WorldWideScience

Sample records for bay rhode island

  1. Rhode Island unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard Lardaro

    2010-01-01

    How can a state like Rhode Island have such a high unemployment rate? This question has been asked often over the past year, especially since at one point, Rhode Island found itself with the dubious distinction of having the highest unemployment rate in the United States. Following that extreme, Rhode Island seemed to settle into a niche where its rank was third nationally.

  2. 77 FR 43514 - Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... Rhode Island Sound, RI,'' in the Federal Register (76 FR 15246). We received nine comments on the... Sound, RI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is removing an obsolete... Island Sound south of Brenton Point, Rhode Island, for use by vessels waiting to enter Narragansett...

  3. Rhode Island School Terrorist Attack Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Michael W. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the state of safety and terrorist attack preparedness in Rhode Island Schools as determined by Rhode Island school leader perceptions. The study is descriptive in nature as it gathers data to describe a particular event or situation. Using a researcher generated survey based on terrorist preparedness guidelines and suggestions…

  4. Lessons from the Rhode Island banking crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas E. Pulkkinen; Eric S. Rosengren

    1993-01-01

    The failure of the Rhode Island Share and Deposit Indemnity Corporation (RISDIC), a private insurance fund, and the closure of its 45 remaining member institutions froze the accounts of 300,000 individuals and 10 percent of all deposits in the state. While the closure of two institutions triggered RISDIC’s demise, flaws in both design and management had set the stage for failure and are the focus of this article. The authors group RISDIC’s problems into three categories: risk concentrations, ...

  5. Developing a wintering waterfowl community baseline for environmental monitoring of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island [version 3; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty J. Kreakie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, the Atlantic Ecology Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Research and Development began an annual winter waterfowl survey of Rhode Island’s Narragansett Bay. Herein, we explore the survey data gathered from 2004 to 2011 in order to establish a benchmark understanding of our waterfowl communities and to establish a statistical framework for future environmental monitoring. The abundance and diversity of wintering waterfowl were relatively stable during the initial years of this survey, except in 2010 when there was a large spike in abundance and a reciprocal fall in diversity. There was no significant change in ranked abundance of most waterfowl species, with only Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola and Hooded Merganser (Lophodytes cucllatus showing a slight yet significant upward trend during the course of our survey period. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS was used to examine the community structure of wintering waterfowl. The results of the NMDS indicate that there is a spatial structure to the waterfowl communities of Narragansett Bay and this structure has remained relatively stable since the survey began. Our NMDS analysis helps to solidify what is known anecdotally about the bay’s waterfowl ecology, and provides a formalized benchmark for long-term monitoring of Narragansett Bay’s waterfowl communities. Birds, including waterfowl, are preferred bioindicators and we propose using our multivariate approach to monitor the future health of the bay. While this research focuses on a specific area of New England, these methods can be easily applied to novel areas of concern and provide a straightforward nonparametric approach to community-level monitoring. The methods provide a statistic test to examine potential drivers of community turnover and well-suited visualization tools.

  6. Leaking Underground Tanks in Rhode Island; LUSTs12

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — This dataset shows the location of storage tanks and associated piping used for petroleum and certain hazardous substances that have experienced leaks as determined...

  7. Using hydrogeochemical methods to evaluate complex quaternary subsurface stratigraphy Block Island, Rhode Island, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeger, A.I.; Stone, B.D.

    1996-01-01

    One of the major problems in Hydrogeologic investigations of glaciated regions is the determination of complex stratigraphic relationships in the subsurface where insufficient information is available from drilling and geophysical records. In this paper, chemical characteristics of groundwater were used to identify stratigraphic changes in glacial deposits that were previously inferred on Block Island, Rhode Island, USA, an emergent remnant of the late Wisconsinan terminal moraine, located approximately 16 km south of the Rhode Island mainland. Two chemically distinct water types are recognized on the island: 1) high-iron, characterized by dissolved silica levels in excess of 20 mg/L, bicarbonate greater than 30 mg/L and dissolved iron ranging from 1-20 mg/L; and 2) low-iron, characterized by dissolved silica levels below 16 mg/L, bicarbonate less than 30 mg/L, and less than 0.3 mg/L dissolved iron. The spatial distribution of iron-bearing minerals and organic matter and the resulting redox conditions are believed to control the occurrence of highiron groundwater. The high-iron waters occur almost exclusively in the eastern half of the island and appear to coincide with the presence of allochthonous blocks of Cretaceous-age coastal-plain sediments that were incorporated into Pleistocene-age deposits derived from the Narragansett Bay-Buzzard's Bay lobe of the Late Wisconsinan Laurentide ice sheet. The low-iron waters occur in the western half of the island, where the occurrence of these Cretaceous-age blocks is rare and the sediments are attributed to a sublobe of the Hudson-Champlain lobe of the Late Wisconsinan ice sheet.

  8. Marine Programs at the University of Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, James J.

    Marine science at the University of Rhode Island (URI) is an orientation, a direction. It is not an isolated activity of one department or even of one college. URI has a commitment to a total effort in marine science that is expressed in the cooperation, and, indeed, the interdependence of departments and personnel in many aspects of marine…

  9. How Employers Judge CETA: A Rhode Island Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, G. Geoffrey; Koveos, Peter E.

    1982-01-01

    A telephone survey of Rhode Island employers sought to determine their attitudes toward the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA), CETA-trained employees, and state CETA office assistance. Employers had generally favorable impressions but expressed the need for less red tape, better ability screening, and closer monitoring of the type…

  10. Continuing Evolution: The Rhode Island Early Childhood Summer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horm, Diane M.; O'Keefe, Beverly; Diffendale, Charlotte; Cohen, Amy; Schennum, Ruth; Pucciarelli, Larry; Collins, Cheryl; Merrifield, Margaret; Nardone, Virginia; Martin, Marilyn; Bryan, Linda; DeRobbio, Gail

    2004-01-01

    This narrative chronicles the continued evolution and development of the Rhode Island Early Childhood Summer Institute, an intensive 5-day inservice professional development program designed for educational leaders from various sectors of the early care and education field. The goal is to review the continued use of successful practices…

  11. In Rhode Island, an Unusual Marriage of Engineering and Languages Lures Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Students in the University of Rhode Island's International Engineering Program (IEP) spend a semester studying at an overseas university and another six months interning at a company abroad; at the end of five years, they earn two degrees, in engineering and a foreign language. Despite the extra academic demands, nearly a third of Rhode Island's…

  12. Human Babesia microti Incidence and Ixodes scapularis Distribution, Rhode Island, 1998–2004

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah E. Rodgers; Mather, Thomas N.

    2007-01-01

    Distribution of nymphal Ixodes scapularis in Rhode Island was used as a logistical regressor for predicting presence of human babesiosis. Although the incidence of babesiosis is increasing in southern Rhode Island, large areas of the state are free of babesiosis risk.

  13. 77 FR 30214 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ...) for the State of Rhode Island. See 77 FR 11798. The NPR proposed approval of the Rhode Island State...'' subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October... Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999); Is not an economically significant regulatory...

  14. Surficial geology of the sea floor in Central Rhode Island Sound Southeast of Point Judith, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Schaer, J.D.; Nadeau, M.A.; Wood, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are working together to study sea-floor environments off the northeast coast of the United States. During 2008, NOAA survey H11996 collected multibeam echosounder data in a 65-square kilometer area in central Rhode Island Sound, southeast of Point Judith, Rhode Island. During 2010, the USGS collected bottom photographs and sediment samples from 25 stations in this study area. The bathymetry, photography, and sediment data are used to interpret sea-floor features including scour depressions, sand waves, trawl marks, and dredge spoils. Scour depressions cover the bathymetric highs in much of the study area. Sand waves are located mostly in the southwest, and trawl marks tend to be in the northern regions. Dredge spoils are located at a disposal site in a bathymetric low in the western end of the study area. Most stations have a sea-floor surface of sand or silty sand, but eight of the stations have boulders to pea-sized gravel or gravelly sediment on the surface. Photographs show sandy areas typically have scattered burrows, shells, amphipod communities, and worm tubes. Boulders and cobbles are commonly overgrown with hydrozoans and anemones.

  15. Combined multibeam and bathymetry data from Rhode Island Sound and Block Island Sound: a regional perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; McMullen, Katherine Y.; Danforth, William W.; Blankenship, Mark R.; Clos, Andrew R.; Glomb, Kimberly A.; Lewit, Peter G.; Nadeau, Megan A.; Wood, Douglas A.; Parker, Castleton E.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed bathymetric maps of the sea floor in Rhode Island and Block Island Sounds are of great interest to the New York, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts research and management communities because of this area's ecological, recreational, and commercial importance. Geologically interpreted digital terrain models from individual surveys provide important benthic environmental information, yet many applications of this information require a geographically broader perspective. For example, individual surveys are of limited use for the planning and construction of cross-sound infrastructure, such as cables and pipelines, or for the testing of regional circulation models. To address this need, we integrated 14 contiguous multibeam bathymetric datasets that were produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration during charting operations into one digital terrain model that covers much of Block Island Sound and extends eastward across Rhode Island Sound. The new dataset, which covers over 1244 square kilometers, is adjusted to mean lower low water, gridded to 4-meter resolution, and provided in Universal Transverse Mercator Zone 19, North American Datum of 1983 and geographic World Geodetic Survey of 1984 projections. This resolution is adequate for sea-floor feature and process interpretation but is small enough to be queried and manipulated with standard Geographic Information System programs and to allow for future growth. Natural features visible in the data include boulder lag deposits of winnowed Pleistocene strata, sand-wave fields, and scour depressions that reflect the strength of oscillating tidal currents and scour by storm-induced waves. Bedform asymmetry allows interpretations of net sediment transport. Anthropogenic features visible in the data include shipwrecks and dredged channels. Together the merged data reveal a larger, more continuous perspective of bathymetric topography than previously available, providing a fundamental framework for

  16. Environmental management of mosquito-borne viruses in Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Howard S.; Gettman, Alan; Becker, Elisabeth; Bandyopadhyay, Ananda S.; LeBrun, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) and Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus (EEEV) are both primarily bird viruses, which can be transmitted by several mosquito species. Differences in larval habitats, flight, and biting patterns of the primary vector species result in substantial differences in epidemiology, with WNV more common, primarily occurring in urban areas, and EEEV relatively rare, typically occurring near swamp habitats. The complex transmission ecology of these viruses complicates prediction of disease outbreaks. The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) and Department of Health (DoH) provide prevention assistance to towns and maintain a mosquito surveillance program to identify potential disease risk. Responses to potential outbreaks follow a protocol based on surveillance results, assessment of human risk, and technical consultation.

  17. Rhode Island State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive-waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-01

    The Rhode Island State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Rhode Island. The profile is the result of a survey of radioactive material licensees in Rhode Island. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Rhode Island.

  18. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for seals, whales, and dolphins in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, and the New York/New Jersey...

  19. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anadromous fish species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector arcs in...

  20. 2012 USACE Post Sandy Topographic LiDAR: Rhode Island and Massachusetts Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This topographic elevation point data derived from multiple return light detection and ranging (LiDAR) represents 354.272 square miles of coastline for Rhode Island...

  1. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and terrestrial invertebrate species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New...

  2. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for small mammal species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector polygons...

  3. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Rhode Island based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Rhode Island census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  4. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: HABPT (Habitat and Plant Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for rare terrestrial plants in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Vector points...

  5. Rhode Island State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive-waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rhode Island State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Rhode Island. The profile is the result of a survey of radioactive material licensees in Rhode Island. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Rhode Island

  6. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, and anadromous fish species in coastal Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New...

  7. 2012 USACE Post Hurricane Sandy Topographic LiDAR: Rhode Island and Massachusetts Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This topographic elevation point data derived from multiple return light detection and ranging (LiDAR) represents 354.272 square miles of coastline for Rhode Island...

  8. Chronostratigraphy of uplifted Quaternary hemipelagic deposits from the Dodecanese island of Rhodes (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillévéré, Frédéric; Cornée, Jean-Jacques; Moissette, Pierre; López-Otálvaro, Gatsby Emperatriz; van Baak, Christiaan; Münch, Philippe; Melinte-Dobrinescu, Mihaela Carmen; Krijgsman, Wout

    2016-07-01

    An integrated magneto-biostratigraphic study, based on calcareous nannofossils and foraminifers, together with the radiometric dating of a volcaniclastic layer found in several outcrops, was carried out on the hemipelagic deposits of the Lindos Bay Formation (LBF) at six localities on the island of Rhodes (Greece). Our highly refined chronostratigraphic framework indicates that the lower and upper lithostratigraphic boundaries of the LBF are diachronous. Associated with the 40Ar/39Ar age determination of 1.85 ± 0.08 Ma for the volcaniclastic layer, our data show that among the investigated outcrops, the Lindos Bay type locality section provides the longest record (1.1 Ma) of the LBF. Hemipelagic deposition occurred continuously from the late Gelasian (∼1.9 Ma) to the late Calabrian (∼0.8 Ma), i.e., from Chrons C2n (Olduvai) to C1r.1r (Matuyama) and from nannofossil Zones CNPL7 to CNPL10. This long record, together with the hemipelagic nature of the deposits, make the Lindos Bay type locality section a unique element in the eastern Mediterranean region, allowing future comparisons with other early Quaternary deep-sea sections available in the central and western Mediterranean regions.

  9. The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the State of Rhode Island, elevation data are critical for flood risk management, natural resources conservation, coastal zone management, sea level rise and subsidence, agriculture and precision farming, and other business uses. Today, high-quality light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the sources for creating elevation models and other elevation datasets. Federal, State, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data, on a national basis, that are (on average) 30 years old and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist. A joint goal of State and Federal partners is to acquire consistent, statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data. The new 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative (Snyder, 2012a,b), managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other three-dimensional representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  10. CTD data from Rhode Island Sound collected from R/V Hope Hudner in 2009-2010 in support of Rhode Island Ocean Special Area Management Plan (NODC Accession 0109929)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset consists of 173 CTD casts in Rhode Island and Block Island Sounds obtained during 4 surveys. The surveys were performed during 22-24 September 2009, 7-8...

  11. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small-scale hydroelectric power in Rhode Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric energy at the state level are discussed. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area, and the dual regulatory system from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by the FERC is examined. In Rhode Island, any private rights in the flowing waters of a river or stream depend upon ownership of the abutting land. It appears Rhode Island follows the reasonable use theory of riparian law. The Department of Environmental Management is the most significant administrative agency with regard to dam construction, alteration, and operation in the state of Rhode Island.

  12. Offshore wind farm siting procedures applied offshore of Block Island, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Christopher M.

    Since 2008, the Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Council (CRMC) has been leading a Rhode Island Ocean Area Management Plan (RIOSAMP) in partnership with the University of Rhode Island, resulting in an extensive multidisciplinary analysis of the Rhode Island offshore environment and its suitability for siting an offshore wind farm. As part of the RIOSAMP project, a standard siting optimization approach was first developed based on a siting index defined as the ratio of costs associated with the wind farm deployment to the available wind resource. This index, combined within a marine spatial planning approach to address ecological and societal constraints, provided an initial macro-siting tool (Spaulding et al., 2010). The multiple GIS layers required in this approach and the absence of theoretical support to optimize the resulting zoning, led to an extension of the initial optimization approach into a more comprehensive macro-siting optimization tool, integrating societal and ecological constraints into the siting tool, the Wind Farm Siting Index (WIFSI) (Grilli et al, 2012). The projects led to the definition of several favorable development areas including a Renewable Energy Zone (REZ) off of Block Island, in State Waters. Deep Water Wind Inc. (DWW) plans to install and commission five 6 MW direct drive Siemens lattice jacket turbines in the REZ area, by 2014. In this thesis two major steps are accomplished to refine and expand the RIOSAMP macro-siting tool. First the macro-siting tool is expanded to include a model simulating the exclusionary zones defined by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations. Second a micro-siting model is developed, optimizing the relative position of each turbine within a wind farm area. The micro-siting objective is to minimize, (1) the loss in power due to the loss of wind resource in the wake of the turbines (wake "effect"), and (2) the cable costs that inter-connect the turbines and connecting the farm to the

  13. Hepatitis C Prevention and Needle Exchange Programs in Rhode Island: ENCORE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Raynald; Kofman, Aaron; Larney, Sarah; Fitzgerald, Paul

    2014-07-01

    As Rhode Island's only needle exchange program, ENCORE (Education, Needle Exchange, Counseling, Outreach, and REferrals) serves a wide range of clients infected or at risk for infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Through its on-site and outreach platforms across Rhode Island, ENCORE is in a unique position to serve at-risk individuals who may not otherwise present for prevention, testing and care for HCV, as well as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In this article, we discuss the role of needle exchange programs in preventing HCV transmission, and provide an overview of the history and current operations of ENCORE. PMID:24983019

  14. 75 FR 26976 - Rhode Island; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... 20472, (202) 646-3886. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) hereby... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Rhode Island; Amendment No. 3 to Notice of an Emergency Declaration AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice amends...

  15. First Report to the General Assembly of the Rhode Island Task Force on Teenage Suicide Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode Island Office of the Lieutenant Governor, Providence.

    This document reports on the activities of the Rhode Island Task Force on Teenage Suicide Prevention which held its first meeting in September 1985. The function, progress, membership, and meetings of the three committees (public relations, resource, and research) are discussed. A pilot program on suicide prevention is described which provided…

  16. Continuity in the Rhode Island Writing Project: Keeping Teachers at the Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Susan; Roemer, Marjorie; Sanzen, Keith; Vander Does, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The Presenters' Collaborative Network (PCN) was started in 2002 to support the creation of a corps of teacher-consultants who would lead workshops for the Rhode Island Writing Project (RIWP) at local schools and conferences. The PCN is a group of teachers, past participants from summer institutes or year-round embedded programs in schools that…

  17. REDUCED FOREST COVER AND CHANGES IN BREEDING BIRD SPECIES COMPOSITION IN RHODE ISLAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to assess the relationship of land use/cover, riparian vegetation, and avian populations. Our objective was to compare the vegetation structure in riparian corridors with the composition of breeding bird populations in eight Rhode Island subwatersheds alo...

  18. School District Regionalization in Rhode Island: Relationship with Spending and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    In Rhode Island, unless costs for education are controlled, taxpayers could face increased property taxes, increased sales tax on goods and services, and tax increases to existing fees to raise revenue (NEEP, 2010). Reducing the number of school districts was cited as the number two solution by the New England Economic Partnership in 2010 to…

  19. Socioeconomic Correlates of Current and Regular Smoking among College Students in Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkin, Patrick F.; Tisch, Linda A.; Glicksman, Arvin S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine how sociodemographic variables, in particular socioeconomic status, correlate with current and regular smoking among college students in Rhode Island. Participants and Methods: Over a 4-year period (academic year 2000-2001 to 2003-2004), the authors examined sociodemographic correlates of…

  20. Measuring the Influences That Affect Technological Literacy in Rhode Island High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study sampled the current state of technological literacy in Rhode Island high schools using a new instrument, the Technological Literacy Assessment, which was developed for this study. Gender inequalities in technological literacy were discovered, and possible causes and solutions are presented. This study suggests possible next steps for…

  1. How Will Teachers Fare in Rhode Island's New Hybrid Pension Plan? Public Pension Project Brief 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Butrica, Barbara A.; Haaga, Owen; Southgate, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid retirement plans that combine defined benefit pensions with 401(k) type, defined contribution accounts can play important roles in the reform of public-sector pensions. Summarizing results from our longer report ["How Will Rhode Island's New Hybrid Pension Plan Affect Teachers? A Report of the Public Pension Project" (2014)], this…

  2. Rhode Island Pension Reform: Implications and Opportunities for Education. Education Sector Policy Briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herriot-Hatfield, Jennie; Monahan, Amy; Rosenberg, Sarah; Tucker, Bill

    2011-01-01

    On August 24, 2010, the state of Rhode Island received some outstanding news. Its yearlong, bipartisan effort to develop new policies to spur educational improvement was about to pay off. The state, along with eight others and the District of Columbia, was named a winner of the U.S. Department of Education's Race to the Top grant competition. The…

  3. 77 FR 14691 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Reasonably Available...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    .... Requirements for charcoal lighter materials, aerosol adhesives and floor wax strippers; 3. Requirements for... being in nonattainment of the 1997 8-hour ozone NAAQS (69 FR 23858). The entire State of Rhode Island... Standard--Phase 2 (the Phase 2 Rule) (70 FR 71612; November 29, 2005). As noted in the EPA's Phase 2...

  4. Video Review: Better Places: The Hmong of Rhode Island a Generation Later

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Youyee Vang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a review of Better Places: a documentary that follows up with Hmong families who were originally part of a film produced in the early 1980s about the resettlement experiences of Hmong refugees in Providence, Rhode Island.

  5. Whole-Genome Sequencing Detection of Ongoing Listeria Contamination at a Restaurant, Rhode Island, USA, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosciminski, Michael; Miller, Adam

    2016-01-01

    In November 2014, the Rhode Island Department of Health investigated a cluster of 3 listeriosis cases. Using whole-genome sequencing to support epidemiologic, laboratory, and environmental investigations, the department identified 1 restaurant as the likely source of the outbreak and also linked the establishment to a listeriosis case that occurred in 2013. PMID:27434089

  6. The Brave New World of GEC Evaluation: The Experience of the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filinson, Rachel; Clark, Phillip G.; Evans, Joann; Padula, Cynthia; Willey, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the Health Resources Services Administration introduced new mandates that raised the standards on program evaluation for Geriatric Education Centers. Described in this article are the primary and secondary evaluation efforts undertaken for one program within the Rhode Island Geriatric Education Center (RIGEC), the findings from these…

  7. Whole-Genome Sequencing Detection of Ongoing Listeria Contamination at a Restaurant, Rhode Island, USA, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Jonathan S; Gosciminski, Michael; Miller, Adam

    2016-08-01

    In November 2014, the Rhode Island Department of Health investigated a cluster of 3 listeriosis cases. Using whole-genome sequencing to support epidemiologic, laboratory, and environmental investigations, the department identified 1 restaurant as the likely source of the outbreak and also linked the establishment to a listeriosis case that occurred in 2013. PMID:27434089

  8. Sources of geologic and hydrologic information pertinent to ground-water resources in Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trench, Elaine C.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes sources of geologic and hydrologic information useful to water managers and others involved in the investigation, appraisal, development, and protection of ground-water resources in Rhode Island. The geographic scope of the report includes Rhode Island and small adjoining areas of Massachusetts and Connecticut, where drainage basins are shared with these States. The information summarized is found in maps and reports prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and published by either the U.S. Geological Survey or by the State of Rhode Island. Information sources are presented in maps and tables. Reference maps show drainage divides, town lines, and the 7.5-minute grid of latitude and longitude for the State. Maps show availability of surficial geologic maps, bedrock geologic maps, and ground-water studies by 7.5-minute quadrangle, and show availability of ground-water studies by drainage basin, subbasin, and special study area. Sources of geologic and hydrologic information for the thirty-seven 7.5-minute quadrangles covering Rhode Island have been compiled based on the following information categories: surficial geology, bedrock geology, subsurface materials, altitude of bedrock surface, water-table altitudes, water-table contours, saturated thickness, hydraulic conductivity, transmissivity, drainage divides, recharge areas, ground-water reservoirs, induced infiltration, and ground-water quality. A table for each of the 37 quadrangles lists the major categories of information available for that quadrangle, provides references to the publications in which the information can be found, and indicates the format, scale, and other pertinent attributes of the information. A table organized by report series gives full citations for publications prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey pertaining to the geology and hydrology of Rhode Island. To facilitate location of information for particular municipalities, a table lists cities and towns in the State and

  9. Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) Soil Polygons for the State of Rhode Island: Bristol, Kent, Newport, Providence, and Washington Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — 2013 VERSION 6 Spatial: This data set is a digital soil survey and generally is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National...

  10. 2005 - 2007 US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Topo/Bathy Lidar: Maine, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MASSACHUSETTS AND RHODE ISLAND: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers collects (by themselves and contractors) and maintains LiDAR data including orthophotos in coastal...

  11. Ship Tracklines for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Western Rhode Island Sound (N80_1LINES.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in western Rhode Island Sound aboard the...

  12. Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) Special Line Features for the State of Rhode Island: Bristol, Kent, Newport, Providence, and Washington County

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — This data set is a digital soil survey and generally is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. The...

  13. Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) Special Point Features for the State of Rhode Island: Bristol, Kent, Newport, Providence, and Washington Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — This data set is a digital soil survey and generally is the most detailed level of soil geographic data developed by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. The...

  14. Analysis of Human Trafficking Cases in Rhode Island, 2009-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faith Skodmin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is an analysis of law enforcement identified cases of human trafficking in Rhode Island from 2009 to 2013. Information was collected from police and court records, prosecutors’ press releases, and reports in the media. During this period, there was one case of forced labor of a domestic worker and six cases of domestic sex trafficking. Many of the characteristics of the Rhode Island cases were consistent with other human trafficking cases in the United States. Discussions of key findings include (a outcomes of a criminal case using a new human trafficking statute on fraud in foreign contracting and a civil suit, (b how online prostitution ads are used to market victims to sex buyers using ethnicity of the victims and age and social standing of the sex buyers, and (c how mothers of victims are involved in locating their daughters and making reports to the police that initiated investigations.

  15. The Changing Face of HIV in Pregnancy in Rhode Island 2004–2009

    OpenAIRE

    Jacqueline Firth; Chia-Ching Wang; Fizza Gillani; Nicole Alexander; Elizabeth Dufort; Aadia Rana; Susan Cu-Uvin

    2012-01-01

    Meeting the needs of HIV-infected pregnant women requires understanding their backgrounds and potential barriers to care and safe pregnancy. Foreign-born women are more likely to have language, educational, and economic barriers to care, but may be even more likely to choose to keep a pregnancy. Data from HIV-infected pregnant women and their children in Rhode Island were analyzed to identify trends in demographics, viral control, terminations, miscarriages, timing of diagnosis, and adherence...

  16. Rhode Island Water Supply System Management Plan Database (WSSMP-Version 1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Gregory E.

    2004-01-01

    In Rhode Island, the availability of water of sufficient quality and quantity to meet current and future environmental and economic needs is vital to life and the State's economy. Water suppliers, the Rhode Island Water Resources Board (RIWRB), and other State agencies responsible for water resources in Rhode Island need information about available resources, the water-supply infrastructure, and water use patterns. These decision makers need historical, current, and future water-resource information. In 1997, the State of Rhode Island formalized a system of Water Supply System Management Plans (WSSMPs) to characterize and document relevant water-supply information. All major water suppliers (those that obtain, transport, purchase, or sell more than 50 million gallons of water per year) are required to prepare, maintain, and carry out WSSMPs. An electronic database for this WSSMP information has been deemed necessary by the RIWRB for water suppliers and State agencies to consistently document, maintain, and interpret the information in these plans. Availability of WSSMP data in standard formats will allow water suppliers and State agencies to improve the understanding of water-supply systems and to plan for future needs or water-supply emergencies. In 2002, however, the Rhode Island General Assembly passed a law that classifies some of the WSSMP information as confidential to protect the water-supply infrastructure from potential terrorist threats. Therefore the WSSMP database was designed for an implementation method that will balance security concerns with the information needs of the RIWRB, suppliers, other State agencies, and the public. A WSSMP database was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the RIWRB. The database was designed to catalog WSSMP information in a format that would accommodate synthesis of current and future information about Rhode Island's water-supply infrastructure. This report documents the design and implementation of

  17. 4-m Grid of the Combined Multibeam Bathymetry Generated from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surveys H11922, H11995, H11996, H12009, H12010, H12011, H12015, H12023, H12033, H12137, H12139, H12296, H12298, H12299 Offshore in Rhode island and Block Island Sound (RICOMB_4MUTM, UTM Zone 19, NAD 83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Detailed bathymetric maps of the sea floor in Block Island and Rhode Island Sounds are of great interest to the New York, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts research...

  18. 4-m Grid of the Combined Multibeam Bathymetry Generated from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surveys H11922, H11995, H11996, H12009, H12010, H12011, H12015, H12023, H12033, H12137, H12139, H12296, H12298, and H12299 Offshore in Rhode Island and Block Island Sounds (RICOMB_4MGEO, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Detailed bathymetric maps of the sea floor in Block Island and Rhode Island Sounds are of great interest to the New York, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts research...

  19. Ingestion of cigarettes and cigarette butts by children--Rhode Island, January 1994-July 1996 .

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-14

    During 1995, the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) received 7917 reports of potentially toxic exposures to tobacco products among children aged cigars. Acute nicotine poisoning is characterized by rapid onset of symptoms that may be severe when large amounts have been ingested. During January 1994-July 1996, the Rhode Island Poison Control Center (RIPCC) received 146 reports of ingestion of products containing nicotine by children aged cigarette butts among children aged cigarette butts by children aged < or = 6 years resulted in minor toxic effects and occurred more frequently in households where smoking was permitted in the presence of children and where cigarettes and cigarette wastes were accessible to children.

  20. Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, C. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Neuhauser, K. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012, 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Thirty-seven of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while five were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. Building Science Corporation developed a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average.

  1. Wind turbine generator interaction with conventional diesel generators on Block Island, Rhode Island. Volume 2: Data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilreker, V. F.; Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Kruse, V. J.; Smith, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Assessing the performance of a MOD-OA horizontal axis wind turbine connected to an isolated diesel utility, a comprehensive data measurement program was conducted on the Block Island Power Company installation on Block Island, Rhode Island. The detailed results of that program focusing on three principal areas of (1) fuel displacement (savings), (2) dynamic interaction between the diesel utility and the wind turbine, (3) effects of three models of wind turbine reactive power control are presented. The approximate two month duration of the data acquisition program conducted in the winter months (February into April 1982) revealed performance during periods of highest wind energy penetration and hence severity of operation. Even under such conditions fuel savings were significant resulting in a fuel reduction of 6.7% while the MOD-OA was generating 10.7% of the total electrical energy. Also, electrical disturbance and interactive effects were of an acceptable level.

  2. Analysis of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the Rhode Island/Massachusetts Wind Energy Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.

    2013-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to BOEM on the identification and delineation of offshore leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM in 2012. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of BOEM's Rhode Island/Massachusetts (RIMA) WEA leasing areas. The objective of the NREL evaluation was to assess the proposed delineation of the two leasing areas and determine if the division is reasonable and technically sound. Additionally, the evaluation aimed to identify any deficiencies in the delineation. As part of the review, NREL performed the following tasks: 1. Performed a limited review of relevant literature and RIMA call nominations. 2. Executed a quantitative analysis and comparison of the two proposed leasing areas 3. Conducted interviews with University of Rhode Island (URI) staff involved with the URI Special Area Management Plan (SAMP) 4. Prepared this draft report summarizing the key findings.

  3. "Killed by its mother": infanticide in Providence County, Rhode Island, 1870 to 1938.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Simone

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes infanticide based on the Coroners' Records for Providence County, Rhode Island, from the 1870s to 1938 to determine doctors' and coroners' attitudes toward mothers who killed. The nineteenth century witnessed a medical discourse on the possibility of postpartum insanity as a cause of infanticide. While some women claimed temporary insanity, and some doctors and coroners legitimated this defense, its application to mothers who killed was arbitrary. They determined who deserved this diagnosis based on the woman's character, her forthrightness, and extenuating circumstances. Infanticide divided the profession nationally and at the local level and prevented doctors or coroners from speaking in a united voice on the issue. This article does not attempt to follow cases of infanticide through to jury verdicts. Instead, it provides an opportunity to analyze the circumstances women faced that led them to kill their newborns, and to analyze the responses of doctors and coroners to these mothers who killed. Unlike the findings of other studies, neither physicians nor coroners in Rhode Island were united in a claim of ignorance to save these women from guilty verdicts.

  4. Patient Engagement for Youth in Multiple Facets of Healthcare in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joanna; Rafferty, Jason; Golding, Deborah; Adewale, Victoria; Chan, Lauren; Pastorello, Christina; Stebbins, Patricia; Neukirch, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    Health reform strives to be patient-centered but often emphasizes institutional and financial well-being at the expense of patient responsiveness. Rhode Island is a pioneer, with innovative youth engagement programs in health care. The Youth Advisory Board of the Adolescent Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Initiative at Brown Family Medicine has brought together adolescents to gather feedback about participants' preferences for their health care and bring that feedback to health care providers. The Adolescent Leadership Council (TALC) of Hasbro Children's Hospital is comprised of adolescents with chronic medical illnesses and serves as an advisory group. The Rhode Island Department of Health's Office of Special Needs offers Dare to Dream, a youth leadership development program, a youth advisory council and a healthy lifestyles program. These youth engagement programs allow youth to help shape the health care system to meet their needs and contribute to youth empowerment in the state. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-08.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27472769

  5. Water-quality trends in the Scituate reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, 1983-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2015-01-01

    The Scituate Reservoir is the primary source of drinking water for more than 60 percent of the population of Rhode Island. Water-quality and streamflow data collected at 37 surface-water monitoring stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, from October 2001 through September 2012, water years (WYs) 2002-12, were analyzed to determine water-quality conditions and constituent loads in the drainage area. Trends in water quality, including physical properties and concentrations of constituents, were investigated for the same period and for a longer period from October 1982 through September 2012 (WYs 1983-2012). Water samples were collected and analyzed by the Providence Water Supply Board, the agency that manages the Scituate Reservoir. Streamflow data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey. Median values and other summary statistics for pH, color, turbidity, alkalinity, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, total coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and orthophosphate were calculated for WYs 2003-12 for all 37 monitoring stations. Instantaneous loads and yields (loads per unit area) of total coliform bacteria and E. coli, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, and orthophosphate were calculated for all sampling dates during WYs 2003-12 for 23 monitoring stations with streamflow data. Values of physical properties and concentrations of constituents were compared with State and Federal water-quality standards and guidelines and were related to streamflow, land-use characteristics, varying classes of timber operations, and impervious surface areas.

  6. Patient Engagement for Youth in Multiple Facets of Healthcare in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joanna; Rafferty, Jason; Golding, Deborah; Adewale, Victoria; Chan, Lauren; Pastorello, Christina; Stebbins, Patricia; Neukirch, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    Health reform strives to be patient-centered but often emphasizes institutional and financial well-being at the expense of patient responsiveness. Rhode Island is a pioneer, with innovative youth engagement programs in health care. The Youth Advisory Board of the Adolescent Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Initiative at Brown Family Medicine has brought together adolescents to gather feedback about participants' preferences for their health care and bring that feedback to health care providers. The Adolescent Leadership Council (TALC) of Hasbro Children's Hospital is comprised of adolescents with chronic medical illnesses and serves as an advisory group. The Rhode Island Department of Health's Office of Special Needs offers Dare to Dream, a youth leadership development program, a youth advisory council and a healthy lifestyles program. These youth engagement programs allow youth to help shape the health care system to meet their needs and contribute to youth empowerment in the state. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-08.asp, free with no login].

  7. Profiles of medicinal cannabis patients attending compassion centers in rhode island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, Nickolas; Topletz, Ariel; Frater, Susan; Yates, Gail; Lally, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Little is understood regarding medicinal marijuana dispensary users. We sought to characterize socio-demographics and reasons for medicinal marijuana use among medical cannabis dispensary patients in Rhode Island. Participants (n=200) were recruited from one of two Compassion Centers in Rhode Island and asked to participate in a short survey, which included assessment of pain interference using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). The majority of participants were male (73%), Caucasian (80%), college educated (68%), and had health insurance (89%). The most common reason for medicinal marijuana use was determined to be chronic pain management. Participants were more likely to have BPI pain interference scores of > 5 if they were older (OR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.04-1.78) or reported using cannabis as a substitute for prescription medications (OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.23-4.95), and were less likely to have interference scores of >5 if they had higher income levels (OR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.40-0.70) or reported having ever received treatment for an alcohol use disorder. One-fifth of participants had a history of a drug or alcohol use disorder. Most participants report that medicinal cannabis improves their pain symptomology, and are interested in alternative treatment options to opioid-based treatment regimens. PMID:25715068

  8. First record of the non-indigenous fangtooth moray Enchelycore anatina from Rhodes Island, south- eastern Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. KALOGIROU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The collection of one specimen of the non-indigenous fangtooth moray Enchelycore anatina of tropical Atlantic origin was for the first time found in an area of south eastern Aegean Sea. This record may indicate a recent establishment of the species on the coasts of Rhodes Island and a possible expansion of it on the coastal rocky habitats.

  9. How Will Rhode Island's New Hybrid Pension Plan Affect Teachers? A Report of the Public Pension Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Butrica, Barbara A.; Haaga, Owen; Southgate, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011 Rhode Island replaced the stand-alone defined benefit pension plan it provided to state employees with a hybrid plan that reduced the defined benefit component and added a 401(k)-type, defined contribution component. Although controversial, the new hybrid plan will boost retirement incomes for most of the states public school teachers. Our…

  10. Notes on the continental malacofauna of Rhodes, with two new species for the fauna of the island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barna Páll-Gergely

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Data for 15 terrestrial and freshwater snail (Gastropoda species are given from 35 localities on Rhodes Island. An invasive species, Haitia acuta (Draparnaud, 1805, and a species occurring in brackish waters, Ovatella firminii (Payraudeau, 1826 are new species and genus to the fauna of the island. This is the second record of O. firminii from Greece, which is interesting from another point of view; it was found in freshwater (not brackish about 6 km from the sea.

  11. Assessment of Enterococcus Levels in Recreational Beach Sand Along the Rhode Island Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Eugenie; Parris, Amie L; Wyman, Al; Latowsky, Gretchen

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that coastal beach sand as well as coastal ocean water can be contaminated with fecal indicator Enterococcus bacteria (ENT). A study of sand ENT concentrations over a four-week period at 12 Rhode Island beaches was conducted during the summer of 2009. While average contamination was low relative to water quality standards, every beach had at least one day with very high sand ENT readings. On 10 of the 12 beaches, a statistically significant gradient occurred in geometric mean ENT concentrations among tidal zones, with dry (supratidal, or above high tide mark) sand having the highest level, followed by wet (intratidal, or below high tide mark) and underwater sand. Beaches with higher wave action had significantly lower ENT levels in wet and underwater sand compared to beaches with lower wave action.

  12. Bedrock geologic map of the Uxbridge quadrangle, Worcester County, Massachusetts, and Providence County, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    The bedrock geology of the 7.5-minute Uxbridge quadrangle consists of Neoproterozoic metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Avalon zone. In this area, rocks of the Avalon zone lie within the core of the Milford antiform, south and east of the terrane-bounding Bloody Bluff fault zone. Permian pegmatite dikes and quartz veins occur throughout the quadrangle. The oldest metasedimentary rocks include the Blackstone Group, which represents a Neoproterozoic peri-Gondwanan marginal shelf sequence. The metasedimentary rocks are intruded by Neoproterozoic arc-related plutonic rocks of the Rhode Island batholith. This report presents mapping by G.J. Walsh. The complete report consists of a map, text pamphlet, and GIS database. The map and text pamphlet are available only as downloadable files (see frame at right). The GIS database is available for download in ESRI™ shapefile and Google Earth™ formats, and includes contacts of bedrock geologic units, faults, outcrops, structural geologic information, geochemical data, and photographs.

  13. Siting high-level nuclear waste repositories: A progress report for Rhode Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this booklet, we will not try to argue the pros and cons of nuclear power or weapons production. We will focus instead on the issue of nuclear waste disposal. With the passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, the US Congress and the President charged federal and state regulators with the responsibility of settling that issue by the end of this century - with extensive public involvement. This booklet, now in its second printing, is designed to explain the nature of ''high-level'' nuclear waste, the essential criteria for its safe and permanent disposal, and Rhode Island's participation in the federal repository program. It has been funded from a USDOE grant derived from a utility-financed Nuclear Waste Fund established under the NWPA. 17 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease Outbreak and Carriage Evaluation at a College - Rhode Island, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeters, Heidi M; McNamara, Lucy A; Whaley, Melissa; Wang, Xin; Alexander-Scott, Nicole; Kanadanian, Koren V; Kelleher, Catherine M; MacNeil, Jessica; Martin, Stacey W; Raines, Nathan; Sears, Steven; Vanner, Cynthia; Vuong, Jeni; Bandy, Utpala; Sicard, Kenneth; Patel, Manisha

    2015-06-12

    On February 2, 2015, the Rhode Island Department of Health was notified of a case of meningococcal disease in a male undergraduate student at Providence College. Three days later, a second case was reported in a male undergraduate with no contact with the first student, indicating an attack rate of 44 cases per 100,000 students, nearly 500 times higher than the national incidence of 0.15 cases per 100,000 among persons aged 17-22 years (Division of Bacterial Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC, unpublished data, 2013). Both cases were caused by a rare outbreak strain of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (ST-9069); neither case was fatal. In response to the outbreak, potential contacts received antibiotic chemoprophylaxis, and a mass vaccination campaign with a recently licensed serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine was implemented. In collaboration with CDC, the first phase of a meningococcal carriage evaluation was undertaken. PMID:26068563

  15. One-Minute Navigation Shapefile of Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Western Rhode Island Sound (N80_1_1MINNAV_SORT.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in western Rhode Island Sound aboard the...

  16. 15-Minute Navigation for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Southern Rhode Island Sound in 1980 (A80_6NAV_SORT.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in southern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  17. One-Minute Navigation Shapefile of Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Southern Rhode Island Sound in 1980 (A80_6_1MINNAV_SORT.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in southern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  18. Ship Tracklines for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Southern Rhode Island Sound in 1980 (A80_6LINES2.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in southern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  19. One-Minute Shotpoint Navigation for Seismic-Reflection Data from Western Rhode Island Sound Formatted for Use With Landmark (N80_1_SHOTNAV.TXT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in western Rhode Island Sound aboard the...

  20. Ship Tracklines for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Eastern Rhode Island Sound in 1975 (A75_6LINES2.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in eastern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  1. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), Marine Geological Samples Laboratory (MGSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Geological Samples Laboratory (MGSL) of the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), University of Rhode Island is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  2. 15-Minute Navigation for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Eastern Rhode Island Sound in 1975 (A75_6NAV_SORT.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in eastern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  3. Ship Tracklines of Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Western Rhode Island Sound; Lines Correspond to SEG-Y Files (N80_1_SEGYLINES.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in western Rhode Island Sound aboard the...

  4. One-Minute Navigation Shapefile of Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Eastern Rhode Island Sound in 1975 (A75_6_1MINNAV_SORT.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in eastern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  5. A75_6SEGY.TXT: Seismic-Reflection Profiles in SEG-Y Format from Eastern Rhode Island Sound Collected in 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in eastern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  6. A80_6SEGY.TXT: Seismic-Reflection Profiles in SEG-Y Format From Southern Rhode Island Sound

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in southern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  7. N80_1SEGY.TXT: Seismic-Reflection Profiles in SEG-Y Format From Western Rhode Island Sound

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, a Uniboom seismic-reflection survey was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in western Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research Vessel...

  8. 15-Minute Navigation for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Western Rhode Island Sound (N80_1NAV.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in western Rhode Island Sound aboard the...

  9. Color Shaded-Relief GeoTIFF Image Showing the Combined 4-m Multibeam Bathymetry Generated from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surveys H11922, H11995, H11996, H12009, H12010, H12011, H12015, H12023, H12033, H12137, H12139, H12296, H12298, and H12299 Offshore in Rhode Island and Block Island Sounds (RICOMB_4MMB_UTM19.TIF, UTM Zone 19, NAD 83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Detailed bathymetric maps of the sea floor in Block Island and Rhode Island Sounds are of great interest to the New York, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts research...

  10. Outline of the GeoTIFF Image of the Combined 4-m Multibeam Bathymetry Generated from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surveys H11922, H11995, H11996, H12009, H12010, H12011, H12015, H12023, H12033, H12137, H12139, H12296, H12298, and H12299 offshore in Block Island and Rhode Island Sounds (RICOMBOUTLINE.SHP, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Detailed bathymetric maps of the sea floor in Block Island and Rhode Island Sounds are of great interest to the New York, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts research...

  11. Color Shaded-Relief GeoTIFF Image Showing the Combined 4-m Multibeam Bathymetry Generated from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surveys H11922, H11995, H11996, H12009, H12010, H12011, H12015, H12023, H12033, H12137, H12139, H12296, H12298, and H12299 Offshore in Rhode Island and Block Island Sounds (RICOMB_4MMB_GEO.TIF, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Detailed bathymetric maps of the sea floor in Block Island and Rhode Island Sounds are of great interest to the New York, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts research...

  12. Overview of the Plio-Pleistocene geology of Rhodes, Greece. Lithology, calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy, and sampling of the Kallithea Bay section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Erik; Rasmussen, Tine Lander; Hastrup, Annette

    2005-01-01

    The Kallithea Bay section on the east coast of Rhodes represents an overall transgressive succession ranging from fluviatile and brackish water gravel at the base to deep-water marl at the top. The brackish water and near-shore deposits are assigned to the Kritika Formation, while the deep-water ...

  13. Foraminifera and paleoenvironment of the Plio-Pleistocene Kallithea Bay section, Rhodes, Greece: Evidence for cyclic sedimentation and shallow-water sapropels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tine Lander; Thomsen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Nearly 250 species of benthic foraminifera have been identified from the Plio-Pleistocene strata of the Kallithea Bay section on the eastern coast of Rhodes. The section comprises an overall transgressive succession ranging from fluviatile and brackish-water gravel at the base to fine-grained dee...... beds in the Kallithea Bay section are interpreted as shallow water extensions of sapropels. The shallowest of the laminated beds were deposited at water depth around 75 m....

  14. Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee National Wildlife Refuges: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee NWRs for the next 15 years....

  15. Numerical simulation of groundwater and surface-water interactions in the Big River Management Area, central Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, John P.; Granato, Gregory E.

    2013-01-01

    The Rhode Island Water Resources Board is considering use of groundwater resources from the Big River Management Area in central Rhode Island because increasing water demands in Rhode Island may exceed the capacity of current sources. Previous water-resources investigations in this glacially derived, valley-fill aquifer system have focused primarily on the effects of potential groundwater-pumping scenarios on streamflow depletion; however, the effects of groundwater withdrawals on wetlands have not been assessed, and such assessments are a requirement of the State’s permitting process to develop a water supply in this area. A need for an assessment of the potential effects of pumping on wetlands in the Big River Management Area led to a cooperative agreement in 2008 between the Rhode Island Water Resources Board, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the University of Rhode Island. This partnership was formed with the goal of developing methods for characterizing wetland vegetation, soil type, and hydrologic conditions, and monitoring and modeling water levels for pre- and post-water-supply development to assess potential effects of groundwater withdrawals on wetlands. This report describes the hydrogeology of the area and the numerical simulations that were used to analyze the interaction between groundwater and surface water in response to simulated groundwater withdrawals. The results of this analysis suggest that, given the hydrogeologic conditions in the Big River Management Area, a standard 5-day aquifer test may not be sufficient to determine the effects of pumping on water levels in nearby wetlands. Model simulations showed water levels beneath Reynolds Swamp declined by about 0.1 foot after 5 days of continuous pumping, but continued to decline by an additional 4 to 6 feet as pumping times were increased from a 5-day simulation period to a simulation period representative of long-term average monthly conditions. This continued decline in water levels with

  16. Integrated assessment of behavioral and environmental risk factors for Lyme disease infection on Block Island, Rhode Island.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Finch

    Full Text Available Peridomestic exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi-infected Ixodes scapularis nymphs is considered the dominant means of infection with black-legged tick-borne pathogens in the eastern United States. Population level studies have detected a positive association between the density of infected nymphs and Lyme disease incidence. At a finer spatial scale within endemic communities, studies have focused on individual level risk behaviors, without accounting for differences in peridomestic nymphal density. This study simultaneously assessed the influence of peridomestic tick exposure risk and human behavior risk factors for Lyme disease infection on Block Island, Rhode Island. Tick exposure risk on Block Island properties was estimated using remotely sensed landscape metrics that strongly correlated with tick density at the individual property level. Behavioral risk factors and Lyme disease serology were assessed using a longitudinal serosurvey study. Significant factors associated with Lyme disease positive serology included one or more self-reported previous Lyme disease episodes, wearing protective clothing during outdoor activities, the average number of hours spent daily in tick habitat, the subject's age and the density of shrub edges on the subject's property. The best fit multivariate model included previous Lyme diagnoses and age. The strength of this association with previous Lyme disease suggests that the same sector of the population tends to be repeatedly infected. The second best multivariate model included a combination of environmental and behavioral factors, namely hours spent in vegetation, subject's age, shrub edge density (increase risk and wearing protective clothing (decrease risk. Our findings highlight the importance of concurrent evaluation of both environmental and behavioral factors to design interventions to reduce the risk of tick-borne infections.

  17. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block...

  18. Island Bay Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Back-end data file for the Island Bay Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use.The Wilderness Act of...

  19. Plant Species Distribution on Islands in Machias Bay, Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report details plant species that were present on eleven islands in Machias Bay, Maine during surveys conducted in 1979-80 and 1982-84.

  20. The Changing Face of HIV in Pregnancy in Rhode Island 2004–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Firth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Meeting the needs of HIV-infected pregnant women requires understanding their backgrounds and potential barriers to care and safe pregnancy. Foreign-born women are more likely to have language, educational, and economic barriers to care, but may be even more likely to choose to keep a pregnancy. Data from HIV-infected pregnant women and their children in Rhode Island were analyzed to identify trends in demographics, viral control, terminations, miscarriages, timing of diagnosis, and adherence to followup. Between January 2004 and December 2009, 76 HIV-infected women became pregnant, with a total of 95 pregnancies. Seventy-nine percent of the women knew their HIV status prior to becoming pregnant. Fifty-four percent of the women were foreign-born and 38 percent of the 16 women who chose to terminate their pregnancies were foreign-born. While the number of HIV-infected women becoming pregnant has increased only slightly, the proportion that are foreign-born has been rising, from 41 percent between 2004 and 2005 to 57.5 percent between 2006 and 2009. A growing number of women are having multiple pregnancies after their HIV diagnosis, due to the strength of their desire for childbearing and the perception that HIV is a controllable illness that does not preclude the creation of a family.

  1. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Forty-one. Rhode Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of the laws and programs of the State of Rhode Island governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  2. Radioactive ground-water contamination from a cold scrap recovery operation, Wood River Junction, Rhode Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid wastes from a uranium-bearing cold scrap recovery plant in southern Rhode Island were discharged to the environment through evaporation ponds from 1966-1980. Leakage from the polyethylene- and polyvinylchloride-lined ponds resulted in a plume of contaminated ground water that extends from the ponds to the Pawcatuck River through a highly permeable sand and gravel aquifer. Water quality data from more than 100 observation wells indicate that the plume of contamination is approximately 2300 feet long, 300 feet wide, and is confined to the upper 80 feet of saturated thickness. Piezometric-head and water quality data from wells screened at multiple depths on both sides of the river indicate that contaminants discharge both to the river and to a swampy area at the west edge of the river. Dilution precludes detection of contaminants once they have entered the river. Strontium 90, technetium 99, boron, nitrate, and potassium exceed background concentrations by an order of magnitude in much of the plume. Concentrations of gross β emitters range from 5 to 500 picoCuries per liter. No γ emitters above detection levels have been found. Laboratory tests of exchangeable cations indicate little capacity for uptake on the course sediments. In the swamp, however, reducing conditions may promote observable solute interaction with sediments or organic material

  3. A Comparison of Depression and Mental Distress Indicators, Rhode Island Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongwen Jiang, PhD

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionDepression is a public health concern that warrants accurate population estimates. The patient health questionnaire 8 (PHQ-8 offers high sensitivity and specificity for assessing depression but is time-consuming to administer, answer, and score. We sought to determine whether 1 of 3 simpler instruments — the shorter PHQ-2 or 2 single questions from the health-related quality of life (HRQOL module of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS — could offer accuracy comparable to the PHQ-8.MethodsWe compared the depression and mental distress indicators of 2006 Rhode Island BRFSS data by using 4 types of analyses: 1 sensitivity and specificity estimates, 2 prevalence estimates, 3 multivariable logistic regression modeling of the relationship between each of the 4 indicators and 11 demographic and health risk variables, and 4 geographic distribution of prevalence.ResultsCompared with the PHQ-8, the 3 other measures have high levels of specificity but lower sensitivity. Depression prevalence estimates ranged from 8.6% to 10.3%. The adjusted odds ratios from logistic regression modeling were consistent. Each of the indicators was significantly associated with low income, being unable to work, current smoking, and having a disability.ConclusionThe PHQ-8 indicator is the most sensitive and specific and can assess depression severity. The HRQOL and PHQ-2 indicators are adequate to obtain population prevalence estimates if questionnaire length is limited.

  4. NOAA Digital Orthophotography and Ancillary Oblique Imagery Collection for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and Hudson River/Long Island /NY/NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA Digital Orthophotography and Ancillary Oblique Imagery Collection for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and...

  5. From Concept to Practice: Using the School Health Index to Create Healthy School Environments in Rhode Island Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah N. Pearlman, PhD

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing, and schools are ideal places to support healthy eating and physical activity. In 2000, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC developed the School Health Index, a self-assessment and planning tool that helps schools evaluate and improve physical activity and nutrition programs and policies. Although many state education agencies, health departments, and individual schools have used the School Health Index, few systematic evaluations of the tool have been performed. We examined the physical activity and nutrition environments in Rhode Island’s public elementary schools with high and low minority student enrollments and evaluated a school-based environmental and policy intervention that included implementation of the School Health Index. Methods As part of a CDC Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity cooperative agreement awarded to the Rhode Island Department of Health, we conducted a needs assessment of 102 elementary schools and implemented an intervention in four inner-city elementary schools. In phase 1, we analyzed the Rhode Island Needs Assessment Tool (RINAT, a telephone survey of principals in approximately 50% of all Rhode Island public elementary schools in the state during the 2001–2002 school year (n = 102. Comparisons of the nutrition and physical activity environments of schools with low and high minority enrollment were calculated by cross-tabulation with the chi-square test. In phase 2, we used process and outcome evaluation data to assess the use of the School Health Index in creating healthier environments in schools. Our intervention — Eat Healthy and Get Active! — involved implementing three of the eight School Health Index modules in four Rhode Island elementary schools. Results Survey data revealed that schools with high minority enrollment (student enrollment of ≥10% black, ≥25% Hispanic, or both offered few programs supporting

  6. Vascular Plants Collected at Tornaya Bay, Iturup Island in 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Hideki; FUKUDA, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    A list of 109 species in 40 families of vascular plants around Tornaya Bay, Iturup Islands was prepared based on a field survey in 2012. The biased composition of the ten dominant families at Tornaya Bay may be influenced by the local coastal meadow vegetation of the region. Forest vegetation is poor around Tornaya Bay. Among the noteworthy discoveries was Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. var. succapitata Naruhashi.

  7. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: HABITATS (Habitat and Plant Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for eelgrass, macroalgae, submerged aquatic vegetation, and rare terrestrial plants in coastal Rhode...

  8. Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, C.; Neuhauser, K.

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent 'package' of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  9. Sea-Floor geology and character of Eastern Rhode Island Sound West of Gay Head, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, L.J.; McMullen, K.Y.; Ackerman, S.D.; Blackwood, D.S.; Irwin, B.J.; Schaer, J.D.; Forrest, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    Gridded multibeam bathymetry covers approximately 102 square kilometers of sea floor in eastern Rhode Island Sound west of Gay Head, Massachusetts. Although originally collected for charting purposes during National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hydrographic survey H11922, these acoustic data and the sea-floor stations subsequently occupied to verify them (1) show the composition and terrain of the seabed, (2) provide information on sediment transport and benthic habitat, and (3) are part of an expanding series of studies that provide a fundamental framework for research and management activities (for example, windfarms and fisheries) along the Massachusetts inner continental shelf. Most of the sea floor in the study area has an undulating to faintly rippled appearance and is composed of bioturbated muddy sand, reflecting processes associated with sediment sorting and reworking. Shallower areas are composed of rippled sand and, where small fields of megaripples are present, indicate sedimentary environments characterized by processes associated with coarse bedload transport. Boulders and gravel were found on the floors of scour depressions and on top of an isolated bathymetric high where erosion has removed the Holocene marine sediments and exposed the underlying relict lag deposits of Pleistocene drift. The numerous scour depressions, which formed during storm-driven events, result in the juxtaposition of sea-floor areas with contrasting sedimentary environments and distinct gravel, sand, and muddy sand textures. This textural heterogeneity in turn creates a complex patchwork of habitats. Our observations of local variations in community structure suggest that this small-scale textural heterogeneity adds dramatically to the sound-wide benthic biological diversity.

  10. Nutrient, suspended sediment, and trace element loads in the Blackstone River Basin in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, 2007 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marc J.; Waldron, Marcus C.; DeSimone, Leslie A.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrients, suspended sediment, and trace element loads in the Blackstone River and selected tributaries were estimated from composite water-quality samples in order to better understand the distribution and sources of these constituents in the river basin. The flow-proportional composite water-quality samples were collected during sequential 2-week periods at six stations along the river’s main stem, at three stations on tributaries, and at four wastewater treatment plants in the Massachusetts segment of the basin from June 2007 to September 2009. Samples were collected at an additional station on the Blackstone River near the mouth in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, from September 2008 to September 2009. The flow-proportional composite samples were used to estimate average daily loads during the sampling periods; annual loads for water years 2008 and 2009 also were estimated for the monitoring station on the Blackstone River near the Massachusetts-Rhode Island border. The effects of hydrologic conditions and net attenuation of nitrogen were investigated for loads in the Massachusetts segment of the basin. Sediment resuspension and contaminant loading dynamics were evaluated in two Blackstone River impoundments, the former Rockdale Pond (a breached impoundment) and Rice City Pond.

  11. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control

  12. Simulated and observed 2010 floodwater elevations in the Pawcatuck and Wood Rivers, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Straub, David E.; Smith, Thor E.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy, persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe flooding that set, or nearly set, peaks of record for streamflows and water levels at many long-term U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in Rhode Island. In response to this flood, hydraulic models of Pawcatuck River (26.9 miles) and Wood River (11.6 miles) were updated from the most recent approved U.S. Department of Homeland Security-Federal Emergency Management Agency flood insurance study (FIS) to simulate water-surface elevations (WSEs) for specified flows and boundary conditions. The hydraulic models were updated to Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) using steady-state simulations and incorporate new field-survey data at structures, high resolution land-surface elevation data, and updated flood flows from a related study. The models were used to simulate the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flood, which is the AEP determined for the 2010 flood in the Pawcatuck and Wood Rivers. The simulated WSEs were compared to high-water mark (HWM) elevation data obtained in a related study following the March–April 2010 flood, which included 39 HWMs along the Pawcatuck River and 11 HWMs along the Wood River. The 2010 peak flow generally was larger than the 0.2-percent AEP flow, which, in part, resulted in the FIS and updated model WSEs to be lower than the 2010 HWMs. The 2010 HWMs for the Pawcatuck River averaged about 1.6 feet (ft) higher than the 0.2-percent AEP WSEs simulated in the updated model and 2.5 ft higher than the WSEs in the FIS. The 2010 HWMs for the Wood River averaged about 1.3 ft higher than the WSEs simulated in the updated model and 2.5 ft higher than the WSEs in the FIS. The improved agreement of the updated simulated water elevations to observed 2010 HWMs provides a measure of the hydraulic model performance, which indicates the updated models better represent flooding at other AEPs than the existing FIS models.

  13. COMPARATIVE ETHOGRAM OF MALE SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR OF RHODE ISLAND RED AND VANARAJA FOWL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Modhukoilya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiment was conducted to compare the male sexual behaviour of Rhode Island Red and Vanaraja fowl parent stock managed under deep litter system. Twenty males and 140 females of each genetic group were selected randomly in two batches belonging to age and body weight ranges of 36-48 weeks & 2.8-4.5 kg respectively. Sexual behaviour was recorded for one hour starting at 5 PM. Every bird was observed for 20 sessions. The transformed data were analysed to identify the variation due to genetic group if any. Frequency of mounting in RIR and Vanaraja males are 1.80 ± 0.01 and 1.78 ± 0.01 respectively. Frequency (per hour of forced mounting is seen significantly (P 0.01 more in Vanaraja (1.93 ± 0.02 than that in RIR (1.77 ± 0.01. Frequency of copulation and forced copulation in RIR are 1.87 ± 0.01 and 1.62 ± 0.01 respectively; whereas in Vanaraja these values are 1.84 ± 0.01 and 1.63 ± 0.01. Frequency of male to male aggression does not differ significantly as the values are exactly the same in both genetic groups (2.29 ± 0.03. Frequency of male to female aggression in Vanaraja (2.64 ± 0.02 is significantly (P 0.05 more than that in RIR (2.56 ± 0.02. Frequency of waltzing pattern is seen significantly (P 0.01 more in RIR (2.10 ± 0.02 than in Vanaraja (1.95 ± 0.02. Frequency per hour of high step advance for both RIR and Vanaraja are 2.06 et al. 0.02 and 1.9 ± 0.02 respectively; Frequency per hour of steps off is seen more in RIR (2.00 ± 0.01 than that in Vanaraja (1.94 ± 0.01. Statistical analysis revealed significant effect of genetic group on steps off activity. It is concluded that RIR cocks appear to be more successful breeder. Vanaraja cocks have made more aggressive display of different patterns.

  14. Comparison of Substance-Use Prevalence among Rhode Island and The Miriam Hospital Emergency Department Patients to State and National General Population Prevalence Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino, Vera L.; Baird, Janette R.; Liu, Tao; Merchant, Roland C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Compare the prevalence of recent alcohol, tobacco, and drug use among patients from two Rhode Island emergency departments (EDs) to Rhode Island state and United States national general population estimates between 2010 and 2012. Methods Secondary analysis of ED patient data and the National Survey of Drug Use and Health. Results Alcohol was the most commonly reported substance, and prevalence of its use was higher among ED patients than those in the national, but not the Rhode Island, general population. Drug use was higher among ED patients than in the state and national general population. For ED patients, tobacco and opioid use was highest among 26–34 year-olds, alcohol and marijuana highest among 18–25 years-olds, and cocaine highest among 35–49 years-olds. Conclusion Rhode Island Hospital and The Miriam Hospital ED patients report a greater prevalence of substance use than the national population and in many cases the state general population. PMID:25830171

  15. Hydrologic, vegetation, and soil data collected in selected wetlands of the Big River Management area, Rhode Island, from 2008 through 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenstein, Meredith S.; Golet, Francis C.; Armstrong, David S.; Breault, Robert F.; McCobb, Timothy D.; Weiskel, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    The Rhode Island Water Resources Board planned to develop public water-supply wells in the Big River Management Area in Kent County, Rhode Island. Research in the United States and abroad indicates that groundwater withdrawal has the potential to affect wetland hydrology and related processes. In May 2008, the Rhode Island Water Resources Board, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the University of Rhode Island formed a partnership to establish baseline conditions at selected Big River wetland study sites and to develop an approach for monitoring potential impacts once pumping begins. In 2008 and 2009, baseline data were collected on the hydrology, vegetation, and soil characteristics at five forested wetland study sites in the Big River Management Area. Four of the sites were located in areas of potential drawdown associated with the projected withdrawals. The fifth site was located outside the area of projected drawdown and served as a control site. The data collected during this study are presented in this report.

  16. Building Inclusive School-to-Work Systems. State Profiles: Colorado, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadsey, Janis; Leach, Lynda; Shelden, Debra

    This report contains profiles of eight states (Colorado, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont) that describe the states' efforts to include youth with disabilities in School-to-Work efforts. Data were gathered on each of the states through written records of state resources and grants, web site information,…

  17. Local tsunami early warning: the case of Rhodes island, Greece, and the NEARTOWARN (EU-DG ECHO) prevention project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Gerassimos; Argyris, Ilias; Fokaefs, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Local, that is near-field, tsunamis occur in the global ocean including the Mediterranean Sea and its connected seas. For such tsunamis the first wave has very short travel time of arrival (less than 30 min.) to the closest coastal zone thus making the early warning a very difficult task. An efficient, end-to-end early tsunami warning system in local conditions should fulfill the condition that the time needed for the earthquake detection, plus the time needed for the warning message transmission to the authorities and afterwards to the general public and/or other task groups, plus the time needed for response and real evacuation is less than the travel time of the first wave. In the physiographic conditions of the Mediterranean Sea it is extremely hard to satisfy such a condition unless the total time needed to response in early warning is drastically minimized. The project Near-Field Tsunami Warning and Emergency Planning (NEARTOWARN, which is supported by the EU DG-ECHO prevention programme, aims, among others, to establish a system in Rhodes island, Greece, with the purpose to meet needs for local early tsunami warning. To minimize the time for emergency in less than 30 sec, seismic alert devices (SED's) make the core component of the system. SED's are activated and send alerting signals as soon as a P-phase of seismic wave is detected in the near-field but for a predetermined threshold of ground motion. Then, emergency starts while SED's activate remotely other devices, such as computers with data bases of pre-calculated tsunami simulations, surveillance cameras etc. The system is completed with tide-gauges, simulated tsunami scenarios and emergency planning supported by a Geographical Management System. Rhodes island in Dodecanese, South Aegean Sea, Greece, has been selected as a test-area for the development of the prototype system given that it was hit by large tsunamigenic earthquakes several times in the past.

  18. A technique for estimating ground-water levels at sites in Rhode Island from observation-well data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolow, Roy S.; Frimpter, Michael H.; Turtora, Michael; Bell, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    Estimates of future high, median, and low ground- water levels are needed for engineering and architectural design decisions and for appropriate selection of land uses. For example, the failure of individual underground sewage-disposal systems due to high ground-water levels can be prevented if accurate water-level estimates are available. Estimates of extreme or average conditions are needed because short duration preconstruction obser- vations are unlikely to be adequately represen- tative. Water-level records for 40 U.S. Geological Survey observation wells in Rhode Island were used to describe and interpret water-level fluctuations. The maximum annual range of water levels average about 6 feet in sand and gravel and 11 feet in till. These data were used to develop equations for estimating future high, median, and low water levels on the basis of any one measurement at a site and records of water levels at observation wells used as indexes. The estimating technique relies on several assumptions about temporal and spatial variations: (1) Water levels will vary in the future as they have in the past, (2) Water levels fluctuate seasonally (3) Ground-water fluctuations are dependent on site geology, and (4) Water levels throughout Rhode Island are subject to similar precipitation and climate. Comparison of 6,697 estimates of high, median, and low water levels (depth to water level exceeded 95, 50, and 5 percent of the time, respectively) with the actual measured levels exceeded 95, 50, and 5 percent of the time at 14 sites unaffected by pumping and unknown reasons, yielded mean squared errors ranging from 0.34 to 1.53 square feet, 0.30 to 1.22 square feet, and 0.32 to 2.55 square feet, respectively. (USGS)

  19. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in elementary school children in Rhode Island: associated psychosocial factors and medications used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Ephat H; Brown, William D

    2003-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore psychosocial factors associated with referral for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) evaluation or ADHD diagnosis among elementary school children in Rhode Island, as well as to examine the extent of drug therapy among this population. A survey was distributed to parents/guardians of 2,800 3rd- to 5th-grade public school students in 4 Rhode Island school districts. The average age of the children was 9.0 +/- 1.0 years with 52% girls. Approximately 12% of the students had been referred for ADHD evaluation (RFE). Of these, 52% (6% of all children in the survey) were receiving psychoactive prescription medications daily. While the male:female ratio in the non-RFE group was almost 1:1, there were more boys than girls in the RFE group (male/female ratio of 3:1, p medicated group (male/female ratio 4:1, p children and medicated children were older than classroom peers (p children and medicated children were significantly less likely to have parents who completed college (p children (p medicated children) followed by methylphenidate (43%). Nearly 18% of the medicated children were receiving 1 to 3 additional psychoactive prescription medications on a daily basis. In conclusion, RFE children and children medicated for ADHD were more likely to have a stepparent, have no siblings, and have parents that had not completed college. Amphetamine rather than methylphenidate accounted for the majority of medications used in this study, and simultaneous use of multiple psychoactive medications was reported in 18% of the medicated children.

  20. Estimated water use and availability in the South Coastal Drainage Basin, southern Rhode Island, 1995-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Emily C.; Nimiroski, Mark T.

    2005-01-01

    The South Coastal Drainage Basin includes approximately 59.14 square miles in southern Rhode Island. The basin was divided into three subbasins to assess the water use and availability: the Saugatucket, Point Judith Pond, and the Southwestern Coastal Drainage subbasins. Because there is limited information on the ground-water system in this basin, the water use and availability evaluations for these subbasins were derived from delineated surface-water drainage areas. An assessment was completed to estimate water withdrawals, use, and return flow over a 5-year study period from 1995 through 1999 in the basin. During the study period, one major water supplier in the basin withdrew an average of 0.389 million gallons per day from the sand and gravel deposits. Most of the potable water is imported (about 2.152 million gallons per day) from the adjacent Pawcatuck Basin to the northwest. The estimated water withdrawals from the minor water suppliers, which are all in Charlestown, during the study period were 0.064 million gallons per day. The self-supplied domestic, industrial, commercial, and agricultural withdrawals from the basin were 0.574 million gallons per day. Water use in the basin was 2.874 million gallons per day. The average return flow in the basin was 1.190 million gallons per day, which was entirely from self-disposed water users. In this basin, wastewater from service collection areas was exported (about 1.139 million gallons per day) to the Narragansett Bay Drainage Basin for treatment and discharge. During times of little to no recharge, in the form of precipitation, the surface- and ground-water system flows are from storage primarily in the stratified sand and gravel deposits, although there is flow moving through the till deposits at a slower rate. The ground water discharging to the streams, during times of little to no precipitation, is referred to as base flow. The PART program, a computerized hydrograph-separation application, was used at the

  1. One-Minute Shot Point Navigation for Seismic-Reflection Data from Southern Rhode Island Sound Collected in 1980; Formatted for Use With Landmark (A80_6_SHOTNAV.TXT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in southern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  2. Ship Tracklines of Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Southern Rhode Island Sound in 1980; Lines Correspond to SEG-Y Files (A80_6_SEGYLINES.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in southern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  3. One-Minute Shot Point Navigation for Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in 1975 from Eastern Rhode Island Sound; Formatted for Use With Landmark (A75_6_SHOTNAV.TXT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in eastern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  4. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Rhode Island, Connecticut, and the New York-New Jersey Metropolitan Area - Volume 1, Geographic Information Systems data and Volume 2, Maps in Portable Document Format (NODC Accession 0014792)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Rhode Island, Connecticut, and the New York - New Jersey Metropolitan Area from 1999 to...

  5. Ship Tracklines of Seismic-Reflection Data Collected in Eastern Rhode Island Sound in 1975; Lines Correspond to SEG-Y Files (A75_6_SEGYLINES.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 1975, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey utilizing Uniboom seismics in eastern Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research...

  6. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay NWR, Mackay Island NWR, and Fisherman Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report...

  7. Areas contributing recharge to production wells and effects of climate change on the groundwater system in the Chipuxet River and Chickasheen Brook Basins, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesz, Paul J.; Stone, Janet R.

    2015-01-01

    The Chipuxet River and Chickasheen Brook Basins in southern Rhode Island are an important water resource for public and domestic supply, irrigation, recreation, and aquatic habitat. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Rhode Island Department of Health, began a study in 2012 as part of an effort to protect the source of water to six large-capacity production wells that supply drinking water and to increase understanding of how climate change might affect the water resources in the basins. Soil-water-balance and groundwater-flow models were developed to delineate the areas contributing recharge to the wells and to quantify the hydrologic response to climate change. Surficial deposits of glacial origin ranging from a few feet to more than 200 feet thick overlie bedrock in the 24.4-square mile study area. These deposits comprise a complex and productive aquifer system.

  8. Effects of Water-Management Strategies on Water Resources in the Pawcatuck River Basin, Southwestern Rhode Island and Southeastern Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Zarriello, Phillip J.; Bent, Gardner C.; Masterson, John P.; Granato, Gregory E.; Scherer, J. Eric; Crawley, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    The Pawcatuck River Basin in southwestern Rhode Island and southeastern Connecticut is an important high-quality water resource for domestic and public supplies, irrigation, recreation, and the aquatic ecosystem. Concerns about the effects of water withdrawals on aquatic habitat in the basin have prompted local, State, and Federal agencies to explore water-management strategies that minimize the effects of withdrawals on the aquatic habitat. As part of this process, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Rhode Island Water Resources Board completed a study to assess the effects of current (2000-04) and potential water withdrawals on streamflows and groundwater levels using hydrologic simulation models developed for the basin. The major findings of the model simulations are: *Moving highly variable seasonal irrigation withdrawals from streams to groundwater wells away from streams reduces short-term fluctuations in streamflow and increases streamflow in the summer when flows are lowest. This occurs because of the inherent time lag between when water is withdrawn from the aquifer and when it affects streamflow. *A pumped well in the vicinity of small streams indicates that if withdrawals exceed available streamflow, groundwater levels drop substantially as a consequence of water lost from aquifer storage, which may reduce the time wetlands and vernal pools are saturated, affecting the animal and plant life that depend on these habitats. *The effects of pumping on water resources such as ponds, streams, and wetlands can be minimized by relocating pumping wells, implementing seasonal pumping schemes that utilize different wells and pumping rates, or both. *The effects of projected land-use change, mostly from forest to low- and medium density housing, indicate only minor changes in streamflow at the subbasin scale examined; however, at a local scale, high flows could increase, and

  9. 77 FR 27115 - Newport to Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Newport to Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Newport, RI AGENCY... Special Local Regulation for the biennial Newport to Bermuda Regatta, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, from... Guard will enforce the special local regulation for the biennial Newport/Bermuda Regatta,...

  10. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2015-01-01

    Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2013 (October 1, 2012, through September 30, 2013) for tributaries to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island. Streamflow and water-quality data used in the study were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB) in the cooperative study. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these streamgages are equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring water level, specific conductance, and water temperature. Water-quality samples were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 continuous-record streamgages by the USGS during WY 2013 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations are in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by the PWSB are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2013.

  11. Semen quality parameters, their inter-relationship and post-washing sperm attributes of Rhode Island Red roosters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Richard Churchil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present experiments were conducted (a to evaluate the semen attributes of older Rhode Island Red (RIR roosters and the inter-trait relationships, (b to test sperm washing and storage duration suitable for gene transfer experiments. Materials and Methods: The semen characteristics of older RIR roosters were studied, and Pearson correlation analysis was done to demonstrate the inter-trait relationships. Progressive motility and percent live sperms were tested at different post-washing intervals to identify suitable sperm processing conditions for gene transfer experiments. Results: The volume, appearance score, initial motility, sperm count and percent live and abnormal spermatozoa were 0.38 ml, 3.58, 80.34%, 4.03 × 109 sperms/ml, 83.18% and 4.52% respectively. Positive correlation was observed among appearance score, motility, live sperm and sperm count. Semen volume is negatively correlated with all the other characters except live sperms, whereas, percent abnormal sperms negatively associated with all the other traits. Significant (p<0.05 decrease in terms of motility and live sperm was recorded at 60 min post-washing. Conclusion: The semen attributes of RIR roosters compares well with the other breeds of chicken. The appearance score can be used to assess fertility where microscopic evaluation facilities are limited. The sperm washing protocol tested in the experiment is suitable for gene transfer experiments.

  12. 77 FR 15981 - Special Local Regulations; OPSAIL 2012 Connecticut, Niantic Bay, Long Island Sound, Thames River...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Act notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR..., Niantic Bay, Long Island Sound, Thames River and New London Harbor, New London, CT AGENCY: Coast Guard... special local regulations on the navigable waters of Niantic Bay, Long Island Sound, the Thames River...

  13. Application of the Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM 5.0) to Rhode Island NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) report presents a model for projecting the effects of sea-level rise on coastal marshes and related habitats on Rhode...

  14. Glaciers, Rhode Island Glacial Deposits; s44ggl88; This dataset shows Rhode Island glacial deposits, such as outwash and till deposits, and some but not all bedrock outcrops, Published in 1989, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Glaciers dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 1989. It is described as 'Rhode...

  15. Volcanic geology of Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢光福; 王德滋; 金庆民; 沈渭洲; 陶奎元

    2002-01-01

    At Admiralty Bay of central King George Island, Keller Peninsula, Ullman Spur and Point Hennequin are main Tertiary volcanic terranes. Field investigation and isotopic datings indicate that, there occurred three periods of eruptions ( three volcanic cycles) and accompanying N-toward migration of the volcanic center on Keller Peninsula. After the second period of eruptions, the crater collapsed and a caldera was formed, then later eruptions were limited at the northern end of the peninsula and finally migrated to Ullman Spur. Thus Keller Peninsula is a revived caldera, and its volcanism migrated toward E with time. Point Hennequin volcanism happened more or less simultaneously with the above two areas, but has no clear relation in chemical evolution with them, frequently it belongs to another independent volcanic center.

  16. 76 FR 15246 - Anchorage Regulations; Narragansett Bay and Rhode Island Sound, RI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008 issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public... coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. Dated: March 3, 2011. Daniel A. Neptun, Rear Admiral, U.S....

  17. Online Hookup Sites for Meeting Sexual Partners Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Rhode Island, 2013: A Call for Public Health Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Philip A; Towey, Caitlin; Poceta, Joanna; Rose, Jennifer; Bertrand, Thomas; Kantor, Rami; Harvey, Julia; Santamaria, E Karina; Alexander-Scott, Nicole; Nunn, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Frequent use of websites and mobile telephone applications (apps) by men who have sex with men (MSM) to meet sexual partners, commonly referred to as "hookup" sites, make them ideal platforms for HIV prevention messaging. This Rhode Island case study demonstrated widespread use of hookup sites among MSM recently diagnosed with HIV. We present the advertising prices and corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs of the top five sites used by newly diagnosed HIV-positive MSM to meet sexual partners: Grindr, Adam4Adam, Manhunt, Scruff, and Craigslist. Craigslist offered universal free advertising. Scruff offered free online advertising to selected nonprofit organizations. Grindr and Manhunt offered reduced, but widely varying, pricing for nonprofit advertisers. More than half (60%, 26/43) of newly diagnosed MSM reported meeting sexual partners online in the 12 months prior to their diagnosis. Opportunities for public health agencies to promote HIV-related health messaging on these sites were limited. Partnering with hookup sites to reach high-risk MSM for HIV prevention and treatment messaging is an important public health opportunity for reducing disease transmission risks in Rhode Island and across the United States. PMID:26957661

  18. Strategies for Success of Women Faculty in Science: The ADVANCE Program at the University of Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishner, K.; Silver, B.; Boudreaux-Bartels, F.; Harlow, L.; Knickle, H.; Mederer, H.; Peckham, J.; Roheim, C.; Trubatch, J.; Webster, K.

    2004-12-01

    The NSF-funded ADVANCE program seeks to increase the recruitment and retention of women faculty in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines as part of a national goal of creating a broad-based scientific workforce able to effectively address societal demands. The University of Rhode Island, a recipient of an Institutional Transformation ADVANCE grant in 2003, has begun a campus-wide initiative. The 5 goals are (1) to increase the numbers of women STEM faculty, (2) to provide faculty development opportunities, (3) to improve networks of professional and social support, (4) to assess the academic work environment for all faculty, and (5) to implement long-term changes throughout the university that promote a supportive work environment for women STEM faculty. Accomplishments during the first year include (1) hiring several ADVANCE Assistant Professors, (2) developing workshops on critical skills for junior faculty (grant writing, negotiations, mentoring), (3) initiating a series of lunch meetings where pertinent topical and work-family issues are discussed informally, (4) awarding small Incentive grants for research and other projects that enhance the careers of women STEM faculty, (5) developing and modifying university policies on family leave and dual career couple recruitment, (6) developing and implementing quantitative and qualitative assessment tools for baseline and ongoing campus-wide work climate surveys within the context of a theoretical model for change, and (7) offering directed self-study workshops for entire departments using a trained facilitator. The ADVANCE Assistant Professor position, unique to URI's program, allows a new hire to spend the first 2-3 years developing a research program without teaching obligations. ADVANCE pays their salary during this time, at which point they transition to a regular faculty position. During this first of five years of NSF funding, the ADVANCE program has been met with campus wide

  19. Simulated and observed 2010 floodwater elevations in selected river reaches in the Pawtuxet River Basin, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Olson, Scott A.; Flynn, Robert H.; Strauch, Kellan R.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy, persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe flooding that set, or nearly set, peaks of record for streamflows and water levels at many long-term streamgages in Rhode Island. In response to this event, hydraulic models were updated for selected reaches covering about 56 river miles in the Pawtuxet River Basin to simulate water-surface elevations (WSEs) at specified flows and boundary conditions. Reaches modeled included the main stem of the Pawtuxet River, the North and South Branches of the Pawtuxet River, Pocasset River, Simmons Brook, Dry Brook, Meshanticut Brook, Furnace Hill Brook, Flat River, Quidneck Brook, and two unnamed tributaries referred to as South Branch Pawtuxet River Tributary A1 and Tributary A2. All the hydraulic models were updated to Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) version 4.1.0 using steady-state simulations. Updates to the models included incorporation of new field-survey data at structures, high resolution land-surface elevation data, and updated flood flows from a related study. The models were assessed using high-water marks (HWMs) obtained in a related study following the March– April 2010 flood and the simulated water levels at the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP), which is the estimated AEP of the 2010 flood in the basin. HWMs were obtained at 110 sites along the main stem of the Pawtuxet River, the North and South Branches of the Pawtuxet River, Pocasset River, Simmons Brook, Furnace Hill Brook, Flat River, and Quidneck Brook. Differences between the 2010 HWM elevations and the simulated 0.2-percent AEP WSEs from flood insurance studies (FISs) and the updated models developed in this study varied with most differences attributed to the magnitude of the 0.2-percent AEP flows. WSEs from the updated models generally are in closer agreement with the observed 2010 HWMs than with the FIS WSEs. The improved agreement of the updated simulated water elevations to

  20. Effect of egg weight on hatchability and hatchling weight in Fayoumi, Desi and crossbred (Rhode Island Red X Fayoumi chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rashid

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of egg weight on hatchability, embryonic deaths and hatchling weight of three rural breeds (Fayoumi, Desi and crossbred (Rhode Island Red X Fayoumi chickens. Materials and Methods: Three different egg weight groups classified into small: ( 45g were used in the experiment. A complete randomized design was used for the experiment. Simultaneously quadratic type equation was used to determine the egg weight for optimum hatchability and hatchling weight. Results: Percentage hatchability of medium-sized eggs was higher (P < 0.05 than those in large sized eggs. Similarly, large–sized eggs had higher (P < 0.05 percentage hatchability than small sized eggs in all breeds. Hatchability percentage changed by ratio 0.4077 with one unit change in mean egg weight of Fayoumi. The hatchability changed by ratio 0.5488 with one unit change in egg weight of Desi. The hatchability changed by ratio 0.3767 with one unit change in egg weight of crossbred chickens. Mean hatchling weight in Fayoumi eggs changed by ratio of 0.6760; Desi eggs by ratio of 0.5955 and crossbred chicken eggs by ratio of 1.3613 with one unit change in mean egg weight. The overall mean hatchling weight as percentage of mean egg weight in case of Fayoumi was 67.10, in Desi 62.42 and 68.36 in case of cross birds. There was no evidence that hatchabilitypercentage increased with increase in egg weight in all the three strains of birds. Small-sized eggs had higher (P<0.05 embryonic deaths than those of medium and large-sized eggs in three breeds. Hatchling weight from large eggs were (P < 0.05 higher than those of small eggs in three breeds. Mean hatchling weight of Fayoumi changed by ratio 0.676 with one unit change in mean egg weight. In case of Desi chickens, mean hatchling weight changed by ratio 0.5955 with one unit change in egg weight. In case of crossbred chicken, mean hatchling weight changed by ratio 1.3613 with one unit change in

  1. Patterns of health-related quality of life and patterns associated with health risks among Rhode Island adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesser Jana

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL has become an important consideration in assessing the impact of chronic disease on individuals as well as in populations. HRQOL is often assessed using multiple indicators. The authors sought to determine if multiple indicators of HRQOL could be used to characterize patterns of HRQOL in a population, and if so, to examine the association between such patterns and demographic, health risk and health condition covariates. Methods Data from Rhode Island's 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS were used for this analysis. The BRFSS is a population-based random-digit-dialed telephone survey of adults ages 18 and older. In 2004 RI's BRFSS interviewed 3,999 respondents. A latent class regression (LCR model, using 9 BRFSS HRQOL indicators, was used to determine latent classes of HRQOL for RI adults and to model the relationship between latent class membership and covariates. Results RI adults were categorized into four latent classes of HRQOL. Class 1 (76% was characterized by good physical and mental HRQOL; Class 2 (9% was characterized as having physically related poor HRQOL; Class 3 (11% was characterized as having mentally related poor HRQOL; and Class 4 (4% as having both physically and mentally related poor HRQOL. Class 2 was associated with older age, being female, unable to work, disabled, or unemployed, no participation in leisure time physical activity, or with having asthma or diabetes. Class 3 was associated with being female, current smoking, or having asthma or disability. Class 4 was associated with almost all the same predictors of Classes 2 and 3, i.e. older age, being female, unable to work, disabled, or unemployed, no participation in leisure time physical activity, current smoking, with having asthma or diabetes, or with low income. Conclusion Using a LCR model, the authors found 4 distinct patterns of HRQOL among RI adults. The largest class was associated

  2. Reconnaissance surveys of contaminants potentially affecting Green Bay and Gravel Island National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Biota samples were collected from several islands in Green Bay and Lake Michigan during 1987-1988 and were analyzed for various organochlorines and metals. PCBs and...

  3. Distribution and abundance of breeding seabirds in Chiniak and southern Marmot Bays, Kodiak Island, Alaska, 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A census survey of breeding seabirds was conducted by boat and airplane in Chiniak and southern Marmot Bays, Kodiak Island, Alaska, from 15 June to 14 August 1975....

  4. Summer bird use of a barrier island near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The number and distribution of birds near a barrier island west of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, were recorded during the summer of 1972. Eiders fed and rested in the open...

  5. Quarterly refuge narrative report : Cold Bay and Aleutian Islands Area [1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Cold Bay Game Management Area and Aleutian Islands Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1949. The...

  6. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : January - April, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1962. The report begins by summarizing...

  7. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year - 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  8. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : September - December, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by...

  9. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  10. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : January - April, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1963. The report begins by summarizing...

  11. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : May - August, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  12. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : September - December, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by...

  13. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year - 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  14. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : May - August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  15. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  16. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year - 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  17. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : September - December 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by...

  18. Quarterly refuge narrative report : Cold Bay and Aleutian Islands Area [1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Cold Bay Game Management Area and Aleutian Islands Area outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins...

  19. Distribution and area of mangrove forest in Pising Bay coastal area North Kabaena Island Southeast Sulawesi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salam Tarigan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available esearched of mangrove forest in Pising Bay, North Kabaena Island Southeast Sulawesi was carried out on April 2006. Data digital Landsat 7ETM+ parth/raw 113/064 was used for mangrove mapping. Classification method was done is multispectral supervised with artificial neural networks algortms. Analysis and data validation from field survey, it is estimated that distribution and areas of mangrove forest in Pising Bay, North Kabaena Island Southeast Sulawesi is 152.128 Ha. Mangrove in Pising Bay dominated by rhizophora apiculata, rhizophora mucronata; and the forest is relatively in good condition.

  20. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, Fox River National Wildlife Refuge, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay and Gravel Islands National Wildlife Refuges: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Horicon NWR, Fox River NWR, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay NWR, and Gravel Islands NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments...

  1. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, Fox River National Wildlife Refuge, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay and Gravel Islands National Wildlife Refuges: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Horicon NWR, Fox River NWR, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay NWR, and Gravel Islands NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments...

  2. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, Fox River National Wildlife Refuge, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay and Gravel Islands National Wildlife Refuges: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Horicon NWR, Fox River NWR, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay NWR, and Gravel Islands NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments...

  3. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, Fox River National Wildlife Refuge, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness: Green Bay and Gravel Islands National Wildlife Refuges: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Horicon NWR, Fox River NWR, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay NWR, Gravel Islands NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during...

  4. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, Fox River National Wildlife Refuge, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay and Gravel Islands National Wildlife Refuges: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Horicon NWR, Fox River NWR, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay NWR, and Gravel Islands NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments...

  5. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, Fox River National Wildlife Refuge, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay and Gravel Islands National Wildlife Refuges: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Horicon NWR, Fox River NWR, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay NWR, and Gravel Islands NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments...

  6. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, Fox River National Wildlife Refuge, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay and Gravel Islands National Wildlife Refuges: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Horicon NWR, Fox River NWR, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay NWR, and Gravel Islands NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments...

  7. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, Fox River National Wildlife Refuge, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay and Gravel Islands National Wildlife Refuges: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Horicon NWR, Fox River NWR, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay NWR, and Gravel Islands NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments...

  8. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, Fox River National Wildlife Refuge, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay and Gravel Islands National Wildlife Refuges: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Horicon NWR, Fox River NWR, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay NWR, and Gravel Islands NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments...

  9. Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, Fox River National Wildlife Refuge, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay and Gravel Islands National Wildlife Refuges: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Horicon NWR, Fox River NWR, Wisconsin Islands Wilderness, Green Bay NWR, and Gravel Islands NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments...

  10. 77 FR 33967 - Special Local Regulations; OPSAIL 2012 Connecticut, Niantic Bay, Long Island Sound, Thames River...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... Connecticut DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register SLIS Sector Long Island Sound A... Sound, Thames River and New London Harbor, New London, CT'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 15981). We..., Niantic Bay, Long Island Sound, Thames River and New London Harbor, New London, CT AGENCY: Coast...

  11. 78 FR 48805 - Safety Zone; Sprucewold Cabbage Island Swim, Linekin Bay, Boothbay Harbor, ME

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... published in the Federal Register on April 20, 2012 (77 FR 23608). Table 1 1. Sprucewold Cabbage Island Swim... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Sprucewold Cabbage Island Swim, Linekin Bay, Boothbay... from hazards associated with the swim event. During the enforcement period, no person or vessel...

  12. 78 FR 74009 - Safety Zone; Nike Fireworks, Upper New York Bay, Ellis Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 69614). ] Table 1 1. Nike Fireworks Ellis Launch site: A barge located Island Safety Zone... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Nike Fireworks, Upper New York Bay, Ellis Island,...

  13. Assessment of Habitat and Streamflow Requirements for Habitat Protection, Usquepaug-Queen River, Rhode Island, 1999-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David S.; Parker, Gene W.

    2003-01-01

    The relations among stream habitat and hydrologic conditions were investigated in the Usquepaug?Queen River Basin in southern Rhode Island. Habitats were assessed at 13 sites on the mainstem and tributaries from July 1999 to September 2000. Channel types are predominantly low-gradient glides, pools, and runs that have a sand and gravel streambed and a forest or shrub riparian zone. Along the stream margins,overhanging brush, undercut banks supported by roots, and downed trees create cover; within the channel, submerged aquatic vegetation and woody debris create cover. These habitat features decrease in quality and availability with declining streamflows, and features along stream margins generally become unavailable once streamflows drop to the point at which water recedes from the stream banks. Riffles are less common, but were identified as critical habitat areas because they are among the first to exhibit habitat losses or become unavailable during low-flow periods. Stream-temperature data were collected at eight sites during summer 2000 to indicate the suitability of those reaches for cold-water fish communities. Data indicate stream temperatures provide suitable habitat for cold-water species in the Fisherville and Locke Brook tributaries and in the mainstem Queen River downstream of the confluence with Fisherville Brook. Stream temperatures in the Usquepaug River downstream from Glen Rock Reservoir are about 6?F warmer than in the Queen River upstream from the impoundment. These warmer temperatures may make habitat in the Usquepaug River marginal for cold-water species. Fish-community composition was determined from samples collected at seven sites on tributaries and at three sites on the mainstem Usquepaug?Queen River. Classification of the fish into habitat-use groups and comparison to target fish communities developed for the Quinebaug and Ipswich Rivers indicated that the sampled reaches of the Usquepaug?Queen River contained most of the riverine fish

  14. Streamflow, water quality and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2016-05-03

    Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2014 (October 1, 2013, through September 30, 2014) for tributaries to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island. Streamflow and water-quality data used in the study were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Providence Water Supply Board in the cooperative study. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these streamgages are equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring water level, specific conductance, and water temperature. Water-quality samples were collected at 37 sampling stations by the Providence Water Supply Board and at 14 continuous-record streamgages by the U.S. Geological Survey during WY 2014 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations are in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by the Providence Water Supply Board are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2014.The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the U.S. Geological Survey) contributed a mean streamflow of 23 cubic feet per second to the reservoir during WY 2014. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.35 to about 14 cubic feet per second. Together, tributaries (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,200,000 kilograms of sodium and 2,100,000 kilograms of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2014; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 7,700 to 45,000 kilograms per year per

  15. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Smith, Kirk P.

    2010-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB), Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgage stations; 13 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance and water temperature. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2009 (October 1, 2008, to September 30, 2009). Water-quality samples also were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 monitoring stations by the USGS during WY 2009 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations are in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by PWSB are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2009. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed a mean streamflow of about 27 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2009. For the same time period, annual mean1 streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.50 to 17 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,400,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 2,200,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2009; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 10,000 to 64,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 15,000 to 110,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the PWSB, the median of the median

  16. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Campbell, Jean P.

    2010-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board, Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgage stations; 10 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate instantaneous (15-minute) loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2003 (October 1, 2002, to September 30, 2003). Water-quality samples were also collected at 37 sampling stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area by the Providence Water Supply Board during WY 2003 as part of a long-term sampling program. Water-quality data are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2003. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed about 31 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2003. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows1 measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.44 to 20 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,200,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 1,900,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2003; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 10,000 to 61,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 15,000 to 100,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the Providence Water Supply Board, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 21.3 milligrams per liter

  17. Streamflow, Water Quality, and Constituent Loads and Yields, Scituate Reservoir Drainage Area, Rhode Island, Water Year 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Campbell, Jean P.

    2010-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board, Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgage stations; 10 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate instantaneous (15-minute) loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2006 (October 1, 2005, to September 30, 2006). Water-quality samples were also collected at 37 sampling stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area by the Providence Water Supply Board during WY 2006 as part of a long-term sampling program. Water-quality data are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2006. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed about 42 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2006. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows1 measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.60 to 26 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,600,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 2,500,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2006; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 15,000 to 100,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 22,000 to 180,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the Providence Water Supply Board, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 24.6 milligrams per liter

  18. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Campbell, Jean P.

    2010-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board, Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgage stations; 10 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate instantaneous (15-minute) loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2004 (October 1, 2003, to September 30, 2004). Water-quality samples were also collected at 37 sampling stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area by the Providence Water Supply Board during WY 2004 as part of a long-term sampling program. Water-quality data are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2004. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed about 27 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2004. For the same time period, annual mean1 streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.42 to 19 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,100,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 1,700,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2004; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 12,000 to 61,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 17,000 to 100,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the Providence Water Supply Board, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 24.8 milligrams per liter

  19. Streamflow, Water Quality, and Constituent Loads and Yields, Scituate Reservoir Drainage Area, Rhode Island,Water Year 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board, Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamflow-gaging stations; 10 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate instantaneous (15-minute) loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2002 (October 1, 2001 to September 30, 2002). Water-quality samples were also collected at 35 of 37 sampling stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area by the Providence Water Supply Board during WY 2002 as part of a long-term sampling program. Water-quality data are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2002. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed about 12.6 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2002. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.14 to 8.1 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 534,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 851,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2002; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 2,900 to 40,200 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 4,200 to 68,200 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the Providence Water Supply Board, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 16.8 milligrams per

  20. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.; Breault, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB), Rhode Island's largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance and water temperature. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2010 (October 1, 2009, to September 30, 2010). Water-quality samples also were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 monitoring stations by the USGS during WY 2010 as part of a long sampling program; all stations are in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Waterquality data collected by PWSB are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2010. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed a mean streamflow of about 39 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2010. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.7 to 27 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,500,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 2,500,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2010; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 11,000 to 66,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 18,000 to 110,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the PWSB, the median of the median chloride

  1. Streamflow, water quality, and constituent loads and yields, Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, water year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk P.

    2014-01-01

    Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2012 (October 1, 2011, through September 30, 2012), for tributaries to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island. Streamflow and water-quality data used in the study were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB). Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgages; 14 of these streamgages were equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring water level, specific conductance, and water temperature. Water-quality samples were collected at 37 sampling stations by the PWSB and at 14 continuous-record streamgages by the USGS during WY 2012 as part of a long-term sampling program; all stations were in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area. Water-quality data collected by the PWSB were summarized by using values of central tendency and used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2012. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed a mean streamflow of about 26 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2012. For the same time period, annual mean1 streamflows measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.40 to about 17 ft3/s. Together, tributaries (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,100,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 1,900,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2012; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 8,700 to 51,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 14,000 to 87,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected

  2. 33 CFR 334.1380 - Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay, Island of Oahu, Hawaii-Ulupau Crater Weapons...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...), Kaneohe Bay, Island of Oahu, Hawaii-Ulupau Crater Weapons Training Range; danger zone. 334.1380 Section... Bay, Island of Oahu, Hawaii—Ulupau Crater Weapons Training Range; danger zone. (a) The danger zone...″ W Point C: Latitude 21°25′01.79″ N, Longitude 157°40′33.70″ W (b) The regulations. (1)...

  3. Escape to Alcatraz: evolutionary history of slender salamanders (Batrachoseps) on the islands of San Francisco Bay

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Solano Iñigo; Lawson Robin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Island populations are excellent model systems for studies of phenotypic, ecological and molecular evolution. In this study, molecular markers of mitochondrial and nuclear derivation were used to investigate the evolution, structure and origin of populations of the California slender salamander (Batrachoseps attenuatus) inhabiting the six major islands of San Francisco Bay, formed following the rising of sea level around 9,000 years ago. Results There was a high degree of ...

  4. 33 CFR 110.156 - Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island, N.Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Randall Bay, Freeport, Long Island, N.Y. 110.156 Section 110.156 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND....Y. (a) The anchorage grounds. Southward of a line 312 feet south of and parallel to the south...

  5. Mesoscale geomorphic change on low energy barrier islands in Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. Andrew G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of decadal (mesoscale) geomorphic change on sandy barrier islands in the fetch-limited environment of Chesapeake Bay. Low energy barrier islands exist in two settings: on the fringe of marshes and in open water and this analysis shows the various types of barrier island to be genetically related. Barrier islands that face the dominant wind and wave direction (E or W) retreat via barrier translation, preserving the barrier island volume. Those that exist in re-entrants are dominated by longshore transport processes, are strongly affected by sediment supply and are subject to disintegration. Marsh fringe barrier islands are perched on or draped over the surface of the underlying marsh. They migrate landwards via barrier translation during periodic high water events accompanied by large waves (hurricanes and northeasters). The underlying marsh surface erodes under all water levels and the rate of retreat of the barrier island and underlying marsh may take place at different rates, leading to various configurations from perched barrier islands several metres landward of the marsh edge, to barrier islands that have a sandy shoreface extending into the subtidal zone. The coastal configuration during landward retreat of marsh fringe barrier islands is subject to strong local control exerted by the underyling marsh topography. As erosion of marsh promontories occurs and marsh creeks are intersected and bypassed, the configuration is subject to rapid change. Periodic sediment influxes cause spits to develop at re-entrants in the marsh. The spits are initiated as extensions of adjacent marsh fringe barrier islands, but as the sediment volume is finite, the initial drift-aligned spits become sediment-starved and begin to develop a series of swash-aligned cells as they strive for morphodynamic equilibrium. The individual cells are stretched until breaches form in the barrier islands, creating inlets with tidal deltas. At this stage the low

  6. Climate Change and the Evolution and Fate of the Tangier Islands of Chesapeake Bay, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, David M.; Dridge, Karin M.; Hudgins, Mark H.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change and associated sea level rise (SLR) are already impacting low-lying coastal areas, including islands, throughout the world. Many of these areas are inhabited, many will need to be abandoned in coming decades as SLR continues. We examine the evolution (1850-2013) of the last inhabited offshore island in Virginia waters of Chesapeake Bay USA, the Tangier Islands. Three SLR scenarios, a low, mid, and high, were considered. Since 1850, 66.75% of the islands landmass has been lost. Under the mid-range SLR scenario, much of the remaining landmass is expected to be lost in the next 50 years and the Town will likely need to be abandoned. The high SLR scenario will accelerate the land loss and subsidence, such that the Town may need to be abandoned in as few as 25 years. We propose a conceptual plan that would significantly extend the lifespan of the islands and Town.

  7. Alternations in Cholesterol and Fatty Acids Composition in Egg Yolk of Rhode Island Red x Fyoumi Hens Fed with Hemp Seeds (Cannabis sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaib Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of hemp seed (HS supplementation on egg yolk cholesterol and fatty acid composition in laying hens. Sixty hens (Rhode Island Red x Fyoumi were evenly distributed into four groups (three replicates per group at the peak production (34 weeks. HS was included into the ration at the level of 0.0 (HS-0, 15 (HS-15, 20 (HS-20, and 25% (HS-25 and continued the supplementation for consecutively three weeks. At the end of the experiment, three eggs per replicate were randomly collected and analyzed for egg yolk fatty acids and cholesterol profile. The statistical analysis of the result revealed that supplementation of HS-25 significantly (P<0.05 decreased egg yolk total cholesterol, myristic (C14:0, palmitic (C16:0, and stearic (C18:0. Similarly, total as well as individual monounsaturated fatty acids decreased significantly (P<0.05 while total and individual polyunsaturated fatty acids increased significantly in the HS-25. In addition, total omega-3 and omega-6 increased significantly in the HS-25 group. From the present result, we concluded that addition of HS at the rate of 25% to the diet of laying hens augmented the cholesterol and fatty acids profile in egg yolk.

  8. A Review of 20 Years of Research on Overdiagnosis and Underdiagnosis in the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark

    2016-02-01

    The Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project represents an integration of research methodology into a community-based outpatient practice affiliated with an academic medical centre. The MIDAS project is the largest clinical epidemiological study using semi-structured interviews to assess a wide range of psychiatric disorders in a general clinical outpatient practice. In an early report from the MIDAS project, we found that across diagnostic categories clinicians using unstandardized, unstructured clinical interviews underrecognized diagnostic comorbidity, compared with the results of semi-structured interviews. Moreover, we found that the patients often wanted treatment for symptoms of disorders that were diagnosed as comorbid, rather than principal, conditions. This highlighted the importance, from the patient's perspective, of conducting thorough diagnostic interviews to diagnose disorders that are not related to the patient's chief complaint because patients often desire treatment for these additional diagnoses. While several of the initial papers from the MIDAS project identified problems with the detection of comorbid disorders in clinical practice, regarding the diagnosis of bipolar disorder we observed the emergence of an opposite phenomenon-clinician overdiagnosis. The results from the MIDAS project, along with other studies of diagnosis in routine clinical practice, have brought to the forefront the problem with diagnosis in routine clinical practice. An important question is what do these findings suggest about the community standard of care in making psychiatric diagnoses, and whether and how the standard of care should be changed? The implications are discussed.

  9. Species composition and seasonal numbers of shorebirds at Pea Island, Mattamuskeet, Back Bay, Cape Romain, and Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Wildlife inventory data were used to determined species composition and seasonal shorebird numbers at Back Bay, Pea Island, Mattamuskeet, Cape Romain and Merritt...

  10. Escape to Alcatraz: evolutionary history of slender salamanders (Batrachoseps on the islands of San Francisco Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Solano Iñigo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Island populations are excellent model systems for studies of phenotypic, ecological and molecular evolution. In this study, molecular markers of mitochondrial and nuclear derivation were used to investigate the evolution, structure and origin of populations of the California slender salamander (Batrachoseps attenuatus inhabiting the six major islands of San Francisco Bay, formed following the rising of sea level around 9,000 years ago. Results There was a high degree of congruence in the results of analyses of nucleotide and allozyme data, both of which strongly support the hypothesis that, for the majority of the islands, salamanders are descended from hilltop populations that became isolated with the formation of the Bay ca. 9,000 years ago. There are two exceptions (Alcatraz and Yerba Buena where the evidence suggests that salamander populations are wholly or in part, the result of anthropogenic introductions. Comparison of the molecular data and the interpretations drawn therefrom with an earlier morphological study of many of the same salamander populations show some of the same evolutionary trends. Conclusion In spite of marked differences between the evolutionary rates of the two kinds of molecular markers, both indicate distinctive and similar patterns of population structure for B. attenuatus in the San Francisco Bay Area and its islands. With the two noted exceptions, it is clear that most island populations were established prior to the 9,000 years since the formation of the Bay. Results of coalescence-based analyses suggest that for most island populations the mtDNA lineages from which they were derived date from the Pleistocene. It can be said that, based on observed values of genetic diversity, the last 9,000 years of evolution on these islands have been characterized by relative stability, with the occasional extinction of some haplotypes or alleles that were formerly shared between island and mainland

  11. The History of Research and Development Islands Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr B. Kosolapov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the history of the discovery, research and development of the islands of Russian pioneers in Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan from the middle of the XIX century. The paper used in scientific papers and journalistic materials researchers Islands Peter the Great Bay, unpublished sources: Russian State Historical Archive of the Far East, Primorsky Region State Archives, Archives of Primorsky regional department of the All-Russian public organization "Russian Geographical Society" Society for the Study of the Amur region. The methodological basis of the work was the principle of historicism and objectivity, allowed to consider the issue of research and development of the islands of the Gulf of Peter the Great on a broad documentary basis in the process of development in the specific historical conditions. The history of hydrographic discoveries of natural and geographical studies. It touches upon the issues concerning the construction of Vladivostok fortress. In the periodical press materials recreated pages agricultural and industrial development of the islands. Examples of business entrepreneurs first edge (A.D. Startsev, M.I. Jankowski, O.V. Lindgolm. The Toponymic notes link the island territories with the names of their discoverers, explorers, industrialists. The authors conclude that the historical conditionality of development of the islands is linked mainly with the military interests of Russia on its southeastern edge, using the resources of the sea and the unique natural conditions suitable for the development of agricultural, industrial, recreation and tourism.

  12. Island abandonment and sea-level rise: an historical analog from the Chesapeake Bay, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, S.J.A. [Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo (Canada). Dept. of Geography and Enivronmental Studies; Nicholls, R.J. [University of Southampton (United Kingdom). School of Civil Engineering

    2006-02-15

    Small islands are widely agreed to be vulnerable to human-induced sea-level rise during the 21st century and beyond, with forced abandonment of some low-lying oceanic islands being a real possibility. A regional abandonment of islands in the Chesapeake Bay, USA provides an historical analog of such vulnerability as this has been linked to a mid 19th Century acceleration in relative sea-level rise. Using a case study approach for Holland Island, Maryland, this hypothesis was tested using a range of physical and human historical data. While sea-level rise was the underlying driver, this analysis shows that the abandonment was more complex than a direct response to sea-level rise. Between 1850 and 1900, Holland Island was a booming community and population increased from 37 to 253, with immigration causing the majority of the increase. At the same time, the upland area where people made their homes was steadily diminishing, losing about 15 ha or 38% of the total. After 1900, the island experienced a decrease in population to 169 in 1916, with final abandonment in 1918, with the exception of one family who left by 1920. Final abandonment was triggered by this depopulation as the population fell below a level that could support critical community services, and the community lost faith in their future on Holland Island. It is likely that similar social processes determined the abandonment of the other Chesapeake Bay islands. Looking to the future, it shows that many small low-lying islands could be abandoned due to sea-level rise long before they become physically uninhabitable. (author)

  13. PHYTOPLANKTON COMPOSITION AT THE FISH AND SHELLFISH FARM IN THE KALDONTA BAY (CRES ISLAND)

    OpenAIRE

    Marija Tomec

    2004-01-01

    The Kaldonta Bay is situated at the south–western coast of the Cres island in the Lošinj channel, rather protected from larger influence of general sea water current. In the Bay there are installed 44 floating cages of 5 by 10 m dimensions. The cages are used for the culture of about 70 tons of sea water fish: gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), sharp–snouted sparus (Diplodus puntazzo) and dentex (Dentex dentex). Besides some physico–chemical parameters (sea w...

  14. Extensive Chaetoceros curvisetus bloom in relation to water quality in Port Blair Bay, Andaman Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Mehmuna; Sahu, Biraja Kumar; Das, Apurba Kumar; Vinithkumar, Nambali Valsalan; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam

    2015-05-01

    Blooming of diatom species Chaetoceros curvisetus (Cleve, 1889) was observed in Junglighat Bay and Haddo Harbour of Port Blair Bay of Andaman and Nicobar Islands during June 2010. Physico-chemical parameters, nutrient concentrations and phytoplankton composition data collected from five stations during 2010 were classified as bloom area (BA) and non-bloom area (NBA) and compared. Elevated values of dissolved oxygen were recorded in the BA, and it significantly varied (p parametric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) ordinations; cluster analysis powered by SIMPROF test also grouped the stations as BA and NBA.

  15. Extensive Chaetoceros curvisetus bloom in relation to water quality in Port Blair Bay, Andaman Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Mehmuna; Sahu, Biraja Kumar; Das, Apurba Kumar; Vinithkumar, Nambali Valsalan; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam

    2015-05-01

    Blooming of diatom species Chaetoceros curvisetus (Cleve, 1889) was observed in Junglighat Bay and Haddo Harbour of Port Blair Bay of Andaman and Nicobar Islands during June 2010. Physico-chemical parameters, nutrient concentrations and phytoplankton composition data collected from five stations during 2010 were classified as bloom area (BA) and non-bloom area (NBA) and compared. Elevated values of dissolved oxygen were recorded in the BA, and it significantly varied (p parametric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) ordinations; cluster analysis powered by SIMPROF test also grouped the stations as BA and NBA. PMID:25838063

  16. Migration studies and stock structure of dolly varden in the Chiniak Bay area of Kodiak Island, Alaska: Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — From 1984 through 1989 a total of 31,374 Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma) in the Chiniak Bay area of Kodiak Island, Alaska were tagged with numbered anchor tags....

  17. Reconnaissance of breeding marine birds and mammals in the Latax Rocks and Perenosa Bay, Shuyak-Afognak Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes survey efforts on Latax Rocks and Perenosa Bay, Shuyak-Afrognak Island for breeding marine birds and mammals. Methods, result and discussion...

  18. Nitrogen Loads in Groundwater Entering Back Bays and Ocean from Fire Island National Seashore, Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christopher E.; deVries, M. Peter; Finch, Anne J.

    2010-01-01

    Fire Island is a barrier island that lies south of central Long Island, N.Y. It is about 60 km (37 mi) long and 0.5 km (1/4 mi) wide and is bounded by the Great South Bay, Narrow Bay, and Moriches Bay estuaries to the north; by the Atlantic Ocean to the south; by Fire Island Inlet to the west; and by Moriches Inlet to the east (fig. 1). Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS) encompasses a 42-km (26-mi) length of Fire Island that is bordered by Robert Moses State Park to the west and Smith Point County Park to the east (fig. 2). Interspersed throughout FIIS are 17 residential beach communities that together contain about 4,100 homes. The barrier island's summer population increases 50-fold through the arrival of summer residents and vacationers. The National Park Service (NPS) has established several facilities on the island to accommodate visitors to FIIS. About 2.2 million people visit at least one of the 17 communities and (or) Smith Point County Park, the waterways surrounding Fire Island, or a FIIS facility annually (National Park Service, 2007). Combined visitation on a peak-season weekend day can be as high as 100,000 (National Park Service, 2002). Most homes and businesses in the 17 barrier-island communities discharge untreated wastewater directly to the shallow (water-table) aquifer through private septic systems and cesspools; the NPS facilities discharge wastewater to this aquifer through leach fields and cesspools. (The community of Ocean Beach (fig. 2) has a treatment plant that discharges to tidewater.) Contaminants in sewage entering the shallow groundwater move through the flow system and are ultimately discharged to adjacent marine surface waters, where they can pose a threat to coastal habitats. A contaminant of major concern is nitrogen, which is derived from fertilizers and human waste. The continuous inflow of nitrogen to surface-water bodies can lead to increased production of phytoplankton and macroalgae, which in turn can cause oxygen

  19. amphibians and reptiles of luzon island, philippines, Ⅵ:the herpetofauna of the subic bay area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    we present detailed species accounts for 55 species of amphibians and reptiles (14 species of frogs,24 snakes,16 lizards,one turtle) from 24 localities in the vicinity of subic bay,southern zambales province,luzon island,philippines.although we note numerous species that are conspicuously absent in subic bay (and which we expect will eventually be recorded in the region),our many new records plus a summary of the available historical museum specimen data depict a diverse subset of species diversity known from the southern zambales mountains of southwestern luzon.we compare our data to several other recent herpetofunal surveys from luzon,discuss biogeographic regionalism of this complex island,and report on numerous new natural history observations for many included species.with the absence of any protected areas in the entire province,the amphibians and reptiles of zambales should be a particularly important future conservation priority.

  20. Lagrangian transport in a microtidal coastal area: the Bay of Palma, Mallorca Island, Spain

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-Carrasco, Ismael; Orfila, Alejandro; Hernández-García, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Coastal transport in the Bay of Palma, a small region in the island of Mallorca, Spain, is characterized in terms of Lagrangian descriptors. The data sets used for this study are the output for two months of a high resolution realistic numerical model, ROMS, forced atmospherically and with a spatial resolution of 300 m. Semi-persistent Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) are found during both months. We study the fluid interchange between the Bay and the open ocean by computing particle trajectories and residence times. We found clear differences between autumn and summer. Stirring is smaller in autumn (October) than in summer (July), presenting diurnal variability at both months, probably induced by the effect of the wind. The escape rate of particles out of the Bay is qualitatively different, with more particles escaping to the ocean in October than in July. We show that LCSs separate regions with different transport properties, and display spatial distributions of residence times on synoptic Lagrangian ma...

  1. PHYTOPLANKTON ASSEMBLAGES AT FISH FARM IN MASLINOVA BAY (THE ISLAND OF BRAČ)

    OpenAIRE

    Sanda Skejić; Živana Ninčević Gladan; Ivona Marasović

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish phytoplankton composition at the sea bream (Sparus aurata) and sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) fish farm in the middle Adriatic Sea. The investigation was performed from September 2005 to September 2006 at a station located in Maslinova Bay at the island of Brač. Considering the whole research period, diatoms generally prevailed in terms of abundance while dinoflagellates were particularly abundant in June. Number of species of diatoms in comparison to d...

  2. Back Bay, Fisherman Island, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1984 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  3. Back Bay, Fisherman Island, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1983 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  4. Water-quality assessment of the New England Coastal Basins in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island : environmental settings and implications for water quality and aquatic biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sarah M.; Nielsen, Martha G.; Robinson, Keith W.; Coles, James F.

    1999-01-01

    The New England Coastal Basins in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island constitute one of 59 study units selected for water-quality assessment as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. England Coastal Basins study unit encompasses the fresh surface waters and ground waters in a 23,000 square-mile area that drains to the Atlantic Ocean. Major basins include those of the Kennebec, Androscoggin, Saco, Merrimack, Charles, Blackstone, Taunton, and Pawcatuck Rivers. Defining the environmental setting of the study unit is the first step in designing and conducting a multi-disciplinary regional water-quality assessment. The report describes the natural and human factors that affect water quality in the basins and includes descriptions of the physiography, climate, geology, soils, surface- and ground-water hydrology, land use, and the aquatic ecosystem. Although surface-water quality has greatly improved over the past 30 years as a result of improved wastewater treatment at municipal and industrial wastewater facilities, a number of water-quality problems remain. Industrial and municipal wastewater discharges, combined sewer overflows, hydrologic modifications from dams and water diversions, and runoff from urban land use are the major causes of water-quality degradation in 1998. The most frequently detected contaminants in ground water in the study area are volatile organic compounds, petroleum-related products, nitrates, and chloride and sodium. Sources of these contaminants include leaking storage tanks, accidental spills, landfills, road salting, and septic systems and lagoons. Elevated concentrations of mercury are found in fish tissue from streams and lakes throughout the study area.

  5. Streamflow, Water Quality, and Constituent Loads and Yields, Scituate Reservoir Drainage Area, Rhode Island, Water Year 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Robert F.; Campbell, Jean P.

    2010-01-01

    Streamflow and water-quality data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or the Providence Water Supply Board, Rhode Island’s largest drinking-water supplier. Streamflow was measured or estimated by the USGS following standard methods at 23 streamgage stations; 10 of these stations were also equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance. Streamflow and concentrations of sodium and chloride estimated from records of specific conductance were used to calculate instantaneous (15-minute) loads of sodium and chloride during water year (WY) 2005 (October 1, 2004, to September 30, 2005). Water-quality samples were also collected at 37 sampling stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area by the Providence Water Supply Board during WY 2005 as part of a long-term sampling program. Water-quality data are summarized by using values of central tendency and are used, in combination with measured (or estimated) streamflows, to calculate loads and yields (loads per unit area) of selected water-quality constituents for WY 2005. The largest tributary to the reservoir (the Ponaganset River, which was monitored by the USGS) contributed about 30 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) to the reservoir during WY 2005. For the same time period, annual mean streamflows1 measured (or estimated) for the other monitoring stations in this study ranged from about 0.42 to 19 ft3/s. Together, tributary streams (equipped with instrumentation capable of continuously monitoring specific conductance) transported about 1,300,000 kilograms (kg) of sodium and 2,000,000 kg of chloride to the Scituate Reservoir during WY 2005; sodium and chloride yields for the tributaries ranged from 13,000 to 77,000 kilograms per square mile (kg/mi2) and from 19,000 to 130,000 kg/mi2, respectively. At the stations where water-quality samples were collected by the Providence Water Supply Board, the median of the median chloride concentrations was 25.3 milligrams per

  6. Efectos nutricionales de la inclusión dietética de harina de hojas de Leucaena leucocephala y Moringa oleifera en el comportamiento de gallinas Rhode Island Red

    OpenAIRE

    Abou-Elezz F. M. K.; L. Sarmiento-Franco; R. Santos-Ricalde; F. Solorio-Sanchez

    2011-01-01

    Este estudio consistió en dos experimentos para determinar el efecto de la inclusión dietética de harina de hojas de Leucaena leucocephala (HLL) y Moringa oleifera (HHMO) en la producción y calidad de huevos de gallinas Rhode Island Red (RIR). En el primer experimento, treinta y seis gallinas RIR, de 36 semanas de edad, se distribuyeron aleatoriamente en cuatro grupos de nueve aves cada uno y se alojaron en jaulas individuales. Los cuatro grupos se correspondieron con los cuatro tratamientos ...

  7. Childbirth on Kiriwina, Trobriand Islands, Milne Bay Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöschl, R; Pöschl, U

    1985-09-01

    This study presents the first true documentation of birthgiving among the Trobriand Islanders of Papua New Guinea. In contrast to other research projects where interviews only provide a rather imprecise and partly contradictory picture of childbirth, the information here is based upon participant observation and photographs taken of three birthing processes. The advantages and disadvantages of both the traditional and Western birthing systems are compared and analyzed. Suggestions for a Traditional Birth Attendant programme are presented with the aim of improving village deliveries in ways that are consistent with deeply ingrained aspects of culture. They are meant to initiate further discussions based on this topic and do not provide a final structure of such a Traditional Birth Attendant programme.

  8. Internet-Based Methods to Construct a Stakeholder Network for the Sustainability of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background\\Questions\\Methods Conservation coalitions, where numerous organizations collaborate for the augmented environmental protection of a critical habitat, have been shown to reduce redundancy and increase effectiveness. In order to initiate an effective conservation coalit...

  9. Paleo ice flow and subglacial meltwater dynamics in Pine Island Bay, West Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. O. Nitsche

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence for an elaborate subglacial drainage network underneath modern Antarctic ice sheets suggests that basal meltwater has an important influence on ice stream flow. Swath bathymetry surveys from previously glaciated continental margins display morphological features indicative of subglacial meltwater flow in inner shelf areas of some paleo ice stream troughs. Over the last few years several expeditions to the eastern Amundsen Sea embayment (West Antarctica have investigated the paleo ice streams that extended from the Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers. A compilation of high-resolution swath bathymetry data from inner Pine Island Bay reveals details of a rough seabed topography including several deep channels that connect a series of basins. This complex basin and channel network is indicative of meltwater flow beneath the paleo-Pine Island and Thwaites ice streams, along with substantial subglacial water inflow from the east. This meltwater could have enhanced ice flow over the rough bedrock topography. Meltwater features diminish with the onset of linear features north of the basins. Similar features have previously been observed in several other areas, including the Dotson-Getz Trough (western Amundsen Sea embayment and Marguerite Bay (SW Antarctic Peninsula, suggesting that these features may be widespread around the Antarctic margin and that subglacial meltwater drainage played a major role in past ice-sheet dynamics.

  10. Paleo ice flow and subglacial meltwater dynamics in Pine Island Bay, West Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. O. Nitsche

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence for an elaborate subglacial drainage network underneath modern Antarctic ice sheets suggests that basal meltwater has an important influence on ice stream flow. Swath bathymetry surveys from previously glaciated continental margins display morphological features indicative of subglacial meltwater flow in inner shelf areas of some paleo ice stream troughs. Over the last few years several expeditions to the Eastern Amundsen Sea embayment (West Antarctica have investigated the paleo ice streams that extended from the Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers. A compilation of high-resolution swath bathymetry data from inner Pine Island Bay reveals details of a rough seabed topography including several deep channels that connect a series of basins. This complex basin and channel network is indicative of meltwater flow beneath the paleo-Pine Island and Thwaites ice streams, along with substantial subglacial water inflow from the east. This meltwater could have enhanced ice flow over the rough bedrock topography. Meltwater features diminish with the onset of linear features north of the basins. Similar features have previously been observed in several other areas, including the Dotson-Getz Trough (Western Amundsen Sea embayment and Marguerite Bay (SW Antarctic Peninsula, suggesting that these features may be widespread around the Antarctic margin and that subglacial meltwater drainage played a major role in past ice-sheet dynamics.

  11. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in marine organisms and sediments from Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevizani, Tailisi Hoppe; Figueira, Rubens Cesar Lopes; Ribeiro, Andreza Portella; Theophilo, Carolina Yume Sawamura; Majer, Alessandra Pereira; Petti, Monica Angélica Varella; Corbisier, Thais Navajas; Montone, Rosalinda Carmela

    2016-05-15

    The Antarctic continent is considered a low-impact environment; however, there is a tendency to increase the contaminants' levels due to human activities in the research stations. In this study, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn levels in sediment and biota were determined in the environmental samples from Admiralty Bay (King George Island, Antarctica) collected in 2003. The results demonstrated high concentrations of Cu and Zn in the sediments. There was bioaccumulation of As in the biota from Admiralty Bay and bioaccumulation of Zn specifically in the biota from Martel Inlet. In addition, the results were useful in order to understand the heavy metal levels for the pre-accident condition of Comandante Ferraz Antarctic Station, where an accident occurred in 2012, and also for the comparison with current conditions within the monitoring work developed by INCT-APA (National Institute of Science and Technology for Environmental Research Antarctic). PMID:26936119

  12. Simulated and observed 2010 flood-water elevations in selected river reaches in the Moshassuck and Woonasquatucket River Basins, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Straub, David E.; Westenbroek, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe flooding and set, or nearly set, peaks of record for streamflows and water levels at many long-term U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in Rhode Island. In response to this flood, hydraulic models were updated for selected reaches covering about 33 river miles in Moshassuck and Woonasquatucket River Basins from the most recent approved Federal Emergency Management Agency flood insurance study (FIS) to simulate water-surface elevations (WSEs) from specified flows and boundary conditions. Reaches modeled include the main stem of the Moshassuck River and its main tributary, the West River, and three tributaries to the West River—Upper Canada Brook, Lincoln Downs Brook, and East Branch West River; and the main stem of the Woonasquatucket River. All the hydraulic models were updated to Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) version 4.1.0 and incorporate new field-survey data at structures, high-resolution land-surface elevation data, and flood flows from a related study. The models were used to simulate steady-state WSEs at the 1- and 2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flows, which is the estimated AEP of the 2010 flood in the Moshassuck River Basin and the Woonasquatucket River, respectively. The simulated WSEs were compared to the high-water mark (HWM) elevation data obtained in these basins in a related study following the March–April 2010 flood, which included 18 HWMs along the Moshassuck River and 45 HWMs along the Woonasquatucket River. Differences between the 2010 HWMs and the simulated 2- and 1-percent AEP WSEs from the FISs and the updated models developed in this study varied along the reach. Most differences could be attributed to the magnitude of the 2- and 1-percent AEP flows used in the FIS and updated model flows. Overall, the updated model and the FIS WSEs were not appreciably different when compared to the observed 2010 HWMs along the

  13. Natural and human causes of a flash flood in a small catchment (Rhodes Island, Greece) based on atmospheric forcing and runoff modeling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalis, Sotirios; Katsafados, Petros; Karymbalis, Efthimios; Tsanakas, Konstantinos; Valkanou, Kanella

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the natural (hydro-meteorological and geomorphological) and human induced factors responsible for a flash flood event that occurred on November 22nd, 2013 in a small ungauged catchment (covering an area of about 24km2) of Rhodes Island, Greece. The flash flooding killed four people and caused over â¬10 million worth of damages located mainly around the Kremasti village. In this study the reconstruction of this extreme hydro-meteorological event is attempted by using detailed spatiotemporal rainfall information, a physically based hydrological model (LISEM) and the 1D hydraulic model HEC-RAS. Furthermore, the human impacts, which are responsible for extreme flood discharge within the drainage basin, are recorded and mapped. The major meteorological feature of this event is associated with the passage of a cold front over SE Aegean Sea. The destructive flash flood was triggered by the extreme precipitation (almost 100 mm in 4 hours was recorded at the meteorological stations closest to the flooded area). An advanced nowcasting method is applied in order to provide high spatiotemporal distribution of the precipitation over the catchment area. OpenLisem (Limbourg Soil Erosion Model) is used as a runoff model for exploring the response of the catchment. It is a freeware raster model (based on PCRaster) that simulates the surface water and sediment balance for every gridcell. It is event based and has fine spatial and temporal resolution. The model is designed to simulate the effects of detailed land use changes or conservation measures on runoff, flooding and erosion during heavy rainstorms. Since OpenLISEM provides a detailed simulation of runoff processes, it is very demanding on input data (it requires a minimum of 24 maps depending on the input options). The PCRaster GIS functionality was used to derive the necessary data from the basic maps (DEM, land unit map and map of impermeable areas). The sources for the basic maps include geological

  14. Simulation of the Effects of Water Withdrawals, Wastewater Return Flows, and Land-Use Change on Streamflow in the Blackstone River Basin, Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    Streamflow in many parts of the Blackstone River Basin in south-central Massachusetts and northern Rhode Island is altered by water-supply withdrawals, wastewater-return flows, and land-use change associated with a growing population. Simulations from a previously developed and calibrated Hydrological Simulation Program?FORTRAN (HSPF) precipitation-runoff model for the basin were used to evaluate the effects of water withdrawals, wastewater-return flows, and land-use change on streamflow. Most of the simulations were done for recent (1996?2001) conditions and potential buildout conditions in the future when all available land is developed to provide a long-range assessment of the effects of possible future human activities on water resources in the basin. The effects of land-use change were evaluated by comparing the results of long-term (1960?2004) simulations with (1) undeveloped land use, (2) 1995?1999 land use, and (3) potential buildout land use at selected sites across the basin. Flow-duration curves for these land-use scenarios were similar, indicating that land-use change, as represented in the HSPF model, had little effect on flow in the major tributary streams and rivers in the basin. However, land-use change?particularly increased effective impervious area?could potentially have greater effects on the hydrology, water quality, and aquatic habitat of the smaller streams in the basin. The effects of water withdrawals and wastewater-return flows were evaluated by comparing the results of long-term simulations with (1) no withdrawals and return flows, (2) actual (measured) 1996?2001 withdrawals and wastewater-return flows, and (3) potential withdrawals and wastewater-return flows at buildout. Overall, the results indicated that water use had a much larger effect on streamflow than did land use, and that the location and magnitude of wastewater-return flows were important for lessening the effects of withdrawals on streamflow in the Blackstone River Basin

  15. Volcanic geology and geochemistry of Motuhora (Whale Island), Bay of Plenty, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motuhora (Whale Island) lies c. 11 km offshore from Whakatane in the Bay of Plenty, New Zealand, and comprises tuffaceous marine sediments of the Camp Bay and Motuhora Formations separated by lavas, volcanic breccias, and slope-wash deposits of the Whale Volcanics. Whale Volcanics can be divided into East Dome, Central Dome Complex, and Pa Hill Dome. East Dome is a flow banded, chaotically jointed dacite that is probably extrusive. Central Dome comprises lava flows, and extensive volcanic breccias and tuffs which thicken into a local depression to the north of the central high, suggesting rapid growth and erosion of the dome. Pa Hill Dome is largely intrusive into Camp Bay Formation, although blocks of Pa Hill dacite in an upper slope-wash cobble bed suggest it was partially extrusive. The lavas are porphyritic with phenocrysts of plagioclase, orthopyroxene, and titanomagnetite with subordinate clinopyroxene and amphibole (particularly in Pa Hill Dome), and rare biotite. Rounded or broken and embayed quartz crystals are found in the Central Dome Complex and Pa Hill domes. Magmatic xenoliths are common in all lavas. Chemically the lavas are medium-K, calc-alkaline andesites and dacites, and show relative LILE enrichment and HFSE depletion typical of arc volcanics. Isotopically, samples tend to have more radiogenic Sr and less radiogenic Nd than volcanics from neighbouring White Island. It is likely that Motuhora lavas were formed by a multi-stage process involving partial melting of N-MORB-type mantle that had been fluxed by fluids rich in incompatible elements derived from the dehydrating downgoing slab and followed by crystal fractionation of the magma. As the magma rose through the lower continental crust it was contaminated, probably by Torlesse metasediment. Petrographic textures and mineral chemistry indicate that magma mixing, while in an upper crustal magma chamber, is the norm for Motuhora lavas. (author). 69 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Breeding waterbirds (Pelecaniformes) at Maracujá island, Babitonga bay estuary, north coast of Santa Catarina, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre Venson Grose; Marta Jussara Cremer; Nei Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Waterbirds usually breed in an aggregate way, forming large breeding colonies with different species. This study describes biological aspects of waterbirds from a colony at Maracujá island, in the Babitonga bay estuary, north coast of Santa Catarina, Brazil. We collected data on species richness, abundance, breeding chronology, predation, and nest distribution in the island. Within the period from September 2010 to February 2011, 15 waterbird species were identified using the ...

  17. TERRAIN, KENT COUNTY, RHODE ISLAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Kent AOI consists of the costal portion of the county, and meshes up seamlessly with the Providence county AOI directly north. Ground Control is collected...

  18. TERRAIN, PROVIDENCE COUNTY, RHODE ISLAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Providence AOI consists of the costal portion of the county, and meshes up seamlessly with the Kent county AOI directly south. Ground Control is collected...

  19. Evolution of foredune texture following dynamic restoration, Doughboy Bay, Stewart Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konlechner, T. M.; Ryu, W.; Hilton, M. J.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Growing concern regarding the geomorphic and associated biotic effects of dune management practises has led to an increase in the number of dune restoration projects globally. Most recent projects aim to enhance the efficiency of aeolian sediment dynamics and increase dune mobility by decreasing vegetation cover, but we lack objective measures to evaluate such projects. Here we demonstrate the use of landscape metrics to quantify the evolution of foredune texture following the removal of vegetation. A long-term program of marram grass (Ammophila arenaria) eradication in southern New Zealand (Doughboy Bay, Stewart Island) is examined. Four metrics: bare sand area, patch adjacency, complexity, and the range of proximity, are used to classify a series of foredune textures beginning with the pre-restoration state through the phases of marram removal, to the current state. Foredune texture at Doughboy Bay has evolved from a semi-stable to an active state as the consequence of restoration. Two metrics, bare sand and adjacency, appear to be particularly good measures of change following marram removal. Patterns and rates of change for these metrics are consistent with ground observations of increased 'naturalness' (native plant communities, sand mobility) over the same period. The set of landscape metrics derived for Doughboy Bay were compared to similar sets measured for a nearby foredune system where marram invasion has not occurred, and where conditions presumably represent equilibrium foredune texture. Since the removal of marram at Doughboy Bay and the consequent remobilization of the sand surface, the foredune texture has increased in similarity to that of the reference site, indicating a favourable shift in plant cover as a result of the restoration program. We conclude that landscape metrics can be used to track changes in foredune morphology following restoration. Second, the planning, management, and monitoring of coastal dune restoration programs will benefit

  20. Macrobenthic community response to copper in Shelter Island Yacht Basin, San Diego Bay, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira, Carlos; Mendoza, Guillermo; Levin, Lisa A; Zirino, Alberto; Delgadillo-Hinojosa, Francisco; Porrachia, Magali; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2011-04-01

    We examined Cu contamination effects on macrobenthic communities and Cu concentration in invertebrates within Shelter Island Yacht Basin, San Diego Bay, California. Results indicate that at some sites, Cu in sediment has exceeded a threshold for "self defense" mechanisms and highlight the potential negative impacts on benthic faunal communities where Cu accumulates and persists in sediments. At sites with elevated Cu levels in sediment, macrobenthic communities were not only less diverse but also their total biomass and body size (individual biomass) were reduced compared to sites with lower Cu. Cu concentration in tissue varied between species and within the same species, reflecting differing abilities to "regulate" their body load. The spatial complexity of Cu effects in a small marina such as SIYB emphasizes that sediment-quality criteria based solely on laboratory experiments should be used with caution, as they do not necessarily reflect the condition at the community and ecosystem levels. PMID:21354577

  1. Coupled Wave Energy and Erosion Dynamics along a Salt Marsh Boundary, Hog Island Bay, Virginia, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony M. Priestas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between lateral erosion of salt marshes and wind waves is studied in Hog Island Bay, Virginia USA, with high-resolution field measurements and aerial photographs. Marsh retreat is compared to wave climate calculated in the bay using the spectral wave-model Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN. We confirm the existence of a linear relationship between long-term salt marsh erosion and wave energy, and show that wave power can serve as a good proxy for average salt-marsh erosion rates. At each site, erosion rates are consistent across several temporal scales, ranging from months to decades, and are strongly related to wave power. On the contrary, erosion rates vary in space and weakly depend on the spatial distribution of wave energy. We ascribe this variability to spatial variations in geotechnical, biological, and morphological marsh attributes. Our detailed field measurements indicate that at a small spatial scale (tens of meters, a positive feedback between salt marsh geometry and wave action causes erosion rates to increase with boundary sinuosity. However, at the scale of the entire marsh boundary (hundreds of meters, this relationship is reversed: those sites that are more rapidly eroding have a marsh boundary which is significantly smoother than the marsh boundary of sheltered and slowly eroding marshes.

  2. Wave and Hydrodynamic Modeling for Engineering Design of Jetties at Tangier Island in Chesapeake Bay, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihwa Lin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The protection of a boat canal at the western entrance of Tangier Island, Virginia, located in the lower Chesapeake Bay, is investigated using different structural alternatives. The existing entrance channel is oriented 45 deg with respect to the local shoreline, and exposed directly to the lower Bay without any protection. The adjacent shoreline has experienced progressive erosion in recent decades by flooding due to severe storms and waves. To protect the western entrance of the channel and shoreline, five different jetty and spur combinations were proposed to reduce wave energy in the lee of jetties. Environmental forces affecting the proposed jettied inlet system are quantified using the Coastal Modeling System, consisting of a spectral wave model and a depth-averaged circulation model with sediment transport calculations. Numerical simulations were conducted for design wave conditions and a 50-year return period tropical storm at the project site. Model results show a low crested jetty of 170-m length connecting to the north shore at a 45-deg angle, and a short south spur of 25-m long, provide adequate wave-reduction benefits among the five proposed alternatives. The model simulation indicates this alternative has the minimum impact on sedimentation around the structured inlet and boat canal.

  3. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, 2011 RIDEM Multispectral Orthophotography of Rhode Island. Rhode Island aerial photography project produced 6" (.15m) GSD multispectral digital orthoimagery for the entire state including the water and islands within Narragansett Bay and Block Island., Published in 2011, 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset, published at 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, was produced all or in part from LIDAR information as of 2011....

  4. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Benthic Habitat Data, Catlett and Goodwin Islands on the York River in Chesapeake Bay, VA, 2002-2004 (NODC Accession 0090253)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are a collection of benthic habitat data from studies conducted in the Catlett and Goodwin Islands on the York River in Chesapeake Bay, Virginia in GIS...

  5. CNTR10M - 10 meter bathymetric contours of the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and Santa Barbara Bay. (UTM 10N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Data layer containing 10 meter bathymetric contours for the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and Santa Barbara Bay. Data are derived from 1:250,000-scale...

  6. Variations in population exposure and evacuation potential to multiple tsunami evacuation phases on Alameda and Bay Farm Islands, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, J.

    2015-12-01

    Planning for a tsunami evacuation is challenging for California communities due to the variety of earthquake sources that could generate a tsunami. A maximum tsunami inundation zone is currently the basis for all tsunami evacuations in California, although an Evacuation Playbook consisting of specific event-based evacuation phases relating to flooding severity is in development. We chose to investigate the Evacuation Playbook approach for the island community of Alameda, CA since past reports estimated a significant difference in numbers of residents in the maximum inundation zone when compared to an event-based inundation zone. In order to recognize variations in the types of residents and businesses within each phase, a population exposure analysis was conducted for each of the four Alameda evacuation phases. A pedestrian evacuation analysis using an anisotropic, path distance model was also conducted to understand the time it would take for populations to reach high ground by foot. Initial results suggest that the two islands of the City of Alameda have different situations when it comes to the four tsunami evacuation phases. Pedestrian evacuation results suggest that Bay Farm Island would have more success evacuating by vehicle due to limited nearby high ground for pedestrians to reach safety. Therefore, agent-based traffic simulation software was used to model vehicle evacuation off Bay Farm Island. Initial results show that Alameda Island could face challenges evacuating numerous boat docks and a large beach for phases 1 and 2, whereas Bay Farm Island is unaffected at these phases but might be challenged with evacuating by vehicle for phases 3 and maximum due to congestion on limited egress routes. A better understanding of the population exposure within each tsunami Evacuation Playbook phase and the time it would take to evacuate out of each phase by foot or vehicle will help emergency managers implement the evacuation phases during an actual tsunami event.

  7. PHYTOPLANKTON COMPOSITION AT THE FISH AND SHELLFISH FARM IN THE KALDONTA BAY (CRES ISLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Tomec

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Kaldonta Bay is situated at the south–western coast of the Cres island in the Lošinj channel, rather protected from larger influence of general sea water current. In the Bay there are installed 44 floating cages of 5 by 10 m dimensions. The cages are used for the culture of about 70 tons of sea water fish: gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata, sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax, sharp–snouted sparus (Diplodus puntazzo and dentex (Dentex dentex. Besides some physico–chemical parameters (sea water temperature, transparence and salinity, special attention has been paid to the qualitative composition of net phytoplankton. Investigations were performed in the period of May, September and December 2003 and February 2004 at five locations in the Kaldonta Bay (Figure 1 at the depths of 0.5 m, 5 m, 10 m and 1 m from the bottom. According to the physico–chemical parameters, sea water temperature was influenced by the temperature of the environment, and the transparence suggested to the oligotrophic situation in the investigated aquatorium. Qualitative composition of net phytoplankton comprised 161 microphytic species belonging to the systematic compartments of Cyanobacteria, Chrysophyta and Dinophyta (Table 1. The most numerous algal group were diatoms or Bacillarophyceae (98 species or 61%, with relative frequencies of species from 1 to 7. Taxonomic composition of diatoms showed Chaetoceros–Rhizosolenia (Proboscia to be the dominant community. Diatom species was the most abundant in late autumn period (beginning of December. The second most important comparatment were Dinophyta (55 species or 34.1%, with the dominant genera Ceratium and Protoperidinium. During the investigation, the representatives of Dinophyta did not show large variety of species in the water column. Relative frequency of the species was 1, rarely 2 and 3. Dinophyts were the most abundant in September. From Cyanobacteria (5 species or 3.1% only filamentous algae were determined

  8. Nitrogen stable isotope ratios of anthropgenic organic matter in the coastal environment of Kosirina Bay (Murter Island, Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenec, T.; Lambaša, Ž.; Lojen, S.; Rogan, N.; Kniewald, G.; Dolenec, M.

    2009-04-01

    In this study stable nitrogen isotopes ratios of particulate matter POM, zooplankton and selected biota such as Anemonia sulcata and Mytilus galloprovincialis were used to assessed the impact of anthropogenically derived organic matter from the untreated domestic sewage, municipal and industrial effluents on the coastal ecosystem of the Kosirina Bay (Murter Island). The differences in δ15N values observed in POM and organisms collected in Kosirina Bay as compared to POM and biota sampled at unaffected sites from the southern part of the Kornati Island and highly impacted Pirovac Bay revealed only a very minor effects of anthropogenic inputs of nutrients and organic matter which most probably derived from a sewage outfall south of the Tužbina Island. However, to get a better insight into the qualitative or quantitative shifts in the structure of aquatic food web caused by pollutants, more extended research on benthic population is needed, as well as a detailed investigation of seasonal variations of abundance and isotopic composition of POM and zooplankton as their presumed food source.

  9. Atmospheric controls on the precipitation isotopes over the Andaman Islands, Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, S.; Sinha, N.; Chattopadhyay, R.; Sengupta, S.; Mohan, P. M.; Datye, A.

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of precipitation over the Andaman Island, Bay of Bengal was carried out for the year 2012 and 2013 in order to study the atmospheric controls on rainwater isotopic variations. The oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions are typical of the tropical marine sites but show significant variations depending on the ocean-atmosphere conditions; maximum depletion was observed during the tropical cyclones. The isotopic composition of rainwater seems to be controlled by the dynamical nature of the moisture rather than the individual rain events. Precipitation isotopes undergo systematic depletions in response to the organized convection occurring over a large area and are modulated by the integrated effect of convective activities. Precipitation isotopes appear to be linked with the monsoon intraseasonal variability in addition to synoptic scale fluctuations. During the early to mid monsoon the amount effect arose primarily due to rain re-evaporation but in the later phase it was driven by moisture convergence rather than evaporation. Amount effect had distinct characteristics in these two years, which appeared to be modulated by the intraseasonal variability of monsoon. It is shown that the variable nature of amount effect limits our ability to reconstruct the past-monsoon rainfall variability on annual to sub-annual time scale. PMID:26806683

  10. PHYTOPLANKTON ASSEMBLAGES AT FISH FARM IN MASLINOVA BAY (THE ISLAND OF BRAČ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Skejić

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish phytoplankton composition at the sea bream (Sparus aurata and sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax fish farm in the middle Adriatic Sea. The investigation was performed from September 2005 to September 2006 at a station located in Maslinova Bay at the island of Brač. Considering the whole research period, diatoms generally prevailed in terms of abundance while dinoflagellates were particularly abundant in June. Number of species of diatoms in comparison to dinoflagellates through the investigated period was similar. From 111 species of phytoplankton found, there were 55 species of Bacillariophyceae (diatoms, 47 species of Dinophyta (dinoflagellates, 5 species of Prymnesiophyceae, 3 Chrysophyceae and 1 Euglenophyta. Among the diatoms, the majority of species belonged to genus Chaetoceros. The most represented dinoflagellate genera were Oxytoxum and Gymnodinium. There were no considerable differences in phytoplankton composition with respect to different depths, but seasonal influence was significant. Biodiversity and abundance ranges of phytoplankton species indicated good water conditions and there were no evident alterations induced by the increased release of nutrients.

  11. Mangrove zonation and utilization by the local people in Ajuy and Pedada Bays, Panay Island, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kef S. Sinfuego

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted in order to establish and describe the mangrove zones and the resource uses in Ajuy and Pedada Bays, Panay Island, Iloilo, Philippines. Plot or quadrat method coupled with informal community folk interviews were done. Cluster and principal component analyses indicated four mangrove zones: Zone 1 – Avicennia–Sonneratia zone; Zone 2 – Avicennia–Rhizophora zone; Zone 3 – Avicennia–Excoecaria–Bruguiera–Ceriops zone; and Zone 4 – Avicennia zone. Fishpond establishment was the main dominant activity. Additionally, subsistent and apparently sustainable localized fuel wood gathering was still evidently practiced by the fisherfolks. With the bays’ natural mangrove landscape greatly deformed and transformed, the study recommends two strategies which could serve as its turning point leading to a more sustainable utilization and conservation of the mangroves. First we recommend the creation of a landscape corridor and secondly, adoption of a mangrove aquasilviculture system as an alternative to the current extensive fishpond practice. Implementation of these two strategies can be facilitated by a strong biodiversity education program and a local ordinance.

  12. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Rhode Island. Preliminary background report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Rhode Island statutes vest in the Public Utility Commission and the Division of Public Utilities the exclusive power and authority to regulate public utility companies in that state. Both bodies have been established within the Department of Business Regulation but are independent of the Department's director and are not under his jurisdiction. The jurisdiction to regulate utilities is shared by the Commission and the Division. The Commission serves as a quasi-judicial tribunal with jurisdiction, powers, and duties to hold investigations and hearings involving rates, sufficiency and resonableness of facilities, gas, electric, water, and pipeline public utilities. The administrator, who is chief executive officer of the Division, is responsible for exercising the jurisdiction, supervision, powers, and duties not specifically assigned to the Commission. By virtue of his office, the chairman of the Commission serves also as the administrator and he supervises and directs the execution of all laws relating to public utilities and carriers and all regulations and orders of the Commission governing the conduct and charges of public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  13. Bair Island Restoration and Management Plan : Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Bair Island Ecological Reserve

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, and the California Department of Fish and Game are proposing adoption of...

  14. Water-Quality Conditions and Constituent Loads, Water Years 1996-2002, and Water-Quality Trends, Water Years 1983-2002, in the Scituate Reservoir Drainage Area, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimiroski, Mark T.; DeSimone, Leslie A.; Waldron, Marcus C.

    2008-01-01

    The Scituate Reservoir is the primary source of drinking water for more than 60 percent of the population of Rhode Island. Water-quality data and streamflow data collected at 37 surface-water monitoring stations in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area, Rhode Island, from October 1, 1995 through September 30, 2002, (water years (WY) 1996-2002) were analyzed to determine water-quality conditions and constituent loads in the drainage area. Trends in water quality, including physical properties and concentrations of constituents, were investigated for the same period and for a longer period from October 1, 1982 through September 30, 2002 (WY 1983-2002). Water samples were collected and analyzed by Providence Water Supply Board, the agency that manages the Scituate Reservoir. Streamflow data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey. Median values and other summary statistics were calculated for WY 1996-2002 for all 37 monitoring stations for pH, color, turbidity, alkalinity, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, total coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, orthophosphate, iron, and manganese. Instantaneous loads and yields (loads per unit area) of total coliform and E. coli bacteria (indicator bacteria), chloride, nitrite, nitrate, orthophosphate, iron, and manganese were calculated for all sampling dates during WY 1996-2002 for the 23 stations with streamflow data. Values of physical properties and concentrations of constituents were compared to State and Federal water-quality standards and guidelines, and were related to streamflow, land-use characteristics, and road density. Tributary stream water in the Scituate Reservoir drainage area for WY 1996-2002 was slightly acidic (median pH of all stations equal to 6.1) and contained low concentrations of chloride (median 13 milligrams per liter (mg/L)), nitrate (median 0.04 mg/L as N), and orthophosphate (median 0.04 mg/L as P). Turbidity and alkalinity values also were low with median values of 0

  15. Breeding waterbirds (Pelecaniformes at Maracujá island, Babitonga bay estuary, north coast of Santa Catarina, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Venson Grose

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Waterbirds usually breed in an aggregate way, forming large breeding colonies with different species. This study describes biological aspects of waterbirds from a colony at Maracujá island, in the Babitonga bay estuary, north coast of Santa Catarina, Brazil. We collected data on species richness, abundance, breeding chronology, predation, and nest distribution in the island. Within the period from September 2010 to February 2011, 15 waterbird species were identified using the feeding and resting site, and, out of them, 5 species bred in the island (Nycticorax nycticorax, Nyctanassa violacea, Egretta caerulea, Phimosus infuscatus, and Aramides cajanea. We registered 154 active nests, 79 nests of N. Nycticorax, 14 nests of N. violacea, 6 nests of P. infuscatus, 5 nests of E. caerulea, and only 1 nest of A. cajanea. The estimated local population was 308 breeding individuals, and N. nycticorax was the most abundant species, accounting for 51% of nests. The months with higher concentration of nests were September, October, and November. In addition to waterbirds, 4 birds of prey and scavenger species were registered, which were responsible for egg and/or chick losses, along with Larus dominicanus. Maracujá island has been used for breeding by at least 5 species and its protection deserves attention, in order to ensure the maintenance and possibility to expand this breeding site.

  16. First evidence for a late LGM subglacial lake in Pine Island Bay, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Gerhard; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Kasten, Sabine; Smith, James A.; Nitsche, Frank O.; Frederichs, Thomas; Wiers, Steffen; Ehrmann, Werner; Klages, Johann P.; Mogollón, José M.

    2016-04-01

    Subglacial lakes are widespread beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet and as a source for subglacial meltwater they are assumed to modulate ice stream velocity. Further, the evacuation of subglacial meltwater at the ice sheet margin influences ocean circulation and geochemical cycles. However, despite their importance,, subglacial lakes are one of the least explored environments on our planet. As a consequence, their importance for ice sheet dynamics and their ability to harbour life remain poorly characterised. We present the first direct evidence for a palaeo-subglacial lake on the Antarctic continental shelf, documenting that subglacial meltwater was stored during the last glacial period and evacuated during the subsequent deglaciation. A distinct sediment facies observed in a core recovered from a small bedrock basin in Pine Island Bay, Amundsen Sea, is indicative of deposition within a low-energy subglacial lake setting. Diffusive modelling demonstrates that low chloride concentrations in the pore water of this characteristic sediment facies can only be explained by original deposition in a freshwater setting. We also show that the location of the subglacial lake within a basin on the inner shelf is consistent with the predicted distribution of subglacial lakes based on bathymetric data. This finding will enable future modelling studies to investigate how the geometry and capacity of subglacial lake systems can influence ice dynamics when the substrate and profile of the ice sheet is known - especially in the highly sensitive area known as the "weak underbelly" of the WAIS. With the exception of a direct lake water access at Subglacial Lake Vostok, and some centimetres of sediment retrieval from Subglacial Lake Whillans, the subglacial hydrological system in Antarctica has hitherto mostly been explored using remote sensing and numerical models that suggest the number of potential lake sites to more than 12.000. Our study not only provides first empirical evidence

  17. Hurricane Mitch: Landscape Analysis of Damaged Forest Resources of the Bay Islands and Caribbean Coast of Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Thomas W.; Michot, Thomas C.; Roetker, Fred; Sullivan, Jason; Melder, Marcus; Handley, Benjamin; Balmat, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    The advent of analog and digital video has provided amateur photographers with professional-like technology to capture dynamic images with ease and clarity. Videography is also rapidly changing traditional business and scientific applications. In the natural sciences, camcorders are being used largely to record timely observations of plant and animal behavior or consequence of some catastrophic event. Spectacular video of dynamic events such as hurricanes, volcanic eruptions and wildfire document the active process and aftermath. Scientists can analyze video images to quantify aspects of a given event, behavior, or response, temporally and spatially. In this study we demonstrate the simple use of an aerial application of videography to record the spatial extent and damage expression of mangrove forest in the Bay Islands and mainland coast of northern Honduras from wind damage following Hurricane Mitch (1998). In this study, we conducted a video overflight of coastal forests of the Bay Islands and mainland coast of northern Honduras 14 months after impact by Hurricane Mitch (1998). Coastal areas were identified where damage was evident and described relative to damage extent to forest cover, windfall orientation, and height of downed trees. The variability and spatial extent of impact on coastal forest resources is related to reconstructed wind profiles based on model simulations of Mitch's path, strength, and circulation during landfall.

  18. Aquaculture, Salt and Brackish Water, Rhode Island Aquaculture Locations; Point Locations for Aquaculture operations in Narragansett Bay and the coastal ponds of Rhode Island., Published in 2005, 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aquaculture, Salt and Brackish Water dataset, published at 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2005. It...

  19. Microbial community analysis of Acropora palamata mucus swabs, water and sediment samples from Hawksnest Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    OpenAIRE

    May, Lisa A.; Avadanei, Athena R.; Rogers, Caroline S.; Miller, Jeff; Woodley, Cheryl M.

    2010-01-01

    Colonies of the scleractinian coral Acropora palmata, listed as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act in 2006, have been monitored in Hawksnest Bay, within Virgin Islands National Park, St. John, from 2004 through 2010 by scientists with the US Geological Survey, National Park Service, and the University of the Virgin Islands. The focus has been on documenting the prevalence of disease, including white band, white pox (also called patchy necrosis and white patches), and unidentified ...

  20. Time-series measurements of the colored volcanic vent seawaters during a tidal cycle in Nagahama Bay, Satsuma Iwo-jima Island, Kagoshima, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Ninomiya, Tomomi; KIYOKAWA, Shoichi

    2009-01-01

    Satsuma Iwo-jima Island, located 40 km south of Kyushu Island, Japan, bears a shallow-water hydrothermal system. The coastal seawaters are stained ivory and red colors attributing to the presence of suspended aluminous and ferric precipitates produced by the mixing of volcanic fluids and seawaters. In Nagahama Bay, which is partly isolated from the pelagic realm, the seawaters appear dark reddish brown, attributing to the concentrated ferric precipitatess. In order to understand how the ferri...

  1. Back Bay, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1986 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  2. Back Bay, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1989 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  3. Back Bay, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1988 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  4. Back Bay, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1987 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  5. Back Bay, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1985 calendar year. The report begins with a summary...

  6. Estuarine, intertidal and subtidal wetland habitat types in Klag Bay, Chichagof Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Six major estuarine intertidal and subtidal wetland habitat types were identified within the inner basin of Klag Bay. These habitat types are mapped in Fig. 3. The...

  7. The quest for chron E23r at Partridge Island, bay of Fundy, Canada: CAMP emplacement postdates the end-Triassic extinction event at the North American craton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenen, M.H.L.; Krijgsman, W.; Ruhl, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Partridge Island stratigraphic section at the Bay of Fundy, Maritime Canada, reveals a continental sedimentary succession with the end-Triassic mass extinction level closely followed by basalts of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP). New Paleomagnetic data show that a short reverse mag

  8. Enhanced Composite Sidescan Sonar Mosaic of NOAA Survey H11310 in Central Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island (H11310SS_GEO1M_INV.TIF, Geographic)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is working cooperatively with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) to interpret the surficial geology...

  9. H11310SS_GEO1M_INV.TIF: Enhanced Composite Sidescan Sonar Mosaic of NOAA Survey H11310 in Central Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island (Geographic)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is working cooperatively with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) to interpret the surficial geology...

  10. USE OF A LONG ENDURANCE SOLAR POWERED AUTONOMOUS UNDERWATER VEHICLE (SAUV II) TO MEASURE DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN GREENWICH BAY, RHODE ISLAND, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    As hypoxic water masses increase worldwide in duration and extent due to coastal eutrophication, advanced technology water quality monitoring by autonomous vehicles can increase our capability to document and respond to these environmental perturbations. We evaluated the use of a...

  11. Towards an ecosystem approach to small island fisheries: A preliminary study of a balanced fishery in Kotania Bay (Seram Island, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.G. Hutubessy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries (EAF is a holistic one as EAF considers all species as important elements within the eco-system. An EAF requires that community and ecosystem structure should be maintained by harvesting fish communities in proportion to their natural productivity, thereby sustaining the balance of species and sizes in a community. This article draws from research on the reef fish community and catch in Kotania Bay on Seram Island in Maluku, Indonesia, an area of approximately 6000 ha. Based on the trophic guild (ie the aggregation of species utilizing similar food resources on the reef, the biomass of predator fish currently being captured now represents 40.4% of the total catch biomass. Members of the grouper family, the humphead wrasse (Cheilinus undulatus and trevally (Caranx melampygus in particular, have become targeted for sale in fish markets. If these predators are selectively targeted and exploited, the overall reef fishery and the human populations that depend on it may become imperilled, given these species’ significant roles in controlling those lower in the food chain. This study thereby emphasizes the need for balanced fisheries informed by the EAF model in small island fisheries management in order to sustain food security in such regions.

  12. Characteristics of Growth Rate of Coral Porites from Sanya Bay, Hainan Island and its Relationship to Environmental Variables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Qi; Zhang Yechun; Sun Donghuai

    2003-01-01

    The time series of annual and seasonal growth rate of two coral Porites, collected at different sites of fringe reef in the Sanya Bay, Hainan Island have been obtained by analyzing X-radiograph of skeletal band. There are obvious seasonal variations of the growth rate in two corals, the average low rate in winter and the average high rate from spring to autumn. Compared with the time series of environmental variables, the coral growth rate is only correlated statistically with seawater temperature and not related to rainfall and sunshine. Furthermore, the growth rate in spring and summer is correlated directly with seawater temperature of the winter-early spring ( between December and March ) and the other seasonal growth rate has no relationship with seasonal variations of seawater temperature. We propose that seawater temperature is one of the factors affecting the coral growth rate in the area and the low seawater temperature is a primary control of the seasonal growth rate.

  13. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy 03 (WQB-03): Kiholo Bay, Big Island, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  14. Coastal vulnerability to typhoon inundation in the Bay of Bangkok, Thailand? Evidence from carbonate boulder deposits on Ko Larn island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, James P.; Jankaew, Kruawun; Dunne, Kieran

    2015-11-01

    At the head of the Gulf of Thailand, the subsiding Chao Phraya delta and adjacent low-lying coastlines surrounding the Bay of Bangkok are at risk of coastal flooding. Although a significant marine inundation event has not been experienced in historical times, this work identifies coastal depositional evidence for high-energy waves in the past. On Ko Larn island in eastern Bay of Bangkok, numerous coastal carbonate boulders (CCBs) were discovered at elevations up to 4+ m above sea level, the largest weighing over 1.3 tonnes. For the majority of CCBs, their karstified appearance bears testimony to long periods of immobility since original deposition, whilst their geomorphic settings on coastal slopes of coarse blocky talus is helpful in recognising lifting (saltation) as the probable mode of wave transport. In the absence of local tsunamigenic potential, these CCBs are considered to be prehistoric typhoon deposits, presumably sourced from fringing coral reefs by high-energy wave action. Application of existing hydrodynamic flow transport equations reveals that 4.7 m/s and 7.1 m/s are the minimum flow velocities required to transport 50% and 100% of the measured CCBs, respectively. Such values are consistent with cyclone-impacted coastlines studied elsewhere in the tropical Asia-Pacific region. Overall, the evidence of elevated carbonate boulder deposits on Ko Larn implies that typhoons before the modern record may have entered the Bay of Bangkok. The recurrence of a similar event in future would have the potential to cause damaging marine inundation on surrounding low-lying coastlines.

  15. A GIS FOR THE ANTARCTIC SPECIALLY MANAGED AREA OF ADMIRALTY BAY,KING GEORGE ISLAND,ANTARCTICA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    ABSTRACT A GIS is proposed as a tool for the managing plan for the Antarctic specially managed area (ASMA) in Admiralty Bay.The ASMA comprises the area considered to be within the glacial drainage basin of the bay.Furthermore,it includes part of SSSI No.8 adjacent to the area but outside of the glacial drainage basin.Three stations and six refuges are located in the area.Using a SPOT satellite image map,the limits of the ASMA are marked and its area is re_calculated.It consists of 362 km2,including 186 km2 island ice field and small cirque glaciers and 32 km2 ice_free field.The rest comprises water of the bay and a small adjacent area (8 km2) of the Bransfield Strait. The ASMA_GIS will consists of 12 data layers ranging from the physiographic settings to the biological and administrative features.All data will be implemented into Arc/Info GIS according to the cartographic guidelines of the SCAR WG_GGI.First,five plans of information will be realised using a topographic database compiled from various sources and data from the revised bathymetric chart published by the Brazilian Navy Hydrographic Survey and also including: 1) Limits of the ASMA and protected areas;2) Glaciological features (e.g.drainage basin limits) and 3) Human presence (e.g.stations and historical sites).These basic GIS layers will be operational in early 2001.Then,additional data on the remaining layers (e.g.hydrology,geology and geomorphology) will be included from published sources. The ASMA_GIS will form an important database for environmental monitoring and studies surveying temporal changes of features such as glacier front positions or bird breading sites.

  16. Relative abundance, age, growth, and fecundity of grubby Myoxocephalus aenaeus in Niantic River and Niantic Bay, Long Island Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseman, Edward F.; Tomichek, Christine A.; Maynard, Tracy; Burton, Jennifer A.

    2005-04-01

    Grubby ( Myoxocephalus aenaeus, Cottidae) is a common benthic fish of inshore waters and estuaries of eastern Long Island Sound; however, little information exists on their life history or population demographics. This study utilised a long-term data series (1976-2002) to assess grubby life history and population demographics and explores trends in the Niantic River and Niantic Bay populations. In addition, we examined the age, size, and fecundity of adult grubby in 2001-02 to determine the population characteristics in the region. Mean grubby catch per unit effort (CPUE) in Niantic Bay ranged from 0.4 per trawl in 1976 to 2.9 per trawl in 1984 while river CPUE ranged from 0.4 per trawl in 1977 to 7.6 per trawl in 1989. Catch of grubby in bottom trawls varied seasonally with highest CPUE occurring in winter. Highest entrainment of grubby larvae occurred in 2001 while the lowest entrainment observed was in 1991. Four age classes, 0+ through III+, were derived from otolith analysis (N = 51) although length frequency analysis suggested the possibility of older fish in the population. The total number of eggs in ovaries ranged from 286 to 16 451 for grubby (N = 64) between 52 mm and 155 mm TL. Results of this study indicated a decline in abundance of adult grubby over the 26-year period, possibly related to concurrent declines in eelgrass ( Zostera marina) abundance and/or increased water temperature.

  17. Geochemical survey of Levante Bay, Vulcano Island (Italy), a natural laboratory for the study of ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatta, F; D'Alessandro, W; Gagliano, A L; Liotta, M; Milazzo, M; Rodolfo-Metalpa, R; Hall-Spencer, J M; Parello, F

    2013-08-30

    Shallow submarine gas vents in Levante Bay, Vulcano Island (Italy), emit around 3.6t CO2 per day providing a natural laboratory for the study of biogeochemical processes related to seabed CO2 leaks and ocean acidification. The main physico-chemical parameters (T, pH and Eh) were measured at more than 70 stations with 40 seawater samples were collected for chemical analyses. The main gas vent area had high concentrations of dissolved hydrothermal gases, low pH and negative redox values all of which returned to normal seawater values at distances of about 400m from the main vents. Much of the bay around the vents is corrosive to calcium carbonate; the north shore has a gradient in seawater carbonate chemistry that is well suited to studies of the effects of long-term increases in CO2 levels. This shoreline lacks toxic compounds (such as H2S) and has a gradient in carbonate saturation states. PMID:23465567

  18. 美國羅德島州公立學校教育體系的源起與H. Barnard的教育作為(1800-1849) The Origin of Public School System of Rhode Island and the Accomplishments of H. Barnard (1800-1849

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    彭煥勝 Huan-Sheng Peng

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available 本文以美國羅德島州為例,觀察其特殊的歷史文化背景對公立學校體系發展的影響,探討美國首次以州公款每年定期補助各地方公立學校教育發展之《免費學校法》(1800 年)的源起、挫敗經過。1828 年《學校法》再度頒布,奠定州議會教育經費補助地方公立學校教育發展之制度。1843 年州政府延攬H. Barnard主持羅德島州的公共教育事務,經過Barnard 的努力,開創羅德島首次強迫各地方徵收教育稅,以及解除各鎮自行徵收教育稅上限的規定,在州的教育補助經費、校舍建築與設備、教師素質與成長團體、教育視導制度等方面,皆有顯著的成效,建立起羅德島州的公立學校教育體系。 Taking the public school system of Rhode Island as an example, this research examines the influence of Rhode Island’s unique history and culture on the development of its public school system. It also examines the origin and setback of Free School Law in 1800, which first enacted periodical subsidies of every local public school. The School Act of 1828 was finally implemented, so that state assembly could found public schools. H. Barnard became the Commissioner of Public Schools in 1843. Under his administration, Rhode Island first mandated local governments to levy a tax on education and removed the upper limits of educational taxes collected by every town. In addition to funds, school buildings and facilities, the quality of teachers and their associating, and the educational supervision system had also developed and made a great deal of progress. The contribution of Barnard to the establishment of Rhode Island’s public school system has been marked ever since.

  19. Mineshafts on Treasure Island: A Relief Map of the eBay Fraud Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary M. Calkins

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available As explorers once opened up new trade passages, thus attracting hordes of both honest traders and dishonest pirates, so too has the Internet opened new lanes of commerce and attracted the modern versions of the same. One of the widest of these lanes undoubtedly runs through eBay, located at http://www.ebay.com . From its humble beginnings as a little-known auction site hawking PEZ candy dispensers, broken laser pointers and other garage-sale pickings, eBay has transformed itself into a reputable public sales powerhouse where a Gulfstream II jet, million-dollar sports artifacts, and Madonna’s wedding tiara might easily change hands.4

  20. A late Holocene palaeoenvironmental record from Altona Bay, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, C.A.; Pedersen, Jørn Bjarke Torp; Bartholdy, Jesper;

    2008-01-01

    sea-level rise, from a position, c.2 m lower than present. After a c. 1000 year period of marine sedimentation lasting until c. 2500 cal BP, renewed formation of tropical wetland occurred at the site. This development may be attributed to the increased isolation of the shallow Altona Bay, most likely......A reconstruction of the palaeoenvironmental development of Altona Bay, St. Croix, northeastern Caribbean, has been made based on the sedimentological, geochemical and pollen analyses of a 1.83 m long vibracore. For chronological control, AMS 14 C measurements were made at 5 levels downcore....... The sedimentary sequence covers the last c. 4700 years, containing both (mangrove) peat and fine-grained clastic sediment units. Comparison with regional Holocene sea level data demonstrates a gradual marine flooding of a mangrove environment around 3500 cal BP was presumably related to a regional late Holocene...

  1. A new species of Begonia (Begoniaceae from Sagea Lagoon, Weda Bay, Halmahera Island, North Moluccas, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Wiriadinata

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Begonia sageaensis  Wiriadinata (Begoniaceae from south of Mt. Sohra Ecoregion, Sagea  Lagoon,  Weda Bay, Halmahera, North Moluccas, Indonesia is described and illustrated. This species close to B. holosericea Teijsm. & Binn. in small herb habit but it differ in red hirsute hairs on both leaf surface and on its petiole, persistence equitant bracts, longer pedicels of male flowers and  fruit has three equal wings with both flat ends. 

  2. Level III Ecoregions of Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  3. Level IV Ecoregions of Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  4. 2006 FEMA Lidar: Rhode Island Coastline

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. By positioning laser range finding with the use of 1...

  5. Rhode Island Consumer Education Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

    This consumer curriculum guide is divided into 10 component areas: basic economics in the marketplace, credit, consumer law/protection, banking skills, comparison shopping, advertising, responsible budgeting, insurance, taxes, and conservation of energy and resources. Each component is accompanied by a goal statement that identifies key concepts…

  6. 2015 State Geodatabase for Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The 2015 TIGER Geodatabases are extracts of selected nation based and state based geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  7. Primary carbon sources for juvenile penaeid shrimps in a mangrove-fringed Bay of Inhaca Island, Mozambique: a dual carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Macia, A.

    2004-01-01

    A study to estimate the relative importance of mangrove primary carbon and nitrogen sources to five commercial penaeid shrimps species was done at Saco da Inhaca, a non-estuarine mangrove-fringed bay on Inhaca Island, southern Mozambique. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios were determined in a variety of primary producers (mangroves, epiphytes, phytoplankton and seagrasses), sediments and in five penaeid shrimp species (Penaeus (Fenneropenaeus) indicus, P. japonicus, P. semisulcatus, M...

  8. {sup 137}Cs in marine sediments of Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Paulo Alves de Lima [Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo (IO-USP), Pça. do Oceanográfico, 191, Butantã, SP, 05508 900 (Brazil); Ribeiro, Andreza Portella, E-mail: andrezpr@usp.br [Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo (IO-USP), Pça. do Oceanográfico, 191, Butantã, SP, 05508 900 (Brazil); Mestrado de Gestão Ambiental e Sustentabilidade, Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE), Avenida Francisco Matarazzo, 612, prédio C, andar térreo, Água Branca, São Paulo, SP, 05001 100 (Brazil); Nascimento, Mylene Giseli do; Martins, Cesar de Castro [Centro de Estudos do Mar, Universidade Federal do Paraná (CEM-UFPR), Av. Beira-mar, no number, Balneário Pontal do Sul, Pontal do Paraná, PR, 83255 971 (Brazil); Mahiques, Michel Michaelovitch de; Montone, Rosalinda Carmelo; Figueira, Rubens Cesar Lopes [Instituto Oceanográfico, Universidade de São Paulo (IO-USP), Pça. do Oceanográfico, 191, Butantã, SP, 05508 900 (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    The radionuclide cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is produced exclusively by anthropogenic processes and primarily by nuclear explosions. This study determined the reference inventory that is {sup 137}Cs associated with the element's original input, and utilized the levels of activity of this radionuclide previously measured in five sediment profiles collected from Admiralty Bay, Antarctica, to investigate the mobility of this element in the environment. {sup 137}Cs has a half-life of 30 years. Because of this, it is environmentally persistent and has been shown to accumulate in marine organisms. The mean reference inventory of this radionuclide in Admiralty Bay sediments, determined using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry, was 20.23 ± 8.94 Bq m{sup −2}, and within the ambient {sup 137}Cs activity range. A model of {sup 137}Cs diffusion–convection was applied to data collected from 1 cm intervals in sediment cores with the aim of providing insights with respect to this element's behavior in sediments. Model results showed a significant correlation between measured and modeled values using the concentrations of {sup 137}Cs, and estimated input into the system from the global fallout of past nuclear tests and expected values based on local sedimentation rates. Results highlight the importance of accounting for the vertical diffusion of {sup 137}Cs in marine sediments when used as a tracer for environmental processes and for assessing potential bioavailability. - Highlights: ► Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is produced exclusively by anthropogenic processes. ► A model of diffusion–convection simulated {sup 137}Cs environmental behavior. ► This is important for assessing the bioavailability of this toxic element. ► In Antarctica ice cover influenced the input to the sediments.

  9. Three tropical seagrasses as potential bio-indicators to trace metals in Xincun Bay, Hainan Island, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lei; HUANG Xiaoping

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations of the trace metals Cu,Cd,Pb,and Zn were measured in seawater,rhizosphere sediments,interstitial water,and the tissues of three tropical species of seagrasses (Thalassia hemprichii,Enhalus acoroides and Cymodocea rotundata) from Xincun Bay of Hainan Island,South China.We analyzed different environmental compartments and the highest concentrations of Pb and Zn were found in the interstitial and seawater.The concentrations of Cd and Zn were significantly higher in blades compared with roots or rhizomes in T.hemprichii and E.acoroides,respectively.A metal pollution index (MPI) demonstrated that sediment,interstitial water,and seagrasses in the sites located nearest anthropogenic sources of pollution had the most abundant metal concentrations.There was obvious seasonal variation of these metals in the three seagrasses with higher concentrations of Cu,Pb and Zn in January and Cd in July.Furthermore,the relationships between metal concentrations in seagrasses and environmental compartments were positively correlated significantly.The bioconcentration factors (BCF) demonstrated that Cd from the tissues of the three seagrasses might be absorbed from the sediment by the roots.However,for C.rotundata,Zn is likely to be derived from the seawater through its blades.Therefore,the blades of T.hemprichii,E.acoroides and C.rotundata are potential bio-indicators to Cd content in sediment,and additionally Zn content (C.rotundata only) in seawater.

  10. Cinnabar, arsenian pyrite and thallium-enrichment in active shallow submarine hydrothermal vents at Paleochori Bay, Milos Island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kati, Marianna; Voudouris, Panagiotis; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Magganas, Andreas; Baltatzis, Emmanouil; Kanellopoulos, Christos; Mavrogonatos, Constantinos

    2015-04-01

    We herein report the discovery of active cinnabar-depositing hydrothermal vents in a submarine setting at Paleochori Bay, within the offshore southeastern extension of the Milos Island Geothermal Field, South Aegean Active Volcanic Arc. Active, low temperature (up to 115 °C) hydrothermal venting through volcaniclastic material has led to a varied assemblage of sulfide and alteration mineral phases in an area of approximately 1 km2. Our samples recovered from Paleochori Bay are hydrothermal edifices composed of volcaniclastic detrital material cemented by pyrite, or pure sulfide (mainly massive pyrite) mounts. Besides pyrite and minor marcasite, the hydrothermal minerals include cinnabar, amorphous silica, hydrous ferric oxides, carbonates (aragonite and calcite), alunite-jarosite solid solution and Sr-rich barite. Among others, growth textures, sieve-textured pyrite associated with barite, alunite-jarosite solid solution and hydrous ferric oxides rims colloform-banded pyrite layers. Overgrowths of arsenian pyrite layers (up to 3.2 wt. % As and/or up to 1.1 wt. % Mn) onto As-free pyrite indicate fluctuation in As content of the hydrothermal fluid. Mercury, in the form of cinnabar, occurs in up to 5 μm grains within arsenian pyrite layers, usually forming distinct cinnabar-enriched micro-layers. Hydrothermal Sr-rich barite (barite-celestine solid solution), pseudocubic alunite-jarosite solid solution and Mn- and Sr-enriched carbonates occur in various amounts and closely associated with pyrite and/or hydrous ferric oxides. Thallium-bearing sulfides and/or sulfosalts were not detected during our study; however, hydrous ferric oxides show thallium content of up to 0.5 wt. % Tl. The following scenarios may have played a role in pyrite precipitation at Paleochori: (a) H2S originally dissolved in the deep fluid but separated upon boiling could have reacted with oxygenated seawater under production of sulphuric acid, thus causing leaching and dissolution of primary iron

  11. Geological survey of Maryland using EREP flight data. [mining, mapping, Chesapeake Bay islands, coastal water features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, K. N. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Underflight photography has been used in the Baltimore County mined land inventory to determine areas of disturbed land where surface mining of sand and ground clay, or stone has taken place. Both active and abandoned pits and quarries were located. Aircraft data has been used to update cultural features of Calvert, Caroline, St. Mary's, Somerset, Talbot, and Wicomico Counties. Islands have been located and catalogued for comparison with older film and map data for erosion data. Strip mined areas are being mapped to obtain total area disturbed to aid in future mining and reclamation problems. Coastal estuarine and Atlantic Coast features are being studied to determine nearshore bedforms, sedimentary, and erosional patterns, and manmade influence on natural systems.

  12. Population structure and residency of whale sharks Rhincodon typus at Utila, Bay Islands, Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S; Foisy, I; De La Parra Venegas, R; Galván Pastoriza, B E; Graham, R T; Hoffmayer, E R; Holmberg, J; Pierce, S J

    2013-09-01

    There were 479 reported whale shark Rhincodon typus encounters between 1999 and 2011 at the island of Utila, which forms part of the Meso-American Barrier Reef System (MBRS) in the western Caribbean Sea. The majority of R. typus were found to feed on small bait fish associated with various tuna species. Ninety-five individual R. typus, ranging from 2 to 11 m total length (LT ), were identified through their unique spot patterns. A significant male bias (65%) was present. There was no significant difference between the mean ± s.d. LT of female (6·66 ± 1·65 m) and male (6·25 ± 1·60 m) R. typus. Most R. typus were transient to Utila, with 78% sighted only within a single calendar year, although some individuals were sighted in up to 5 years. Mean residency time was modelled to be 11·76 days using maximum likelihood methods.

  13. Population structure and residency of whale sharks Rhincodon typus at Utila, Bay Islands, Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S; Foisy, I; De La Parra Venegas, R; Galván Pastoriza, B E; Graham, R T; Hoffmayer, E R; Holmberg, J; Pierce, S J

    2013-09-01

    There were 479 reported whale shark Rhincodon typus encounters between 1999 and 2011 at the island of Utila, which forms part of the Meso-American Barrier Reef System (MBRS) in the western Caribbean Sea. The majority of R. typus were found to feed on small bait fish associated with various tuna species. Ninety-five individual R. typus, ranging from 2 to 11 m total length (LT ), were identified through their unique spot patterns. A significant male bias (65%) was present. There was no significant difference between the mean ± s.d. LT of female (6·66 ± 1·65 m) and male (6·25 ± 1·60 m) R. typus. Most R. typus were transient to Utila, with 78% sighted only within a single calendar year, although some individuals were sighted in up to 5 years. Mean residency time was modelled to be 11·76 days using maximum likelihood methods. PMID:23991875

  14. Epigeus macroinvertebrates species assemblages along a successional gradient in Hailuotu Island (Bothnia Bay, Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo A. Del Rio Mora

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Epigeus macroinvertebrates were collected during summer time in 2007, by using pitfall traps in different sites representing vegetation patches situated on land uplift area on successional gradients in the dune shore of Bothnian on the island of Hailuoto, Northern part of the Gulf of Bothnia, Finland. The sites were divided into six vegetation patches types or open sands, all of them localized on early, deflation zone and late successional stages or ecological subgroups: 1 Empetrum patches or microsites (small-scale element distribution in soil plant-systems in patches of Empetrum nigrum, in early succession; 2 Empetrum nigrum patches in deflation zone; 3 open sand in early succession; 4 open sand in deflation zone; 5 Empetrum nigrum patches in late succession, and 6 open sand in late succession. A total of 19034 specimens belonging to 14 species of Insecta and only one group to Aranea species were caught and identified. Afterwards they were grouped by trophic groups as follows: herbivores, predators and detritivores and calculated their richness, abundance, diversity and evenness for each vegetation type. The data obtained were analyzed by different analytical methods and relevant between them as MRPP for the purpose of identifying the possible differences between groups and habitats, which denoted no statistically significant between the 6 environmental types, but if for the case of composition or populations general diversity as abundance, richness, evenness, diversity. It is enclosed too Correspondence Analysis (CA and cluster analysis for epigeus invertebrates species assemblages. As a support to analysis of results we added on ended the species-accumulation curve and estimation curves Chao1 and Jacknife2 for all ecological types.

  15. Transport of nutrients and contaminants from ocean to island by emperor penguins from Amanda Bay, East Antarctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Sun, Liguang; Wang, Yuhong; Chu, Zhuding; Qin, Xianyan; Yang, Lianjiao

    2014-01-15

    Penguins play important roles in the biogeochemical cycle between Antarctic Ocean and land ecosystems. The roles of emperor penguin Aptenodytes forsteri, however, are usually ignored because emperor penguin breeds in fast sea ice. In this study, we collected two sediment profiles (EPI and PI) from the N island near a large emperor penguin colony at Amanda Bay, East Antarctic and performed stable isotope and element analyses. The organic C/N ratios and carbon and nitrogen isotopes suggested an autochthonous source of organic materials for the sediments of EPI (C/N = 10.21 ± 0.28, n = 17; δ(13)C = -13.48 ± 0.50‰, δ(15)N = 8.35 ± 0.55‰, n = 4) and an allochthonous source of marine-derived organic materials for the sediments of PI (C/N = 6.15 ± 0.08, δ(13)C = -26.85 ± 0.11‰, δ(15)N = 21.21 ± 2.02‰, n = 20). The concentrations of total phosphorus (TP), selenium (Se), mercury (Hg) and zinc (Zn) in PI sediments were much higher than those in EPI, the concentration of copper (Cu) in PI was a little lower, and the concentration of element lead (Pb) showed no difference. As measured by the geoaccumulation indexes, Zn, TP, Hg and Se were from moderately to very strongly enriched in PI, relative to local mother rock, due to the guano input from juvenile emperor penguins. Because of its high trophic level and transfer efficiency, emperor penguin can transport a large amount of nutrients and contaminants from ocean to land even with a relatively small population, and its roles in the biogeochemical cycle between ocean and terrestrial environment should not be ignored.

  16. Enterococcus species diversity and molecular characterization of biomarker genes in Enterococcus faecalis in Port Blair Bay, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Balakrishnan; Anburajan, Lawrance; Sathish, Thadikamala; Raghavan, Rangamaran Vijaya; Jha, Dilip Kumar; Venkateshwaran, Pitchiah; Das, Apurba Kumar; Dheenan, Palaiya Sukumaran; Vinithkumar, Nambali Valsalan; Dharani, Gopal; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam

    2015-05-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the abundance and diversity of Enterococcus sp. and the distribution of biomarker genes in Enterococcus faecalis in Port Blair Bay, Andaman and Nicobar Islands. The Enterococcus sp. densities at the seven sampling stations were highly influenced by tidal fluctuations and season. The distributions and diversities of species varied in the inner and outer regions of Port Blair Bay. Among the 1816 total isolates, the occurrence of fecal Enterococcus was high (1.78×10(4) CFU/100 mL) in Phoenix Bay. Moreover, 67.76% of the isolates were identified as Enterococcus, and the most frequently identified species were E. hirae, E. avium and E. faecalis. Assessments of antibiotic resistance and biomarker genes revealed the maximum occurrence in the Aberdeen Bay isolates. The most prevalent biomarker genes observed in the E. faecalis isolates were gelE and asa1, whereas cyl was not found among the isolates. In silico sequence analysis of biomarker genes of E. faecalis also revealed that they are evolutionarily well conserved with those of earlier reports. Further, multivariate analysis distinguished the JB, PB and OS stations from the other stations according to distinctive microbial densities and compositions. In addition, the Shannon-Wiener diversity indices and box-whisker plots further facilitated and supported the multivariate results.

  17. Trial of Multidisciplinary Observation at an Expandable Sub-Marine Cabled Station “Off-Hatsushima Island Observatory” in Sagami Bay, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaya, Takafumi; Mitsuzawa, Kyohiko; Goto, Tada-nori; Iwase, Ryoichi; Sayanagi, Keizo; Araki, Eiichiro; Asakawa, Kenichi; Mikada, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Tomoki; Takahashi, Ichiro; Nagao, Toshiyasu

    2009-01-01

    Sagami Bay is an active tectonic area in Japan. In 1993, a real-time deep sea floor observatory was deployed at 1,175 m depth about 7 km off Hatsushima Island, Sagami Bay to monitor seismic activities and other geophysical phenomena. Video cameras monitored biological activities associated with tectonic activities. The observation system was renovated completely in 2000. An ocean bottom electromagnetic meter (OBEM), an ocean bottom differential pressure gauge (DPG) system, and an ocean bottom gravity meter (OBG) were installed January 2005; operations began in February of that year. An earthquake (M5.4) in April 2006, generated a submarine landslide that reached the Hatsushima Observatory, moving some sensors. The video camera took movies of mudflows; OBEM and other sensors detected distinctive changes occurring with the mudflow. Although the DPG and OBG were recovered in January 2008, the OBEM continues to obtain data. PMID:22291563

  18. Detrital thermochronology and sedimentology of the Sabine Bay and Assistance formations, Ellesmere Island: insights into the source of the Melvilian Disturbance event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Y.; Leier, A.; Guest, B.; Beauchamp, B.; Morris, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Melvillian Disturbance in the Sverdrup Basin of the Canadian Arctic occurred between early and middle Permian time and is characterized by angular unconfomities, basaltic flows, and is linked to a broader mid-Permian circum-Arctic tectonic event.We examined the lower-middle Permian Sabine Bay and Assistance formations exposed in northwestern Ellesmere Island in order to better understand the depositional and tectonic history of this region during the middle Permian time. Detailed sections of these units were measured at multiple locations and samples were collected for zircon/apatite thermochronology. The Sabine Bay Formation is present in limited locations where it consists of white, medium-grained, quartzose sediments. Beds contain trough cross-strata with drapes of mud-sized organic material, ripples, and rare bioturbation. Preliminary paleocurrent data indicate transport to the west. We interpret the Sabine Bay Formation to have been deposited in a fluvial environment, possibly with some tidal influence. The Assistance Formation unconformably overlies the Sabine Bay Formation and appears to be more regionally extensive than the Sabine Bay Formation. The Assistance Formation consists of fine-grained quartzose sandstone with abundant Zoophycos burrows, shell biota and other marine trace fossils. The character of the Assistance Formation varies between locations, but in some locations the formation contains hummocky and swaley cross-stratification bedding. Vertically, the Assistance Formation grades from sandstone beds into mudstone beds with deeper-water marine trace fossils. We interpret the Assistance Formation to have been deposited in a lower-shoreface, storm-influenced, shelf setting that was progressively transgressed during deposition. The isolated occurrences of the Sabine Bay Formation and large lateral thickness variations of the Assistance Formation suggest these units were deposited in fault-bounded sub-basins within the Sverdrup Basin. The larger

  19. Nutrients, temperature and salinity data for Honokohau Harbor, Kealakekua Bay, and Kailua Bay Big Island, Hawaii 2005-2007 (NODC Accession 0059191)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set was used as groundtruthing for low-altitude thermal infrared imagery of surface nearshore coastal waters of west Hawaii (the Big Island). Data are...

  20. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Benthic Habitat Data, Long Island Sound, Jamaica Bay, and Lower Bay of NY/NJ Harbor, NY, 1994-2002 (NODC Accession 0089467)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are a collection of benthic habitat data from studies conducted in the coastal Long Island Sound, NY region in GIS shapefile (.shp, .dbf, .shx, and .prj...

  1. Narragansett Bay From Space: A Perspective for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, John F.; Swanson, Craig; Deacutis, Chris

    2001-01-01

    In 1996, the NASA Administrator Dan Goldin and Rhode Island Congressman Patrick Kennedy challenged researchers in the Department of Geological Sciences at Brown University to developed a series of projects to apply remotely sensed data to problems of immediate concern to the State of Rhode Island. The result of that challenge was the project Narragansett Bay from Space: A Perspective for the 21st Century. The goals of the effort were to a) identify problems in coordination with state and local agencies, b) apply NASA technology to the problems and c) to involve small business that would benefit from incorporating remotely sensed data into their business operations. The overall effort was to serve two functions: help provide high quality science results based on remotely sensed data and increase the capacity of environmental managers and companies to use remotely sensed data. The effort has succeeded on both these fronts by providing new, quantitative information on the extent of environmental problems and developing a greater awareness and acceptance of remotely sensed data as a tool for monitoring and research.

  2. H10628: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Rhode Island Sound Corridor, Rhode Island, 1995-09-11

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  3. H10720: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Rhode Island Sound, Rhode Island, 1996-11-05

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  4. Diel use of a saltwater creek by white-tip reef sharks Triaenodon obesus (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae) in Academy Bay, Galapagos Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñiaherrera, César; Hearn, Alex R; Kuhn, Angela

    2012-06-01

    White-tip reef sharks are common inhabitants of the shallow waters surrounding the Galapagos Islands, where several known aggregation sites have become touristic attractions. With the aim to describe site fidelity and residency patterns of the white-tip reef sharks in a saltwater creek, we used the ultrasonic telemetry method. The study was undertaken in a saltwater channel South of Academy Bay, Santa Cruz Island, from May 2008-September 2009. A total of nine transmitters were attached to sharks and ultrasonic receivers were deployed at the inner and outside areas of the creek. From the total of fitted sharks, four lost their transmitters. The results obtained with the remaining sharks showed an elevated use of the inner area of the channel during the day, with more use of the external area during the night. However, none of the sharks were detected at the site every day, suggesting that they may have a number of preferred sites within their home range. More studies are needed to detail the home range and habitat use of this species, and to guide its protection level in the Academy Bay area.

  5. Plugging the leak: barrier island restoration following Hurricane Katrina enhances larval retention and improves salinity regime for oysters in Mobile Bay, Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyeong; Powers, Sean P; Bosarge, George S; Jung, Hoon-Shin

    2014-03-01

    Changes in geomorphology of estuaries are common following major perpetuations such as hurricanes and may have profound impacts on biological systems. Hurricane Katrina in 2005 created a new pass, called Katrina Cut, halving Dauphin Island in Mobile Bay, Alabama. Significant decline in oyster population at Cedar Point Reef, the primary oyster harvest grounds in Mobile Bay, had persisted since then until the Cut was artificially closed in 2010. A bio-physical model for hydrodynamics and oyster larval transport was used to evaluate two potential mechanisms responsible for oyster population declines: salinity changes in the context of oyster habitat suitability and retention of oyster larvae. The model results revealed that when open Katrina Cut increased salinity at Cedar Point Reef. During high freshwater discharge, in particular, water exchange through Katrina Cut increased the bottom salinity from 20) psu during the tropic tides. Elevated salinities are associated with greater predation on oysters and higher disease incidence. The presence of the Katrina Cut also reduced larval retention in the spawning area regardless of tidal or river discharge conditions. We conclude that closing the Cut likely improved conditions for oysters within Mobile Bay and eastern Mississippi Sound and that these improved conditions have contributed to increased oyster landings.

  6. Integrated Assessment of Heavy Metal Pollution in the Surface Sediments of the Laizhou Bay and the Coastal Waters of the Zhangzi Island, China: Comparison among Typical Marine Sediment Quality Indices

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuang, Wen; Gao, Xuelu

    2014-01-01

    The total concentrations and chemical forms of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in the surface sediments of the Laizhou Bay and the surrounding marine area of the Zhangzi Island (hereafter referred to as Zhangzi Island for short) were obtained and multiple indices and guidelines were applied to assess their contamination and ecological risks. The sedimentary conditions were fine in both of the two studied areas according to the marine sediment quality of China. Whereas the probable ef...

  7. South San Francisco Bay tidal marsh vegetation and elevation surveys-Corkscrew Marsh, Bird Island, and Palo Alto Baylands, California, 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, James L.; Drexler, Judy Z.; Dedrick, Kent G.

    2005-01-01

    Changes in the topography and ecology of the San Francisco Bay Estuary ('Estuary') during the past 200 years have resulted in the loss of nearly 80 percent of the historical salt marsh in the region. Currently, numerous projects are being undertaken by federal, state, and local governments in an attempt to restore wetland habitat and ecosystem function at a number of locations within the Estuary. Much information is needed concerning the historical topographic and ecologic characteristics of the Estuary to facilitate these restoration efforts. This report presents previously unpublished vegetation and elevation data collected in 1983 by the California State Lands Commission at Corkscrew marsh, Bird Island, and Palo Alto Baylands, all located in South San Francisco Bay. These precise and detailed elevation and plant surveys represent a snapshot of South Bay flora before invasion by the Atlantic smooth cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora. Such precise elevation data are rare for relatively undisturbed marshes in the San Francisco Bay; publication of these historical data may facilitate wetland restoration efforts. Marsh-surface and tidal-channel elevations were determined at a total of 962 stations by differential leveling to established tidal benchmark stations at each site and referenced to Mean Lower Low Water (MLLW) relative to the National Tidal Datum Epoch (1960-78). In addition, presence or absence of nine salt marsh species, percentage plant cover, and percentage bare soil were recorded for 1-square meter quadrats at 648 stations where elevations were determined. Collectively, over the three sites, salt marsh vegetation ranged in elevation from 0.98 to 2.94 m above MLLW. S. foliosa and Salicornia virginica were the most frequently observed plant species. Atriplex patula, Deschampsia cespitosa, and Limonium californicum were each recorded at only one of the three sites.

  8. Comparing effects of land reclamation techniques on water pollution and fishery loss for a large-scale offshore airport island in Jinzhou Bay, Bohai Sea, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hua-Kun; Wang, Nuo; Yu, Tiao-Lan; Fu, Qiang; Liang, Chen

    2013-06-15

    Plans are being made to construct Dalian Offshore Airport in Jinzhou Bay with a reclamation area of 21 km(2). The large-scale reclamation can be expected to have negative effects on the marine environment, and these effects vary depending on the reclamation techniques used. Water quality mathematical models were developed and biology resource investigations were conducted to compare effects of an underwater explosion sediment removal and rock dumping technique and a silt dredging and rock dumping technique on water pollution and fishery loss. The findings show that creation of the artificial island with the underwater explosion sediment removal technique would greatly impact the marine environment. However, the impact for the silt dredging technique would be less. The conclusions from this study provide an important foundation for the planning of Dalian Offshore Airport and can be used as a reference for similar coastal reclamation and marine environment protection. PMID:23608638

  9. Investigation of late Quaternary fault block uplift along the Motagua/Swan Islands fault system: Implications for seismic/tsunami hazard for the Bay of Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Randel Tom; Lumsden, David N.; Gough, Kevin; Lloyd, Roger; Talnagi, Joseph

    2008-09-01

    Uplifted and warped coastal landforms (fossil coral reef and beachrock, wave-cut and beach terraces) on the western part of Roatan Island off the northern Honduran coast record at least two late Holocene earthquakes that we estimate to have had magnitudes of > M7. Uplift has been primarily related to a fault that follows the southern coast of western Roatan, herein termed the "Flowers Bay fault", a subsidiary fault of the Motagua/Swan Islands Fault System which marks the boundary between the North American and Caribbean plates. Using electron spin resonance (ESR) and radiocarbon ages of calcium carbonate samples and a late Quaternary sea level elevation curve that is compatible with Caribbean sea level data, we constrain the ages and long-term uplift rates of the displaced landforms on Roatan caused by the vertical component of slip on the Flowers Bay fault. The fossil reef that is uplifted along the fault grew between 43 and 34 ka, and the beachrock horizon and lowest uplifted terrace along the southern and western coasts developed between 1000 and 1700 AD. We describe evidence of one earthquake that raised the south coast ~ 3 m (as much as 5 m locally) and that post-dates 1700 AD. We interpret this event to be the great earthquake of August 1856 that generated a tsunami which ran as much as 24 km onto the mainland. Another earthquake circa 900 AD produced a similar amount of uplift as the 1856 event and likely generated a similar tsunami. The age and elevation of the fossil reef suggest a long-term uplift rate of 3 mm/year, consistent with a recurrence interval of ~ 1000 years for these large earthquakes.

  10. Tides, tidal currents and their effects on the intertidal ecosystem of the southern bay, Inhaca Island, Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de W.F.; Rydberg, L.; Saide, V.

    2000-01-01

    Sediment characteristics and tidal currents were studied in the 1500 ha intertidal area south of Inhaca Island, Mozambique. The tide is semi-diurnal with a range at spring of about 3 m. The area connects directly to the ocean through the Ponta Torres Strait and (indirectly) through several narrow ti

  11. 77 FR 18739 - Safety Zone; Bay Swim V, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bay Swim V, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA... is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of the Presque Island Bay during the Bay Swim...

  12. 77 FR 35860 - Safety Zone; Bay Swim V, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ..., Erie, PA in the Federal Register (77 FR 18739). We received no letters commenting on the proposed rule... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bay Swim V, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA... restrict vessels from a portion of the Presque Island Bay during the Bay Swim V swimming event. The...

  13. Bay in Flux: Marine Climate Impacts, Art and Tablet App Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintisch, E. S.

    2012-12-01

    Bay in Flux is a year-long experimental effort to design and develop interactive tablet computer apps exploring the marine impacts of climate change. The goal is to convey, visualize and enliven scientific ideas around this topic, while engaging a broad audience through the design of interactive content. Pioneering new models of scientist-artist collaborations are a central part of the effort as well. The project begins with an innovative studio class at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) called Bay in Flux, taught in the Fall 2012 semester. Its three instructor team includes two artist-designers and one science reporter, with active collaborations from affiliated marine scientists. The subject matter focus is the Narragansett Bay, which has shown physical, chemical and ecological impacts of climate change, along with the ongoing efforts of researchers to explain and characterize it. In exploring this rich story, we intend to innovate pioneering means of handling narrative material on interactive e-books, enable data collection by citizen scientists or devise game-like simulations to enable audiences to explore and understand complex natural systems. The lessons we seek to learn in this project include: how to effectively encourage collaborations between scientists and designers around digital design; how to pioneer new and compelling ways to tell science-based nonfiction stories on tablets; and how art and design students with no scientific training can engage with complex scientific content effectively. The project will also challenge us to think about the tablet computer not only as a data output device -- in which the user reads, watches, or interacts with provided content -- but also as a dynamic and ideal tool for mobile data input, enabling citizen science projects and novel connections between working researchers and the public. The intended audience could include high school students or older audiences who currently eschew science journalism. HTML5

  14. A rich Pleistocene-Holocene avifaunal sequence from Te Waka no. 1 : terrestrial fossil vertebrate faunas from inland Hawke's Bay, North Island, New Zealand. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of 13 m2 of new excavations in the rockshelter called Te Waka no. 1, 900 m above sea level in inland Hawke's Bay, North Island, New Zealand, are presented. The site is shown to have an unparalleled continuous faunal record in sediments about 3 m deep that spans the period from the Kawakawa eruption 22,600 14C yrs BP to the present. Good temporal control is afforded by clear stratigraphy, three obvious tephras (Taupo Ignimbrite, one unidentified, Kawakawa Tephra (Oruanui Ignimbrite)), seven AMS radiocarbon ages, and one uranium-series age. Three frog species, a tuatara, five lizards, 42 birds, and three bats are represented in the 2490 identified bones from the combined faunas from W.H. Hartree's late 1950s and our 1999-2000 excavations. The fauna is interpreted as being mainly derived from the prey remains of Falco novaeseelandiae; it includes the first fossil records of Garrodia nereis and Charadrius bicinctus from the North Island. The presence in the fossil avifauna of species that live only in shrubland or forest indicates that such vegetation was present on Te Waka between 22,600 14C yrs BP and the Late Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18,000 14C yrs BP). Pterodroma cookii ceased to breed on Te Waka over the LGM. The absence of this species (which nests solely under forest), the lack of forest passerines, and the presence of species characteristic of open vegetation indicate a substantial loss of vegetation around the site at that time. The sedimentary and faunal record indicate that the area was reafforested about 14,000 14C yrs BP. (author). 75 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  15. Seasonal variation in the intensity of movements by the estuarine dolphin, Sotalia guianensis (Cetacea: Delphinidae, in the North Bay, Santa Catarina Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Simões-Lopes

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The resident population of estuarine dolphins (Sotalia guianensis in the North Bay, Santa Catarina Island, southern Brazil, was studied from September 2001 until July 2003 through periodical boat surveys. Using focal-group and sequential sampling, information such as geographical position and behavioral patterns were registered at 5-minute intervals. All the information collected was insert in a GIS database of the study area. Since patterns of seasonal variation concerning home range and behavior had been established in previous work, we aimed at evaluating the existence of seasonal intensity of movements, therefore strengthening the proposed hypothesis of higher spatial requirements when food resources are low. The daily mean speed of the dolphin’s group was used as an index of the intensity of movements, and its seasonal variation throughout the study period was analyzed. We found a statistically significant seasonal variation in the intensity of movement. The dolphins tended to move more in the cold seasons, in contrast with the hot seasons when the dolphins tended to move less. Thus, previous studies are corroborated, supporting the hypothesis og higher spatial requirements when there are fewer food resources.

  16. Geoenvironments from the vicinity of Arctowski Station, Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica: vulnerability and valuation assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto G.R.; Santana, Rogério Mercandelle; Simas, Felipe Nogueira Bello; Francelino, Márcio R.; Filho, Elpídio Inácio Fernandes; Albuquerque, Miriam Abreu; Calijuri, Maria Lúcia

    2007-01-01

    The use of a geographic information system (GIS) allows the mapping and quantification of biotic and physical features of importance to the environmental planning of Antarctic areas. In this paper we examined the main aspects of the geoenvironments of Arctowski Station vicinity (Admiralty bay, Maritime Antartica), by means of a photointerpretation of an orthomosaic at 1:6000 scale, produced by non-conventional aerial photographs obtained by the Brazilian Cryosols project. We carried out a preliminary environmental valuation and vulnerability assessment of the area. Hence, geoenvironments were classified and ranked according with their biological valuation and vulnerability (fragility), mapping 20 units covering approximately 150 ha. The most fragile geoenvironmental units were former and present penguin rookeries with different vegetation covers, all very prone to degradation by over-trampling and human perturbations. The relationships between each geoenvironment were also explored, emphasizing the ecological aspects and their valuation. In quantitative terms, the most vulnerable and fragile units (classes 4 and 5) occupy nearly 22 % of the total area, being highly concentrated near the coastal areas. There, ornithogenic input is an important factor favoring the vegetation development.

  17. North Atlantic Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Massachusetts (2001), Delaware Bay (1996), New Hampshire (2004), Hudson River (2006), and Rhode Island, Connecticut, NY/NJ Metro Area (2001) maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0020555)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These ESI data were collected, mapped, and digitized to provide environmental data for oil spill planning and response. The Clean Water Act with amendments by the...

  18. Four-year survey of dissolved/dispersed petroleum hydrocarbons on surface waters of Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Caruso Bícego

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Seawater from 8 stations in Admiralty Bay was systematically sampled during the summer of 1994, 1995, 1996 and 1997 and analyzed by spectrofluorimetry to measure dissolved/dispersed petroleum hydrocarbons (DDPHs. The purpose of this study was to detect some temporal and spatial changes in terms of oil contamination of the region. The results indicate low levels of oil pollution with relatively high concentrations near the research stations located in the study area. During the summers of 1995 and 1996 the average concentrations for individual stations were low and below of 0.50 ¼g.L-1. Summers of 1994 and 1997 had relatively higher average concentrations (up to 1.57 ¼g.L-1, mainly in front of Arctowski and Ferraz Research Stations.Amostras de água na Baía do Almirantado, Península Antártica, foram sistematicamente coletadas em 8 estações durante os verões de 1994 a 1997 onde foram analisados hidrocarbonetos do petróleo dispersos e dissolvidos por espectrofluorescência. O objetivo foi avaliar variações temporais e espaciais em termos de contaminação por óleo na região. Os resultados em geral indicam baixos níveis de poluição embora tenham sido verificadas algumas concentrações relativamente maiores nas proximidades das estações de pesquisa fixadas na região de estudo. Durante os anos de 1995 e 1996 a média das concentrações foram baixas e menores que 0,50 ¼g.L-1 para os pontos individuais. Os verões de 1994 e 1997 tiveram concentrações médias mais elevadas (até 1,57 ¼g.L-1, e os maiores valores foram nas proximidades das estações brasileira e polonesa.

  19. Application of Computer-Aided Tomography (CT) Technology to Visually Compare Belowground Components of Salt Marshes in Jamaica Bay and Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using CT imaging, we found that rapidly deteriorating marshes in Jamaica Bay had significantly less belowground mass and abundance of coarse roots and rhizomes at depth (< 10 cm) compared to more stable areas in the Jamaica Bay Estuary. In addition, the rhizome diameters and pea...

  20. Bathymetric Contours, Bathymetric Depth Contours for Narragansett Bay; s44hby97; This data is bathymetric depth contours for Narragansett Bay and Block Island Sound at twenty foot intervals as depicted on NOAA nautical charts. Processed by Spot depths manually digitized., Published in 1997, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Bathymetric Contours dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 1997. It is described...

  1. Rhode Island 2010 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of RI in 2010. The data types...

  2. 2014 NOAA NGS Topobathy Lidar: Post Sandy, Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were collected by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Geodetic Survey Remote Sensing Division using a Riegl VQ820G system. The data...

  3. COASTAL STUDY, KENT COUNTY,RHODE ISLAND USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study data as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for Coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping, submitted as a result of a...

  4. COASTAL STUDY, BRISTOL COUNTY,RHODE ISLAND USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study data as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for Coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping, submitted as a result of a...

  5. Recent Trends in Bird Abundance on Rhode Island Salt Marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt marsh habitat is under pressure from development on the landward side, and sea level rise from the seaward side. The resulting loss of habitat is potentially disastrous for salt marsh dependent species. To assess the population status of three species of salt marsh dependent...

  6. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, BRISTOL COUNTY, RHODE ISLAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  7. Rhode Island 2007 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of RI in 2007. The data types...

  8. Rhode Island 2005 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Atlantic coast of RI in 2005. The data types...

  9. H11921: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Rhode Island Sound and Approaches, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, 2008-09-08

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  10. H11922: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Rhode Island Sound and Approaches, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, 2008-08-22

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  11. H11920: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Rhode Island Sound and Approaches, Rhode Island and Massachusetts, 2008-08-08

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  12. Bartolome Island, Galapagos Stable Oxygen Calibration Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Galapagos Coral Stable Oxygen Calibration Data. Sites: Bartolome Island: 0 deg, 17'S, 90 deg 33' W. Champion Island: 1 deg, 15'S, 90 deg, 05' W. Urvina Bay (Isabela...

  13. Bair Island Restoration Project Monitoring Plan 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bair Island is located adjacent to the San Francisco Bay in Redwood City, San Mateo County, California (Figure 1). Historically, Bair Island was part of a large...

  14. Bair Island Restoration Project Monitoring Plan 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bair Island is located adjacent to the San Francisco Bay in Redwood City, San Mateo County, California (Figure 1). Historically, Bair Island was part of a large...

  15. Bathymetry 2M Grid of NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Reserve, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Grid with 2 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the a portion of the NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and...

  16. Identifying Environmental Contaminations in Estuaries: Spatial Distribution of Nutrients and Heavy Metals in Jamaica Bay Area, Western Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, R. K.; Beauzile, W.; Ma, N.; Clauson, K.

    2009-12-01

    Nutrient and metal contaminations of estuarine environment is an increasing problem as urbanization continues to extend in many estuary area in the world. Jamaica Bay, an embayment of the Atlantic Ocean on southwestern Long Island receives a large inputs from waste water treatment plants, sewage outflows, and surface runoff enriched with nutrients and heavy metals, poses a serious environmental problem. As an initiative of broader study to understand the spatial and temporal variability of heavy metal and nutrient concentrations in this area, water and sediment samples are being collected periodically from three different sites capturing the wide range of flushing zones. Water samples were analyzed for dissolved nutrients (phosphate, silicate, ammonia, nitrate, nitrite) by Lachet QuickChem 8500 and dissolved trace metals (As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mo, Mn, Ni, Se, Zn) were measured by ICP-OES (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry). Temperatures, conductivity, pH, ORP, dissolved oxygen (DO) were measured on site by YSI multiparameter probe (600 QS) and ranged from 25.7 to 27.1oC, 17.3 to 36.9 mS/cm, 8.1 to 8.4, 74.7 to 160.8 mV, and 5.1 to 9.2 mg/l respectively. The 15 cm sections of 76 cm depth auger samples were analyzed for a suite of 26 elements including major and trace elements by using XRF (x-ray fluorescence spectrometry). Average Fe concentration was found to be 6.5 ± 2.9 g/kg and distributed consistently in increased concentration with depth which also agree with the observed sediment colors on site; more darker towards surface. The preliminary data from site A showed a consistency in trace metal concentrations in surface water and sediments. Higher aqueous concentrations of Cu (17.5 ± 4.1 μg/l), Pb (39.1 ± 23.9 μg/l), Zn (91.1 ± 36.8 μg/l) correspond to their elevated level in the sediments [Cu (50 ± 10 mg/kg), Pb (30 ± 30 mg/kg), Zn (30 ± 20 mg/kg)]. Trace amount of As (3.3 ± 1.5 μg/l) and Cd (3.9 ± 1.5 μg/l) were found

  17. Distribution and behavior of major and trace elements in Tokyo Bay, Mutsu Bay and Funka Bay marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Teruyuki [Musashi Inst. of Technology, Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Kimura, Ken-ichiro [Musashi Inst. of Technology, Graduate School, Research Division in Engineering, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2003-06-01

    Fourteen major and trace elements in marine sediment core samples collected from the coasts along eastern Japan, i.e. Tokyo Bay (II) (the recess), Tokyo Bay (IV) (the mouth), Mutsu Bay and Funka Bay and the Northwest Pacific basin as a comparative subject were determined by the instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The sedimentation rates and sedimentary ages were calculated for the coastal sediment cores by the {sup 210}Pb method. The results obtained in this study are summarized as follows: (1) Lanthanoid abundance patterns suggested that the major origin of the sediments was terrigenous material. La*/Lu* and Ce*/La* ratios revealed that the sediments from Tokyo Bay (II) and Mutsu Bay more directly reflected the contribution from river than those of other regions. In addition, the Th/Sc ratio indicated that the coastal sediments mainly originated in the materials from the volcanic island-arcs, Japanese islands, whereas those from the Northwest Pacific mainly from the continent. (2) The correlation between the Ce/U and Th/U ratios with high correlation coefficients of 0.920 to 0.991 indicated that all the sediments from Tokyo Bay (II) and Funka Bay were in reducing conditions while at least the upper sediments from Tokyo Bay (IV) and Mutsu Bay were in oxidizing conditions. (3) It became quite obvious that the sedimentation mechanism and the sedimentation environment at Tokyo Bay (II) was different from those at Tokyo Bay (IV), since the sedimentation rate at Tokyo Bay (II) was approximately twice as large as that at Tokyo Bay (IV). The sedimentary age of the 5th layer (8{approx}10 cm in depth) from Funka Bay was calculated at approximately 1940{approx}50, which agreed with the time, 1943{approx}45 when Showa-shinzan was formed by the eruption of the Usu volcano. (author)

  18. Elsasser and Rhode: Further Notes on California Charmstones

    OpenAIRE

    Parkman, E. Breck

    2001-01-01

    Further Notes on California Charmstones . Albert B. Elsasser and Peter T. Rhode. Coyote Press Archives of California Prehistory, Number 38. Salinas: Coyote Press, 1996. 144 pp., 15 figs., 3 charts, 1 sketch, 3 appendices, 1112.00 (paper).

  19. Geological and chemical data collected around Gaillard Island, Mobile Bay, Alabama from 11 Apr 1980 to 25 Aug 1982 (NODC Accession 0117688)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sediment samples were collected from four sites around Gaillard Island, quarterly in 1980 and monthly in 1981-1982, and analyzed for particle size characteristics,...

  20. Numerical simulation of the 2002 Northern Rhodes Slide (Greece) and evaluation of the generated tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaniboni, Filippo; Armigliato, Alberto; Pagnoni, Gianluca; Tinti, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Small landslides are very common along the submarine margins, due to steep slopes and continuous material deposition that increment mass instability and supply collapse occurrences, even without earthquake triggering. This kind of events can have relevant consequences when occurring close to the coast, because they are characterized by sudden change of velocity and relevant speed achievement, reflecting into high tsunamigenic potential. This is the case for example of the slide of Rhodes Island (Greece), named Northern Rhodes Slide (NRS), where unusual 3-4 m waves were registered on 24 March 2002, provoking some damage in the coastal stretch of the city of Rhodes (Papadopoulos et al., 2007). The event was not associated with earthquake occurrence, and eyewitnesses supported the hypothesis of a non-seismic source for the tsunami, placed 1 km offshore. Subsequent marine geophysical surveys (Sakellariou et al., 2002) evidenced the presence of several detachment niches at about 300-400 m depth along the northern steep slope, one of which can be considered responsible of the observed tsunami, fitting with the previously mentioned supposition. In this work, that is carried out in the frame of the European funded project NearToWarn, we evaluated the tsunami effects due to the NRS by means of numerical modelling: after having reconstructed the sliding body basing on morphological assumptions (obtaining an esteemed volume of 33 million m3), we simulated the sliding motion through the in-house built code UBO-BLOCK1, adopting a Lagrangian approach and splitting the sliding mass into a "chain" of interacting blocks. This provides the complete dynamics of the landslide, including the shape changes that relevantly influence the tsunami generation. After the application of an intermediate code, accounting for the slide impulse filtering through the water depth, the tsunami propagation in the sea around the island of Rhodes and up to near coasts of Turkey was simulated via the

  1. Arthropod Distribution and Habitat, Commercial Lobster Fishing Areas of Narragansett Bay; These areas are considered a general, non species specific, reference for lobster fishing areas in Narragansett Bay., Published in 2001, 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Arthropod Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2001. It...

  2. Ecological effects of Spartina anglica on the macro-invertebrate infauna of the mud flats at Bull Island, Dublin Bay, Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    M. J. McCorry; Otte, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Spartina anglica (C. E. Hubbard) is a relatively new invasive perennial grass species in Ireland. It is well adapted to the intertidal mudflat environment and forms mono-specific swards. There have been concerns about its potential to impact negatively the ecosystems of mud flats and salt marshes. This ongoing project investigates the ecological effects of S. anglica, and its control, on the mudflats and saltmarsh at Bull Island, and the implications for management...

  3. H12023: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Block Island Sound, Rhode Island, 2009-10-14

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  4. H12010: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Block Island Sound, Rhode Island, 2009-08-19

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  5. Complexity of nearshore strontium-to-calcium ratio variability in a core sample of the massive coral Siderastrea siderea obtained in Coral Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Christopher D.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Hickey, T. Don; Morrison, Jennifer M.; Flannery, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Strontium-to-calcium ratios (Sr/Ca) were measured on the skeletal matrix of a core sample from a colony of the massive coral Siderastrea siderea collected in Coral Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands. Strontium and calcium are incorporated into the coral skeleton during the precipitation of aragonite by the coral polyps and their ratio is highly temperature dependent. The robustness of this temperature dependence makes Sr/Ca a reliable proxy for sea surface temperature (SST). Details presented from the St. John S. siderea core indicate that terrestrial inputs of sediment and freshwater can disrupt the chemical balance and subsequently complicate the utility of Sr/Ca in reconstructing historical SST. An approximately 44-year-long record of Sr/Ca shows that an annual SST signal is recorded but with an increasing Sr/Ca trend from 1980 to present, which is likely the result of runoff from the mountainous terrain of St. John. The overwhelming influence of the terrestrial fingerprint on local seawater chemistry makes utilizing Sr/Ca as a SST proxy in nearshore environments very difficult.

  6. Dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls concentrations in Larus dominicanus. Case study: Marambaia island, Sepetiba bay, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v35i3.18344

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Pacheco Ferreira

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Seabirds play a significant role as bioindicators: they are conspicuous, relatively easy to observe, well-established studied group of organisms, and in the focus of public interest due to pollution in aquatic ecosystem. Systematically, a significant number of man-made chemicals have been introduced in the marine environment and represent the major problem arising in the development worldwide. Many of these chemical contaminants are persistent, known to bioaccumulate and biomagnify through the aquatic food web, affecting species associated with aquatic systems. Dioxins [polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD, dibenzofurans (PCDF] and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB concentrations were measured in Kelp gull Larus dominicanus collected from 2006 to 2011 on Marambaia Island, Sepetiba Bay, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Detectable liver concentrations of PCDD Fs-1 and PCBs were found in all samples analyzed. These represent some of the first measurements of PCDD Fs-1 and PCBs in seabirds from this area. Although levels of these contaminants in the tested species currently appear to fall below critical values, a continuous and systematic monitoring on these compounds becomes essential and desirable to not express toxic values in the future.   

  7. The History of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Denise E.

    2012-01-01

    The historiography of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program (Program) presents a historical journey of health care, as it relates to oral health, in the United States, in Ohio, and in Lima. This study bridges the gap between the history of higher education and the history of an academic program, dental hygiene. Prior to this study, there…

  8. Migrants on offshore islands of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezwan Siddiqui

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Riverbank erosion and the consequent formation of new islands in the Bay of Bengal cause frequent changes in the shape and size of the delta, forcing the inhabitants to migrate frequently.

  9. Distribution and characteristics of marine habitats in a subpolar bay based on hydroacoustics and bed shear stress estimates—Potter Cove, King George Island, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Lim, Chai Heng; Hass, H. Christian; Lindhorst, Sebastian; Tosonotto, Gabriela; Lettmann, Karsten Alexander; Kuhn, Gerhard; Wolff, Jörg-Olaf; Abele, Doris

    2014-10-01

    Marine habitats worldwide are increasingly pressurized by climate change, especially along the Antarctic Peninsula. Well-studied areas in front of rapidly retreating tidewater glaciers like Potter Cove are representative for similar coastal environments and, therefore, shed light on habitat formation and development on not only a local but also regional scale. The objective of this study was to provide insights into habitat distribution in Potter Cove, King George Island, Antarctica, and to evaluate the associated environmental processes. Furthermore, an assessment concerning the future development of the habitats is provided. To describe the seafloor habitats in Potter Cove, an acoustic seabed discrimination system (RoxAnn) was used in combination with underwater video images and sediment samples. Due to the absence of wave and current measurements in the study area, bed shear stress estimates served to delineate zones prone to sediment erosion. On the basis of the investigations, two habitat classes were identified in Potter Cove, namely soft-sediment and stone habitats that, besides influences from sediment supply and coastal morphology, are controlled by sediment erosion. A future expansion of the stone habitat is predicted if recent environmental change trends continue. Possible implications for the Potter Cove environment, and other coastal ecosystems under similar pressure, include changes in biomass and species composition.

  10. Ecological effects of Spartina anglica on the macro-invertebrate infauna of the mud flats at Bull Island, Dublin Bay, Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Otte

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Spartina anglica (C. E. Hubbard is a relatively new invasive perennial grass species in Ireland. It is well adapted to the intertidal mudflat environment and forms mono-specific swards. There have been concerns about its potential to impact negatively the ecosystems of mud flats and salt marshes. This ongoing project investigates the ecological effects of S. anglica, and its control, on the mudflats and saltmarsh at Bull Island, and the implications for management of S. anglica. The diversity and density of the macro-invertebrate infauna and some physical factors of the sediment were compared in: a clumps of S. anglica, b areas vegetated by Salicornia spp., c an adjacent area of bare mud, and d an unvegetated area. Presence of S. anglica had a significant effect on the density and diversity of macro-invertebrate infauna species. The results suggest that clumps of S. anglica can provide a habitat that supports a macro-invertebrate infauna as abundant and species rich as areas vegetated by Salicornia spp.

  11. 33 CFR 80.1430 - Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI. 80.1430 Section 80.1430 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1430 Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, HI. A straight...

  12. 33 CFR 80.1420 - Mamala Bay, Oahu, HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mamala Bay, Oahu, HI. 80.1420 Section 80.1420 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1420 Mamala Bay, Oahu, HI. A line drawn...

  13. Utilization by fishes of the Alviso Island ponds and adjacent waters in south san francisco bay following restoration to tidal influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, M.K.; Mejia, F.H.

    2009-01-01

    Earthen levees of three isolated salt ponds known locally as the Alviso Island Ponds were intentionally breached in March 2006 to allow tidal exchange of the ponds with water from Coyote Creek. The water exchange transformed the previously fishless hypersaline ponds into lower salinity habitats suitable for fish life. This study documented fish utilization of the ponds, adjacent reaches of Coyote Creek, and an upstream reach in nearby Artesian Slough during May-July 2006. By the time the study was initiated, water quality conditions in the ponds were similar to conditions in adjacent reaches of Coyote Creek. The only variable exhibiting a strong gradient within the study area was salinity, which increased progressively from upstream to downstream in Coyote Creek. A total of 4,034 fish represented by 18 species from 14 families was caught during the study. Judging from cluster analysis of presence-absence data that excluded rare fish species, the 10 sampling units (3 ponds, 6 reaches in Coyote Creek, and 1 reach in Artesian Slough) formed two clusters or groups, suggesting two species assemblages. The existence of two groups was also suggested by ordination with non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMS). One group, which was composed of the three ponds and four of the lowermost reaches of Coyote Creek, was characterized by mostly estuarine or marine species (e.g., topsmelt, Atherinops affinis; northern anchovy, Engraulis mordax; and longjaw mudsucker, Gillichthys mirabilis). The second group, which was composed of the two uppermost reaches of Coyote Creek and the one reach of Artesian Slough, was characterized by freshwater species (e.g., Sacramento sucker, Catostomus occidentalis) and by an absence of the estuarine/marine species noted in the first assemblage. Judging from a joint plot of selected water quality variables overlaying the ordination results, salinity was the only important variable associated with spatial distribution of fish species. Water

  14. Diversity of hydrolases from hydrothermal vent sediments of the Levante Bay, Vulcano Island (Aeolian archipelago) identified by activity-based metagenomics and biochemical characterization of new esterases and an arabinopyranosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placido, Antonio; Hai, Tran; Ferrer, Manuel; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Distaso, Marco; Armstrong, Dale; Yakunin, Alexander F; Toshchakov, Stepan V; Yakimov, Michail M; Kublanov, Ilya V; Golyshina, Olga V; Pesole, Graziano; Ceci, Luigi R; Golyshin, Peter N

    2015-12-01

    A metagenomic fosmid expression library established from environmental DNA (eDNA) from the shallow hot vent sediment sample collected from the Levante Bay, Vulcano Island (Aeolian archipelago) was established in Escherichia coli. Using activity-based screening assays, we have assessed 9600 fosmid clones corresponding to approximately 350 Mbp of the cloned eDNA, for the lipases/esterases/lactamases, haloalkane and haloacid dehalogenases, and glycoside hydrolases. Thirty-four positive fosmid clones were selected from the total of 120 positive hits and sequenced to yield ca. 1360 kbp of high-quality assemblies. Fosmid inserts were attributed to the members of ten bacterial phyla, including Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobateria, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Chloroflexi, Spirochaetes, Thermotogae, Armatimonadetes, and Planctomycetes. Of ca. 200 proteins with high biotechnological potential identified therein, we have characterized in detail three distinct α/β-hydrolases (LIPESV12_9, LIPESV12_24, LIPESV12_26) and one new α-arabinopyranosidase (GLV12_5). All LIPESV12 enzymes revealed distinct substrate specificities tested against 43 structurally diverse esters and 4 p-nitrophenol carboxyl esters. Of 16 different glycosides tested, the GLV12_5 hydrolysed only p-nitrophenol-α-(L)-arabinopyranose with a high specific activity of about 2.7 kU/mg protein. Most of the α/β-hydrolases were thermophilic and revealed a high tolerance to, and high activities in the presence of, numerous heavy metal ions. Among them, the LIPESV12_24 was the best temperature-adapted, retaining its activity after 40 min of incubation at 90 °C. Furthermore, enzymes were active in organic solvents (e.g., >30% methanol). Both LIPESV12_24 and LIPESV12_26 had the GXSXG pentapeptides and the catalytic triads Ser-Asp-His typical to the representatives of carboxylesterases of EC 3.1.1.1. PMID:26266751

  15. Diel oxygen variations in the Rhode River Estuary, Maryland, 1970-1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, Robert L.; Dresler, Paul V.

    1981-01-01

    Since April 1970 the U.S. Geological Survey has operated an estuarine water quality monitor in the upper reach of Rhode River, a small embayment on the northwestern shore of Chesapeake Bay. This report analyzes variations in diel oxygen over the period April 1970 through January 1979. The diel oxygen range is used as an indicator of open-water metabolism. Polygons of temperature versus salinity portray the monthly variations of the two dominant environmental factors which influence biological metabolism and reveal effects of events such as a cool versus a warm spring or salinity reduction due to tropical storm freshwater runoff. Seasonally the average daily oxygen pulse range increased from a winter low of 1.6 mg/L to summer high of 5.3 mg/L. Annually highest daily ranges occurred the summer of 1972 when nutrient laden runoff from tropical storm Agnes stimulated open-water metabolism to produce an average diel range of 6.3 mg/L. Spearman 's ranked correlation coefficients were used to compare seasonal and annual variations in temperature and salinity versus diel oxygen range. There was high agreement between annual variations in spring temperatures and diel oxygen ranges and an inverse correlation between summer and autumn salinity and diel oxygen range. (USGS)

  16. Great Blue Herons in the Lake Champlain Ecosystem An Assessment of the Rookeries on Shad Island, VT and Valcour Island, New York Spring/Summer 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Lake Champlain is home to four Great Blue Heron rookeries, three large and one small. The Shad Island, Valcour Island and Porter Bay rookeries are large rookeries...

  17. Bathymetry (2011) for Fish Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution depth surface for Fish Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). The...

  18. Bathymetry (2011) for Coral Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution depth surface for Coral Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). The...

  19. Tsunami Inundation modeling for Tolaga Bay, Tokomaru Bay, Hicks Bay and Te Araroa communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberopoulou, A.; Wang, X.; Power, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    We assess the tsunami hazard to four communities in Raukumara Peninsula (Northeastern region of North Island of New Zealand): Tokomaru Bay, Tolaga Bay, Hicks Bay and Te Araroa. Representative severe but realistic scenarios that could affect the Raukumara peninsula are earthquakes that rupture the interface between the Australian and Pacific plates, earthquakes that rupture faults within the overlying Australian plate or the subducting Pacific plate (location is not always well constrained). Earthquakes that rupture both the plate interface and simultaneously faults within the crust of the Australian plate are also a possibility. Tsunamis may also be caused by submarine landslides that occur near the edge of the continental shelf, but these are not considered here. For this study four scenario events were constructed, including a distant event from South America (offshore Peru), outer rise events and a thrust event in the Hikurangi region off the east coast of New Zealand. The sources are not exhaustive but representative of the types of significant events that could occur in the region and were either improved from earlier sources or derived from recent studies. Available high resolution LiDAR and RTK data were combined with topographic and LINZ data for the development of bathymetric/topographic grids. Our modelling results show that Tolaga Bay appears most vulnerable to tsunami inundation although Hicks Bay and Te Araroa are also significantly inundated in several of the scenarios. Tokomaru Bay is naturally well protected because the rapid change in elevation limits the range of inundation. The worst scenario for Tokomaru Bay was an earthquake in the Hikurangi subduction zone resulting in large flow depths, whereas for Tolaga Bay inundation is severe from most scenarios. Hicks Bay and Te Araroa get the most severe flooding from earthquakes in South America and on the Hikurangi subduction zone. Inundation extent is similar for Tolaga Bay during the Outer Rise and

  20. DELFT 3D在离岸人工岛建设中的应用——以海南岛万宁日月湾人工岛为例%Application of DELFT 3D model for plan design of an artificial island——A case study for the artificial island construction in the Riyue Bay,Wanning City,Hainan Island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚文平; 李昌宇; 林国尧; 莫文渊

    2012-01-01

    The construction of offshore artificial island has become one of the dominant ways for land reclamation. It will definitely alter the hydrodynamics, sediment transport and coastal morphology in the surrounding area. A critical issue for the success of the project is to choose an optimal layout and minimize its negative impact on the regional environment. This case study focuses on the application of DELFT 3D model to the plan design of an artificial island in Riyue Bay, Wanning City, Hainan Island. Through simulation of the changes in wave propagation, wave induced circulation, sediment transport and morphological evolution under different layout schemes, the possibility of formation of tombolo or salient is discussed, and the potential accumulated sand volume is calculated. Consequently, the advantages and disadvantages of each layout scheme are compared, and finally, an optimal scheme is recommended. The study results show that the possibility of the formation of the tombolo is reduced as the artificial island becomes far away from the coastline, the location is deeper, and the projected length on the wave crest is shorter.%离岸建设人工岛是围填海的重要方式之一.人工岛的建设势必改变工程区的水动力条件、泥沙输运格局与海岸演变状况.选取合理的平面布置方案,减少工程建设对海岸环境的负面影响,是人工岛建设能否成功的关键因素.以海南岛万宁日月湾人工岛建设为例,利用DELFT 3D模型系统,研究原场与不同平面布置方案后的波浪传播、波生流、泥沙输运与岸滩演变,探讨不同人工岛方案岛后形成连岛坝( Tombolo)或突出体(Salient)的可能性及泥沙淤积体积的大小,分析不同方案的优劣.研究表明,不同人工岛方案因为其大小、离岸距离及所处位置的差异,对岛后的波浪传播、波生流、泥沙输运与地形冲淤演变产生不同的影响.人工岛离岸距离越远、所处位置水深越大,人工

  1. Paleoenvironmental interpretation of the Plio-Pleistocene Kallithea Bay Section, Rhodes, Greece, based on Ostracods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Annette; Thomsen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    biofacies. Biofacies I includes the coarse-grained deposits in the lower part of the section. It is associated with species of Xestoleberis, Aurila, Callistocythere and other shallow-water ostracods. Biofacies II occupies the central part of the section. It is associated with species that today live mainly...... and III are intermixed with a large number of shallow-water species belonging mainly to Xestoleberis, Aurila, and Semicytherura. The shallow-water species consist almost exclusively of juvenile specimens and they are probably allochthonous. A number of laminated beds in the upper part of the section...

  2. Generation of periodic intrusions at Suruga Bay when the Kuroshio follows a large meandering path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumata, Takaaki

    2016-07-01

    We measured the vertical profiles of currents at the eastern mouth of the Suruga Bay using a moored acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). Currents vertical profiles were found to be mostly barotropic in structure when intrusions occurred at the eastern mouth of the bay. Warm-water intrusions at the Suruga Bay and sea level elevations at the bay and at islands on the Izu Ridge located off the bay have the same period of 26 days. The temporal variation in the sea levels occurs in response to Kuroshio frontal waves, and the two phases are consistent. The sea level rise propagates from Hachijo Island to the Suruga Bay via Miyake Island and Kozu Island, i.e., from off the Suruga Bay to in or near the bay. The perturbation of the sea level along the Izu Ridge occurs as waves with a period of 26 days, a wavelength of 500 km, and a phase speed of 23 cm/sec. The propagated waves and those of the Kuroshio frontal waves have the same features. This means that the periodic inflows at the eastern mouth of the Suruga Bay are caused by the passage of Kuroshio frontal waves off the bay.

  3. Native and alien ichthyofauna in coastal fishery of Rhodes (eastern Mediterranean (2002-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Corsini-Foka

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rhodes Island (southeastern Aegean is located in a geographically crucial region subjected to biological invasions. Among the 108 alien species recorded, 30 are fish, all of Indo-Pacific/Red Sea origin introduced via Suez through Lessepsian migration (Corsini-Foka et al., 2015; Corsini-Foka and Kondylatos, In press; Kondylatos and Corsini-Foka, In press. In this oligotrophic area, fishery production is limited, due to the paucity of species of commercial interest and their low abundance, while adapted infrastructures for fish landing and marketing are absent. Coastal fishery has dominated during the last twenty years (ELSTAT, 2015. Within 2002-2010, the Hydrobiological Station of Rhodes conducted experimental boat seining surveys, using exclusively a professional 12m fishing boat, at 5-30 m depth, in the Gulf of Trianda (sandy mud, Posidonia meadows. The 94 carried out hauls (7-18 hauls/year, produced a total fish biomass of approximately 4400 Kg, recording 97 fish (86 native, 11 alien and 4 cephalopod species (3 native, 1 alien. Fish species ranged from 32 to 63/year, whereas aliens ranged from 5 to 8 species. Almost steadily present since 2002, were earlier colonizers such as Apogonichthyoides pharaonis, Siganus rivulatus, Siganus luridus, Stephanolepis diaspros and more recent ones as Pteragogus trispilus, Sphyraena chrysotaenia and Fistularia commersonii, while Lagocephalus sceleratus, firstly recorded in 2005, occurred regularly since 2007; the presence of Lagocephalus suezensis, Sphyraena flavicauda and Upeneus pori was scattered since their first records in 2004-2005. Alien fish commercially important are the Siganids, S. chrysotaenia and surprisingly F. commersonii. In terms of biomass per haul, alien fish ranged from 0 to 18.5 Kg, native from 1.5 to 182 Kg. Catches were dominated by Centracanthidae (Spicara spp. and Sparidae (Boops boops, sometimes by other native such as Oblada melanura, Diplodus spp., Chromis Chromis and others. The

  4. NOAA ESRI Geotiff- 2m Multibeam Bathymetry of NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Reserve, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131860)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 2 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the a portion of the NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and...

  5. NOAA ESRI Geotiff- 2m Multibeam Bathymetry of NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Reserve, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 2 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the a portion of the NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and...

  6. Whose Bay Street? Competing Narratives of Nassau's City Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nona Patara Martin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Bay Street has always been at the centre of commercial, cultural and political life in the Bahama Islands. It also acts as a gateway for millions of tourists who come to Nassau, the Bahamian capital, via cruise ships every year. Not surprisingly, Bahamians and non-Bahamians have widely divergent impressions of Bay Street. The need to accommodate the tourists who are critical to the Bahamian economy has meant that Bay Street, despite its deep social significance for Bahamians, has increasingly become a tourist space. With reference to the ‘sense of place’ and place attachment literature, this paper traces the transformation of Bay Street and attempts to tease out the most obvious tensions between the Bay Street that Bahamians experience and Bay Street as a port of call.

  7. Meteorological, biological, and hydrographic data collected from Middle Bay Lighthouse in Mobile Bay, AL from 05/23/2005 - 12/31/2013 (NODC Accession 0117376)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abstract: Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the University of South Alabama, the Alabama Department of...

  8. Island ponds mitigation monitoring and reporting : Year 3 – 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report presents Year 3 2008 monitoring results for Island Ponds Restoration Project on Don Edwards San Francisco Bay NWR. The Santa Clara Valley Water District...

  9. Bair Island Restoration and Management Plan: Existing Hydrologic Conditions Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society is developing a Restoration and Management Plan for 3,200 acres of Federal and State lands on Bair Island, Redwood City,...

  10. Raptor Migration Observations during the fall of 1998 on Seal Island National Wildlife Refuge and Brimstone and Robert's Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a summary of observations of raptor traffic and their migratory behavior on Penobscot Bay Maine Islands during the fall of 1998. The time period from...

  11. Arthropod Distribution and Habitat, Lobster Migration (lobsterln); Lines were created from capture and recapture locations as an approximation of lobster migration in Narragansett Bay., Published in 2001, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Arthropod Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2001. It...

  12. Land Use and Land Cover, Land Use Adjacent to Wetlands in Narragansett Bay;nblu500;Landuse classification of uplands in the 500 ft buffer zone of coastal wetlands, delineated from 1996 true color aerial photography and coded according to a modified Anderson classification, Published in 2003, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Land Use and Land Cover dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2003. It is described...

  13. Study on artificial island port in Beibu gulf

    OpenAIRE

    Jinrong, A.M.; Yaqiong, B.G.; Kunqiang, C.L.; Zhimin, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Regarding preservation and development of coast, artificial island port has been concerned for years by the government of Guangxi province which locates in the north coast of Beibu gulf in China. The nature conditions are suitable to build ports for the semi-closed gulf and curvilinear bays. There are three main port bays in Guangxi province named as Fangcheng, Qinzhou, and Tieshan. The former two bays have developed almost all the deepwater shoreline into docks. With many land reclamation pr...

  14. Bayes and empirical Bayes: do they merge?

    CERN Document Server

    Petrone, Sonia; Scricciolo, Catia

    2012-01-01

    Bayesian inference is attractive for its coherence and good frequentist properties. However, it is a common experience that eliciting a honest prior may be difficult and, in practice, people often take an {\\em empirical Bayes} approach, plugging empirical estimates of the prior hyperparameters into the posterior distribution. Even if not rigorously justified, the underlying idea is that, when the sample size is large, empirical Bayes leads to "similar" inferential answers. Yet, precise mathematical results seem to be missing. In this work, we give a more rigorous justification in terms of merging of Bayes and empirical Bayes posterior distributions. We consider two notions of merging: Bayesian weak merging and frequentist merging in total variation. Since weak merging is related to consistency, we provide sufficient conditions for consistency of empirical Bayes posteriors. Also, we show that, under regularity conditions, the empirical Bayes procedure asymptotically selects the value of the hyperparameter for ...

  15. Shallow-water Benthic Habitat Map (2013) for Coral Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This shapefile contains information about the shallow-water (<40 meters) geology and biology of the seafloor in Coral Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands...

  16. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Plum Tree National Wildlife Refuge outlines...

  17. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Plum Tree National Wildlife Refuge outlines...

  18. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Plum Tree National Wildlife Refuge outlines...

  19. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Plum Tree National Wildlife Refuge outlines...

  20. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Plum Tree National Wildlife Refuge outlines...

  1. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Plum Tree National Wildlife Refuge outlines...

  2. Nonindigenous marine species in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii in 1999 - 2000 (NODC Accession 0001053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The presence and impact of nonindigenous (introduced) marine organisms in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaiian Islands are evaluated using a combination of historical...

  3. Nonindigenous Marine Species in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii in 1999-2000 (NODC Accession 0001053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The presence and impact of nonindigenous (introduced) marine organisms in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaiian Islands are evaluated using a combination of historical...

  4. NOAA ESRI Geotiff- 2m Multibeam Backscatter of NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Reserve, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131860)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 2 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the north shore (Salt River) of St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography...

  5. NOAA ESRI Geotiff- 2m Multibeam Backscatter of NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Reserve, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 2 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of the north shore (Salt River) of St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography...

  6. Guiding Surge Reduction Strategies via Characterization of Coastal Surge Propagation and Internal Surge Generation within a Complex Bay/Estuary System, Galveston Bay, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, B.; Torres, J.; Irza, N.; Bedient, P. B.; Dawson, C.; Proft, J.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, Hurricane Ike (2008) and a suite of synthetic storms are simulated in order to evaluate how different hurricane landfalls, wind intensities, and radius to maximum winds influence the surge response in complex semi-enclosed bays such as Galveston Bay, located along the Texas Gulf Coast. The Advanced CIRCulation and Simulating Waves Nearshore (ADCIRC+SWAN) models are employed to quantify surge in terms of its relative coastal contributions that propagate across barrier islands and tidal inlets and subsequently into Galveston Bay, the surge generated locally within the Bay itself, and the interaction between these coastal and local components of surge. Results from this research will further the current understanding of surge interactions in bay systems and guide coastal engineering surge reduction projects that need to consider multiple lines of defense to protect complex bay/estuary systems such as Galveston Bay, TX.

  7. San Diego Bay Bibliography

    OpenAIRE

    Brueggeman, Peter

    1994-01-01

    The San Diego Bay Bibliography references the scientific & gray literature on the Bay up through 1994 and it is NOT current. Compiled from numerous resources (including Hubbs-Sea World Research Institute, Regional Water Quality Control Board, & local library catalogs), it is not comprehensive since so the Bay literature is elusive. In addition, there can be duplicate references varying in completeness. The San Diego Bay Bibliography is the outcome of discussion and networking within ...

  8. 75 FR 5900 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... changes because candidates are less willing to participate in the nomination process when they are not... nomination and balloting process. It would provide candidates the opportunity to indicate what position... nomination process does not permit an election process for each position. Authority for this action...

  9. James Franklin and Freedom of the Press in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, 1717-1735.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffery A.

    The career of James Franklin, Benjamin Franklin's older brother, provides a case study in the use of polemics for a free press. A printer who actively courted controversy, Franklin found it necessary to use an unusual variety of strategies and justifications to evade or overcome potential legal, religious, and economic restraints. He demonstrated…

  10. 75 FR 43409 - Rhode Island: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ...-- ] Standards for Hazardous Waste Storage and Treatment Tank Systems, 51 FR 25422-25486, July 14, 1986 and 51 FR..., 1987; CL 52--Standards for Hazardous Waste Storage and Treatment Tank Systems, 53 FR 34079, Sept. 2... Solid Waste--Amendment II, 61 FR 13103, March 26, 1996: Rule 2.2 C; CL 152--Imports and Exports...

  11. 2011 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Topographic Lidar: Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is a combination of 3 separate FEMA collections (Blackstone, Charles-Quincy and Narragansett) with similar specifications. See the Ground Control...

  12. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: REPTILES (Reptile and Amphibian Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for threatened/endangered sea turtles, diamondback terrapins, and rare reptiles/amphibians in coastal...

  13. TIGER/Line Shapefile, 2010, 2010 state, Rhode Island, 2010 Census Block State-based

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census...

  14. Education and the Economy: Boosting Rhode Island's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  15. Transitions to Adult Care for Rhode Island Youth with Special Healthcare Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Suzanne; Terry, Christopher; Neukirch, Jodie; Garneau, Deborah; Golding, Deb; Brown, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The transitioning of youth from pediatric to adult care systems is often fraught with discontinuity, miscommunication and gaps in care. This is most significant for youth with special health care needs. A panel discussion on transitioning youth to adult care systems that was part of a learning collaborative held by The RI Care Transformation Collaborative (CTC) is presented here, illustrated by a pertinent case of a youth with type 1 diabetes. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-08.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27472770

  16. SEABOSS Images from the Cruise 2011-006-FA in Rhode Island Sound, in JPEG Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the...

  17. Potential for localized groundwater contamination in a porous pavement parking lot setting in Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boving, Thomas B.; Stolt, Mark H.; Augenstern, Janelle; Brosnan, Brian

    2008-08-01

    The control of polluted surface runoff and the assessment of possible impacts on groundwater is a concern at the local and regional scale. On this background, a study investigates possible impacts of organic and inorganic pollutants (including bacteria) originating from a permeable asphalt parking lot on the water quality immediately beneath it. The functioning of the permeable pavement, including clogging and restricted vertical percolation, was also evaluated. Four nested sample ports (shallow and deep) were installed below low- and high-traffic areas, including one port outside the parking lot. At least initially there was a good hydraulic connection between the parking surface and the shallow sample ports. The presence of a geotextile layer at the base of the parking lot structure, however, was identified in lab tests as one factor restricting vertical percolation to the deeper ports. Clogging of the permeable surface was most pronounced in heavy traffic areas and below snow pile storage areas. Corroborated by high electric conductivity and chloride measurements, sand brought in by cars during winter was the principal cause for clogging. No bacteria or BOD were found in percolating water. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were present at concentrations near minimum detection limit. Nutrients (nitrate and phosphate) were being leached into the ground via the permeable parking lot surface at annual flux rates of 0.45 0.84 g/m2/year. A multi-species tracer test demonstrated a retention capacity of the permeable parking lot structure of >90% for metals and 27% for nutrients, respectively.

  18. WASTE LUBRICATING OIL DISPOSAL PRACTICES IN PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND: POTENTIAL SIGNIFICANCE TO COASTAL WATER QUALITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 1979-80 survey of Providence, R.I., residents indicated that approximately 35 percent changed their own automotive lubricating oil, disposing of this oil by a variety of methods. The most popular method of disposal reported by the respondents was putting the oil in the garbage ...

  19. H10788: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Point Judith, Rhode Island, 1997-11-05

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  20. Vulnerability of Rhode Island Salt Marshes to Sea Level Rise and Poor Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Across the northeastern Unites States, salt marshes are losing ground. Edges are eroding, tidal channel networks are expanding, and new ponds are forming and expanding within salt marshes. This leaves shorelines - and in some cases houses - more vulnerable to nor'easters and tr...

  1. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Resource Points and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for bridges, state borders, airports, aquaculture sites, beaches, boat ramps, commercial fishing sites, Coast Guard,...

  2. The role of oyster restoration and aquaculture in nutrient cycling within a Rhode Island estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal ecosystems are increasingly impacted by over-enrichment of nutrients, which has cascading effects for other organisms. Oyster aquaculture and restoration are hypothesized to mitigate excessive nitrogen (N) loads via benthic denitrification. However, this has not been exam...

  3. The role of oyster restoration and aquaculture in nitrogen removal within a Rhode Island estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal systems are increasingly impacted by over-enrichment of nutrients, which has cascading effects for ecosystem functioning. Oyster aquaculture and restoration are hypothesized to mitigate excessive nitrogen (N) loads via assimilation, burial, or benthic denitrification. Stu...

  4. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains management area data for National Estuarine Research Reserves, wildlife refuges, wildlife management areas, state/regional parks, state...

  5. 78 FR 24333 - Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    ...@ams.usda.gov . Small businesses may obtain information on complying with this and other marketing.../MarketingOrdersSmallBusinessGuide ; or by contacting Jeffrey Smutny, Marketing Order and Agreement Division... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF...

  6. 78 FR 39057 - Environmental Impact Statement: T.F. Green Airport, Warwick, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... Decision, which evaluates an updated noise mitigation program at Theodore Francis Green Airport in Warwick... Central Library, 600 Sandy Lane, Warwick, RI, 401-739-5440 Warwick Library, Apponaug Branch, 3267 Post Road, Warwick, RI, 401-739- 6411 Warwick Library, Norwood Branch, 328 Pawtuxet Ave., Warwick, RI,...

  7. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors, diving birds, pelagic birds, passerine birds, gulls and...

  8. Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey ESI: INDEX (Index Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing the boundaries of the U.S. Geological Survey 1:24,000 topographic maps and other map and digital data boundaries...

  9. 40 CFR 52.2081 - EPA-approved EPA Rhode Island State regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...)(15) No. 13 Particulate emissions from fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units 1/17/73.../19/77 5/07/81 46 FR 25446 (c)(12) No. 8 Sulfur content of fuels 10/01/71 5/31/72 37 FR 10842 (b) 5/28... Source Definition. Changes in 9.1.24(b)(3), 9.5.2(b)(2)d(i), 9.5.1(d) and 9.5.1(f) to change...

  10. Acoustic monitoring of migrating bats on Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Coastal New England is an important migratory corridor and contains important stopover habitats for migratory songbirds and bats. For example, many songbird species...

  11. Acoustic monitoring of migrating bats and birds on Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Coastal New England is an important migratory corridor and contains important stopover habitats for migratory songbirds and bats. For example, many songbird species...

  12. Exploring the Destination Branding Process: A Case Study of the Greek Island of Rhodes

    OpenAIRE

    BONIATI, SMARAGDA

    2009-01-01

    The destination brand is defined as a ‘name, symbol, logo, word or other graphic that both identifies and differentiates the destination; it conveys the promise of a memorable travel experience that is uniquely associated with the destination; it also serves to consolidate and reinforce the recollection of pleasurable memories of destination experience’ (Ritchie and Ritchie, 1998, p.277). Furthermore, the destination brand is also defined as ‘a unique combination of product characteristi...

  13. Knowledge about Anabolic Steroids of Rhode Island Adolescents: Implications for Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, June

    Although anabolic steroids are associated with short term behavior and long term health problems, few schools address this issue. Adolescents were surveyed to determine their general knowledge of anabolic steroids, attitudes related to fair play, and interest in limiting anabolic steroid use. Data from 322 boys and 331 girls in grades 7-12 were…

  14. 77 FR 20330 - Disestablishment of Restricted Area; Rhode Island Sound off Newport, RI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... this restricted area would have practically no economic impact on the public, no anticipated... avoid the use of any special characters, any form of encryption, and be free of any defects or viruses... regulatory flexibility analysis for any regulation that will have a significant economic impact on...

  15. 77 FR 11798 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Rhode Island; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... (64 FR 35714), the Regional Haze Rule. The Regional Haze Rule revised the existing visibility... conditions. See 64 FR 35715, (July 1, 1999). B. Background Information In section 169A(a)(1) of the 1977... FR 80084 (Dec. 2, 1980). These regulations represented the first phase in addressing...

  16. Potential Job Creation in Rhode Island as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  17. A compilation of cold cases using scanning electron microscopy at the University of Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platek, Michael J.; Gregory, Otto J.

    2015-10-01

    Scanning electron microscopy combined with microchemical analysis has evolved into one of the most widely used instruments in forensic science today. In particular, the environmental scanning electron microscope (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), has created unique opportunities in forensic science in regard to the examination of trace evidence; i.e. the examination of evidence without altering the evidence with conductive coatings, thereby enabling criminalists to solve cases that were previously considered unsolvable. Two cold cases were solved at URI using a JEOL 5900 LV SEM in conjunction with EDS. A cold case murder and a cold missing person case will be presented from the viewpoint of the microscopist and will include sample preparation, as well as image and chemical analysis of the trace evidence using electron microscopy and optical microscopy.

  18. Coenzyme Q10 and soyphosphatidylcholine in EK extender on preservation of Rhode Island Red poultry semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Nath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of EK extender alone or incorporation with CoenzymeQ10 (CoQ10 and/or soyphosphatidylcholine (SPC in poultry semen and their effects on seminal traits during temporal storage at 4⁰C for different time intervals (12 h, 24 h, and 36 h. Heterospermic pooled semen samples diluted (1:4 with EK, EK + SPC, EK+ CoQ10 and EK + SPC + CoQ10 extenders separately, preserved and different spermiogram were assessed. Various seminal traits within the same extender differ significantly (p<0.05 among different groups and with different time intervals of storage. CoQ10 and SPC in the EK extender exhibited favorable synergistic effect on sperm quality and were able to protect the male gametes against cold-stress up to 36h at 4⁰C. In this study, we concluded that incorporation of SPC and CoQ10 together in EK extender possess novel potentiality to maintain seminal quality during liquid storage of poultry semen at 4⁰C and for their safe transportation and further use for Artificial Reproductive technologies (ARTs.

  19. 2010 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Topographic Lidar: Coastal Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. Landscape Terms and Place Names in the Trobriand Islands--The Kaile'una Subset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senft, Gunter

    2008-01-01

    After a brief introduction to the topic the paper first gives an overview of Kilivila landscape terms and then presents the inventory of names for villages, wells, island points, reef-channels and gardens on Kaile'una Island, one of the Trobriand Islands in the Milne Bay Province of Papua New Guinea. The data on the meaning of the place names…

  1. Principal Component Surface (2011) for Fish Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.3x0.3 meter principal component analysis (PCA) surface for areas inside Fish Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). It was...

  2. Orthophoto Mosaic (2012) for Coral Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 0.3x0.3 meter imagery mosaic of Coral Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands was created by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) using...

  3. Orthophoto Mosaic (2012) for Fish Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 0.3x0.3 meter imagery mosaic of Fish Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands was created by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) using a...

  4. Principal Component Surface (2011) for Coral Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 0.3x0.3 meter principal component analysis (PCA) surface for areas inside Coral Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). It was...

  5. Galapagos Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of the Galapagos Islands was acquired on March 12, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The Galapagos Islands, which are part of Ecuador, sit in the Pacific Ocean about 1000 km (620 miles) west of South America. As the three craters on the largest island (Isabela Island) suggest, the archipelago was created by volcanic eruptions, which took place millions of years ago. Unlike most remote islands in the Pacific, the Galapagos have gone relatively untouched by humans over the past few millennia. As a result, many unique species have continued to thrive on the islands. Over 95 percent of the islands' reptile species and nearly three quarters of its land bird species cannot be found anywhere else in the world. Two of the more well known are the Galapagos giant tortoise and marine iguanas. The unhindered evolutionary development of the islands' species inspired Charles Darwin to begin The Origin of Species eight years after his visit there. To preserve the unique wildlife on the islands, the Ecuadorian government made the entire archipelago a national park in 1959. Each year roughly 60,000 tourists visit these islands to experience what Darwin did over a century and a half ago. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  6. Radioactivity Levels in Kola Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment samples were collected in May 1995 from 16 locations in Kola Bay, North-west Russia, during an expedition starting from Murmansk and ending at Kildin Island in the Barents Sea. The purpose was to study the contamination level in an area with several potential sources of civilian and military radioactive pollution. 137Cs concentrations in the sediments, algae and benthic samples were low, but small particles containing 137Cs were separated from the sediment samples. All the sediments between the nuclear icebreaker base Atomflot and the open Barents Sea contained 60Co. Traces of 125Sb, 134Cs, 95Zr, 154Eu and 152Eu were also detected in some of the samples. Plutonium levels were low, but the increased 238Pu/239,240Pu ratio at Atomflot indicated a fresh release from the facility or from the waste storage vessels, Lepse and Imandra, lying in front of it. An increased 238Pu/239,240Pu ratio was also found in sediment collected in the outlet of Kola Bay in the Barents Sea. (author)

  7. Island characteristics within wetlands influence waterbird nest success and abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Christopher; Ackerman, Josh; Herzog, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Coastal waterbird populations are threatened by habitat loss and degradation from urban and agricultural development and forecasted sea level rise associated with climate change. Remaining wetlands often must be managed to ensure that waterbird habitat needs, and other ecosystem functions, are met. For many waterbirds, the availability of island nesting habitat is important for conserving breeding populations. We used linear mixed models to investigate the influence of pond and island landscape characteristics on nest abundance and nest success of American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), and Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri) in San Francisco Bay, California, USA, based on a 9-year dataset that included >9,000 nests. Nest abundance and nest success were greatest within ponds and on individual islands located either 4 km from San Francisco Bay. Further, nest abundance was greater within ponds with relatively few islands, and on linear-shaped, highly elongated islands compared to more rounded islands. Nest success was greater on islands located away from the nearest surrounding pond levee. Compared to more rounded islands, linear islands contained more near-water habitat preferred by many nesting waterbirds. Islands located away from pond levees may provide greater protection from terrestrial egg and chick predators. Our results indicate that creating and maintaining a few, relatively small, highly elongated and narrow islands away from mainland levees, in as many wetland ponds as possible would be effective at providing waterbirds with preferred nesting habitat.

  8. Meteorological and hydrographic data collected from Middle Bay Lighthouse Station in Mobile Bay, Alabama, Gulf of Mexico from 2014-01-01 to 2014-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0141138)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Mobile County to provide real-time...

  9. Report of the SocMon capacity development workshop for the Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem countries in South Asia, St Martin's Island, Bangladesh, 2-11 January, 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Hoon, V.; Saleem, M.; Townsley, P.

    2015-01-01

    Socio-economic Monitoring (SocMon) is an approach and set of tools for conducting socio-economic monitoring of changes in coastal communities. Planned outputs of the workshop included: training of local staff i SocMon methodologies; draft a SocMon report for St. Martin's Island; a workplan for implementing the SocMon; a communication strategy; and key inputs to a regional SocMon strategy

  10. Tampa Bay: Chapter N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Larry; Spear, Kathryn; Cross, Lindsay; Baumstark, René; Moyer, Ryan; Thatcher, Cindy

    2013-01-01

    Tampa Bay is Florida’s largest open-water estuary and encompasses an area of approximately 1036 km2 (400 mi2) (Burgan and Engle, 2006; TBNEP, 2006). The Bay’s watershed drains 5,698 km2 (2,200 mi2) of land and includes freshwater from the Hillsborough River to the north east, the Alafia and Little Manatee rivers to the east, and the Manatee River to the south (Figure 1). Freshwater inflow also enters the bay from the Lake Tarpon Canal, from small tidal tributaries, and from watershed runoff. Outflow travels from the upper bay segments (Hillsborough Bay and Old Tampa Bay) into Middle and Lower Tampa Bay. Southwestern portions of the water shed flow through Boca Ciega Bay into the Intracoastal Waterway and through the Southwest Channel and Passage Key Inlet into the Gulf of Mexico. The average depth in most of Tampa Bay is only 3.4 m (11 ft); however, 129 km (80 mi) of shipping channels with a maximum depth of 13.1 m (43 ft) have been dredged over time and are regularly maintained. These channels help to support the three ports within the bay, as well as commercial and recreational boat traffic.

  11. Barrier island vulnerability to breaching: a case study on Dauphin Island, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mark; Sallenger, Asbury H.

    2007-01-01

    Breaching of barrier islands can adversely impact society by severing infrastructure, destroying private properties, and altering water quality in back bays and estuaries. This study provides a scheme that assesses the relative vulnerability of a barrier island to breach during storms. Dauphin Island, Alabama was selected for this study because it has a well documented history of island breaches and extensive geological and geomorphic data. To assess the vulnerability of the island, we defined several variables contributing to the risk of breaching: island geology, breaching history, and island topography and geomorphology. These variables were combined to form a breaching index (BI) value for cross island computational bins, each bin every 50 m in the alongshore direction. Results suggest the eastern section of Dauphin Island has the lowest risk of breaching with the remaining portion of the island having a moderate to high risk of breaching. Two reaches in the western section of the island were found to be particularly vulnerable due primarily to their minimal cross-sectional dimensions.

  12. Thatcher Bay, Washington, Nearshore Restoration Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breems, Joel; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy; Grossman, Eric E.; Elliott, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The San Juan Archipelago, located at the confluence of the Puget Sound, the Straits of Juan de Fuca in Washington State, and the Straits of Georgia, British Columbia, Canada, provides essential nearshore habitat for diverse salmonid, forage fish, and bird populations. With 408 miles of coastline, the San Juan Islands provide a significant portion of the available nearshore habitat for the greater Puget Sound and are an essential part of the regional efforts to restore Puget Sound (Puget Sound Shared Strategy 2005). The nearshore areas of the San Juan Islands provide a critical link between the terrestrial and marine environments. For this reason the focus on restoration and conservation of nearshore habitat in the San Juan Islands is of paramount importance. Wood-waste was a common by-product of historical lumber-milling operations. To date, relatively little attention has been given to the impact of historical lumber-milling operations in the San Juan Archipelago. Thatcher Bay, on Blakely Island, located near the east edge of the archipelago, is presented here as a case study on the restoration potential for a wood-waste contaminated nearshore area. Case study components include (1) a brief discussion of the history of milling operations. (2) an estimate of the location and amount of the current distribution of wood-waste at the site, (3) a preliminary examination of the impacts of wood-waste on benthic flora and fauna at the site, and (4) the presentation of several restoration alternatives for the site. The history of milling activity in Thatcher Bay began in 1879 with the construction of a mill in the southeastern part of the bay. Milling activity continued for more than 60 years, until the mill closed in 1942. Currently, the primary evidence of the historical milling operations is the presence of approximately 5,000 yd3 of wood-waste contaminated sediments. The distribution and thickness of residual wood-waste at the site was determined by using sediment

  13. eBay.com

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Celebrated as one of the leading and most valuable brands in the world, eBay has acquired iconic status on par with century-old brands such as Coca-Cola and Disney. The eBay logo is now synonymous with the world’s leading online auction website, and its design is associated with the company’s...

  14. First chelonian eggs and carapace fragments from the Pliocene of Rhodes, Greece

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller-Töwe, Inken J.; Kjeldahl-Vallon, Tina A.; Milàn, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    Well-preserved fossil eggs and eggshell fragments from the Pliocene Apolakkia Formation of Rhodes (Greece) are described. The eggs were found in-situ in a clutch. They are sub-spherical with lengths of 53-60 mm and widths of about 40 mm. All eggs are diagenetically compressed and their original d...

  15. Growth Strategy of Seagrass Thalassia hemprichii in Xincun Bay near Hainan Island of China%新村湾海黾草(Thalassia hemprichii)的生长策略研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许战洲; 黄良民; 黄小平; 朱艾嘉; 张偲

    2009-01-01

    海草的种内差异是它在特定环境中形成生长策略的关键因素.本研究通过将现场实测数据和文献记录进行类比以探讨新村湾海黾草(Thalassia hemprichii)的生长策略.研究结果表明海黾草地下茎伸长速率的差异可以解释该海草生物量和生长的大部分种内差异;新村湾海黾草垂直地下茎和水平地下茎的伸长速率在夏季分别为2.38 cm/yr和 24.4 cm/yr,在冬季分别为1.87 cm/yr和 29.2 cm/yr.海黾草茎枝密度的变化范围是822 shoots m-2至 941 shoots m-2,最大值出现在夏季而最小值出现在冬季,生物量的季节变化与此类似.新村湾海黾草通过交替调节垂直地下茎和水平地下茎的伸长速率以适应光照强度和温度的季节变化,从而导致茎枝密度和地上生物量的相应变化.通过这样的生长策略,海黾草可以把夏季干旱和冬季光照强度下降对其生长造成的消极影响降低到最小程度.%A compilation of data on biomass and growth allowed an examination of the intraspecific plasticity in Thalassia hemprichii which played key roles to develop site-specific growth strategies for this species in Xincun Bay. The results showed the difference in rhizome elongation rates which explained most of the variation of biomass and growth within species. The seagrass T. hemprichii in Xincun Bay adjusted its vertical and horizontal rhizome elongation rates alternatively in response to light level and temperature changes, resulting in the variation of shoot densities and above biomass in return. The vertical and horizontal rhizomes elongated at rates of 2.38 and 24.4 cm yr-1 in summer while 1.87 and 29.2 cm yr-1 in winter respectively. The shoot density ranged from 822 to 941 shoots m-2 with a peak in summer and a trough in winter which was similar to that of biomass. The growth strategy enabled T. hemprichii to minimize the negative effects of desiccation in summer as well as light reduction in winter.

  16. Hammond Bay Biological Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Hammond Bay Biological Station (HBBS), located near Millersburg, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). HBBS was established by...

  17. Humboldt Bay Orthoimages

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of 0.5-meter pixel resolution, four band orthoimages covering the Humboldt Bay area. An orthoimage is remotely sensed image data in which...

  18. Bathymetry in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 4x4 meter resolution bathymetric surface for Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico (in NAD83 UTM 19 North). The depth values are in meters referenced to...

  19. Logy Bay Fishing Settlement

    OpenAIRE

    S H Parsons and Sons

    2003-01-01

    202 x 151 mm. Showing the small inlet with moored rowing boats and rough wooden shacks built on the cliffside. Lying about seven miles from St. John's, Logy Bay was used as a summertime fishing station.

  20. Biscayne Bay Alongshore Epifauna

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Field studies to characterize the alongshore epifauna (shrimp, crabs, echinoderms, and small fishes) along the western shore of southern Biscayne Bay were started...

  1. Topobathymetric model of Mobile Bay, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Brock, John C.; Howard, Daniel M.; Gesch, Dean B.; Bonisteel-Cormier, Jamie M.; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2013-01-01

    Topobathymetric Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are a merged rendering of both topography (land elevation) and bathymetry (water depth) that provides a seamless elevation product useful for inundation mapping, as well as for other earth science applications, such as the development of sediment-transport, sea-level rise, and storm-surge models. This 1/9-arc-second (approximately 3 meters) resolution model of Mobile Bay, Alabama was developed using multiple topographic and bathymetric datasets, collected on different dates. The topographic data were obtained primarily from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Elevation Dataset (NED) (http://ned.usgs.gov/) at 1/9-arc-second resolution; USGS Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) data (2 meters) (http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/400/); and topographic lidar data (2 meters) and Compact Hydrographic Airborne Rapid Total Survey (CHARTS) lidar data (2 meters) from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) (http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/data/coastallidar/). Bathymetry was derived from digital soundings obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/geodas/geodas.html) and from water-penetrating lidar sources, such as EAARL and CHARTS. Mobile Bay is ecologically important as it is the fourth largest estuary in the United States. The Mobile and Tensaw Rivers drain into the bay at the northern end with the bay emptying into the Gulf of Mexico at the southern end. Dauphin Island (a barrier island) and the Fort Morgan Peninsula form the mouth of Mobile Bay. Mobile Bay is 31 miles (50 kilometers) long by a maximum width of 24 miles (39 kilometers) with a total area of 413 square miles (1,070 square kilometers). The vertical datum of the Mobile Bay topobathymetric model is the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). All the topographic datasets were originally referenced to NAVD 88 and no transformations

  2. Radar image San Francisco Bay Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay Area in California and its surroundings are shown in this radar image from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On this image, smooth areas, such as the bay, lakes, roads and airport runways appear dark, while areas with buildings and trees appear bright. Downtown San Francisco is at the center and the city of Oakland is at the right across the San Francisco Bay. Some city areas, such as the South of Market district in San Francisco, appear bright due to the alignment of streets and buildings with respect to the incoming radar beam. Three of the bridges spanning the Bay are seen in this image. The Bay Bridge is in the center and extends from the city of San Francisco to Yerba Buena and Treasure Islands, and from there to Oakland. The Golden Gate Bridge is to the left and extends from San Francisco to Sausalito. The Richmond-San Rafael Bridge is in the upper right and extends from San Rafael to Richmond. Angel Island is the large island east of the Golden Gate Bridge, and lies north of the much smaller Alcatraz Island. The Alameda Naval Air Station is seen just below the Bay Bridge at the center of the image. Two major faults bounding the San Francisco-Oakland urban areas are visible on this image. The San Andreas fault, on the San Francisco peninsula, is seen on the left side of the image. The fault trace is the straight feature filled with linear reservoirs, which appear dark. The Hayward fault is the straight feature on the right side of the image between the urban areas and the hillier terrain to the east.This radar image was acquired by just one of SRTM's two antennas and, consequently, does not show topographic data, but only the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground. This signal, known as radar backscatter, provides insight into the nature of the surface, including its roughness, vegetation cover and urbanization. The overall faint striping pattern in the images is a data processing artifact due to the

  3. Module bay with directed flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torczynski, John R.

    2001-02-27

    A module bay requires less cleanroom airflow. A shaped gas inlet passage can allow cleanroom air into the module bay with flow velocity preferentially directed toward contaminant rich portions of a processing module in the module bay. Preferential gas flow direction can more efficiently purge contaminants from appropriate portions of the module bay, allowing a reduced cleanroom air flow rate for contaminant removal. A shelf extending from an air inlet slit in one wall of a module bay can direct air flowing therethrough toward contaminant-rich portions of the module bay, such as a junction between a lid and base of a processing module.

  4. 77 FR 36396 - Safety Zones; Fireworks Displays in Captain of the Port Long Island Sound Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register LIS Long Island Sound A. Regulatory History... Long Island Sound Zone, in the Federal Register (77 FR 20324). The NPRM proposed these events and... Niantic Bay Fireworks submitted marine event applications with 135 day notice and on April 4, 2012...

  5. Plankton diversity and aquatic ecology of a freshwater lake (L3) at Bharti Island, Larsemann Hills, east Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Bharti, Pawan K.; U.K. Niyogi

    2015-01-01

    The Larsemann Hills range is an ice-free oasis on the Ingrid Christensen Coast of Princess Elizabeth Land, East Antarctica, which includes Bharti Island, Fisher Island, McLeod Island, Broknes Peninsula, Stornes Peninsula, and several other islands, promontories, and nunataks. The Larsemann Hills is an ice-free area of approximately 50 km2, located halfway between the Vestfold Hills and the Amery Ice Shelf on the south-eastern coast of Prydz Bay, Princess Elizabeth Land, East Antarctica. The i...

  6. 33 CFR 100.124 - Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York. 100.124 Section 100.124 Navigation and Navigable... NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.124 Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York... swimmer or safety craft on the swim event race course bounded by the following points: Starting Point...

  7. Meteorological and hydrographic data collected from Meaher Park in Mobile Bay, Alabama, Gulf of Mexico from 2014-01-01 to 2014-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0141139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Mobile County to provide real-time...

  8. Meteorological and hydrographic data collected from Perdido Pass near Mobile Bay, Alabama, Gulf of Mexico from 2014-01-01 to 2014-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0141137)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Mobile County to provide real-time...

  9. Meteorological and hydrographic data collected from Dauphin Island Station near Dauphin Island, Alabama, Gulf of Mexico from 2014-01-01 to 2014-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0141141)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Mobile County to provide real-time...

  10. FIVE UNPUBLISHED COINS OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT AND HIS SUCCESSORS IN THE RHODES UNIVERSITY COLLECTION

    OpenAIRE

    J.D. Snowball; W.D. Snowball

    2012-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the economic and political significance of the Alexander III (“the Great”) type silver tetradrachm and publishes three of his coins currently held by the Rhodes University Classics Museum. Based on stylistic elements, they are classified as from the Amphipolis and Arados mints and were probably minted during his lifetime. Two further tetradrachms from the empires of Alexander’s successors, Ptolemy II and Seleucus IV, are also published.

  11. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Biological Effects of Toxic Contaminants in Sediments from Long Island Sound and Environs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey of sediment toxicity was carried out by NOAA's National Status and Trends Program in the coastal bays that surround Long Island Sound in New York and...

  12. Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana Open Bays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1995-06-23

    Data were collected prior to termination of discharge at three sites (including two open bay sites at Delacroix Island and Bay De Chene) for the risk assessments. The Delacroix Island Oil and Gas Field has been in production since the first well drilling in 1940; the Bay De Chene Field, since 1942. Concentrations of 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Po, and 228Th were measured in discharges. Radium conc. were measured in fish and shellfish tissues. Sediment PAH and metal conc. were also available. Benthos sampling was conducted. A survey of fishermen was conducted. The tiered risk assessment showed that human health risks from radium in produced water appear to be small; ecological risk from radium and other radionuclides in produced water also appear small. Many of the chemical contaminants discharged to open Louisiana bays appear to present little human health or ecological risk. A conservative screening analysis suggested potential risks to human health from Hg and Pb and a potential risk to ecological receptors from total effluent, Sb, Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Ag, Zn, and phenol in the water column and PAHs in sediment; quantitiative risk assessments are being done for these contaminants.

  13. Composition of plagioclases in volcanic rocks of King George Island, Antarctica with reference to the petrogenetic significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Plagioclases occur mainly as phenocrysts in volcanic rocks of King George Island, South Shetland Islands, West Antarctica. In basaltic andesites and andesites of Keller Peninsula and Ullman Spur (Admiralty Bay), they are high structure state labradorite-andesines; and in high-A1 basalts and basaltic andesites of Barton and Weaver peninsulas (Maxwell Bay), they are high structure state bytownite-anorthites.∑REE, La/Yb ratios and δEu values of plagioclases from Admiralty Bay are higher than those from Maxwell Bay. All plagioclases have rather identical chondritenormalized transitional element distribution patterns, probably reflecting that crystal structure rather than composition of plagioclase controls their diversity. Compositions of plagioclases depend chiefly on those of their host rocks, compositional differences of plagioclases reveal that basaltic magmas in the Admiralty Bay area are more evolved than in the Maxwell Bay area.

  14. Solomon Islands

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2015-01-01

    This report aims to build understanding of the existing disaster risk financing and insurance (DRFI) tools in use in the Solomon Islands and to identify gaps where engagement could further develop financial resilience. It also aims to encourage peer exchange of regional knowledge, specifically by encouraging dialogue on past experiences, lessons learned, optimal use of these financial tool...

  15. The Fermi's Bayes Theorem

    CERN Document Server

    D'Agostini, G

    2005-01-01

    It is curious to learn that Enrico Fermi knew how to base probabilistic inference on Bayes theorem, and that some influential notes on statistics for physicists stem from what the author calls elsewhere, but never in these notes, {\\it the Bayes Theorem of Fermi}. The fact is curious because the large majority of living physicists, educated in the second half of last century -- a kind of middle age in the statistical reasoning -- never heard of Bayes theorem during their studies, though they have been constantly using an intuitive reasoning quite Bayesian in spirit. This paper is based on recollections and notes by Jay Orear and on Gauss' ``Theoria motus corporum coelestium'', being the {\\it Princeps mathematicorum} remembered by Orear as source of Fermi's Bayesian reasoning.

  16. Results of geoelectrical surveys in the area of Crater 70, Deception Island, Maritime Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Antonio; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2015-01-01

    Deception Island is horse-shoe shaped stratovolcano with 15 km diameter and a large caldera that opens towards the southeast, forming a bay about 7 km wide. The maximum altitude is at Mount Pond (539 m a.s.l.). About 57% of the island area is covered by glaciers. In geological terms Deception Island is composed of volcano-sedimentary deposits, including pyroclastic flows and deposits, strombolian scoriae and lava, volcanic and hypo-volcanic indurated ashes, and phreatomagmatic deposits. Recen...

  17. Isotopic and chemical composition of submarine geothermal gases from the Bay of Plenty, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas samples collected from the ocean floor near Whale Island, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand, are composed of carbon dioxide, methane, hydrogen, and air. The methane has an isotopic composition of delta13C(PDB) = -280/00 and deltaD(SMOW) = -1250/00. The isotopic and chemical composition show that the gases are of geothermal origin and similar to gas evolved from Whale Island hot springs

  18. Plant diversity and biomass of Marudu bay mangroves in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mangroves of Marudu Bay in the state of Sabah is situated at the tip of Borneo Island, and at the southern limit of the Coral Triangle whose waters hold the highest diversity of corals, fish, molluscks, crustaceans and marine plant species in the world. The ecosystem shows a deterioration due to unsustainable fishing, pollution and encroachment, and these are impacting the Marudu Bay coastal communities economically. Fishing is the major economic activity here. Realising the importance of conserving the mangroves to uplift the socio-economic livelihood of the coastal community, a resource inventory of the mangroves and its productivity study were carried out. A total of 16 plant species in 12 genera and 9 families were identified. It was also found that 0.7 ha is capable of capturing all the species in the mangrove forest. The mangrove forests of Marudu Bay are dominated by Rhizopora apiculata and R. mucronata. The highest Importance Value index (IVI) was given by Rhizophora mucronata. Total Above Ground Biomass (TAGB) for 1-ha of mangrove forest in Marudu Bay was estimated to be 98.4 t/ha. It was found in other parallel studies that the mangroves of Marudu Bay are productive ecosystems that provide valuable habitats, nurseries and spawning grounds for various commercially important species of fish and invertebrates such as shrimp besides many species of wildlife. The mangroves at Marudu Bay are not only aesthetically attractive but provide opportunities for ecotourism activities that can be undertaken by the local community inhabiting the area to uplift their meagre income, These activities include mangrove cruising, recreational fishing, educational tourism and mangrove honey production, amongst others. This way, the degradation of the mangrove in Marudu Bay can be halted and reversed. (author)

  19. Breeding productivity of Smith Island black ducks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haramis, G.M.; Jorde, D.G.; Olsen, G.H.; Stotts, D.B.; Harrison, M.K.; Perry, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the breeding performance of American black ducks (Anas rubripes) on Smith Island, Chesapeake Bay, to improve our understanding of island black duck breeding ecology and to make management recommendations to enhance productivity. During 1995-96, we implanted 56 female black ducks with 20-g radio transmitters and tracked 35 of the individuals through the breeding season to locate nests, determine nest fate, and identify brood habitat. We also increased preseason banding efforts and compared capture characteristics over 12 years with those from the Deal Island Wildlife Management Area, a banding site on the mainland of Tangier Sound. A low rate of nesting (37%), lack of renesting, and poor hatching success (31%) indicated that island salt marsh habitats present a harsh environment for breeding black ducks. Black ducks located 11 of 13 nests (85%) in black needlerush (Juncus roemerianus) marsh where they were vulnerable to flooding from extreme tides and to egg predators. No nests were found on forested tree hammocks, a feature that distinguishes Smith Island from nearby South Marsh and Bloodsworth Islands. Nest predators included red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), herring gulls (Larus argentams), fish crows (Corvus ossifragus), and, potentially, Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus). Unlike mainland red foxes, foxes radio tracked on Smith Island were found to be capable swimmers and effective low marsh predators. We found shoreline meadows of widgeon grass (Ruppia maritima) to be important foraging sites for black ducks and suspected that the virtual absence of fresh water in this high salinity environment (1217+ ppt) to incur some cost in terms of growth and survival of ducklings. Preseason bandings revealed a high proportion of banded adults and a strong positive correlation in age ratios with the Deal Island banding site. This latter finding strongly suggests a negative universal effect of storm tides on nest success for Tangier Sound black ducks. Management to

  20. Yaquina Bay Topobathy DEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S.EPA contracted with the U.S.ACE to obtain intertidal and subtidal bathymetric soundings of Yaquina Bay between Poole Slough and the South Beach Marina in 2002. These data were compiled with U.S.ACE subtidal soundings from 1999, 1998, 2000 and National Ocean Service soundi...

  1. Concentrations of metals in blood and feathers of nestling ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) in Chesapeake and Delaware Bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, B.A.; Golden, N.H.; Toschik, P.C.; McGowan, P.C.; Custer, T.W.

    2008-01-01

    In 2000, 2001, and 2002, blood and feather samples were collected from 40-45-day-old nestling ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) from Chesapeake Bay and Delaware Bay and River. Concentrations of 18 metals, metalloids, and other elements were determined in these samples by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy, and Hg concentrations were measured by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy. When compared to concurrent reference areas (South, West, and Rhode Rivers), mean As and Hg concentrations in blood were greater (p nestlings from the highly industrialized Elizabeth River compared to the rural reference area. When compared to the concurrent reference area, mean Al, Ba, Hg, Mn, and Pb concentrations in feathers were substantially greater (p nestlings from northern Delaware Bay and River had greater concentrations (p nestling feathers from Delaware were frequently greater than in the Chesapeake. The present findings and those of related reproductive studies suggest that concentrations of several heavy metals (e.g., Cd, Hg, Pb) in nestling blood and feathers from Chesapeake and Delaware Bays were below toxicity thresholds and do not seem to be affecting chick survival during the nestling period.

  2. Soundscape Ecology of Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin Resting Bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heenehan, Heather Leigh

    Sound is a key sensory modality for Hawaiian spinner dolphins. Like many other marine animals, these dolphins rely on sound and their acoustic environment for many aspects of their daily lives, making it is essential to understand soundscape in areas that are critical to their survival. Hawaiian spinner dolphins rest during the day in shallow coastal areas and forage offshore at night. In my dissertation I focus on the soundscape of the bays where Hawaiian spinner dolphins rest taking a soundscape ecology approach. I primarily relied on passive acoustic monitoring using four DSG-Ocean acoustic loggers in four Hawaiian spinner dolphin resting bays on the Kona Coast of Hawai'i Island. 30-second recordings were made every four minutes in each of the bays for 20 to 27 months between January 8, 2011 and March 30, 2013. I also utilized concomitant vessel-based visual surveys in the four bays to provide context for these recordings. In my first chapter I used the contributions of the dolphins to the soundscape to monitor presence in the bays and found the degree of presence varied greatly from less than 40% to nearly 90% of days monitored with dolphins present. Having established these bays as important to the animals, in my second chapter I explored the many components of their resting bay soundscape and evaluated the influence of natural and human events on the soundscape. I characterized the overall soundscape in each of the four bays, used the tsunami event of March 2011 to approximate a natural soundscape and identified all loud daytime outliers. Overall, sound levels were consistently louder at night and quieter during the daytime due to the sounds from snapping shrimp. In fact, peak Hawaiian spinner dolphin resting time co-occurs with the quietest part of the day. However, I also found that humans drastically alter this daytime soundscape with sound from offshore aquaculture, vessel sound and military mid-frequency active sonar. During one recorded mid

  3. Consolidation and strength properties of calcareous sediments from Kaneohe and Kailua Bays, Hawaii

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Brandes, H.G.; Khadge, N.H.; Nakayama, D.D.

    Shallow-water sediments found near the shorelines of Kaneohe and Kailua bays on the island of Oahu, an area that has seen continuous development over the last 40 years, were tested to determine the influence of terrigenous input on the geotechnical...

  4. Urvina Bay Stable Isotope (delta 18O) Data for 1600 to 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A. URVCOMP.TXT Site: Urvina Bay, Galapagos Islands, 00 deg 24.52 min S, 91 deg 14.04 min W. Oxygen Isotopic time series averaged from 2 cores-UR-86 (Pavona clavus,...

  5. QUANTIFYING SEDIMENT CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE GUÁNICA BAY PUERTO RICO

    Science.gov (United States)

    The island of Puerto Rico faces considerable challenges regarding sustainable land use and effects of land use on adjacent freshwater and marine ecosystem services. In watersheds feeding Guánica Bay (southwestern Puerto Rico), increased soil erosion and sediment loading to strea...

  6. Decline of the Jakarta Bay molluscan fauna linked to human impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, van der S.E.T.; Moolenbeek, R.G.; Hoeksema, B.W.

    2009-01-01

    In 1937/38 representative mollusc collections were made in Jakarta Bay (West Java, Indonesia). New data from here and the adjacent offshore Thousand Islands archipelago (Kepulauan Seribu) became available in 2005. Although collecting efforts and sampling methods differed, a comparison of the mollusc

  7. Spatial and temporal trends of contaminants in eggs of wading birds from San Francisco Bay, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hothem, R.L.; Marois, K.C.; Wainwright, S.E. [National Biological Service, Davis, CA (United States); Roster, D.L. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Newark, CA (United States). San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge; King, K.A. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Phoenix, AZ (United States). Ecological Services; Keldsen, T.J. [National Biological Service, Fort Collins, CO (United States). Midcontinent Ecological Science Center

    1995-08-01

    Between 1989 and 1991, reproduction by black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) and snowy egrets (Egretta thula) was studied at sites in San Francisco Bay. Eggs were collected from these and other bay sites and from South Wilbur Flood Area, a reference site in California`s San Joaquin Valley. Eggs were analyzed for inorganic trace elements, organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Results were compared among sites and years and with results of previous studies. There was some evidence of impaired reproduction, but concentrations of contaminants were generally lower than threshold levels for such effects. Egg hatchability was generally good, with predation being the factor that most limited reproductive success. Mean PCB concentrations were generally higher in eggs from the south end of San Francisco Bay than from the north, but the only temporal change, an increase, was observed at Alcatraz Island. There were spatial differences for p,p{prime}-DDE in night-heron eggs in 1990, but the highest mean concentration of DDE was in night-heron eggs from South Wilbur in 1991. Temporal declines in maximum concentrations of DDE in eggs were observed in the bay, but means did not change significantly over time. At Bair Island in the southern end of the bay, mean concentrations of mercury decreased while selenium increased in night-heron eggs over time, but there were no clear bay-wide spatial or temporal trends for either element.

  8. Benthic flux of nutrients and trace metals in the northern component of San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Parcheso, Francis; Engelstad, Anita C.; Greene, Valerie E.

    2009-01-01

    Two sets of sampling trips were coordinated in late summer 2008 (weeks of July 8 and August 6) to sample the interstitial and overlying bottom waters at 10 shallow locations (9 sites Brown?s Island. Except for the elevated flux at Browns Island, the benthic flux of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) was consistently: (1) lower than previously reported for South Bay sites, (2) an order of magnitude lower than oligotrophic Coeur d?Alene Lake, (3) two orders of magnitude lower than determined for eutrophic Upper Klamath Lake, and (4) an order of magnitude or more lower than the estimated summer riverine inputs for SRP (900 to 1,300 kilograms of phosphorous per day (kg-P d-1)). In contrast to fluxes reported for the South Bay, nitrate fluxes were consistently negative (that is, drawn from the water column into the sediment), except for one site with statistically insignificant nitrate fluxes (Site 409 within Suisun Bay). The most negative nitrate flux (-7.3?0.1 mmole m-2d-1) was observed within Grizzly Bay (Site 416). Observed nitrate fluxes bracketed the estimated summer fluvial flux of nitrate (3,500 to 5,000 kg-N d-1). With the exception of the two Grizzly Bay sites (416 and 417), the consistently positive benthic flux of ammonia generally counteracted the negative flux of nitrate to yield a net balance of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. Ammonia benthic fluxes extrapolated for Suisun Bay ranged from 320 kg-N d-1 (Site SSB009 near the entrance to Honker Bay) to 1,900 kg-N d-1 (Montezuma Island). These values represent a significant ammonia source to the water column relative to summer riverine inputs (approximately 400 to 600 kg-N d-1). Dissolved silica also displayed a consistently positive benthic flux, except for Site 409 within Suisun Bay, which showed insignificant fluxes (also insignificant for nitrate and SRP). As with the nitrate fluxes, Grizzly Bay and Browns Island sites yielded the highest dissolved silica fluxes (1.3?1.2 to 2.5?0.6 mmole m-2d-1, respectively

  9. Islands for SAT

    OpenAIRE

    H Fang; Kilani, Y.; Lee, J.H.M.; Stuckey, P. J.

    2006-01-01

    In this note we introduce the notion of islands for restricting local search. We show how we can construct islands for CNF SAT problems, and how much search space can be eliminated by restricting search to the island.

  10. Establishing an Anthropogenic Nitrogen Baseline Using Native American Shell Middens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, has been heavily influenced by anthropogenic nutrients for more than 200 years. Recent efforts to improve water quality have cut sewage nitrogen (N) loads to this point source estuary by more than half. Given that the bay has been heavily fertilize...

  11. Bayes and the Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Norman; Neil, Martin; Berger, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Although the last forty years has seen considerable growth in the use of statistics in legal proceedings, it is primarily classical statistical methods rather than Bayesian methods that have been used. Yet the Bayesian approach avoids many of the problems of classical statistics and is also well suited to a broader range of problems. This paper reviews the potential and actual use of Bayes in the law and explains the main reasons for its lack of impact on legal practice. These include misconceptions by the legal community about Bayes’ theorem, over-reliance on the use of the likelihood ratio and the lack of adoption of modern computational methods. We argue that Bayesian Networks (BNs), which automatically produce the necessary Bayesian calculations, provide an opportunity to address most concerns about using Bayes in the law. PMID:27398389

  12. Estructura poblacional de Chiton articulatus en las islas Pájaros y Venados de la bahía de Mazatlán, Sinaloa, México Population structure of Chiton articulatus from Pájaros and Venados islands of Mazatlán Bay, Sinaloa, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Flores-Campaña

    2007-10-01

    actividades. No existe ningún tipo de normatividad y/o vigilancia sobre su captura y comercialización.This work represents a contribution to the knowledge of the basic and fishery biology of Chiton articulatus, which is exploited by amateur fishermen along the coast of Mazatlán, Sinaloa. Collections were made every two months from February to December of 2000 at four different sites in the intertidal zone of Pájaros and Venados islands, during the lowest tide. Two sites were in the protected zone facing Mazatlán Bay and two in the exposed zones of both islands. All specimens were identified and measured in the laboratory where body size and weight were obtained with a caliper (±0.1 mm and scale (± 0.001g respectively. The total length (Lt of the 1,236 specimens examined varied between 11.2 and 86.8 mm, height (Al between 2.0 and 48.1 mm, width (An from 7.1 mm to 48.1 mm and total weight (Pt from 0.1 g to 53.8 g. Size distributions showed that most of the population was between Lt of 31 - 64 mm with a modal Lt of 41.1 mm and mean of 45.6±8.5 mm. The larger sizes were recorded on the exposed zone of Pájaros island and the smaller sizes were found in the protected zone of Venados island. This difference can be explained by wave exposure and differences in fishery pressure related to the ease of access to each zone. Biometric relationships between sizes were linear {An=0.5423(Lt+2.7594, Al=0.2316(Lt-0.4576 and Al=0.3807(An-0.3832} and between size and weight were exponential {Pt=0.0001(Lt2.8404, Pt=0.0005(An2.8807 and Pt=0.0329(Al2.3236}; the values of slope (b between size and weight relationships were close to 3, indicating isometric growth. The relationship between Pt and foot weight (Pp was {Pt=4.8778(Pp+1.0933}, which means that the portion of each specimen used was 17 % of Pt. Capture of C. articulatus is a subsistence activity for different groups for temporary relief in times of poor catches or to complement earnings from other activities. There are no

  13. Beautiful hainan island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪伦

    2002-01-01

    Hainan Island is the second largest island in China. It is situated on the Nanhai Sea(South China Sea) and faces Guangdong Province across Qiongzhou Strait (海峡).Hainan Province was established (建立)in 1988. It consists of Hainan Island, Xisha Islands, Zhongsha Islands, Nansha Islands and the vast sea areas around them.Its total area is 340,000 km2.

  14. Sub-tidal benthic habitats of central San Francisco Bay and offshore Golden Gate area: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, H. Gary; Endris, Charles; Vallier, Tracy; Golden, Nadine E.; Cross, Jeffery; Ryan, Holly F.; Dieter, Bryan; Niven, Eric; Barnard, P.L.; Jaffee, B.E.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    Deep-water potential estuarine and marine benthic habitat types were defined from a variety of new and interpreted data sets in central San Francisco Bay and offshore Golden Gate area including multibeam echosounder (MBES), side-scan sonar and bottom grab samples. Potential estuarine benthic habitats identified for the first time range from hard bedrock outcrops on island and mainland flanks and some Bay floor

  15. Investigation of unusual mortalities of bottlenose dolphins along the mid-Texas coastal bay ecosystem during 1992

    OpenAIRE

    Colbert, A. A.; Scott, G. I.; Fulton, M. H.; Wirth, E.F.; Daugomah, J. W.; Key, P B; Strozier, E. D.; Galloway, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    An investigation was conducted into the deaths of more than 220 bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) that occurred within the coastal bay ecosystem of mid-Texas between January and May 1992. The high mortality rate was unusual in that it was limited to a relatively small geographical area, occurred primarily within an inshore bay system separated from the Gulf of Mexico by barrier islands, and coincided with deaths of other taxa including birds and fish. Factors examined to determine th...

  16. Meteorological, biological, and hydrographic data collected from Katrina Cut Station near Dauphin Island, AL from 04/15/2011 - 12/31/2013 (NODC Accession 0117374)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abstract: Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Mobile County to provide...

  17. Meteorological, biological, and hydrographic data collected from Bon Secour Station near Dauphin Island, AL from 01/01/2014 - 12/31/2014 (NCEI Accession 0140527)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abstract: Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Mobile County to provide...

  18. Meteorological, biological, and hydrographic data collected from a nearshore moored buoy near Dauphin Island, Alabama from 24 Feb 2003 to 31 Dec 2013 (NODC Accession 0114998)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Abstract: Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the the Alabama Department of Conservation, State Land Division,...

  19. Meteorological and hydrographic data collected from Cedar Point Station near Dauphin Island, Alabama from 2014-01-01 to 2014-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0140929)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program have partnered with the Alabama Department of Conservation and Mobile County to provide real-time...

  20. Chronic hydrocarbon exposure of harlequin ducks in areas affected by the Selendang Ayu oil spill at Unalaska Island, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Paul L.; Schamber, J.L.; Trust, K.A.; Miles, A.K.; Henderson, J.D.; Wilson, B.W.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated chronic exposure of harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) to hydrocarbons associated with the 2004 M/V Selendang Ayu oil spill at Unalaska Island, Alaska. We measured levels of hepatic 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD) in liver biopsy samples as an indicator of hydrocarbon exposure in three oiled bays and one reference bay in 2005, 2006, and 2008. Median EROD activity in ducks from oiled bays was significantly higher than in the reference bay in seven of nine pairwise comparisons. These results indicated that harlequin ducks were exposed to lingering hydrocarbons more than three years after the spill.

  1. 75 FR 11837 - Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Commodity Credit Corporation Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative AGENCY: Commodity Credit Corporation and... program funds for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative. SUMMARY: The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC... Watershed Initiative for agricultural producers in the Chesapeake Bay watershed in the States of...

  2. BCDC Bay Trail Alignment 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Bay Trail provides easily accessible recreational opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts, including hikers, joggers, bicyclists and skaters. It also offers a...

  3. 76 FR 51383 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Rhode Island and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the.... ACTION: Call for Information and Nominations for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the OCS Offshore... commercial leases that would allow a lessee to propose the construction of a wind energy project(s) on...

  4. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: Boston Weather Forecast Office (BOX WFO) - Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's efforts to create an online mapping viewer...

  5. From Concept to Practice: Using the School Health Index to Create Healthy School Environments in Rhode Island Elementary Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah N. Pearlman, PhD; Elizabeth Dowling, MPH; Cheryl Bayuk; Kathleen Cullinen, MS, RD,; Ann Kelsey Thacher, MS

    2005-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of childhood obesity is increasing, and schools are ideal places to support healthy eating and physical activity. In 2000, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed the School Health Index, a self-assessment and planning tool that helps schools evaluate and improve physical activity and nutrition programs and policies. Although many state education agencies, health departments, and individual schools have used the School Health Index, few syste...

  6. Time of travel and dispersion of a dye plume in the Blackstone River, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Gene W.; Breault, Robert F.; Waite, Andrew M.; Hartman, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    To obtain copies of this report, please contact: Director, Division of Watershed Management, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, 8 New Bond St., Worcester, MA 01608, (508) 792–7650

  7. 2011 Dynamics at Surfaces Gordon Research Conference (August 7-12, 2011, Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Sitz

    2011-08-12

    The 2011 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 32nd anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state scattering dynamics, chemical reaction dynamics, non-adiabatic effects in reactive and inelastic scattering of molecules from surfaces, single molecule dynamics at surfaces, surface photochemistry, ultrafast dynamics at surfaces, and dynamics at water interfaces. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology, biophysics, and astronomy.

  8. A Framework for Enhancing Bird Habitat Value of Urban Greenspaces in the Woonasquatucket Watershed, Rhode Island, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modifying greenspaces to enhance habitat value has been proposed as a means towards protecting or restoring biodiversity in urban landscapes. In this report, we provide a framework for developing low-cost, low-impact enhancements that can be incorporated during the restoration of...

  9. F00345: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Southern New England Coast, New York and Rhode Island, 1990-06-05

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  10. Syringe Acquisition Experiences and Attitudes among Injection Drug Users Undergoing Short-Term Opioid Detoxification in Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    OpenAIRE

    Zaller, Nickolas D.; Yokell, Michael A.; Nayak, Sandeep M.; Fu, Jeannia J.; Bazazi, Alexander R.; Rich, Josiah D.

    2012-01-01

    Access to sterile syringes for injection drug users (IDUs) is a critical part of a comprehensive strategy to combat the transmission of HIV, hepatitis C virus, and other bloodborne pathogens. Understanding IDUs’ experiences and attitudes about syringe acquisition is crucial to ensuring adequate syringe supply and access for this population. This study sought to assess and compare IDUs’ syringe acquisition experiences and attitudes and HIV risk behavior in two neighboring states, Massachusetts...

  11. Age, geographical distribution and taphonomy of an unusual occurrence of mummified crabeater seals on James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, A. E.; Smellie, J. L.; Williams, M.; Moreton, S.

    2008-01-01

    An unusually dense collection of some 150 dead crabeater seals (Family Phocidae), in various stages of decay, occurs in the Brandy Bay hinterland, north-western James Ross Island, northern Antarctic Peninsula. Throughout the past 100 years, the presence of shelf ice (no longer present today) and sea ice in Prince Gustav Channel, between James Ross Island and the Antarctic Peninsula, has prevented seals from readily accessing the western side of James Ross Island. However, open water pools, so...

  12. News from Academy Bay

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    A spate of Galapagos books. The phenomenal El Nino. The Galapagos on television. Galapagos tourism. The CDRS Director in the Soviet Union. Saving the Hawaiian Petrel. Wild dogs and land iguanas. Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the Galapagos Islands. More about those bloodthirsty "vampire finches". Auf Wiedersehen, Friedemann! Harold Jefferson Coolidge at eighty. Events and visits at the Darwin Research Station.

  13. Recent hydrogeologic study of the Vis island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janislav Kapelj

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The Vis Island belongs to the group of the Middle Dalmatian islands. It comprises an area of about 90.2 km2. Morphologically, three belts of highlands and two depressions with karst poljes are significant. The highest point on the island is Hum with 587 m a.s.l. theisland’s water supply is organized from the water-supply station “Korita”, situated in the central part of island, in tectonically formed depression. There are two additional capturedobjects: the well K-1 above the Komiža town and the spring “Pizdica”. The most important hydrogeological role on the island have two hydrogeological barriers, one in the KomižaBay, completely made of impermeable igneous and clastic rocks, and another one, the recently recognized relative barrier in the area of Dra~evo, Plisko and Velo polje. Since the island karst aquifer is in permanent dynamic relation with seawater, classical geologic,structural and hydrogeologic investigations have been performed with application of hydrogeochemical methods taking into account the natural chemical tracer content of groundwater and its variations in different hydrologic and vegetation conditions. Precipitationregime is very unfavorable with regard to the recharging of island’s aquifer, because dry periods are usually very long. During the summer tourist season, when the number of inhabitants and fresh water consumption considerably increase, amounts of island’sgroundwater suitable for water supply and irrigation rapidly decrease. Sometimes, insufficient quantity of fresh water on the Vis Island causes restrictions. Concerning the development of tourist potential and the present agricultural activities, summer lack ofwater is a serious restrictive factor. Some results of the performed hydrogeological study, important as a basis for island’s fresh water potential assessment, will be presented.

  14. Land Use and Land Cover, Rhode Island 1962 Land-Cover Maps; Set of 37 scanned maps of land cover for the State of Rhode Island originally prepared by John J. Kupa and William R. Whitman based on 1962 aerial photographs., Published in 2011, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Land Use and Land Cover dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2011. It is described...

  15. Preschool Facilities, Location and contact information for public and private schools from the preschool through the university level in Rhode Island as listed by Rhode Island Department of Education for school year 2008. The intention of this dataset was to provide an overv, Published in 2008, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Preschool Facilities dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2008. It is described as...

  16. Avian Distribution and Habitat, Distribution of Bird Species in Rhode Island; s44nbs96; Breeding season species distribution of birds nesting in Rhode Island as documented in 1982-1987 delineated by kilometer grid cells areas., Published in 1996, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Avian Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 1996. It is...

  17. Hurricane and Tsunami Inundation Areas, Rhode Island Worst Case Hurricane Surge Inundation Areas; Worst case Hurricane Surge Inundation areas for category 1 through 4 hurricanes striking the coast of Rhode Island., Published in 2010, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hurricane and Tsunami Inundation Areas dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information...

  18. 78 FR 14185 - Safety Zone; MODU KULLUK; Kiliuda Bay, Kodiak Island, AK to Captains Bay, Unalaska Island, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: ] Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM... forth in 33 U.S.C. 1232 and 50 U.S.C. 192. Dated: February 20, 2013. Paul Mehler III, Captain,...

  19. Benthic flux of nutrients and trace metals in the northern component of San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Parcheso, Francis; Engelstad, Anita C.; Greene, Valerie E.

    2009-01-01

    Two sets of sampling trips were coordinated in late summer 2008 (weeks of July 8 and August 6) to sample the interstitial and overlying bottom waters at 10 shallow locations (9 sites Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies, provides information to assist in developing and refining management strategies for the Bay/Delta system and supports efforts to monitor changes in food-web structure associated with regional habitat modifications directed by the California Bay-Delta Authority. On July 7, 2008, and August 5, 2008, pore-water profilers were successfully deployed at six North Bay sites per trip to measure the concentration gradient of dissolved macronutrients and trace metals near the sediment-water interface. Only two of the sites (433 and SSB009 within Honker Bay) were sampled in both series of profiler deployments. At each sampling site, profilers were deployed in triplicate, while discrete samples and dataloggers were used to collect ancillary data from both the water column and benthos to help interpret diffusive-flux measurements. Benthic flux of dissolved (0.2-micron filtered) inorganic phosphate (that is, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP)) ranged from negligible levels (-0.003?0.005 millimole per square meter per day (mmole m-2d-1) at Site 4.1 outside Honker Bay) to 0.060?0.006 mmole m-2d-1 near the northern coast of Brown?s Island. Except for the elevated flux at Browns Island, the benthic flux of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) was consistently: (1) lower than previously reported for South Bay sites, (2) an order of magnitude lower than oligotrophic Coeur d?Alene Lake, (3) two orders of magnitude lower than determined for eutrophic Upper Klamath Lake, and (4) an order of magnitude or more lower than the estimated summer riverine inputs for SRP (900 to 1,300 kilograms of phosphorous per day (kg-P d-1)). In contrast to fluxes reported for the South Bay, nitrate fluxes were consistently negative (that is, drawn from the water column into the sediment

  20. 75 FR 29891 - Special Local Regulation; Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Swim, Great South Bay, NY, in the Federal Register (74 FR 32428). We did not receive any comments or... published at 74 FR 32428 on July 8, 2009, is adopted as a final rule with the following changes: PART 100... South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY:...

  1. Bayes Multiple Decision Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Wensong

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of simultaneously making many (M) binary decisions based on one realization of a random data matrix X. M is typically large and X will usually have M rows associated with each of the M decisions to make, but for each row the data may be low dimensional. A Bayesian decision-theoretic approach for this problem is implemented with the overall loss function being a cost-weighted linear combination of Type I and Type II loss functions. The class of loss functions considered allows for the use of the false discovery rate (FDR), false nondiscovery rate (FNR), and missed discovery rate (MDR) in assessing the decision. Through this Bayesian paradigm, the Bayes multiple decision function (BMDF) is derived and an efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal Bayes action is described. In contrast to many works in the literature where the rows of the matrix X are assumed to be stochastically independent, we allow in this paper a dependent data structure with the associations obtained through...

  2. Structural and geophysical interpretation of Roatan Island, Honduras, Western Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Daniel Scott

    Roatan Island is the largest of the Bay Islands of Honduras. These islands form an emergent crest off the Caribbean coast of Honduras called the Bonacca Ridge. The Bartlett Trough to the north and subsequent Bonacca Ridge were likely formed due to the transform fault system of the Motagua-Swan Islands Fault System. This fault system forms the tectonic plate boundary between the North American and Caribbean plates. Although the timing and kinematics are poorly constrained, the Bay Islands and the Bonacca Ridge were likely uplifted due to transpression along this left-lateral strike-slip system. With limited regional exposures along the adjacent tectonic boundary, this study aimed to present a structural interpretation for Roatan. This new interpretation is further explained through regional considerations for a suggested geologic history of the northwestern Caribbean. In order to better constrain the kinematics of uplift and exhumation of Roatan Island, structural, gravity, and magnetic surveys were conducted. Principal attention was directed to the structural relationship between the geologic units and their relationship to one another through deformation. Resulting geologic cross-sections from this study present the metamorphic basement exposed throughout the island to be in a normal structural order consisting of biotite schist and gneiss, with overlying units of chlorite schist, carbonate, and conglomerate. These units have relatively concordant strike and dip measurements, consistent with resultant magnetic survey readings. Additionally, large and irregular bodies of amphibolite and serpentinite throughout the island are interpreted to have been emplaced as mafic and ultra-mafic intrusions in weakness zones along Early Paleogene transform system fault planes. The interpretation and suggested geologic history from this study demonstrate the importance of transpressive tectonics both local to Roatan and regionally throughout geologic history. Consideration of

  3. 76 FR 38020 - Safety Zone; Bay Point Fireworks, Bay Point Marina; Marblehead, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bay Point Fireworks, Bay Point Marina... transit or anchor in a portion of the Lake Erie, Bay Point Marina; Marblehead, OH between 10 p.m. and 10... Zone; Bay Point Fireworks, Bay Point Marina; Marblehead, OH. (a) Location. The following area is...

  4. Researching Pacific island livelihoods:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund Christensen, Andreas; Mertz, Ole

    2010-01-01

    on contemporary theories of nissology and conceptual analytical frameworks for island research. Through a review of selected case-study-based island literature on changing livelihoods coming out of the South Pacific, we wish to illustrate and discuss advantages of finding common grounds for small island studies......Small island literature is vast in focus and aim, and is rooted in many different disciplines. The challenge is to find common grounds for researching small islands conceptually and theoretically. The aim of this article is to comment on how to research small islands, including a discussion....... The focus is on two dimensions of island livelihood, migration and natural resource management, both of which are significant contributors in making island livelihoods and shaping Pacific seascapes. We argue that there is still a substantial lack of studies targeting small island dynamics that are empirical...

  5. Recent surface marine sediments of Cocos Island in Costa Rica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeffrey A. SIBAJA-CORDERO; Jess S. TRONCOSO; Eddy GMEZ-RAMREZ

    2014-01-01

    Subtidal sediments of Isla del Coco (Cocos Island), Costa Rica were described in their grain size, sorting, organic matter, and carbonates from 27 dredge samples (3-75 m), collected in April 2010. The organic matter range between 1.37-3.31% and carbonates presented a mean of 74±17%. The sorting was moderately or poorly. The grain size ranged between 0.1-1.1mm. The pattern is that sediment change from inner to mouth of bays. Carbonates and gravel fractions increased offshore and organic matter have high values inner the bays. Input of vegetal debris and mud was from the rivers of this island covered with rain and cloud forest.

  6. The struggle for the Bay : the life and times of Sandwip, an almost unknown Portuguese port in the Bay of Bengal in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rila Mukherjee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article places Sandwip, a lesser known salt trading island and port in the Bay of Bengal within the nexus of global trade and politics in the seventeenth century. Sandwip is now a part of Bangladesh but at the time under review it was successively part of the medieval kingdoms of Bengal, Tripura and Arakan. Sandwip was, briefly, held by the Portuguese and is referred to in Portuguese annals as a ‘minor’ settlement, part of their ‘informal empire’ in the Bay. The article argues that we should not read such settlements of the Portuguese in Southasia as ‘formal’ or ‘informal’, ‘minor’ or ‘major’, and make thereby artificial distinctions between categories. We need to, instead, refocus and study Portuguese expansion as a multi pronged enterprise in which local exigencies and imperial vision were braided all over the Bay of Bengal.

  7. Bayes multiple decision functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wensong; Peña, Edsel A

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of simultaneously making many (M) binary decisions based on one realization of a random data matrix X. M is typically large and X will usually have M rows associated with each of the M decisions to make, but for each row the data may be low dimensional. Such problems arise in many practical areas such as the biological and medical sciences, where the available dataset is from microarrays or other high-throughput technology and with the goal being to decide which among of many genes are relevant with respect to some phenotype of interest; in the engineering and reliability sciences; in astronomy; in education; and in business. A Bayesian decision-theoretic approach to this problem is implemented with the overall loss function being a cost-weighted linear combination of Type I and Type II loss functions. The class of loss functions considered allows for use of the false discovery rate (FDR), false nondiscovery rate (FNR), and missed discovery rate (MDR) in assessing the quality of decision. Through this Bayesian paradigm, the Bayes multiple decision function (BMDF) is derived and an efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal Bayes action is described. In contrast to many works in the literature where the rows of the matrix X are assumed to be stochastically independent, we allow a dependent data structure with the associations obtained through a class of frailty-induced Archimedean copulas. In particular, non-Gaussian dependent data structure, which is typical with failure-time data, can be entertained. The numerical implementation of the determination of the Bayes optimal action is facilitated through sequential Monte Carlo techniques. The theory developed could also be extended to the problem of multiple hypotheses testing, multiple classification and prediction, and high-dimensional variable selection. The proposed procedure is illustrated for the simple versus simple hypotheses setting and for the composite hypotheses setting

  8. Unprovoked fatal shark attack in Lifou Island (Loyalty Islands, New Caledonia, South Pacific) by a great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clua, Eric; Séret, Bernard

    2010-09-01

    The case of a fatal, unprovoked shark attack is reported and analyzed. The incident took place on the 30th of September 2007, in the lagoon of Luengoni Bay, Lifou Island (Loyalty Islands, New Caledonia). A young French woman who was snorkeling was severely bitten on the right thigh and died of hemorrhage. An analysis based in particular on the size and color of the shark, the characteristics of the wounds, and the behavior of the shark before and after the bite suggests that the aggressor was a great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias. PMID:20606572

  9. Nutrient Subsidies to Hanalei Bay, Kauai, HI From Submarine Groundwater Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee, K.; Santoro, A.; Street, J.; Boehm, A.; Berg, C.; Paytan, A.

    2005-12-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) has been shown to be a potentially important source of freshwater, nutrients, and pollutants to many coastal areas, including some locations in Hawaii. This study investigated the importance of SGD in Hanalei Bay, a northward-opening, half-moon shaped bay approximately 2 km in diameter, located on the northern shore of the island of Kauai. High fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) counts at Hanalei beaches sparked concern that nutrients and/or bacteria might be leaching into groundwater from septic systems and cesspools and making their way to the coastal ocean. Sampling was conducted in March and June 2005 at 3 local beaches, 3 streams, the Hanalei River, several groundwater pits, and the open bay. Radium was used as a groundwater tracer. Salinity, water temperature, nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, phosphate, silicate, total coliform, Enterococcus, and E. coli were measured. The ratio of 223Ra (half life = 11.4 days) to 224Ra (half life = 3.66 days) was relatively constant across samples from groundwater and the bay, indicating that the residence time of water in the bay was less than one day during the study period. Groundwater had lower concentrations of all FIB than the Hanalei River, the streams, or the bay, indicating that SGD was not contributing bacteria directly to the coastal zone over the course of this study. However, E. coli was detected at relative high levels in groundwater seaward of a cesspool, suggesting that during periods of high discharge, SGD could transport fecal bacteria to the bay. Concentrations of all nutrients were higher in groundwater than in Hanalei Bay, and nitrate concentrations were higher in groundwater than in the Hanalei River or the streams. Additionally, nitrate concentrations in groundwater and in Hanalei Bay were coupled with radium activities, suggesting a common source, most likely SGD. Mass balance calculations, based on residence times of 2 and 6 hours for the surf zone, indicate that the SGD

  10. Ecological characteristics of the invasive pufferfish Lagocephalus sceleratus (Gmelin, 1789 in the eastern Mediterranean Sea – a case study from Rhodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. KALOGIROU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the ecological and societal impact of the invasive pufferfish Lagocephalus sceleratus on coastal habitats of an area of the eastern Mediterranean Sea (Rhodes Island was investigated. Seasonal quantitative samplings in two common coastal habitats were used to investigate habitat use of different life-stages. Sandy areas were found to be highly important for the early life stages of L. sceleratus. In contrast, Posidonia oceanica habitats were mainly preferred by larger (> 29 cm reproductive adults, not exceeding 64 cm. Lagocephalus sceleratus was found to feed on invertebrates and fish while size classification revealed a tendency for a diet shift with increased size. During early life stages, L. sceleratus inhabits sandy bottoms where it feeds on various invertebrates. The predominant molluscan species found in the diet of larger (> 20 cm L. sceleratus individuals were the economically important Sepia officinalis and Octopus vulgaris. The size at which 50% of individuals reach maturity was estimated to 19 cm. With increased size, habitat shift to seagrass meadows most possibly occurs to meet both the increased demand in prey availability and requirement of appropriate spawning ground. Condition factor of L. sceleratus showed significantly higher values during summer than all other seasons and this was attributed to spawning season and increase in feeding. Societal impacts were alarming due to increased public attention concerning its lethal effects (presence of tetrodotoxin, if consumed. Its high abundance in the coastal fish communities of the studied area combined with ecological and societal impacts, clearly classify L. sceleratus a pest for fisheries and potential threat for biodiversity.

  11. USGS Tampa Bay Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, K.K.; Cronin, T. M.; Crane, M.; Hansen, M.; Nayeghandi, A.; Swarzenski, P.; Edgar, T.; Brooks, G.R.; Suthard, B.; Hine, A.; Locker, S.; Willard, D.A.; Hastings, D.; Flower, B.; Hollander, D.; Larson, R.A.; Smith, K.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the nation's estuaries have been environmentally stressed since the turn of the 20th century and will continue to be impacted in the future. Tampa Bay, one the Gulf of Mexico's largest estuaries, exemplifies the threats that our estuaries face (EPA Report 2001, Tampa Bay Estuary Program-Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (TBEP-CCMP)). More than 2 million people live in the Tampa Bay watershed, and the population constitutes to grow. Demand for freshwater resources, conversion of undeveloped areas to resident and industrial uses, increases in storm-water runoff, and increased air pollution from urban and industrial sources are some of the known human activities that impact Tampa Bay. Beginning on 2001, additional anthropogenic modifications began in Tampa Bat including construction of an underwater gas pipeline and a desalinization plant, expansion of existing ports, and increased freshwater withdrawal from three major tributaries to the bay. In January of 2001, the Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP) and its partners identifies a critical need for participation from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in providing multidisciplinary expertise and a regional-scale, integrated science approach to address complex scientific research issue and critical scientific information gaps that are necessary for continued restoration and preservation of Tampa Bay. Tampa Bay stakeholders identified several critical science gaps for which USGS expertise was needed (Yates et al. 2001). These critical science gaps fall under four topical categories (or system components): 1) water and sediment quality, 2) hydrodynamics, 3) geology and geomorphology, and 4) ecosystem structure and function. Scientists and resource managers participating in Tampa Bay studies recognize that it is no longer sufficient to simply examine each of these estuarine system components individually, Rather, the interrelation among system components must be understood to develop conceptual and

  12. Recommendations for a Barrier Island Breach Management Plan for Fire Island National Seashore, including the Otis Pike High Dune Wilderness Area, Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S. Jeffress; Foley, Mary K.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S Army Corps of Engineers, New York District is developing engineering plans, including economic costs and benefits, for storm damage reduction along an 83 mile stretch of the coastal barrier islands and beaches on the south shore of Long Island, NY from Fire Island Inlet east to the Montauk Point headland. The plan, expected to include various alternatives for storm protection and erosion mitigation, is referred to as the Fire Island to Montauk Point Reformulation Plan (FIMP). These plans are expected to follow the Corps of Engineers’ Environmental Operating Principles striving for long term environmental sustainability and balance between environmental protection and protection of human health and property. Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS), a 19,579 acre unit of the National Park System includes a 32 mile long coastal barrier island located within the FIMP project area. A seven-mile section of the park, Otis Pike Fire Island High Dune Wilderness Area, is also a designated Federal Wilderness Area. The FIIS includes not only the barrier island and sand dunes, but also several islands, sand flats and wetlands landward of the barrier, submerged parts of Great South Bay shoreface, extending approximately 4,000 feet into the bay with the inner shelf region extending approximately 1,000 feet seaward of the Fire Island shoreline. The Fire Island barrier islands, a sand-starved system dominated by highly dynamic processes, are struggling to maintain their integrity in the face of sea-level rise and storms. Adding to the dilemma is that development on the barriers and the mainland has increased greatly during the past 50 years. As such, managers and decision makers in federal agencies, state agencies and local governments are challenged to balance tradeoffs between protection of lives and property, public access and long term conservation of natural habitats and processes and the plants and animals that depend on these habitats. National Park Service (NPS

  13. News from Academy Bay

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Oil Spill in Galápagos. Derrame de Combustible en las Aguas de Galápagos. Beagle V: The Station's New Vessel. Children Conservationists. Niños Conservacionistas. Fruto del Empeño: Nuevo Edificio en San Cristóbal. New Building in Isla San Cristóbal. CDRS Director in Argentina. Van Straelen Gift. Change in Directorship at the CDRS. Cambio del Director en la Estación Científica. International Symposium/Workshop on the Herpetology of the Galápagos Islands: Research & Conservation.

  14. Back Bay Wilderness area description

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a description of the lands located within the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Within these lands, it designates which area is suitable for...

  15. Annual report, Bristol Bay, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Commercial fishery management activities for Bristol Bay for 1955, including lists of operators, extensive statistics, descriptions of enforcement activities, and...

  16. FL BAY SPECTROUT-DIET

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Juvenile spotted seatrout and other sportfish are being monitored annually over a 6-mo period in Florida Bay to assess their abundance over time relative to...

  17. Lavaca Bay 1985-1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Samples were collected from October 15, 1985 through June 12, 1987 in emergent marsh and non-vegetated habitats throughout the Lavaca Bay system to characterize...

  18. Shemya Island prehistory

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 752 artifacts described in this paper are from 5 sites on Shemya Island. Artifactual evidence suggests the island had a small resident population and was...

  19. City and Town Halls; townHalls13

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — Locations of city and town halls in Rhode Island. Derived using information originally compiled by the State of Rhode Island (http://www.ri.gov), and built upon...

  20. Broadband Wireline Provider Service: Other Copper Wireline; BBRI_otherCopper12

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — This dataset represents the availability of wireline broadband Internet access in Rhode Island via "Other Copper Wireline" technology. In Rhode Island, this...