Paleowattmeter of Austin and Evans (2007) combined with the thermodynamic approach of Regenauer-Lieb and Yuen (2004). Depending on the dissipated energy, grain sizes in these domains vary substantially in space and time. While low strain rates (low stresses) in the swells favor grain growth and GSI dominated deformation, high strain rates in the pinches provoke dramatic grain size reduction with an increasing contribution of GSS as a function of decreasing grain size. The development of symmetric necks observed in nature thus seems to coincide with the transition from dislocation to diffusion creep dominated flow with continuous grain size reduction and growth from swell to neck at relatively high extensional strains. REFERENCES Austin, N. and Evans, B. (2007). Paleowattmeters: A scaling relation for dynamically recrystallized grain size. Geology, 35. Goscombe, B.D., Passchier, C.W. and Hand, M. (2004). Boudinage classification: End-member boudin types and modified boudin structures, Journal of Structural Geology, 26. Herwegh, M., Poulet, T., Karrech, A. and Regenauer-Lieb, K. (in press). From transient to steady state deformation and grain size: A thermodynamic approach using elasto-visco-plastic numerical modeling. Journal of Geophysical Research. Karrech, A., Regenauer-Lieb, K. and Poulet, T. (2011a). A Damaged visco-plasticity model for pressure and temperature sensitive geomaterials. Journal of Engineering Science 49. Regenauer-Lieb, K. and Yuen, D. (2004). Positive feedback of interacting ductile faults from coupling of equation of state, rheology and thermal-mechanics. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 142. Schmalholz, S.M. and Maeder, X. (2012). Pinch-and-swell structure and shear zones in viscoplastic layers. Journal of Structural Geology, 34.

  16. F/A-18(A-D) Wing Root Fatigue Life Expended (FLE) Prediction Without the Use of Strain Gage Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    divided by 7.5) rNzMin Minimum G’s (divided by 7.5) RBM Reference Bending Moment RH Right Hand RSE Residual Standard Error SAFE...quantile-quantile plot exhibits a normality with deviations of less than 0.01 at the ends. With a residual standard error ( RSE ) of 0.00799, a maximum...increases to 0.9107, and the RSE decreases to 0.00761. Shown in Figure 6, the plots retain the same properties as the original model which leads to

  17. DS-777 Spatial Location of Gages with Total Flow and estimated Base Flow, for the Predevelopment Simulation Period for the Northern High Plains Groundwater-Flow Model in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Baseflow is the portion of streamflow derived from groundwater flow. It is an important component of the groundwater budget, and can be estimated using known total...

  18. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_2b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 15,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  19. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_8b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 62,300 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  20. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_1b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 12,000 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  1. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_5b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 33,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  2. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_6b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 39,900 at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  3. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_3b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 21,450 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  4. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_4b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 27,900 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  5. SIR2016-5029_cfwgoshor_7b: Flood Inundation Depth for a Flow of 46,800 cfs at the Gage Coast Fork Willamette River at Goshen, Oregon (Area of Uncertainty)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The domain of the model is as follows: Row River from Dorena dam to the confluence with the Coast Fork; Coast Fork from Cottage Grove dam to the confluence with the...

  6. Development of brush holder pressure gage for locomotive traction motor%机车牵引电机刷握压力电子检测仪的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单国庆

    2008-01-01

    对内燃机车牵引电机刷握压力检测误差大及检测精度低的原因进行了分析,介绍了新研制的机车牵引电机刷握压力电子检测仪的结构和特点.新检测仪提高了电机刷握压力检测的准确度,解决了内燃机车牵引电机刷握压力检测的工艺技术难题.

  7. Genetic variants of immunoglobulin γ and κ chains influence humoral immunity to the cancer-testis antigen XAGE-1b (GAGED2a) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, J P; Namboodiri, A M; Ohue, Y; Oka, M; Nakayama, E

    2014-04-01

    GM (γ marker) allotypes, genetic variants of immunoglobulin γ chains, have been reported to be associated strongly with susceptibility to lung cancer, but the mechanism(s) underlying this association is not known. One mechanism could involve their contribution to humoral immunity to lung tumour-associated antigens. In this study, we aimed to determine whether particular GM and KM (κ marker) allotypes were associated with antibody responsiveness to XAGE-1b, a highly immunogenic lung tumour-associated cancer-testis antigen. Sera from 89 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were allotyped for eight GM and two KM determinants and characterized for antibodies to a synthetic XAGE-1b protein. The distribution of various GM phenotypes was significantly different between XAGE-1b antibody-positive and -negative patients (P = 0·023), as well as in the subgroup of XAGE-1b antigen-positive advanced NSCLC (P = 0·007). None of the patients with the GM 1,17 21 phenotype was positive for the XAGE-1b antibody. In patients with antigen-positive advanced disease, the prevalence of GM 1,2,17 21 was significantly higher in the antibody-positive group than in those who lacked the XAGE-1b antibody (P = 0·026). This phenotype also interacted with a particular KM phenotype: subjects with GM 1,2,17 21 and KM 3,3 phenotypes were almost four times (odds ratio = 3·8) as likely to be positive for the XAGE-1b antibody as the subjects who lacked these phenotypes. This is the first report presenting evidence for the involvement of immunoglobulin allotypes in immunity to a cancer-testis antigen, which has important implications for XAGE-1b-based immunotherapeutic interventions in lung adenocarcinoma.

  8. Flood-frequency characteristics of Wisconsin streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, W.R.; Conger, D.H.; Gebert, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Flood-frequency characteristics for 269 gaged sites on Wisconsin streams are presented for recurrence intervals of 2 to 100 years. Annual flood peaks for the period of record for each gaged site are included.

  9. Microcomputer Checks Butt-Weld Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clisham, W.; Garner, W.; Cohen, C.; Beal, J.; Polen, R.; Lloyd, J.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical gage and microcomputer eliminate time-consuming manual measurements. Alinement and angle of plates on either side of butt weld are measured and recorded automatically by hand-held gage and desk-top microcomputer. Gage/micro-computer quickly determine whether weld is within dimensional tolerances or whether reworking is needed. Microcomputer prints out measurements while operator moves gage from point to point along weld. Out-of-tolerance measurements are marked by an asterisk on printout.

  10. 77 FR 64475 - Notice of Final Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value: Circular Welded Carbon-Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ....165 inch wall thickness (gage 8) 4.000 inch O.D. and 0.148 inch wall thickness (gage 9) 4.000 inch O.D. and 0.165 inch wall thickness (gage 8) 4.500 inch O.D. and 0.203 inch wall thickness (gage 7) The pipe..., respondent Universal Tube and Plastic Industries, Ltd. (UTP-JA), KHK Scaffolding & Formwork LLC (KHK),...

  11. Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle Procedures Guides: Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    can open and close fully and locks in both OPEN and CLOSED positions. 8. Check that safety pin is not missing. Internal fire suppression handles 9...that safety pin is not missing. Driver’s instrument panel 19. Check VOLTS gage. 20. Check ENGINE COOLANT TEMP gage. 21. Check ENGINE OIL gage. 22

  12. Instrumentation of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Div.; Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship, D.A.; DeYonge, W.F.; Schiermeister, D.M. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L.; Baird, G.T. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories had the responsibility for the experimental activities at the WIPP and fielded several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The instrumentation of these tests involved the placement of over 4,200 gages including room closure gages, borehole extensometers, stress gages, borehole inclinometers, fixed reference gages, borehole strain gages, thermocouples, thermal flux meters, heater power gages, environmental gages, and ventilation gages. Most of the gages were remotely read instruments that were monitored by an automated data acquisition system, but manually read instruments were also used to provide early deformation information and to provide a redundancy of measurement for the remote gages. Instruments were selected that could operate in the harsh environment of the test rooms and that could accommodate the ranges of test room responses predicted by pretest calculations. Instruments were tested in the field prior to installation at the WIPP site and were modified to improve their performance. Other modifications were made to gages as the TSI tests progressed using knowledge gained from test maintenance. Quality assurance procedures were developed for all aspects of instrumentation including calibration, installation, and maintenance. The instrumentation performed exceptionally well and has produced a large quantity of quality information.

  13. DS-777 Spatial Location of Gages with Total Flow and estimated Base Flow, organized by Seasonal Stress Periods for the Development Simulation Period for the Northern High Plains Groundwater-Flow Model in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Baseflow is the portion of streamflow derived from groundwater flow. It is an important component of the groundwater budget, and can be estimated using known total...

  14. O encéfalo de Phineas Gage: Contribuição da neuropsicologia para a compreensão das alterações cognitivas, psicopatológicas e do processo de tomada de decisão em indivíduos com traumatismo crânio-encefálico

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Dissertação de Mestrado em Psicopatologia e Psicologia Clínica Nesta dissertação apresenta-se uma investigação sobre as alterações neurocomportamentais, psicopatológicas e no processo de tomada de decisões pessoais e sociais após a ocorrência de um Traumatismo Crânio-Encefálico (T.C.E.). Os T.C.E. constituem uma epidemia silenciosa que incapacita milhares de indivíduos anualmente em todo o mundo. As suas alterações "neurológicas" são bem conhecidas, mas as suas alterações "psicológicas"...

  15. National transonic facility Mach number system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, F. A.; Knight, C. W.; Zasimowich, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Mach number system for the Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility was designed to measure pressures to determine Mach number to within + or - 0.002. Nine calibration laboratory type fused quartz gages, four different range gages for the total pressure measurement, and five different range gages for the static pressure measurement were used to satisfy the accuracy requirement over the 103,000-890,000 Pa total pressure range of the tunnel. The system which has been in operation for over 1 year is controlled by a programmable data process controller to select, through the operation of solenoid valves, the proper range fused quartz gage to maximize the measurement accuracy. The pressure gage's analog outputs are digitized by the process controller and transmitted to the main computer for Mach number computation. An automatic two-point on-line calibration of the nine quartz gages is provided using a high accuracy mercury manometer.

  16. Summary of hydrologic conditions in Kansas, 2013 water year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Arin J.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Kansas Water Science Center (KSWSC), in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring gages in the State of Kansas. These include 195 real-time streamflow-gaging stations (herein gages) and 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations. These data and associated analysis, accumulated for many years, provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve our understanding of our water resources.

  17. Tensile Deformation and Adiabatic Heating in Post-Yield Response of Polycarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    strain histories for max and gage length and b) stress-strain behavior of PC at intermediate rate for max and gage length 8 3.4 Rate Effects on... frame . To determine the variations in yield and post-yield response at different locations of the gage area of the specimen, digital image...significant rate-sensitive mechanical response. 15. SUBJECT TERMS polycarbonate, tension, rate effects , thermal, heating 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  18. Engineering and Design: Ice-Influenced Flood Stage Frequency Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-31

    ETL 1110-2-325 31Ju1 91 freezeup jams, formed by the collection of pieces of floating ice during the pe- riods of relatively steady flow experienced...the potential for gage freezeup because of cold weather, ice effects on the gage rat- ing curve, the location of the gage relative to the ice...project, it may be necessary to split the sample population into two or more subsets, such as open water, freezeup , solid ice cover, and breakup. (1

  19. 77 FR 64465 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the United Arab Emirates: Final Affirmative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ....D. and 0.165 inch wall thickness (gage 8) 4.000 inch O.D. and 0.148 inch wall thickness (gage 9) 4.000 inch O.D. and 0.165 inch wall thickness (gage 8) 4.500 inch O.D. and 0.203 inch wall thickness... Industries LLC All-Others 4.12 In accordance with section 705(c)(1)(C) of the Act, we are directing...

  20. Deterministic and Stochastic Wavefield in the Near-Field from Explosive Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-03

    were placed. The gage cannisters were placed in boreholes and then filled with uniformly rained sand. The emplacement of gages within drill holes is a... Spallation and the generation of surface waves by an underground explosion, J. Geophys. Res. 78, 2475- 2487. Werth, G. C. and R. F. Herbst (1963...first number next to each gage is the spell dwell time in as and the number in parenthesis is the velocity at spallation C in c/s. 23 Figure 9: The three

  1. Myocardial wall-thickness transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H.

    1976-01-01

    Device consists of highly compliant circular beam attached to piezoresistive strain gage and barbed needle. Radial deflection of myocardium is measured with minimal disturbance of normal heart functions.

  2. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain using four connecting wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Allen R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new signal-conditioning technique for measuring strain and temperature which uses fewer connecting wires than conventional techniques. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain has been achieved by using thermocouple wire to connect strain gages to signal conditioning. This signal conditioning uses a new method for demultiplexing sampled analog signals and the Anderson current loop circuit. Theory is presented along with data to confirm that strain gage resistance change is sensed without appreciable error because of thermoelectric effects. Furthermore, temperature is sensed without appreciable error because of voltage drops caused by strain gage excitation current flowing through the gage resistance.

  3. Identifying streamgage networks for maximizing the effectiveness of regional water balance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, L. M.; Hunter, T. S.; Phanikumar, M. S.; Fortin, V.; Gronewold, A. D.

    2013-05-01

    One approach to regional water balance modeling is to constrain rainfall-runoff models with a synthetic regionalized hydrologic response. For example, the Large Basin Runoff Model (LBRM), a cornerstone of hydrologic forecasting in the Laurentian Great Lakes basin, was calibrated to a synthetic discharge record resulting from a drainage area ratio method (ARM) for extrapolating beyond gaged areas. A challenge of such approaches is the declining availability of observations for development of synthetic records. To advance efficient use of the declining gage network in the context of regional water balance modeling, we present results from an assessment of ARM. All possible combinations of "most-downstream" gages were used to simulate runoff at the gaged outlet of Michigan's Clinton River watershed in order to determine the influence of gages' drainage area and other physical characteristics on model skill. For nearly all gage combinations, ARM simulations resulted in good model skill. However, the gages' catchment area relative to that of the outlet's catchment is not an unquestionable predictor of model performance. Results indicate that combinations representing less than 30% of the total catchment area (less than 10% in some cases) can provide very good discharge simulations, but that similarity of the gaged catchments' developed and cultivated area, stream density, and permeability relative to the outlet's catchment is also important for successful simulations. Recognition of thresholds on the relationship between the number of gages and their relative value in simulating flow over large area provides an opportunity for improving historical records for regional hydrologic modeling.

  4. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Handling Efficiency Improvement Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project determined specific performance metrics and discrete technology development goals with which to gage proposed investments in ground propellant systems...

  5. Real-time, continuous water-quality monitoring in Indiana and Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Megan E.; Lathrop, Timothy R.; Risch, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Water-quality “super” gages (also known as “sentry” gages) provide real-time, continuous measurements of the physical and chemical characteristics of stream water at or near selected U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgages in Indiana and Kentucky. A super gage includes streamflow and water-quality instrumentation and representative stream sample collection for laboratory analysis. USGS scientists can use statistical surrogate models to relate instrument values to analyzed chemical concentrations at a super gage. Real-time, continuous and laboratory-analyzed concentration and load data are publicly accessible on USGS Web pages.

  6. Basin Centroid Points for Unregulated Streamgagages in and near West Virginia 1930-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Correlation of flows at pairs of streamgages were evaluated using a Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient to better identify gages that can be used as index gages...

  7. Streamflow Correlation Map Grids in and near West Virginia 1930-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Correlation of flows at pairs of streamgages were evaluated using a Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient to better identify gages that can be used as index gages...

  8. Finding the Effective Mass and Spring Constant of a Force Probe from Simple Harmonic Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nathaniel R.; Gill, Tom; Eyerly, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Force probes are versatile tools in the physics lab, but their internal workings can introduce artifacts when measuring rapidly changing forces. The Dual-Range Force Sensor by Vernier uses strain gage technology to measure force, based on the bending of a beam. Strain gages along the length of the beam change resistance as the beam bends. The…

  9. Apparatus for measuring fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.E.; Thomas, D.G.

    Flow measuring apparatus includes a support loop having strain gages mounted thereon and a drag means which is attached to one end of the support loop and which bends the sides of the support loop and induces strains in the strain gages when a flow stream impacts thereon.

  10. An Application of Signal Analysis and Pattern Recognition to Study a Simple Ground Motion Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    via Visual Examination 40 Table 4. List of Features 41 Table 5. Basic Studies - Prediction Results 43 Table 6. Single Feature Study - Prediction Results...CCC CCC D -4-- CD0000 -~ - - z a -44 39- TABLE 3. POOR WAVEFORMS VIA VISUAL EXAMINATION Test/Gage Problem A304* bandedge A306 probable gage failure, TOA

  11. 29 CFR 1910.94 - Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... A pressure gage shall be installed to show the pressure drop across the filters. This gage shall be marked to show the pressure drop at which the filters require cleaning or replacement. Filters shall be..., repairs shall be made as soon as possible. (b) The static pressure drop at the exhaust ducts leading...

  12. Novel dielectric reduces corona breakdown in ac capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehner, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Dielectric system was developed which consists of two layers of 25-gage paper separated by one layer of 50-gage polypropylene to reduce corona breakdown in ac capacitors. System can be used in any alternating current application where constant voltage does not exceed 400 V rms. With a little research it could probably be increased to 700 to 800 V rms.

  13. Water resources data for Hawaii and other Pacific areas, water year 1989. Volume 2. Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, federated states of Micronesia, Palau, and American Samoa. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1988-30 September 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, R.A.; Kunishige, V.E.; Lum, M.G.

    1996-05-01

    Water-resources data for the 1989 water year for other Pacific areas consist of records of discharge, and water quality of streams and stage of a lake and reservoir; water levels and water quality in wells; stage in a tide gage; and rainfall. This report volume 2 contains discharge records for 26 gaging stations; stage only for 2 gaging stations; water quality at 11 gaging stations, one streamflow partial record station, and 54 wells; water levels for 28 observations wells; and tide stages for one tide gage station. Also included are 2 crest-stage partial record stations, 4 miscellaneous partial-record stations, 15 low-flow partial-record stations, and 19 rainfall stations.

  14. Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison in Bismarck, North Dakota, from 1988 through 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, Karen R.; Emerson, Douglas G.; Macek-Rowland, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    A solid precipitation measurement intercomparison was recommended by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and was initiated after approval by the ninth session of the Commission for Instruments and Methods of Observation. The goal of the intercomparison was to assess national methods of measuring solid precipitation against methods whose accuracy and reliability were known. A field study was started in Bismarck, N. Dak., during the 1988-89 winter as part of the intercomparison. The last official field season of the WMO intercomparison was 1992-93; however, the Bismarck site continued to operate through the winter of 1996-97. Precipitation events at Bismarck were categorized as snow, mixed, or rain on the basis of descriptive notes recorded as part of the solid precipitation intercomparison. The rain events were not further analyzed in this study. Catch ratios (CRs) - the ratio of the precipitation catch at each gage to the true precipitation measurement (the corrected double fence intercomparison reference) - were calculated. Then, regression analysis was used to develop equations that model the snow and mixed precipitation CRs at each gage as functions of wind speed and temperature. Wind speed at the gages, functions of temperature, and upper air conditions (wind speed and air temperature at 700 millibars pressure) were used as possible explanatory variables in the multiple regression analysis done for this study. The CRs were modeled by using multiple regression analysis for the Tretyakov gage, national shielded gage, national unshielded gage, AeroChem gage, national gage with double fence, and national gage with Wyoming windshield. As in earlier studies by the WMO, wind speed and air temperature were found to influence the CR of the Tretyakov gage. However, in this study, the temperature variable represented the average upper air temperature over the duration of the event. The WMO did not use upper air conditions in its analysis. The national shielded and

  15. Numerical Analysis of a Radiant Heat Flux Calibration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanjuan; Horn, Thomas J.; Dhir, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    A radiant heat flux gage calibration system exists in the Flight Loads Laboratory at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. This calibration system must be well understood if the heat flux gages calibrated in it are to provide useful data during radiant heating ground tests or flight tests of high speed aerospace vehicles. A part of the calibration system characterization process is to develop a numerical model of the flat plate heater element and heat flux gage, which will help identify errors due to convection, heater element erosion, and other factors. A 2-dimensional mathematical model of the gage-plate system has been developed to simulate the combined problem involving convection, radiation and mass loss by chemical reaction. A fourth order finite difference scheme is used to solve the steady state governing equations and determine the temperature distribution in the gage and plate, incident heat flux on the gage face, and flat plate erosion. Initial gage heat flux predictions from the model are found to be within 17% of experimental results.

  16. Shock Induced Starting of Gasdynamic Laser Nozzles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-01

    Operating Frequency, Hertz y Ratio of Specific Heat at Constant Pressure to Specific Heat at Constant Volume Hg Mercury hir Measured Mercury Manometer Column...Heraeus type E-70 vacuum pump and measured with a mercury manometer . Minimum attainable pressure was approximately 2.0 inches of mercury absolute. The...P4/ . Atm Pressurization P I Bleed Valve P Valve Gage Atm Shutoff P4 Bleed Valve Valve P Gage Shutoff Valve P4 Gage P 1 Mercury Manometer 0-30 in Hg

  17. Results of solar testing of circular foil heat-flux sensors at the White Sands solar furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, B. L.

    1982-06-01

    A pair of circular foil heat flux sensors were tested against a Kendall radiometer. The gages are a form of the circular foil type in that a mirrored ellipsoidal cavity is positioned in front of the foil surface. A small diameter aperture is used to reduce convective losses and the susceptibility of the gage to handling damage. An error analysis performed on the data acquired during the five day test program, indicates that atmospheric conditions and limitations of the facility preclude the accurate comparison of the heat flux sensors to the Kendall radiometer. Details about the data acquisition, error analysis, and consideration about the proper gage calibration procedure are included.

  18. Summary of Activities for Health Monitoring of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels Updated January 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skow, Miles G.

    2014-01-01

    This three year project (FY12-14) will design and demonstrate the ability of new Magnetic Stress Gages for the measurement of stresses on the inner diameter of a Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel overwrap.

  19. Flow-Angle and Airspeed Sensor System (FASS) Using Flush-Mounted Hot-Films Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Micron-thin surface hot-film gages are used to develop flow-angle and airspeed sensor system (FASS). Unlike Pitot-static and other pressure-based devices, which...

  20. Detection and location of metal fragments in the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. L.; Neuschaefer, R. W.

    1970-01-01

    Portable electronic device, based on the design of an eddy current gage, detects ferrous and nonferrous metal fragments. Device is more easily transported than X-ray equipment and does not present a radiation hazard.

  1. USGS data that is publicly available from their website

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data are mean daily discharge data at United States Geological Survey gages. Once column provides the date (mm/dd/yyyy) and the other column provides the mean...

  2. Composite Structure Monitoring using Direct Write Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Direct Write (DW) sensors deposited directly and precisely on to complex (3D) components are proposed. Sensors proposed include strain gages and thermocouples,...

  3. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 1:1,000,000-Scale Hydrographic Geodatabase of the United States - Hawaii 201403 FileGDB 10.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase contains streams, waterbodies and wetlands, streamflow gaging stations, and coastlines for Hawaii. The streams are incorporated into a geometric...

  4. Surface-water data and statistics from U.S. Geological Survey data-collection networks in New Jersey on the World Wide Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Robert G.; Watson, Kara M.; Chang, Ming; Nieswand, Steven P.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with other Federal, State, and local agencies, operates and maintains a variety of surface-water data-collection networks throughout the State of New Jersey. The networks include streamflow-gaging stations, low-flow sites, crest-stage gages, tide gages, tidal creststage gages, and water-quality sampling sites. Both real-time and historical surface-water data for many of the sites in these networks are available at the USGS, New Jersey District, web site (http://nj.usgs.gov/), and water-quality data are available at the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) web site (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/). These data are an important source of information for water managers, engineers, environmentalists, and private citizens.

  5. Real Time River Forecasting Center Quantitative Precipitation Estimate

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Radar indicated-rain gage verified and corrected hourly precipitation estimate on a corrected ~4km HRAP grid. This archive contains hourly estimates of precipitation...

  6. River Forecasting Center Quantitative Precipitation Estimate Archive

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Radar indicated-rain gage verified and corrected hourly precipitation estimate on a corrected ~4km HRAP grid. This archive contains hourly estimates of precipitation...

  7. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 1:1,000,000-Scale Hydrographic Geodatabase of the United States - Conterminous United States 201403 FileGDB 10.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase contains streams, waterbodies and wetlands, streamflow gaging stations, and coastlines for the conterminous United States. The streams are...

  8. Rating of new outlet structures for MacFarlane Reservoir

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Memorandum explaining the new work on the outlet structure at MacFarlane Reservoir. Flow measurements were taken at different staff gage elevations and this data is...

  9. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 1998 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. A. Shaull; M. R. Alexander; R. P. Reynolds; C. T. McLean; R. P. Romero

    1999-02-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 19 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Caiion de Vane.

  10. Digital Data Sets of Depth-Duration Frequency of Precipitation for Oklahoma, USGS OFR 99-463.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These geospatial data sets consist of precipitation stations used in a regional precipitation frequency analysis for Oklahoma. Data were used from precipitation gage...

  11. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 1:1,000,000-Scale Hydrographic Geodatabase of the United States - Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands 201403 FileGDB 10.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase contains streams, waterbodies and wetlands, streamflow gaging stations, and coastlines for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The streams are...

  12. History of U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging on the Souris River in and near Minot, North Dakota, 1903–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kevin K.; Robinson, Steven M.

    2016-09-07

    The U.S. Geological Survey began collecting streamflow data, in cooperation with the North Dakota State Water Commission, on the Souris River in and near Minot, North Dakota, in April 1903. The gage was started up to better understand the water resources available in North Dakota. Currently (2016), water availability is still important as well as the flood monitoring and forecasting that has become an important component of this gage. Gage-height and streamflow data for the Souris River in and near Minot have been collected at five different streamgage locations during the years. This fact sheet describes the history of streamgaging (locations, gage-height data, and streamflow data) and flooding on the Souris River in and near Minot since 1903.

  13. U.S. Hourly Precipitation Data Publication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This publication contains hourly precipitation amounts obtained from recording rain gages located at National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and...

  14. WATSTORE Stream Flow Basin Characteristics File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Stream Flow Basin Characteristics file contains information about the drainage basins of selected USGS gaging stations. Data elements of this file were converted...

  15. Finite element stress analysis of a compression mold. Final report. [Using SASL and WILSON codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watterson, C.E.

    1980-03-01

    Thermally induced stresses occurring in a compression mold during production molding were evaluated using finite element analysis. A complementary experimental stress analysis, including strain gages and thermocouple arrays, verified the finite element model under typical loading conditions.

  16. Citizen Hydrology and Compressed-Air Hydropower for Rural Electrification in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    At the present time, only one in eight residents of Haiti has access to electricity. Two recent engineering and statistical innovations have the potential for vastly reducing the cost of installation of hydropower in Haiti and the rest of the developing world. The engineering innovation is that wind, solar and fluvial energy have been used to compress air for generation of electricity for only 20 per megawatt-hour, in contrast to the conventional World Bank practice of funding photovoltaic cells for 156 per megawatt-hour. The installation of hydropower requires a record of stream discharge, which is conventionally obtained by installing a gaging station that automatically monitors gage height (height of the water surface above a fixed datum). An empirical rating curve is then used to convert gage height to stream discharge. The multiple field measurements of gage height and discharge over a wide range of discharge values that are required to develop and maintain a rating curve require a manpower of hydrologic technicians that is prohibitive in remote and impoverished areas of the world. The statistical innovation is that machine learning has been applied to the USGS database of nearly four million simultaneous measurements of gage height and discharge to develop a new classification of rivers so that a rating curve can be developed solely from the stream slope, channel geometry, horizontal and vertical distances to the nearest upstream and downstream confluences, and two pairs of discharge - gage height measurements. The objective of this study is to organize local residents to monitor gage height at ten stream sites in the northern peninsula of Haiti over a one-year period in preparation for installation of hydropower at one of the sites. The necessary baseline discharge measurements and channel surveying are being carried out for conversion of gage height to discharge. Results will be reported at the meeting.

  17. Foreign Object Impact Design Criteria. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    obtained using strain gages and an ex- tensometer . The change in diameter is used to calculate Poisson’s ratio. The high strain rate tests are...with high resistance strain gages. For the through-the-thickness and torsion rod specimens, it is planned to use an ex- tensometer to measure...strength test is an attempt to classify damage to specimens in terms of an equivalent stress concentration factor. Holes and cracks will be machined in

  18. 各種トランスデューサによる衝撃荷重の測定における問題点

    OpenAIRE

    神宮, 利夫; 松本, 浩之; 根津, 紀久雄; 坂本, 賢治

    1988-01-01

    Transducers consisting of a strain gage or accelerometer and piezo-electric sensor are popular instruments used to evaluate dynamic response. Although the observation of transmitted strain by means of the strain gage method assures accuracy, it is not convenient to estimate the dynamic response of materials having a large cross-sectional area. On the other hand, there is little restriction in measuring of dynamic response using an accelerometer since it is small and light. It is easy to fabri...

  19. Mount St. Helens Project. Cowlitz River Levee Systems, 2009 Level of Flood Protection Update Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    Cowlitz River near Kosmos , WA 14233500 1040 Cowlitz River at Mossyrock, WA 14235000 1162 Tilton River above Bear Canyon near Cinebar, WA 14236200 141...Cowlitz Falls dam, the Cowlitz River near Randle gage was abandoned in 1994; however, the Cowlitz River near Kosmos , WA (#14233500) was in place just...downstream. The drainage areas are within 1% of eachother, so no adjustments were made to the Kosmos gage data. The Cowlitz River at Mossyrock, WA

  20. Potential for Advanced Thermoplastic Composites in Space Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    in gages down to 125 fxm. (34). 43 Damping The intrinsic damping of polymer matrix composite is one of three decades greater than aluminum or...PROPERTIES BETWEEN POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE , ALUMINUM, AND BERYLLIUM Polymer Matrix Composite Aluminum Beryllium Density, mg/m3 1.7 2.7 1.7...0*, 0*. 0*, 0"], laminate that is directionally stiffened for beam and tube applications. bMinimum polymer matrix composite gage is for six plies

  1. The Aluminum Ship Evaluation Model (ASEM) Static Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    0-.-SI -SO 0 3 9906 N -272 2 9996 179i s79 60071 8 -2 7’ 3 8975 -1 2 NN 779 063 9012611 059 -27 70 4890 3 -7 4 9 7794 779 IC 98181 -BSR 20. 72 2 8724...TABLE B.5 (Continued) P MAXIMUM MEASURED STRAIN .&MAIMUM. PREDICTED SYRAI. CAGE GAGE GAGE IASSUMES MEASIIXCO P MOMENT PRECICTEG PRED IEC OMN MEASUE 662

  2. QA/QC Issues Related to Data From Volunteer Citizen Scientist Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, G. C.; Crimmins, M.; Vazquez, R.; Rupprecht, C.

    2007-12-01

    Earth science researchers increasingly are using field data gathered by volunteer citizen scientists, particularly where there is a need for dense or far-flung networks of instruments, or qualitative observations of environmental conditions (e.g., drought-caused plant stress, bird migration, spring ice break-up). Precipitation monitoring is a popular form of citizen science, with hundreds of local networks, and two regional networks - CoCoRaHS with observers in over 20 states, and RainLog, with over 1,200 observers in the Southwestern U.S. Dense networks of rain gages are especially valuable for capturing localized, convective storm events, with the data used for multiple purposes, including research, flood early warning, drought monitoring, and weather reporting. Researchers may be hesitant to use data collected by citizen scientists because of Quality Assurance/Quality Control issues associated with networks of volunteers. Gages vary in precision and accuracy, and citizen scientists have different levels of skill and experience. Backyard gages are not always ideally sited with respect to buildings and trees. Data entry issues include delays in reporting and input errors. Missing data are not only more prevalent than for official gages, the missing data are non-random. Spatial patterns of volunteers' gages reflect development patterns and socio-demographic factors, resulting in clusters and voids in gage distribution. Current interpolation methodologies do not handle these gage patterns well. RainLog is systematically quantifying these QA/QC issues, and where possible, developing procedures to mitigate them. Citizen scientists are kept informed and engaged and informed through a variety of web-based data visualization approaches. Automated monthly data reviews glean missing data and offer an opportunity to check outlier values. Various statistical approaches are used to estimate accuracy and precision for each gage. Finally, we are developing and implementing more

  3. Effect of specimen thickness of fatigue-crack-growth behavior and fracture toughness of 7075-T6 and 7178-T6 aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, C. M.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A study was made to determine the effects of specimen thickness on fatigue crack growth and fracture behavior of 7075-T6 and 7178-T6 aluminum alloy sheet and plate. Specimen thicknesses ranged from 5.1 to 12.7 mm (0.20 to 0.50 in.) for 7075-T6 and from 1.3 to 6.4 mm (0.05 to 0.25 in.) for 7178-T6. The stress ratios R used in the crack growth experiments were 0.02 and 0.50. For 7075-T6, specimen thickness had relatively little effect on fatigue-crack growth. However, the fracture toughness of the thickness of the thickest gage of 7075-T6 was about two-thirds of the fracture toughness of the thinner gages of 7075-T6. For 7178-T6, fatigue cracks generally grew somewhat faster in the thicker gages than in the thinnest gage. The fracture toughness of the thickest gage of 7178-T6 was about two-thirds of the fracture toughness of the thinner gages of 7178-T6. Stress intensity methods were used to analyze the experimental results. For a given thickness and value of R, the rate of fatigue crack growth was essentially a single-valued function of the stress intensity range for 7075-T6 and 7178-T6. An empirical equation developed by Forman, Kearney, and Engle fit the 7075-T6 and 7178-T6 crack growth data reasonably well.

  4. Estimates of Median Flows for Streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    The Kansas State Legislature, by enacting Kansas Statute KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., mandated the criteria for determining which Kansas stream segments would be subject to classification by the State. One criterion for the selection as a classified stream segment is based on the statistic of median flow being equal to or greater than 1 cubic foot per second. As specified by KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., median flows were determined from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging-station data by using the most-recent 10 years of gaged data (KSA) for each streamflow-gaging station. Median flows also were determined by using gaged data from the entire period of record (all-available hydrology, AAH). Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating median flows for uncontrolled stream segments. The drainage area of the gaging stations on uncontrolled stream segments used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. A logarithmic transformation of the data was needed to develop the best linear relation for computing median flows. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. Tobit analyses of KSA data yielded a model standard error of prediction of 0.285 logarithmic units, and the best equations using Tobit analyses of AAH data had a model standard error of prediction of 0.250 logarithmic units. These regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute median flows for the uncontrolled stream segments on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Measured median flows from gaging stations were incorporated into the regression-estimated median flows along the stream segments where available. The segments that were uncontrolled were interpolated using gaged data weighted according to the drainage area and the bias between the

  5. The effect of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, strain sensitivity and crack sensitivity of steel fiber reinforced smart cement composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teomete, Egemen

    2016-07-01

    Earthquakes, material degradations and other environmental factors necessitate structural health monitoring (SHM). Metal foil strain gages used for SHM have low durability and low sensitivity. These factors motivated researchers to work on cement based strain sensors. In this study, the effects of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivity) and crack sensitivity were determined for steel fiber reinforced cement based composite. A rapid increase of electrical resistance at 200 °C was observed due to damage occurring between cement paste, aggregates and steel fibers. The moisture—electrical resistance relationship was investigated. The specimens taken out of the cure were saturated with water and had a moisture content of 9.49%. The minimum electrical resistance was obtained at 9% moisture at which fiber-fiber and fiber-matrix contact was maximum and the water in micro voids was acting as an electrolyte, conducting electrons. The variation of compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivities) and crack sensitivity were investigated by conducting compression, split tensile and notched bending tests with different moisture contents. The highest gage factor for the compression test was obtained at optimal moisture content, at which electrical resistance was minimum. The tensile strain gage factor for split tensile test and crack sensitivity increased by decreasing moisture content. The mechanisms between moisture content, electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivity were elucidated. The relations of moisture content with electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivities have been presented for the first time in this study for steel fiber reinforced cement based composites. The results are important for the development of self sensing cement based smart materials.

  6. Evaluation of TRMM rainfall estimates over a large Indian river basin (Mahanadi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kneis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the quality of satellite-based precipitation estimates for the Lower Mahanadi River Basin (Eastern India. The considered data sets known as 3B42 and 3B42-RT (version 7/7A are routinely produced by the tropical rainfall measuring mission (TRMM from passive microwave and infrared recordings. While the 3B42-RT data are disseminated in real time, the gage-adjusted 3B42 data set is published with a delay of some months. The quality of the two products was assessed in a two-step procedure. First, the correspondence between the remotely sensed precipitation rates and rain gage data was evaluated at the sub-basin scale. Second, the quality of the rainfall estimates was assessed by analyzing their performance in the context of rainfall-runoff simulation. At sub-basin level (4000 to 16 000 km2 the satellite-based areal precipitation estimates were found to be moderately correlated with the gage-based counterparts (R2 of 0.64–0.74 for 3B42 and 0.59–0.72 for 3B42-RT. Significant discrepancies between TRMM data and ground observations were identified at high intensity levels. The rainfall depth derived from rain gage data is often not reflected by the TRMM estimates (hit rate 80 mm day−1. At the same time, the remotely sensed rainfall rates frequently exceed the gage-based equivalents (false alarm ratios of 0.2–0.6. In addition, the real time product 3B42-RT was found to suffer from a spatially consistent negative bias. Since the regionalization of rain gage data is potentially associated with a number of errors, the above results are subject to uncertainty. Hence, a validation against independent information, such as stream flow, was essential. In this case study, the outcome of rainfall–runoff simulation experiments was consistent with the above-mentioned findings. The best fit between observed and simulated stream flow was obtained if rain gage data were used as model input (Nash–Sutcliffe Index of 0.76–0.88 at gages not

  7. Full Flight Envelope Direct Thrust Measurement on a Supersonic Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Timothy R.; Sims, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Direct thrust measurement using strain gages offers advantages over analytically-based thrust calculation methods. For flight test applications, the direct measurement method typically uses a simpler sensor arrangement and minimal data processing compared to analytical techniques, which normally require costly engine modeling and multisensor arrangements throughout the engine. Conversely, direct thrust measurement has historically produced less than desirable accuracy because of difficulty in mounting and calibrating the strain gages and the inability to account for secondary forces that influence the thrust reading at the engine mounts. Consequently, the strain-gage technique has normally been used for simple engine arrangements and primarily in the subsonic speed range. This paper presents the results of a strain gage-based direct thrust-measurement technique developed by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and successfully applied to the full flight envelope of an F-15 aircraft powered by two F100-PW-229 turbofan engines. Measurements have been obtained at quasi-steady-state operating conditions at maximum non-augmented and maximum augmented power throughout the altitude range of the vehicle and to a maximum speed of Mach 2.0 and are compared against results from two analytically-based thrust calculation methods. The strain-gage installation and calibration processes are also described.

  8. Minimizing errors in phase change correction measurements for gauge blocks using a spherical contact technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoup, John R.; Faust, Bryon S.; Doiron, Theodore D.

    1998-09-01

    One of the most elusive measurement elements in gage block interferometry is the correction for the phase change on reflection. Techniques used to quantify this correction have improved over the year, but the measurement uncertainty has remained relatively constant because some error sources have proven historically difficult to reduce. The precision engineering division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology has recently developed a measurement technique that can quantify the phase change on reflection correction directly for individual gage blocks and eliminates some of the fundamental problems with historical measurement methods. Since only the top surface of the gage block is used in the measurement, wringing film inconsistencies are eliminated with this technique thereby drastically reducing the measurement uncertainty for the correction. However, block geometry and thermal issues still exist. This paper will describe the methods used to minimize the measurement uncertainty of the phase change on reflection evaluation using a spherical contact technique. The work focuses on gage block surface topography and drift eliminating algorithms for the data collection. The extrapolation of the data to an undeformed condition and the failure of these curves to follow theoretical estimates are also discussed. The wavelength dependence of the correction was directly measured for different gage block materials and manufacturers and the data will be presented.

  9. A self-strain feedback tuning-fork-shaped ionic polymer metal composite clamping actuator with soft matter elasticity-detecting capability for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guo-Hua; Huang, Wei-Lun

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a smart tuning-fork-shaped ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) clamping actuator for biomedical applications. The two fingers of the actuator, which perform the clamping motion, can be electrically controlled through a unique electrode design on the IPMC material. The generated displacement or strain of the fingers can be sensed using an integrated soft strain-gage sensor. The IPMC actuator and associated soft strain gage were fabricated using a micromachining technique. A 13.5×4×2 mm(3) actuator was shaped from Nafion solution and a selectively grown metal electrode formed the active region. The strain gage consisted of patterned copper foil and polyethylene as a substrate. The relationship between the strain gage voltage output and the displacement at the front end of the actuator's fingers was characterized. The equivalent Young's modulus, 13.65 MPa, of the soft-strain-gage-integrated IPMC finger was analyzed. The produced clamping force exhibited a linear increasing rate of 1.07 mN/s, based on a dc driving voltage of 7 V. Using the developed actuator to clamp soft matter and simultaneously acquire its Young's modulus was achieved. This demonstrated the feasibility of the palpation function and the potential use of the actuator in minimally invasive surgery.

  10. Auger electron spectroscopy study of oxidation of a PdCr alloy used for high-temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Darwin L.; Zeller, Mary V.; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos

    1993-01-01

    A Pd-13 wt. percent Cr solid solution is a promising high-temperature strain gage alloy. In bulk form it has a number of properties that are desirable in a resistance strain gage material, such as a linear electrical resistance versus temperature curve to 1000 C and stable electrical resistance in air at 1000 C. However, unprotected fine wire gages fabricated from this alloy perform well only to 600 C. At higher temperatures severe oxidation degrades their electrical performance. In this work Auger electron spectroscopy was used to study the oxidation chemistry of the alloy wires and ribbons. Results indicate that the oxidation is caused by a complex mechanism that is not yet fully understood. As expected, during oxidation, a layer of chromium oxide is formed. This layer, however, forms beneath a layer of metallic palladium. The results of this study have increased the understanding of the oxidation mechanism of Pd-13 wt. percent Cr.

  11. Estimation of rainfall using remote sensing for Riyadh climate, KSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHassoun, Saleh A.

    2013-05-01

    Rainfall data constitute an important parameter for studying water resources-related problems. Remote sensing techniques could provide rapid and comprehensive overview of the rainfall distribution in a given area. Thus, the infrared data from the LandSat satellite in conjunction with the Scofield-oliver method were used to monitor and model rainfall in Riyadh area as a resemble of any area in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia(KSA). Four convective clouds that covered two rain gage stations were analyzed. Good estimation of rainfall was obtained from satellite images. The results showed that the satellite rainfall estimations were well correlated to rain gage measurements. The satellite climate data appear to be useful for monitoring and modeling rainfall at any area where no rain gage is available.

  12. Experimental Marvin Windshield Effects on Precipitation Records in Leadville, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Robert D.; Crow, Loren W.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation of the Leadville, Colorado, precipitation records that include a reported record-breaking storm (and flood) at higher elevations in the Rocky Mountains has indicated that the use of an experimental Marvin windshield (designed to decrease the effects of wind on precipitation-gage catchment of snow during winter) resulted in substantially overregistered summer precipitation for 1919 to 1938. The July monthly precipitation for these years was over-registered by an average of 157 percent of the long-term July monthly precipitation at Leadville. The cause of the overregistration of precipitation was the almost 4-foot-top-diameter cone-shaped windshield that had the effect of 'funneling' hail and rain splash into the rain gage. Other nearby precipitation gages, which did not use this Marvin windshield, did not have this trend of increased precipitation for the same period. Streamflow records from the Leadville area also do not indicate an increase in streamflow from 1919 to 1938.

  13. Techniques for estimating flood-frequency discharges for streams in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eash, David A.

    2001-01-01

    A statewide study was conducted to develop regression equations for estimating flood-frequency discharges for ungaged stream sites in Iowa. Thirty-eight selected basin characteristics were quantified and flood-frequency analyses were computed for 291 streamflow-gaging stations in Iowa and adjacent States. A generalized-skew-coefficient analysis was conducted to determine whether generalized skew coefficients could be improved for Iowa. Station skew coefficients were computed for 239 gaging stations in Iowa and adjacent States, and an isoline map of generalized-skew-coefficient values was developed for Iowa using variogram modeling and kriging methods. The skew map provided the lowest mean square error for the generalized-skew- coefficient analysis and was used to revise generalized skew coefficients for flood-frequency analyses for gaging stations in Iowa.

  14. Sources of suspended-sediment loads in the lower Nueces River watershed, downstream from Lake Corpus Christi to the Nueces Estuary, south Texas, 1958–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Wehmeyer, Loren L.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District; City of Corpus Christi; Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority; San Antonio River Authority; and San Antonio Water System, developed, calibrated, and tested a Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) watershed model to simulate streamflow and suspended-sediment concentrations and loads during 1958-2010 in the lower Nueces River watershed, downstream from Lake Corpus Christi to the Nueces Estuary in south Texas. Data available to simulate suspended-sediment concentrations and loads consisted of historical sediment data collected during 1942-82 in the study area and suspended-sediment concentration data collected periodically by the USGS during 2006-7 and 2010 at three USGS streamflow-gaging stations (08211000 Nueces River near Mathis, Tex. [the Mathis gage], 08211200 Nueces River at Bluntzer, Tex. [the Bluntzer gage], and 08211500 Nueces River at Calallen, Tex. [the Calallen gage]), and at one ungaged location on a Nueces River tributary (USGS station 08211050 Bayou Creek at Farm Road 666 near Mathis, Tex.). The Mathis gage is downstream from Wesley E. Seale Dam, which was completed in 1958 to impound Lake Corpus Christi. Suspended-sediment data collected before and after completion of Wesley E. Seale Dam provide insights to the effects of the dam and reservoir on suspended-sediment loads transported by the lower Nueces River downstream from the dam to the Nueces Estuary. Annual suspended-sediment loads at the Nueces River near the Mathis, Tex., gage were considerably lower for a given annual mean discharge after the dam was completed than before the dam was completed.

  15. Accuracy and versatility of the NIST M48 coordinate measuring machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoup, John R.; Doiron, Theodore D.

    2001-10-01

    The NIST Is continuing to develop the ability to perform accurate, traceable measurements on a wide range of artifacts using a very precise, error-mapped coordinate measuring machine (CMM). The NIST M48 CMM has promised accuracy and versatility for many ears. Recently, these promises have been realized in a reliable, reproducible way for many types of 1D, 2D, and 3D engineering metrology artifacts. The versatility of the machine has permitted state-of-the-art, accurate measurements of one meter step gages and precision ball plates as well as 500 micrometer holes and small precision parts made of aluminum or glass. To accomplish this wide range of measurements the CMM has required extensive assessment of machine positioning and straightness errors, probe response, machine motion control and speed, environmental stability, and measurement procedures. The CMM has been used as an absolute instrument and as a very complicated comparator. The data collection techniques have been designed to acquire statistical information on the machine and probe performance and to evaluate and remove any potential thermal drift in the machine coordinate system during operation. This paper will present the data collection and measurement techniques used by NIST to achieve excellent measurement results for gage blocks, long end standards, step gages, ring and plug gages, small holes, ball plates, and angular artifacts. Comparison data with existing independent primary measuring instruments will also be presented to show agreement and correlation with those historical methods. Current plans for incorporating the CMM into existing measurement services, such as plain ring gages, large plug gages, and long end standards, will be presented along with other proposed development of this CMM.

  16. Montana StreamStats—A method for retrieving basin and streamflow characteristics in Montana: Chapter A in Montana StreamStats

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Peter M.; Dutton, DeAnn M.; Sando, Steven K.; Sando, Roy

    2016-04-05

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides streamflow characteristics and other related information needed by water-resource managers to protect people and property from floods, plan and manage water-resource activities, and protect water quality. Streamflow characteristics provided by the USGS, such as peak-flow and low-flow frequencies for streamflow-gaging stations, are frequently used by engineers, flood forecasters, land managers, biologists, and others to guide their everyday decisions. In addition to providing streamflow characteristics at streamflow-gaging stations, the USGS also develops regional regression equations and drainage area-adjustment methods for estimating streamflow characteristics at locations on ungaged streams. Regional regression equations can be complex and often require users to determine several basin characteristics, which are physical and climatic characteristics of the stream and its drainage basin. Obtaining these basin characteristics for streamflow-gaging stations and ungaged sites traditionally has been time consuming and subjective, and led to inconsistent results.StreamStats is a Web-based geographic information system application that was created by the USGS to provide users with access to an assortment of analytical tools that are useful for water-resource planning and management. StreamStats allows users to easily obtain streamflow and basin characteristics for USGS streamflow-gaging stations and user-selected locations on ungaged streams. The USGS, in cooperation with Montana Department of Transportation, Montana Department of Environmental Quality, and Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, completed a study to develop a StreamStats application for Montana, compute streamflow characteristics at streamflow-gaging stations, and develop regional regression equations to estimate streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites. Chapter A of this Scientific Investigations Report describes the Montana Stream

  17. Accuracy evaluation of a lower-cost and four higher-cost laser scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Valentina; Howell, Stephen M; Hull, Maury L

    2016-01-04

    Knowing the accuracy of laser scanners is imperative to select the best scanner to generate bone models. However, errors stated by manufacturers may not apply to bones. The three objectives of this study were to determine: 1) whether the overall error stated by the manufacturers of five laser scanners was different from the root mean squared error (RMSE) computed by scanning a gage block; 2) the repeatability of 3D models generated by the laser scanners when scanning a complex freeform surface such as a distal femur and whether this differed from the repeatability when scanning a gage block; 3) whether the errors for one lower-cost laser scanner are comparable to those of four higher-cost laser scanners. The RMSEs in scanning the gage block were 2 to 52µm lower than the overall errors stated by the manufacturers. The repeatability in scanning the bovine femur 10 times was significantly worse than that in scanning the gage block 10 times. The precision of the lower-cost laser scanner was comparable to that of the higher-cost laser scanners, but the bias was an order of magnitude greater. The contributions of this study are that 1) the overall errors stated by the manufacturers are an upper bound when simple geometric objects like a gage block are scanned, 2) the repeatability is worse on average three times when scanning a complex freeform surface compared to scanning the gage block, and 3) the main difference between the lower-cost and the higher-cost laser scanners is the bias.

  18. Hydrologic Record Extension of Water-Level Data in the Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) Using Artificial Neural Network Models, 2000-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, Paul A.; Roehl, Edwin A.

    2007-01-01

    The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) is an integrated network of real-time water-level gaging stations, ground-elevation models, and water-surface models designed to provide scientists, engineers, and water-resource managers with current (2000-present) water-depth information for the entire freshwater portion of the greater Everglades. The U.S. Geological Survey Greater Everglades Priority Ecosystem Science provides support for EDEN and the goal of providing quality assured monitoring data for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. To increase the accuracy of the water-surface models, 25 real-time water-level gaging stations were added to the network of 253 established water-level gaging stations. To incorporate the data from the newly added stations to the 7-year EDEN database in the greater Everglades, the short-term water-level records (generally less than 1 year) needed to be simulated back in time (hindcasted) to be concurrent with data from the established gaging stations in the database. A three-step modeling approach using artificial neural network models was used to estimate the water levels at the new stations. The artificial neural network models used static variables that represent the gaging station location and percent vegetation in addition to dynamic variables that represent water-level data from the established EDEN gaging stations. The final step of the modeling approach was to simulate the computed error of the initial estimate to increase the accuracy of the final water-level estimate. The three-step modeling approach for estimating water levels at the new EDEN gaging stations produced satisfactory results. The coefficients of determination (R2) for 21 of the 25 estimates were greater than 0.95, and all of the estimates (25 of 25) were greater than 0.82. The model estimates showed good agreement with the measured data. For some new EDEN stations with limited measured data, the record extension

  19. Flood of June 22-24, 2006, in North-Central Ohio, With Emphasis on the Cuyahoga River Near Independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James M.; Ebner, Andrew D.; Koltun, G.F.; Astifan, Brian M.

    2007-01-01

    Heavy rains caused severe flooding on June 22-24, 2006, and damaged approximately 4,580 homes and 48 businesses in Cuyahoga County. Damage estimates in Cuyahoga County for the two days of flooding exceed $47 million; statewide damage estimates exceed $150 million. Six counties (Cuyahoga, Erie, Huron, Lucas, Sandusky, and Stark) in northeast Ohio were declared Federal disaster areas. One death, in Lorain County, was attributed to the flooding. The peak streamflow of 25,400 cubic feet per second and corresponding peak gage height of 23.29 feet were the highest recorded at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging station Cuyahoga River at Independence (04208000) since the gaging station began operation in 1922, exceeding the previous peak streamflow of 24,800 cubic feet per second that occurred on January 22, 1959. An indirect calculation of the peak streamflow was made by use of a step-backwater model because all roads leading to the gaging station were inundated during the flood and field crews could not reach the station to make a direct measurement. Because of a statistically significant and persistent positive trend in the annual-peak-streamflow time series for the Cuyahoga River at Independence, a method was developed and applied to detrend the annual-peak-streamflow time series prior to the traditional log-Pearson Type III flood-frequency analysis. Based on this analysis, the recurrence interval of the computed peak streamflow was estimated to be slightly less than 100 years. Peak-gage-height data, peak-streamflow data, and recurrence-interval estimates for the June 22-24, 2006, flood are tabulated for the Cuyahoga River at Independence and 10 other USGS gaging stations in north-central Ohio. Because flooding along the Cuyahoga River near Independence and Valley View was particularly severe, a study was done to document the peak water-surface profile during the flood from approximately 2 miles downstream from the USGS streamflow-gaging station at

  20. Stages and Discharges of the Mississippi River and Tributaries and Other Watersheds in the New Orleans District for 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    RAILROAD HRIJGE AT PILE 2q.5 FROM lEAU . lolA . 03oT60.) , ,. % ,%* IAIE. -414L .LO-T TYPE. * ,LNELRAL p’lFURmATIlUN. GAGE READ ANO MAINTAINED BY NATIONAL...4 %. % 98 DAILY STAGES FCR 1981% LCD LAKE AT MOOR2NGSPCRT, LA.% LOLA TI ON. LAT. 34-41-52, LONG. 93-57-213. FIGh’%AY 530 BRIDOGE. (SYA. 1960024...MANGE. 1700 FEET ABOVE LAKE CHICO ’. (STA. 4959009.) GAGE. STAFF TYPE, RANGE 15. ZERO, MSVD . . .. .. 6.-.i .W v V ’K .11 I TV ’u1W % V gr N F L - 1T

  1. Response Measurements on an Echinodome Subjected to Explosive Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.M.M. El-Deeb

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Free field explosion experiments were carried out to determine the general characteristics of the pressure pulse generated by a detonator underwater. An echinodome – an axisymmetric shell structure of optimum form – was subjected to a shock wave from the same type of detonator, the structure being in a floating submerged and tethered state. Some indication of the influence of the structure on the incident pressure wave was obtained from a surface mounted miniature pressure gage. Structural response was measured with the aid of strain gages from which principal stress data were deduced. Consideration was given to the theoretical modelling aspects of the problem.

  2. Cylinder valve packing nut studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, S.C. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The design, manufacture, and use of cylinder valve packing nuts have been studied to improve their resistance to failure from stress corrosion cracking. Stress frozen photoelastic models have been analyzed to measure the stress concentrations at observed points of failure. The load effects induced by assembly torque and thermal expansion of stem packing were observed by strain gaging nuts. The effects of finishing operations and heat treatment were studied by the strain gage hole boring and X-ray methods. Modifications of manufacturing and operation practices are reducing the frequency of stress corrosion failures.

  3. Limited SP17 expression within tumors diminishes its therapeutic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, M F; Ditzel, H J

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the expression of the tumor antigen sperm protein 17 (SP17) in a large panel of human cancers and compared it with the expression of two well-characterized families of tumor antigens, melanoma-associated antigen-A (MAGE-A) and G antigen (GAGE). We found that SP17...... positive tumors in contrast to MAGE-A and GAGE proteins, which were homogenously expressed in large foci. Our results suggest that SP17 may not be an optimal target for cancer vaccines....

  4. MEANS FOR DETERMINING CENTRIFUGE ALIGNMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W.Q.

    1958-08-26

    An apparatus is presented for remotely determining the alignment of a centrifuge. The centrifage shaft is provided with a shoulder, upon which two followers ride, one for detecting radial movements, and one upon the shoulder face for determining the axial motion. The followers are attached to separate liquid filled bellows, and a tube connects each bellows to its respective indicating gage at a remote location. Vibrations produced by misalignment of the centrifuge shaft are transmitted to the bellows, and tbence through the tubing to the indicator gage. This apparatus is particularly useful for operation in a hot cell where the materials handled are dangerous to the operating personnel.

  5. Somerset County Flood Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Heidi L.

    2007-01-01

    The timely warning of a flood is crucial to the protection of lives and property. One has only to recall the floods of August 2, 1973, September 16 and 17, 1999, and April 16, 2007, in Somerset County, New Jersey, in which lives were lost and major property damage occurred, to realize how costly, especially in terms of human life, an unexpected flood can be. Accurate forecasts and warnings cannot be made, however, without detailed information about precipitation and streamflow in the drainage basin. Since the mid 1960's, the National Weather Service (NWS) has been able to forecast flooding on larger streams in Somerset County, such as the Raritan and Millstone Rivers. Flooding on smaller streams in urban areas was more difficult to predict. In response to this problem the NWS, in cooperation with the Green Brook Flood Control Commission, installed a precipitation gage in North Plainfield, and two flash-flood alarms, one on Green Brook at Seeley Mills and one on Stony Brook at Watchung, in the early 1970's. In 1978, New Jersey's first countywide flood-warning system was installed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Somerset County. This system consisted of a network of eight stage and discharge gages equipped with precipitation gages linked by telephone telemetry and eight auxiliary precipitation gages. The gages were installed throughout the county to collect precipitation and runoff data that could be used to improve flood-monitoring capabilities and flood-frequency estimates. Recognizing the need for more detailed hydrologic information for Somerset County, the USGS, in cooperation with Somerset County, designed and installed the Somerset County Flood Information System (SCFIS) in 1990. This system is part of a statewide network of stream gages, precipitation gages, weather stations, and tide gages that collect data in real time. The data provided by the SCFIS improve the flood forecasting ability of the NWS and aid Somerset County and municipal agencies in

  6. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1997 water year. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaull, D.A.; Alexander, M.R.; Reynolds, R.P.; McLean, C.T.

    1998-01-01

    This annual water data report from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contains flow data from 19 stream-gaging stations that cover most of the Laboratory`s property. The authors focused data collection on the Laboratory`s downstream boundary, approximated by New Mexico State Highway 4; the upstream boundary is approximated by New Mexico State Highway 501. Some of the gaging stations are within Laboratory boundaries and were originally installed to assist groups other than the Water Quality and Hydrology Group (ESH-18) that also conduct site-specific earth science research. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Canon de Valle.

  7. Analysis of Directional Spectra and Reflection Coefficients in Incident and Reflected Wave Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳淑学; 俞聿修

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the modified Bayesian method for the analysis of directional wave spectra and reflection coefficients is verified by numerical and physical simulation of waves. The results show that the method can basically separate the incident and reflected directional spectra. In addition, the effect of the type of wave gage arrays, the number of measured wave properties, and the distance between the wave gage array and the reflection line on the resolution of the method are investigated. Some suggestions are proposed for practical application.

  8. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of four boron nitride coated ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.; Zimmerman, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Six types of uncoated ceramic fibers were static tensile and tensile creep tested at various elevated temperatures. Three types of boron nitride coated fibers were also tested. Room temperature static tensile tests were initially performed on all fibers, at gage lengths of 1, 2, and 4 inches, to determine the magnitude of end effects from the gripping system used. Tests at one elevated temperature, at gage lengths of 8 and 10 inches, were also conducted, to determine end effects at elevated temperatures. Fiber cross sectional shapes and areas were determined using scanning electron microscopy. Creep testing was typically performed for 4 hours, in an air atmosphere.

  9. Comparación de los resultados de los volúmenes encontrados a partir de los métodos: calibración líquida api 2555 y calibración por medidas api 2552 para un tanque esferoidal de la refinería la libertad

    OpenAIRE

    Murrieta Reasco, Atilio Javier; Malavé Carrera, Carlos Alfredo; Gallegos O., Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    This work presents in the first section the procedure for the measurement and calibration of a smooth spheroidal tank using API Standard 2552 - ASTM D 1408-65 and the Liquid Calibration or API Standard 2555 - ASTM D 1406. We developed the gage table using the API Standard 2552 and the other gage table obtained for a company of calibration of tanks using Liquid Calibration. Calculations were made for a tank of Refinería La Libertad. The final section we concluded that the precision of resul...

  10. Summary of significant floods in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands, 1970 through 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Charles A.; Aldridge, Byron N.; Ross, Heather C.

    2001-01-01

    This volume is a compilation of significant floods that occurred throughout the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands during 1970 through 1989. A summary of most devastating floods according to amount of damage and lives lost is provided for each year. State-by-state compilations include a description of the general hydroclimatology and conditions that produce significant floods, a description of climate and basin characteristics that significantly affect maximum flows, tables of data that compare each significant flood during 1970 through 1989 with the maximum flood for the entire period of record at selected streamflow-gaging stations, and maps showing the location of the streamflow-gaging stations.

  11. X-Wray Stats and Performance EXplorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Auto, Succ , Corr) A = (T, Desr, Auto, Succ , Serv, Type) 2. Test Bed Architecture The test bed architecture consists of a mini-cluster with one...We conducted a Gage R&R study to prove that the X-Wray SPEX test bed reliably measures key indicators of efficiency. We used this test bed to

  12. Nuclear and radiation techniques - state of art and development trends; Techniki jadrowe i radiacyjne - stan obecny oraz kierunki rozwoju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, A.G. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The state of art and development trends of nuclear and radiation techniques in Poland and worldwide have been presented. Among them the radiometric gages, radiation technologies, radiotracer methods and measuring systems for pipeline and vessels, brightness control have been described and their applications in industry, agriculture, health and environment protection have been shown and discussed. 35 refs, 1 fig.

  13. Characteristics of ground motion and threshold values for colluvium slope displacement induced by heavy rainfall: a case study in northern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Ching-Jiang; Sue, Dar-Zen

    2016-06-01

    The Huafan University campus is located in the Ta-lun Shan area in northern Taiwan, which is characterized by a dip slope covered by colluvium soil of various depths. For slope disaster prevention, a monitoring system was constructed that consisted of inclinometers, tiltmeters, crack gages, groundwater level observation wells, settlement and displacement observation marks, rebar strain gages, concrete strain gages, and rain gages. The monitoring data derived from hundreds of settlement and displacement observation marks were analyzed and compared with the displacement recorded by inclinometers. The analysis results revealed that the maximum settlement and displacement were concentrated on the areas around the Hui-Tsui, Zhi-An, and Wu-Ming buildings and coincided with periods of heavy rainfall. The computer program STABL was applied for slope stability analysis and modeling of slope failure. For prevention of slope instability, a drainage system and tieback anchors with additional stability measures were proposed to discharge excess groundwater following rainfall. Finally, threshold value curves of rainfall based on slope displacement were proposed. The curves can be applied for predicting slope stability when typhoons are expected to bring heavy rainfall and should be significant in slope disaster prevention.

  14. Le labyrinthe de la cité radieuse. Les pérégrinations de Bérenger chez Ionesco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Satijn, Nicolaas Alexander Gerardus

    1982-01-01

    In this study we have made an analysis of the Bérenger-cycle, and more in particular of Tueur sans gages, focussed on some elements which seem to us of essential importance for the study of any literary text. In the order in which they are dealt with these elements are: space, time, language and com

  15. 46 CFR 193.10-5 - Fire pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Minimum number of pumps Hose and hydrant size, inches Nozzle orifice size, inches Length of hose, feet 100... tube pressure may not be less than 35 p.s.i. (d) Fire pumps shall be fitted on the discharge side with... this amount. (e) Fire pumps shall be fitted with a pressure gage on the discharge side of the pumps....

  16. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2006 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.P. Romero, D. Ortiz, G. Kuyumjian

    2007-08-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 44 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data for 44 stations.

  17. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2008 water year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, David; Cata, Betsy; Kuyumjian, Gregory

    2009-09-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 69 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  18. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2009 water year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, David; McCullough, Betsy

    2010-05-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 73 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  19. The Calibration of a Low-Frequency Calibrating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-08-20

    to measure the pressure changes because such changes were too small to be measured with a mercury manometer or conventional gage, 4.222 Data The data...volume displacement of the water If the chamber is infinitely stiff, all -the volume displacement will be passed through the mercury manometer , causing a

  20. Damage Mechanisms/Failure Mechanics of Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    cutting method was used to minimize material waste, not because * carbon-carbon is difficult to machine . 2.2 Tension Testing 2.2.1 Specimen Configuration...was made to bond the strain gages to fiber bundles if possible rather than to a layer of matrix material. Ex- tensometers were also employed to measure

  1. 最佳反馈控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    An Experimental Research on Active Control of Vibration Strain in a Flexible Linkage with Piezoceramic Actuators and Gage Sensors.Applications of the eigenvalue theorem on approximate optimizations of nonlinear regulators.Approximations to Optimal Feedback Control Using a Successive Wavelet Collocation Algorithm.Computation of Feedback Operators for Distributed Parameter Systems with Non-Normal Linearizations.

  2. Shock-Induced Borehole Waves and Fracture Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H.; Smeulders, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    We perform wave experiments using a vertical shock tube setup. Shock waves are generated by the rupture of a thin membrane. In the test section, the incident pressure waves generate borehole-guided waves along water-saturated samples. The tube is equipped with side wall gages and a mobile pressure p

  3. Modelling the Somatic Electrical Response of Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    non-linear, time-varying conductances in the soma, including those that underly three putative sodium currents , (IN.-tr,, INa-tail, and INa-rep), a...for excitation and propagation of the nerve impulse. Biophysics Journal. 6:, 1966. [12] C. French and P. Gage. A threshold sodium current in pyramidal

  4. Effects of Surface Water Withdrawal on Fishes in Rivers of Northeast Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    the monthly volume of water that occurred at each representative gage location during wet to dry water conditions (30- to 90-percent exceedance val...multiplied by the volume of water for wet to dry water conditions (see Table 4). As discussed in the main text, this procedure assumed that water removed

  5. Water‐Data Report 394031093062801 ELK CREEK NEAR ROTHVILLE MO, STUTMAN RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39040’31”N, Long. 9306’28”W, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is located at southwest corner of bridge crossing on...

  6. Flood characteristics of streams in Owyhee County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, H.C.; Harenberg, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    Channel-width measurements were used to estimate annual peaks with a recurrence interval of 10 years at 79 sites in Owyhee County, Idaho, and adjacent areas. These discharges and those from 33 gaging stations are plotted on a map of the area. The map will allow the user to interpolate between sites. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. 49 CFR 213.139 - Spring rail frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.139 Spring rail frogs. (a) The outer edge of a wheel tread shall not contact the gage side of a spring wing rail. (b) The toe of each... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring rail frogs. 213.139 Section...

  8. 75 FR 986 - Granting of Request for Early Termination of the Waiting Period Under the Premerger Notification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ... Agropur Cooperative. G Sjerp W. Ysselstein. G Green Meadows Food, LLC. 20100083 G Tellabs, Inc. G WiChorus... Marketing Worlwide, Inc. 20100106 G Groupe Aeroplan Inc. G The Barbara Carlson Gage 1998 GST Family Trust. G Carlson Marketing Worlwide, Inc. 20100110 G GS Capital Partners VI, L.P. G Compass Investors Inc....

  9. The use of crosshead displacement in determining fracture parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walters, C.L.; Voormeeren, L.O.; Janssen, M.

    2013-01-01

    In determining the fracture toughness of a test specimen, standards currently require either locally-measured load-line displacements or clip gage displacements. In order to measure these parameters, secondary sensors generally need to be installed and calibrated, which often comes at a higher cost.

  10. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative High Speed Shaft Tapered Roller Bearing Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; McNiff, B.

    2013-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) is a project investigating gearbox reliability primarily through testing and modeling. Previous dynamometer testing focused upon acquiring measurements in the planetary section of the test gearbox. Prior to these tests, the strain gages installed on the planetary bearings were calibrated in a load frame.

  11. College Textbook Reading Attitude Survey: The Development of an Attitude Measuring Tool and Vocabulary and Reading Comprehension's Impact on Student Teachers' Attitudes and Perceptions Concerning College Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, James E.; Becker, Melisa; Lamb, Holy; McGregor, Jenifer

    2009-01-01

    Attitude toward reading has long proven to be of importance in learning. This study designed a survey instrument for college teachers to gage future teachers, college students' attitudes toward the reading of textbooks. College students (n = 64) responded to two instruments, the newly created survey called the College Textbook Reading Attitude…

  12. A NEW HYSTERESIS COMPENSATION METHOD FOR LOAD CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuZijian; ChenRenwen

    2002-01-01

    A new hysteresis compensation method is presented.After analyzing the characteristics of strain-gage based load cells under loading & unloading conditions, mathe-matical models are established.A solution to compensate the hysteresis of the load cell by the experiments.It is shown that the method is reliable and can effectively re-duce the hysteresis.

  13. 2-D Biaxial Testing and Failure Predictions of IM7/977-2 Carbon/Epoxy Quasi-Isotropic Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    laminate plates from which the desired cruci- form specimen shape, including gage section, was machined out using a computer numeric controlled ( CNC ) mill...and high-speed router . That is, in physically machining the spec- imen to the desired thickness, the (0/90) portions of the lam- inate was removed from

  14. Precipitation Depth-Duration-Frequency Analysis for the Nevada National Security Site and Surrounding Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Li [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States). Division of Hydrologic Sciences; Miller, Julianne J. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States). Division of Hydrologic Sciences

    2016-08-01

    Accurate precipitation frequency data are important for Environmental Management Soils Activities on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are important for environmental assessments performed for regulatory closure of Soils Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Sites, as well as engineering mitigation designs and post-closure monitoring strategies to assess and minimize potential contaminant migration from Soils CAU Sites. Although the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Atlas 14 (Bonnin et al., 2011) provides precipitation frequency data for the NNSS area, the NNSS-specific observed precipitation data were not consistent with the NOAA Atlas 14 predicted data. This is primarily due to the NOAA Atlas 14 products being produced from analyses without including the approximately 30 NNSS precipitation gage records, several of which approach or exceed 50 year of record. Therefore, a study of precipitation frequency that incorporated the NNSS precipitation gage records into the NOAA Atlas 14 dataset, was performed specifically for the NNSS to derive more accurate site-specific precipitation data products. Precipitation frequency information, such as the depth-duration-frequency (DDF) relationships, are required to generate synthetic standard design storm hydrographs and assess actual precipitation events. In this study, the actual long-term NNSS precipitation gage records, some of which are the longest gage records in southern and central Nevada, were analyzed to allow for more accurate precipitation DDF estimates to be developed for the NNSS. Gridded maps of precipitation frequency for the NNSS and surrounding areas were then produced.

  15. The Shock and Vibration Bulletin. Part 1. Welcome, Keynote Address, Invited Papers, Pyrotechnic Shock, and Shock Testing and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    Kiddy, Naval Surface Weapons Center, Silver Spring, MD THE VIBRATION OF SLIGHTLY, CURVED RECTANGULAR PLATES UNDER COMPRESSION S. I. Dickinson and S...Study of the Multifrequency Reed Gage 1968). for Measuring Shock Motion," by Samuel Davidson and Emily J. Adams, DTMB Report 613 (Jul 1949). 18. "The

  16. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2000 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A.Shaull; M.R.Alexander; R.P.Reynolds; R.P.Romero; E.T.Riebsomer; C.T.McLean

    2001-06-02

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 23 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs, two that flow into Canon del Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

  17. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2002 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A. Shaull; D. Ortiz; M.R. Alexander; R.P. Romero

    2003-03-03

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 34 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data from 16 stations.

  18. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1999 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. A. Shaull; M. R. Alexander; R. P. Reynolds; C. T. McLean; R. P. Romero

    2000-04-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 22 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory with one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Canon de Valle and nine partial-record storm water stations.

  19. Conveyance characteristics of the Nueces River, Cotulla to Simmons, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Bernard C.; Reeves, William E.

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of discharge hydrographs for streamflow-gaging stations on the Nueces River at Cotulla, Tilden, and Simmons indicate that significant water losses occur along the 108-mile reach from Cotulla to Simmon during storm-runoff periods. Computed losses along the 83-mile reach from Cotulla to Tilden for 15 storm periods range from 32 to 59 percent of the total runoff volume passing the Cotulla gage. For six storm periods that occurred while the gage at Simmons was in operation, computed losses from Cotulla to Simmons averaged 48 percent of the storm runoff passing the Cotulla gage. Estimates of total-annual losses were made with the aid of a regression model developed to relate monthly rainfall totals to monthly runoff. Total annual water losses, estimated with the aid of the regression model, ranged from 46,000 acre-feet during 1969 to 368,500 acre-feet during 1967, and averaged about 174,000 acre-feet for 1966-77. (USGS)

  20. 30 CFR 77.413 - Boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boilers. 77.413 Section 77.413 Mineral... Mechanical Equipment § 77.413 Boilers. (a) Boilers shall be equipped with guarded, well-maintained water... the gages shall be kept clean and free of scale and rust. (b) Boilers shall be equipped with...

  1. Water‐Data Report 394031093062801 ELK CREEK NEAR ROTHVILLE MO, STUTMAN RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39040’31”N, Long. 9306’28”W, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is located at southwest corner of bridge crossing on...

  2. Water‐Data Report 393937093090901 TURKEY CREEK NR SUMNER MO, FULBRIGHT RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39 deg 39’ 37”N, long. 93 deg 9’ 9”W, 23 miles east southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is on the right bank, 75 feet south of bridge...

  3. Water‐Data Report 393619093074801 YELLOW CREEK NR MENDON MO, HWY CC ON SWAN LAKE NWR-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39036’19”N, long. 9307’48”W near Swan Lake NWR, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, in Charlton County. Gage is mounted 9 feet off the ground on...

  4. Water‐Data Report 393619093074801 YELLOW CREEK NR MENDON MO, HWY CC ON SWAN LAKE NWR-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39036’19”N, long. 9307’48”W near Swan Lake NWR, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, in Charlton County. Gage is mounted 9 feet off the ground on...

  5. Water‐Data Report 393937093090901 TURKEY CREEK NR SUMNER MO, FULBRIGHT RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39 deg 39’ 37”N, long. 93 deg 9’ 9”W, 23 miles east southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is on the right bank, 75 feet south of bridge...

  6. Water‐Data Report 394031093062801 ELK CREEK NEAR ROTHVILLE MO, STUTMAN RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39040’31”N, Long. 9306’28”W, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is located at southwest corner of bridge crossing on...

  7. Water‐Data Report 393937093090901 TURKEY CREEK NR SUMNER MO, FULBRIGHT RD NEAR SWAN LAKE NWR-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39 deg 39’ 37”N, long. 93 deg 9’ 9”W, 23 miles east southeast of Chillicothe, MO, Charlton County. Gage is on the right bank, 75 feet south of bridge...

  8. Potential-scour assessments and estimates of maximum scour at selected bridges in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, E.E.

    1995-01-01

    The results of potential-scour assessments at 130 bridges and estimates of maximum scour at 10 bridges in Iowa are presented. All of the bridges evaluated in the study are constructed bridges (not culverts) that are sites of active or discontinued streamflow-gaging stations and peak-stage measurement sites. The period of the study was from October 1991 to September 1994.

  9. E-2C Loads Calibration in DFRC Flight Loads Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Lawrence S.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: a) Safely and efficiently perform structural load tests on NAVAIR E-2C aircraft to calibrate strain gage instrumentation installed by NAVAIR; b) Collect load test data and derive loads equations for use in NAVAIR flight tests; and c) Assist flight test team with use of loads equations measurements at PAX River.

  10. Stress state in turbopump bearing induced by shrink fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, P.; Zee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The stress generated by shrink fitting in bearing-like geometries is studied. The feasibility of using strain gages to determine the strain induced by shrink fitting process is demonstrated. Results from a ring with a uniform cross section reveal the validity of simple stress mechanics calculations for determining the stress state induced in this geometry by shrink fitting.

  11. Rainfall estimation using raingages and radar — A Bayesian approach: 1. Derivation of estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, D.-J.; Smith, J. A.

    1991-03-01

    Procedures for estimating rainfall from radar and raingage observations are constructed in a Bayesian framework. Given that the number of raingage measurements is typically very small, mean and variance of gage rainfall are treated as uncertain parameters. Under the assumption that log gage rainfall and log radar rainfall are jointly multivariate normal, the estimation problem is equivalent to lognormal co-kriging with uncertain mean and variance of the gage rainfall field. The posterior distribution is obtained under the assumption that the prior for the mean and inverse of the variance of log gage rainfall is normal-gamma 2. Estimate and estimation variance do not have closed-form expressions, but can be easily evaluated by numerically integrating two single integrals. To reduce computational burden associated with evaluating sufficient statistics for the likelihood function, an approximate form of parameter updating is given. Also, as a further approximation, the parameters are updated using raingage measurements only, yielding closed-form expressions for estimate and estimation variance in the Gaussian domain. With a reduction in the number of radar rainfall data in constructing covariance matrices, computational requirements for the estimation procedures are not significantly greater than those for simple co-kriging. Given their generality, the estimation procedures constructed in this work are considered to be applicable in various estimation problems involving an undersampled main variable and a densely sampled auxiliary variable.

  12. Flood forecasting for River Mekong with data-based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Khurram M.; Plate, Erich J.

    2014-09-01

    In many regions of the world, the task of flood forecasting is made difficult because only a limited database is available for generating a suitable forecast model. This paper demonstrates that in such cases parsimonious data-based hydrological models for flood forecasting can be developed if the special conditions of climate and topography are used to advantage. As an example, the middle reach of River Mekong in South East Asia is considered, where a database of discharges from seven gaging stations on the river and 31 rainfall stations on the subcatchments between gaging stations is available for model calibration. Special conditions existing for River Mekong are identified and used in developing first a network connecting all discharge gages and then models for forecasting discharge increments between gaging stations. Our final forecast model (Model 3) is a linear combination of two structurally different basic models: a model (Model 1) using linear regressions for forecasting discharge increments, and a model (Model 2) using rainfall-runoff models. Although the model based on linear regressions works reasonably well for short times, better results are obtained with rainfall-runoff modeling. However, forecast accuracy of Model 2 is limited by the quality of rainfall forecasts. For best results, both models are combined by taking weighted averages to form Model 3. Model quality is assessed by means of both persistence index PI and standard deviation of forecast error.

  13. Manual for estimating selected streamflow characteristics of natural-flow streams in the Colorado River basin in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, R.C.; Johnson, E.B.; Plantz, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    Methods are presented for estimating 10 streamflow characteristics at three types of sites on natural flow streams in the Colorado River Basin in Utah. The streamflow characteristics include average discharge and annual maximum 1-, 7-, and 15-day mean discharges for recurrence intervals of 10, 50 and 100 years. At or near gaged sites, two methods weight gaging station data with regression equation values to estimate streamflow characteristics. At sites on ungaged streams, a method estimates streamflow characteristics using regression equations. The regression equations relate the streamflow characteristics to the following basin and climatic characteristics: contributing drainage area, mean basin elevation, mean annual precipitation, main channel slope, and forested area. Separate regression equations were developed for four hydrologically distinct regions in the study area. The standard error of estimate for the 10 streamflow characteristics ranges from 13% to 87%. Basin, climatic, and streamflow characteristics, available as of September 30, 1981, are presented for 135 gaging stations in Utah, Arizona, Colorado, and Wyoming. In addition, weighted estimates of the streamflow characteristics based on station data and the regression equation estimates are provided for most gaging stations. (Author 's abstract)

  14. Dollar Summary of Prime Contract Awards by State, Place, and Contractor, FY84, Part 4, (Allenville, Missouri-Wyoming, Pennsylvania).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    CRESCENT GAGE & TOOL SALES INC 28 28 CROSSROADS TL & MFG INC 368 366 CROWN SERVICES INC 49 49 D M L MACHINE CORPORATION 215- 215- DARWIN INDUSTRIES 30...INC 417 417 CARTWRIGHT BREISCH ENGINEERING CO 179 179 QIAID, DARYL 59 59 T & S SERVICES CO 32 32 TOTAL - CARTWRIGHT 270 270 MPC911 PRIME CONTRACT AWARDS

  15. Uncertainty analysis of steady state incident heat flux measurements in hydrocarbon fuel fires.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this report is to develop uncertainty estimates for three heat flux measurement techniques used for the measurement of incident heat flux in a combined radiative and convective environment. This is related to the measurement of heat flux to objects placed inside hydrocarbon fuel (diesel, JP-8 jet fuel) fires, which is very difficult to make accurately (e.g., less than 10%). Three methods will be discussed: a Schmidt-Boelter heat flux gage; a calorimeter and inverse heat conduction method; and a thin plate and energy balance method. Steady state uncertainties were estimated for two types of fires (i.e., calm wind and high winds) at three times (early in the fire, late in the fire, and at an intermediate time). Results showed a large uncertainty for all three methods. Typical uncertainties for a Schmidt-Boelter gage ranged from {+-}23% for high wind fires to {+-}39% for low wind fires. For the calorimeter/inverse method the uncertainties were {+-}25% to {+-}40%. The thin plate/energy balance method the uncertainties ranged from {+-}21% to {+-}42%. The 23-39% uncertainties for the Schmidt-Boelter gage are much larger than the quoted uncertainty for a radiative only environment (i.e ., {+-}3%). This large difference is due to the convective contribution and because the gage sensitivities to radiative and convective environments are not equal. All these values are larger than desired, which suggests the need for improvements in heat flux measurements in fires.

  16. Flexible Case - Grain Interaction in Ballistic Weapon Systems. Volume I. Technical Accomplishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-01

    October 1976). 8. “Simulation Testing of a Modified Bomb Dumy Uni t (BDU)”, AFRPL- TR-72- 107 (December 1972). 9. Briar , H. P.,and Bills , Jr. , K...10. Briar , H. P.,and Bills , Jr., K. W., and Schapery, R. A. , “Design and Test of the Operational In-Situ Gage for Solid Propellant - - Surveillance

  17. 49 CFR Appendix E to Part 178 - Flame Penetration Resistance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the test burner cone. (4) Thermocouples. The seven thermocouples to be used for testing must be 1/16 inch ceramic sheathed, type K, grounded thermocouples with a nominal 30 American wire gage (AWG) size conductor. The seven thermocouples must be attached to a steel angle bracket to form a thermocouple rake...

  18. Water‐Data Report 411214091070601 Lake Odessa at Schafer Landing nr Wapello Iowa - 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Location is Lat. 41° 12 ’14” N Long. 91° 7’ 6” W near Wapello, Iowa in Wapello County at Schafer Landing near Port Louisa National Wildlife Refuge. Gage is mounted...

  19. Whitey SCHe Ball Valves Provide Test Port Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-09-15

    These valves are 1/4 inch ball valves fabricated of 316 stainless steel. Packing is TFE (standard). They are used as normally closed isolation valves for test ports in the SCHe System between the gage root valve and the pressure indicator.

  20. SUPERDUCK Nearshore Processes Experiment: Summary of Studies, CERC (Coastal Engineering Research Facility) Field Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    celc its-Il 1 Odeinlrmrk opttes rsece terv~esdea hsfra I .of, aeayadtoa eakcmuain rsec# nterv t$d fsfr Figure 12. Littoral Environment... resonant tuning by the bar under broad-banded wind wave forcing. 49. The offshore wind wave directional array (discussed under Linear Array Wave Gage in

  1. 77 FR 3500 - Reading Powder Coatings, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Berks and Beyond Employment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ...] Reading Powder Coatings, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Berks and Beyond Employment Services and Gage Personnel Reading, PA; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker... Assistance and Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance on October 19, 2011, applicable to workers of...

  2. Selective Mode Excitation And Detection Of Micromachined Resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prak, Albert; Elwenspoek, Miko; Fluitman, Jan H.J

    1992-01-01

    Distributed mechanical systems such as micromachined resonant strain gages possess an infinite number of modes of vibration. Mostly, one is interested in only one or a few modes. A method is described with which only the desired modes are excited and detected. This is achieved by geometrically shapi

  3. Force Measurements in Vibration and Acoustic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharton, T. D.

    1996-01-01

    The advent of triaxial, piezoelectric force gages and the associated signal processing is a precursor to several dynamics testing innovations. This new technology is applicable to spacecraft programs that JPL manages. An application of force measurement is force limiting (when testing spacecraft in random vibration tests). Base-drive and acoustic modal testing is a potential application.

  4. Effects of Stress on the Electrical Resistance of Ytterbium and Calibration of Ytterbium Stress Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-08-01

    approximately 1,9 cm thick. The gage leads were brought out through holes drilled in the back piece. In order to improve the probability of lead...bump occurring at about 3.5 nsec is a fracture signal arising from a wave reflection from new free surfaces caused by spallation of the target

  5. Response of a Plain and Filled Elastomer (Solithane 113) to High Strain-Rate Compression, Shear, and Tension Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    conducted at a higher impact velocity, showed macro- scopic spallation . A scanning microscope picture showing the internal * surfaces is presented in Figure...To fabricate the gages, it is necessary to drill through the walls of the cylindrical mold. Wires were carefully stretched and welded (see Figure 3.7

  6. Water‐Data Report 393619093074801 YELLOW CREEK NR MENDON MO, HWY CC ON SWAN LAKE NWR-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 39036’19”N, long. 9307’48”W near Swan Lake NWR, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillicothe, MO, in Charlton County. Gage is mounted 9 feet off the ground on...

  7. Water‐Data Report 393556093132501 ELK CREEK NR SUMNER MO, DS ON SWAN LAKE REFUGE-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 390 35’ 56.0” N, long. 930 13’ 25” W, at Swan Lake NWR, 23.5 miles southeast of Chillecothe, MO, in Charlton County. Gage is located near abandoned...

  8. Water‐Data Report 432139084024201 SHIAWASSEE RIVER AT JAMES TOWNSHIP MI ON SHIAWASSEE NWR-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 43o21’38” N, long. 84o02’18’’W, approximately 4 miles southwest of Saginaw, MI, Saginaw County. Gage is located on Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge...

  9. Water‐Data Report 432139084024201 SHIAWASSEE RIVER AT JAMES TOWNSHIP MI ON SHIAWASSEE NWR-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — LOCATION: Lat. 43o21’38” N, long. 84o02’18’’W, approximately 4 miles southwest of Saginaw, MI, Saginaw County. Gage is located on Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge...

  10. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a segment of a high pressure distribution system at a pressure that exceeds the... segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage,...

  11. Mathematical Storage-Battery Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, C. P.; Aston, M.

    1985-01-01

    Empirical formula represents performance of electrical storage batteries. Formula covers many battery types and includes numerous coefficients adjusted to fit peculiarities of each type. Battery and load parameters taken into account include power density in battery, discharge time, and electrolyte temperature. Applications include electric-vehicle "fuel" gages and powerline load leveling.

  12. August Median Streamflow on Ungaged Streams in Eastern Aroostook County, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.; Tasker, Gary D.; Nielsen, Martha G.

    2003-01-01

    Methods for estimating August median streamflow were developed for ungaged, unregulated streams in the eastern part of Aroostook County, Maine, with drainage areas from 0.38 to 43 square miles and mean basin elevations from 437 to 1,024 feet. Few long-term, continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations with small drainage areas were available from which to develop the equations; therefore, 24 partial-record gaging stations were established in this investigation. A mathematical technique for estimating a standard low-flow statistic, August median streamflow, at partial-record stations was applied by relating base-flow measurements at these stations to concurrent daily flows at nearby long-term, continuous-record streamflow- gaging stations (index stations). Generalized least-squares regression analysis (GLS) was used to relate estimates of August median streamflow at gaging stations to basin characteristics at these same stations to develop equations that can be applied to estimate August median streamflow on ungaged streams. GLS accounts for varying periods of record at the gaging stations and the cross correlation of concurrent streamflows among gaging stations. Twenty-three partial-record stations and one continuous-record station were used for the final regression equations. The basin characteristics of drainage area and mean basin elevation are used in the calculated regression equation for ungaged streams to estimate August median flow. The equation has an average standard error of prediction from -38 to 62 percent. A one-variable equation uses only drainage area to estimate August median streamflow when less accuracy is acceptable. This equation has an average standard error of prediction from -40 to 67 percent. Model error is larger than sampling error for both equations, indicating that additional basin characteristics could be important to improved estimates of low-flow statistics. Weighted estimates of August median streamflow, which can be used when

  13. Monitoring of stage and velocity, for computation of discharge in the Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois, 2010-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin K.; Goodwin, Greg E.

    2013-01-01

    Lake Michigan diversion accounting is the process used by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers to quantify the amount of water that is diverted from the Lake Michigan watershed into the Illinois and Mississippi River Basins. A network of streamgages within the Chicago area waterway system monitor tributary river flows and the major river flow on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal near Lemont as one of the instrumental tools used for Lake Michigan diversion accounting. The mean annual discharges recorded by these streamgages are used as additions or deductions to the mean annual discharge recorded by the main stream gaging station currently used in the Lake Michigan diversion accounting process, which is the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal near Lemont, Illinois (station number 05536890). A new stream gaging station, Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois (station number 414757087490401), was installed on September 23, 2010, for the purpose of monitoring stage, velocity, and discharge through the Summit Conduit for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in accordance with Lake Michigan diversion accounting. Summit Conduit conveys flow from a small part of the lower Des Plaines River watershed underneath the Des Plaines River directly into the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal. Because the Summit Conduit discharges into the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal upstream from the stream gaging station at Lemont, Illinois, but does not contain flow diverted from the Lake Michigan watershed, it is considered a flow deduction to the discharge measured by the Lemont stream gaging station in the Lake Michigan diversion accounting process. This report offers a technical summary of the techniques and methods used for the collection and computation of the stage, velocity, and discharge data at the Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois stream gaging station for the 2011 and 2012 Water Years. The stream gaging station Summit Conduit near Summit, Illinois (station number 414757087490401) is an

  14. 一种可用于飞行载荷测量的改进遗传算法%An Improved Genetic Algorithm for Flight Load Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵燕; 高尚; 张多源

    2012-01-01

    The selection of strain gages is important in determining flight loads by strain gage measurement, which has large effects on the prediction of load equations. An improved genetic algorithm of selecting strain gages in the measurements of flight loads was proposed in this paper by considering the elimination of the irrelevant gages. Also, the performances of improved genetic algorithm were analyzed compared with those of exhaustive search and genetic algorithms. Further, the improved genetic algorithm was applied to select the strain gages in the load measurements of certain landing gear. The test example shows that the improved genetic algorithm in this paper could obtain the high-quality load equations with acceptable accuracy and small irrelevance.%应变电桥选择直接决定着飞行载荷测量的精度。通过消除不相关应变电桥,给出了一种适用于飞行载荷测量应变电桥选择的改进遗传算法。通过和穷尽搜索法及传统遗传算法的比较,分析了该改进遗传算法的性能,并将该算法应用于某起落架载荷测量。结果表明:该改进遗传算法可获得具有可接受精度及较小不相关性的高质量载荷方程。

  15. Estimates of monthly streamflow characteristics at selected sites in the upper Missouri River basin, Montana, base period water years 1937-86

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrett, Charles; Johnson, D.R.; Hull, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Estimates of streamflow characteristics (monthly mean flow that is exceeded 90, 80, 50, and 20 percent of the time for all years of record and mean monthly flow) were made and are presented in tabular form for 312 sites in the Missouri River basin in Montana. Short-term gaged records were extended to the base period of water years 1937-86, and were used to estimate monthly streamflow characteristics at 100 sites. Data from 47 gaged sites were used in regression analysis relating the streamflow characteristics to basin characteristics and to active-channel width. The basin-characteristics equations, with standard errors of 35% to 97%, were used to estimate streamflow characteristics at 179 ungaged sites. The channel-width equations, with standard errors of 36% to 103%, were used to estimate characteristics at 138 ungaged sites. Streamflow measurements were correlated with concurrent streamflows at nearby gaged sites to estimate streamflow characteristics at 139 ungaged sites. In a test using 20 pairs of gages, the standard errors ranged from 31% to 111%. At 139 ungaged sites, the estimates from two or more of the methods were weighted and combined in accordance with the variance of individual methods. When estimates from three methods were combined the standard errors ranged from 24% to 63 %. A drainage-area-ratio adjustment method was used to estimate monthly streamflow characteristics at seven ungaged sites. The reliability of the drainage-area-ratio adjustment method was estimated to be about equal to that of the basin-characteristics method. The estimate were checked for reliability. Estimates of monthly streamflow characteristics from gaged records were considered to be most reliable, and estimates at sites with actual flow record from 1937-86 were considered to be completely reliable (zero error). Weighted-average estimates were considered to be the most reliable estimates made at ungaged sites. (USGS)

  16. Flood-inundation maps for Lake Champlain in Vermont and in northern Clinton County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robert H.; Hayes, Laura

    2016-06-30

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an approximately100-mile length of Lake Champlain in Addison, Chittenden, Franklin, and Grand Isle Counties in Vermont and northern Clinton County in New York were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the International Joint Commission (IJC). The flood-inundationmaps, which can be accessed through the International Joint Commission (IJC) Web site at http://www.ijc.org/en_/, depict estimates of the areal extent flooding correspondingto selected water levels (stages) at the USGS lake gage on the Richelieu River (Lake Champlain) at Rouses Point, N.Y. (station number 04295000). In this study, wind and seiche effects (standing oscillating wave with a long wavelength) were not taken into account and the flood-inundation mapsreflect 11 stages (elevations) for Lake Champlain that are static for the study length of the lake. Near-real-time stages at this lake gage, and others on Lake Champlain, may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at the Richelieu River (Lake Champlain) at Rouses Point.Static flood boundary extents were determined for LakeChamplain in Addison, Chittenden, Franklin, and Grand Isle Counties in Vermont and northern Clinton County in New York using recently acquired (2013–2014) lidar (light detection and ranging) and may be referenced to any of the five USGS lake gages on Lake Champlain. Of these five lakgages, USGS lake gage 04295000, Richelieu River (Lake Champlain) at Rouses Point, N.Y., is the only USGS lake gage that is also a National Weather Service prediction location. Flood boundary extents for the Lake Champlain static flood-inundation map corresponding to the May 201 flood(103.2 feet [ft], National Geodetic Vertical Datum [NGVD] 29) were evaluated by comparing these boundary

  17. Estimates of Flow Duration, Mean Flow, and Peak-Discharge Frequency Values for Kansas Stream Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    Streamflow statistics of flow duration and peak-discharge frequency were estimated for 4,771 individual locations on streams listed on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. These statistics included the flow-duration values of 90, 75, 50, 25, and 10 percent, as well as the mean flow value. Peak-discharge frequency values were estimated for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods. Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating flow-duration values of 90, 75, 50, 25, and 10 percent and the mean flow for uncontrolled flow stream locations. The contributing-drainage areas of 149 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Kansas and parts of surrounding States that had flow uncontrolled by Federal reservoirs and used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. Logarithmic transformations of climatic and basin data were performed to yield the best linear relation for developing equations to compute flow durations and mean flow. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were contributing-drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. The analyses yielded a model standard error of prediction range of 0.43 logarithmic units for the 90-percent duration analysis to 0.15 logarithmic units for the 10-percent duration analysis. The model standard error of prediction was 0.14 logarithmic units for the mean flow. Regression equations used to estimate peak-discharge frequency values were obtained from a previous report, and estimates for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods were determined for this report. The regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute flow durations, mean flow, and estimates of peak-discharge frequency for locations along uncontrolled flow streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Flow durations, mean

  18. Selected developments in laser wire stripping. [cutting insulation from aerospace-type wires and cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The operation of mechanical and thermal strippers and the early development of laser wire strippers are reviewed. NASA sponsored development of laser wire stripping for space shuttle includes bench-type strippers as well as an advanced portable hand-held stripper which incorporates a miniaturized carbon dioxide laser and a rotating optics unit with a gas-jet assist and debris exhaust. Drives and controls girdle the wire and slit the remaining slug without manual assistance. This unit can strip wire sizes 26 through 12 gage. A larger-capacity hand-held unit for wire sizes through 1/0 gage was built using a neodynium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. The hand-held units have a flexible umbilical cable to an accompanying cart that carries the power supply, gas supply, cooling unit, and the controls.

  19. Evaluation of multi-brush anode systems in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Lanas, Vanessa

    2013-11-01

    The packing density of anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was examined here using four different graphite fiber brush anode configurations. The impact of anodes on performance was studied in terms of carbon fiber length (brush diameter), the number of brushes connected in parallel, and the wire current collector gage. MFCs with different numbers of brushes (one, three or six) set perpendicular to the cathode all produced similar power densities (1200±40mW/m2) and coulombic efficiencies (60%±5%). Reducing the number of brushes by either disconnecting or removing them reduced power, demonstrating the importance of anode projected area covering the cathode, and therefore the need to match electrode projected areas to maintain high performance. Multi-brush reactors had the same COD removal as single-brush systems (90%). The use of smaller Ti wire gages did not affect power generation, which will enable the use of less metal, reducing material costs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. On the spring and mass of the Dirac oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, James P.

    1993-01-01

    The Dirac oscillator is a relativistic generalization of the quantum harmonic oscillator. In particular, the square of the Hamiltonian for the Dirac oscillator yields the Klein-Gordon equation with a potential of the form: (ar(sub 2) + b(L x S)), where a and b are constants. To obtain the Dirac oscillator, a 'minimal substitution' is made in the Dirac equation, where the ordinary derivative is replaced with a covariant derivative. However, an unusual feature of the covariant derivative in this case is that the potential is a non-trivial element of the Clifford algebra. A theory which naturally gives rise to gage potentials which are non-trivial elements of the Clifford algebra is that based on local automorphism invariance. An exact solution of the automorphism gage field equations which reproduces both the potential term and the mass term of the Dirac oscillator is presented.

  1. Helmet blastometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, William C; King, Michael J

    2015-03-24

    A helmet blastometer for characterizing the direction, speed, magnitude, and duration of a blast event to determine the likelihood of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (biTBI). Time of arrival (TOA) gage sensors are mounted on a rigid outer shell of the helmet each producing a TOA signal in response to a fast rising blast induced positive pressure change above a predetermined threshold. A receiver analyzes the positive pressure changes from the gages to determine direction, speed, and magnitude of a blast. Other TOA gauge sensors can be used to produce a TOA signal in response to a negative pressure change below a predetermined threshold. The positive and negative pressure change TOA signals are used to determine blast duration. A second set of internal contact pressure sensors is connected to an inner liner of the helmet to detect contact pressure on a user's head to determine if biTBI has been sustained.

  2. Rock Springs Site 12 hydraulic/explosive true in situ oil shale fracturing experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrish, R.L.; Boade, R.R.; Stevens, A.L.; Long, A. Jr.; Turner, T.F.

    1980-06-01

    The experiment plan involved the creation and characterization of three horizontal hydraulic fractures, followed by the insertion and simultaneous detonation of slurry explosive in the two lower fractures. Core analyses, wellbore logging, and airflow and /sup 85/Kr tracer tests were used for site characterization and assessment of the hydraulic and explosive fracturing. Tiltmeters, wellhead pressure and flow gages, and in-formation pressure, flow and crack-opening sensors were used to monitor hydrofracture creation and explosive insertion. Explosive detonation diagnostic data were taken with stress and time-of-arrival gages and surface and in-formation accelerometers. The post-fracturing assessments indicated that: (1) hydrofracture creation and explosive insertion and detonation were accomplished essentially as planned; (2) induced fractures were randomly distributed through the shale with no extensively fractured regions or dislocation of shale; and (3) enhancement of permeability was limited to enlargement of the explosive-filled fractures.

  3. Effects of the pre-transformation microstructures on the grain refining of medium-carbon 5Cr-Mo-V steels; Chutanso 5Cr-Mo-V ko no gyaku hentai sairyuka ni oyobosu zenhentai soshiki no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukauda, Y.; Shibata, T.; Ono, S.; Ishiguro, T. [Nippon Steel Works, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    For the purpose of obtaining refined grains over full cross section for improved ductility in heavy-gage products of a medium carbon 5Cr- Mo-V steel, the effects of pre-transformation microstructures on the grain refining during austenitizing were investigated. Samples were prepared to possess either one of three different microstructures , pearlite, bainite and martensite. These samples were heated slowly to the desired austenitizing temperature followed by rapid cooling, and the formation of new austenite grains was examined. Though austenite grains were not refined in cases of martensite and bainite microstructures, these were remarkably refined in case of pearlite. Portions of pearlite were enriched with carbon, where the transformation temperature into austenite was lower, and this is considered to be the reason that finer austenite grains were formed.Above results show that arranging pearlite microstructure before quenching heat treatment is effective for obtaining refined grains over full cross section in heavy-gage products. (author)

  4. Serration Phenomena Occurring During Tensile Tests of Three High-Manganese Twinning-Induced Plasticity (TWIP) Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seokmin; Shin, Sang Yong; Lee, Junghoon; Ahn, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Chin, Kwang-Geun; Lee, Sunghak

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the serration phenomena of two high-Mn TWIP steels and an Al-added TWIP steel were examined by tensile tests, and were explained by the microstructural evolution including formation of localized Portevin-Le Chatelier deformation bands and twins. In stress-strain curves of the high-Mn steels, serrations started in a fine and short shape, and their height and periodic interval increased with increasing strain, whereas the Al-added steel did not show any serrations. According to digital images of strain rate and strain obtained from a vision strain gage system, deformation bands were initially formed at the upper region of the gage section, and moved downward along the tensile loading direction. The time when the band formation started was matched with the time when one serration occurred in the stress-time curve. This serration behavior was generally explained by dynamic strain aging, which was closely related with the formation of deformation bands.

  5. Analysis of the Magnitude and Frequency of Peak Discharge and Maximum Observed Peak Discharge in New Mexico and Surrounding Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltemeyer, Scott D.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of the magnitude and frequency of peak discharges are necessary for the reliable design of bridges, culverts, and open-channel hydraulic analysis, and for flood-hazard mapping in New Mexico and surrounding areas. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Mexico Department of Transportation, updated estimates of peak-discharge magnitude for gaging stations in the region and updated regional equations for estimation of peak discharge and frequency at ungaged sites. Equations were developed for estimating the magnitude of peak discharges for recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 500 years at ungaged sites by use of data collected through 2004 for 293 gaging stations on unregulated streams that have 10 or more years of record. Peak discharges for selected recurrence intervals were determined at gaging stations by fitting observed data to a log-Pearson Type III distribution with adjustments for a low-discharge threshold and a zero skew coefficient. A low-discharge threshold was applied to frequency analysis of 140 of the 293 gaging stations. This application provides an improved fit of the log-Pearson Type III frequency distribution. Use of the low-discharge threshold generally eliminated the peak discharge by having a recurrence interval of less than 1.4 years in the probability-density function. Within each of the nine regions, logarithms of the maximum peak discharges for selected recurrence intervals were related to logarithms of basin and climatic characteristics by using stepwise ordinary least-squares regression techniques for exploratory data analysis. Generalized least-squares regression techniques, an improved regression procedure that accounts for time and spatial sampling errors, then were applied to the same data used in the ordinary least-squares regression analyses. The average standard error of prediction, which includes average sampling error and average standard error of regression, ranged from 38 to 93 percent

  6. APPLICATION OF PIEZOELECTRIC MATERIAL FILM PVDF (Polyvinylidene Flouride AS LIQUID VISCOSITY SENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hananto F. S, Santoso D.R., Julius

    2012-03-01

    Research was done by taking 10 samples of oil and 3 different size ofPVDF film and a strain gage,that are: 1 cm x 3 cm (PVDF1; 1 cm x 2 cm (PVDF2; 1 cm x 1 cm (PVDF3. Results showed that the resolution of  PVDF1,  PVDF2 and PVDF3 are  4.6  mv/cPois;  3.1  mv/cPois and 1.5  mv/cPois respectively, while the strain gage produce a resolution of 1.2  mv/cPois. The average resolution of PVDF is 1.53 mv.cPois-1.cm-2, which means that every 1 cm2   PVDF film area and the increase of 1 cPois of viscosity of the material will produce 1.53 millivolts.

  7. An Analysis of Shock-Compression in Mo-Si Powder Mixtures Using Recovery and Time-Resolved Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    1999-06-01

    The densification and reaction characteristics in the Mo-Si system were investigated utilizing recovery experiments as well as time resolved measurements with in-situ stress gages. The starting sample in all cases consisted of statically pressed Mo + 2 Si powder mixtures ( ~55% TMD). The recovery experiments were performed using the Sandia Momma Bear and Momma Bear A fixtures with baratol and composition B explosives respectively. The instrumented experiments were performed in a capsule design similar to that of the Momma Bear, but modified to incorporate poly-vinyl di-flouride (PVDF) stress gages at the front and rear surfaces of the powder. These experiments were performed using a single stage gas gun in the velocity range of 500 m/s to 1 km/s. The instrumented experiments allow the crush strength, densification history, and reaction threshold to be mapped at increasing pressure to correlate with reaction observed in the recovery experiments.

  8. SIM regional comparison SIM.L-K4.2009 on the calibration of internal and external diameter standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Theodore; Pires Alves, J. A.; Gastaldi, Bruno R.; Navarrete, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    The Inter-American Metrology System (SIM) has carried out a key comparison of diameter measurements. The artifacts studied were four ring gages and four plug gages. The measurand was a specified diameter of each gauge at 20 °C and corrected to zero force. This report presents results obtained by the individual participants and an analysis of the results and their uncertainties. The results are in good agreement with one another, well within the range expected based on the measurement uncertainties claimed by the participants. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCL, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  9. Rain rate and modeled fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from five years of network rain gauge measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Krichevsky, Vladimir; Gebo, Norman

    1992-01-01

    Five years of rain rate and modeled slant path attenuation distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from a network of 10 tipping bucket rain gages was examined. The rain gage network is located within a grid 70 km north-south and 47 km east-west in the Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States in the vicinity of Wallops Island, Virginia. Distributions were derived from the variable integration time data and from one minute averages. It was demonstrated that for realistic fade margins, the variable integration time results are adequate to estimate slant path attenuations at frequencies above 20 GHz using models which require one minute averages. An accurate empirical formula was developed to convert the variable integration time rain rates to one minute averages. Fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz were derived employing Crane's Global model because it was demonstrated to exhibit excellent accuracy with measured COMSTAR fades at 28.56 GHz.

  10. Liquid salt environment stress-rupture testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weiju; Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2016-03-22

    Disclosed herein are systems, devices and methods for stress-rupture testing selected materials within a high-temperature liquid salt environment. Exemplary testing systems include a load train for holding a test specimen within a heated inert gas vessel. A thermal break included in the load train can thermally insulate a load cell positioned along the load train within the inert gas vessel. The test specimen can include a cylindrical gage portion having an internal void filled with a molten salt during stress-rupture testing. The gage portion can have an inner surface area to volume ratio of greater than 20 to maximize the corrosive effect of the molten salt on the specimen material during testing. Also disclosed are methods of making a salt ingot for placement within the test specimen.

  11. Strength Estimation of Self-Piercing Rivets using Lower Bound Limit Load Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2005-08-01

    This paper summarizes the authors' work on strength and failure mode estimation of self-piercing rivets (SPR) for automotive applications. First, the static cross tension strength of an SPR joint is estimated using a lower bound limit load based strength estimator. Failure mode associated with the predicted failure strength can also be identified. It is shown that the cross tension strength of an SPR joint depends on the material and gage combinations, rivet design, die design and riveting direction. The analytical rivet strength estimator is then validated by experimental rivet strength measurements and failure mode observations from nine SPR joint populations with various material and gage combinations. Next, the estimator is used to optimize rivet strength. Two illustrative examples are presented in which rivet strength is improved by changing rivet length and riveting direction from the original manufacturing parameters.

  12. Development of Rainfall-Discharge Model for Future NPP candidate Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Ji-hong; Yee, Eric [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    By this study, most suitable model for future nuclear power plant site in Yeongdeok to be used to predict peak amount of riverine flooding was developed by examining historical rainfall and discharge data from the nearest gage station which is Jodong water level gage station in Taehwa basin. Sitting a nuclear power plant (NPP) requires safety analyses that include the effects of extreme events such as flooding or earthquake. In light of South Korean government's 15-year power supply plan that calls for the construction of new nuclear power station in Yeongdeok, it becomes more important to site new station in a safe area from flooding. Because flooding or flooding related accidents mostly happen due to extremely intense rainfall, it is necessary to find out the relationship between rainfall and run-off by setting up feasible model to figure out the peak flow of the river around nuclear related facilities.

  13. Characterization of long-gauge fiber optic sensors for structural identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suzhen; Wu, Zhishen

    2005-05-01

    To monitor structural behavior of large-scale civil infrastructures such as long-span bridges, it requires direct and accurate measurement of "macroscopic" strains which are more representative of the deformation of entire structural element. On the other hand, quasi-distributed measurements are also supposed to serve the purpose to catch the characters of whole structure. In this regard, a novel packaging method for practical adaptation of long-gage FBG strain sensor in civil structures is proposed. After a series of tests including uniaxial tension and compression, bending, free-vibration and shaking table tests, the ability of the packaged FBG sensors fixed on different specimen for macro-strain measurements has been characterized by comparing with conventional foil strain gauges in both static and dynamic cases. Combined with the parametric identification method based on macro-stains, the applicability of quasi-distributed long-gage FBG sensors in structural parameter estimation and damage detection is discussed.

  14. Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin: Statewide project data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

    1992-03-01

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Ohio each water year. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations, 95 miscellaneous sites; (2) stage and content records for 5 streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality for 40 streamflow-gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and (4) water levels for 431 observation wells.

  15. Effects of light wavelength and coherence in structured light sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Kevin; Ramamurthy, Rajesh; Zhai, Zirong; Han, Jie; Yang, Dongmin

    2016-05-01

    Structured light methods are used by many commercial products on the market today. Many such systems using white light projectors while many line gages use standard red laser diodes. However, in recent years there has been much claimed about using blue light, polarized light and partially coherent systems to obtain better performance. Unlike interferometers, moving from red to blue light for a system using only geometric shape information does not gain an automatic advantage from the shorter wavelength. The sensitivity metric does not have a wavelength component to it. But there are other factors that can improve gage performance. The ability to measure some feature is also a function of other parameters such as signal to noise ratio, reflectivity variations, and depth-of-field over which a clear pattern can be seen. This paper will explore the theoretical and experimental data relating to what works and what can be expected from variations on the old methods.

  16. A computer program for plotting stress-strain data from compression, tension, and torsion tests of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, A.; Baker, D. J.; Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program for plotting stress-strain curves obtained from compression and tension tests on rectangular (flat) specimens and circular-cross-section specimens (rods and tubes) and both stress-strain and torque-twist curves obtained from torsion tests on tubes is presented in detail. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 language for the Control Data 6000 series digital computer with the SCOPE 3.0 operating system and requires approximately 110000 octal locations of core storage. The program has the capability of plotting individual strain-gage outputs and/or the average output of several strain gages and the capability of computing the slope of a straight line which provides a least-squares fit to a specified section of the plotted curve. In addition, the program can compute the slope of the stress-strain curve at any point along the curve. The computer program input and output for three sample problems are presented.

  17. Geochemical and hydrologic data for San Marcos Springs recharge characterization near San Marcos, Texas, November 2008--December 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Cassi L.

    2012-01-01

    During 2008–10, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Antonio Water System, collected geochemical and hydrologic data in Bexar, Comal, and Hays Counties, Texas, to define and characterize the sources of recharge to San Marcos Springs. Precipitation samples were collected for stable isotope analysis at 1 site and water-quality samples were collected at 7 springs, 21 wells, and 9 stream sites in the study area between November 2008 and December 2010. Continuous water-quality monitors were installed in three springs, two wells, and at one stream site. Three continuous stream-gaging stations were installed to measure gage height and a stagedischarge rating was developed at two of the three sites. Depth to water below land surface was continuously measured in two wells.

  18. Occurrence and transport of selected constituents in streams near the Stibnite mining area, Central Idaho, 2012–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheridge, Alexandra B.

    2015-12-07

    Mining of stibnite (antimony sulfide), tungsten, gold, silver, and mercury near the town of Stibnite in central Idaho has left a legacy of trace element contamination in local streams. Water-quality and streamflow monitoring data from a network of five streamflow-gaging stations were used to estimate trace-element and suspended-sediment loads and flow-weighted concentrations in the Stibnite mining area between 2012 and 2014. Measured concentrations of arsenic exceeded human health-based water-quality criteria at each streamflow-gaging station, except for Meadow Creek (site 2), which was selected to represent background conditions in the study area. Measured concentrations of antimony exceeded human health-based water-quality criteria at sites 3, 4, and 5.

  19. Peak streamflow on selected streams in Arkansas, December 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaker, Brian K.

    2017-01-11

    Heavy rainfall during December 2015 resulted in flooding across parts of Arkansas; rainfall amounts were as high as 12 inches over a period from December 27, 2015, to December 29, 2015. Although precipitation accumulations were highest in northwestern Arkansas, significant flooding occurred in other parts of the State. Flood damage occurred in several counties as water levels rose in streams, and disaster declarations were declared in 32 of the 75 counties in Arkansas.Given the severity of the December 2015 flooding, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), conducted a study to document the meteorological and hydrological conditions prior to and during the flood; compiled flood-peak gage heights, streamflows, and flood probabilities at USGS streamflow-gaging stations; and estimated streamflows and flood probabilities at selected ungaged locations.

  20. Des bains au tourisme: la tentation de l'eau au début de la Troisième République

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille Bruston

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Les monographies départementales d’Adolphe Joanne permettent de proposer une image touristique de la France des années 1880. Par une analyse du corpus linguistique, on propose de voir les grandes tendances à l’œuvre mais également la variété des situations, d’où se dégage un constat d’importance: le lien originel entre les pratiques de bains et le tourisme.

  1. Preventative Therapeutics for Heterotopic Ossification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    tissues and blood vessels and can cause loss of normal posture and mobility, chronic pain, prosthesis fitting problems, deep venous thrombosis or other...posture, pain, prosthesis fitting problems, reduced mobility, formation of pressure ulcers, deep venous thrombosis or other complications (8-10...Gage FA, Stojadinovic A, Elster EA 2009 Heterotopic ossification in high-energy wartime extremity injuries: prevalence and risk factors . J. Bone Joint

  2. Testing Brain Overgrowth and Synaptic Models of Autism Using NPC’s and Neurons from Patient-Derived IPS Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    interaction, and limited and repetitive interests and behavior. Recent studies have led to two major hypotheses for autism pathogenesis : early brain...interests and behavior. Recent studies have led to two major hypotheses for autism pathogenesis . First, early brain overgrowth appears to be a critical...Models of Autism Using NPC’s and Neurons from Patient- Derived IPS Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Fred H. Gage, Ph.D

  3. Analysis of the Acoustic Response of a Railroad Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    atmospheric explosions, surf, missiles, rockets, weather systems and even animal vocalizations [1]. In order for up-going infrasonic energy to be...systems – Animal vocalizations – Urban Noise* PREMISE: Structures generate coupled low-frequency acoustics as fundamental modes of motion What is...rating tests: – Strain Gages (44 Used) • Main Structural Elements – One Train Engine Stringer Bottom Chord Diagonal Chord Diagonal Floor Beam Top

  4. Strain path's influence on the elastic behaviour of theTRIP 700 steel

    OpenAIRE

    MENDIGUREN, Joseba; CORTES, Fernando; GALDOS, Lander; Berveiller, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of thestrain path's influence on the elastic behaviour of TRIP700 steel; it aims to validate the cyclic testing method to characterise inelastic behaviour of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). Different cyclic tests are done, where the strain path is changed from test to test. Large deformation strain gages are used to determine the inelastic behaviour of the specimens at macro-level. At a lower scale, stress measurements are carried out using the XRD tec...

  5. Streamflow and Suspended-Sediment Loads Before and During Highway Construction, North Halawa, Haiku, and Kamooalii Drainage Basins, Oahu, Hawaii, 1983-91

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Barry R.

    1996-01-01

    Concern over potential effects from construction of the H-3 highway on Oahu, Hawaii, prompted a long-term study of streamflow and suspended-sediment transport at a network of five stream-gaging stations along the highway route. This report presents results for 1983-91, which included pre-construction and construction periods at all stream-gaging stations. Annual rainfall, streamflow, and suspended-sediment loads were generally higher during construction than before construction. Data collected before and during construction were compared using analysis of covariance to determine whether streamflow and suspended-sediment loads changed significantly during construction after accounting for effects of increased rainfall. Streamflow at stream-gaging stations was compared with streamflow at an index stream-gaging station unaffected by construction. Streamflow data were divided into low- and high-flow classes, and the two flow classes were analyzed separately. Low flows increased 117 percent during construction at one station. This increase probably was related to the removal of vegetation for highway construction. Low flows decreased 28 percent at another station, probably as a result of increased ground-water withdrawals and highway construction activities. No significant changes in low flows were detected at the other stations, and no significant changes in high flows were detected at any stations. Suspended-sediment loads increased significantly during construction at three stations. Highway construction contributed between 56 and 76 percent of the suspended-sediment loads measured at these stations during construction. Loads did not change significantly at a station downstream of a reservoir, and loads decreased at a station downstream of a drainage basin that was heavily used for agriculture before construction. Suspended-sediment concentrations were used to assess compliance with applicable State water-quality standards. State water-quality standards for suspended

  6. 46 CFR 95.10-5 - Fire pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... pumps Hose and hydrant size, inches Nozzle orifice size, inches Length of hose feet 100 1 1 1 11/2 1 1/2... be only 35 p.s.i. (d) Fire pumps shall be fitted on the discharge side with relief valves set to... pumps shall be fitted with a pressure gage on the discharge side of the pumps. (f) Fire pumps may...

  7. The Futility of Force and the Preservation of Power: British Strategic Failure in America, 1780-83

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Mountain marked a significant turning point in the war. The shocking reversal all but destroyed the loyalist movement in the region and forced a stunned...Manhattan, KS: Sunflower University Press, 1983), 115-121. 61. Higginbotham, The War of American Independence, 355 and 363; Smith, Loyalists and...rebel movement in America. See Clarence E. Carter, ed., The Correspondence of General Thomas Gage (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1931), Vol

  8. Understanding British Strategic Failure in America: 1780-1783

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-17

    loyalist movement in the region and forced a stunned Cornwallis, then on the outskirts of Charlotte, to beat a hasty retreat south into the Palmetto...USA: Sunflower University Press, 1983) which constitutes an in depth expansion of his original article "Making Bricks without Straw: Nathanael...Beginning in the fall of 1774, Gage repeatedly warned his superiors in London about the growing strength and capability of the rebel movement in

  9. Bassett Creek Watershed, Hennepin County, Minnesota. Feasibility Report for Control. Appendixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-03-01

    animal life for present and future generations to enjoy are becoming increasingly rare as well as increasingly essential as urban growth continues...Theodore Wirth Park along with the Eloise Butler Wildflower Garden provide Minneapolis and Golden Valley residents with passive recreation opportunities...in Louisville, Kentucky . A very complete analysis of the effects of urbanization was made by Anderson (1968) in his study of 64 gaging stations in

  10. DOE Project 353: TAMS Prototype and production coupling alignment units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, K.V.

    1996-02-01

    TAMS is an electronic measurement system used to determine the alignment of turbine-generator shafts at the coupling interface. The displacement transducer is a strain gage based sensor mounted in a portable probe. The measurement system was experiencing zero input drift and temperature induced drift. This project endeavored to determine the source of these problems and to revise a unit to be returned to a customer, Baltimore Gas and Electric (BGE), within a period of five weeks.

  11. Development of a Phantom Tissue for Blood Perfusion Measurements and Noninvasive Blood Perfusion Estimation in Living Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Mudaliar, Ashvinikumar

    2007-01-01

    A convenient method for testing and calibrating surface perfusion sensors has been developed. A phantom tissue model is used to mimic the non-directional blood flow of tissue perfusion. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was constructed in Fluent to design the phantom tissue and validate the experimental results. The phantom perfusion system was used with a perfusion sensor based on the clearance of thermal energy. A heat flux gage measures the heat flux response of tissue whe...

  12. Assessment of the Repeatability and Sensitivity of the Thermoelectric Perfusion Probe

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, Brent Earl

    2006-01-01

    The Thermoelectric Perfusion Probe is a completely electronic system that cyclically heats and cools tissue to measure blood perfusion. The probe produces the thermal event with a thermoelectric cooler and then measures the resulting heat flux and temperatures: the arterial temperature and the sensor temperature (the temperature between the heat flux gage and the skin). The Thermoelectric Perfusion Probe was validated and calibrated on a phantom tissue test stand, a system that simulates pe...

  13. Method to determine factors contributing to thermoplastic sheet shrinkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensch, Greg J.; Frye, Brad A.

    A test method is presented for the determination of shrinkage behavior in vacuum-formed thermoplastic resin sheeting, as presently simulated for various resin lots, sheet-gage thicknesses, sheet orientations, and mold profiles. The thermoforming machine and vacuum-forming mold characteristics are discussed. It is established that the four variable factors exert statistically significant effects on the shrinkage response of three Declar resin lots, but that these are of no real practical significance for either engineering or manufacturing operations.

  14. The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) surface-water model, version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telis, Pamela A.; Xie, Zhixiao; Liu, Zhongwei; Li, Yingru; Conrads, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) is an integrated network of water-level gages, interpolation models that generate daily water-level and water-depth data, and applications that compute derived hydrologic data across the freshwater part of the greater Everglades landscape. The U.S. Geological Survey Greater Everglades Priority Ecosystems Science provides support for EDEN in order for EDEN to provide quality-assured monitoring data for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan.

  15. Fluidic Actuation and Control of Munition Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-31

    compute the vorticity and turbulent kinetic energy. Hot wire anemometry measurements were taken in the wake of the model, for the model with control at...constructed of strain gages. A temperature compensation algorithm, much like the temperature compensation procedure for hot - wire anemometry , is...is characterized by the PIV and hot - wire anemometry . IV.1 Actuation by a Single Jet The variation of the magnitude of the normal force coefficient

  16. Water Resources Investigation. St. Louis Metropolitan Area, Missouri and Illinois. Maline Creek, Missouri Survey Report. Volume 2. Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    the extension of Chippewa Street) against a 52-foot Mississippi River flood stage ( Market Street gage). Details regarding the overall city of St. Louis...significantly contribute to outdoor recreation objective by increasing the opportunity for such activities as nature hiking and birdwatching . wildlife...resources related to any proposed project. The changes may be of a market or non- market character, but generally the latter. Such effects are inextricably

  17. Assessment of wind turbine load measurement instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfiadakis, E.; Papadopoulos, K. [CRES (Greece); Borg, N. van der [ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Petersen, S.M. [Risoe, Roskilde (Denmark); Seifert, H. [DEWI, Wilhelmshaven (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    In the framework of Sub-Task3 `Wind turbine load measurement instrumentation` of EU-project `European Wind Turbine Testing Procedure Development`, the load measurement techniques have been assessed by laboratory, full scale and numerical tests. The existing methods have been reviewed with emphasis on the strain gage application techniques on composite materials and recommendations are provided for the optimisation of load measurement techniques. (au) EU. 14 refs.

  18. Comparative simulations of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami with MOST and Cliffs

    CERN Document Server

    Tolkova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Wet-dry interface which appreciably increases accuracy of tsunami simulations with the MOST model (Method of Splitting Tsunamis, adapted by the NOAA for tsunami forecasting operations) is highlighted here with a few comparative simulations. The new solution, termed Cliffs, exceeds all MOST versions in accuracy of computing later waves. This is demonstrated with simulation of the Tohoku-2011 tsunami to Monterey Bay, CA, and into fiords, bays, and inlets of southeastern Alaska, followed by comparison with tide gage records.

  19. Expression Patterns of Cancer-Testis Antigens in Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Their Cell Derivatives Indicate Lineage Tracks

    OpenAIRE

    Nadya Lifantseva; Anna Koltsova; Tatyana Krylova; Tatyana Yakovleva; Galina Poljanskaya; Olga Gordeeva

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into various lineages but undergo genetic and epigenetic changes during long-term cultivation and, therefore, require regular monitoring. The expression patterns of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) MAGE-A2, -A3, -A4, -A6, -A8, -B2, and GAGE were examined in undifferentiated human embryonic stem (hES) cells, their differentiated derivatives, teratocarcinoma (hEC) cells, and cancer cell lines of neuroectodermal and mesodermal origin. Undifferentiated hES ce...

  20. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division 1990 Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    immunoreactivity (GFAP- IR) in specific areas of the hippo-campal formation (Gage et al.,1988). Adult cholinergic interneurons of the neostriatum are not...and 15 periglomerular cells. Individual cell EPSPs and IPSPs were calculated via non-linear summation of potentials in compartments in mitral/tufted...characterize the 3 dimensional configuration of basal ganglia circuitry, the PI has determined the 3-dimensional organization of cholinergic interneurons in

  1. Annual Report of the Navy Aeroballistics Committee to the Naval Air Systems Command and the Naval Sea Systems Command for 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Sands Proving Grounds. The tests involved supersonic flight of the T-22 missile to a precise aimpoint above the target area, controlled dispense of...second test by commanding the heliostats to the radome in a unique manner. Due to thermal limitation of the strain gages used, the experimental data...guidance sections. Thus, the precise value of solar absorptivity used in a partic- ular analysis takes on even greater importance. For this reason tests

  2. Slamming Testing of Facetted Bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    Technical Report DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 May 2010-31 Aug2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Slamming Testing of Facetted Bottom 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...of fast craft are due to slamming , or hydrodynamic impact. A 9 meter long steel / composite hybrid slamming load test facility has been employed for...the purpose of furthering understanding of the slamming phenomenon. This craft is heavily instrumented with strain gages, accelerometers, cameras, an

  3. Analytical/Computational Investigation of Planetary Gear Dynamics in Rotorcraft Transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-28

    spectrum are at the planetary gear mesh frequency (number of teeth that pass through mesh per second) and integer multiples of this mesh frequency...high torque -weight ratios and division of load between multiple load paths. We completed a full mathematical model of compound planetary gears of...it is evident that large stress occurs at the ring gear teeth even when the strain gaged tooth is far from a tooth mesh of the rotating planets

  4. Demonstration and Validation of Materials for Corrosion-Resistant Fencing and Guard Railings in Aggressive Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    and con- trol costs. Tested materials included fuse-bonded PVC, galvanized steel , stainless steel , aluminized steel , a proprietary material called...29 vi Figure 24. Aluminized steel wire coupon at FRF (left) and KTA (right) after 12 months of exposure...Table 16. Breaking loads of wires removed during exposure period (9 gage aluminized steel , ASTM A-817, Type I, original breaking load 1525 lb

  5. A Research on the Relationship Between Staff Cognitive Style and Innovative Behavior——Mediating Effect of Staff Psychological Innovative Climate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Jin-lian; WANG Ya-bin; ZHONG Jing

    2010-01-01

    In the dynamic environment, staff has become the basic working unit when the organizations en-gaged in innovative activities, and the major influencing factors on innovation behavior of organization members have become a hot spot. However, there is still lack of empirical study support in the cur-rent researches of synthesis influence of staff cognitive style and staff psychological innovative climate on staff innovative behavior.

  6. The Model of Nonstationary Rotor Magnetic Field Observer in the Induction Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkov, Alexander; Krasilnikyants, Evgenii; Smirnov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article is devoted to the questions, associated with observer construction for monitoring the values of rotor magnetic vector magnitude and angular deflection of induction motor oriented on bidimensional convolution on temporal and spatial actual parameters. The interrelation of induction motor breakdown torque and rotor characteristic time and transportation lag is shown. The system of rotor running stream observer on the basis of gage rotor position and stator current is put forward.

  7. An Experimental Technique for Developing Intermediate Strain Rates in Ductile Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Instrumented Charpy tests rely on a strain gage instrumented load cell to col- lect a load-history during impact. However, the same fundamental limitations due...to wave-propagation and inertia effects are inherent in the instrumented Charpy test , as other instrumented impact tests , limiting the velocities at...lower velocities, the instrumentation of the Charpy test has transformed it from an al- most purely subjective impact survivability test to

  8. Analysis of Waves in the Near-Field of Wave Energy Converter Arrays through Stereo Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, C.; Haller, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Oregon State University conducted a series of laboratory experiments to measure and quantify the near-field wave effects caused within arrays of 3 and 5 Wave Energy Converters (WEC). As the waves and WECs interact, significant scattering and radiation occurs increasing/decreasing the wave heights as well as changing the direction the wave is traveling. These effects may vary based on the number of WECs within an array and their respective locations. The findings of this analysis will assist in selecting the WEC farm location and in improving WEC design. Analyzing the near-field waves will help determine the relative importance of absorption, scattering, and radiation as a function of the incident wave conditions and device performance. The WEC mooring system design specifications may also be impacted if the wave heights in the near-field are greater than expected. It is imperative to fully understand the near-field waves before full-scale WEC farms can be installed. Columbia Power Technologies' Manta served as the test WEC prototype on a 1 to 33 scale. Twenty-three wave gages measured the wave heights in both regular and real sea conditions at locations surrounding and within the WEC arrays. While these gages give a good overall picture of the water elevation behavior, it is difficult to resolve the complicated wave field within the WEC array using point gages. Here stereo video techniques are applied to extract the 3D water surface elevations at high resolution in order to reconstruct the multi-directional wave field in the near-field of the WEC array. The video derived wave information will also be compared against the wave gage data.

  9. Enhance International Cooperation to Promote Technology Supervision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Helin; Terry Qin

    1995-01-01

    @@ Tubular Goods Research Center(TGRC) is not only a scientific research institution of CNPC, but also the Tubular goods Quality Supervising, Inspection and Testing Center, the OCTG Thread Gage Measurement and Certification Agency, the secretariat of Tubular Goods Technical Committee of China Petroleum Standardization Committee,the National Laboratory of OCTG Certification for China Administration of Import and Export Commodity Inspection, Oil field Tubular Goods and Equipment Subcenter of Failure Analysis and Prevention Center of China Science Association.

  10. Annual Historical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Development Plan V 41 _ MRSA Field Evaluation on SDC Program V 41 ,-. SMART at AMCCOM V 41 MOP Shop Relocation V 42 M249 Squad Automatic Weapon V 42 Technical... robotics , and measurements and qualification of auto gages at Mississippi Army Ammunition Plant. Major General 0. Decker (retired) conducted an...be telerobotically operated to eliminate human contact with dud ammunition. The Human Engineering Laboratory (HEL) had an ongoing robotic test project

  11. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1995 water year. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barks, R. [ed.; Shaull, D.A.; Alexander, M.R.; Reynolds, R.P.

    1996-08-01

    The principle investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 15 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The United States Department of Interior Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, operates two of the stations under a subcontract; these are identified in the station manuscripts. Included in this report are data from one seepage run conducted in Los Alamos Canyon during the 1995 water year.

  12. Evaluating accessibility to Bangkok Metro Systems using multi-dimensional criteria across user groups

    OpenAIRE

    Duangporn Prasertsubpakij; Vilas Nitivattananon

    2012-01-01

    Metro systems act as fast and efficient transport systems for many modern metropolises; however, enhancing higher usage of such systems often conflicts with providing suitable accessibility options. The traditional approach of metro accessibility studies seems to be an ineffective measure to gage sustainable access in which the equal rights of all users are taken into account. Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR) transportation has increasingly relied on the role of two mass rapid transport syst...

  13. Transonic steady- and unsteady-pressure measurements on a high-aspect-ratio supercritical-wing model with oscillating control surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, M. C.; Ricketts, R. H.; Cazier, F. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A supercritical wing with an aspect ratio of 10.76 and with two trailing-edge oscillating control surfaces is described. The semispan wing is instrumented with 252 static orifices and 164 in situ dynamic-pressure gages for studying the effects of control-surface position and motion on steady- and unsteady-pressures at transonic speeds. Results from initial tests conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at two Reynolds numbers are presented in tabular form.

  14. Acoustic Doppler current profiler raw measurements on the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers, 2000-2016, Columbia Environmental Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulliner, Edward A.; Elliott, Caroline M.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2017-01-01

    Between the years 2000 and 2016, scientists and technicians from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC) have collected over 400 field-days worth of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements on the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers, primarily for the purposes of assessing physical aquatic habitat for the pallid sturgeon. Scientists and technicians collected data using boat-mounted Teledyne Rio Grande ADCPs, which were processed using customized scripting tools and archived in standardized formats. To assess longitudinal variability in depth and velocity distributions along the Missouri River, as well as compare the Missouri River to its unaltered analog, the Yellowstone River, we compiled the collected datasets into a single comma-separated value (csv) file using a series of data-processing scripts written in Python. To allow for the comparison of measurements collected only within a specific window of flow exceedance, we conducted geospatial analyses to attribute each ADCP measurement by a discharge from the most relevant USGS gage location (with the most relevant gage location being the gage located between the same major tributaries as the measurement, even if it was not the closest spatially), and assigned each measurement a flow exceedance percentile based on the relevant gage's record between 2000 and 2016. We also conducted general quality control on the data, discarding any ADCP returns where the ADCP measured a depth-averaged velocity greater than 3 meters per second or a depth greater than 16 meters; these values were considered to be an approximate upper bounds for realistic values on the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers. The presented csv file lists individual ADCP bins for all measurements that have been archived between 2000 and 2016 by CERC scientists along with their three-dimensional velocity components, depth-averaged velocity magnitude for a given ADCP return, average channel depth for a given ADCP

  15. Comparison of Different Culture Mode for Long-term Expansion of Neural Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 Introduction The mammalian central nervous system(CNS) is incredibly complex and possesses only a limited ability to recover from damage~([1]). Fortunately, the discovery of self-renewing stem cell populations within the fetal and adult CNS has opened promising lines of inquiry. Neural stem cells (NSCs) can be cultured in two modes in vitro, suspension and monolayer. Reynolds~([2]) and other groups culture NSCs as neurospheres in suspension. Alternatively Gage cultured NSCs in monolayer. There is little s...

  16. Loads Monitoring and Hums

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Strain Measurement Fibre Optic Strain Temperature Pressure Crack Gage Crack Growth Accelerometer C.G. or Local Acceleration, Vibration, Buffet Pressure...Fig. 3.3-3 Zone 4 sensor location and results 1-15 A different method of monitoring structural health is shown in Fig. 3.3-4, a fibre optic array...Computer System Fig. 3.3-4 Fibre Optic monitoring array embedded in structure The two major tasks of structural health monitoring: Identification of

  17. Test and Analysis Correlation for a Y-Joint Specimen for a Composite Cryotank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Brian H.; Sleight, David W.; Grenoble, Ray

    2015-01-01

    The Composite Cryotank Technology Demonstration (CCTD) project under NASA's Game Changing Development Program (GCDP) developed space technologies using advanced composite materials. Under CCTD, NASA funded the Boeing Company to design and test a number of element-level joint specimens as a precursor to a 2.4-m diameter composite cryotank. Preliminary analyses indicated that the y-joint in the cryotank had low margins of safety; hence the y-joint was considered to be a critical design region. The y-joint design includes a softening strip wedge to reduce localized shear stresses at the skirt/dome interface. In this paper, NASA-developed analytical models will be correlated with the experimental results of a series of positive-peel y-joint specimens from Boeing tests. Initial analytical models over-predicted the experimental strain gage readings in the far-field region by approximately 10%. The over-prediction was attributed to uncertainty in the elastic properties of the laminate and a mismatch between the thermal expansion of the strain gages and the laminate. The elastic properties of the analytical model were adjusted to account for the strain gage differences. The experimental strain gages also indicated a large non-linear effect in the softening strip region that was not predicted by the analytical model. This non-linear effect was attributed to delamination initiating in the softening strip region at below 20% of the failure load for the specimen. Because the specimen was contained in a thermally insulated box during cryogenic testing to failure, delamination initiation and progression was not visualized during the test. Several possible failure initiation locations were investigated, and a most likely failure scenario was determined that correlated well with the experimental data. The most likely failure scenario corresponded to damage initiating in the softening strip and delamination extending to the grips at final failure.

  18. Analysis of uncertainties, associated to the calculating hypothesis, in discharge tables for high flows estimating, based on mathematics models for calculating water surface profiles fore steady gradually varied flow; Analisis de las incertidumbres, asociadas a las hipotesis de calculo, en la estimacion de curvas de gasto para crcidas, basada en el empleo de modelo matematico de calculo hidraulico en regimen permanente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldana Valverde, A. L.; Gonzalez Rodriguez, J. C.

    1999-08-01

    In this paper are analyzed some of the most important factors which can influence on the results of calculating water surface profiles for steady gradually varied flow. In this case, the objective of this kind of modeling, has been the estimation of discharges tables for high flows of river station gages connected to the hydrologic automatic information system (SAIH) of the Confederacion Hidrografica del Sur de Espana, system named red Hidrosur. (Author) 3 refs

  19. Proceedings of a Workshop on Calibration and Application of Hydrologic Models Held in Gulf Shores, Alabama on October 18-20, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    gage catch is shown on Figure 6. A calibration factor (CF) of Fro’enPcktown Rader precjpjtjonv&.1RA%,4GasL APr~1 14. 187 S1.2 C d Max - 1.24 Xnchog CL 0...Attachment 1) that were being considered in connection with a channel improvement and an underground tunnel (see Attachmentt)to solve all flooding

  20. When Are Users Comfortable Sharing Locations with Advertisers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    suggest that users’ strong privacy concerns may hinder this potentially invasive form of advertising , as early efforts reach the market . We also find that...When Are Users Comfortable Sharing Locations with Advertisers ? Patrick Gage Kelley, Michael Benisch, Lorrie Faith Cranor, Norman Sadeh October 2010...15213-3890 As smartphones and other mobile computing devices have increased in ubiquity, advertisers have begun to realize a more effective way of

  1. Development of a rotary instrumentation system, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, A.; Skidmore, W.

    1982-12-01

    A rotary instrumentation system which consists of ruggedized miniature telemetry transmitters installed on the rotating shaft of a gas turbine engine to telemeter the outputs of sensors (strain gages, thermocouples, etc.) on rotating engine components was designed. A small prototype system, which demonstrates the capabilities of performing in the intended environment and demonstrates that the system is expandable to handle about 100 data channels was developed.

  2. Evaluation of Ceramic Honeycomb Core Compression Behavior at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Richard K.; Lapointe, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Room temperature flatwise compression tests were conducted on two varieties of ceramic honeycomb core specimens that have potential for high-temperature structural applications. One set of specimens was fabricated using strips of a commercially-available thin-gage "ceramic paper" sheet molded into a hexagonal core configuration. The other set was fabricated by machining honeycomb core directly from a commercially available rigid insulation tile material. This paper summarizes the results from these tests.

  3. Bolt Shear Force Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-12

    to connect to a signal conditioner 200 (See FIG. 6). The deformable ring 102 may be constructed from conventional materials (metal, composite...plastic etc.) or with piezoelectric ceramics. If the ring 102 is constructed with piezoelectric ceramics, the ring itself is the sensor; therefore...elements used (i.e., resistance strain gages, fiber optic Bragg grating or piezoelectric material ), an output is generated (i.e., resistance

  4. Investigations of Spot Weld Material Characterization for Hat Beam Component Impact Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sachin Patil; Hamid Lankarani

    2016-01-01

    With a greater emphasis placed on weight reduction the ground vehicle industry has increased the use of higher strength, thinner gage steels, particularly cold rolled high strength steels (HSS). Choice of a particular HSS will depend upon such factors as cost, formability, fatigue resistance and weldability, in particular spot weldability. Vehicle collision characteristics significantly influenced by spot welded joints in vehicle steel body components.In engineering practice, spot welds are n...

  5. Historical Climate and Streamflow Trends in Santa Ana River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, D.; Sultana, R.; Tang, V.

    2015-12-01

    Santa Ana River watershed, located in Southern California, is the home of more than 5 million people. Population is projected to double within the next 50 years in the 2,650 square miles watershed. With prolonged drought conditions, and projected climate change, a strong concern exists about sustainable water supply of the area. In this study, historic climate and streamflow trend from water year 1965 to 2014 is analyzed using the nonparametric Mann-Kendall test. Climate trends are studied using annual rainfall, and annual average maximum and minimum temperature at 5 and 4 weather stations, respectively. Three of the precipitation stations show precipitation is decreasing in the watershed while minimum and maximum temperature has an increasing trend at three stations (p < 0.05). To assess whether streamflow and stream-channel characteristics are tended to increase or decrease monotonically with time, four variables - (1) annual maximum peak, (2) annual mean, (3) low to moderate and (4) moderate to high maximum peak streamflow were tested at 20 stream gauge sites. Only at 5 stream gage stations, significant streamflow trend is observed. At two stream gages, annual peak and annual average streamflow is increasing and at two stations, annual average streamflow has a decreasing trend. Low to moderate peak streamflow is increasing at two gage locations but there is no monotonic trend in moderate to high flows. As precipitation is decreasing in some part of the watershed, the effect of increasing urbanization in the area can be attributed for the localized increase in mean and peak streamflow. The trend analysis in weather and stream gage data will be presented in detail.

  6. Overwash Processes and Foredune Ecology, Nauset Spit, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    played a major role in the infilling of Laguna Madre behind Padre Island, Texas . Washover deposits were subsequently reworked by the wind, which...stabilization experiments have been undertaken along the U.S. barrier coastline from Massachusetts to Texas (Savage, 1963; Gage, 1970; Dahl, et al., 1975...embayment in the mainland at the Chatham Fish Pier (Fig. $ 90). In this region the barrier widened to as much as 800 meters. In 1938 New North Beach was 4.1

  7. Development of an Inlet Pressure Sensor for Control in a Left Ventricular Assist Device

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    A Tesla type continuous flow left ventricular assist device (VAD) has been designed by Penn State and Advanced Bionics, Inc. (ABI). When a continuous flow device is employed, care must be taken to limit low pressures in the ventricle that can produce an obstruction to the inlet cannula or trigger arrhythmias. Design of an inexpensive, semi-conductor strain gage inlet pressure sensor to detect suction has been completed. The research and design analysis included finite element modeling of the ...

  8. Environmental Durability of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    linear variable capacitor (displacement measuring device) xxvii of applied far-field stress at fracture instability Giys intercept yield strength Outs...humidity. Two varieties of F M73 were tested: F M®73M containing a non-woven polyester scrim cloth (Figure 6a); and F M®73U, an unsupported "neat...those from the Gr-BMI/AF-191M/Gr-BMI system) or an SLVC (super linear variable capacitor ) capacitance gage transducer for specimens experiencing small

  9. Sub-Scale Analysis of New Large Aircraft Pool Fire-Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    style dual heat flux gages positioned 90-degrees apart and around the fire perimeter recorded total and radiation heat flux. A single infrared and two...conditions could fully-develop. Four fire suppression nozzles positioned 90-degrees apart near the base and perpendicular to the fuel pan then discharged...conduction thermally coupled to the surrounding gaseous flow field. Agent spray conditions were defined as DPM flat-fan-atomizer injection types with

  10. Experimental Development of a Novel Stress Sensor for in situ Stress Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL; Daniels, Ryan J [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    This paper will describe ongoing work to adapt a previously demonstrated method for measuring stress in ceramics to develop a borehole deployed in situ stress sensor. The method involves the use of a cementitious material which exhibits a strong piezo-spectroscopic stress response as a downhole stress gage. A description of the conceptual approach will be provided along with preliminary analysis and proof-of-concept laboratory results.

  11. Heat transfer investigation of two Langley Research Center delta wing configurations at a Mach number of 10.5, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves, R. H.; Buchanan, T. D.; Warmbrod, J. D.; Johnson, C. B.

    1972-01-01

    Heat transfer tests for two delta wing configurations were conducted in the hypervelocity wind tunnel. The 24-inch long models were tested at a Mach number of approximately 10.5 and at angles of attack of 20, 40, and 60 degrees over a length Reynolds number range from 5 million to 23 million on 4 May to 4 June 1971. Heat transfer results were obtained from model surface heat gage measurements and thermographic phosphor paint.

  12. Declining streamflows reveal nonstationary orographic precipitation enhancement driven by reduced westerly flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Charles; Abatzoglou, John; Holden, Zachary

    2016-04-01

    Although orographic enhancement of precipitation lends mountains an important role in water resources, they are dramatically undersampled by long-term precipitation gages. This has led to the widespread practice of extrapolating trends in low-elevation precipitation gage networks to high elevations via simple climatological precipitation ratios developed from isohyetal maps. An implicit assumption in such a process is non-stationarity in orographic precipitation enhancement, an assumption that can lead to large errors in trend detection and attribution of climate change effects. We show an example from the Northwestern United States where streamflows from mountain watersheds show substantial declines over the last 60 years, even while long-term precipitation gage networks in the region show no trend. We demonstrate that these observed streamflow declines are driven by previously unexplored differential trends in precipitation. November to March westerly winds are strongly correlated with high-elevation precipitation but weakly correlated with low-elevation precipitation. Decreases in winter westerlies across the region from 1950 to 2012 are hypothesized to have reduced orographic precipitation enhancement, yielding differential trends in precipitation across elevations leading to the apparent paradox. Climate projections show continued weakening meridional pressure gradients and westerly flow across the region under greenhouse forcing, highlighting an additional stressor that is relevant for climate change impacts on water resources. This study also reveals the potential of wind speed data from circulation reanalysis products to better inform historical precipitation reconstructions.

  13. Overview of hydro-acoustic current-measurement applications by the U.S. geological survey in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlock, Scott E.; Stewart, James A.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains a network of 170 streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana to collect data from which continuous records of river discharges are produced. Traditionally, the discharge record from a station is produced by recording river stage and making periodic discharge measurements through a range of stage, then developing a relation between stage and discharge. Techniques that promise to increase data collection accuracy and efficiency include the use of hydro-acoustic instrumentation to measure river velocities. The velocity measurements are used to compute river discharge. In-situ applications of hydro-acoustic instruments by the USGS in Indiana include acoustic velocity meters (AVM's) at six streamflow-gaging stations and newly developed Doppler velocity meters (DVM's) at two stations. AVM's use reciprocal travel times of acoustic signals to measure average water velocities along acoustic paths, whereas DVM's use the Doppler shift of backscattered acoustic signals to compute water velocities. In addition to the in-situ applications, three acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP's) are used to make river-discharge measurements from moving boats at streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana. The USGS has designed and is testing an innovative unmanned platform from which to make ADCP discharge measurements.

  14. Plate Boundary Observatory and related networks: GPS data analysis methods and geodetic products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Thomas A.; Melbourne, Timothy I.; Murray, Mark H.; Floyd, Michael A.; Szeliga, Walter M.; King, Robert W.; Phillips, David A.; Puskas, Christine M.; Santillan, Marcelo; Wang, Lei

    2016-12-01

    The Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope (GAGE) Facility Global Positioning System (GPS) Data Analysis Centers produce position time series, velocities, and other parameters for approximately 2000 continuously operating GPS receivers spanning a quadrant of Earth's surface encompassing the high Arctic, North America, and Caribbean. The purpose of this review is to document the methodology for generating station positions and their evolution over time and to describe the requisite trade-offs involved with combination of results. GAGE GPS analysis involves formal merging within a Kalman filter of two independent, loosely constrained solutions: one is based on precise point positioning produced with the GIPSY/OASIS software at Central Washington University and the other is a network solution based on phase and range double-differencing produced with the GAMIT software at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The primary products generated are the position time series that show motions relative to a North America reference frame and secular motions of the stations represented in the velocity field. The position time series themselves contain a multitude of signals in addition to the secular motions. Coseismic and postseismic signals, seasonal signals from hydrology, and transient events, some understood and others not yet fully explained, are all evident in the time series and ready for further analysis and interpretation. We explore the impact of analysis assumptions on the reference frame realization and on the final solutions, and we compare within the GAGE solutions and with others.

  15. A new bi-axial cantilever beam design for biomechanics force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huai-Ti; Trimmer, Barry A

    2012-08-31

    The demand for measuring forces exerted by animals during locomotion has increased dramatically as biomechanists strive to understand and implement biomechanical control strategies. In particular, multi-axial force transducers are often required to capture animal limb coordination patterns. Most existing force transducers employ strain gages arranged in a Wheatstone bridge on a cantilever beam. Bi-axial measurements require duplicating this arrangement in the transverse direction. In this paper, we reveal a method to embed a Wheatstone bridge inside another to allow bi-axial measurements without additional strain gages or additional second beams. This hybrid configuration resolves two force components from a single bridge circuit and simplifies fabrication for the simultaneous assessment of normal and transverse loads. This design can be implemented with two-dimensional fabrication techniques and can even be used to modify a common full bridge cantilever force transducer. As a demonstration of the new design, we built a simple beam which achieved bi-axial sensing capability that outperformed a conventional half-bridge-per-axis bi-axial strain gage design. We have used this design to measure the ground reaction forces of a crawling caterpillar and a caterpillar-mimicking soft robot. The simplicity and increased sensitivity of this method could facilitate bi-axial force measurements for experimental biologists.

  16. Evaluation of satellite rainfall products through hydrologic simulation in a fully distributed hydrologic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitew, Menberu M.; Gebremichael, Mekonnen

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of four global high-resolution satellite rainfall products (CMORPH, TMPA 3B42RT, TMPA 3B42, and PERSIANN) through the hydrologic simulation of a 1656 km2 mountainous watershed in the fully distributed MIKE SHE hydrologic model. This study shows that there are significant biases in the satellite rainfall estimates and large variations in rainfall amounts, leading to large variations in hydrologic simulations. The rainfall algorithms that use primarily microwave data (CMORPH and TMPA 3B42RT) show consistent and better performance in streamflow simulation (bias in the order of -53% to -3%, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) from 0.34 to 0.65); the rainfall algorithm that uses primarily infrared data (PERSIANN) shows lower performance (bias from -82% to -3%, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency from -0.39 to 0.43); and the rainfall algorithm that merges the satellite data with rain gage data (TMPA 3B42) shows inconsistencies and the lowest performance (bias from -86% to 0.43%, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency from -0.50 to 0.27). A dilemma between calibrating the hydrologic model with rain gage data and calibrating it with the corresponding satellite rainfall data is presented. Calibrating the model with corresponding satellite rainfall data increases the performance of satellite streamflow simulation compared to the model calibrated with rain gage data, but decreases the performance of satellite evapotranspiration simulation.

  17. Water resources data Texas water year 2001, volume 5. Guadalupe River basin, Nueces River basin, Rio Grande basin, and intervening coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Susan C.

    2002-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2001 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 5 contains records for water discharge at 77 gaging stations; stage only at 4 gaging stations; stage and contents at 5 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 27 gaging stations; and data for 23 partial-record stations comprised of 3 flood-hydrograph, 8 low-flow, 4 crest-stage, and 3 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  18. Water resources data, Texas water year 1998, volume 3. Colorado River basin, Lavaca River basin, Guadalupe River basin, Nueces River basin, Rio Grande basin, and intervening coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Barbie, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1998 water year for Texas are presented in four volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3 contains records for water discharge at 126 gaging stations; stage only at 3 gaging stations; stage and contents at 15 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 62 gaging stations; and data for 35 partial-record stations comprised of 8 flood-hydrograph, 14 low-flow, and 18 creststage, and 5 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  19. Water resources data Texas water year 2003, volume 5. Guadalupe River basin, Nueces River basin, Rio Grande basin, and intervening coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Susan C.

    2004-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 5 contains records for water discharge at 84 gaging stations; stage only at 6 gaging stations; stage and contents at 6 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 28 gaging stations; and data for 18 partial-record stations comprised of 1 flood-hydrograph, 10 low-flow, 4 crest-stage, and 3 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  20. Water resources data Texas water year 1999, volume 5. Guadalupe River basin, Nueces River basin, Rio Grande basin, and intervening coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.; Jones, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1999 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 5 contains records for water discharge at 76 gaging stations; stage only at 1 gaging stations; stage and contents at 4 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 38 gaging stations; and data for 30 partial-record stations comprised of 3 flood-hydrograph, 14 low-flow, and 8 crest-stage, and 5 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  1. Water resources data Texas water year 2002, volume 5. Guadalupe River basin, Nueces River basin, Rio Grande basin, and intervening coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Susan C.

    2003-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2002 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 5 contains records for water discharge at 82 gaging stations; stage only at 6 gaging stations; stage and contents at 8 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 25 gaging stations; and data for 30 partial-record stations comprised of 2 flood-hydrograph, 6 low-flow, 4 crest-stage, and 18 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  2. Water resources data Texas water year 2000, volume 5. Guadalupe River basin, Nueces River basin, Rio Grande basin, and intervening coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 5 contains records for water discharge at 71 gaging stations; stage only at 4 gaging stations; stage and contents at 4 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 29 gaging stations; and data for 23 partial-record stations comprised of 3 flood-hydrograph, 10 low-flow, 6 crest-stage, and 4 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  3. Water resources data Texas, water year 2004, volume 5. Guadalupe River basin, Nueces River basin, Rio Grande basin, and intervening coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Susan C. Aragon; Reece, Brian D.; Eames, Deanna R.

    2005-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 5 contains records for water discharge at 86 gaging stations; stage only at 5 gaging stations; elevation at 3 lakes and reservoirs; content at 4 lakes and reservoirs;and water quality at 24 gaging stations. Also included are data for 16 partial-record stations comprised of 1 flood-hydrograph, 11 low-flow, and 4 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  4. Particle Velocity Measurement for Spherical Wave in Solid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Xue-feng; WANG Zhan-jiang; LIN Jun-de; SHEN Jun-yi

    2006-01-01

    An experimental technique for research on spherical divergent wave propagation in a solid has been developed,in which the source of generating spherical wave is a center initiating explosive charge designed in a mini-spherical shape with yield equivalent to 0.125 g and 0. 486 g TNT and a set of circular electromagnetic particle velocity gages is used to record the particle velocity histories. By using the circular electromagnetic particle velocity gages, the signal outputs not only are unattenuated due to the geometrical divergence, but also represent the average of the measured dynamic states of the medium over a circle on the wavefront. The distinctive features of this technique are very useful for the study of spherical divergent wave propagation in a solid, especially in an inhomogeneous solid, and the corresponding material dynamics.Many experimental measurements were conducted in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and granite by means of the technique, and the reproducibility of tests was shown to be good. The measurement technique of the circular electromagnetic particle velocity gages is also suitable to the case of cylindrical wave.

  5. Evaluation of a Hopkinson bar fly-away technique for high amplitude shock accelerometer calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togami, T.C.; Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    A split Hopkinson bar technique has been developed to evaluate the performance of accelerometers that measure large amplitude pulses. An evaluation of this technique has been conducted in the Mechanical Shock Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to determine its use in the practical calibration of accelerometers. This evaluation consisted of three tasks. First, the quartz crystal was evaluated in a split Hopkinson bar configuration to evaluate the quartz gage`s sensitivity and frequency response at force levels of 18,000, 35,000 and 53,000 N at ambient temperature, {minus}48 C and +74 C. Secondly, the fly away technique was evaluated at shock amplitudes of 50,000, 100,000, 150,000 and 200,000 G (1 G = 9.81 m/s{sup 2}) at ambient temperature, {minus}48 C and +74 C. Lastly, the technique was performed using a NIST calibrated reference accelerometer. Comparisons of accelerations calculated from the quartz gage data and the measured acceleration data have shown very good agreement. Based on this evaluation, the authors expect this split Hopkinson fly away technique to be certified by the SNL Primary Standards Laboratory.

  6. Global energy and water cycle experiment (GEWEX) continental-scale international project (GCIP); reference data sets CD-ROM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Alan; Cederstrand, Joel R.

    1994-01-01

    The data sets on this compact disc are a compilation of several geographic reference data sets of interest to the global-change research community. The data sets were chosen with input from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Continental-Scale International Project (GCIP) Data Committee and the GCIP Hydrometeorology and Atmospheric Subpanels. The data sets include: locations and periods of record for stream gages, reservoir gages, and meteorological stations; a 500-meter-resolution digital elevation model; grid-node locations for the Eta numerical weather-prediction model; and digital map data sets of geology, land use, streams, large reservoirs, average annual runoff, average annual precipitation, average annual temperature, average annual heating and cooling degree days, hydrologic units, and state and county boundaries. Also included are digital index maps for LANDSAT scenes, and for the U.S. Geological Survey 1:250,000, 1:100,000, and 1:24,000-scale map series. Most of the data sets cover the conterminous United States; the digital elevation model also includes part of southern Canada. The stream and reservoir gage and meteorological station files cover all states having area within the Mississippi River Basin plus that part of the Mississippi River Basin lying within Canada. Several data-base retrievals were processed by state, therefore many sites outside the Mississippi River Basin are included.

  7. Rainfall thresholds for forecasting landslides in the Seattle, Washington, area - exceedance and probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chleborad, Alan F.; Baum, Rex L.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2006-01-01

    Empirical rainfall thresholds and related information form a basis for forecasting landslides in the Seattle area. A formula for a cumulative rainfall threshold (CT), P3=3.5-0.67P15, defined by rainfall amounts (in inches) during the last 3 days (72 hours), P3, and the previous 15 days (360 hours), P15, was developed from analysis of historical data for 91 landslides that occurred as part of 3-day events of three or more landslides between 1933 and 1997. Comparison with historical records for 577 landslides (including some used in developing the CT) indicates that the CT captures more than 90 percent of historical landslide events of three or more landslides in 1-day and 3-day periods that were recorded from 1978 to 2003. However, the probability of landslide occurrence on a day when the CT is exceeded at any single rain gage (8.4 percent) is low, and additional criteria are needed to confidently forecast landslide occurrence. Exceedance of a rainfall intensity-duration threshold I=3.257D-1.13, for intensity, I, (inch per hour) and duration, D, (hours), corresponds to a higher probability of landslide occurrence (42 percent at any 3 rain gages or 65 percent at any 10 rain gages), but it predicts fewer landslides. Both thresholds must be used in tandem to forecast landslide occurrence in Seattle.

  8. Water resources data Texas water year 2002, volume 1. Arkansas River basin, Red River basin, Sabine River basin, Neches River basin, and intervening coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Susan C.

    2003-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2002 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 63 gaging stations; stage only at 3 gaging stations; stage and contents at 34 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 35 gaging stations; and data for 8 partial-record stations comprised of 6 flood-hydrograph and 2 low-flow stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  9. Water resources data, Texas water year 1998, volume 1. Arkansas River basin, Red River basin, Sabine River basin, Neches River basin, Trinity River Basin, and intervening coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Barbie, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1998 water year for Texas are presented in four volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 112 gaging stations; stage only at 5 gaging stations; stage and contents at 33 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 65 gaging stations; and data for 12 partial-record stations comprised of 7 flood-hydrograph, 2 low-flow, and 3 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  10. Water resources data Texas water year 2000, volume 1. Arkansas River basin, Red River basin, Sabine River basin, Neches River basin, and intervening coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 68 gaging stations; stage only at 3 gaging stations; stage and contents at 37 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 39 gaging stations; and data for 9 partial-record stations comprised of 6 flood-hydrograph and 3 low-flow stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  11. Water resources data Texas water year 2001, volume 1. Arkansas River basin, Red River basin, Sabine River basin, Neches River basin, and intervening coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Susan C.

    2002-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2001 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 68 gaging stations; stage only at 3 gaging stations; stage and contents at 30 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 40 gaging stations; and data for 12 partial-record stations comprised of 6 flood-hydrograph and 6 low-flow stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  12. Water resources data Texas water year 1999, volume 1. Arkansas River basin, Red River basin, Sabine River basin, Neches River basin, and intervening coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.; Jones, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1999 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 71 gaging stations; stage only at 3 gaging stations; stage and contents at 23 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 47 gaging stations; and data for 9 partial-record stations comprised of 6 flood-hydrograph and 3 low-flow stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  13. Water resources data Texas water year 2003, volume 1. Arkansas River basin, Red River basin, Sabine River basin, Neches River basin, and intervening coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Susan C.

    2004-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 72 gaging stations; stage only at 3 gaging stations; stage and contents at 35 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 28 gaging stations; and data for 9 partial-record stations comprised of 6 flood-hydrograph and 3 low-flow stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  14. Water resources data Texas, water year 2004, volume 1. Arkansas River basin, Red River basin, Sabine River basin, Neches River basin, and intervening coastal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Susan C. Aragon; Reece, Brian D.; Eames, Deanna R.

    2005-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 72 gaging stations; stage only at 3 gaging stations; elevation at 29 lakes and reservoirs; content at 6 lakes and reservoirs; and water quality at 26 gaging stations. Also included are data for 9 partial-record stations comprised of 6 flood-hydrograph and 3 low-flow stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  15. Advanced Liquid Feed Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, E.; Noll, C.

    1993-06-01

    The Advanced Liquid Feed Experiment (ALFE) is a Hitchhiker experiment flown on board the Shuttle of STS-39 as part of the Space Test Payload-1 (STP-1). The purpose of ALFE is to evaluate new propellant management components and operations under the low gravity flight environment of the Space Shuttle for eventual use in an advanced spacecraft feed system. These components and operations include an electronic pressure regulator, an ultrasonic flowmeter, an ultrasonic point sensor gage, and on-orbit refill of an auxiliary propellant tank. The tests are performed with two transparent tanks with dyed Freon 113, observed by a camera and controlled by ground commands and an on-board computer. Results show that the electronic pressure regulator provides smooth pressure ramp-up, sustained pressure control, and the flexibility to change pressure settings in flight. The ultrasonic flowmeter accurately measures flow and detects gas ingestion. The ultrasonic point sensors function well in space, but not as a gage during sustained low-gravity conditions, as they, like other point gages, are subject to the uncertainties of propellant geometry in a given tank. Propellant transfer operations can be performed with liquid-free ullage equalization at a 20 percent fill level, gas-free liquid transfer from 20-65 percent fill level, minimal slosh, and can be automated.

  16. Processing and Characterization of a Novel Distributed Strain Sensor Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Nonwoven Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Dai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of an innovative carbon nanotube-based non-woven composite sensor that can be tailored for strain sensing properties and potentially offers a reliable and cost-effective sensing option for structural health monitoring (SHM. This novel strain sensor is fabricated using a readily scalable process of coating Carbon nanotubes (CNT onto a nonwoven carrier fabric to form an electrically-isotropic conductive network. Epoxy is then infused into the CNT-modified fabric to form a free-standing nanocomposite strain sensor. By measuring the changes in the electrical properties of the sensing composite the deformation can be measured in real-time. The sensors are repeatable and linear up to 0.4% strain. Highest elastic strain gage factors of 1.9 and 4.0 have been achieved in the longitudinal and transverse direction, respectively. Although the longitudinal gage factor of the newly formed nanocomposite sensor is close to some metallic foil strain gages, the proposed sensing methodology offers spatial coverage, manufacturing customizability, distributed sensing capability as well as transverse sensitivity.

  17. Guidelines for Surveying Bankfull Channel Geometry and Developing Regional Hydraulic-Geometry Relations for Streams of New York State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Rocky O.; Miller, Sarah J.; Westergard, Britt E.; Mulvihill, Christiane I.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Gallagher, Anne S.; Starr, Richard R.

    2004-01-01

    Many disturbed streams within New York State are being restored in an effort to provide bank and bed stability and thereby decrease sedimentation and erosion. Efforts to identify and provide accurate indicators for stable-channel characteristics for ungaged streams have been hampered by the lack of regional equations or relations that relate drainage area to bankfull discharge and to channel depth, width, and cross-sectional area (bankfull hydraulic-geometry relations). Regional equations are needed to confirm bankfull hydraulic-geometry, assess stream stability, evaluate restoration needs, and verify restoration design for ungaged streams that lack stage-to-discharge ratings or historic peak-flow records. This report presents guidelines for surveying bankfull channel geometry at USGS stream gages and developing regional hydraulic-geometry relations (equations) for wadeable streams in New York. It summarizes methods to (1) compile and assess existing hydrologic, geometric, photographic, and topographic data, (2) conduct stream-reconnaissance inspections, (3) identify channel-bankfull characteristics, (4) conduct longitudinal and cross-section surveys, (5) measure stream discharge, (6) develop and refine bankfull hydraulic-geometry equations, and (7) analyze and assure data completeness and quality. The techniques primarily address wadeable streams with either active or discontinued surface-water and crest-stage gages. The relations can be applied to ungaged or actively gaged streams that are wadeable, and may be extended to non-wadeable streams (with some limitations) if they have drainage areas comparable to those used to develop the relations.

  18. The Guayas Estuary and sea level corrections to calculate flooding areas for climate change scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreano, H. R.; Paredes, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Guayas estuary is the inner area of the Gulf of Guayaquil, it holds a water body of around 5000 km2 and the Puna island divides the water flow in two main streams : El Morro and Estero Salado Channel (length: 90 Km.) and Jambeli and Rio Guayas Channel (length: 125km.). The geometry of the estuarine system with the behavior of the tidal wave (semidiurnal) makes tidal amplitude higher at the head than at the mouth, whereas the wave crest at the head is delayed from one and a half to two hours from that at the mouth and sea level recorded by gages along the estuary are all different because of the wave propagation and mean sea level (msl) calculated for each gage show differences with that of La Libertad which is the base line for all altitudes on land (zero level). A leveling and calculations were made to correct such differences in a way that all gages (msl) records were linked to La Libertad and this in turn allowed a better estimates of flooding areas and draw them on topographic maps where zero level corresponds to the mean sea level at La Libertad. The procedure and mathematical formulation could be applied to any estuary or coastal area and it is a useful tool to calculate such areas especially when impacts are on people or capital goods and related to climate change scenarios.

  19. The Relationship of Endoscopic Proficiency to Educational Expense for Virtual Reality Simulator Training Amongst Surgical Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque, Jessica; Goble, Adam; Jones, Veronica M; Waldman, Lindsey E; Sutton, Erica

    2015-07-01

    With the introduction of Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery, training methods in flexible endoscopy are being augmented with simulation-based curricula. The investment for virtual reality simulators warrants further research into its training advantage. Trainees were randomized into bedside or simulator training groups (BED vs SIM). SIM participated in a proficiency-based virtual reality curriculum. Trainees' endoscopic skills were rated using the Global Assessment of Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Skills (GAGES) in the patient care setting. The number of cases to reach 90 per cent of the maximum GAGES score and calculated costs of training were compared. Nineteen residents participated in the study. There was no difference in the average number of cases required to achieve 90 per cent of the maximum GAGES score for esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 13 (SIM) versus11 (BED) (P = 0.63), or colonoscopy 21 (SIM) versus 4 (BED) (P = 0.34). The average per case cost of training for esophagogastroduodenoscopy was $35.98 (SIM) versus $39.71 (BED) (P = 0.50), not including the depreciation costs associated with the simulator ($715.00 per resident over six years). Use of a simulator appeared to increase the cost of training without accelerating the learning curve or decreasing faculty time spent in instruction. The importance of simulation in endoscopy training will be predicated on more cost-effective simulators.

  20. GAUGE R&R FOR AN OPTICAL MICROMETER INDUSTRIAL TYPE MACHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia A. Louka

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the uncertainty of a metric system, as 'Gauge R&R' and the collation of results between the Xbar & R and the ANOVA method, are extended in this essay. In an academic school laboratory we accomplished a sequence of measurements with the use of an Optical Micrometer Industrial Type Machine (MUL 300. This paper analyzes the measurement system that used in the laboratory and checks the reasons of the variability's provocation that observed in the machine, between the theoretical calculations and measurements. In order to find out this problem, we will use the 'Gage Repeatability and Reproducibility' technique of Measurement System Analysis (M.S.A.. This technique uses analysis of variance. In addition, will use Minitab program in order to find out the factors that we have in the whole experiment as enlarge the problem of measurements. In this paper, a statistical method using the correlation between Gage R&R and process capability indices is proposed for evaluating the adequacy of the acceptance criteria of P/T ratio. Finally, a comparative analysis has also been performed for evaluating the accuracy of Gage R&R between two methods (ANOVA and R- Xbar method. Hopefully, the results of this research can provide a useful reference for quality practitioners in various industries.

  1. Streamflow and Suspended-Sediment Loads Before, During, and After H-3 Highway Construction, North Halawa, Haiku, South Fork Kapunahala, and Kamooalii Drainage Basins, Oahu, Hawaii, 1983-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael F.; Yeatts, Daniel S.

    2002-01-01

    A long-term study (1983?99) was conducted to determine the effects of the H-3 Highway construction on streamflow and suspended-sediment transport on Oahu, Hawaii. Data were collected at five streamflow-gaging stations before, during, and after construction and at two stream-gaging stations during and after construction. Drainage areas at the seven streamflow-gaging stations ranged from 0.40 to 4.01 mi2 and highway construction affected from 4 to 15 percent of these areas. Analysis of covariance and regression techniques were used to assess changes in streamflow and suspended-sediment loads during and after construction, relative to before-construction conditions. Streamflow at the seven streamflow-gaging stations was compared to streamflow at an index station unaffected by highway construction. Streamflow data were divided into low- and high-flow classes, and the two flow classes were analyzed separately. Additionally, instantaneous peak flows were analyzed at three streamflow-gaging stations. During construction, observed low flows significantly increased by 108 percent at Luluku Stream, a tributary to Kamooalii Stream, and decreased by 31 percent at Kamooalii Stream. After construction, low flows increased by 47 percent at North Halawa Stream near Honolulu compared to low flows during construction. Low flows at Luluku Stream increased by 99 percent after construction compared to before construction. Increased low flows were attributed to removal of vegetation for construction and the increase of impervious areas that reduced infiltration. Decreased low flows were attributed to increased ground-water withdrawals and construction activities. High flows observed during highway construction compared to before construction increased significantly only at Haiku Stream (by 25 percent). Observed high flows after construction compared to during construction increased significantly only at Kamooalii Stream (by 34 percent). Observed high flows after construction compared to

  2. Land-margin ecosystem hydrologic data for the coastal Everglades, Florida, water years 1996-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gordon H.; Smith, Thomas J.; Balentine, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    , as a response for a more interdisciplinary science approach to understanding the coastal Everglades ecological system, the SOFL-GCC hydrology project was integrated into the “Dynamics of Land-Margin Ecosystems: Historical Change, Hydrology, Vegetation, Sediment, and Climate” study (Smith and others, 2002). Data from the ongoing study has been useful in providing an empirical hydrologic baseline for the greater Everglades ecosystem restoration science and management needs. The hydrology network consisted of 13 hydrologic gaging stations installed in the southwestern coastal region of Everglades National Park along three transects: Shark River (Shark or SH) transect, Lostmans River (Lostmans or LO) transect, and Chatham River (Chatham or CH) transect (fig. 1). There were five paired surface-water/groundwater gaging stations on the Shark transect (SH1, SH2, SH3, SH4, and SH5) and one stage gaging station (BSC) in the Big Sable Creek; four paired surface-water/groundwater gaging stations on the Lostmans transect (LO1, LO2, LO3, and LO4); and three paired surface-water/groundwater gaging stations on the Chatham transect (CH1, CH2, and CH3). Both surface-water and groundwater levels, salinities, and temperatures were monitored at the paired gaging stations. Rainfall was recorded at marsh and open canopy gaging stations. This report details the study introduction, method, and description of data collected, which are accessible through the final instantaneous hydrologic dataset stored in the USGS South Florida Information Access (SOFIA) South Florida Hydrology Database website, http://sofia.usgs.gov/exchange/sfl_hydro_data/location.html#brdlandmargin.

  3. Historical Channel Adjustment and Estimates of Selected Hydraulic Values in the Lower Sabine River and Lower Brazos River Basins, Texas and Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Greene, Lauren E.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Water Development Board, evaluated historical channel adjustment and estimated selected hydraulic values at U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in the lower Sabine River Basin in Texas and Louisiana and lower Brazos River Basin in Texas to support geomorphic assessments of the Texas Instream Flow Program. Channel attributes including cross-section geometry, slope, and planform change were evaluated to learn how each river's morphology changed over the years in response to natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Historical and contemporary cross-sectional channel geometries at several gaging stations on each river were compared, planform changes were assessed, and hydraulic values were estimated including mean flow velocity, bed shear stress, Froude numbers, and hydraulic depth. The primary sources of historical channel morphology information were U.S. Geological Survey hard-copy discharge-measurement field notes. Additional analyses were done using computations of selected flow hydraulics, comparisons of historical and contemporary aerial photographs, comparisons of historical and contemporary ground photographs, evaluations of how frequently stage-discharge rating curves were updated, reviews of stage-discharge relations for field measurements, and considerations of bridge and reservoir construction activities. Based on historical cross sections at three gaging stations downstream from Toledo Bend Reservoir, the lower Sabine River is relatively stable, but is subject to substantial temporary scour-and-fill processes during floods. Exceptions to this characterization of relative stability include an episode of channel aggradation at the Sabine River near Bon Wier, Texas, during the 1930s, and about 2 to 3 feet of channel incision at the Sabine River near Burkeville, Texas, since the late 1950s. The Brazos River, at gaging stations downstream from Waco, Texas, has adjusted to a combination of

  4. Methods for estimating flow-duration and annual mean-flow statistics for ungaged streams in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esralew, Rachel A.; Smith, S. Jerrod

    2010-01-01

    Flow statistics can be used to provide decision makers with surface-water information needed for activities such as water-supply permitting, flow regulation, and other water rights issues. Flow statistics could be needed at any location along a stream. Most often, streamflow statistics are needed at ungaged sites, where no flow data are available to compute the statistics. Methods are presented in this report for estimating flow-duration and annual mean-flow statistics for ungaged streams in Oklahoma. Flow statistics included the (1) annual (period of record), (2) seasonal (summer-autumn and winter-spring), and (3) 12 monthly duration statistics, including the 20th, 50th, 80th, 90th, and 95th percentile flow exceedances, and the annual mean-flow (mean of daily flows for the period of record). Flow statistics were calculated from daily streamflow information collected from 235 streamflow-gaging stations throughout Oklahoma and areas in adjacent states. A drainage-area ratio method is the preferred method for estimating flow statistics at an ungaged location that is on a stream near a gage. The method generally is reliable only if the drainage-area ratio of the two sites is between 0.5 and 1.5. Regression equations that relate flow statistics to drainage-basin characteristics were developed for the purpose of estimating selected flow-duration and annual mean-flow statistics for ungaged streams that are not near gaging stations on the same stream. Regression equations were developed from flow statistics and drainage-basin characteristics for 113 unregulated gaging stations. Separate regression equations were developed by using U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in regions with similar drainage-basin characteristics. These equations can increase the accuracy of regression equations used for estimating flow-duration and annual mean-flow statistics at ungaged stream locations in Oklahoma. Streamflow-gaging stations were grouped by selected drainage

  5. Floods of Selected Streams in Arkansas, Spring 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkhouser, Jaysson E.; Eng, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Floods can cause loss of life and extensive destruction to property. Monitoring floods and understanding the reasons for their occurrence are the responsibility of many Federal agencies. The National Weather Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the U.S. Geological Survey are among the most visible of these agencies. Together, these three agencies collect and analyze floodflow information to better understand the variety of mechanisms that cause floods, and how the characteristics and frequencies of floods vary with time and location. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has monitored and assessed the quantity of streamflow in our Nation's streams since the agency's inception in 1879. Because of ongoing collection and assessment of streamflow data, the USGS can provide information about a range of surface-water issues including the suitability of water for public supply and irrigation and the effects of agriculture and urbanization on streamflow. As part of its streamflow-data collection activities, the USGS measured streamflow in multiple streams during extreme flood events in Arkansas in the spring of 2008. The analysis of streamflow information collected during flood events such as these provides a scientific basis for decision making related to resource management and restoration. Additionally, this information can be used by water-resource managers to better define flood-hazard areas and to design bridges, culverts, dams, levees, and other structures. Water levels (stage) and streamflow (discharge) currently are being monitored in near real-time at approximately 150 locations in Arkansas. The streamflow-gaging stations measure and record hydrologic data at 15-minute or hourly intervals; the data then are transmitted through satellites to the USGS database and displayed on the internet every 1 to 4 hours. Streamflow-gaging stations in Arkansas are part of a network of over 7,500 active streamflow-gaging stations operated by the USGS throughout the United

  6. Simulation of streamflow and water quality in the Leon Creek watershed, Bexar County, Texas, 1997-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; Roussel, Meghan C.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the San Antonio River Authority, configured, calibrated, and tested a Hydrological Simulation Program ? FORTRAN watershed model for the approximately 238-square-mile Leon Creek watershed in Bexar County, Texas, and used the model to simulate streamflow and water quality (focusing on loads and yields of selected constituents). Streamflow in the model was calibrated and tested with available data from five U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations for 1997-2004. Simulated streamflow volumes closely matched measured streamflow volumes at all streamflow-gaging stations. Total simulated streamflow volumes were within 10 percent of measured values. Streamflow volumes are greatly influenced by large storms. Two months that included major floods accounted for about 50 percent of all the streamflow measured at the most downstream gaging station during 1997-2004. Water-quality properties and constituents (water temperature, dissolved oxygen, suspended sediment, dissolved ammonia nitrogen, dissolved nitrate nitrogen, and dissolved and total lead and zinc) in the model were calibrated using available data from 13 sites in and near the Leon Creek watershed for varying periods of record during 1992-2005. Average simulated daily mean water temperature and dissolved oxygen at the most downstream gaging station during 1997-2000 were within 1 percent of average measured daily mean water temperature and dissolved oxygen. Simulated suspended-sediment load at the most downstream gaging station during 2001-04 (excluding July 2002 because of major storms) was 77,700 tons compared with 74,600 tons estimated from a streamflow-load regression relation (coefficient of determination = .869). Simulated concentrations of dissolved ammonia nitrogen and dissolved nitrate nitrogen closely matched measured concentrations after calibration. At the most downstream gaging station, average simulated monthly

  7. Updated one-dimensional hydraulic model of the Kootenai River, Idaho-A supplement to Scientific Investigations Report 2005-5110

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Christiana R.; Barton, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    The Kootenai Tribe of Idaho, in cooperation with local, State, Federal, and Canadian agency co-managers and scientists, is assessing the feasibility of a Kootenai River habitat restoration project in Boundary County, Idaho. The restoration project is focused on recovery of the endangered Kootenai River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population, and simultaneously targets habitat-based recovery of other native river biota. River restoration is a complex undertaking that requires a thorough understanding of the river and floodplain landscape prior to restoration efforts. To assist in evaluating the feasibility of this endeavor, the U.S. Geological Survey developed an updated one-dimensional hydraulic model of the Kootenai River in Idaho between river miles (RMs) 105.6 and 171.9 to characterize the current hydraulic conditions. A previously calibrated model of the study area, based on channel geometry data collected during 2002 and 2003, was the basis for this updated model. New high-resolution bathymetric surveys conducted in the study reach between RMs 138 and 161.4 provided additional detail of channel morphology. A light detection and ranging (LIDAR) survey was flown in the Kootenai River valley in 2005 between RMs 105.6 and 159.5 to characterize the floodplain topography. Six temporary gaging stations installed in 2006-08 between RMs 154.1 and 161.2, combined with five permanent gaging stations in the study reach, provided discharge and water-surface elevations for model calibration and verification. Measured discharges ranging from about 4,800 to 63,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) were simulated for calibration events, and calibrated water-surface elevations ranged from about 1,745 to 1,820 feet (ft) throughout the extent of the model. Calibration was considered acceptable when the simulated and measured water-surface elevations at gaging stations differed by less than (+/-)0.15 ft. Model verification consisted of simulating 10 additional events with

  8. Wadter Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin and Statewide Project Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synaptic sites, and partial-record sites; and (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake- and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures ga through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two to three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  9. Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  10. Summary of precipitation data for the Black Hills area of South Dakota, water years 1931-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Daniel G.; Hamade, Ghaith R.; Kenner, Scott J.

    2000-01-01

    Long-term precipitation records are sum-marized for the Black Hills area of South Dakota. Precipitation data are available for numerous gaging locations; however, few gages have continuous, long-term records, and periods of missing record are common. Thus, a geographic information system (GIS) utilizing an inverse-distance weighting method was developed to generate spatial precipitation distributions from point precipitation data for the Black Hills area, based on available monthly records. The spatial distributions were used to estimate periods of missing record for all 94 gages considered. The resulting monthly records of measured and estimated precipitation are tabulated for water years 1931-98. Average values for water years 1961-90, which is the period used for calculation of climatic normals, were used to develop an isohyetal map of normal annual precipitation for the Black Hills area. Temporal trends in precipitation for the Black Hills area also were examined. Sustained periods of deficit precipitation occurred during 1931-40 and 1948-61. Sustained periods of surplus precipitation occurred during 1941-47, 1962-68, and 1991-98, with the late 1990's identified as the wettest period since 1931. The driest 30-year period was 1931-60, when annual precipitation averaged 17.17 inches for the study area. The wettest 30-year period was 1969-98, when annual precipitation averaged 19.61 inches. Normal annual precipitation (1961-90) for the study area is 19.06 inches, compared with the long-term (1931-98) annual average of 18.61 inches. Annual extremes for the study area have ranged from 10.22 inches in water year 1936 to 27.39 inches in water year 1995.

  11. Pyroshock data acquisition-historical developments using piezoelectric accelerometers and other transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himelblau, Harry

    2002-05-01

    For nearly 50 years, P/E accelerometers have been used for acquiring pyroshock data with mixed results. For longer distances between the explosive source and the transducer location (e.g., two feet or more), valid data of lesser shock magnitude were usually obtained. However, for shorter distances, a variety of problems were often encountered, causing erroneous results. It was subsequentially determined that most problems were caused by measurement system nonlinearities, i.e., the nonlinear resonant response of the accelerometer, or exceeding the linear amplitude range of the signal conditioner and recorder. In the earlier years, it was erroneously assumed that subsequent low pass filtering of the signal would remove the nonlinearities, hopefully leading to valid data. This only masked the invalid results. Eventually, improved P/E accelerometers were developed with higher natural frequencies and larger amplitude limits that caused substantially fewer problems and allowed measurements closer to the explosive sources. Shortly thereafter, the high frequency noncontact laser doppler vibrometer became available which circumvented the accelerometer resonance problem. However, this velocity transducer is almost always limited to laboratory tests in order to constrain the motion of the laser head by a very rigid and massive support foundation compared to the flexible structure which is attached to the laser target. Other LDV measurement problems have been encountered that must be avoided to achieve valid data. Conventional strain gages have been successfully used to measure pyroshock strain. However, due to the short wavelength of direct and bending pyroshock waves at high frequencies, small strain gages are usually required to avoid spatial averaging over the length of the gage.

  12. The mechanical properties of 3C thin-film silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kamili Moja

    Thin-film silicon carbide is a promising material for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) because of its resistance to high temperatures and corrosive environments. However, more knowledge of its mechanical properties is needed to produce optimum MEMS devices with this material. Microsample tensile tests have been performed on this material to provide basic mechanical properties. Tests were conducted using tensile specimens with a gage width of 600 mum, gage length of 4 mm, and different thicknesses. The specimens were tested with a custom-built microsample testing machine comprised of specially designed grips, a piezoelectric actuator, and a miniature load cell. Strain was measured with a direct strain measurement system, the Interferometric Strain Displacement Gage. Obstacles to specimen fabrication resulted in a decrease in the amount and quality of the data. Material from Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) was used; each material had unique fabrication challenges. The CWRU material had difficulties with adhesion of metal for strain measurement and excess material on some specimens. MIT fabrication was time consuming with low yield and required the collaboration of four institutions. Results from tests on epitaxially grown material from CWRU show an elastic modulus of 428 +/- 42 GPa, no Poisson's ratio results, and strengths of 1.13 +/- 0.48 GPa and 1.65 +/- 0.24 GPa for two different batches of material. The elastic modulus is lower than the calculated modulus of 456--466 GPa, but agrees well with previous bulge tests. Results from tests on polycrystalline material from MIT show an average elastic modulus of 428 GPa, strength of 0.49 +/- 0.20 GPa, and an average Poisson's ratio of 0.24 for Batch One. Batch Two, a material with a different texture, resulted in an average elastic modulus of 448 GPa, strength of 0.81 +/- 0.23 GPa, and an average Poisson's ratio of 0.17.

  13. Channel Incision and Suspended Sediment Delivery at Caspar Creek, Mendocino County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, N. J.; Lisle, T. E.; Reid, L. M.

    2003-12-01

    Tributary and headwater valleys in the Caspar Creek watershed, in coastal Mendocino County, California, show signs of incision along much of their lengths. An episode of incision followed initial-entry logging which took place between 1860 and 1906. Another episode of incision cut into skid-trails created for second-entry logging in the 1970's. Gullies resulting from both of these episodes of incision are sensitive to hydrologic fluctuations and feature active headcuts, deepening plungepools, and unstable banks, which continue to contribute sediment to the Caspar Creek channel network. Headcuts are numerous in each channel. In some cases headcuts define the upstream extent of an incised reach; in many cases headcuts migrate up previously incised reaches, increasing the depth of incision. Surveys indicate that bank retreat, plunge pool deepening, and headcut retreat all contributed sediment to the channels between 2000 and 2003. Since bank walls have considerably more surface area than headwalls per given length of channel, and headcuts have largely migrated into positions temporarily constrained by resistant lips, bankwall retreat appears to be a more significant chronic source of sediment than headwall retreat. Stream gage records show that some channels consistently deliver higher levels of suspended sediment than others. In comparing channels, ongoing levels of suspended sediment delivery correlate well with total amount of exposed channel bank (depth of incision integrated over length of channel) in the reaches upstream of stream gages. On an annual to decadal time-scale, rates of suspended sediment delivery per unit area of catchment correlate better with the amount of exposed bank area in reaches upstream of stream gages, than with the volume of sediment delivered by landslide events, with total catchment area, or with peak storm flow per unit area. The correlation between amount of exposed bank area and ongoing levels of suspended sediment delivery is

  14. Multi-gauge Calibration for modeling the Semi-Arid Santa Cruz Watershed in Arizona-Mexico Border Area Using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraula, Rewati; Norman, Laura A.; Meixner, Thomas; Callegary, James B.

    2012-01-01

    In most watershed-modeling studies, flow is calibrated at one monitoring site, usually at the watershed outlet. Like many arid and semi-arid watersheds, the main reach of the Santa Cruz watershed, located on the Arizona-Mexico border, is discontinuous for most of the year except during large flood events, and therefore the flow characteristics at the outlet do not represent the entire watershed. Calibration is required at multiple locations along the Santa Cruz River to improve model reliability. The objective of this study was to best portray surface water flow in this semiarid watershed and evaluate the effect of multi-gage calibration on flow predictions. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was calibrated at seven monitoring stations, which improved model performance and increased the reliability of flow, in the Santa Cruz watershed. The most sensitive parameters to affect flow were found to be curve number (CN2), soil evaporation and compensation coefficient (ESCO), threshold water depth in shallow aquifer for return flow to occur (GWQMN), base flow alpha factor (Alpha_Bf), and effective hydraulic conductivity of the soil layer (Ch_K2). In comparison, when the model was established with a single calibration at the watershed outlet, flow predictions at other monitoring gages were inaccurate. This study emphasizes the importance of multi-gage calibration to develop a reliable watershed model in arid and semiarid environments. The developed model, with further calibration of water quality parameters will be an integral part of the Santa Cruz Watershed Ecosystem Portfolio Model (SCWEPM), an online decision support tool, to assess the impacts of climate change and urban growth in the Santa Cruz watershed.

  15. Analysis of regional rainfall-runoff parameters for the Lake Michigan Diversion hydrological modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, David T.; Over, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting (LMDA) system has been developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District (USACE-Chicago) and the State of Illinois as a part of the interstate Great Lakes water regulatory program. The diverted Lake Michigan watershed is a 673-square-mile watershed that is comprised of the Chicago River and Calumet River watersheds. They originally drained into Lake Michigan, but now flow to the Mississippi River watershed via three canals constructed in the Chicago area in the early twentieth century. Approximately 393 square miles of the diverted watershed is ungaged, and the runoff from the ungaged portion of the diverted watershed has been estimated by the USACE-Chicago using the Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) program. The accuracy of simulated runoff depends on the accuracy of the parameter set used in the HSPF program. Nine parameter sets comprised of the North Branch, Little Calumet, Des Plaines, Hickory Creek, CSSC, NIPC, 1999, CTE, and 2008 have been developed at different time periods and used by the USACE-Chicago. In this study, the U.S. Geological Survey and the USACE-Chicago collaboratively analyzed the parameter sets using nine gaged watersheds in or adjacent to the diverted watershed to assess the predictive accuracies of selected parameter sets. Six of the parameter sets, comprising North Branch, Hickory Creek, NIPC, 1999, CTE, and 2008, were applied to the nine gaged watersheds for evaluating their simulation accuracy from water years 1996 to 2011. The nine gaged watersheds were modeled by using the three LMDA land-cover types (grass, forest, and hydraulically connected imperviousness) based on the 2006 National Land Cover Database, and the latest meteorological and precipitation data consistent with the current (2014) LMDA modeling framework.

  16. Micromechanical finite-element modeling and experimental characterization of the compressive mechanical properties of polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds prepared by selective laser sintering for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Shaun; Das, Suman

    2012-08-01

    Bioresorbable scaffolds with mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HA) by selective laser sintering (SLS) and modeled by finite-element analysis (FEA). Both solid gage parts and scaffolds having 1-D, 2-D and 3-D orthogonal, periodic porous architectures were made with 0, 10, 20 and 30 vol.% HA. PCL:HA scaffolds manufactured by SLS had nearly full density (99%) in the designed solid regions and had excellent geometric and dimensional control. Through optimization of the SLS process, the compressive moduli for our solid gage parts and scaffolds are the highest reported in the literature for additive manufacturing. The compressive moduli of solid gage parts were 299.3, 311.2, 415.5 and 498.3 MPa for PCL:HA loading at 100:0, 90:10, 80:20 and 70:30, respectively. The compressive effective stiffness tended to increase as the loading of HA was increased and the designed porosity was lowered. In the case of the most 3-D porous scaffold, the compressive modulus more than doubled from 14.9 to 36.2 MPa when changing the material from 100:0 to 70:30 PCL:HA. A micromechanical FEA model was developed to investigate the reinforcement effect of HA loading on the compressive modulus of the bulk material. Using a first-principles based approach, the random distribution of HA particles in a solidified PCL matrix was modeled for any HA loading to predict the bulk mechanical properties of the composites. The bulk mechanical properties were also used for FEA of the scaffold geometries. The results of the FEA were found to be in good agreement with experimental mechanical testing. The development of patient- and site-specific composite tissue-engineering constructs with tailored properties can be seen as a direct extension of this work on computational design, a priori modeling of mechanical properties and direct digital manufacturing.

  17. Methods for estimating peak discharge and flood boundaries of streams in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B.E.; Lindskov, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    Equations for estimating 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year peak discharges and flood depths at ungaged sites in Utah were developed using multiple-regression techniques. Ratios of 500- to 100-year values also were determined. The peak discharge equations are applicable to unregulated streams and the flood depth equations are applicable to the unregulated flow in natural stream channels. The flood depth data can be used to approximate flood prone areas. Drainage area and mean basin elevation are the two basin characteristics needed to use these equations. The standard error of estimate ranges from 38% to 74% for the 100-year peak discharge and from 23% to 33% for the 100-year flood depth. Five different flood mapping methods are described. Streams are classified into four categories as a basis for selecting a flood mapping method. Procedures for transferring flood depths obtained from the regression equations to a flood boundary map are outlined. Also, previous detailed flood mapping by government agencies and consultants is summarized to assist the user in quality control and to minimize duplication of effort. Methods are described for transferring flood frequency data from gaged to ungaged sites on the same stream. Peak discharge and flood depth frequency relations and selected basin characteristics data, updated through the 1980 water year, are tabulated for more than 300 gaging stations in Utah and adjoining states. In addition, weighted estimates of peak discharge relations based on the station data and the regression estimates are provided for each gaging station used in the regression analysis. (Author 's abstract)

  18. Base flow separation: A comparison of analytical and mass balance methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Darline A.; Stewart, Mark T.

    2016-04-01

    Base flow is the ground water contribution to stream flow. Many activities, such as water resource management, calibrating hydrological and climate models, and studies of basin hydrology, require good estimates of base flow. The base flow component of stream flow is usually determined by separating a stream hydrograph into two components, base flow and runoff. Analytical methods, mathematical functions or algorithms used to calculate base flow directly from discharge, are the most widely used base flow separation methods and are often used without calibration to basin or gage-specific parameters other than basin area. In this study, six analytical methods are compared to a mass balance method, the conductivity mass-balance (CMB) method. The base flow index (BFI) values for 35 stream gages are obtained from each of the seven methods with each gage having at least two consecutive years of specific conductance data and 30 years of continuous discharge data. BFI is cumulative base flow divided by cumulative total discharge over the period of record of analysis. The BFI value is dimensionless, and always varies from 0 to 1. Areas of basins used in this study range from 27 km2 to 68,117 km2. BFI was first determined for the uncalibrated analytical methods. The parameters of each analytical method were then calibrated to produce BFI values as close to the CMB derived BFI values as possible. One of the methods, the power function (aQb + cQ) method, is inherently calibrated and was not recalibrated. The uncalibrated analytical methods have an average correlation coefficient of 0.43 when compared to CMB-derived values, and an average correlation coefficient of 0.93 when calibrated with the CMB method. Once calibrated, the analytical methods can closely reproduce the base flow values of a mass balance method. Therefore, it is recommended that analytical methods be calibrated against tracer or mass balance methods.

  19. Tsunami waveform inversion by numerical finite-elements Green’s functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Piatanesi

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, the steady increase in the quantity and quality of the data concerning tsunamis has led to an increasing interest in the inversion problem for tsunami data. This work addresses the usually ill-posed problem of the hydrodynamical inversion of tsunami tide-gage records to infer the initial sea perturbation. We use an inversion method for which the data space consists of a given number of waveforms and the model parameter space is represented by the values of the initial water elevation field at a given number of points. The forward model, i.e. the calculation of the synthetic tide-gage records from an initial water elevation field, is based on the linear shallow water equations and is simply solved by applying the appropriate Green’s functions to the known initial state. The inversion of tide-gage records to determine the initial state results in the least square inversion of a rectangular system of linear equations. When the inversions are unconstrained, we found that in order to attain good results, the dimension of the data space has to be much larger than that of the model space parameter. We also show that a large number of waveforms is not sufficient to ensure a good inversion if the corresponding stations do not have a good azimuthal coverage with respect to source directivity. To improve the inversions we use the available a priori information on the source, generally coming from the inversion of seismological data. In this paper we show how to implement very common information about a tsunamigenic seismic source, i.e. the earthquake source region, as a set of spatial constraints. The results are very satisfactory, since even a rough localisation of the source enables us to invert correctly the initial elevation field.

  20. Water quality and aquatic toxicity data of 2002 spring thaw conditions in the upper Animas River watershed, Silverton, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, D.L.; Wirt, L.; Besser, J.M.; Wright, W.G.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents hydrologic, water-quality, and biologic toxicity data collected during the annual spring thaw of 2002 in the upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colorado. The spring-thaw runoff is a concern because elevated concentrations of iron oxyhydroxides can contain sorbed trace metals that are potentially toxic to aquatic life. Water chemistry of streams draining the San Juan Mountains is affected by natural acid drainage and weathering of hydrothermal altered volcanic rocks and by more than a century of mining activities. The timing of the spring-thaw sampling effort was determined by reviewing historical climate and stream-flow hydrographs and current weather conditions. Twenty-one water-quality samples were collected between 11:00 AM March 27, 2002 and 6:00 PM March 30, 2002 to characterize water chemistry at the A-72 gage on the upper Animas River below Silverton. Analyses of unfiltered water at the A-72 gage showed a relation between turbidity and total-recoverable iron concentrations, and showed diurnal patterns. Copper and lead concentrations were related to iron concentrations, indicating that these elements are probably sorbed to colloidal iron material. Calcium, strontium, and sulfate concentrations showed overall decreasing trends due to dilution, but the loads of those constituents increased over the sampling period. Nine water-quality samples were collected near the confluence of Mineral Creek with the Animas River, the confluence of Cement Creek with the Animas River, and on the upper Animas River above the confluence with Cement Creek (three samples at each site). A total of six bulk water-toxicity samples were collected before, during, and after the spring thaw from the Animas River at the A-72 gage site. Toxicity tests conducted with the bulk water samples on amphipods did not show strong differences in toxicity among the three sampling periods; however, toxicity of river water to fathead minnows showed a decreasing trend

  1. Cancer-testis antigen expression in digestive tract carcinomas: frequent expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and its precursor lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Tseng; Panarelli, Nicole C; Piotti, Kathryn C; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2014-05-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens are attractive tumor antigens for cancer immunotherapy. They comprise a group of proteins normally expressed in germ cells and aberrantly activated in a variety of human cancers. The protein expression of eight cancer-testis antigens [MAGEA, NY-ESO-1, GAGE, MAGEC1 (CT7), MAGEC2 (CT10), CT45, SAGE1, and NXF2] was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 61 esophageal carcinomas (40 adenocarcinoma and 21 squamous cell carcinoma), 50 gastric carcinomas (34 diffuse and 16 intestinal type), and 141 colorectal carcinomas. The highest frequency of expression was found in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas: Positive staining for MAGEA, CT45, CT7, SAGE1, GAGE, NXF2, NY-ESO-1, and CT10 was observed in 57%, 38%, 33%, 33%, 29%, 29%, 19%, and 14% of squamous cell carcinomas, respectively. Similar staining patterns were observed in squamous dysplasias. Expression frequencies of cancer-testis antigens were seen in 2% to 24% of gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas and were not significantly different between adenocarcinomas of the stomach versus the esophagus, or between diffuse and intestinal types of gastric adenocarcinomas. Colorectal cancers did not express NY-ESO-1, CT7, CT10, or GAGE, and only infrequently expressed SAGE1 (0.7%) MAGEA (1.4%), CT45 (3.5%), and NXF2 (8.5%). We conclude that cancer-testis antigens are frequently expressed in esophageal squamous neoplasms. Although cancer-testis antigens are generally considered to be expressed later in tumor progression, they are found in squamous dysplasias, suggesting a potential diagnostic role for cancer-testis antigens in the evaluation of premalignant squamous lesions.

  2. 高温应变片在高温下的性能特性%The performance characteristics of high temperature strain gauge under high temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹福炎

    2011-01-01

    近十几年来,高温称重传感器在冶金工业部门的应用越来越普遍。但是,由于高温称重传感器所用的高温应变片和高温胶粘剂等的特殊性,在制作过程中必须经繁杂的处理和测试工序,使产品生产效率降低、成本提高。人们试图改变这种状态,但是由于有关高温应变片在高温下性能的系统资料甚少,给工作带来不少困难。为了增加人们对传感器用高温应变片的了解,现根据日本TML公司的产品,就高温应变片在高温下的性能特性加以介绍,以供参考。%Over the last decade, high temperature load cell plays an important role in metallurgical industry. But as high temperature strain gage and high temperature adhesive has specificity, we must adopt complex processing and testing procedures in manufacturing process, this method products less efficient and increased cost. People try to change this state, as the information of high temperature strain gage is less, the work has some trouble. In order to increase the understanding of high temperature strain gage, this article introduces performance characteristics of high temperature strain gauge under high temperature, based on the production of Japan TML Corporation, for reference.

  3. Citizen Hydrology - Tradeoffs between Traditional Continuous Approaches and Temporally Discrete Hydrologic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Jeffrey; Rutten, Martine; van de Giesen, Nick; Mehl, Steffen; Norris, James

    2016-04-01

    Traditional approaches to hydrologic data collection rely on permanent installations of sophisticated and relatively accurate but expensive monitoring equipment at limited numbers of sites. Consequently, the spatial coverage of the data is limited and the cost is high. Moreover, achieving adequate maintenance of the sophisticated equipment often exceeds local technical and resource capacity, and experience has shown that permanently deployed monitoring equipment is susceptible to vandalism, theft, and other hazards. Rather than using expensive, vulnerable installations at a few points, SmartPhones4Water (S4W), a form of citizen science, leverages widely available mobile technology to gather hydrologic data at many sites in a manner that is highly repeatable and scalable. The tradeoff for increased spatial resolution, however, is reduced observation frequency. As a first step towards evaluating the tradeoffs between the traditional continuous monitoring approach and emerging citizen science methods, 50 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow gages were randomly selected from the population of roughly 350 USGS gages operated in California. Gaging station metadata and historical 15 minute flow data for the period from 01/10/2007 through 31/12/2014 were compiled for each of the selected gages. Historical 15 minute flow data were then used to develop daily, monthly, and yearly determinations of average, minimum, maximum streamflow, cumulative runoff, and streamflow distribution. These statistics were then compared to similar statistics developed from randomly selected daily and weekly spot measurements of streamflow. Cumulative runoff calculated from daily and weekly observations were within 10 percent of actual runoff calculated from 15 minute data for 75 percent and 46 percent of sites respectively. As anticipated, larger watersheds with less dynamic temporal variability compared more favorably for all statistics evaluated than smaller watersheds. Based on the

  4. Cabinet - strategy board game for network and system management learning

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Gamification may be a new term, and recently it has been receiv- ing a considerable attention in several areas and fields. This ne- ologism, however, describe an idea that is not exactly new: using game-thinking and game mechanics to solve problems and to en- gage audiences. This paper describes the approach to applying gamification to a higher education subject in the course of computer science. We fo- cus mainly in the design, development and assessment of a strategy board game of the wo...

  5. Design and Calibration of a Novel High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Raphael-Mabel, Sujay Anand

    2005-01-01

    Heat flux gages are important in applications where measurement of the transfer of energy is more important than measurement of the temperature itself. There is a need for a heat flux sensor that can perform reliably for long periods of time in high temperature and high heat flux environment. The primary objective is to design and build a heat flux sensor that is capable of operating for extended periods of time in a high heat flux and high temperature environment. A High Temperature Heat F...

  6. Nickel Nanoparticles Entangled in Carbon Nanotubes: Novel Ink for Nanotube Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Fattah, Abdel Rahman; Majdi, Tahereh; Abdalla, Ahmed M; Ghosh, Suvojit; Puri, Ishwar K

    2016-01-27

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a rapid and inexpensive method to attach nanoscale magnetic chaperones to carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs) become entangled in CNTs after both are dispersed in kerosene by sonication and form conjugates. An externally applied magnetic field manipulates the resulting CNTs-NiNP ink without NiNP separation, allowing us to print an embedded circuit in an elastomeric matrix and fabricate a strain gage and an oil sensor. The new method to print a circuit in a soft material using an NiNP-CNT ink is more rapid and inexpensive than the complex physical and chemical means typically used to magnetize CNTs.

  7. Improving remote sensing flood assessment using volunteered geographical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Schnebele

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology for the generation of flood hazard maps is presented fusing remote sensing and volunteered geographical data. Water pixels are identified utilizing a machine learning classification of two Landsat remote sensing scenes, acquired before and during the flooding event as well as a digital elevation model paired with river gage data. A statistical model computes the probability of flooded areas as a function of the number of adjacent pixels classified as water. Volunteered data obtained through Google news, videos and photos are added to modify the contour regions. It is shown that even a small amount of volunteered ground data can dramatically improve results.

  8. Intrinsic Embedded Sensors for Polymeric Mechatronics: Flexure and Force Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif P. Jentoft

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available While polymeric fabrication processes, including recent advances in additive manufacturing, have revolutionized manufacturing, little work has been done on effective sensing elements compatible with and embedded within polymeric structures. In this paper, we describe the development and evaluation of two important sensing modalities for embedding in polymeric mechatronic and robotic mechanisms: multi-axis flexure joint angle sensing utilizing IR phototransistors, and a small (12 mm, three-axis force sensing via embedded silicon strain gages with similar performance characteristics as an equally sized metal element based sensor.

  9. The Army Needs a Strategic Armored Gun System--Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-05

    the AGS ROC. IVECO- Fiat, The Italian firm o4 IVECO- Fiat has proposed three variants as candidates for the AGS! - The Centauro 9x8 wheeled light...armored vehicle with OTO Melana, i05mm turret. - The Centauro SxO with the Cadillac-Gage 105mm turret mounting the Royal Ordnance L-7 105mm gun. - The... Centauro 6x6 with the LAV-i10mm turret and EX-35 gun. The three systems cannot meet many of the AGE requirements# primarily weightp since the heaviest

  10. Flood Plain Information, Delhi New York, West Branch Delaware River and Little Delaware River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    1,383.9 1,382.4 1,391.3 Little Delaware River Back River Road 0.15 1,346.4 1,346.9 1,352.1 College Golf Course Footbridge 0.28 1,349.4 1,350.0 1,353.2...College Golf Course Footbridge 0.36 1,353.7 1,353.6 1,356.1 Bridge by USGS Gaging Station 1.79 1,395.9 1,396.9 1,403.6 N.Y. Rte. 28 5.93 1,533.9

  11. Cyclic Stress-Strain Studies of Metals in Torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1940-12-01

    give a uniform stress distribution for th,at part of the specimen .on which the twist uas measured. IQ the cyclic” torsion tests data for a shearing...In the tensile and the, com- pressive tests, strains, were measured, over 2-i.~h g-e leugths usiag the I.larteLnsmirror .= tensometer - ~?hree-iach gage...considered. thus far.., Except foy the ~irst part of the firs”t cz?cle, a li~e~~ relati-onship between shearing stress aad strain was not obtained”. What

  12. Tests of Flat Panels with Four Types of Stiffeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-01-01

    within one-half of 1 percent by a standard tensile test. in this test two Huggenberger tensometers with 1-inch gage lengths were used to measure the...into three equal parts by a lever arrsngement, the loads being 25-pound bags of shot. This lever system wss designed to fit all four stiffener spacings...the platens about an axis normal to the plane of the specimen was very small. In the second and third groups of tests, tensometers were also attached

  13. Propagation Testing of M61 Rockets in Single Round Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    approximately 4.5" diameter by 78" long and weighs 58 pounds. It requires a 24 volt DC: power source for firing the electric squib in the igniter...34 inside diameter, 16 gage wall thickness. A dome is welded to one end; and a square flange is welded to the other end, with four bolts welded to the...a spring is attached to the blind flange to apply retention pressure to the rocket contained within the SRC. Square stacking brackets with guide pins

  14. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Gearbox 3 Planet Bearing Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jonathan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-03-24

    The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative gearbox was redesigned to improve its load-sharing characteristics and predicted fatigue life. The most important aspect of the redesign was to replace the cylindrical roller bearings with preloaded tapered roller bearings in the planetary section. Similar to previous work, the strain gages installed on the planet tapered roller bearings were calibrated in a load frame. This report describes the calibration tests and provides the factors necessary to convert the measured units from dynamometer testing to bearing loads, suitable for comparison to engineering models.

  15. Some important aspects in testing high-modulus fiber composite tubes designed for multiaxial loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, T. L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Tubular specimens were potted in metal grips to determine the feasibility of this gripping method in applying multiaxial loads. Strain gage rosettes were used to assess grip transitional strains, through thickness strain variation and strain variations along the tube length and circumference. The investigation was limited to loading 0, 45, plus or minus 45, and 90 deg graphite/epoxy and glass/epoxy tubes in axial tension. Results include modifications made to the grips to reduce transitional strains, illustrations of the tube failure modes, and some material properties. The gripping concept shows promise as a satisfactory technique for applying multiaxial loads to high-strength, high-modulus fiber composite tubes.

  16. Bathymetry of the Hong and Luoc River Junction, Red River Delta, Vietnam, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Paul J.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; Toan, Duong Duc; Thanh, Mung Dinh; Shimizu, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the Water Resources University in Hanoi, Vietnam, conducted a bathymetric survey of the junction of the Hong and Luoc Rivers. The survey was done to characterize the channel morphology of this delta distributary network and provide input for hydrodynamic and sediment transport models. The survey was carried out in December 2010 using a boat-mounted multibeam echo sounder integrated with a global positioning system. A bathymetric map of the Hong and Luoc River junction was produced which was referenced to the datum of the Trieu Duong tide gage on the Luoc River.

  17. Use of hot-wire anemometry for turbulence measurements in shock induced flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, L. C.; Duffy, R. E.; Troller, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    A research program is currently being conducted with the aim to investigate the operating environment of future gas turbines. The present paper provides a description of the experimental methods which have been employed in performing turbulence intensity measurements in shock-induced flows. In a discussion of the instrumentation, attention is given to the employed low pressure shock tube, the hot-wire probe, the anemometer, the test facility, the experimental setup, the Kistler pressure transducer, and silicon piezoresistive gages. Aspects of instrumentation calibration are considered along with data corrections, experimental data, and data processing.

  18. A note on generalized electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kruglov, S I

    2011-01-01

    The generalized Maxwell equations with arbitrary gage parameter are considered in the $11\\times 11$-matrix form. The gauge invariance of such a model is broken due to the presence of a scalar field. The canonical and symmetrical Belinfante energy-momentum tensors are found. The dilatation current is obtained and we demonstrate that the theory possesses the dilatation symmetry. The matrix Schr\\"{o}dinger form of equations is derived. The non-minimal interaction in curved space-time is introduced and equations are considered in Friedmann--Robertson--Walker background. We obtain some solutions of equations for the vector field.

  19. Methods for estimating streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites in western Montana based on data through water year 2009: Chapter G in Montana StreamStats

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Peter M.; Sando, Roy; Sando, Steven K.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2016-04-05

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality and the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation, developed regional regression equations based on basin and streamflow characteristics for streamflow-gaging stations through water year 2009 that can be used to estimate streamflow characteristics for ungaged sites in western Montana. The regression equations allow estimation of low-flow frequencies; mean annual and mean monthly streamflows; and the 20-, 50-, and 80-percent durations for annual and monthly duration streamflows for ungaged sites in western Montana that are unaffected by regulation.

  20. A Small Area In-Situ MEMS Test Structure to Accurately Measure Fracture Strength by Electrostatic Probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitsie, Fernando; Jensen, Brian D.; de Boer, Maarten

    1999-07-15

    We have designed, fabricated, tested and modeled a first generation small area test structure for MEMS fracture studies by electrostatic rather than mechanical probing. Because of its small area, this device has potential applications as a lot monitor of strength or fatigue of the MEMS structural material. By matching deflection versus applied voltage data to a 3-D model of the test structure, we develop high confidence that the local stresses achieved in the gage section are greater than 1 GPa. Brittle failure of the polycrystalline silicon was observed.

  1. Un matérialisme « stupéfiant »

    OpenAIRE

    Berdet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Ce texte se veut programmatique. Il dresse le portrait politique d’un Walter Benjamin en « matérialiste anthropologique », portrait sous le signe duquel se place la présente revue. En suivant certaines indications du philosophe, il dégage cinq grandes familles du matérialisme anthropologique, en démontre le dénominateur commun, pour en proposer finalement une première définition minimale. Il montre comment le matérialisme anthropologique déplace le cadre conceptuel du matérialisme dialectique...

  2. Test Structures Applied to the Rapid Prototyping of Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, M.; Chang, L-J.; Martin, D.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, test structures were used to aid in the rapid development of a gas sensor and pressure sensor. These sensors were fabricated using co-fired ceramic technology and a multiproject approach. This talk will describe results obtained from a ceramic substrate which contained 36 chips with six variants including the sensors, process control monitors, and an interconnect chip. As far as the authors know, this is the first implementation of multi-projects in co-fired ceramic substrate. The gas sensor is being developed for the Space Shuttle and the pressure gage is being developed as a Martian barometer.

  3. Handbook of Supersonic Aerodynamics. Section 20. Wind Tunnel Instrumentation and Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-01

    Ground (BRL) R. Jackson , M. R. Mulkey, and J. D. Whitfield of the Gas Dynamics Facility, Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC GDF) H. Ramm and...Low Pressures," J. Aeronaut. Sci., Vol. 15 (December 1948), pp. 735-737. 50. Kane, E. D. and Maslach , G. J. Impact-Pressure Interpretation in a...1954. 55. Schaaf, S. A. and Cyr, R. R. "Time Constants for Vacuum Gage Sys- tems," J. Appl. Phys., Vol. 20 (1949), pp. 860-863. 56. Maslach , G. J. "A

  4. Load-displacement measurement and work determination in three-point bend tests of notched or precracked specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzard, R. J.; Fisher, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Suggestions for testing of notched or cracked three-point bend specimens are presented that (1) correct displacement measurement errors resulting from misalignment between the load applicator and specimen; (2) account for coincidental strains not associated with the work of crack extension; (3) simplify record analysis and processing; and (4) extend displacement gage range without sacrifice of sensitivity or accuracy. These testing details are particularly applicable to procedures in which the crack extension force J(I) is determined from the work done on the specimen.

  5. Water resources data, Indiana, water year 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James A.; Keeton, Charles R.; Benedict, Brian L.; Hammil, Lowell E.

    1994-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1993 water year for Indiana consist of records of discharge, stage, and water quality of streams and wells; reservoir stage and contents; and water levels in lakes and wells. This report contains records of discharge for 175 stream-gaging station, stage for 5 stream station, 1 sediment station, stage and contents for 1 reservoir, water quality for 3 streams, and water levels for 80 lakes and 94 observation wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Indiana in cooperation with State and Federal agencies.

  6. Water resources data, Indiana, water year 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James A.; Keeton, Charles R.; Benedict, Brian L.; Hammil, Lowell E.

    1993-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1992 water year for Indiana consist of records of discharge, stage, and water quality of streams and wells; reservoir stage and contents; and water levels in lakes and wells. This report contains records of discharge for 175 stream-gaging stations, stage for 7 stream stations, 1 sediment station, stage and contents for 1 reservoir, water quality for 3 streams, and water levels for 80 lakes and 94 observation wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Indiana in cooperation with State and Federal agencies.

  7. Water resources data, Indiana, water year 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James A.; Deiwert, Clyde E.

    1992-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Indiana consist of records of discharge, stage, and water quality of streams and wells; reservoir stage and contents; and water levels in lakes and wells. This report contains records of discharge for 183 stream-gaging stations, stage for 7 stream stations, stage and contents for 1 reservoir, water quality for 3 streams, and water levels for 80 lakes and 95 observation wells. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in Indiana in cooperation with State and Federal Agencies.

  8. La participation des personnes utilisatrices aux exercices de planification et d'organisation des services de santé mentale au Québec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Clément

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cet article documente la manière dont s'est renouvelé et s'est transformé au fil du temps le projet de faire participer les usagers aux exercices de planification et d'organisation des services de santé mentale au Québec (Canada. Pour ce faire, les auteurs reviennent sur l'ensemble des documents ministériels qui ont traité de cette question et dégage, pour les principaux moment-clés, les principales modalités de participation des usagers.

  9. Venusian atmospheric turbulence evaluated from cloud brightness distribution in VEX UV images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraguchi, T.; Kasaba, Y.; Hoshino, N.; Sato, T. M.; Takahashi, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Yamada, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Kouyama, T.; Titov, D.; Markiewicz, W.

    2011-10-01

    This study suggested following points: (1) The power spectra mostly contained the inflection. The slope at lower wavenumbers was steeper than that at higher wavenumbers. Such a feature agrees with the characteristics in the kinetic energy spectra shon Earth (Nastrom et al., 1984; Nastrom and Gage, 1985). (2) The slopes at planetary wavenumbers K Matsuda (2006) suggested that the inflection point at 330 - 1000km can be a border between 2D and 3D turbulences. Our result indicates a possibility to have enstrophy forward cascade in 2D turbulence at lower wavenumbers and the energy forward cascade in 3D turbulence at higher wavenumbers.

  10. Estimated dissolved-solids loads and trends at selected streams in and near the Uinta Basin, Utah, Water Years 1989–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiros, Susan A.

    2017-03-23

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Forum, studied trends in dissolved-solids loads at selected sites in and near the Uinta Basin, Utah. The Uinta Basin study area includes the Duchesne River Basin and the Middle Green River Basin in Utah from below Flaming Gorge Reservoir to the town of Green River.Annual dissolved-solids loads for water years (WY) 1989 through 2013 were estimated for 16 gaging stations in the study area using streamflow and water-quality data from the USGS National Water Information System database. Eight gaging stations that monitored catchments with limited or no agricultural land use (natural subbasins) were used to assess loads from natural sources. Four gaging stations that monitored catchments with agricultural land in the Duchesne River Basin were used to assess loads from agricultural sources. Four other gaging stations were included in the dissolved-solids load and trend analysis to help assess the effects of agricultural areas that drain to the Green River in the Uinta Basin, but outside of the Duchesne River Basin.Estimated mean annual dissolved-solids loads for WY 1989–2013 ranged from 1,520 tons at Lake Fork River above Moon Lake, near Mountain Home, Utah (UT), to 1,760,000 tons at Green River near Green River, UT. The flow-normalized loads at gaging stations upstream of agricultural activities showed no trend or a relatively small change. The largest net change in modeled flow-normalized load was -352,000 tons (a 17.8-percent decrease) at Green River near Green River, UT.Annual streamflow and modeled dissolved-solids loads at the gaging stations were balanced between upstream and downstream sites to determine how much water and dissolved solids were transported to the Duchesne River and a section of the Green River, and how much was picked up in each drainage area. Mass-balance calculations of WY 1989–2013 mean annual dissolved-solids loads at the studied sites show

  11. Ab initio calculation of the NMR shielding constants for histamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, A. P.; Dobrowolski, J. Cz.; Sadlej, J.

    1997-12-01

    The gage-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) approach is used within the coupled Hartree-Fock approximation to compute the 1H, 13C and 15N NMR shielding constants in two tautomeric forms of both the histamine molecule and its protonated form. An analysis of the results shows that the protonation on the end of the chain changes its nitrogen shielding constants of the pyridine and pyrrole type. These changes are much higher for the N(3)-H than for the N(1)-H tautomer.

  12. The Turbulent-Laminar Transition on the Rocket Surface During the Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Yurchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The variety of turbulent-laminar transition criteria in such environments as the launch vehicle injection points to the essential influence of spherical nose roughness, which is included in one form or another in the critical Reynolds numbers for a lot of explorers of blunt bodies. Some of researchers of the reentry bodies have founded the correlation functions between the momentum thickness Reynolds number and Max number as the transition criteria.In this article we have considered results of flight tests carried out using launch vehicles to define boundary layer regime on the payload fairing surface. The measurements were carried out using specially designed complex of gages consisted of calorimeters, surface temperature gages, and pressure gages. The turbulent-laminar transition was defined in accordance with the sharp change of calorimeter readings and flow separation pressure gages indication.The universal criterion of turbulent-laminar transition has been identified for blunted payload fairings i.e. Reynolds number Reek based on the boundary layer edge parameters in the sonic point of the payload fairing spherical nose and surface roughness height k, which gives the best correlation of all data of flight experiment conducted to define turbulent-laminar transition in boundary layer. The criterion allows defining time margins when boundary layer regime is turbulent at Reek=20±14 existing on space head surfaces and at Reek=6±5 the boundary layer regime is totally laminar.It was defined that under conditions when there are jointly high background disturbances of free stream flux at operation of main launch vehicle engines and influence of the surface roughness the critical value of Reynolds number is an order-diminished value as compared to the values obtained in wind tunnels and in free flight.It was found that with decreasing of roughness influence in growing boundary layer the flow disturbances evolution wide apart the payload fairing

  13. Water Resources Data for California, water year 1981: Vol. 1. Colorado River basin, Southern Great basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake basin, and Pacific slope basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1982-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1981 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 169 gaging stations; stage and contents for 19 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 42 streams and 21 wells; water levels for 169 observation wells. Also included are 10 crest-stage partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  14. Effect of oxygen barrier coatings on oxidation and embrittlement of Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo foil in heat shield applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. K.; Unnam, J.; Wiedemann, K. E.

    1986-01-01

    Because of the loss of ductility with exposure to oxidizing conditions, long time applications of titanium alloys have been limited to temperatures below 700 K and short time applications have been limited to temperatures below 815 K. Oxygen barrier coatings for shielding Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo alloy from oxidation during exposure to high temperatures were studied using foil gage specimens. The coatings included micrometer-thick sputtered SiO2 and chemical-vapor-deposited silicate layers both with and without an aluminum basecoat. The oxidation rates and resistance to embrittlement of the coated specimens were significantly better than those of the uncoated specimens.

  15. Sources des textes traduits

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Stanton Elizabeth Cady, Eighty Years & More : Reminiscences, 1815-1897, Boston, Northeastern University Press, 1993. [New York, T. Fisher Unwin 1898]. Stanton Elizabeth Cady, Anthony Susan B., Gage Matilda Joslyn et al., History of Woman Suffrage, vol. I, 1848-1861, New York, Fowler and Wells, 1881. Stanton Elizabeth Cady et al., The Woman’s Bible, Boston, Northeastern University Press, 1993 [1895-1898]. Bernhard Virginia, et Fox-Genovese Elizabeth éd., The Birth of American Feminism : the Se...

  16. SSX2-4 expression in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, K B V; Pøhl, M; Olsen, K E

    2014-01-01

    The expression of cancer/testis antigens SSX2, SSX3, and SSX4 in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was examined, since they are considered promising targets for cancer immunotherapy due to their immunogenicity and testis-restricted normal tissue expression. We characterized three SSX antibodies...... was only detected in 5 of 143 early-stage NSCLCs, which is rare compared to other cancer/testis antigens (e.g. MAGE-A and GAGE). However, further studies are needed to determine whether SSX can be used as a prognostic or predictive biomarker in NSCLC....

  17. Steady- and unsteady-pressure measurements on a supercritical-wing model with oscillating control surfaces at subsonic and transonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, M. C.; Ricketts, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    A high aspect ratio supercritical wing with oscillating control surfaces is described. The semispan wing model was instrumented with 252 static pressure orifices and 164 in situ dynamic pressure gages for studying the effects of control surface position and sinusoidal motion on steady and unsteady pressures. Results from the present test (the third in a series of tests on this model) were obtained in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at Mach numbers of 0.60, 0.78, and 0.86 and are presented in tabular form.

  18. Supply chain management et tableau de bord prospectif : à la recherche de synergies

    OpenAIRE

    MORANA, Joelle; Paché, Gilles

    2000-01-01

    National audience; Face à un environnement de plus en plus complexe et turbulent, des publications relativement onvergentes tendent à indiquer que l'efficacité d'une chaîne logistique globale se mesure à l'aune de son niveau de réactivité, de reconfiguration rapide des processus, d'élimination des gaspillages etd'intelligence. Si un relatif consensus se dégage ainsi sur les facteurs-clés de succès d'un supply chain management, force est de reconnaître que peu de hoses ont été dites et écrites...

  19. Crash response data system for the controlled impact demonstration (CID) of a full scale transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calloway, Raymond S.; Knight, Vernie H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    NASA Langley's Crash Response Data System (CRDS) which is designed to acquire aircraft structural and anthropomorphic dummy responses during the full-scale transport CID test is described. Included in the discussion are the system design approach, details on key instrumentation subsystems and operations, overall instrumentation crash performance, and data recovery results. Two autonomous high-environment digital flight instrumentation systems, DAS 1 and DAS 2, were employed to obtain research data from various strain gage, accelerometer, and tensiometric sensors installed in the B-720 test aircraft. The CRDS successfully acquired 343 out of 352 measurements of dynamic crash data.

  20. Mechanical Properties and Fatigue Behavior of Unitized Composite Airframe Structures at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    T5 T5-8 25 MS3-2 ±45° T6 T6-2 19 After labeling, the gage section width and thickness was measured using a Mitutoyo Absolute Solar Digimatic Caliper...solution of soap and water and thoroughly rinsed with distilled water in order to remove contaminants from the machining process. After cleaning, specimens...section width and thickness was measured using a Mitutoyo Absolute Solar Digimatic Caliper, Model N0. CD-S6”CT. Specimen thickness varied slightly from

  1. Using the tracer-dilution discharge method to develop streamflow records for ice-affected streams in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capesius, Joseph P.; Sullivan, Joseph R.; O'Neill, Gregory B.; Williams, Cory A.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate ice-affected streamflow records are difficult to obtain for several reasons, which makes the management of instream-flow water rights in the wintertime a challenging endeavor. This report documents a method to improve ice-affected streamflow records for two gaging stations in Colorado. In January and February 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board, conducted an experiment using a sodium chloride tracer to measure streamflow under ice cover by the tracer-dilution discharge method. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of obtaining accurate ice-affected streamflow records by using a sodium chloride tracer that was injected into the stream. The tracer was injected at two gaging stations once per day for approximately 20 minutes for 25 days. Multiple-parameter water-quality sensors at the two gaging stations monitored background and peak chloride concentrations. These data were used to determine discharge at each site. A comparison of the current-meter streamflow record to the tracer-dilution streamflow record shows different levels of accuracy and precision of the tracer-dilution streamflow record at the two sites. At the lower elevation and warmer site, Brandon Ditch near Whitewater, the tracer-dilution method overestimated flow by an average of 14 percent, but this average is strongly biased by outliers. At the higher elevation and colder site, Keystone Gulch near Dillon, the tracer-dilution method experienced problems with the tracer solution partially freezing in the injection line. The partial freezing of the tracer contributed to the tracer-dilution method underestimating flow by 52 percent at Keystone Gulch. In addition, a tracer-pump-reliability test was conducted to test how accurately the tracer pumps can discharge the tracer solution in conditions similar to those used at the gaging stations. Although the pumps were reliable and consistent throughout the 25-day study period

  2. Behavioral Variability, Learning Processes, and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    BRONFENBRENNER , J CARDINET, C. M. CLARK, W. DOYLE, M. J. DUNKIN, N L. GAGE, R. GLASER. S. HEYNEMAN, A. M. HUBERMAN, L. G. KATZ. P. KOCH, M LAMPERT, G...ce W’est par la r~petition de la r~gle gdn~rale scion laquelle il nWest jamais inutile de bien connaitre le niveau de Fdl~ve pour lui prodiguer uri ...rappeler, une place contralo daiis )a th~ urie constructiviste de Piagot (t96-7). Dans un antre contexte, Popper (1973) l’a explicitemerit utilise pour

  3. Solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis preprototype subsystem. [oxygen production for life support systems on space stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Hardware and controls developed for an electrolysis demonstration unit for use with the life sciences payload program and in NASA's regenerative life support evaluation program are described. Components discussed include: the electrolysis module; power conditioner; phase separator-pump and hydrogen differential regulator; pressure regulation of O2, He, and N2; air-cooled heat exchanger; water accumulator; fluid flow sight gage assembly; catalytic O2/H2 sensor; gas flow sensors; low voltage power supply; 100 Amp DC contactor assembly; and the water purifier design.

  4. Strength-length scaling of elementary hemp fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poriķe, E.; Andersons, J.

    2013-03-01

    The application of hemp fibers as a reinforcement of composite materials necessitates the characterization of fiber strength scatter and the effect of fiber length on its strength. With this aim, elementary hemp fibers were tested in tension at two different gage lengths. Due to the similar morphology of hemp and flax fibers, the probabilistic strength models derived and verified for the latter were applied to the former. The fiber strength was found to agree with the modified Weibull distribution. The modeling approaches developed for describing the variability of the strength and failure strain of elementary flax fibers are shown to be also applicable to hemp fibers.

  5. Un terrain d'histoire culturelle : la Tunisie

    OpenAIRE

    Bendana, Kmar

    2002-01-01

    rubrique Positions de recherche; National audience; Ce texte reproduit l'exposé que Kmar BENDANA a prononcé pour la soutenance de son habilitation à diriger des recherches, le 10 juin 2002, à la Faculté des Sciences Humaines et Sociales de Tunis, sous le titre : Histoire culturelle et histoire des intellectuels en Tunisie aux XIXe et XXe siècles. L'auteur y passe en revue l'ensemble de ses travaux à la lumière des nouvelles hypothèses de travail qui se profilent à ce stade. Elle dégage la con...

  6. An initial abstraction and constant loss model, and methods for estimating unit hydrographs, peak streamflows, and flood volumes for urban basins in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Streamflow data, basin characteristics, and rainfall data from 39 streamflow-gaging stations for urban areas in and adjacent to Missouri were used by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Metropolitan Sewer District of St. Louis to develop an initial abstraction and constant loss model (a time-distributed basin-loss model) and a gamma unit hydrograph (GUH) for urban areas in Missouri. Study-specific methods to determine peak streamflow and flood volume for a given rainfall event also were developed.

  7. Interaction Effects of Cracks, Flaws and Damage in Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-04

    Crack Opening Displacement (COD) gage from M7s 6: 1000 lb. Load Cell from Sensotech 7: 2-channel DC amplifier from Ectron 8. Microsoft’s Virtual Basic...the Galil card language has been completed. Microsoft’s Virtual Basic is being used to create a driver program which is more visual and convenient. A...eealy, d MYZZ is Weaker than the grain for nt Aula fractur Fig.19 gi the diand ca. eson g OWal *nodal force curve for the cuse of LP - =EP and E?- a

  8. Statistical process control (SPC) for coordinate measurement machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, R.N.

    2000-01-04

    The application of process capability analysis, using designed experiments, and gage capability studies as they apply to coordinate measurement machine (CMM) uncertainty analysis and control will be demonstrated. The use of control standards in designed experiments, and the use of range charts and moving range charts to separate measurement error into it's discrete components will be discussed. The method used to monitor and analyze the components of repeatability and reproducibility will be presented with specific emphasis on how to use control charts to determine and monitor CMM performance and capability, and stay within your uncertainty assumptions.

  9. Hydrologic data for Little Elm Creek, Trinity River basin, Texas, 1976

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, R.M.; Hays, T.H.; Schoultz, C.T.

    1976-01-01

    This report contains rainfall, runoff, and storage data collected during the 1976 water year for a 75.5 sq mi area above the stream-gaging station Little Elm Creek near Aubrey, Texas. Floodflows from 35.7 sq mi of the area are regulated by 16 floodwater-retarding structures constructed by the Soil Conservation Service. During the 1976 water year, five storm periods were selected for detailed computations and analyses. Beginning with the 1975 water year, water-quality data is given for Little Elm Creek. Investigations in the Little Elm Creek watershed were terminated on September 30, 1976. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Techniques to estimate generalized skew coefficients of annual peak streamflow for natural basins in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Linda J.; Asquith, William H.; Slade, Raymond M.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents two techniques to estimate generalized skew coefficients used for log-Pearson Type III peak-streamflow frequency analysis of natural basins in Texas. A natural basin has less than 10 percent impervious cover, and less than 10 percent of its drainage area is controlled by reservoirs. The estimation of generalized skew coefficients is based on annual peak and historical peak streamflow for all U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations having at least 20 years of annual peak-streamflow record from natural basins in Texas. Station skew coefficients calculated for each of 255 Texas stations were used to estimate generalized skew coefficients for Texas.

  11. A cephalic influence on gastric motility upon seeing food in domestic turkeys (Melagris gallopavo), great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, G E; Evanson, O A; Redig, P T

    1976-11-01

    Strain gage transducers were permanently implanted on the muscular stomachs of 13 turkeys, 3 great-horned owls and 2 red-tailed hawks to monitor gastric motility before, during and after eating. Following fasting, the sight of food resulted in significant increases in gastric contractile activity in all three species. Gastric motility further increased when the birds were allowed to eat. In raptors, however, a brief interruption in gastric motility occurred immediately after eating. This is apparently analogous to receptive relaxation which occurs in the stomach of mammals.

  12. Les jetons de l’Abbé Gaultier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Olivier

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available On peut penser que l’aspect caricatural, pour notre époque, de l’enseignement de la géographie, qui se dégage des manuels rédigés en terme de demanderéponse au XIXe siècle, était tempéré par l’usage de la carte, point de départ et d’aboutissement, tout au moins pour certains pédagogues comme l’Abbé Gaultier.

  13. Experimental and Computational Study of Underexpanded Jet Impingement Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufer, Shann J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Picetti, Donald

    2009-01-01

    An experiment was performed to assess CFD modeling of a hypersonic-vehicle breach, boundary-layer flow ingestion and internal surface impingement. Tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel. Four simulated breaches were tested and impingement heat flux data was obtained for each case using both phosphor thermography and thin film gages on targets placed inside the model. A separate target was used to measure the surface pressure distribution. The measured jet impingement width and peak location are in good agreement with CFD analysis.

  14. Evaluación de tensiones en un tanque cilíndrico para gas natural vehicular

    OpenAIRE

    Alva Dávila, Fortunato

    2008-01-01

    El presente trabajo trata sobre la evaluación de tensiones en un tanque cilíndrico para gas natural vehicular, utilizando el método analítico, estudiado por Lamé en 1833, por simulación numérica mediante el uso de un software comercial Cosmo Works, aplicando la técnica de elementos y por el método experimental (strain gages) El objetivo fundamental del estudio es, evaluar las tensiones y deformaciones de un tanque cilíndrico para GNV, para verificar la resistencia de los tanques que se es...

  15. River Mileages and Drainage Areas for Illinois Streams. Volume 2. Illinois River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    FOREST 50.2 MADISON STREET RIVER FOREST 50.5 IL PT 56 RIVER FOREST 51.0 C & NW RR RIVER FOREST 51.1 LAKE STREET RIVER FOREST 51.6 CHICAGO AVENUE RIVER ... FOREST 51.9 SILVER CREEK R RIVER FOREST 53.9 DAM S35v40NoRI2E RIVER FOREST 54.2 NORTH PUEBLO AVENUE RIVER FOREST 55.1 GRAND AVENUE RIVER FOREST 55.1...USGS GAGE 05530600 AT RIVER GROVE 451 415546 O75040 RIVER

  16. Role of ferrite and phosphorus plus sulphur in the crack sensitivity of autogenously welded type 309 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, Jr., F. J.

    1976-07-01

    A study on autogenous welding of Type 309 thin stainless steel sheet was made after experiencing cracking difficulties on several commercial heats. A relationship exists between the sum of the phosphorus plus sulfur, the ferrite control of the weld metal, and the crack sensitivity of autogenously made welds. A new simple weld test for thin-gage sheet is utilized for studying the susceptibility to cracking. A chemistry modification is suggested to alleviate possible weld cracking when autogenously welding this grade. The principles of crack sensitivity prediction could apply to other austenitic stainless steel types where chemistry limits are such that ferrite is possible.

  17. Development of an intelligent hypertext system for wind tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ching F.; Shi, George Z.; Steinle, Frank W.; Wu, Y. C. L. Susan; Hoyt, W. Andes

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a system utilizing artificial intelligence technology to improve the productivity of project engineers who conduct wind tunnel tests. The objective was to create an intelligent hypertext system which integrates a hypertext manual and expert system that stores experts' knowledge and experience. The preliminary (Phase I) effort implemented a prototype IHS module encompassing a portion of the manuals and knowledge used for wind tunnel testing. The effort successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the intelligent hypertext system concept. A module for the internal strain gage balance, implemented on both IBM-PC and Macintosh computers, is presented. A description of the Phase II effort is included.

  18. Long term weathering effects on the thermal performance of the solaron (air) solar collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The test procedures and the results obtained during the evaluation test program on the Solaron Corporation air-type solar collector are presented. The tests were performed under simulated conditions, following long-term exposure to natural weathering conditions. The Solaron Model 2001, air-type solar collector has a gross area of 19 square feet and the weight is 160 pounds. The absorber plate is made of 24-gage steel, the coating is baked-on black paint, the cover consists of two sheets of 1/8-inch low-iron tempered glass, and the insulation is one thickness of 3 5/8-inch fiberglass batting.

  19. Análisis cinético de indicadores difusos en tobillo y rodilla para clasificar la marcha hemipléjica espástica utilizando diagrama de flujo

    OpenAIRE

    Ubaldo Padilla Liendo

    2016-01-01

    Esta investigación pretende modelar características difusas de indicadores cinéticos en tobillo y rodilla de pacientes hemipléjicos espásticos por parálisis cerebral. Estos indicadores son consistentes con los utilizados por los especialistas, en la interpretación clásica para clasificar la hemiplejia, propuesta por el Dr. Gage. Cumpliendo los protocolos del Hospital Ortopédico Infantil en Caracas, Venezuela, se procesan los registros de 178 pacientes hemip...

  20. Leadership Development Wargame Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-10

    rses o f actio n...in ach ievin g a m in o r o b jective. D evelo p ed tru st w ith m u ltip le p layers th ro u gh th e co u rse o f th e gam e. Is firm , fair...s. U sed m u ltip le ap p ro ach es w h en d evelo p in g co u rses o f actio n . So u n d Ju d gm e n t En gaged in th o u gh tfu l