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Sample records for bax-mitochondria-caspase protease pathway

  1. Chlamydia trachomatis secretion of proteases for manipulating host signaling pathways

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    Guangming eZhong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogen C. trachomatis secretes numerous effectors into host cells in order to successfully establish and complete the intracellular growth cycle. Three C. trachomatis proteases (CPAF, Tsp & cHtrA have been localized in the cytosol of the infected cells either by direct immunofluorescence visualization or functional implication. Both CPAF and Tsp have been found to play important roles in C. trachomatis interactions with host cells although the cellular targets of cHtrA have not been identified. All three proteases contain a putative N-terminal signal sequence, suggesting that they may be secreted via a sec-dependent pathway. However, these proteases are also found in chlamydial organism-free vesicles in the lumen of the chlamydial inclusions before they are secreted into host cell cytosol, suggesting that these proteases may first be translocated into the periplasmic region via a sec-dependent pathway and then exported outside of the organisms via an outer membrane vesicles (OMVs budding mechanism. The vesiculized proteases in the inclusion lumen can finally enter host cell cytosol via vesicle fusing with or passing through the inclusion membrane. Continuing identification and characterization of the C. trachomatis-s

  2. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers

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    Jayant S Goda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor, RAS (rat sarcoma oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells, it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies.

  3. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Jayant S; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies.

  4. Signaling pathways induced by serine proteases to increase intestinal epithelial barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahey, Kelcie A; Ronaghan, Natalie J; Shang, Judie; Dion, Sébastien P; Désilets, Antoine; Leduc, Richard; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2017-01-01

    Changes in barrier function of the gastrointestinal tract are thought to contribute to the inflammatory bowel diseases Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Previous work in our lab demonstrated that apical exposure of intestinal epithelial cell lines to serine proteases results in an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). However, the underlying mechanisms governing this response are unclear. We aimed to determine the requirement for proteolytic activity, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation, and downstream intracellular signaling in initiating and maintaining enhanced barrier function following protease treatment using a canine intestinal epithelial cell line (SCBN). We also examined the role of phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain on the serine protease-induced increase in TER through. It was found that proteolytic activity of the serine proteases trypsin and matriptase is required to initiate and maintain the protease-mediated increase in TER. We also show that MMP-independent EGFR activation is essential to the sustained phase of the protease response, and that Src kinases may mediate EGFR transactivation. PI3-K and ERK1/2 signaling were important in reaching a maximal increase in TER following protease stimulation; however, their upstream activators are yet to be determined. CK2 inhibition prevented the increase in TER induced by serine proteases. The bradykinin B(2) receptor was not involved in the change in TER in response to serine proteases, and no change in phosphorylation of MLC was observed after trypsin or matriptase treatment. Taken together, our data show a requirement for ongoing proteolytic activity, EGFR transactivation, as well as downstream PI3-K, ERK1/2, and CK2 signaling in protease-mediated barrier enhancement of intestinal epithelial cells. The pathways mediating enhanced barrier function by proteases may be novel therapeutic targets for intestinal disorders characterized by disrupted epithelial

  5. In vitro protease cleavage and computer simulations reveal the HIV-1 capsid maturation pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jiying; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Yufenyuy, Ernest L.; Wagner, Jef; Himes, Benjamin A.; Zhao, Gongpu; Aiken, Christopher; Zandi, Roya; Zhang, Peijun

    2016-12-01

    HIV-1 virions assemble as immature particles containing Gag polyproteins that are processed by the viral protease into individual components, resulting in the formation of mature infectious particles. There are two competing models for the process of forming the mature HIV-1 core: the disassembly and de novo reassembly model and the non-diffusional displacive model. To study the maturation pathway, we simulate HIV-1 maturation in vitro by digesting immature particles and assembled virus-like particles with recombinant HIV-1 protease and monitor the process with biochemical assays and cryoEM structural analysis in parallel. Processing of Gag in vitro is accurate and efficient and results in both soluble capsid protein and conical or tubular capsid assemblies, seemingly converted from immature Gag particles. Computer simulations further reveal probable assembly pathways of HIV-1 capsid formation. Combining the experimental data and computer simulations, our results suggest a sequential combination of both displacive and disassembly/reassembly processes for HIV-1 maturation.

  6. Factor VII activating protease (FSAP) promotes the proteolysis and inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanse, Sandip M.; Declerck, Paul J.; Ruf, Wolfram; Broze, George; Etscheid, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Factor VII activating protease (FSAP) activates FVII as well as pro-urokinase and inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB, thus regulating haemostasis- and remodeling-associated processes in the vasculature. A genetic variant of FSAP (Marburg I polymorphism) results in low enzymatic activity and is associated with an enhanced risk for carotid stenosis and stroke. We postulate that there are additional substrates for FSAP that will help to explain its role in vascular biology and have searched for such a substrate. Results and Methods Using screening procedures to determine the influence of FSAP on various haemostasis-related processes on endothelial cells we discovered that FSAP inhibited tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), a major anti-coagulant secreted by these cells. Proteolytic degradation of TFPI by FSAP could also be demonstrated by Western blotting and the exact cleavage sites were determined by N-terminal sequencing. The Marburg I variant of FSAP had a diminished ability to inhibit TFPI. A monoclonal antibody to FSAP, that specifically inhibited FSAP binding to TFPI, reversed the inhibitory effect of FSAP on TFPI. Conclusions The identification of TFPI as a sensitive substrate for FSAP increases our understanding of its role in regulating haemostasis and proliferative remodeling events in the vasculature. PMID:22116096

  7. Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Protein Cry6Aa Triggers Caenorhabditis elegans Necrosis Pathway Mediated by Aspartic Protease (ASP-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjuan Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell death plays an important role in host-pathogen interactions. Crystal proteins (toxins are essential components of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt biological pesticides because of their specific toxicity against insects and nematodes. However, the mode of action by which crystal toxins to induce cell death is not completely understood. Here we show that crystal toxin triggers cell death by necrosis signaling pathway using crystal toxin Cry6Aa-Caenorhabditis elegans toxin-host interaction system, which involves an increase in concentrations of cytoplasmic calcium, lysosomal lyses, uptake of propidium iodide, and burst of death fluorescence. We find that a deficiency in the necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Cry6Aa toxin. Intriguingly, the necrosis pathway is specifically triggered by Cry6Aa, not by Cry5Ba, whose amino acid sequence is different from that of Cry6Aa. Furthermore, Cry6Aa-induced necrosis pathway requires aspartic protease (ASP-1. In addition, ASP-1 protects Cry6Aa from over-degradation in C. elegans. This is the first demonstration that deficiency in necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Bt crystal protein, and that Cry6A triggers necrosis represents a newly added necrosis paradigm in the C. elegans. Understanding this model could lead to new strategies for nematode control.

  8. Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Protein Cry6Aa Triggers Caenorhabditis elegans Necrosis Pathway Mediated by Aspartic Protease (ASP-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengjuan; Peng, Donghai; Cheng, Chunsheng; Zhou, Wei; Ju, Shouyong; Wan, Danfeng; Yu, Ziquan; Shi, Jianwei; Deng, Yaoyao; Wang, Fenshan; Ye, Xiaobo; Hu, Zhenfei; Lin, Jian; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cell death plays an important role in host-pathogen interactions. Crystal proteins (toxins) are essential components of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) biological pesticides because of their specific toxicity against insects and nematodes. However, the mode of action by which crystal toxins to induce cell death is not completely understood. Here we show that crystal toxin triggers cell death by necrosis signaling pathway using crystal toxin Cry6Aa-Caenorhabditis elegans toxin-host interaction system, which involves an increase in concentrations of cytoplasmic calcium, lysosomal lyses, uptake of propidium iodide, and burst of death fluorescence. We find that a deficiency in the necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Cry6Aa toxin. Intriguingly, the necrosis pathway is specifically triggered by Cry6Aa, not by Cry5Ba, whose amino acid sequence is different from that of Cry6Aa. Furthermore, Cry6Aa-induced necrosis pathway requires aspartic protease (ASP-1). In addition, ASP-1 protects Cry6Aa from over-degradation in C. elegans. This is the first demonstration that deficiency in necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Bt crystal protein, and that Cry6A triggers necrosis represents a newly added necrosis paradigm in the C. elegans. Understanding this model could lead to new strategies for nematode control. PMID:26795495

  9. The Levels of the Lectin Pathway Serine Protease MASP-1 and Its Complex Formation with C1 Inhibitor Are Linked to the Severity of Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Cecilie Bo; Csuka, Dorottya; Munthe-Fog, Lea

    2015-01-01

    C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) is known to form complexes with the lectin complement pathway serine proteases MASP-1 and MASP-2. Deficiency of C1-INH is associated with hereditary angioedema (HAE), an autosomal inherited disease characterized by swelling attacks caused by elevated levels of bradykinin. MASP...

  10. Evolutionary conservation and variation of protein folding pathways. Two protease inhibitor homologues from black mamba venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollecker, M; Creighton, T E

    1983-08-05

    The pathways of unfolding and refolding of three homologous proteins are shown to be closely related. This implies that folding pathways, as well as the final folded conformation, have been largely conserved during the presumed evolutionary divergence of these proteins from a common ancestor. The pathways of the homologous proteins I and K from black mamba venom were determined here, using the disulphide interaction between their six cysteine residues to trap and identify the intermediate states, and are compared with those determined previously in the same way for the homologous bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. The major one- and two-disulphide intermediates are the same with all three proteins; their kinetic roles are similar, although there are differences in the rates at which they are interconverted and in the minor intermediates that accumulate. As a consequence, different pathways may predominate with another homologous protein, even though the various most favourable pathways are the same. The energetics of the folding transitions and the stabilities of the folded states differ substantially for the three proteins. The differences in stabilities of the fully folded states are primarily reflected kinetically in the rate-determining rearrangements of the native-like conformation; the rates and equilibria of the other steps are not affected markedly. With the less stable proteins, the direct folding pathway of sequential formation of the three correct disulphide bonds becomes significant and is the most facile when considered on a solely intramolecular basis.

  11. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  12. Loss of MYC confers resistance to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis by preventing the activation of multiple serine protease- and caspase-mediated pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grassilli, Emanuela; Ballabeni, Andrea; Maellaro, Emilia

    2004-01-01

    -MYC null cells we confirm and extend recent reports showing a c-Myc requirement for the induction of apoptosis by a number of anticancer agents. In particular, we show that c-Myc is required for the induction of apoptosis by doxorubicin and etoposide, whereas it is not required for camptothecin......-induced cell death. We have investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in executing doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and show caspase-3 activation by both mitochondria-dependent and -independent pathways. Moreover, serine proteases participate in doxorubicin-induced apoptosis partly by contributing to caspase......-3 activation. Finally, a complete rescue from doxorubicin-induced apoptosis is obtained only when serine proteases, caspase-3, and mitochondrial activation are inhibited simultaneously. Interestingly, doxorubicin requires c-Myc for the activation of all of these pathways. Our findings therefore...

  13. Fungal protease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buxton, F.; Jarai, G.; Visser, J.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a novel DNA sequence coding for an Aspergillus aspartic protease, an Aspergillus aspartic protease per se and a method for the preparation thereof. The invention further concerns a novel Aspergillus mutant strain defective in a protease of the aspartic proteinase-type,

  14. Processing Proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Anders Sebastian Rosenkrans

    Processing proteases are proteases which proteolytically activate proteins and peptides into their biologically active form. Processing proteases play an important role in biotechnology as tools in protein fusion technology. Fusion strategies where helper proteins or peptide tags are fused...... to the protein of interest are an elaborate method to optimize expression or purification systems. It is however critical that fusion proteins can be removed and processing proteases can facilitate this in a highly specific manner. The commonly used proteases all have substrate specificities to the N...... of few known proteases to have substrate specificity for the C-terminal side of the scissile bond. LysN exhibits specificity for lysine, and has primarily been used to complement trypsin in to proteomic studies. A working hypothesis during this study was the potential of LysN as a processing protease...

  15. The papain-like protease of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus negatively regulates type I interferon pathway by acting as a viral deubiquitinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yaling; Chen, Jianfei; Tu, Jian; Zhang, Bailing; Chen, Xiaojuan; Shi, Hongyan; Baker, Susan C; Feng, Li; Chen, Zhongbin

    2013-07-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is the cause of an economically important swine disease. Previous studies suggested that PEDV does not elicit a robust IFN response, but the mechanism(s) used to evade or block this innate immune response was not known. In this study, we found that PEDV infection blocked synthetic dsRNA-induced IFN-β production by interfering with the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). We identified PEDV replicase encoded papain-like protease 2 (PLP2) as an IFN antagonist that depends on catalytic activity for its function. We show that levels of ubiquitinated proteins are reduced during PEDV infection and that PEDV PLP2 has deubiquitinase (DUB) activity that recognizes and processes both K-48 and K-63 linked polyubiquitin chains. Furthermore, we found that PEDV PLP2 strongly inhibits RIG-I- and STING-activated IFN expression and that PEDV PLP2 can be co-immunoprecipitated with and deubiquitinates RIG-I and STING, the key components of the signalling pathway for IFN expression. These results show that PEDV infection suppresses production of IFN-β and provides evidence indicating that the PEDV papain-like protease 2 acts as a viral DUB to interfere with the RIG-I- and STING-mediated signalling pathway.

  16. Pulmonary Proteases in the Cystic Fibrosis Lung Induce Interleukin 8 Expression from Bronchial Epithelial Cells via a Heme/Meprin/Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Toll-like Receptor Pathway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cosgrove, Sonya

    2011-03-04

    A high intrapulmonary protease burden is characteristic of cystic fibrosis (CF), and the resulting dysregulation of the protease\\/anti-protease balance has serious implications for inflammation in the CF lung. Because of this inflammation, micro-bleeds can occur releasing hemoglobin into the lung. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the protease-rich environment of the CF lung on human hemoglobin and to assess the proinflammatory effect of heme on CF bronchial epithelium. Here, we show that the Pseudomonas proteases (Pseudomonas elastase and alkaline protease) and the neutrophil proteases (neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase-3) are capable of almost complete degradation of hemoglobin in vitro but that NE is the predominant protease that cleaves hemoglobin in vivo in CF bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. One of the effects of this is the release of heme, and in this study we show that heme stimulates IL-8 and IL-10 protein production from ΔF508 CFBE41o(-) bronchial epithelial cells. In addition, heme-induced IL-8 expression utilizes a novel pathway involving meprin, EGF receptor, and MyD88. Meprin levels are elevated in CF cell lines and bronchial brushings, thus adding to the proinflammatory milieu. Interestingly, α(1)-antitrypsin, in addition to its ability to neutralize NE and protease-3, can also bind heme and neutralize heme-induced IL-8 from CFBE41o(-) cells. This study illustrates the proinflammatory effects of micro-bleeds in the CF lung, the process by which this occurs, and a potential therapeutic intervention.

  17. Pulmonary proteases in the cystic fibrosis lung induce interleukin 8 expression from bronchial epithelial cells via a heme/meprin/epidermal growth factor receptor/Toll-like receptor pathway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cosgrove, Sonya

    2012-02-01

    A high intrapulmonary protease burden is characteristic of cystic fibrosis (CF), and the resulting dysregulation of the protease\\/anti-protease balance has serious implications for inflammation in the CF lung. Because of this inflammation, micro-bleeds can occur releasing hemoglobin into the lung. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the protease-rich environment of the CF lung on human hemoglobin and to assess the proinflammatory effect of heme on CF bronchial epithelium. Here, we show that the Pseudomonas proteases (Pseudomonas elastase and alkaline protease) and the neutrophil proteases (neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase-3) are capable of almost complete degradation of hemoglobin in vitro but that NE is the predominant protease that cleaves hemoglobin in vivo in CF bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. One of the effects of this is the release of heme, and in this study we show that heme stimulates IL-8 and IL-10 protein production from DeltaF508 CFBE41o(-) bronchial epithelial cells. In addition, heme-induced IL-8 expression utilizes a novel pathway involving meprin, EGF receptor, and MyD88. Meprin levels are elevated in CF cell lines and bronchial brushings, thus adding to the proinflammatory milieu. Interestingly, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, in addition to its ability to neutralize NE and protease-3, can also bind heme and neutralize heme-induced IL-8 from CFBE41o(-) cells. This study illustrates the proinflammatory effects of micro-bleeds in the CF lung, the process by which this occurs, and a potential therapeutic intervention.

  18. Linkage between PTK Signaling Pathway “Crosstalking” and Caspase-3/ CPP32-1ike Proteases Activation in Signaling Transduction of CD4+ T Lymphocytes Apoptosis Induced by Superantigen SEB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊世勤; 朱锡华

    2003-01-01

    Exposure of naive murine CD4+ T lymphocytes to superantigen such as staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) induces a strong proliferative response. Prolonged exposure or subsequent restimulation of the responding T cell population with SEB leads to the apoptotic events of activation-induced cell death (AICD). The signaling mechanism responsible for the AICD is a target of intensive investigation. However, the precise downstream signahng pathways of SEB-induced AICD remains unclear. Our results here show that the sequential activation of caspase-1/ICE-hke and caspase-3/CPP32-hke cysteine proteases probably plays a role in the signaling transduction of SEB-induced AICD, but caspase-3/CPP32-hke proteases activation does not depend on caspase-1-like proteases activation. Herbimycin A, a specific inhibitor of protein tyresine kinases,inhibit caspase-3/CPP32-1ike cysteine proteases activation. However, it does not prevent DNA fragmentation of CD4+ Tcells apoptosis induced by SEB. These results indicate that protein tyrosine kinases pathway is probably involved in the signaling transduction of CD4+ T cells apoptosis induced by SEB and “crosstalks” with the pathway of caspase-3/CPP32-1ike proteases activation.

  19. Protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a polypeptide exhibiting a protease inhibitory activity and uses of said polypeptide in methods for inhibiting, directly or indirectly, one or more proteases of the blood clotting cascade. The invention also relates to use of said polypeptide as a pharmaceutical e...

  20. Supermarket Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  1. Essential role of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in protease activated receptor 2-mediated nitric-oxide production from rat primary astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gyu Hwan; Jeon, Se Jin; Ryu, Jae Ryun; Choi, Min Sik; Han, Seol-Heui; Yang, Sung-Il; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Shin, Chan Young; Ko, Kwang Ho

    2009-09-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) play important roles in the regulation of brain function such as neuroinflammation by transmitting the signal from proteolytic enzymes such as thrombin and trypsin. We and others have reported that a member of the family, PAR-2 is activated by trypsin, whose involvement in the neurophysiological process is increasingly evident, and is involved in the neuroinflammatory processes including morphological changes of astrocytes. In this study, we investigated the role of PAR-2 in the production of nitric oxide (NO) in rat primary astrocytes. Treatment of PAR-2 agonist trypsin increased NO production in a dose-dependent manner, which was mediated by the induction of inducible nitric-oxide synthase. The trypsin-mediated production of NO was mimicked by PAR-2 agonist peptide and reduced by either pharmacological PAR-2 antagonist peptide or by siRNA-mediated inhibition of PAR-2 expression, which suggests the critical role of PAR-2 in this process. NO production by PAR-2 was mimicked by PMA, a PKC activator, and was attenuated by Go6976, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor. PAR-2 stimulation activated three subtypes of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs): extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK. NO production by PAR-2 was blocked by inhibition of ERK, p38, and JNK pathways. PAR-2 stimulation also activated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) DNA binding and transcriptional activity as well as IkappaBalpha phosphorylation. Inhibitors of NF-kappaB pathway inhibited PAR-2-mediated NO production. In addition, inhibitors of MAPK pathways prevented transcriptional activation of NF-kappaB reporter constructs. These results suggest that PAR-2 activation-mediated NO production in astrocytes is transduced by the activation of MAPKs followed by NF-kappaB pathways.

  2. Mouse Ficolin B Has an Ability to Form Complexes with Mannose-Binding Lectin-Associated Serine Proteases and Activate Complement through the Lectin Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Endo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ficolins are thought to be pathogen-associated-molecular-pattern-(PAMP- recognition molecules that function to support innate immunity. Like mannose-binding lectins (MBLs, most mammalian ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs, leading to complement activation via the lectin pathway. However, the ability of murine ficolin B, a homologue of human M-ficolin, to perform this function is still controversial. The results of the present study show that ficolin B in mouse bone marrow is an oligomeric protein. Ficolin B, pulled down using GlcNAc-agarose, contained very low, but detectable, amounts of MASP-2 and small MBL-associated protein (sMAP and showed detectable C4-deposition activity on immobilized N-acetylglucosamine. These biochemical features of ficolin B were confirmed using recombinant mouse ficolin B produced in CHO cells. Taken together, these results suggest that like other mammalian homologues, murine ficolin B has an ability to exert its function via the lectin pathway.

  3. SARS coronavirus papain-like protease inhibits the type I interferon signaling pathway through interaction with the STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojuan; Yang, Xingxing; Zheng, Yang; Yang, Yudong; Xing, Yaling; Chen, Zhongbin

    2014-05-01

    SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) develops an antagonistic mechanism by which to evade the antiviral activities of interferon (IFN). Previous studies suggested that SARS-CoV papain-like protease (PLpro) inhibits activation of the IRF3 pathway, which would normally elicit a robust IFN response, but the mechanism(s) used by SARS PLpro to inhibit activation of the IRF3 pathway is not fully known. In this study, we uncovered a novel mechanism that may explain how SARS PLpro efficiently inhibits activation of the IRF3 pathway. We found that expression of the membrane-anchored PLpro domain (PLpro-TM) from SARS-CoV inhibits STING/TBK1/IKKε-mediated activation of type I IFNs and disrupts the phosphorylation and dimerization of IRF3, which are activated by STING and TBK1. Meanwhile, we showed that PLpro-TM physically interacts with TRAF3, TBK1, IKKε, STING, and IRF3, the key components that assemble the STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex for activation of IFN expression. However, the interaction between the components in STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex is disrupted by PLpro-TM. Furthermore, SARS PLpro-TM reduces the levels of ubiquitinated forms of RIG-I, STING, TRAF3, TBK1, and IRF3 in the STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex. These results collectively point to a new mechanism used by SARS-CoV through which PLpro negatively regulates IRF3 activation by interaction with STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex, yielding a SARS-CoV countermeasure against host innate immunity.

  4. Genome-Wide Survey of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 Reveals a Role for the Glyoxylate Pathway and Extracellular Proteases in the Utilization of Mucin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jeffrey M; Phan, Chi; Hunter, Ryan C

    2017-08-01

    Chronic airway infections by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are a major cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Although this bacterium has been extensively studied for its virulence determinants, biofilm growth, and immune evasion mechanisms, comparatively little is known about the nutrient sources that sustain its growth in vivo Respiratory mucins represent a potentially abundant bioavailable nutrient source, although we have recently shown that canonical pathogens inefficiently use these host glycoproteins as a growth substrate. However, given that P. aeruginosa, particularly in its biofilm mode of growth, is thought to grow slowly in vivo, the inefficient use of mucin glycoproteins may be relevant to its persistence within the CF airways. To this end, we used whole-genome fitness analysis, combining transposon mutagenesis with high-throughput sequencing, to identify genetic determinants required for P. aeruginosa growth using intact purified mucins as a sole carbon source. Our analysis reveals a biphasic growth phenotype, during which the glyoxylate pathway and amino acid biosynthetic machinery are required for mucin utilization. Secondary analyses confirmed the simultaneous liberation and consumption of acetate during mucin degradation and revealed a central role for the extracellular proteases LasB and AprA. Together, these studies describe a molecular basis for mucin-based nutrient acquisition by P. aeruginosa and reveal a host-pathogen dynamic that may contribute to its persistence within the CF airways. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. SARS Coronavirus Papain-Like Protease Inhibits the TLR7 Signaling Pathway through Removing Lys63-Linked Polyubiquitination of TRAF3 and TRAF6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shih-Wen; Wang, Ching-Ying; Jou, Yu-Jen; Huang, Su-Hua; Hsiao, Li-Hsin; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Kung, Szu-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2016-05-05

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) papain-like protease (PLPro) reportedly inhibits the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) pathways. The study investigated the inhibitory effect and its antagonistic mechanism of SARS-CoV PLPro on TLR7-mediated cytokine production. TLR7 agonist (imiquimod (IMQ)) concentration-dependently induced activation of ISRE-, NF-κB- and AP-1-luciferase reporters, as well as the production of IFN-α, IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 in human promonocyte cells. However, SARS-CoV PLPro significantly inhibited IMQ-induced cytokine production through suppressing the activation of transcription factors IRF-3, NF-κB and AP-1. Western blot analysis with anti-Lys48 and anti-Lys63 ubiquitin antibodies indicated the SARS-CoV PLPro removed Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains of TRAF3 and TRAF6, but not Lys48-linked ubiquitin chains in un-treated and treated cells. The decrease in the activated state of TRAF3 and TRAF6 correlated with the inactivation of TBK1 in response to IMQ by PLPro. The results revealed that the antagonism of SARS-CoV PLPro on TLR7-mediated innate immunity was associated with the negative regulation of TRAF3/6-TBK1-IRF3/NF-κB/AP1 signals.

  6. Hemagglutinin protease secreted by V. cholerae induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells by ROS mediated intrinsic pathway and regresses tumor growth in mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Tanusree; Chakrabarti, Monoj Kumar; Pal, Amit

    2016-02-01

    Conventional anticancer therapies are effective but have side effects, so alternative targets are being developed. Bacterial toxins that can kill cells or alter the cellular processes like proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation have been reported for cancer treatment. In this study we have shown antitumor activity of hemagglutinin protease (HAP) secreted by Vibrio cholerae. One µg of HAP showed potent antitumor activity when injected into Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) tumors in Swiss albino mice. Weekly administration of this dose is able to significantly diminish a large tumor volume within 3 weeks and increases the survival rates of cancerous mice. HAP showed apoptotic activity on EAC and other malignant cells. Increased level of pro-apoptotic p53 with increased ratio of pro-apoptotic Bax to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 signify that HAP induced apoptogenic signals lead to death of the tumor cells. In vivo and ex vivo studies suggest that mitochondrial dependent intrinsic pathway is responsible for this apoptosis. The level of ROS in malignant cells is reported to be higher than the normal healthy cells. HAP induces oxidative stress and increases the level of ROS in malignant cells which is significantly higher than the normal healthy cells. As a result the malignant cells cross the threshold level of ROS for cell survival faster than normal healthy cells. This mechanism causes HAP mediated apoptosis in malignant cells, but normal cells remain unaltered in the same environment. Our study suggests that HAP may be used as a new candidate drug for cancer therapy.

  7. SARS coronavirus papain-like protease induces Egr-1-dependent up-regulation of TGF-β1 via ROS/p38 MAPK/STAT3 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shih-Wein; Wang, Ching-Ying; Jou, Yu-Jen; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Huang, Su-Hua; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2016-05-13

    SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) papain-like protease (PLpro) has been identified in TGF-β1 up-regulation in human promonocytes (Proteomics 2012, 12: 3193-205). This study investigates the mechanisms of SARS-CoV PLpro-induced TGF-β1 promoter activation in human lung epithelial cells and mouse models. SARS-CoV PLpro dose- and time-dependently up-regulates TGF-β1 and vimentin in A549 cells. Dual luciferase reporter assays with TGF-β1 promoter plasmids indicated that TGF-β1 promoter region between -175 to -60, the Egr-1 binding site, was responsible for TGF-β1 promoter activation induced by SARS-CoV PLpro. Subcellular localization analysis of transcription factors showed PLpro triggering nuclear translocation of Egr-1, but not NF-κB and Sp-1. Meanwhile, Egr-1 silencing by siRNA significantly reduced PLpro-induced up-regulation of TGF-β1, TSP-1 and pro-fibrotic genes. Furthermore, the inhibitors for ROS (YCG063), p38 MAPK (SB203580), and STAT3 (Stattic) revealed ROS/p38 MAPK/STAT3 pathway involving in Egr-1 dependent activation of TGF-β1 promoter induced by PLpro. In a mouse model with a direct pulmonary injection, PLpro stimulated macrophage infiltration into lung, up-regulating Egr-1, TSP-1, TGF-β1 and vimentin expression in lung tissues. The results revealed that SARS-CoV PLpro significantly triggered Egr-1 dependent activation of TGF-β1 promoter via ROS/p38 MAPK/STAT3 pathway, correlating with up-regulation of pro-fibrotic responses in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Protease-activated receptor-2 promotes kidney tubular epithelial inflammation by inhibiting autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chunyang; Zhang, Tao; Xiao, Xia; Shi, Yonghong; Duan, Huijun; Ren, Yunzhuo

    2017-08-02

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2), which belongs to a specific class of the G-protein-coupled receptors, is central to several inflammation processes. However, the precise molecular mechanism involved remains undefined. Autophagy has been previously shown to affect inflammation. In the present study, we examine the effect of PAR2 on kidney tubular epithelial autophagy and on autophagy-related inflammation and reveal the underlying mechanism involved. Autophagic activity and levels of autophagic marker LC3 were examined in human kidney tubular epithelial cells with PAR2 knockdown or overexpression. We administered the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor (rapamycin) or activator (MHY1485) to investigate the function of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mTOR pathway. We also used transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced HK-2 cell inflammation models to investigate the role of PAR2-associated autophagy in kidney tubular epithelial inflammation. PAR2 antagonist and rapamycin were administered to mice after unilateral ureteral obstruction to detect the correlations between PAR2, autophagy, and inflammation. Our results show that PAR2 overexpression in HK-2 cells led to a greater reduction in autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway activation and induces autophagy-related inflammation. Meanwhile, a knockdown of PAR2 via PAR2 RNAi transfection greatly increased autophagy and alleviated autophagy-associated inflammation. In unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) kidneys, PAR2 antagonist treatment greatly attenuated renal inflammation and interstitial injury by enhancing autophagy. Moreover, inhibition of mTOR, rapa, markedly increased autophagy and inhibited the UUO-induced inflammation. We conclude that PAR2 induces kidney tubular epithelial inflammation by inhibiting autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway. Our results are suggestive that PAR2 inhibition may play a role in the treatment of diseases with increased inflammatory

  9. Inactivation of genes encoding extracellular proteases in bacillus halodurans BhFC01 and the impact on its modified flagellin type III secretion pathway towards improving peptide expression

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Berger, E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available C-NC6 containing fractions were collected and protein precipitation was 21 performed with 10% TCA as described above. 22 23 24 25 11 One-dimensional SDS-PAGE and protease zymography. 1 Protein electrophoresis was performed in a vertical gel...). Following electrophoresis, the gels were stained using 5 colloidal Coomassie Blue G-250 gel stain (8). 6 7 For protease zymograms the different protease deficient strains were grown into stationary 8 phase (24 hours) in LB pH 8.5 at 37oC. Cells were...

  10. SARS Coronavirus Papain-Like Protease Inhibits the TLR7 Signaling Pathway through Removing Lys63-Linked Polyubiquitination of TRAF3 and TRAF6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Wen Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV papain-like protease (PLPro reportedly inhibits the production of type I interferons (IFNs and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 and retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I pathways. The study investigated the inhibitory effect and its antagonistic mechanism of SARS-CoV PLPro on TLR7-mediated cytokine production. TLR7 agonist (imiquimod (IMQ concentration-dependently induced activation of ISRE-, NF-κB- and AP-1-luciferase reporters, as well as the production of IFN-α, IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 in human promonocyte cells. However, SARS-CoV PLPro significantly inhibited IMQ-induced cytokine production through suppressing the activation of transcription factors IRF-3, NF-κB and AP-1. Western blot analysis with anti-Lys48 and anti-Lys63 ubiquitin antibodies indicated the SARS-CoV PLPro removed Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains of TRAF3 and TRAF6, but not Lys48-linked ubiquitin chains in un-treated and treated cells. The decrease in the activated state of TRAF3 and TRAF6 correlated with the inactivation of TBK1 in response to IMQ by PLPro. The results revealed that the antagonism of SARS-CoV PLPro on TLR7-mediated innate immunity was associated with the negative regulation of TRAF3/6-TBK1-IRF3/NF-κB/AP1 signals.

  11. Distinct pathways of mannan-binding lectin (MBL)- and C1-complex autoactivation revealed by reconstitution of MBL with recombinant MBL-associated serine protease-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorup-Jensen, T; Petersen, Steen Vang; Hansen, A G;

    2000-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) plays a pivotal role in innate immunity by activating complement after binding carbohydrate moieties on pathogenic bacteria and viruses. Structural similarities shared by MBL and C1 complexes and by the MBL- and C1q-associated serine proteases, MBL-associated serine...

  12. Proteases as Insecticidal Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Robert L. Harrison; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases from a variety of sources (viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects) have toxicity towards insects. Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. Many of these proteases are cysteine proteases, although insect-toxic...

  13. MALT1 protease: equilibrating immunity versus tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Bertossi, Arianna; Krappmann, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    MALT1 paracaspase links signaling cascades emanating from adaptive or innate immune receptors to the canonical NF-κB pathway. Now, Jaworski et al (2014) investigate the physiological role of MALT1 protease activity in mice. Besides the expected requirement of MALT1 activity for immune activation, the study unveils a novel function for MALT1 activity for the development of peripheral tolerance. Thus, MALT1 protease can act immunogenic or tolerogenic, and this interplay will be highly relevant ...

  14. The outer membrane protease PgtE of Salmonella enterica interferes with the alternative complement pathway by cleaving factors B and H

    OpenAIRE

    Rauna eRiva; Korhonen, Timo K.; Seppo eMeri

    2015-01-01

    The virulence factor PgtE is an outer membrane protease (omptin) of the zoonotic pathogen Salmonella enterica that causes diseases ranging from gastroenteritis to severe enteric fever. It is surface exposed in bacteria that have a short-chain, i.e., rough LPS, as observed e.g., in bacteria residing inside macrophages or just emerging from them. We investigated whether PgtE cleaves the complement factors B (B) and H (H), key proteins controlling formation and inactivation of the complement pro...

  15. The outer membrane protease PgtE of Salmonella enterica interferes with the alternative complement pathway by cleaving factors B and H

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauna eRiva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The virulence factor PgtE is an outer membrane protease (omptin of the zoonotic pathogen Salmonella enterica that causes diseases ranging from gastroenteritis to severe enteric fever. It is surface exposed in bacteria that have a short-chain, i.e. rough LPS, as observed e.g. in bacteria residing inside macrophages or just emerging from them. We investigated whether PgtE cleaves the complement factors B (B and H (H, key proteins controlling formation and inactivation of the complement protein C3b and thereby the activity of the complement system. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium or omptin-expressing recombinant E. coli bacteria were incubated with purified human complement proteins or recombinant H fragments. PgtE cleaved both B and H, whereas its close homolog Pla of Yersinia pestis cleaved only H. H was cleaved at both N- and C-termini, while the central region resisted proteolysis. Because of multiple effects of PgtE on complement components (cleavage of C3, C3b, B and H we assessed its effect on the opsonophagocytosis of Salmonella. In human serum, C3 cleavage was dependent on proteolytically active PgtE. Human neutrophils interacted less with serum-opsonized FITC-stained S. enterica 14028R than with the isogenic ΔpgtE strain, as analyzed by flow cytometry. In conclusion, cleavage of B and H by PgtE, together with C3 cleavage, affects the C3-mediated recognition of S. enterica by human neutrophils, thus thwarting the immune protection against Salmonella.

  16. Novel fungal protease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buxton, F.; Jarai, G.; Visser, J.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a novel DNA sequence coding for an Aspergillus serine protease of the subtilisin-type, an Aspergillus serine protease of the subtilisin-type per se and a method for the preparation thereof. The invention further concerns a novel Aspergillus mutant strain defective in a

  17. Coagulation factor VIIa-mediated protease-activated receptor 2 activation leads to β-catenin accumulation via the AKT/GSK3β pathway and contributes to breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Abhishek; Ansari, Shabbir A; Das, Kaushik; Prasad, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Anindita; Mallik, Suman; Mukherjee, Ashis; Sen, Prosenjit

    2017-08-18

    Cell migration and invasion are very characteristic features of cancer cells that promote metastasis, which is one of the most common causes of mortality among cancer patients. Emerging evidence has shown that coagulation factors can directly mediate cancer-associated complications either by enhancing thrombus formation or by initiating various signaling events leading to metastatic cancer progression. It is well established that, apart from its distinct role in blood coagulation, coagulation factor FVIIa enhances aggressive behaviors of breast cancer cells, but the underlying signaling mechanisms still remain elusive. To this end, we investigated FVIIa's role in the migration and invasiveness of the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Consistent with previous observations, we observed that FVIIa increased the migratory and invasive potential of these cells. We also provide molecular evidence that protease-activated receptor 2 activation followed by PI3K-AKT activation and GSK3β inactivation is involved in these processes and that β-catenin, a well known tumor-regulatory protein, contributes to this signaling pathway. The pivotal role of β-catenin was further indicated by the up-regulation of its downstream targets cyclin D1, c-Myc, COX-2, MMP-7, MMP-14, and Claudin-1. β-Catenin knockdown almost completely attenuated the FVIIa-induced enhancement of breast cancer migration and invasion. These findings provide a new perspective to counteract the invasive behavior of breast cancer, indicating that blocking PI3K-AKT pathway-dependent β-catenin accumulation may represent a potential therapeutic approach to control breast cancer. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing....... These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  19. Expression and functions of proteases in vascular tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, H Earl; Zhao, Mingzhe; Beers, Eric P

    2012-05-01

    With the emergence of new models for wood formation and the increasing emphasis on improving the efficiency of cellulosic biofuel production, research on vascular tissue biology has intensified in recent years. Some of the most active areas of research focus on manipulating activity of enzymes in the cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin pathways. In addition, great strides have been made in the characterization of transcriptional networks controlling genes that affect differentiation, secondary cell wall synthesis and programmed cell death in xylem. Less attention has been devoted to the characterization of proteases that may be important regulators of post-translational events that affect vascular cell differentiation and function and cell wall composition. Several genes for proteases and components of the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway are upregulated in xylem and phloem and in cell culture systems for studying the differentiation of xylem tracheary elements (TEs). Although small molecule protease inhibitors have been used to explore the roles of proteases during the differentiation of cultured TEs, only a small number of vascular tissue-associated protease genes have been directly tested to determine whether they play roles in vascular tissue biology. In this report, we review roles for proteases in vascular cell differentiation and function as determined through the use of protease inhibitors and genetic analyses and conclude by identifying opportunities for future research in this area. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  20. Proteases in Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Sokolonski ANTON

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The caries and the periodontal disease (PD are the most frequent alterations in the oral cavity. The PD presents two stages: gengivitis and periodontitis. The destruction of collagenous fibers which encases the tooth onto the alveolar bone is characteristic of the pariodontitis. The inclusion loss caused by this pathology is due to the presence of bacteria and their products, besides the tissue destruction. This process is caused by excessive discharge of cells of the organism defence which reach the damaged area, and among these cells are neutrophils. These cells free lysosomal granule, where enzymes known as proteases (elastase, colagenasis and catepsin G are present. When excessively delivered, they cause extensive tissue destruction. The organism innate defence respond to this process activating anti-proteases, such as alfa-1-antitripsin e alfa-2-macrogoblulin, and, as consequence, the inflammatory process is subdued. Objective: Revision of the literature on periodontitis and its markers. In periodontitis, the balance between protease and anti-protese seems to be altered and lead to the appearance of these ones. There is an increase of prevalence of PD in the world population. In recent times, it has been associated to systemic conditions that lead to tissue destruction. Perhaps, the cause is based on an exacerbated tissue reaction, more than on the bacterial aggression. Conclusion: The predisposition of the organism is an important factor for the disease development. At reading different studies, it was observed that the discharged protease during the neutrophils degranulation process has internal, not bacterial, origin.

  1. Death proteases come alive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Cell death in plants exhibits morphological features comparable to caspase-mediated apoptosis in animals, suggesting that plant cell death is executed by (caspase-like) proteases. However, to date, no caspase homologues have been identified in plants and therefore the existence and nature of these p

  2. Cross genome comparisons of serine proteases in Arabidopsis and rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowdhamini R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteases are one of the largest groups of proteolytic enzymes found across all kingdoms of life and are associated with several essential physiological pathways. The availability of Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa genome sequences has permitted the identification and comparison of the repertoire of serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species. Results Despite the differences in genome sizes between Arabidopsis and rice, we identified a very similar number of serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species (206 and 222, respectively. Nearly 40% of the above sequences were identified as potential orthologues. Atypical members could be identified in the plant genomes for Deg, Clp, Lon, rhomboid proteases and species-specific members were observed for the highly populated subtilisin and serine carboxypeptidase families suggesting multiple lateral gene transfers. DegP proteases, prolyl oligopeptidases, Clp proteases and rhomboids share a significantly higher percentage orthology between the two genomes indicating substantial evolutionary divergence was set prior to speciation. Single domain architectures and paralogues for several putative subtilisins, serine carboxypeptidases and rhomboids suggest they may have been recruited for additional roles in secondary metabolism with spatial and temporal regulation. The analysis reveals some domain architectures unique to either or both of the plant species and some inactive proteases, like in rhomboids and Clp proteases, which could be involved in chaperone function. Conclusion The systematic analysis of the serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species has provided some insight into the possible functional associations of previously uncharacterised serine protease-like proteins. Further investigation of these aspects may prove beneficial in our understanding of similar processes in commercially significant crop plant species.

  3. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer C; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis.

  4. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer C.; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis. PMID:26667078

  5. Toxoplasma gondii aspartic protease 1 is not essential in tachyzoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonais, Valerie; Shea, Michael; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2011-08-01

    Aspartic proteases are important virulence factors for pathogens and are recognized as attractive drug targets. Seven aspartic proteases (ASPs) have been identified in Toxoplasma gondii genome. Bioinformatics and phylogenetic analyses regroup them into five monophyletic groups. Among them, TgASP1, a coccidian specific aspartic protease related to the food vacuole plasmepsins, is associated with the secretory pathway in non-dividing cells and relocalizes in close proximity to the nascent inner membrane complex (IMC) of daughter cells during replication. Despite a potential role for TgASP1 in IMC formation, the generation of a conventional knockout of the TgASP1 gene revealed that this protease is not required for T. gondii tachyzoite survival or for proper IMC biogenesis.

  6. From proteases to proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurath, H

    2001-04-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950-2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments).

  7. Nucleic Acid Aptamers Against Proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, D M; Andersen, L M; Bøtkjær, Kenneth Alrø

    2011-01-01

    Proteases are potential or realized therapeutic targets in a wide variety of pathological conditions. Moreover, proteases are classical subjects for studies of enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms. We here review the literature on nucleic acid aptamers selected with proteases as targets. Designing...... strategies and of new principles for regulating the activity of the inhibitory action of aptamers of general interest to researchers working with nucleic acid aptamers...

  8. Cathepsin proteases in Toxoplasma gondii

    OpenAIRE

    Dou, Zhicheng; Carruthers, Vern B.

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are important for the growth and survival of apicomplexan parasites that infect humans. The apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii expresses five members of the C1 family of cysteine proteases, including one cathepsin L-like (TgCPL), one cathepsin B-like (TgCPB), and three cathepsin C-like (TgCPC1, 2 and 3) proteases. Recent genetic, biochemical and structural studies reveal that cathepsins function in microneme and rhoptry protein maturation, host cell invasion, replication, and n...

  9. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  10. Nucleic Acid Aptamers Against Proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, D M; Andersen, L M; Bøtkjær, Kenneth Alrø

    2011-01-01

    -specifically, for instance with vastly different affinities to zymogen and active enzyme forms. Furthermore, aptamers can be selected to inhibit the enzyme activity of the target proteases, but also to inhibit functionally important exosite interactions, for instance cofactor binding. Several protease-inhibiting aptamers......, directed against blood coagulation factors, are in clinical trials as anticoagulant drugs. Several of the studies on protease-binding aptamers have been pioneering and trend-setting in the field. The work with protease-binding aptamers also demonstrates many interesting examples of non-standard selection...

  11. Protease signaling in animal and plant-regulated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvesen, Guy S; Hempel, Anne; Coll, Nuria S

    2016-07-01

    This review aims to highlight the proteases required for regulated cell death mechanisms in animals and plants. The aim is to be incisive, and not inclusive of all the animal proteases that have been implicated in various publications. The review also aims to focus on instances when several publications from disparate groups have demonstrated the involvement of an animal protease, and also when there is substantial biochemical, mechanistic and genetic evidence. In doing so, the literature can be culled to a handful of proteases, covering most of the known regulated cell death mechanisms: apoptosis, regulated necrosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis and NETosis in animals. In plants, the literature is younger and not as extensive as for mammals, although the molecular drivers of vacuolar death, necrosis and the hypersensitive response in plants are becoming clearer. Each of these death mechanisms has at least one proteolytic component that plays a major role in controlling the pathway, and sometimes they combine in networks to regulate cell death/survival decision nodes. Some similarities are found among animal and plant cell death proteases but, overall, the pathways that they govern are kingdom-specific with very little overlap. © 2015 FEBS.

  12. Cathepsin proteases in Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Zhicheng; Carruthers, Vern B.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are important for the growth and survival of apicomplexan parasites that infect humans. The apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii expresses five members of the C1 family of cysteine proteases, including one cathepsin L-like (TgCPL), one cathepsin B-like (TgCPB), and three cathepsin C-like (TgCPC1, 2 and 3) proteases. Recent genetic, biochemical and structural studies reveal that cathepsins function in microneme and rhoptry protein maturation, host cell invasion, replication, and nutrient acquisition.. Here, we review the key features and roles of T. gondii cathepsins and discuss the therapeutic potential for specific inhibitor development. PMID:21660658

  13. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jong W.; Hoffman, Sandy; Beal, Allison M.; Dykon, Angela; Ringenberg, Michael A.; Hughes, Anna C.; Dare, Lauren; Anderson, Amber D.; Finger, Joshua; Kasparcova, Viera; Rickard, David; Berger, Scott B.; Ramanjulu, Joshi; Emery, John G.; Gough, Peter J.; Bertin, John; Foley, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 protease inhibitors with suitable pharmacologic properties. To fully investigate the role of MALT1 protease activity, we generated mice homozygous for a protease-dead mutation in MALT1. We found that some, but not all, MALT1 functions in immune cells were dependent upon its protease activity. Protease-dead mice had defects in the generation of splenic marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells displayed decreased T cell receptor-stimulated proliferation and IL-2 production while B cell receptor-stimulated proliferation was partially dependent on protease activity. In dendritic cells, stimulation of cytokine production through the Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and Mincle C-type lectin receptors was also found to be partially dependent upon protease activity. In vivo, protease-dead mice had reduced basal immunoglobulin levels, and showed defective responses to immunization with T-dependent and T-independent antigens. Surprisingly, despite these decreased responses, MALT1 protease-dead mice, but not MALT1 null mice, developed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates in multiple organs, suggesting MALT1 protease activity plays a role in immune homeostasis. These findings highlight the importance of MALT1 protease activity in multiple immune cell types, and in integrating immune responses in vivo. PMID:25965667

  14. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong W Yu

    Full Text Available CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 protease inhibitors with suitable pharmacologic properties. To fully investigate the role of MALT1 protease activity, we generated mice homozygous for a protease-dead mutation in MALT1. We found that some, but not all, MALT1 functions in immune cells were dependent upon its protease activity. Protease-dead mice had defects in the generation of splenic marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells displayed decreased T cell receptor-stimulated proliferation and IL-2 production while B cell receptor-stimulated proliferation was partially dependent on protease activity. In dendritic cells, stimulation of cytokine production through the Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and Mincle C-type lectin receptors was also found to be partially dependent upon protease activity. In vivo, protease-dead mice had reduced basal immunoglobulin levels, and showed defective responses to immunization with T-dependent and T-independent antigens. Surprisingly, despite these decreased responses, MALT1 protease-dead mice, but not MALT1 null mice, developed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates in multiple organs, suggesting MALT1 protease activity plays a role in immune homeostasis. These findings highlight the importance of MALT1 protease activity in multiple immune cell types, and in integrating immune responses in vivo.

  15. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jong W; Hoffman, Sandy; Beal, Allison M; Dykon, Angela; Ringenberg, Michael A; Hughes, Anna C; Dare, Lauren; Anderson, Amber D; Finger, Joshua; Kasparcova, Viera; Rickard, David; Berger, Scott B; Ramanjulu, Joshi; Emery, John G; Gough, Peter J; Bertin, John; Foley, Kevin P

    2015-01-01

    CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 protease inhibitors with suitable pharmacologic properties. To fully investigate the role of MALT1 protease activity, we generated mice homozygous for a protease-dead mutation in MALT1. We found that some, but not all, MALT1 functions in immune cells were dependent upon its protease activity. Protease-dead mice had defects in the generation of splenic marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells displayed decreased T cell receptor-stimulated proliferation and IL-2 production while B cell receptor-stimulated proliferation was partially dependent on protease activity. In dendritic cells, stimulation of cytokine production through the Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and Mincle C-type lectin receptors was also found to be partially dependent upon protease activity. In vivo, protease-dead mice had reduced basal immunoglobulin levels, and showed defective responses to immunization with T-dependent and T-independent antigens. Surprisingly, despite these decreased responses, MALT1 protease-dead mice, but not MALT1 null mice, developed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates in multiple organs, suggesting MALT1 protease activity plays a role in immune homeostasis. These findings highlight the importance of MALT1 protease activity in multiple immune cell types, and in integrating immune responses in vivo.

  16. Application of a cell-based protease assay for testing inhibitors of picornavirus 3C proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Lonneke; Ulferts, Rachel; Nabuurs, Sander B; Kusov, Yuri; Liu, Hong; George, Shyla; Lacroix, Céline; Goris, Nesya; Lefebvre, David; Lanke, Kjerstin H W; De Clercq, Kris; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytical cleavage of the picornaviral polyprotein is essential for viral replication. Therefore, viral proteases are attractive targets for anti-viral therapy. Most assays available for testing proteolytical activity of proteases are performed in vitro, using heterologously expressed proteases

  17. Use of the Protease Fluorescent Detection Kit to Determine Protease Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Cupp-Enyard, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    The Protease Fluorescent Detection Kit provides ready-to-use reagents for detecting the presence of protease activity. This simple assay to detect protease activity uses casein labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) as the substrate.

  18. Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors: roles in synaptic function and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonte, Antoine G; Sweatt, J David

    2011-08-17

    Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors have been intensively investigated in the periphery and their roles in a wide range of processes-coagulation, inflammation, and digestion, for example-have been well characterized (see Coughlin, 2000; Macfarlane et al., 2001; Molinari et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2008; Di Cera, 2009 for reviews). A growing number of studies demonstrate that these protein systems are widely expressed in many cell types and regions in mammalian brains. Accumulating lines of evidence suggest that the brain has co-opted the activities of these interesting proteins to regulate various processes underlying synaptic activity and behavior. In this review, we discuss emerging roles for serine proteases in the regulation of mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Orchestration of an uncommon maturation cascade of the house dust mite protease allergen quartet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Eve eDumez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In more than 20% of the world population, sensitization to house dust mite (HDM allergens triggers typical allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Amongst the 23 mite allergen groups hitherto identified, groups 1 are cysteine proteases belonging to the papain-like family whereas groups 3, 6 and 9 are serine proteases displaying trypsin, chymotrypsin and collagenolytic activities, respectively. While these proteases are more likely to be involved in the mite digestive system, they also play critical roles in the initiation and in the chronicity of the allergic response notably through the activation of innate immune pathways. All these allergenic proteases are expressed in mite as inactive precursor form. Until recently, the exact mechanisms of their maturation into active proteases remained to be fully elucidated. Recent breakthroughs in the understanding of the activation mechanisms of mite allergenic protease precursors have highlighted an uncommon and unique maturation pathway orchestrated by group 1 proteases that tightly regulates the proteolytic activities of groups 1, 3, 6 and 9 through complex intra- or intermolecular mechanisms. This review presents and discusses the currently available knowledge of the activation mechanisms of group 1, 3, 6 and 9 allergens of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus laying special emphasis on their localization, regulation and interconnection.

  20. The Molecular Basis for Ubiquitin and Ubiquitin-like Specificities in Bacterial Effector Proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Pruneda, Jonathan N.; Durkin, Charlotte H.; Geurink, Paul P.; Ovaa, Huib; Santhanam, Balaji; Holden, David W.; Komander, David

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pathogenic bacteria rely on secreted effector proteins to manipulate host signaling pathways, often in creative ways. CE clan proteases, specific hydrolases for ubiquitin-like modifications (SUMO and NEDD8) in eukaryotes, reportedly serve as bacterial effector proteins with deSUMOylase, deubiquitinase, or, even, acetyltransferase activities. Here, we characterize bacterial CE protease activities, revealing K63-linkage-specific deubiquitinases in human pathogens, such as Salmonella, Es...

  1. The mannan-binding lectin pathway and lung disease in cystic fibrosis--disfunction of mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2) may be a major modifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Jensenius, J C; Steffensen, R

    2006-01-01

    with no other precipitating factors. We suspect total MASP-2 dysfunction to be a major modifier of CF lung disease. However, heterozygosity for the D105G mutation of MASP-2 had no correlation to MBL pathway function or poor lung function. Lung function was higher in the MBL deficiency determining genotypes (XA/YO+YO/YO...

  2. The mannan-binding lectin pathway and lung disease in cystic fibrosis-disfunction of mannan-binding lectin-asssociated serine protease 2 (MASP-2) may be a major modifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H.V.; Jensenius, Jens Christian; Steffensen, R.

    2006-01-01

    with no other precipitating factors. We suspect total MASP-2 dysfunction to be a major modifier of CF lung disease. However, heterozygosity for the D105G mutation of MASP-2 had no correlation to MBL pathway function or poor lung function. Lung function was higher in the MBL deficiency determining genotypes (XA/YO+YO/YO...

  3. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  4. Biotechnology of cold-active proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-05-03

    The bulk of Earth's biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth's surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review.

  5. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulasi Satyanarayana

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review.

  6. Plant i - AAA protease controls the turnover of the essential mitochondrial protein import component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalińska, Magdalena; Parys, Katarzyna; Murcha, Monika W; Jańska, Hanna

    2017-03-06

    Mitochondria are multifunctional organelles that play a central role in energy metabolism. Due to life-essential functions of these organelles, mitochondrial content, quality, and dynamics are tightly controlled. Across the species, highly conserved ATP - dependent proteases prevent malfunction of mitochondria through versatile activities. This study focuses on a molecular function of plant mitochondrial inner membrane-embedded i - AAA protease, FTSH4, providing its first bona fide substrate. Here, we report that the abundance of Tim17-2 protein, the essential component of the TIM17:23 translocase, is directly controlled by the proteolytic activity of FTSH4. Plants that are lacking functional FTSH4 protease are characterized by significantly enhanced capacity of preprotein import through the TIM17:23 - dependent pathway. Together with the observation that FTSH4 prevents accumulation of Tim17-2, our data points towards the role of this i - AAA protease in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in plants.

  7. Protease-sensitive synthetic prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Colby

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prions arise when the cellular prion protein (PrP(C undergoes a self-propagating conformational change; the resulting infectious conformer is designated PrP(Sc. Frequently, PrP(Sc is protease-resistant but protease-sensitive (s prions have been isolated in humans and other animals. We report here that protease-sensitive, synthetic prions were generated in vitro during polymerization of recombinant (rec PrP into amyloid fibers. In 22 independent experiments, recPrP amyloid preparations, but not recPrP monomers or oligomers, transmitted disease to transgenic mice (n = 164, denoted Tg9949 mice, that overexpress N-terminally truncated PrP. Tg9949 control mice (n = 174 did not spontaneously generate prions although they were prone to late-onset spontaneous neurological dysfunction. When synthetic prion isolates from infected Tg9949 mice were serially transmitted in the same line of mice, they exhibited sPrP(Sc and caused neurodegeneration. Interestingly, these protease-sensitive prions did not shorten the life span of Tg9949 mice despite causing extensive neurodegeneration. We inoculated three synthetic prion isolates into Tg4053 mice that overexpress full-length PrP; Tg4053 mice are not prone to developing spontaneous neurological dysfunction. The synthetic prion isolates caused disease in 600-750 days in Tg4053 mice, which exhibited sPrP(Sc. These novel synthetic prions demonstrate that conformational changes in wild-type PrP can produce mouse prions composed exclusively of sPrP(Sc.

  8. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyanna O. L.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic analogs.

  9. Nelfinavir: fourth protease inhibitor approved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted accelerated approval to nelfinavir in both adult and pediatric formulations. Agouron, the manufacturer, used innovative computerized drug design techniques to discover, design, and refine the nelfinavir molecule. Nelfinavir is marketed under the trade name Viracept, and costs $5,000 per year. Early clinical trials find it to be as powerful as the other protease inhibitors, but with a different resistance profile. The drug has relatively few drug indications; however, several compounds have been contraindicated.

  10. Protease gene families in Populus and Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansson Stefan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteases play key roles in plants, maintaining strict protein quality control and degrading specific sets of proteins in response to diverse environmental and developmental stimuli. Similarities and differences between the proteases expressed in different species may give valuable insights into their physiological roles and evolution. Results We have performed a comparative analysis of protease genes in the two sequenced dicot genomes, Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa by using genes coding for proteases in the MEROPS database 1 for Arabidopsis to identify homologous sequences in Populus. A multigene-based phylogenetic analysis was performed. Most protease families were found to be larger in Populus than in Arabidopsis, reflecting recent genome duplication. Detailed studies on e.g. the DegP, Clp, FtsH, Lon, rhomboid and papain-Like protease families showed the pattern of gene family expansion and gene loss was complex. We finally show that different Populus tissues express unique suites of protease genes and that the mRNA levels of different classes of proteases change along a developmental gradient. Conclusion Recent gene family expansion and contractions have made the Arabidopsis and Populus complements of proteases different and this, together with expression patterns, gives indications about the roles of the individual gene products or groups of proteases.

  11. The Drosophila melanogaster seminal fluid protease "seminase" regulates proteolytic and post-mating reproductive processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke A LaFlamme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteases and protease inhibitors have been identified in the ejaculates of animal taxa ranging from invertebrates to mammals and form a major protein class among Drosophila melanogaster seminal fluid proteins (SFPs. Other than a single protease cascade in mammals that regulates seminal clot liquefaction, no proteolytic cascades (i.e. pathways with at least two proteases acting in sequence have been identified in seminal fluids. In Drosophila, SFPs are transferred to females during mating and, together with sperm, are necessary for the many post-mating responses elicited in females. Though several SFPs are proteolytically cleaved either during or after mating, virtually nothing is known about the proteases involved in these cleavage events or the physiological consequences of proteolytic activity in the seminal fluid on the female. Here, we present evidence that a protease cascade acts in the seminal fluid of Drosophila during and after mating. Using RNAi to knock down expression of the SFP CG10586, a predicted serine protease, we show that it acts upstream of the SFP CG11864, a predicted astacin protease, to process SFPs involved in ovulation and sperm entry into storage. We also show that knockdown of CG10586 leads to lower levels of egg laying, higher rates of sexual receptivity to subsequent males, and abnormal sperm usage patterns, processes that are independent of CG11864. The long-term phenotypes of females mated to CG10586 knockdown males are similar to those of females that fail to store sex peptide, an important elicitor of long-term post-mating responses, and indicate a role for CG10586 in regulating sex peptide. These results point to an important role for proteolysis among insect SFPs and suggest that protease cascades may be a mechanism for precise temporal regulation of multiple post-mating responses in females.

  12. Structure and mechanism of rhomboid protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ya; Akiyama, Yoshinori; Xue, Yi

    2013-05-31

    Rhomboid protease was first discovered in Drosophila. Mutation of the fly gene interfered with growth factor signaling and produced a characteristic phenotype of a pointed head skeleton. The name rhomboid has since been widely used to describe a large family of related membrane proteins that have diverse biological functions but share a common catalytic core domain composed of six membrane-spanning segments. Most rhomboid proteases cleave membrane protein substrates near the N terminus of their transmembrane domains. How these proteases function within the confines of the membrane is not completely understood. Recent progress in crystallographic analysis of the Escherichia coli rhomboid protease GlpG in complex with inhibitors has provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism of the protease and its conformational change. Improved biochemical assays have also identified a substrate sequence motif that is specifically recognized by many rhomboid proteases.

  13. Proteolytic crosstalk in multi-protease networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Curtis T.; Mather, William H.

    2016-04-01

    Processive proteases, such as ClpXP in E. coli, are conserved enzyme assemblies that can recognize and rapidly degrade proteins. These proteases are used for a number of purposes, including degrading mistranslated proteins and controlling cellular stress response. However, proteolytic machinery within the cell is limited in capacity and can lead to a bottleneck in protein degradation, whereby many proteins compete (‘queue’) for proteolytic resources. Previous work has demonstrated that such queueing can lead to pronounced statistical relationships between different protein counts when proteins compete for a single common protease. However, real cells contain many different proteases, e.g. ClpXP, ClpAP, and Lon in E. coli, and it is not clear how competition between proteins for multiple classes of protease would influence the dynamics of cellular networks. In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate that a multi-protease proteolytic bottleneck can substantially couple the dynamics for both simple and complex (oscillatory) networks, even between substrates with substantially different affinities for protease. For these networks, queueing often leads to strong positive correlations between protein counts, and these correlations are strongest near the queueing theoretic point of balance. Furthermore, we find that the qualitative behavior of these networks depends on the relative size of the absolute affinity of substrate to protease compared to the cross affinity of substrate to protease, leading in certain regimes to priority queue statistics.

  14. Mass spectrometry-assisted protease substrate screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlüter, Hartmut; Rykl, Jana; Thiemann, Joachim;

    2007-01-01

    Since sequencing of the human genome was completed, more than 500 genes have been annotated as proteases. Exploring the physiological role of each protease requires the identification of their natural substrates. However, the endogenous substrates of many of the human proteases are as yet unknown....... Here we describe a new assay that addresses this problem. The assay, which easily can be automated, is based on the incubation of immobilized protein fractions, which may contain the natural substrate, with a defined protease. After concentrating the proteolytically released peptides by reversed...

  15. Cysteine protease activation and apoptosis in Murine norovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettayebi Khalil

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses are the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis. Because a suitable in vitro culture system for the human virus has yet to be developed, many basic details of the infection process are unknown. Murine norovirus (MNV serves as a model system for the study of norovirus infection. Recently it was shown that infection of RAW 264.7 cells involved a novel apoptotic pathway involving survivin. Results Using a different set of approaches, the up-regulation of caspases, DNA condensation/fragmentation, and membrane blebbing, all of which are markers of apoptosis, were confirmed. Live cell imaging and activity-based protein profiling showed that activation of caspase-like proteases occurred within two hours of infection, followed by morphological changes to the cells. MNV infection in the presence of caspase inhibitors proceeded via a distinct pathway of rapid cellular necrosis and reduced viral production. Affinity purification of activity-based protein profiling targets and identification by peptide mass fingerprinting showed that the cysteine protease cathepsin B was activated early in infection, establishing this protein as an upstream activator of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conclusion This work adds cathepsin B to the noncanonical programmed cell death induced by MNV, and provides data suggesting that the virus may induce apoptosis to expand the window of time for viral replication. This work also highlights the significant power of activity-based protein profiling in the study of viral pathogenesis.

  16. Targeting exosites on blood coagulation proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Robson Q.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The high specificity of blood coagulation proteases has been attributed not only to residues surrounding the active site but also to other surface domains that are involved in recognizing and interacting with macromolecular substrates and inhibitors. Specific blood coagulation inhibitors obtained from exogenous sources such as blood sucking salivary glands and snake venoms have been identified. Some of these inhibitors interact with exosites on coagulation enzymes. Two examples are discussed in this short revision. Bothrojaracin is a snake venom-derived protein that binds to thrombin exosites 1 and 2. Complex formation impairs several exosite-dependent activities of thrombin including fibrinogen cleavage and platelet activation. Bothrojaracin also interacts with proexosite 1 on prothrombin thus decreasing the zymogen activation by the prothrombinase complex (FXa/FVa. Ixolaris is a two Kunitz tick salivary gland inhibitor, that is homologous to tissue factor pathway inhibitor. Recently it was demonstrated that ixolaris binds to heparin-binding exosite of FXa, thus impairing the recognition of prothrombin by the enzyme. In addition, ixolaris interacts with FX possibly through the heparin-binding proexosite. Differently from FX, the ixolaris-FX complex is not recognized as substrate by the intrinsic tenase complex (FIXa/FVIIIa. We conclude that these inhibitors may serve as tools for the study of coagulation exosites as well as prototypes for new anticoagulant drugs.

  17. Dimerization and protease resistance: new insight into the function of PR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shunwen; Faris, Justin D; Sherwood, Robert; Edwards, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    The group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins have long been considered hallmarks of hypersensitive response/defense pathways in plants, but their biochemical functions are still obscure despite resolution of the NMR/X-ray structures of several PR-1-like proteins, including P14a (the prototype PR-1). We report here the characterization of two basic PR-1 proteins (PR-1-1 and PR-1-5) recently identified from hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum). Both proteins were expressed in Pichia pastoris as a single major species of ∼15 kDa. Sequence identity of the expressed PR-1 proteins was verified by MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis. Accumulation of the native PR-1-5 protein in pathogen-challenged wheat was confirmed by protein gel blot analysis. Low-temperature SDS-PAGE and yeast two-hybrid assays revealed that PR-1-1 exists primarily as a monomer whereas PR-1-5 forms homodimers. Both PR-1 proteins are resistant to proteases compared to bovine serum albumin, but PR-1-1 shows resistance mainly to subtilisin and protease K (serine proteases) whereas PR-1-5 shows resistance to subtilisin, protease K and papain (a cysteine protease). Site-specific mutations at the five putative active sites in the PR-1 domain all affected dimerization, with the mutations at Glu-72 and Glu-102 (in the PR-1-5 numeration) also diminishing protease resistance. Sequence analysis revealed that the Glu-72 and Glu-102 residues are located in motif-like sequences that are conserved in both PR-1 and the human apoptosis-related caspase proteins. These findings prompt us to examine the function of PR-1 for a role in protease-mediated programmed cell death pathways in plants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang;

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...

  19. Immobilization to prevent enzyme incompatibility with proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossenberg, P.; Beeftink, H.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Tramper, J.

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme incompatibility is a problem in multi-enzyme processes that involve a non-specific protease, such as Alcalase. An example is the one-pot enzymatic synthesis of peptides catalyzed by a lipase and a protease. The incompatibility between lipase B from Candida antarctica (CalB) and Alcalase was

  20. Protease-degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibres are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases. Here we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose-dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fibre populations support selective fibre degradation based on individual fibre degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  1. PROTEASES AND PROTEASE INHIBITORS INTERACTION: DEFENCE STRATEGY AGAINST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S.DHANDE 1 N.J.CHIKHALE 2

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: An increase in crop yield, its management and preservation are among the main challenges standing before the human population that exceed 10 billion by the mid of 21 st  century.  Every year, considerable agricultural losses occur due to repeated practices of cultivation of large genetically similar populations.  Such cultivation practices favors incidence of more insect pests (Hilder and Boulter, 1999;  Oerke  et  al.,  1994;  Smith,  1999.  To  solve  these  problems,  current approaches  rely  on  use  of  synthetic  chemicals  like  fertilizers,  insecticides, herbicides,  fungicides  etc.  But  this  exerts  excessively  high  pressure  on environment  and  destabilizes  the  ecological  balance.  The  traditional  pest control method involves the use of conventional pesticides, most of which are non-specific and wipe out the entire community, pollutes the agro-ecosystem, and  increases  the  cost  of  production.  The  emergence  of  gene  transfer technology  has  solved  some  problems  regarding  overuse  of  chemical pesticides.  The  delta  endotoxin  encoding  gene  from  Bacillus  thuringiensis,  a gram positive soil borne bacteria transferred in crops has given little relief from coleopterans and lepidopterans attack.  Whereas, the insects belonging to these orders like Helicoverpa Sps. have developed resistance against Bt toxins. The other approach takes advantage of use of plant genes encoding defense proteins like protease inhibitors which is more appealing, simpler and safer (Dunaevsky et.  al.,  2005.  Proteinase  inhibitors  (PIs  are  naturally  occurring  proteins  in living organisms and are able to inhibit & control the activity of proteases. PIs act  on  an  active  site  of  digestive  proteolytic  enzymes  and  form  a  stable complex  unlike  enzyme-substrate  or  enzyme-product  weak  complexes  which

  2. Mast cell proteases as pharmacological targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughey, George H

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells are rich in proteases, which are the major proteins of intracellular granules and are released with histamine and heparin by activated cells. Most of these proteases are active in the granule as well as outside of the mast cell when secreted, and can cleave targets near degranulating mast cells and in adjoining tissue compartments. Some proteases released from mast cells reach the bloodstream and may have far-reaching actions. In terms of relative amounts, the major mast cell proteases include the tryptases, chymases, cathepsin G, carboxypeptidase A3, dipeptidylpeptidase I/cathepsin C, and cathepsins L and S. Some mast cells also produce granzyme B, plasminogen activators, and matrix metalloproteinases. Tryptases and chymases are almost entirely mast cell-specific, whereas other proteases, such as cathepsins G, C, and L are expressed by a variety of inflammatory cells. Carboxypeptidase A3 expression is a property shared by basophils and mast cells. Other proteases, such as mastins, are largely basophil-specific, although human basophils are protease-deficient compared with their murine counterparts. The major classes of mast cell proteases have been targeted for development of therapeutic inhibitors. Also, a human β-tryptase has been proposed as a potential drug itself, to inactivate of snake venins. Diseases linked to mast cell proteases include allergic diseases, such as asthma, eczema, and anaphylaxis, but also include non-allergic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune arthritis, atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and scarring diseases of lungs and other organs. In some cases, studies performed in mouse models suggest protective or homeostatic roles for specific proteases (or groups of proteases) in infections by bacteria, worms and other parasites, and even in allergic inflammation. At the same time, a clearer picture has emerged of differences in the

  3. Gene expression and activity of digestive proteases in Daphnia: effects of cyanobacterial protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The frequency of cyanobacterial blooms has increased worldwide, and these blooms have been claimed to be a major factor leading to the decline of the most important freshwater herbivores, i.e. representatives of the genus Daphnia. This suppression of Daphnia is partly attributed to the presence of biologically active secondary metabolites in cyanobacteria. Among these metabolites, protease inhibitors are found in almost every natural cyanobacterial bloom and have been shown to specifically inhibit Daphnia's digestive proteases in vitro, but to date no physiological responses of these serine proteases to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors in Daphnia have been reported in situ at the protein and genetic levels. Results Nine digestive proteases were detected in D. magna using activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Subsequent analyses by LC-MS/MS and database search led to the identification of respective protease genes. D. magna responded to dietary protease inhibitors by up-regulation of the expression of these respective proteases at the RNA-level and by the induction of new and less sensitive protease isoforms at the protein level. The up-regulation in response to dietary trypsin- and chymotrypsin-inhibitors ranged from 1.4-fold to 25.6-fold. These physiological responses of Daphnia, i.e. up-regulation of protease expression and the induction of isoforms, took place even after feeding on 20% cyanobacterial food for only 24 h. These physiological responses proved to be independent from microcystin effects. Conclusion Here for the first time it was shown in situ that a D. magna clone responds physiologically to dietary cyanobacterial protease inhibitors by phenotypic plasticity of the targets of these specific inhibitors, i.e. Daphnia gut proteases. These regulatory responses are adaptive for D. magna, as they increase the capacity for protein digestion in the presence of dietary protease inhibitors. The type and extent of these responses in protease expression might

  4. Caspase Family Proteases and Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Jun FAN; Li-Hui HAN; Ri-Shan CONG; Jin LIANG

    2005-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is an essential physiological process that plays a critical role in development and tissue homeostasis. The progress of apoptosis is regulated in an orderly way by a series of signal cascades under certain circumstances. The caspase-cascade system plays vital roles in the induction, transduction and amplification of intracellular apoptotic signals. Caspases, closely associated with apoptosis, are aspartate-specific cysteine proteases and members of the interleukin-1β-converting enzyme family. The activation and function of caspases, involved in the delicate caspase-cascade system, are regulated by various kinds of molecules, such as the inhibitor of apoptosis protein, Bcl-2 family proteins, calpain,and Ca2+. Based on the latest research, the members of the caspase family, caspase-cascade system and caspase-regulating molecules involved in apoptosis are reviewed.

  5. Biased signaling by peptide agonists of protease activated receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuhong; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Kok, W Mei; Lim, Junxian; Wu, Kai-Chen; Liu, Ligong; Hill, Timothy A; Suen, Jacky Y; Fairlie, David P

    2017-02-07

    Protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is associated with metabolism, obesity, inflammatory, respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders, pain, cancer and other diseases. The extracellular N-terminus of PAR2 is a common target for multiple proteases, which cleave it at different sites to generate different N-termini that activate different PAR2-mediated intracellular signaling pathways. There are no synthetic PAR2 ligands that reproduce the same signaling profiles and potencies as proteases. Structure-activity relationships here for 26 compounds spanned a signaling bias over 3 log units, culminating in three small ligands as biased agonist tools for interrogating PAR2 functions. DF253 (2f-LAAAAI-NH2) triggered PAR2-mediated calcium release (EC50 2 μM) but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation (EC50 > 100 μM) in CHO cells transfected with hPAR2. AY77 (Isox-Cha-Chg-NH2) was a more potent calcium-biased agonist (EC50 40 nM, Ca2+; EC50 2 μM, ERK1/2), while its analogue AY254 (Isox-Cha-Chg-A-R-NH2) was an ERK-biased agonist (EC50 2 nM, ERK1/2; EC50 80 nM, Ca2+). Signaling bias led to different functional responses in human colorectal carcinoma cells (HT29). AY254, but not AY77 or DF253, attenuated cytokine-induced caspase 3/8 activation, promoted scratch-wound healing and induced IL-8 secretion, all via PAR2-ERK1/2 signaling. Different ligand components were responsible for different PAR2 signaling and functions, clues that can potentially lead to drugs that modulate different pathway-selective cellular and physiological responses.

  6. The Trypanosoma cruzi protease cruzain mediates immune evasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia S Doyle

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease. Novel chemotherapy with the drug K11777 targets the major cysteine protease cruzain and disrupts amastigote intracellular development. Nevertheless, the biological role of the protease in infection and pathogenesis remains unclear as cruzain gene knockout failed due to genetic redundancy. A role for the T. cruzi cysteine protease cruzain in immune evasion was elucidated in a comparative study of parental wild type- and cruzain-deficient parasites. Wild type T. cruzi did not activate host macrophages during early infection (<60 min and no increase in ∼P iκB was detected. The signaling factor NF-κB P65 colocalized with cruzain on the cell surface of intracellular wild type parasites, and was proteolytically cleaved. No significant IL-12 expression occurred in macrophages infected with wild type T. cruzi and treated with LPS and BFA, confirming impairment of macrophage activation pathways. In contrast, cruzain-deficient parasites induced macrophage activation, detectable iκB phosphorylation, and nuclear NF-κB P65 localization. These parasites were unable to develop intracellularly and survive within macrophages. IL 12 expression levels in macrophages infected with cruzain-deficient T. cruzi were comparable to LPS activated controls. Thus cruzain hinders macrophage activation during the early (<60 min stages of infection, by interruption of the NF-κB P65 mediated signaling pathway. These early events allow T. cruzi survival and replication, and may lead to the spread of infection in acute Chagas' disease.

  7. Identification and developmental expression of Xenopus laevis SUMO proteases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Wang

    Full Text Available SUMO proteins are small ubiquitin-related modifiers. All SUMOs are synthesized as propeptides that are post-translationally cleaved prior to conjugation. After processing, SUMOs become covalently conjugated to cellular targets through a pathway that is similar to ubiquitination. Ubiquitin like protein proteases/Sentrin specific proteases (Ulp/SENPs mediate both processing and deconjugation of SUMOs. The action of Ulp/SENPs makes SUMOylation a highly dynamic post-translational modification. To investigate how Ulp/SENPs are regulated in a developmental context, we isolated and characterized all Ulp/SENPs in Xenopus laevis. Xenopus possess homologues of mammalian SENP3, 5, 6 and 7. All of these enzymes reacted with HA-tagged vinyl sulfone derivatives of SUMO-2 (HA-SU2-VS but not SUMO-1 (HA-SU1-VS, suggesting that they act primarily on SUMO-2 and -3. In contrast, Xenopus possess a single member of the SENP1/SENP2 subfamily of Ulp/SENPs, most closely related to mammalian SENP1. Xenopus SENP1 reacted with HA-SU1-VS and HA-SU2-VS, suggesting that it acts on all SUMO paralogues. We analyzed the mRNA and protein levels for each of the Ulp/SENPs through development; we found that they show distinct patterns of expression that may involve both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Finally, we have characterized the developmental function of the most abundant Ulp/SENP found within Xenopus eggs, SENP3. Depletion of SENP3 using morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (morpholinos caused accumulation of high molecular weight SUMO-2/3 conjugated species, defects in developing embryos and changes in the expression of some genes regulated by the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta pathway. These findings collectively indicate that SUMO proteases are both highly regulated and essential for normal development.

  8. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Monteiro de Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications.

  9. Gut proteases target Yersinia invasin in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freund Sandra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia enterocolitica is a common cause of food borne gastrointestinal disease. After oral uptake, yersiniae invade Peyer's patches of the distal ileum. This is accomplished by the binding of the Yersinia invasin to β1 integrins on the apical surface of M cells which overlie follicle associated lymphoid tissue. The gut represents a barrier that severely limits yersiniae from reaching deeper tissues such as Peyer's patches. We wondered if gut protease attack on invasion factors could contribute to the low number of yersiniae invading Peyer's patches. Findings Here we show that invasin is rapidly degraded in vivo by gut proteases in the mouse infection model. In vivo proteolytic degradation is due to proteolysis by several gut proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, and pepsin. Protease treated yersiniae are shown to be less invasive in a cell culture model. YadA, another surface adhesin is cleaved by similar concentrations of gut proteases but Myf was not cleaved, showing that not all surface proteins are equally susceptible to degradation by gut proteases. Conclusions We demonstrate that gut proteases target important Yersinia virulence factors such as invasin and YadA in vivo. Since invasin is completely degraded within 2-3 h after reaching the small intestine of mice, it is no longer available to mediate invasion of Peyer's patches.

  10. Versatile assays for high throughput screening for activators or inhibitors of intracellular proteases and their cellular regulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Hayashi

    Full Text Available Intracellular proteases constitute a class of promising drug discovery targets. Methods for high throughput screening against these targets are generally limited to in vitro biochemical assays that can suffer many technical limitations, as well as failing to capture the biological context of proteases within the cellular pathways that lead to their activation. METHODS #ENTITYSTARTX00026;We describe here a versatile system for reconstituting protease activation networks in yeast and assaying the activity of these pathways using a cleavable transcription factor substrate in conjunction with reporter gene read-outs. The utility of these versatile assay components and their application for screening strategies was validated for all ten human Caspases, a family of intracellular proteases involved in cell death and inflammation, including implementation of assays for high throughput screening (HTS of chemical libraries and functional screening of cDNA libraries. The versatility of the technology was also demonstrated for human autophagins, cysteine proteases involved in autophagy.Altogether, the yeast-based systems described here for monitoring activity of ectopically expressed mammalian proteases provide a fascile platform for functional genomics and chemical library screening.

  11. The role of proteases in the differentiation of Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Ricky; Alsam, Selwa; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2008-09-01

    Proteases are significant determinants of protozoan pathogenicity and cytolysis of host cells. However, there is now growing evidence of their involvement in cellular differentiation. Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype elaborates a number of proteases, which are inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride. Using this and other selective protease inhibitors, in tandem with siRNA primers, specific to the catalytic site of Acanthamoeba serine proteases, we demonstrate that serine protease activity is crucial for the differentiation of A. castellanii. Furthermore, both encystment and excystment of A. castellanii was found to be dependent on serine protease function.

  12. Lipase and protease extraction from activated sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gessesse, Amare; Dueholm, Thomas; Petersen, Steffen B.

    2003-01-01

    of gentle and efficient enzyme extraction methods from environmental samples is very important. In this study we present a method for the extraction of lipases and proteases from activated sludge using the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100, EDTA, and cation exchange resin (CER), alone or in combination...... for the extraction of lipases and proteases from activated sludge. The sludge was continuously stirred in the presence of either buffer alone or in the presence of detergent and/or chelating agents. In all cases, a marked reduction in floc size was observed upon continuous stirring. However, no lipase activity...... and negligible protease activity was extracted in the presence of buffer alone, indicating that enzyme extraction was not due to shear force alone. The highest lipase activity was extracted using 0.1% Triton X-100 above which the activity was gradually decreasing. For proteases, the highest activity was obtained...

  13. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Assembly and maturation of the bacteriophage lambda procapsid: gpC is the viral protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Elizabeth; Wieczorek, Doug; Medina, Eva Margarita; Yang, Qin; Feiss, Michael; Catalano, Carlos Enrique

    2010-09-03

    Viral capsids are robust structures designed to protect the genome from environmental insults and deliver it to the host cell. The developmental pathway for complex double-stranded DNA viruses is generally conserved in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic groups and includes a genome packaging step where viral DNA is inserted into a pre-formed procapsid shell. The procapsids self-assemble from monomeric precursors to afford a mature icosahedron that contains a single "portal" structure at a unique vertex; the portal serves as the hole through which DNA enters the procapsid during particle assembly and exits during infection. Bacteriophage lambda has served as an ideal model system to study the development of the large double-stranded DNA viruses. Within this context, the lambda procapsid assembly pathway has been reported to be uniquely complex involving protein cross-linking and proteolytic maturation events. In this work, we identify and characterize the protease responsible for lambda procapsid maturation and present a structural model for a procapsid-bound protease dimer. The procapsid protease possesses autoproteolytic activity, it is required for degradation of the internal "scaffold" protein required for procapsid self-assembly, and it is responsible for proteolysis of the portal complex. Our data demonstrate that these proteolytic maturation events are not required for procapsid assembly or for DNA packaging into the structure, but that proteolysis is essential to late steps in particle assembly and/or in subsequent infection of a host cell. The data suggest that the lambda-like proteases and the herpesvirus-like proteases define two distinct viral protease folds that exhibit little sequence or structural homology but that provide identical functions in virus development. The data further indicate that procapsid assembly and maturation are strongly conserved in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic virus groups.

  15. Acid protease production in fungal root endophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerhofer, Michael S; Fraser, Erica; Kernaghan, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Fungal endophytes are ubiquitous in healthy root tissue, but little is known about their ecosystem functions, including their ability to utilize organic nutrient sources such as proteins. Root-associated fungi may secrete proteases to access the carbon and mineral nutrients within proteins in the soil or in the cells of their plant host. We compared the protein utilization patterns of multiple isolates of the root endophytes Phialocephala fortinii s.l., Meliniomyces variabilis and Umbelopsis isabellina with those of two ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, Hebeloma incarnatulum and Laccaria bicolor, and the wood-decay fungus Irpex lacteus at pH values of 2-9 on liquid BSA media. We also assessed protease activity using a fluorescently labeled casein assay and gelatin zymography and characterized proteases using specific protease inhibitors. I. lacteus and U. isabellina utilized protein efficiently, while the ECM fungi exhibited poor protein utilization. ECM fungi secreted metallo-proteases and had pH optima above 4, while other fungi produced aspartic proteases with lower pH optima. The ascomycetous root endophytes M. variabilis and P. fortinii exhibited intermediate levels of protein utilization and M. variabilis exhibited a very low pH optimum. Comparing proteolytic profiles between fungal root endophytes and fungi with well defined ecological roles provides insight into the ecology of these cryptic root associates.

  16. Carbohydrate protease conjugates: Stabilized proteases for peptide synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wartchow, C.A.; Wang, Peng; Bednarski, M.D.; Callstrom, M.R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of oligopeptides using stable carbohydrate protease conjugates (CPCs) was examined in acetonitrile solvent systems. CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin] was used for the preparation of peptides containing histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan in the P{sub 1} position in 60-93% yield. The CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin]-catalyzed synthesis of octamer Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-OEt from Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-OMe was achieved in 71% yield demonstrating that synthesis peptides containing both hydrophylic and hydrophobic amino acids. The P{sub 2} specificity of papain for aromatic residues was utilized for the 2 + 3 coupling of Z-Tyr-Gly-OMe to H{sub 2}N-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH to generate the leucine enkephalin derivative in 79% yield. Although papain is nonspecific for the hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters in aqueous solution, the rates of synthesis for these derivitives with nucleophile leucine tert-butyl ester differed by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. CPC[thermolysin] was used to prepare the aspartame precursor Z-Asp-Phe-OMe in 90% yield. The increased stability of CPCs prepared from periodate-modified poly(2-methacryl- amido-2-deoxy-D-glucose), poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose), and poly(5-methacryl-amido-5-deoxy-D-ribose), carbohydrate materials designed to increase the aldehyde concentration in aqueous solution, suggests that the stability of CPCs is directly related to the aldehyde concentration of the carbohydrate material. Periodate oxidation of poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) followed by covalent attachment to {alpha}-chymotrypsin gave a CPC with catalytic activity in potassium phosphate buffer at 90{degrees}C for 2 h. 1 fig., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  17. House dust mite major allergens Der p 1 and Der p 5 activate human airway-derived epithelial cells by protease-dependent and protease-independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmerman J André B

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract House dust mite allergens (HDM cause bronchoconstriction in asthma patients and induce an inflammatory response in the lungs due to the release of cytokines, chemokines and additional mediators. The mechanism how HDM components achieve this is largely unknown. The objective of this study was to assess whether HDM components of Dermatophagoides pteronissinus with protease activity (Der p 1 and unknown enzymatic activity (Der p 2, Der p 5 induce biological responses in a human airway-derived epithelial cell line (A549, and if so, to elucidate the underlying mechanism(s of action. A549 cells were incubated with HDM extract, Der p 1, recombinant Der p 2 and recombinant Der p 5. Cell desquamation was assessed by microscopy. The proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and IL-8, were measured by ELISA. Intracellular Ca2+ levels were assessed in A549 cells and in mouse fibroblasts expressing the human protease activated receptor (PAR1, PAR2 or PAR4. HDM extract, Der p 1 and Der p 5 dose-dependently increased the production of IL-6 and IL-8. Added simultaneously, Der p 1 and Der p 5 further increased the production of IL-6 and IL-8. The action of Der p 1 was blocked by cysteine-protease inhibitors, while that of Der p 5 couldn't be blocked by either serine- or cysteine protease inhibitors. Der p 5 only induced cell shrinking, whereas HDM extract and Der p1 also induced cell desquamation. Der p 2 had no effect on A549 cells. Der p 1's protease activity causes desquamation and induced the release of IL6 and IL-8 by a mechanism independent of Ca2+ mobilisation and PAR activation. Der p 5 exerts a protease-independent activation of A549 that involves Ca2+ mobilisation and also leads to the production of these cytokines. Together, our data indicate that allergens present in HDM extracts can trigger protease-dependent and protease-independent signalling pathways in A549 cells.

  18. Protease Inhibitors Targeting Coronavirus and Filovirus Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H.; Renslo, Adam R.; Simmons, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess, whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  19. Evaluation of proteases and protease inhibitors in Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from laboratory and field populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteases and proteases inhibitors were evaluated in a number of preparations of Heterodera glycines cysts obtained from glasshouse cultures (GH) and field (LR) populations. Using a FRET-peptide library comprising 512 peptide substrate pools that detect 4 endoprotease types (aspartic, cysteine, meta...

  20. Protease Inhibitors from Plants with Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonkyung Park

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial proteins (peptides are known to play important roles in the innate host defense mechanisms of most living organisms, including plants, insects, amphibians and mammals. They are also known to possess potent antibiotic activity against bacteria, fungi, and even certain viruses. Recently, the rapid emergence of microbial pathogens that are resistant to currently available antibiotics has triggered considerable interest in the isolation and investigation of the mode of action of antimicrobial proteins (peptides. Plants produce a variety of proteins (peptides that are involved in the defense against pathogens and invading organisms, including ribosome-inactivating proteins, lectins, protease inhibitors and antifungal peptides (proteins. Specially, the protease inhibitors can inhibit aspartic, serine and cysteine proteinases. Increased levels of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors correlated with the plants resistance to the pathogen. Usually, the purification of antimicrobial proteins (peptides with protease inhibitor activity was accomplished by salt-extraction, ultrafiltration and C18 reverse phase chromatography, successfully. We discuss the relation between antimicrobial and anti-protease activity in this review. Protease inhibitors from plants potently inhibited the growth of a variety of pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains and are therefore excellent candidates for use as the lead compounds for the development of novel antimicrobial agents.

  1. Insights into the broad cellular effects of nelfinavir and the HIV protease inhibitors supporting their role in cancer treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Casper, Corey; Ambinder, Richard F

    2013-09-01

    The development of HIV protease inhibitors more than two decades ago heralded a new era in HIV care, changing the infection from universally fatal to chronic but controllable. With the widespread use of protease inhibitors, there was a reduction in the incidence and mortality of HIV-associated malignancies. Studies later found these drugs to have promising direct antitumor effects. Protease inhibitors have a wide range of effects on several cellular pathways that are important for tumorigenesis and independent of inhibition of the HIV protease, including reducing angiogenesis and cell invasion, inhibition of the Akt pathway, induction of autophagy, and promotion of apoptosis. Among protease inhibitors, nelfinavir appears to have the most potent and broad antineoplastic activities, and also affects replication of the oncogenic herpesviruses Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epstein-Barr virus. Nelfinavir is being studied for the prevention and treatment of a wide range of malignancies in persons with and without HIV infection. Nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors are well tolerated, oral drugs that have promising antitumor properties, and may prove to play an important role in the prevention and treatment of several cancers. Additional insights into protease inhibitors' mechanisms of action may lead to the development of novel cancer chemotherapy agents.

  2. Identification of a mutant locus that bypasses the BsgA protease requirement for social development in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, John K; Hager, Elizabeth; Gill, Ronald E

    2015-01-01

    The BsgA protease is required for the earliest morphological changes observed in Myxococcus xanthus development. We hypothesize that the BsgA protease is required to cleave an inhibitor of the developmental program, and isolation of genetic bypass suppressors of a bsgA mutant was used to identify signaling components controlling development downstream of the BsgA protease. Strain M955 was created by transposon mutagenesis of a bsgA mutant followed by screening for strains that could develop despite the absence of the BsgA protease. Strain M955 was able to aggregate, form fruiting bodies, and partially restored the production of viable spores in comparison to the parental bsgA mutant. The bsgA Tn5Ω955 strain partially restored developmental expression to a subset of genes normally induced during development, and expressed one developmentally induced fusion at higher amounts during vegetative growth in comparison to wild-type cells. The transposon in strain M955 was localized to a Ribonuclease D homolog that appears to exist in an operon with a downstream aminopeptidase-encoding gene. The identification of a third distinct bypass suppressor of the BsgA protease suggests that the BsgA protease may regulate a potentially complex pathway during the initiation of the M. xanthus developmental program.

  3. Cleavage entropy as quantitative measure of protease specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Julian E; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Huber, Roland G; Margreiter, Michael A; Spitzer, Gudrun M; Wallnoefer, Hannes G; Liedl, Klaus R

    2013-04-01

    A purely information theory-guided approach to quantitatively characterize protease specificity is established. We calculate an entropy value for each protease subpocket based on sequences of cleaved substrates extracted from the MEROPS database. We compare our results with known subpocket specificity profiles for individual proteases and protease groups (e.g. serine proteases, metallo proteases) and reflect them quantitatively. Summation of subpocket-wise cleavage entropy contributions yields a measure for overall protease substrate specificity. This total cleavage entropy allows ranking of different proteases with respect to their specificity, separating unspecific digestive enzymes showing high total cleavage entropy from specific proteases involved in signaling cascades. The development of a quantitative cleavage entropy score allows an unbiased comparison of subpocket-wise and overall protease specificity. Thus, it enables assessment of relative importance of physicochemical and structural descriptors in protease recognition. We present an exemplary application of cleavage entropy in tracing substrate specificity in protease evolution. This highlights the wide range of substrate promiscuity within homologue proteases and hence the heavy impact of a limited number of mutations on individual substrate specificity.

  4. Cleavage entropy as quantitative measure of protease specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian E Fuchs

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A purely information theory-guided approach to quantitatively characterize protease specificity is established. We calculate an entropy value for each protease subpocket based on sequences of cleaved substrates extracted from the MEROPS database. We compare our results with known subpocket specificity profiles for individual proteases and protease groups (e.g. serine proteases, metallo proteases and reflect them quantitatively. Summation of subpocket-wise cleavage entropy contributions yields a measure for overall protease substrate specificity. This total cleavage entropy allows ranking of different proteases with respect to their specificity, separating unspecific digestive enzymes showing high total cleavage entropy from specific proteases involved in signaling cascades. The development of a quantitative cleavage entropy score allows an unbiased comparison of subpocket-wise and overall protease specificity. Thus, it enables assessment of relative importance of physicochemical and structural descriptors in protease recognition. We present an exemplary application of cleavage entropy in tracing substrate specificity in protease evolution. This highlights the wide range of substrate promiscuity within homologue proteases and hence the heavy impact of a limited number of mutations on individual substrate specificity.

  5. Insect response to plant defensive protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Zeng, Rensen

    2015-01-07

    Plant protease inhibitors (PIs) are natural plant defense proteins that inhibit proteases of invading insect herbivores. However, their anti-insect efficacy is determined not only by their potency toward a vulnerable insect system but also by the response of the insect to such a challenge. Through the long history of coevolution with their host plants, insects have developed sophisticated mechanisms to circumvent antinutritional effects of dietary challenges. Their response takes the form of changes in gene expression and the protein repertoire in cells lining the alimentary tract, the first line of defense. Research in insect digestive proteases has revealed the crucial roles they play in insect adaptation to plant PIs and has brought about a new appreciation of how phytophagous insects employ this group of molecules in both protein digestion and counterdefense. This review provides researchers in related fields an up-to-date summary of recent advances.

  6. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Janek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data provide information in support of the research article, “The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors” (Janek et al., 2016 [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans.

  7. Lipase and protease extraction from activated sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gessesse, Amare; Dueholm, Thomas; Petersen, Steffen B.

    2003-01-01

    In the process of wastewater treatment hydrolysis of polymeric substances is the first and rate-limiting step. A closer study of the enzymes catalysing these reactions is essential for a better understanding of the microbial activity in the wastewater treatment process. Therefore, development...... of gentle and efficient enzyme extraction methods from environmental samples is very important. In this study we present a method for the extraction of lipases and proteases from activated sludge using the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100, EDTA, and cation exchange resin (CER), alone or in combination...... and negligible protease activity was extracted in the presence of buffer alone, indicating that enzyme extraction was not due to shear force alone. The highest lipase activity was extracted using 0.1% Triton X-100 above which the activity was gradually decreasing. For proteases, the highest activity was obtained...

  8. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Jong W Yu; Sandy Hoffman; Allison M Beal; Angela Dykon; Michael A Ringenberg; Anna C Hughes; Lauren Dare; Amber D Anderson; Joshua Finger; Viera Kasparcova; David Rickard; Scott B Berger; Joshi Ramanjulu; John G Emery; Peter J Gough

    2015-01-01

    CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 pr...

  9. NK Cell Maturation and Cytotoxicity are Controlled by the Intramembrane Aspartyl Protease SPPL31

    OpenAIRE

    Hamblet, Corinne E.; Makowski, Stefanie L.; Tritapoe, Julia M.; Pomerantz, Joel L.

    2016-01-01

    NK cell maturation is critical for normal effector function and the innate immune response to tumors and pathogens. However, the molecular pathways that control NK cell maturation remain largely undefined. Here, we investigate the role of SPPL3, an intramembrane aspartyl protease, in murine NK cell biology. We find that deletion of SPPL3 in the hematopoietic system reduces numbers of peripheral NK cells, clearance of MHC Class I-deficient tumors in vivo, and cytotoxicity against tumor cells i...

  10. Disruption of innate immunity due to mitochondrial targeting of a picornaviral protease precursor

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yan; Liang, Yuqiong; Qu, Lin; Chen,Zeming; Yi, MinKyung; LI, Kui; Lemon, Stanley M.

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is an essential component of virus-activated signaling pathways that induce protective IFN responses. Its localization to the outer mitochondrial membrane suggests an important yet unexplained role for mitochondria in innate immunity. Here, we show that hepatitis A virus (HAV), a hepatotropic picornavirus, ablates type 1 IFN responses by targeting the 3ABC precursor of its 3Cpro cysteine protease to mitochondria where it colocalizes with and cl...

  11. ADAM-9 is an insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 protease produced and secreted by human osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Subburaman; Thompson, Garrett R; Amaar, Yousef G; Hathaway, Gary; Tschesche, Harald; Baylink, David J

    2002-12-24

    IGF binding protein-5 (BP-5) is an important bone formation regulator. Therefore, elucidation of the identity of IGF binding protein-5 (BP-5) protease produced by osteoblasts is important for our understanding of the molecular pathways that control the action of BP-5. In this regard, BP-5 protease purified by various chromatographic steps from a conditioned medium of U2 human osteosarcoma cells migrated as a single major band, which comigrated with the protease activity in native PAGE and yielded multiple bands in SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. N-Terminal sequencing of these bands revealed that three of the bands yielded amino acid sequences that were identical to that of alpha2 macroglobulin (alpha2M). Although alpha2M was produced by human osteoblasts (OBs), it was not found to be a BP-5 protease. Because alpha2M had been shown to complex with ADAM proteases and because ADAM-12 was found to cleave BP-3 and BP-5, we evaluated if one of the members of ADAM family was the BP-5 protease. On the basis of the findings that (1) purified preparations of BP-5 protease from U2 cell CM contained ADAM-9, (2) ADAM-9 is produced and secreted in high abundance by various human OB cell types, (3) purified ADAM-9 cleaved BP-5 effectively while it did not cleave other IGFBPs or did so with less potency, and (4) purified ADAM-9 bound to alpha2M, we conclude that ADAM-9 is a BP-5 protease produced by human OBs.

  12. Protease activated receptor signaling is required for African trypanosome traversal of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Grab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs as an in vitro model for how African trypanosomes cross the human blood-brain barrier (BBB we recently reported that the parasites cross the BBB by generating calcium activation signals in HBMECs through the activity of parasite cysteine proteases, particularly cathepsin L (brucipain. In the current study, we examined the possible role of a class of protease stimulated HBMEC G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs known as protease activated receptors (PARs that might be implicated in calcium signaling by African trypanosomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using RNA interference (RNAi we found that in vitro PAR-2 gene (F2RL1 expression in HBMEC monolayers could be reduced by over 95%. We also found that the ability of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense to cross F2RL1-silenced HBMEC monolayers was reduced (39%-49% and that HBMECs silenced for F2RL1 maintained control levels of barrier function in the presence of the parasite. Consistent with the role of PAR-2, we found that HBMEC barrier function was also maintained after blockade of Galpha(q with Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT. PAR-2 signaling has been shown in other systems to have neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective roles and our data implicate a role for proteases (i.e. brucipain and PAR-2 in African trypanosome/HBMEC interactions. Using gene-profiling methods to interrogate candidate HBMEC pathways specifically triggered by brucipain, several pathways that potentially link some pathophysiologic processes associated with CNS HAT were identified. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, the data support a role, in part, for GPCRs as molecular targets for parasite proteases that lead to the activation of Galpha(q-mediated calcium signaling. The consequence of these events is predicted to be increased permeability of the BBB to parasite transmigration and the initiation of neuroinflammation, events precursory to CNS disease.

  13. Activation of ADAM 12 protease by copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of latent proteases to the active form occurs by various mechanisms characteristic for different protease families. Here we report that the disintegrin metalloprotease ADAM 12-S is activated by Cu(II). Copper activation is distinct from the cysteine switch component of latency......: elimination of the ADAM 12 cysteine switch by a point mutation in the propeptide had no effect on copper activation, whereas mutation of an unpaired cysteine residue in the catalytic domain resulted in a mutant form of ADAM 12-S that was insensitive to copper. This suggests a multi-step activation mechanism...

  14. Hydrolysis of Fish Protein by Analkaline Protease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Cod muscle protein was hydrolyzed by an alkaline protease in our study. The influences of hydrolysis temperature,fish protein concentration,and ratio of protease addition to protein amount on its degree of hy drolysis (DH) of protein were studied in details by applying dual quadratic rotary combinational design. The final results showed that more than 84% cod muscle protein could be hydrolyzed and recovered. Cod protein hydrolysate thus obtained had a balanced amino acid composition and mainly consisted of small peptides with molecule weight less than 6900 dalton.

  15. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang;

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...... pocket, its carbonyl group aligning improperly relative to Ser195 and the oxyanion hole, explaining why the peptide is an inhibitor rather than a substrate. Substitution of the P1 Arg with novel unnatural Arg analogues with aliphatic or aromatic ring structures led to an increased affinity, depending...... of this peptidic inhibitor, a concept different from conventional attempts at improving inhibitor affinity by reducing the entropic burden....

  16. Hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease inhibits complement activation by cleaving complement component 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichi Mawatari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is mediated in part by viral proteins that abrogate the host immune response, including the complement system, but the precise mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated whether HCV proteins are involved in the fragmentation of complement component 4 (C4, composed of subunits C4α, C4β, and C4γ, and the role of HCV proteins in complement activation. METHODS: Human C4 was incubated with HCV nonstructural (NS 3/4A protease, core, or NS5. Samples were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then subjected to peptide sequencing. The activity of the classical complement pathway was examined using an erythrocyte hemolysis assay. The cleavage pattern of C4 in NS3/4A-expressing and HCV-infected cells, respectively, was also examined. RESULTS: HCV NS3/4A protease cleaved C4γ in a concentration-dependent manner, but viral core and NS5 did not. A specific inhibitor of NS3/4A protease reduced C4γ cleavage. NS3/4A protease-mediated cleavage of C4 inhibited classical pathway activation, which was abrogated by a NS3/4A protease inhibitor. In addition, co-transfection of cells with C4 and wild-type NS3/4A, but not a catalytic-site mutant of NS3/4A, produced cleaved C4γ fragments. Such C4 processing, with a concomitant reduction in levels of full-length C4γ, was also observed in HCV-infected cells expressing C4. CONCLUSIONS: C4 is a novel cellular substrate of the HCV NS3/4A protease. Understanding disturbances in the complement system mediated by NS3/4A protease may provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying persistent HCV infection.

  17. Arabidopsis SUMO protease ASP1 positively regulates flowering time partially through regulating FLC stability 

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, Xiangxiong

    2016-12-07

    The initiation of flowering is tightly regulated by the endogenous and environment signals, which is crucial for the reproductive success of flowering plants. It is well known that autonomous and vernalization pathways repress transcription of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a focal floral repressor, but how its protein stability is regulated remains largely unknown. Here, we found that mutations in a novel Arabidopsis SUMO protease 1 (ASP1) resulted in a strong late-flowering phenotype under long-days, but to a lesser extent under short-days. ASP1 localizes in the nucleus and exhibited a SUMO protease activity in vitro and in vivo. The conserved Cys-577 in ASP1 is critical for its enzymatic activity, as well as its physiological function in the regulation of flowering time. Genetic and gene expression analyses demonstrated that ASP1 promotes transcription of positive regulators of flowering, such as FT, SOC1 and FD, and may function in both CO-dependent photoperiod pathway and FLC-dependent pathways. Although the transcription level of FLC was not affected in the loss-of-function asp1 mutant, the protein stability of FLC was increased in the asp1 mutant. Taken together, this study identified a novel bona fide SUMO protease, ASP1, which positively regulates transition to flowering at least partly by repressing FLC protein stability.

  18. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanoscrescent SERS probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2013-01-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  19. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  20. Heterologous expression of Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben B

    Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned...... for the full length protease...

  1. Nepenthesin protease activity indicates digestive fluid dynamics in carnivorous nepenthes plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Buch

    Full Text Available Carnivorous plants use different morphological features to attract, trap and digest prey, mainly insects. Plants from the genus Nepenthes possess specialized leaves called pitchers that function as pitfall-traps. These pitchers are filled with a digestive fluid that is generated by the plants themselves. In order to digest caught prey in their pitchers, Nepenthes plants produce various hydrolytic enzymes including aspartic proteases, nepenthesins (Nep. Knowledge about the generation and induction of these proteases is limited. Here, by employing a FRET (fluorescent resonance energy transfer-based technique that uses a synthetic fluorescent substrate an easy and rapid detection of protease activities in the digestive fluids of various Nepenthes species was feasible. Biochemical studies and the heterologously expressed Nep II from Nepenthes mirabilis proved that the proteolytic activity relied on aspartic proteases, however an acid-mediated auto-activation mechanism was necessary. Employing the FRET-based approach, the induction and dynamics of nepenthesin in the digestive pitcher fluid of various Nepenthes plants could be studied directly with insect (Drosophila melanogaster prey or plant material. Moreover, we observed that proteolytic activity was induced by the phytohormone jasmonic acid but not by salicylic acid suggesting that jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways are involved in plant carnivory.

  2. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M El Bakkouri; A Pow; A Mulichak; K Cheung; J Artz; M Amani; S Fell; T de Koning-Ward; C Goodman; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The Clpchaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clpchaperones and proteases in the humanmalariaparasitePlasmodiumfalciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clpchaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  3. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkouri, Majida El; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L.Y.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F.; Goodman, C. Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A. (McMaster U.); (Melbourne); (Toronto); (Deakin); (HWMRI)

    2015-02-09

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clp chaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  4. Developing HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors through Stereospecific Reactions in Protein Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folasade M. Olajuyigbe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Protease inhibitors are key components in the chemotherapy of HIV infection. However, the appearance of viral mutants routinely compromises their clinical efficacy, creating a constant need for new and more potent inhibitors. Recently, a new class of epoxide-based inhibitors of HIV-1 protease was investigated and the configuration of the epoxide carbons was demonstrated to play a crucial role in determining the binding affinity. Here we report the comparison between three crystal structures at near-atomic resolution of HIV-1 protease in complex with the epoxide-based inhibitor, revealing an in-situ epoxide ring opening triggered by a pH change in the mother solution of the crystal. Increased pH in the crystal allows a stereospecific nucleophile attack of an ammonia molecule onto an epoxide carbon, with formation of a new inhibitor containing amino-alcohol functions. The described experiments open a pathway for the development of new stereospecific protease inhibitors from a reactive lead compound.

  5. Protease inhibitor mediated resistance to insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Outchkourov, N.S.

    2003-01-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) are among the defensive molecules that plants produce in order to defend themselves against herbivores. A major aim of this thesis is to develop novel insect resistance traits usingheterologous, non-plant PIs. Prerequisite for the success of the th

  6. Optimization of medium composition for thermostable protease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... 2School of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University ... factorial central composite design (CCD) was chosen to explain the combined ... obtained by the statistical analysis showed that corn starch at 19.8 g/l, ... the optimization process. .... would inhibited the thermostable protease synthesis.

  7. Proteases, neutrophils, and periodontitis: the NET effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauseef, William M

    2014-10-01

    Neutrophils exert potent antimicrobial activities in their role as first-line cellular defenders against infection. The synergistic and collective actions of oxidants and granule proteins, including serine proteases, support the microbial killing in phagosomes, where most neutrophil-mediated antimicrobial action occurs. In addition to phagocytosis, specific stimuli prompt neutrophils to extrude a matrix of DNA, histones, and granule proteins to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which can trap microbes. Mice lacking the serine proteases necessary for NET production are more susceptible to infection, an observation suggesting that functional NETs are required for host protection. In this issue of the JCI, Sørensen and colleagues characterize neutrophils from a patient with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome. The patient has an inactivating mutation in the gene encoding dipeptidyl peptidase I, resulting in neutrophils lacking elastase, a serine protease required for NET production. Despite the inability to form NETS, neutrophils from this patient killed pathogens in vitro, and the patient did not exhibit evidence of an increased propensity toward bacterial infections. Together, these results suggest that proteases in human neutrophils are dispensable for protection against bacterial infection and that the ability to generate NETs in vitro does not compromise host defense.

  8. Bacterial proteases: targets for diagnostics and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaman, W.E.; Hays, J.P.; Endtz, H.P.; Bikker, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are essential for the proliferation and growth of bacteria, and are also known to contribute to bacterial virulence. This makes them interesting candidates as diagnostic and therapeutic targets for infectious diseases. In this review, the authors discuss the most recent developments and po

  9. A novel protease activity assay using a protease-responsive chaperone protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sao, Kentaro [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Murata, Masaharu, E-mail: m-murata@dem.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Fujisaki, Yuri; Umezaki, Kaori [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Center for Future Chemistry, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hashizume, Makoto [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2009-06-05

    Protease activity assays are important for elucidating protease function and for developing new therapeutic agents. In this study, a novel turbidimetric method for determining the protease activity using a protease-responsive chaperone protein is described. For this purpose, a recombinant small heat-shock protein (sHSP) with an introduced Factor Xa protease recognition site was synthesized in bacteria. This recombinant mutant, FXa-HSP, exhibited chaperone-like activity at high temperatures in cell lysates. However, the chaperone-like activity of FXa-HSP decreased dramatically following treatment with Factor Xa. Protein precipitation was subsequently observed in the cell lysates. The reaction was Factor Xa concentration-dependent and was quantitatively suppressed by a specific inhibitor for Factor Xa. Protein aggregation was detected by a simple method based on turbidimetry. The results clearly demonstrate that this assay is an effective, easy-to-use method for determining protease activities without the requirement of labeling procedures and the use of radioisotopes.

  10. Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs: Biogenesis and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Dautin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs constitute a large family of proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella. SPATEs exhibit two distinct proteolytic activities. First, a C-terminal catalytic site triggers an intra-molecular cleavage that releases the N-terminal portion of these proteins in the extracellular medium. Second, the secreted N-terminal domains of SPATEs are themselves proteases; each contains a canonical serine-protease catalytic site. Some of these secreted proteases are toxins, eliciting various effects on mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the biogenesis of SPATEs and their function as toxins.

  11. Comparative Study on the Protease Inhibitors from Fish Eggs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ustadi; K.Y.Kim; S.M.Kim

    2005-01-01

    The protease inhibitor was purified from five different fish eggs. The molecular weights of Pacific herring, chum salmon, pond smelt, glassfish, and Alaska pollock egg protease inhibitors were 120, 89, 84.5, 17, and 16.8kDa, respectively. The specific inhibitory activity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor was the highest followed by those of Pacific herring and Alaska pollock in order. The specific inhibitory activity and purity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor were 19.70 U mg-1 protein and 164.70 folds of purification, respectively. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was reasonably stable at 50 - 65 ℃ and pH 8,which was more stable at high temperature and pH than protease inhibitors from the other fish species. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was noncompetitive with inhibitor constant (Ki) of 4.44 nmol L-1.

  12. A Subset of Membrane-Altering Agents and γ-Secretase Modulators Provoke Nonsubstrate Cleavage by Rhomboid Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Urban

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhomboid proteases are integral membrane enzymes that regulate cell signaling, adhesion, and organelle homeostasis pathways, making substrate specificity a key feature of their function. Interestingly, we found that perturbing the membrane pharmacologically in living cells had little effect on substrate processing but induced inappropriate cleavage of nonsubstrates by rhomboid proteases. A subclass of drugs known to modulate γ-secretase activity acted on the membrane directly and induced nonsubstrate cleavage by rhomboid proteases but left true substrate cleavage sites unaltered. These observations highlight an active role for the membrane in guiding rhomboid selectivity and caution that membrane-targeted drugs should be evaluated for cross-activity against membrane-resident enzymes that are otherwise unrelated to the intended drug target. Furthermore, some γ-secretase-modulating activity or toxicity could partly result from global membrane effects.

  13. Protease-resistant prions selectively decrease Shadoo protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C Watts

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The central event in prion diseases is the conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C into PrP(Sc, a partially protease-resistant and infectious conformer. However, the mechanism by which PrP(Sc causes neuronal dysfunction remains poorly understood. Levels of Shadoo (Sho, a protein that resembles the flexibly disordered N-terminal domain of PrP(C, were found to be reduced in the brains of mice infected with the RML strain of prions [1], implying that Sho levels may reflect the presence of PrP(Sc in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we examined levels of Sho during prion infection using a variety of experimental systems. Sho protein levels were decreased in the brains of mice, hamsters, voles, and sheep infected with different natural and experimental prion strains. Furthermore, Sho levels were decreased in the brains of prion-infected, transgenic mice overexpressing Sho and in infected neuroblastoma cells. Time-course experiments revealed that Sho levels were inversely proportional to levels of protease-resistant PrP(Sc. Membrane anchoring and the N-terminal domain of PrP both influenced the inverse relationship between Sho and PrP(Sc. Although increased Sho levels had no discernible effect on prion replication in mice, we conclude that Sho is the first non-PrP marker specific for prion disease. Additional studies using this paradigm may provide insight into the cellular pathways and systems subverted by PrP(Sc during prion disease.

  14. RC1339/APRc from Rickettsia conorii is a novel aspartic protease with properties of retropepsin-like enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Cruz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Members of the species Rickettsia are obligate intracellular, gram-negative, arthropod-borne pathogens of humans and other mammals. The life-threatening character of diseases caused by many Rickettsia species and the lack of reliable protective vaccine against rickettsioses strengthens the importance of identifying new protein factors for the potential development of innovative therapeutic tools. Herein, we report the identification and characterization of a novel membrane-embedded retropepsin-like homologue, highly conserved in 55 Rickettsia genomes. Using R. conorii gene homologue RC1339 as our working model, we demonstrate that, despite the low overall sequence similarity to retropepsins, the gene product of rc1339 APRc (for Aspartic Protease from Rickettsia conorii is an active enzyme with features highly reminiscent of this family of aspartic proteases, such as autolytic activity impaired by mutation of the catalytic aspartate, accumulation in the dimeric form, optimal activity at pH 6, and inhibition by specific HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Moreover, specificity preferences determined by a high-throughput profiling approach confirmed common preferences between this novel rickettsial enzyme and other aspartic proteases, both retropepsins and pepsin-like. This is the first report on a retropepsin-like protease in gram-negative intracellular bacteria such as Rickettsia, contributing to the analysis of the evolutionary relationships between the two types of aspartic proteases. Additionally, we have also shown that APRc is transcribed and translated in R. conorii and R. rickettsii and is integrated into the outer membrane of both species. Finally, we demonstrated that APRc is sufficient to catalyze the in vitro processing of two conserved high molecular weight autotransporter adhesin/invasion proteins, Sca5/OmpB and Sca0/OmpA, thereby suggesting the participation of this enzyme in a relevant proteolytic pathway in rickettsial life-cycle. As a

  15. RC1339/APRc from Rickettsia conorii is a novel aspartic protease with properties of retropepsin-like enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Cruz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Members of the species Rickettsia are obligate intracellular, gram-negative, arthropod-borne pathogens of humans and other mammals. The life-threatening character of diseases caused by many Rickettsia species and the lack of reliable protective vaccine against rickettsioses strengthens the importance of identifying new protein factors for the potential development of innovative therapeutic tools. Herein, we report the identification and characterization of a novel membrane-embedded retropepsin-like homologue, highly conserved in 55 Rickettsia genomes. Using R. conorii gene homologue RC1339 as our working model, we demonstrate that, despite the low overall sequence similarity to retropepsins, the gene product of rc1339 APRc (for Aspartic Protease from Rickettsia conorii is an active enzyme with features highly reminiscent of this family of aspartic proteases, such as autolytic activity impaired by mutation of the catalytic aspartate, accumulation in the dimeric form, optimal activity at pH 6, and inhibition by specific HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Moreover, specificity preferences determined by a high-throughput profiling approach confirmed common preferences between this novel rickettsial enzyme and other aspartic proteases, both retropepsins and pepsin-like. This is the first report on a retropepsin-like protease in gram-negative intracellular bacteria such as Rickettsia, contributing to the analysis of the evolutionary relationships between the two types of aspartic proteases. Additionally, we have also shown that APRc is transcribed and translated in R. conorii and R. rickettsii and is integrated into the outer membrane of both species. Finally, we demonstrated that APRc is sufficient to catalyze the in vitro processing of two conserved high molecular weight autotransporter adhesin/invasion proteins, Sca5/OmpB and Sca0/OmpA, thereby suggesting the participation of this enzyme in a relevant proteolytic pathway in rickettsial life-cycle. As a

  16. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Cameron D; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W; Cogdell, Richard J; Wall, Daniel M; Burchmore, Richard J S; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  17. Cellular Proteases as Cancer Biomarkers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R. Röthlisberger

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades a variety of biomolecules have been proposed as diagnostic biomarkers and predictors of severity for transmissible and nontransmissible diseases. Studies in a range of cancers have revealed many biomarkers with great potential in cancer diagnosis, in establishing tumor stage, progression, and response to therapies; such as the Kallikrein and Metalloproteinase families. Traditionally blood (serum and tissue have been the main biological sources of biomarker discovery, but in the past decade urine has emerged as a promising source of cancer biomarkers. In this review we will focus on two large families, the Kallikrein family of serine proteases discovered in serum, and the Metalloproteinase family of zinc proteases discovered in urine, as potential cancer biomarkers.

  18. Novel peptide-based protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée

    This thesis describes the design and synthesis of peptide-based serine protease inhibitors. The targeted protease, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activates plasminogen, which plays a major role in cancer metastasis. The peptide upain-2 (S 1 ,S 12-cyclo-AcCSWRGLENHAAC-NH2) is a highly......, the disulfide bridge was replaced with amide bonds of various lengths. The novel peptides did not retain their inhibitory activity, but formed the basis for another strategy. Second, bicyclic peptides were obtained by creating head-to-tail cyclized peptides that were made bicyclic by the addition of a covalent...... increased. Finally, the effect of multivalent display of upain-2 was investigated. Several dimers of upain-2 were made and the attachment of upain-2 via the Copper-catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC) onto an alkyne functionalized carbohydrate scaffold was investigated. Besides the synthesis...

  19. Inhibition of sulfur mustard-increased protease activity by niacinamide, N-acetyl-L-cysteine or dexamethasone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, F.M.; Broomfield, C.A.; Smith, W.J.

    1991-03-11

    The pathologic mechanism of sulfur mustard-induced skin vesication is as yet undefined. Papirmeister et al. have postulated a biochemical mechanism for sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous injury involving sequelae of DNA alkylation, metabolic disruption resulting in NAD+ depletion and activation of protease. The authors have utilized a chromogenic peptide substrate assay to establish that human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed 24 hr previously to sulfur mustard exhibited an increase in proteolytic activity. Doses of compounds known to alter the biochemical events associated with sulfur mustard exposure or reduce protease activity were tested in this system for their ability to block the sulfur mustard-induced protease activity. Treatment with niacinamide 1 hr after or with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or dexamethasone 24 hr prior to sulfur mustard exposure resulted in a decrease of 39%, 33% and 42% respectively of sulfur mustard-increased protease activity. These data suggest that therapeutic intervention into the biochemical pathways that culminate in protease activation might serve as an approach to treatment of sulfur mustard-induced pathology.

  20. Acanthamoeba protease activity promotes allergic airway inflammation via protease-activated receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES) proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25) in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease.

  1. Acanthamoeba protease activity promotes allergic airway inflammation via protease-activated receptor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Kyung Park

    Full Text Available Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25 in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease.

  2. Proteases inhibition assessment on PC12 and NGF treated cells after oxygen and glucose deprivation reveals a distinct role for aspartyl proteases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristidis Kritis

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a severe stressful condition and induces cell death leading to neuronal loss both to the developing and adult nervous system. Central theme to cellular death is the activation of different classes of proteases such as caspases calpains and cathepsins. In the present study we investigated the involvement of these proteases, in the hypoxia-induced PC12 cell death. Rat PC12 is a model cell line for experimentation relevant to the nervous system and several protocols have been developed for either lethal hypoxia (oxygen and glucose deprivation OGD or ischemic preconditioning (IPS. Nerve Growth Factor (NGF treated PC12 differentiate to a sympathetic phenotype, expressing neurites and excitability. Lethal hypoxia was established by exposing undifferentiated and NGF-treated PC12 cells to a mixture of N(2/CO(2 (93:5% in DMEM depleted of glucose and sodium pyruvate for 16 h. The involvement of caspases, calpains and lysosomal cathepsins D and E to the cell death induced by lethal OGD was investigated employing protease specific inhibitors such as z-VAD-fmk for the caspases, MDL28170 for the calpains and pepstatin A for the cathepsins D and E. Our findings show that pepstatin A provides statistically significant protection from cell death of both naive and NGF treated PC12 cells exposed to lethal OGD. We propose that apart from the established processes of apoptosis and necrosis that are integral components of lethal OGD, the activation of cathepsins D and E launches additional cell death pathways in which these proteases are key partners.

  3. Corruption of Innate Immunity by Bacterial Proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempa, Jan; Pike, Robert N.

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system of the human body has developed numerous mechanisms to control endogenous and exogenous bacteria and thus prevent infections by these microorganisms. These mechanisms range from physical barriers such as the skin or mucosal epithelium to a sophisticated array of molecules and cells that function to suppress or prevent bacterial infection. Many bacteria express a variety of proteases, ranging from non-specific and powerful enzymes that degrade many proteins involved in innate immunity to proteases that are extremely precise and specific in their mode of action. Here we have assembled a comprehensive picture of how bacterial proteases affect the host’s innate immune system to gain advantage and cause infection. This picture is far from being complete since the numbers of mechanisms utilized are as astonishing as they are diverse, ranging from degradation of molecules vital to innate immune mechanisms to subversion of the mechanisms to allow the bacterium to hide from the system or take advantage of it. It is vital that such mechanisms are elucidated to allow strategies to be developed to aid the innate immune system in controlling bacterial infections. PMID:19756242

  4. Evolution of cyclic peptide protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Travis S; Young, Douglas D; Ahmad, Insha; Louis, John M; Benkovic, Stephen J; Schultz, Peter G

    2011-07-05

    We report a bacterial system for the evolution of cyclic peptides that makes use of an expanded set of amino acid building blocks. Orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA(CUA) pairs, together with a split intein system were used to biosynthesize a library of ribosomal peptides containing amino acids with unique structures and reactivities. This peptide library was subsequently used to evolve an inhibitor of HIV protease using a selection based on cellular viability. Two of three cyclic peptides isolated after two rounds of selection contained the keto amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (pBzF). The most potent peptide (G12: GIXVSL; X=pBzF) inhibited HIV protease through the formation of a covalent Schiff base adduct of the pBzF residue with the ε-amino group of Lys 14 on the protease. This result suggests that an expanded genetic code can confer an evolutionary advantage in response to selective pressure. Moreover, the combination of natural evolutionary processes with chemically biased building blocks provides another strategy for the generation of biologically active peptides using microbial systems.

  5. Metal-based antimicrobial protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, A; Prisecaru, A; Slator, C; Molphy, Z; McCann, M

    2013-01-01

    Limitations associated with the production cost, metabolic instability, side-effects, resistance and poor pharmacokinetics of organic protease inhibitors (PIs), which form an essential component of the front line HAART treatment for HIV, have fuelled efforts into finding novel, transition metal-based alternatives. Some of the attractive features of metalbased therapeutics include synthetic simplicity, solubility control, redox capability, expansion of coordination number and topography matching of the complex to the protein's active site. Building asymmetry into the complex, which may offer better discrimination between host and rogue cell, can readily be achieved through coordination of chiral ligands to the metal centre. Although the scope of this review has been limited to metal-based agents that have been reported to bind/inhibit HIV-1 and parasitic proteases, some desirables, such as high activity, low dosage, minimal toxicity, crossinhibition, unique binding modes and selectivity, have already been delivered. The variability of the d-block metals, coupled with the availability of designer organic ligands, augers well for the future development of clinical metallo-drugs for deployment against protease-associated, fatal diseases.

  6. Role of Proteases in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C. Pandey

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is generally associated with progressive destruction of airways and lung parenchyma. Various factors play an important role in the development and progression of COPD, like imbalance of proteases, environmental and genetic factors and oxidative stress. This review is specifically focused on the role of proteases and their imbalance in COPD. There are three classes (serine, mettalo, and cysteine of proteases involved in COPD. In serine proteases, neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3 are involved in destruction of alveolar tissue. Matrix-mettaloproteinase-9, 12, 13, plays an influential role in severity of COPD. Among cysteine proteases, caspase-3, caspases-8 and caspase-9 play an important role in controlling apoptosis. These proteases activities can be regulated by inhibitors like α-1-antitrypsin, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, and leukocyte protease inhibitor. Studies suggest that neutrophil elastase may be a therapeutic target for COPD, and specific inhibitor against this enzyme has potential role to control the disease. Current study suggests that Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV is a potential marker for COPD. Since the expression of proteases and its inhibitors play an important role in COPD pathogenesis, therefore, it is worth investigating the role of proteases and their regulation. Understanding the biochemical basis of COPD pathogenesis using advanced tools in protease biochemistry and aiming toward translational research from bench-to-bedside will have great impact to deal with this health problem.

  7. PARTIAL PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ALKALOPHILIC PROTEASE FROM PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Satheeskumar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Partial purification and characterization of alkalophilic protease production from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the gut of marine and coastal waters shrimp Penaeus monodon. The protease production was assayed in submerged fermentation to produce maximum protease activity (423 ± 0.09 U/ml. The enzyme was precipitated with ammonium sulphate and partially purified by ion exchange chromatography through DEAE Sephadex A-50 column. In 10th fraction showed maximum protease activity (734 ± 0.18 U/ml with increase in purification fold. The molecular weight of protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was recorded as 60 kDa. The stability of protease was tested at various pH and temperature; it showed maximum protease activity at pH-9 and temperature 50ºC. Among the various surfactants tested for enzyme stability, maximum activity was retained in poly ethylene glycol. The compatibility of protease enzyme with various commercial detergents; the enzyme retained maximum protease activity in tide. The results are indicated that all these properties make the bacterial proteases are most suitable for wide industrial applications.

  8. Structural determinants of tobacco vein mottling virus protease substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P; Tözsér, József; Waugh, David S

    2010-11-01

    Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) is a member of the Potyviridae, one of the largest families of plant viruses. The TVMV genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that is subsequently processed by three virally encoded proteases. Seven of the nine cleavage events are carried out by the NIa protease. Its homolog from the tobacco etch virus (TEV) is a widely used reagent for the removal of affinity tags from recombinant proteins. Although TVMV protease is a close relative of TEV protease, they exhibit distinct sequence specificities. We report here the crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant TVMV protease (K65A/K67A/C151A) in complex with a canonical peptide substrate (Ac-RETVRFQSD) at 1.7-Å resolution. As observed in several crystal structures of TEV protease, the C-terminus (∼20 residues) of TVMV protease is disordered. Unexpectedly, although deleting the disordered residues from TEV protease reduces its catalytic activity by ∼10-fold, an analogous truncation mutant of TVMV protease is significantly more active. Comparison of the structures of TEV and TVMV protease in complex with their respective canonical substrate peptides reveals that the S3 and S4 pockets are mainly responsible for the differing substrate specificities. The structure of TVMV protease suggests that it is less tolerant of variation at the P1' position than TEV protease. This conjecture was confirmed experimentally by determining kinetic parameters k(cat) and K(m) for a series of oligopeptide substrates. Also, as predicted by the cocrystal structure, we confirm that substitutions in the P6 position are more readily tolerated by TVMV than TEV protease.

  9. Activated factor X signaling via protease-activated receptor 2 suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine production from LPS-stimulated myeloid cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, Eimear M

    2013-07-19

    Vitamin K-dependent proteases generated in response to vascular injury and infection enable fibrin clot formation, but also trigger distinct immuno-regulatory signaling pathways on myeloid cells. Factor Xa, a protease crucial for blood coagulation, also induces protease-activated receptor-dependent cell signaling. Factor Xa can bind both monocytes and macrophages, but whether factor Xa-dependent signaling stimulates or suppresses myeloid cell cytokine production in response to Toll-like receptor activation is not known. In this study, exposure to factor Xa significantly impaired pro-inflammatory cytokine production from lipopolysaccharide-treated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, THP-1 monocytic cells and murine macrophages. Furthermore, factor Xa inhibited nuclear factor-kappa B activation in THP-1 reporter cells, requiring phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase activity for its anti-inflammatory effect. Active-site blockade, γ-carboxyglutamic acid domain truncation and a peptide mimic of the factor Xa inter-epidermal growth factor-like region prevented factor Xa inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced tumour necrosis factor-α release. In addition, factor Xa anti-inflammatory activity was markedly attenuated by the presence of an antagonist of protease-activated receptor 2, but not protease-activated receptor 1. The key role of protease-activated receptor 2 in eliciting factor Xa-dependent anti-inflammatory signaling on macrophages was further underscored by the inability of factor Xa to mediate inhibition of tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 release from murine bone marrow-derived protease-activated receptor 2-deficient macrophages. We also show for the first time that, in addition to protease-activated receptor 2, factor Xa requires a receptor-associated protein-sensitive low-density lipoprotein receptor to inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production. Collectively, this study supports a novel function for factor Xa as an endogenous, receptor

  10. Heighten the Study on Factor Seven Activating Protease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺石林; 陈方平; 张广森; 文志斌

    2008-01-01

    @@ Recent studies have showed that factor seven activating protease (FSAP) is a novel serine protease in human plasma. Immunoreactivity for FSAP has been observed in vascular endothelial cells,epithelial cells and macrophages but FSAP-specific mRNA expression only exists in the former two cells. FSAP has three epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains,a kringle domain and a serine protease domain.

  11. Economic Methods of Ginger Protease'sextraction and Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yuanyuan; Tong, Junfeng; Wei, Siqing; Du, Xinyong; Tang, Xiaozhen

    This article reports the ginger protease extraction and purification methods from fresh ginger rhizome. As to ginger protease extraction, we adapt the steps of organic solvent dissolving, ammonium sulfate depositing and freeze-drying, and this method can attain crude enzyme powder 0.6% weight of fresh ginger rhizome. The purification part in this study includes two steps: cellulose ion exchange (DEAE-52) and SP-Sephadex 50 chromatography, which can purify crude ginger protease through ion and molecular weight differences respectively.

  12. Bacterial retropepsin-like proteases : the evidence from Legionella pneumophila

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Paulo Alexandre Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado em Bioquímica apresentada ao Departamento Ciências da Vida da Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra. A2 family of aspartic proteases harbors mostly proteases found in retroviruses – the retropepsins. The evolution theories regarding these proteases usually state that these proteins are related to pepsin-like proteases from family A1 by two different hypotheses. By the first (and usually most accepted) theory, upon infection of a e...

  13. Importance of lysosomal cysteine proteases in lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman Harold A

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human lysosomal cysteine proteases are a family of 11 proteases whose members include cathepsins B, C, H, L, and S. The biology of these proteases was largely ignored for decades because of their lysosomal location and the belief that their function was limited to the terminal degradation of proteins. In the past 10 years, this view has changed as these proteases have been found to have specific functions within cells. This review highlights some of these functions, specifically their roles in matrix remodeling and in regulating the immune response, and their relationship to lung diseases.

  14. Characterization of Fibrinolytic Proteases from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Ho Choi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This study was undertaken to identify fibrinolytic proteases from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom and to characterize a major fibrinolytic protease purified from the venom. Methods: The venom was subjected to chromatography using columns of Q-Sepharose and Sephadex G-75. The molecular weights of fibrinolytic proteases showing fibrinolytic zone in fibrin plate assay were determined in SDS-PAGE (Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis The effects of inhibitors and metal ions on fibrinolytic protease and the proteolysis patterns of fibrinogen, gelatin, and bovine serum albumin were investigated. Results : 1 The fibrinolytic fractions of the three peaks isolated from Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom contained two polypeptides of 46 and 59 kDa and three polypeptides of 32, 18, and 15 kDa and a major polypeptide of 54 kDa, respectively. 2 The fibrinolytic activity of the purified protease of 54 kDA was inhibited by metal chelators, such as EDTA, EGTA, and 1,10-phenanthroline, and disulfhydryl-reducing compounds, such as dithiothreitol and cysteine. 3 Calcium chloride promoted the fibrinolytic activity of the protease, but mercuric chloride and cobalt(II chloride inhibited it. 4 The fibrinolytic protease cleaved preferentially A-chain and slowly B-chain of fibrinogen. It also hydrolyzed gelatin but not bovine serum albumin. Conclusions: The Gloydius blomhoffii siniticus venom contained more than three fibrinolytic proteases. The major fibrinolytic protease was a metalloprotease which hydrolyzed both fibrinogen and gelatin, but not bovine serum albumin.

  15. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Roszak, Aleksander W. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.walker@glasgow.ac.uk [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  16. PAR-1 mediated apoptosis of breast cancer cells by V. cholerae hemagglutinin protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Tanusree; Pal, Amit

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial toxins have emerged as promising agents in cancer treatment strategy. Hemagglutinin (HAP) protease secreted by Vibrio cholerae induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells and regresses tumor growth in mice model. The success of novel cancer therapies depends on their selectivity for cancer cells with limited toxicity for normal tissues. Increased expression of Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1) has been reported in different malignant cells. In this study we report that HAP induced activation and over expression of PAR-1 in breast cancer cells (EAC). Immunoprecipitation studies have shown that HAP specifically binds with PAR-1. HAP mediated activation of PAR-1 caused nuclear translocation of p50-p65 and the phosphorylation of p38 which triggered the activation of NFκB and MAP kinase signaling pathways. These signaling pathways enhanced the cellular ROS level in malignant cells that induced the intrinsic pathway of cell apoptosis. PAR-1 mediated apoptosis by HAP of malignant breast cells without effecting normal healthy cells in the same environment makes it a good therapeutic agent for treatment of cancer.

  17. Multiple routes and milestones in the folding of HIV-1 protease monomer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Bonomi

    Full Text Available Proteins fold on a time scale incompatible with a mechanism of random search in conformational space thus indicating that somehow they are guided to the native state through a funneled energetic landscape. At the same time the heterogeneous kinetics suggests the existence of several different folding routes. Here we propose a scenario for the folding mechanism of the monomer of HIV-1 protease in which multiple pathways and milestone events coexist. A variety of computational approaches supports this picture. These include very long all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent, an analysis of the network of clusters found in multiple high-temperature unfolding simulations and a complete characterization of free-energy surfaces carried out using a structure-based potential at atomistic resolution and a combination of metadynamics and parallel tempering. Our results confirm that the monomer in solution is stable toward unfolding and show that at least two unfolding pathways exist. In our scenario, the formation of a hydrophobic core is a milestone in the folding process which must occur along all the routes that lead this protein towards its native state. Furthermore, the ensemble of folding pathways proposed here substantiates a rational drug design strategy based on inhibiting the folding of HIV-1 protease.

  18. NK Cell Maturation and Cytotoxicity are Controlled by the Intramembrane Aspartyl Protease SPPL31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblet, Corinne E.; Makowski, Stefanie L.; Tritapoe, Julia M.; Pomerantz, Joel L.

    2016-01-01

    NK cell maturation is critical for normal effector function and the innate immune response to tumors and pathogens. However, the molecular pathways that control NK cell maturation remain largely undefined. Here, we investigate the role of SPPL3, an intramembrane aspartyl protease, in murine NK cell biology. We find that deletion of SPPL3 in the hematopoietic system reduces numbers of peripheral NK cells, clearance of MHC Class I-deficient tumors in vivo, and cytotoxicity against tumor cells in vitro. This phenotype is concomitant with reduced numbers of CD27+CD11b+ and CD27−CD11b+ NK cells, indicating a requirement for SPPL3 in efficient NK cell maturation. NK cell-specific deletion of SPPL3 results in the same deficiencies, revealing a cell-autonomous role for SPPL3 in these processes. CRISPR/Cas9 genomic editing in murine zygotes was used to generate knock-in mice with a catalytically compromised SPPL3 D271A allele. Mice engineered to express only SPPL3 D271A in NK cells phenocopy mice deleted for SPPL3, indicating a requirement for SPPL3 protease activity in NK cell biology. Our results identify SPPL3 as a cell-autonomous molecular determinant of NK cell maturation and expand the role of intramembrane aspartyl proteases in innate immunity. PMID:26851218

  19. NK Cell Maturation and Cytotoxicity Are Controlled by the Intramembrane Aspartyl Protease SPPL3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblet, Corinne E; Makowski, Stefanie L; Tritapoe, Julia M; Pomerantz, Joel L

    2016-03-15

    NK cell maturation is critical for normal effector function and the innate immune response to tumors and pathogens. However, the molecular pathways that control NK cell maturation remain largely undefined. In this article, we investigate the role of SPPL3, an intramembrane aspartyl protease, in murine NK cell biology. We find that deletion of SPPL3 in the hematopoietic system reduces numbers of peripheral NK cells, clearance of MHC class I-deficient tumors in vivo, and cytotoxicity against tumor cells in vitro. This phenotype is concomitant with reduced numbers of CD27(+)CD11b(+) and CD27(-)CD11b(+) NK cells, indicating a requirement for SPPL3 in efficient NK cell maturation. NK cell-specific deletion of SPPL3 results in the same deficiencies, revealing a cell-autonomous role for SPPL3 in these processes. CRISPR/Cas9 genomic editing in murine zygotes was used to generate knockin mice with a catalytically compromised SPPL3 D271A allele. Mice engineered to express only SPPL3 D271A in NK cells phenocopy mice deleted for SPPL3, indicating a requirement for SPPL3 protease activity in NK cell biology. Our results identify SPPL3 as a cell-autonomous molecular determinant of NK cell maturation and expand the role of intramembrane aspartyl proteases in innate immunity. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Dynamic flaps in HIV-1 protease adopt unique ordering at different stages in the catalytic cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, Suresh; Senapati, Sanjib

    2011-06-01

    The flexibility of HIV-1 protease flaps is known to be essential for the enzymatic activity. Here we attempt to capture a multitude of conformations of the free and substrate-bound HIV-1 protease that differ drastically in their flap arrangements. The substrate binding process suggests the opening of active site gate in conjunction with a reversal of flap tip ordering, from the native semiopen state. The reversed-flap, open-gated enzyme readily transforms to a closed conformation after proper placement of the substrate into the binding cleft. After substrate processing, the closed state protease which possessed opposite flap ordering relative to the semiopen state, encounters another flap reversal via a second open conformation that facilitates the evolution of native semiopen state of correct flap ordering. The complicated transitional pathway, comprising of many high and low energy states, is explored by combining standard and activated molecular dynamics (MD) simulation techniques. The study not only complements the existing findings from X-ray, NMR, EPR, and MD studies but also provides a wealth of detailed information that could help the structure-based drug design process. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. msaABCR operon positively regulates biofilm development by repressing proteases and autolysis in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahukhal, Gyan S; Batte, Justin L; Elasri, Mohamed O

    2015-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that causes nosocomial and community-acquired infections. One of the most important aspects of staphylococcal infections is biofilm development within the host, which renders the bacterium resistant to the host's immune response and antimicrobial agents. Biofilm development is very complex and involves several regulators that ensure cell survival on surfaces within the extracellular polymeric matrix. Previously, we identified the msaABCR operon as an additional positive regulator of biofilm formation. In this study, we define the regulatory pathway by which msaABCR controls biofilm formation. We demonstrate that the msaABCR operon is a negative regulator of proteases. The control of protease production mediates the processing of the major autolysin, Atl, and thus regulates the rate of autolysis. In the absence of the msaABCR operon, Atl is processed by proteases at a high rate, leading to increased cell death and a defect in biofilm maturation. We conclude that the msaABCR operon plays a key role in maintaining the balance between autolysis and growth within the staphylococcal biofilm.

  2. An Accessory Protease Inhibitor to Increase the Yield and Quality of a Tumour-Targeting mAb in Nicotiana benthamiana Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutras, Philippe V; Marusic, Carla; Lonoce, Chiara; Deflers, Carole; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Michaud, Dominique; Donini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The overall quality of recombinant IgG antibodies in plants is dramatically compromised by host endogenous proteases. Different approaches have been developed to reduce the impact of endogenous proteolysis on IgGs, notably involving site-directed mutagenesis to eliminate protease-susceptible sites or the in situ mitigation of host protease activities to minimize antibody processing in the cell secretory pathway. We here characterized the degradation profile of H10, a human tumour-targeting monoclonal IgG, in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana also expressing the human serine protease inhibitor α1-antichymotrypsin or the cysteine protease inhibitor tomato cystatin SlCYS8. Leaf extracts revealed consistent fragmentation patterns for the recombinant antibody regardless of leaf age and a strong protective effect of SlCYS8 in specific regions of the heavy chain domains. As shown using an antigen-binding ELISA and LC-MS/MS analysis of antibody fragments, SlCYS8 had positive effects on both the amount of fully-assembled antibody purified from leaf tissue and the stability of biologically active antibody fragments containing the heavy chain Fc domain. Our data confirm the potential of Cys protease inhibitors as convenient antibody-stabilizing expression partners to increase the quality of therapeutic antibodies in plant protein biofactories.

  3. Proteomic approaches to identify substrates of the three Deg/HtrA proteases of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Lam X; Aigner, Harald; Timmerman, Evy; Gevaert, Kris; Funk, Christiane

    2015-06-15

    The family of Deg/HtrA proteases plays an important role in quality control of cellular proteins in a wide range of organisms. In the genome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a model organism for photosynthetic research and renewable energy products, three Deg proteases are encoded, termed HhoA, HhoB and HtrA. In the present study, we compared wild-type (WT) Synechocystis cells with the single insertion mutants ΔhhoA, ΔhhoB and ΔhtrA. Protein expression of the remaining Deg/HtrA proteases was strongly affected in the single insertion mutants. Detailed proteomic studies using DIGE (difference gel electrophoresis) and N-terminal COFRADIC (N-terminal combined fractional diagonal chromatography) revealed that inactivation of a single Deg protease has similar impact on the proteomes of the three mutants; differences to WT were observed in enzymes involved in the major metabolic pathways. Changes in the amount of phosphate permease system Pst-1 were observed only in the insertion mutant ΔhhoB. N-terminal COFRADIC analyses on cell lysates of ΔhhoB confirmed changed amounts of many cell envelope proteins, including the phosphate permease systems, compared with WT. In vitro COFRADIC studies were performed to identify the specificity profiles of the recombinant proteases rHhoA, rHhoB or rHtrA added to the Synechocystis WT proteome. The combined in vivo and in vitro N-terminal COFRADIC datasets propose RbcS as a natural substrate for HhoA, PsbO for HhoB and HtrA and Pbp8 for HtrA. We therefore suggest that each Synechocystis Deg protease protects the cell through different, but connected mechanisms. © The Authors Journal compilation © 2015 Biochemical Society.

  4. Biological Variation in Circulating Levels of Mannan-Binding Lectin (MBL) and MBL-Associated Serine Protease-2 and the Influence of Age, Gender and Physical Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, Henriette; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Thiel, S.

    2007-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2) are central components of the MBL pathway of complement activation, and may have potential as clinical biomarkers in colorectal cancer (CRC). Prior to clinical usage, knowledge of the biological variations of the molecules ...

  5. Mast cell tryptase stimulates myoblast proliferation; a mechanism relying on protease-activated receptor-2 and cyclooxygenase-2

    OpenAIRE

    Côté Claude H; Tremblay Marie-Hélène; Duchesne Elise

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Mast cells contribute to tissue repair in fibrous tissues by stimulating proliferation of fibroblasts through the release of tryptase which activates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2). The possibility that a tryptase/PAR-2 signaling pathway exists in skeletal muscle cell has never been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether tryptase can stimulate myoblast proliferation and determine the downstream cascade. Methods Proliferation of L6 rat skeletal m...

  6. Structural determinants of MALT1 protease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, Christian; Leder, Lukas; Blank, Jutta; Bernardi, Anna; Melkko, Samu; Decock, Arnaud; D'Arcy, Allan; Villard, Frederic; Erbel, Paulus; Hughes, Nicola; Freuler, Felix; Nikolay, Rainer; Alves, Juliano; Bornancin, Frederic; Renatus, Martin

    2012-05-25

    The formation of the CBM (CARD11-BCL10-MALT1) complex is pivotal for antigen-receptor-mediated activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Signaling is dependent on MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1), which not only acts as a scaffolding protein but also possesses proteolytic activity mediated by its caspase-like domain. It remained unclear how the CBM activates MALT1. Here, we provide biochemical and structural evidence that MALT1 activation is dependent on its dimerization and show that mutations at the dimer interface abrogate activity in cells. The unliganded protease presents itself in a dimeric yet inactive state and undergoes substantial conformational changes upon substrate binding. These structural changes also affect the conformation of the C-terminal Ig-like domain, a domain that is required for MALT1 activity. Binding to the active site is coupled to a relative movement of caspase and Ig-like domains. MALT1 binding partners thus may have the potential of tuning MALT1 protease activity without binding directly to the caspase domain.

  7. Characterizing proteases in an Antarctic Janthinobacterium sp. isolate:Evidence of a protease horizontal gene transfer event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cecilia Martinez-Rosales; Juan Jos Marizcurrena; Andrs Iriarte; Natalia Fullana; Hctor Musto; Susana Castro-Sowinski

    2015-01-01

    We report the isolation of a cold-adapted bacterium belonging to the genus Janthinobacterium (named AU11), from a water sample collected in Lake Uruguay (King George Island, South Shetlands). AU11 (growth between 4°C and 30°C) produces a single cold-active extracellular protease (ExPAU11), differentially expressed at low temperature. ExPAU11 was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS) as an alkaline metallo-protease (70% coverage with an extracellular protease of Janthinobacterium sp. PI12), and by protease-inhibitor screening identified as a serine-protease. To the best of our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence of a cold-active extracellular protease produced by Janthinobacterium. Furthermore, we identified a serine-protease gene (named JSP8A) showing 60% identity (98%query coverage) to subtilisin peptidases belonging to the S8 family (S8A subfamily) of many cyanobacteria. A phylogenetic analysis of the JSP8A protease, along with related bacterial protein sequences, confirms that JSP8A clusters with S8A subtilisin sequences from different cyanobacteria, and is clearly separated from S8A bacterial sequences of other phyla (including its own). An analysis of the genomic organization around JSP8A suggests that this protease gene was acquired in an event that duplicated a racemase gene involved in transforming L- to D-amino acids. Our results suggest that AU11 probably acquired this subtilisin-like protease gene by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from a cyanobacterium. We discuss the relevance of a bacterial protease-HGT in the Antarctic environment in light of this hypothesis.

  8. Expression and characterization of Coprothermobacter proteolyticus alkaline serine protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT A putative protease gene (aprE) from the thermophilic bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus was cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was determined to be a serine protease based on inhibition by PMSF. Biochemical characterization demonstrated the enzyme had...

  9. Protease-induced solubilisation of carbohydrates from brewers' spent grain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faulds, C.B.; Collins, S.; Robertson, J.A.; Treimo, J.; Eijsink, V.G.H.; Hinz, S.W.A.; Schols, H.A.; Buchert, J.; Waldron, K.W.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of microbial proteases on the release of carbohydrates from BSG was studied. The proteases were able to release the non-cellulosic glucose, a portion of feruloylated arabinoxylan and over 50% of the protein from brewers' spent grain (BSG) after 24 h hydrolysis. The non-cellulosic glucose

  10. Control of exocellular proteases in dermatophytes and especially Trichophyton rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meevootisom, V; Niederpruem, D J

    1979-06-01

    The production of proteases was investigated during growth of dermatophytic fungi with special emphasis on Trichophyton rubrum. Exogenous glucose suppressed elastase production in all dermatophytes examined. The production of protease active guinea pig hair in keratin-salts broth by Microsporum gypseum. Trichophyton mentagrophytes and T. rubrum was also suppressed by glucose. Various carbohydrates added to keratin-salts broth curtailed protease production by T. rubrum as did individual amino acids but ammonium phosphate did not. Enzyme activities against guinea pig hair were compared in twenty-one diverse clinical isolates of T. rubrum cultured in keratin-salts broth. Activity also occurred towards casein, bovine serum albumin, keratin, collagen and elastin after keratin-growth. Studies concerning the properties of enzyme activities in culture filtrates of T. rubrum after keratin-growth suggested that multiple proteases occurred here. Hydrolysis of guinea pig hair and elastin were optimal at pH7 while keratinase was most active at alkaline pH. Divalent cations stimulated protease(s). Ferric ion and mercuric ion stimulated keratinase but were inhibitory to guinea pig hair hydrolysis and elastase. Chelating agents inhibited elastase and the hydrolysis of guinea pig hair more severely than keratinase and all of those effects were reversed by excess calcium. A serine-protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride (PMSF), curtailed keratinase but was less inhibitory to elastase and guinea pig hair hydrolysis. Soybean trypsin inhibitor arrested each protease.

  11. Engineering Environmentally-Stable Proteases to Specifically Neutralize Protein Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-14

    crystal structure of the prototypical hormone-processing protease Kex2 in complex with an Ala-Lys-Arg boronic acid inhibitor. Biochemistry 42, 6709-6718...deacylation in cleavage of physiological sequences by the processing protease Kex2. Biochemistry 40, 3657-3665. (26) Rockwell, N. C., and Fuller, R. S

  12. Comparison of protease production from newly isolated bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nasir

    2016-10-12

    Oct 12, 2016 ... Fermentation medium (by using sub-merged fermentation technique) was incubated for 48 h at ... of protease, and recovery of final product free of protease ... Nutrient broth (0.8 g) was weighed and then dissolved in 50 ml of.

  13. Protease activities of Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Luna, José de Jesús; Cervantes-Sandoval, Isaac; Calderón, Jesús; Navarro-García, Fernando; Tsutsumi, Victor; Shibayama, Mineko

    2006-01-01

    Acanthamoeba spp. are free-living amoebae that cause amoebic granulomatous encephalitis, skin lesions, and ocular amoebic keratitis in humans. Several authors have suggested that proteases could play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. In the present work, we performed a partial biochemical characterization of proteases in crude extracts of Acanthamoeba spp. and in conditioned medium using 7.5% SDS-PAGE copolymerized with 0.1% m/v gelatin as substrate. We distinguished a total of 17 bands with proteolytic activity distributed in two species of Acanthamoeba. The bands ranged from 30 to 188 kDa in A. castellanii and from 34 to 144 kDa in A. polyphaga. Additionally, we showed that the pattern of protease activity differed in the two species of Acanthamoeba when pH was altered. By using protease inhibitors, we found that the proteolytic activities belonged mostly to the serine protease family and secondly to cysteine proteases and that the proteolytic activities from A. castellanii were higher than those in A. polyphaga. Furthermore, aprotinin was found to inhibit crude extract protease activity on Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) monolayers. These data suggest that protease patterns could be more complex than previously reported.

  14. Peptide synthesis in neat organic solvents with novel thermostable proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toplak, Ana; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; Wu, Bian; Janssen, Dick B

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalytic peptide synthesis will benefit from enzymes that are active at low water levels in organic solvent compositions that allow good substrate and product solubility. To explore the use of proteases from thermophiles for peptide synthesis under such conditions, putative protease genes of the

  15. Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease heterologous expressed in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach

    During germination of barley seeds, the mobilization of protein is essential and Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins [1]. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme until activated through reduction of the...

  16. Heterologous expression of Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben B

    Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned with and w...

  17. Variation in Extracellular Protease Production among Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus Due to Different Levels of Expression of the Protease Repressor sarA

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Anna; Arvidson, Staffan

    2002-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces four major extracellular proteases: staphylococcal serine protease (V8 protease; SspA), cysteine protease (SspB), metalloprotease (aureolysin; Aur), and staphopain (Scp). Several in vitro studies have suggested that these enzymes are important virulence factors. Here we analyzed the protease production of 92 S. aureus strains from infected human soft tissue. Twenty-one strains produced variable zones of proteolysis on casein agar plates, while the remaining 71 s...

  18. Structure-Function of Falcipains: Malarial Cysteine Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C. Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that cysteine proteases play essential role in malaria parasites; therefore an obvious area of investigation is the inhibition of these enzymes to treat malaria. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases genes have suggested a role for cysteine proteases in hemoglobin hydrolysis. The best characterized Plasmodium cysteine proteases are falcipains, which are papain family enzymes. Falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 are major hemoglobinases of P. falciparum. Structural and functional analysis of falcipains showed that they have unique domains including a refolding domain and a hemoglobin binding domain. Overall, the complexes of falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 with small and macromolecular inhibitors provide structural insight to facilitate the design or modification of effective drug treatment against malaria. Drug development targeting falcipains should be aided by a strong foundation of biochemical and structural studies.

  19. Purification and Characterization of An Alkaline Protease from Acetes chinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jiachao; LIU Xin; LI Zhaojie; XU Jie; XUE Changhu; GAO Xin

    2005-01-01

    An alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis was purified and characterized in this study. The steps of purification include ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow, gel filtration chromatography with S300 and the second ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow. The protease was isolated and purified, which was present and active on protein substrates (azocasein and casein). The specific protease activity was 17.15folds and the recovery was 4.67. The molecular weight of the protease was estimated at 23.2 kD by SDS-PAGE. With azocasein as the susbstrate, the optimal temperature was 55 ℃ and the optimal pH value was 5.5. Ion Ca2+ could enhance the proteolytic activity of the protease, while Cu2+ , EDTA and PMSF could inhibit its activity.

  20. Alkaline Protease Production by a Strain of Marine Yeasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ping; CHI Zhenming; MA Chunling

    2006-01-01

    Yeast strain 10 with high yield of protease was isolated from sediments of saltern near Qingdao, China.The protease had the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 45 ℃.The optimal medium for the maximum alkaline protease production of strain 10 was 2.5 g soluble starch and 2.0 g NaNO3 in 100 mL seawater with initial pH6.0.The optimal cultivation conditions for the maximum protease production were temperature 24.5 ℃, aeration rate 8.0 L min -1 and agitation speed 150 r min-1.Under the optimal conditions, 623.1 Umg-1 protein of alkaline protease was reached in the culture within 30 h of fermentation.

  1. Identification of a senescence-related protease in coriander leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Senescence-related protease may play an important role in leaf senescence. By improved SDS-Gela- tin-PAGE assay, a 63 ku senescence-related protease (63 SRP) in coriander leaves was identified. Activity of 63 SRP was increased in parallel to the advance of coriander leaf senescence, and inhibited by treating the leaf with gibberellic acid, and enhanced by ethylene treatment. The 63 SRP was suggested to be a serine protease based on the fact that its activity was inhibited by the protease inhibitor PMSF. The optimal temperature for the activity of the 70 ku protease was 50℃. The maximal activity was observed at pH 6-9, some activity could be observed on the gel slices incubated at pH 5 or 11. The 63 SRP was partly purified by the way of ammonium sulfate precipitation and then gel slicing after gel electrophoresis.

  2. Immunoglobulin A1 protease activity in Gemella haemolysans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, JA; Kilian, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the occurrence and nature of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease activity in members of the genus Gemella and related taxa. Among a total of 22 Gemella strains belonging to the four species Gemella haemolysans, Gemella morbillorum, Gemella sanguinis......, and Gemella bergeriae and four reference strains of the species Helcococcus kunzii, Facklamia hominis, and Globicatella sanguinis, IgA1 protease activity was an exclusive character of all nine isolates of G. haemolysans. The IgA1 protease of G. haemolysans appears to be a metallo-type IgA1 protease...... that cleaves the Pro(227)-Thr(228) peptide bond in the hinge region of the alpha1 chain like that of several Streptococcus species. Phenotypic characterization of the isolates demonstrates that screening for IgA1 protease activity provides a valuable means for species differentiation in this group of bacteria....

  3. Functional Implications of Domain Organization Within Prokaryotic Rhomboid Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Intramembrane proteases are membrane embedded enzymes that cleave transmembrane substrates. This interesting class of enzyme and its water mediated substrate cleavage mechanism occurring within the hydrophobic lipid bilayer has drawn the attention of researchers. Rhomboids are a family of ubiquitous serine intramembrane proteases. Bacterial forms of rhomboid proteases are mainly composed of six transmembrane helices that are preceded by a soluble N-terminal domain. Several crystal structures of the membrane domain of the E. coli rhomboid protease ecGlpG have been solved. Independently, the ecGlpG N-terminal cytoplasmic domain structure was solved using both NMR and protein crystallography. Despite these structures, we still do not know the structure of the full-length protein, nor do we know the functional role of these domains in the cell. This chapter will review the structural and functional roles of the different domains associated with prokaryotic rhomboid proteases. Lastly, we will address questions remaining in the field.

  4. Alkaline protease production by a strain of marine yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Wang; Zhenming, Chi; Chunling, Ma

    2006-07-01

    Yeast strain 10 with high yield of protease was isolated from sediments of saltern near Qingdao, China. The protease had the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 45°C. The optimal medium for the maximum alkaline protease production of strain 10 was 2.5g soluble starch and 2.0g NaNO3 in 100mL seawater with initial pH 6.0. The optimal cultivation conditions for the maximum protease production were temperature 24.5°C, aeration rate 8.0L min-1 and agitation speed 150r min-1 Under the optimal conditions, 623.1 U mg-1 protein of alkaline protease was reached in the culture within 30h of fermentation.

  5. Poliovirus protease 3C(pro) kills cells by apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, A; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    2000-01-20

    The tetracycline-based Tet-Off expression system has been used to analyze the effects of poliovirus protease 3C(pro) on human cells. Stable HeLa cell clones that express this poliovirus protease under the control of an inducible, tightly regulated promoter were obtained. Tetracycline removal induces synthesis of 3C protease, followed by drastic morphological alterations and cellular death. Degradation of cellular DNA in nucleosomes and generation of apoptotic bodies are observed from the second day after 3C(pro) induction. The cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, occurs after induction of 3C(pro), indicating caspase activation by this poliovirus protease. The 3C(pro)-induced apoptosis is blocked by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Our findings suggest that the protease 3C is responsible for triggering apoptosis in poliovirus-infected cells by a mechanism that involves caspase activation. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. The maize cystatin CC9 interacts with apoplastic cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Mueller, André N; Hemetsberger, Christoph; Kashani, Farnusch; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2012-11-01

    In a recent study we identified corn cystain9 (CC9) as a novel compatibility factor for the interaction of the biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis with its host plant maize. CC9 is transcriptionally induced during the compatible interaction with U. maydis and localizes in the maize apoplast where it inhibits apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases. The proteases are activated during incompatible interaction and salicylic acid (SA) treatment and, in turn, are sufficient to induce SA signaling including PR-gene expression. Therefore the inhibition of apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases by CC9 is essential to suppress host immunity during U. maydis infection. Here were present new experimental data on the cysteine protease-cystatin interaction and provide an in silco analysis of plant cystatins and the identified apoplastic cysteine proteases.

  7. Purification and characterization of an alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiachao; Liu, Xin; Li, Zhaojie; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Gao, Xin

    2005-07-01

    An alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis was purified and characterized in this study. The steps of purification include ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow, gel filtration chromatography with S300 and the second ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow. The protease was isolated and purified, which was present and active on protein substrates (azocasein and casein). The specific protease activity was 17.15 folds and the recovery was 4.67. The molecular weight of the protease was estimated at 23.2 kD by SDS-PAGE. With azocasein as the susbstrate, the optimal temperature was 55°C and the optimal pH value was 5.5. Ion Ca2+ could enhance the proteolytic activity of the protease, while Cu2+, EDTA and PMSF could inhibit its activity.

  8. The family of Deg/HtrA proteases in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuhmann Holger

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Deg/HtrA family of ATP-independent serine endopeptidases is present in nearly all organisms from bacteria to human and vascular plants. In recent years, multiple deg/htrA protease genes were identified in various plant genomes. During genome annotations most proteases were named according to the order of discovery, hence the same names were sometimes given to different types of Deg/HtrA enzymes in different plant species. This can easily lead to false inference of individual protease functions based solely on a shared name. Therefore, the existing names and classification of these proteolytic enzymes does not meet our current needs and a phylogeny-based standardized nomenclature is required. Results Using phylogenetic and domain arrangement analysis, we improved the nomenclature of the Deg/HtrA protease family, standardized protease names based on their well-established nomenclature in Arabidopsis thaliana, and clarified the evolutionary relationship between orthologous enzymes from various photosynthetic organisms across several divergent systematic groups, including dicots, a monocot, a moss and a green alga. Furthermore, we identified a “core set” of eight proteases shared by all organisms examined here that might provide all the proteolytic potential of Deg/HtrA proteases necessary for a hypothetical plant cell. Conclusions In our proposed nomenclature, the evolutionarily closest orthologs have the same protease name, simplifying scientific communication when comparing different plant species and allowing for more reliable inference of protease functions. Further, we proposed that the high number of Deg/HtrA proteases in plants is mainly due to gene duplications unique to the respective organism.

  9. Plasmodium falciparum metacaspase PfMCA-1 triggers a z-VAD-fmk inhibitable protease to promote cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Meslin

    Full Text Available Activation of proteolytic cell death pathways may circumvent drug resistance in deadly protozoan parasites such as Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania. To this end, it is important to define the cell death pathway(s in parasites and thus characterize proteases such as metacaspases (MCA, which have been reported to induce cell death in plants and Leishmania parasites. We, therefore, investigated whether the cell death function of MCA is conserved in different protozoan parasite species such as Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania major, focusing on the substrate specificity and functional role in cell survival as compared to Saccharomyces cerevisae. Our results show that, similarly to Leishmania, Plasmodium MCA exhibits a calcium-dependent, arginine-specific protease activity and its expression in yeast induced growth inhibition as well as an 82% increase in cell death under oxidative stress, a situation encountered by parasites during the host or when exposed to drugs such as artemisins. Furthermore, we show that MCA cell death pathways in both Plasmodium and Leishmania, involve a z-VAD-fmk inhibitable protease. Our data provide evidence that MCA from both Leishmania and Plasmodium falciparum is able to induce cell death in stress conditions, where it specifically activates a downstream enzyme as part of a cell death pathway. This enzymatic activity is also induced by the antimalarial drug chloroquine in erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Interestingly, we found that blocking parasite cell death influences their drug sensitivity, a result which could be used to create therapeutic strategies that by-pass drug resistance mechanisms by acting directly on the innate pathways of protozoan cell death.

  10. Stable earthworm serine proteases: application of the protease function and usefulness of the earthworm autolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, N; Sugimoto, M; Ishihara, K

    2000-01-01

    The fibrinolytic enzymes from Lumbricus rubellus [Nakajima, N. et al., Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 57, 1726-1730 (1993), 60, 293-300 (1996), and 63, 2031-2033 (1999)] were further characterized to exploit their catalytic functions. These enzymes are stable in solution for long periods at room temperature and strongly resistant to organic solvents, even toluene and n-hexane. The serine proteases can act on various protein substrates such as elastin and hemoglobin as well as fibrin, and also catalyzed the hydrolysis of esters such as ethyl acetate and a bioplastic, poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] film. The enzymes, in the absence of microbial degradation, contributed to the production of the earthworm autolysate possessing antioxidant ability and protease activity, whose components were similar to those of soy sauce. The extract of the earthworm autolysate could be used as a peptone substitute in media for the cultivation of microorganisms.

  11. Reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Shankar; P Kolandaivel

    2007-09-01

    The gas-phase reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases has been investigated using ab initio and density functional theory. On the irreversible process, after breakdown of tetrahedral intermediate (INT1), small 1-2 anionotropic has been formed and rearranged to give stable by-products sulfenamide (P1) and thiocarbamate (P2) with considerable energy loss. While, on the reversible part of this reaction mechanism, intermediate (INT2) breaks down on oxidation, to form a stable product (P3). Topological and AIM analyses have been performed for hydrogen bonded complex in this reaction profile. Intrinsic reaction coordinates [IRC, minimum-energy path (MEP)] calculation connects the transition state between R-INT1, INT1-P1 and INT1-P2. The products P1, P2 and P3 are energetically more stable than the reactant and hence the reaction enthalpy is found to be exothermic.

  12. Two mannose-binding lectin homologues and an MBL-associated serine protease are expressed in the gut epithelia of the urochordate species Ciona intestinalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoedt, Mikkel-ole; Palarasah, Yaseelan; Rasmussen, Karina

    2010-01-01

    interchain disulphide bridges between N-terminal cysteine residues and cysteines located between the neck region and the CRD. RT-PCR showed a tissue specific expression of CioMBL in the gut and by immunohistochemistry analysis we also demonstrated that CioMBL co-localize with an MBL-associated serine...... protease in the epithelia cells lining the stomach and intestine. In conclusion we present two urochordate MBLs and identify an associated serine protease, which support the concept of an evolutionary ancient origin of the lectin complement pathway....

  13. Exploring a new serine protease from Cucumis sativus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafeesa, Zohara; Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-03-01

    Coagulation is an important physiological process in hemostasis which is activated by sequential action of proteases. This study aims to understand the involvement of aqueous fruit extract of Cucumis sativus L. (AqFEC) European burp less variety in blood coagulation cascade. AqFEC hydrolyzed casein in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of protease activity was further confirmed by casein zymography which revealed the possible presence of two high molecular weight protease(s). The proteolytic activity was inhibited only by phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride suggesting the presence of serine protease(s). In a dose-dependent manner, AqFEC also hydrolysed Aα and Bβ subunits of fibrinogen, whereas it failed to degrade the γ subunit of fibrinogen even at a concentration as high as 100 μg and incubation time up to 4 h. AqFEC reduced the clotting time of citrated plasma by 87.65%. The protease and fibrinogenolytic activity of AqFEC suggests its possible role in stopping the bleeding and ensuing wound healing process.

  14. Cold-adapted proteases as an emerging class of therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornbacke, Marcus; Clarsund, Mats

    2013-06-01

    Proteases have been used in medicine for several decades and are an established and well tolerated class of therapeutic agent. These proteases were sourced from mammals or bacteria that exist or have adapted to moderate temperatures (mesophilic organisms); however, proteases derived from organisms from cold environments-cold-adapted or psychrophilic proteases-generally have high specific activity, low substrate affinity, and high catalytic rates at low and moderate temperatures. Made possible by greater flexibility, psychrophilic enzymes interact with and transform the substrate at lower energy costs. Cold-adapted proteases have been used in a wide range of applications, including industrial functions, textiles, cleaning/hygiene products, molecular biology, environmental bioremediations, consumer food products, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical production. In addition to these applications, they have also shown promise as therapeutic modalities for cosmeceutical applications (by reducing glabellar [frown] lines) and a number of disease conditions, including bacterial infections (by disrupting biofilms to prevent bacterial infection), topical wound management (when used as a debridement agent to remove necrotic tissue and fibrin clots), oral/dental health management (by removing plaque and preventing periodontal disease), and in viral infections (by reducing the infectivity of viruses, such as human rhinovirus 16 and herpes simplex virus). Psychrophilic proteases with greater activity and stability (than the original organism-derived variant) have been developed; this coupled with available manufacturing recombinant production techniques suggests that cold-adapted proteases have a promising future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications.

  15. Screening and characterization of protease producing actinomycetes from marine saltern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthindhiran, Krish; Jayasri, Mangalam Achuthananda; Dipali, Dipa; Prasar, Apurva

    2014-10-01

    In the course of systematic screening program for bioactive actinomycetes, an alkaline protease producing halophilic strain Actinopolyspora sp. VITSDK2 was isolated from marine saltern, Southern India. The strain was identified as Actinopolyspora based on its phenotypic and phylogenetic characters. The protease was partially purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation and subsequently by DEAE cellulose column chromatography. The enzyme was further purified using HPLC and the molecular weight was found to be 22 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. The purified protease exhibited pH stability in a wide range of 4-12 with optimum at 10.0. The enzyme was found to be stable between 25 and 80 °C and displayed a maximum activity at 60 °C. The enzyme activity was increased marginally in presence of Mn(2+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) and decreased in presence of Cu(2+) . PMSF and DFP completely inhibited the activity suggesting it belongs to serine protease. Further, the proteolytic activity was abolished in presence of N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone suggesting this might be chymotrypsin-like serine protease. The protease was 96% active when kept for 10 days at room temperature. The results indicate that the enzyme belong to chymotrypsin-like serine protease exhibiting both pH and thermostability, which can be used for various applications in industries. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SUBSP. plantarum PROBIOTIC STRAINS AS PROTEASE PRODUCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Маtseliukh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteases from probiotic strains of the genus Bacillus, just like the antibiotics, bacteriocins and other hydrolytic enzymes, are one of the main factors that determine their biological activity. The aim of this work was to study the synthesis and biochemical properties of proteases from two strains Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM B-5139 and UCM B-5140 that included in the probiotic Endosporin. The cultivation of strains was carried out in flasks under rotating for two days. The influence of physico-chemical parameters of the reaction medium on proteolytic activity was studied on partially purified protease preparations. Lytic activity was determined by turbidimetric method. On the second day of cultivation B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM В-5139 and UCM В-5140 synthesized the metal-dependent peptidase and serine protease, respectively. The optimum conditions of their action were the following: temperature 37–40 °C and pH 6.5–7.0. Isolated proteases are able to lyse the living cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Thus we demonstrated that B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM B-5140 and UCM B-5139, included in the probiotic veterinary preparation Endosporin, produced proteolytic enzymes that hydrolyze the native insoluble proteins (elastin, fibrin and collagen. These enzymes belong to the group of neutral metal-dependent and serine proteases. They are active under physiological conditions against gram-positive bacteria and yeasts. The application of these proteases in biotechnology is considered.

  17. Protease activity, localization and inhibition in the human hair follicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhogal, R K; Mouser, P E; Higgins, C A; Turner, G A

    2014-02-01

    In humans, the process of hair shedding, referred to as exogen, is believed to occur independently of the other hair cycle phases. Although the actual mechanisms involved in hair shedding are not fully known, it has been hypothesized that the processes leading to the final step of hair shedding may be driven by proteases and/or protease inhibitor activity. In this study, we investigated the presence of proteases and protease activity in naturally shed human hairs and assessed enzyme inhibition activity of test materials. We measured enzyme activity using a fluorescence-based assay and protein localization by indirect immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also developed an ex vivo skin model for measuring the force required to pull hair fibres from skin. Our data demonstrate the presence of protease activity in the tissue material surrounding club roots. We also demonstrated the localization of specific serine protease protein expression in human hair follicle by IHC. These data provide evidence demonstrating the presence of proteases around the hair club roots, which may play a role during exogen. We further tested the hypothesis that a novel protease inhibitor system (combination of Trichogen) and climbazole) could inhibit protease activity in hair fibre club root extracts collected from a range of ethnic groups (U.K., Brazil, China, first-generation Mexicans in the U.S.A., Thailand and Turkey) in both males and females. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this combination is capable of increasing the force required to remove hair in an ex vivo skin model system. These studies indicate the presence of proteolytic activity in the tissue surrounding the human hair club root and show that it is possible to inhibit this activity with a combination of Trichogen and climbazole. This technology may have potential to reduce excessive hair shedding. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  18. An Arabidopsis aspartic protease functions as an anti-cell-death component in reproduction and embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaochun; Dietrich, Charles; Matsuno, Michiyo; Li, Guojing; Berg, Howard; Xia, Yiji

    2005-03-01

    The components and pathways that regulate and execute developmental cell death programmes in plants remain largely unknown. We have found that the PROMOTION OF CELL SURVIVAL 1 (PCS1) gene in Arabidopsis, which encodes an aspartic protease, has an important role in determining the fate of cells in embryonic development and in reproduction processes. The loss-of-function mutation of PCS1 causes degeneration of both male and female gametophytes and excessive cell death of developing embryos. Conversely, ectopic expression of PCS1 causes the septum and stomium cells that normally die in the anther wall to survive instead, leading to a failure in anther dehiscence and male sterility. PCS1 provides a new avenue for understanding the mechanisms of the programmed cell death processes that are associated with developmental pathways in plants and makes available a useful tool for engineering the male sterility trait for hybrid seed production.

  19. Allergens with Protease Activity from House Dust Mites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Reithofer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Globally, house dust mites (HDM are one of the main sources of allergens causing Type I allergy, which has a high risk of progressing into a severe disabling disease manifestation such as allergic asthma. The strong protease activities of a number of these allergens are thought to be involved in several steps of the pathophysiology of this allergic disease. It has been a common notion that protease activity may be one of the properties that confers allergenicity to proteins. In this review we summarize and discuss the roles of the different HDM proteases in the development of Type I allergy.

  20. Protease-associated cellular networks in malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilburn Timothy G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria continues to be one of the most severe global infectious diseases, responsible for 1-2 million deaths yearly. The rapid evolution and spread of drug resistance in parasites has led to an urgent need for the development of novel antimalarial targets. Proteases are a group of enzymes that play essential roles in parasite growth and invasion. The possibility of designing specific inhibitors for proteases makes them promising drug targets. Previously, combining a comparative genomics approach and a machine learning approach, we identified the complement of proteases (degradome in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and its sibling species 123, providing a catalog of targets for functional characterization and rational inhibitor design. Network analysis represents another route to revealing the role of proteins in the biology of parasites and we use this approach here to expand our understanding of the systems involving the proteases of P. falciparum. Results We investigated the roles of proteases in the parasite life cycle by constructing a network using protein-protein association data from the STRING database 4, and analyzing these data, in conjunction with the data from protein-protein interaction assays using the yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H system 5, blood stage microarray experiments 678, proteomics 9101112, literature text mining, and sequence homology analysis. Seventy-seven (77 out of 124 predicted proteases were associated with at least one other protein, constituting 2,431 protein-protein interactions (PPIs. These proteases appear to play diverse roles in metabolism, cell cycle regulation, invasion and infection. Their degrees of connectivity (i.e., connections to other proteins, range from one to 143. The largest protease-associated sub-network is the ubiquitin-proteasome system which is crucial for protein recycling and stress response. Proteases are also implicated in heat shock response, signal peptide

  1. Optimizing PHB and Protease Production by Box Behnken Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amro Abd al fattah Amara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mixed culture is more suitable to adapt more flexible fermentation process and produce different product simultaneously. In this study a mixed Bacillus culture was investigated for their ability to produce the bioplastic "Polyhydroxybutyrate" and both of the mesophilic and the thermophilic proteases in one flask. Box-Behnken experimental design was used. The produced amount of PHB has been increased significantly. Meanwhile there is a competition between PHB and proteases. The maximum produced amount of PHB using Box-Behnken design was 2.82 g/l/48 h with protease activity equal to 41.9 Units/ml/48 h for thermophilic proteases and 99.65 Units/ml/48 h for mesophilic proteases. Excel solver was used for extra-optimization for the optimum conditions obtained from Box-Behnken experiments and its model. The maximum PHB obtained after using Excel solver was 2.88 g/l/48 h. The maximum mesophilic and thermophilic activities obtained at the same PHB production conditions were 175.68 and 243.38 Units/ml respectively. The model accuracy as obtained from Excel solver was 118.8%, which prove the power of the experimental design in optimizing such complicated process. The strategies used in this study are recommended for the production of PHB and different proteases simultaneously using Bacillus mixed culture. ABSTRAK: Kultur campuran adalah lebih sesuai bagi proses penapaian yang fleksibel dan ia boleh menghasilkan produk yang berbeza secara serentak. Dalam kajian ini keupayaan  menghasilkan "Polyhydroxybutyrate" bioplastik serta mesofilik dan termofilik protease dalam satu flask oleh  kultur Bacillus campuran telah disiasat. Eksperimen rekabentuk Box-Behnken telah digunakan. Jumlah PHB yang dikeluarkan meningkat dengan ketara dan terdapat persaingan antara PHB dan protease. Jumlah keluaran PHB maksima menggunakan rekabentuk Box-Behnken adalah 2.82 g/l/48 jam dengan aktiviti protease sama dengan 41.9 Unit/ml/48 jam untuk protease termofilik dan 99.65 Unit

  2. OPTIMIZATION OF PROTEASE PRODUCTION FROM FUNGI ISOLATED FROM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Sethi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fungal strains isolated from soil by serial dilution method were screened for alkaline protease production. Isolate Penicillium chrysogenum the most potent producer of alkaline protease was identified. The isolate showed highest activity in the optimized medium at pH 9.0, temperature 35ºC, with 1% soycake and peptone incubated for 7 days. Proteases represent one of the largest groups of industrial enzymes and find application in detergents, leather industry, food industry, pharmaceutical industry and bioremediation processes.

  3. Influence of major surgery on the mannan-binding lectin pathway of innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, H; Christensen, I J; Basse, L;

    2006-01-01

    The mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation is important in host defence against pathogens and possibly against cancer. We investigated the effect of major surgery on two central components of the MBL pathway; MBL and the MBL-associated serine protease MASP-2, and for compari...

  4. Genome-wide identification and structure-function studies of proteases and protease inhibitors in Cicer arietinum (chickpea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ranu; Suresh, C G

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are a family of enzymes present in almost all living organisms. In plants they are involved in many biological processes requiring stress response in situations such as water deficiency, pathogen attack, maintaining protein content of the cell, programmed cell death, senescence, reproduction and many more. Similarly, protease inhibitors (PIs) are involved in various important functions like suppression of invasion by pathogenic nematodes, inhibition of spores-germination and mycelium growth of Alternaria alternata and response to wounding and fungal attack. As much as we know, no genome-wide study of proteases together with proteinaceous PIs is reported in any of the sequenced genomes till now. Phylogenetic studies and domain analysis of proteases were carried out to understand the molecular evolution as well as gene and protein features. Structural analysis was carried out to explore the binding mode and affinity of PIs for cognate proteases and prolyl oligopeptidase protease with inhibitor ligand. In the study reported here, a significant number of proteases and PIs were identified in chickpea genome. The gene expression profiles of proteases and PIs in five different plant tissues revealed a differential expression pattern in more than one plant tissue. Molecular dynamics studies revealed the formation of stable complex owing to increased number of protein-ligand and inter and intramolecular protein-protein hydrogen bonds. The genome-wide identification, characterization, evolutionary understanding, gene expression, and structural analysis of proteases and PIs provide a framework for future analysis when defining their roles in stress response and developing a more stress tolerant variety of chickpea. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Place of protease inhibitors in antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Tenore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, a number of drugs have been developed. The best choice concerning which antiretroviral analogs to start is always under discussion, especially in the choice between non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors-based therapies and ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors. Both are proven to control viral replication and lead to immunological gain. The choice between a non-nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a protease inhibitor as a third antiretroviral drug in the therapy should consider factors related to the individual, as well as the inclusion of the best therapy in the patient's daily activities and potential adherence. The protease inhibitor-based therapies showed similar efficacy among the various inhibitors with characteristics concerning the adverse events from each medicine. For the treatment of protease-resistant patients, darunavir and tipranavir showed good efficacy with higher genetic barrier to resistance.

  6. Isolation of alkaline protease from Bacillus subtilis AKRS3

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ashok

    2012-08-28

    Aug 28, 2012 ... sodium chloride concentration), production by submerged fermentation and analytical ... subtilis AKRS3 for alkaline protease production indicated that 3% of .... using eight different carbon sources namely, glucose, lactose,.

  7. Isolation and characterization of a protease-producing thermophilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    H.O.D Bio

    2012-08-02

    Aug 2, 2012 ... Full Length Research Paper. Isolation and ... emergence of geothermal-heated groundwater from the ... Meanwhile, the microflora from African geothermal .... The protease activity was assayed in duplicate with cell-free culture.

  8. Stability and selectivity of alkaline proteases in hydrophilic solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars Haastrup; Ritthitham, Sinthuwat; Pleissner, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    proteases, but at higher concentrations and particularly in anhydrous systems most enzymes including alkaline proteases will denature and consequently loose activity [1]. However, partial denaturing and increased structural flexibility due to the interaction between hydrophilic solvents and alkaline...... proteases has been agued as the primary reasons for increasing activity, influencing regio-selectivity and improving the enantio-selectivity of these enzymes [2]. Alkaline proteases have been shown to be active not only on peptides, but on a wide range of renewable resources for synthesis of biologically...... active molecules and carriers, and in synthesis of carbohydrate derivatives with designed functional properties.  When it comes to regio-selectivity of alkaline proateses on carbohydrates both the properties of the particular enzyme and the influence of the solvent is determining for the position...

  9. Effect of Gastrointestinal Protease Digestion on Bioactivity of Marine Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ida-Johanne; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Ossum, Carlo Gunnar;

    2014-01-01

    executed without concerning subsequent digestion after intake and the aim of this work was hence to investigate how the in vitro antioxidative, antihypertensive and caspase activating activities of peptides are affected by digestion with gastrointestinal (GI) proteases. Five different fish protein...... hydrolysates were chosen to study the effect of in vitro digestion on bioactivity. The protein concentration decreased in all samples during digestion and the molecular weight distribution of the peptides shifted towards lower values. Thus, in vitro digestion with GI proteases resulted in a further degradation...... of the peptides obtained by hydrolysis. The antihypertensive effect increased in all samples after digestion with GI proteases whereas the antioxidative capacity decreased. The effect on the caspase activity depended on the proteases used in the preparation of hydrolysates. In conclusion, the caspase activity...

  10. Variable context Markov chains for HIV protease cleavage site prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oğul, Hasan

    2009-06-01

    Deciphering the knowledge of HIV protease specificity and developing computational tools for detecting its cleavage sites in protein polypeptide chain are very desirable for designing efficient and specific chemical inhibitors to prevent acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In this study, we developed a generative model based on a generalization of variable order Markov chains (VOMC) for peptide sequences and adapted the model for prediction of their cleavability by certain proteases. The new method, called variable context Markov chains (VCMC), attempts to identify the context equivalence based on the evolutionary similarities between individual amino acids. It was applied for HIV-1 protease cleavage site prediction problem and shown to outperform existing methods in terms of prediction accuracy on a common dataset. In general, the method is a promising tool for prediction of cleavage sites of all proteases and encouraged to be used for any kind of peptide classification problem as well.

  11. Alkaline protease production on date waste by an alkalophilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... activity and stability towards anionic surfactants like SDS and oxidants ... Alkaline protease activity was determined by the method of. Higahara et al. ... rpm, the media was analyzed for cell mass, total protein concentration ...

  12. Optimization of alkaline protease production by Streptomyces sp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hacene

    2016-06-29

    Jun 29, 2016 ... The results showed the presence of an alkaline protease with optimal pH and ... significant effect on the production of the enzyme (fructose and malt extract), then defining theirs ..... Urease test. + ..... terminating inhibitors. Proc.

  13. Inhibition of activity of the protease from bovine leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, A; Leonard, R; Llido, S; Geoffre, S; Picard, P; Berteau, F; Precigoux, G; Hospital, M; Guillemain, B

    1994-06-13

    In view of the close similarity between bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) we investigated the possibility of developing specific inhibitors of the proteases of these retroviruses using the purified enzyme from BLV. We tested the ability of this protease to specifically cleave various short oligopeptide substrates containing cleavage sites of BLV and HTLV-I proteases, as well as a recombinant BLV Gag precursor. The best substrate, a synthetic decapeptide bearing the natural cleavage site between the matrix and the capsid proteins of BLV Gag precursor polyprotein, was used to develop an inhibition assay. We determined the relative inhibitory effect of synthetic Gag precursor-like peptides in which the cleavable site was replaced by a non-hydrolyzable moiety. The encouraging inhibitory effect of these compounds indicates that potent non-peptidic inhibitors for retroviral proteases are not unattainable.

  14. Internalization and trafficking of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in human respiratory epithelial cells and roles of IgA1 proteases for optimal invasion and persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Cara F; Håkansson, Anders P; Murphy, Timothy F

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) is a leading cause of opportunistic infections of the respiratory tract in children and adults. Although considered an extracellular pathogen, NTHI has been observed repeatedly within and between cells of the human respiratory tract, and these observations have been correlated to symptomatic infection. These findings are intriguing in light of the knowledge that NTHI persists in the respiratory tract despite antibiotic therapy and the development of bactericidal antibodies. We hypothesized that intracellular NTHI avoids, escapes, or neutralizes the endolysosomal pathway and persists within human respiratory epithelial cells and that human IgA1 proteases are required for optimal internalization and persistence of NTHI. Virtually all strains encode a human IgA1 protease gene, igaA, and we previously characterized a novel human IgA1 protease gene, igaB, that is associated with disease-causing strains and is homologous to the IgA1 protease that is unique to pathogenic Neisseria spp. Here, we show that NTHI invades human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro in a lipid raft-independent manner, is subsequently trafficked via the endolysosomal pathway, and is killed in lysosomes after variable durations of persistence. IgaA is required for optimal invasion. IgaB appears to play little or no role in adherence or invasion but is required for optimal intracellular persistence of NTHI. IgaB cleaves lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) at pHs characteristic of the plasma membrane, early endosome, late endosome, and lysosome. However, neither IgA1 protease inhibits acidification of intracellular vesicles containing NTHI. NTHI IgA1 proteases play important but different roles in NTHI invasion and trafficking in respiratory epithelial cells.

  15. Mitochondrial cereblon functions as a Lon-type protease

    OpenAIRE

    Kosuke Kataoka; China Nakamura; Toru Asahi; Naoya Sawamura

    2016-01-01

    Lon protease plays a major role in the protein quality control system in mammalian cell mitochondria. It is present in the mitochondrial matrix, and degrades oxidized and misfolded proteins, thereby protecting the cell from various extracellular stresses, including oxidative stress. The intellectual disability-associated and thalidomide-binding protein cereblon (CRBN) contains a large, highly conserved Lon domain. However, whether CRBN has Lon protease-like function remains unknown. Here, we ...

  16. Proteomic Substrate Identification for Membrane Proteases in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stephan A.; Scilabra, Simone D.; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell communication in the brain is controlled by multiple mechanisms, including proteolysis. Membrane-bound proteases generate signaling molecules from membrane-bound precursor proteins and control the length and function of cell surface membrane proteins. These proteases belong to different families, including members of the “a disintegrin and metalloprotease” (ADAM), the beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzymes (BACE), membrane-type matrix metalloproteases (MT-MMP) and rhomboids. Some of these proteases, in particular ADAM10 and BACE1 have been shown to be essential not only for the correct development of the mammalian brain, but also for myelination and maintaining neuronal connections in the adult nervous system. Additionally, these proteases are considered as drug targets for brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), schizophrenia and cancer. Despite their biomedical relevance, the molecular functions of these proteases in the brain have not been explored in much detail, as little was known about their substrates. This has changed with the recent development of novel proteomic methods which allow to identify substrates of membrane-bound proteases from cultured cells, primary neurons and other primary brain cells and even in vivo from minute amounts of mouse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This review summarizes the recent advances and highlights the strengths of the individual proteomic methods. Finally, using the example of the Alzheimer-related proteases BACE1, ADAM10 and γ-secretase, as well as ADAM17 and signal peptide peptidase like 3 (SPPL3), we illustrate how substrate identification with novel methods is instrumental in elucidating broad physiological functions of these proteases in the brain and other organs.

  17. Novel Procedures for Identification and Characterization of Viral Proteases Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrenberg, Angelica

    2014-01-01

    Viral proteases are often considered to be attractive drug targets because of their crucial function in the viral replication machinery. In order to increase our knowledge of these important targets and to contribute to the discovery and development of new antiviral drugs, the proteases from hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) have been produced and their interactions with inhibitors and fragments have been characterized, using enzyme inhibition and SPR biosensor based in...

  18. Proteomic Substrate Identification for Membrane Proteases in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan A Müller

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell-cell communication in the brain is controlled by multiple mechanisms, including proteolysis. Membrane-bound proteases generate signaling molecules from membrane-bound precursor proteins and control the length and function of cell surface membrane proteins. These proteases belong to different families, including members of the a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM, the beta-site APP cleaving enzymes (BACE, membrane-type matrix metalloproteases (MT-MMP and rhomboids. Some of these proteases, in particular ADAM10 and BACE1 have been shown to be essential for the correct development of the mammalian brain, but also for myelination and maintaining neuronal connections in the adult nervous system. Additionally, these proteases are considered as drug targets for brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and cancer. Despite their biomedical relevance, the molecular functions of these proteases in the brain have not been explored in much detail as little was known about their substrates. This has changed with the recent development of novel proteomic methods which allow to identify substrates of membrane-bound proteases from cultured cells, primary neurons and other primary brain cells and even in vivo from minute amounts of mouse cerebrospinal fluid. This review summarizes the recent advances and highlights the strengths of the individual proteomic methods. Finally, using the example of the Alzheimer-related proteases BACE1, ADAM10, and γ-secretase, as well as ADAM17 and SPPL3, we illustrate how substrate identification with novel methods is instrumental in elucidating broad physiological functions of these proteases in the brain and other organs.

  19. Characterizing Protease Specificity: How Many Substrates Do We Need?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schauperl

    Full Text Available Calculation of cleavage entropies allows to quantify, map and compare protease substrate specificity by an information entropy based approach. The metric intrinsically depends on the number of experimentally determined substrates (data points. Thus a statistical analysis of its numerical stability is crucial to estimate the systematic error made by estimating specificity based on a limited number of substrates. In this contribution, we show the mathematical basis for estimating the uncertainty in cleavage entropies. Sets of cleavage entropies are calculated using experimental cleavage data and modeled extreme cases. By analyzing the underlying mathematics and applying statistical tools, a linear dependence of the metric in respect to 1/n was found. This allows us to extrapolate the values to an infinite number of samples and to estimate the errors. Analyzing the errors, a minimum number of 30 substrates was found to be necessary to characterize substrate specificity, in terms of amino acid variability, for a protease (S4-S4' with an uncertainty of 5 percent. Therefore, we encourage experimental researchers in the protease field to record specificity profiles of novel proteases aiming to identify at least 30 peptide substrates of maximum sequence diversity. We expect a full characterization of protease specificity helpful to rationalize biological functions of proteases and to assist rational drug design.

  20. Direct visualization of protease action on collagen triple helical structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rosenblum

    Full Text Available Enzymatic processing of extracellular matrix (ECM macromolecules by matrix metalloproteases (MMPs is crucial in mediating physiological and pathological cell processes. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to effective physiological enzyme-ECM interactions remain elusive. Only scant information is available on the mode by which matrix proteases degrade ECM substrates. An example is the enzymatic degradation of triple helical collagen II fragments, generated by the collagenase MMP-8 cleavage, during the course of acute inflammatory conditions by gelatinase B/MMP-9. As is the case for many other matrix proteases, it is not clear how MMP-9 recognizes, binds and digests collagen in this important physiological process. We used single molecule imaging to directly visualize this protease during its interaction with collagen fragments. We show that the initial binding is mediated by the diffusion of the protease along the ordered helix on the collagen (3/4 fragment, with preferential binding of the collagen tail. As the reaction progressed and prior to collagen degradation, gelatin-like morphologies resulting from the denaturation of the triple helical collagen were observed. Remarkably, this activity was independent of enzyme proteolysis and was accompanied by significant conformational changes of the working protease. Here we provide the first direct visualization of highly complex mechanisms of macromolecular interactions governing the enzymatic processing of ECM substrates by physiological protease.

  1. Characterizing Protease Specificity: How Many Substrates Do We Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauperl, Michael; Fuchs, Julian E; Waldner, Birgit J; Huber, Roland G; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R

    2015-01-01

    Calculation of cleavage entropies allows to quantify, map and compare protease substrate specificity by an information entropy based approach. The metric intrinsically depends on the number of experimentally determined substrates (data points). Thus a statistical analysis of its numerical stability is crucial to estimate the systematic error made by estimating specificity based on a limited number of substrates. In this contribution, we show the mathematical basis for estimating the uncertainty in cleavage entropies. Sets of cleavage entropies are calculated using experimental cleavage data and modeled extreme cases. By analyzing the underlying mathematics and applying statistical tools, a linear dependence of the metric in respect to 1/n was found. This allows us to extrapolate the values to an infinite number of samples and to estimate the errors. Analyzing the errors, a minimum number of 30 substrates was found to be necessary to characterize substrate specificity, in terms of amino acid variability, for a protease (S4-S4') with an uncertainty of 5 percent. Therefore, we encourage experimental researchers in the protease field to record specificity profiles of novel proteases aiming to identify at least 30 peptide substrates of maximum sequence diversity. We expect a full characterization of protease specificity helpful to rationalize biological functions of proteases and to assist rational drug design.

  2. Proteases induce secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werb, Z.; Aggeler, J.

    1978-04-01

    We have observed that treatment of rabbit synovial fibroblasts with proteolytic enzymes can induce secretion of collagenase (EC 3.4.24.7) and plasminogen activator (EC 3.4.21.-). Cells treated for 2 to 24 hr with plasmin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, papain, bromelain, thermolysin, or ..cap alpha..-protease but not with thrombin or neuraminidase secreted detectable amounts of collagenase within 16 to 48 hr. Treatment of fibroblasts with trypsin also induced secretion of plasminogen activator. Proteases initiated secretion of collagenase (up to 20 units per 10/sup 6/ cells per 24 hr) only when treatment produced decreased cell adhesion. Collagenase production did not depend on continued presence of proteolytic activity or on subsequent cell adhesion, spreading, or proliferation. Routine subculturing with crude trypsin also induced collagenase secretion by cells. Secretion of collagenase was prevented and normal spreading was obtained if the trypsinized cells were placed into medium containing fetal calf serum. Soybean trypsin inhibitor, ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin, bovine serum albumin, collagen, and fibronectin did not inhibit collagenase production. Although proteases that induced collagenase secretion also removed surface glycoprotein, the kinetics of induction of cell protease secretion were different from those for removal of fibronectin. Physiological inducers of secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by cells have not been identified. These results suggest that extracellular proteases in conjunction with plasma proteins may govern protease secretion by cells.

  3. Pnserpin: A Novel Serine Protease Inhibitor from Extremophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine protease inhibitors (serpins are native inhibitors of serine proteases, constituting a large protein family with members spread over eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, only very few prokaryotic serpins, especially from extremophiles, have been characterized to date. In this study, Pnserpin, a putative serine protease inhibitor from the thermophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli for purification and characterization. It irreversibly inhibits chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, elastase-, and subtilisin-like proteases in a temperature range from 20 to 100 °C in a concentration-dependent manner. The stoichiometry of inhibition (SI of Pnserpin for proteases decreases as the temperature increases, indicating that the inhibitory activity of Pnserpin increases with the temperature. SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that Pnserpin inhibits proteases by forming a SDS-resistant covalent complex. Homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations predicted that Pnserpin can form a stable common serpin fold. Results of the present work will help in understanding the structural and functional characteristics of thermophilic serpin and will broaden the current knowledge about serpins from extremophiles.

  4. In vivo imaging of protease activity by Probody therapeutic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kenneth R; Menendez, Elizabeth; Craik, Charles S; Kavanaugh, W Michael; Vasiljeva, Olga

    2016-03-01

    Probody™ therapeutics are recombinant, proteolytically-activated antibody prodrugs, engineered to remain inert until activated locally by tumor-associated proteases. Probody therapeutics exploit the fundamental dysregulation of extracellular protease activity that exists in tumors relative to healthy tissue. Leveraging the ability of a Probody therapeutic to bind its target at the site of disease after proteolytic cleavage, we developed a novel method for profiling protease activity in living animals. Using NIR optical imaging, we demonstrated that a non-labeled anti-EGFR Probody therapeutic can become activated and compete for binding to tumor cells in vivo with a labeled anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, by inhibiting matriptase activity in vivo with a blocking-matriptase antibody, we show that the ability of the Probody therapeutic to bind EGFR in vivo was dependent on protease activity. These results demonstrate that in vivo imaging of Probody therapeutic activation can be used for screening and characterization of protease activity in living animals, and provide a method that avoids some of the limitations of prior methods. This approach can improve our understanding of the activity of proteases in disease models and help to develop efficient strategies for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  5. The roles of intramembrane proteases in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, L David

    2013-12-01

    Intramembrane proteolysis is widely conserved throughout different forms of life, with three major types of proteases being known for their ability to cleave peptide bonds directly within the transmembrane domains of their substrates. Although intramembrane proteases have been extensively studied in humans and model organisms, they have only more recently been investigated in protozoan parasites, where they turn out to play important and sometimes unexpected roles. Signal peptide peptidases are involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control and signal peptide degradation from exported proteins. Recent studies suggest that repurposing inhibitors developed for blocking presenilins may be useful for inhibiting the growth of Plasmodium, and possibly other protozoan parasites, by blocking signal peptide peptidases. Rhomboid proteases, originally described in the fly, are also widespread in parasites, and are especially expanded in apicomplexans. Their study in parasites has revealed novel roles that expand our understanding of how these proteases function. Within this diverse group of parasites, rhomboid proteases contribute to processing of adhesins involved in attachment, invasion, intracellular replication, phagocytosis, and immune evasion, placing them at the vertex of host-parasite interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases.

  6. Pnserpin: A Novel Serine Protease Inhibitor from Extremophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan; Fei, Rui; Xue, Baigong; Yu, Shanshan; Zhang, Zuoming; Zhong, Sheng; Gao, Yuanqi; Zhou, Xiaoli

    2017-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are native inhibitors of serine proteases, constituting a large protein family with members spread over eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, only very few prokaryotic serpins, especially from extremophiles, have been characterized to date. In this study, Pnserpin, a putative serine protease inhibitor from the thermophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli for purification and characterization. It irreversibly inhibits chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, elastase-, and subtilisin-like proteases in a temperature range from 20 to 100 °C in a concentration-dependent manner. The stoichiometry of inhibition (SI) of Pnserpin for proteases decreases as the temperature increases, indicating that the inhibitory activity of Pnserpin increases with the temperature. SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) showed that Pnserpin inhibits proteases by forming a SDS-resistant covalent complex. Homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations predicted that Pnserpin can form a stable common serpin fold. Results of the present work will help in understanding the structural and functional characteristics of thermophilic serpin and will broaden the current knowledge about serpins from extremophiles. PMID:28067849

  7. Three monoclonal antibodies against the serpin protease nexin-1 prevent protease translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousted, Tina Mostrup; Skjoedt, K; Petersen, S V

    2013-01-01

    , conversion to an inactive conformation or induction of serpin substrate behaviour. Until now, no inhibitory antibodies against PN-1 have been thoroughly characterised. Here we report the development of three monoclonal antibodies binding specifically and with high affinity to human PN-1. The antibodies all...... the loop connecting α-helix F with β-strand 3A and the loop connecting α-helix A with β-strand 1B. We conclude that antibody binding causes a direct blockage of the final critical step of protease translocation, resulting in abortive inhibition and premature release of reactive centre cleaved PN-1...

  8. Cystatin protease inhibitors and immune functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavasnik-Bergant, Tina

    2008-05-01

    Cystatins are natural tight-binding reversible inhibitors of cysteine proteases. They are wide spread in all living organisms (mammals, nematodes, arthropods etc.) and are involved in various biological processes where they regulate normal proteolysis and also take part in disease pathology. Many cystatins show changes in expression and/or localization, as well as changes in secretion, following certain stimuli acting on immune cells. In immune cells, cystatins interfere with antigen processing and presentation, phagocytosis, expression of cytokines and nitric oxide and these ways modify the immune response. Further, it has been suggested that cystatin-type molecules secreted from parasites down-modulate the host immune response. Precise understanding of the regulatory roles on proteolytic enzymes of endogenous and exogenous cystatins, such as those from parasites, will provide us with valuable insight into how immune response could be modulated to treat a specific disease. This review covers some specific functions of individual cystatins, with a particular focus on the relevance of cystatins to the immune response.

  9. The role of Serine Proteases and Serine Protease Inhibitors in the migration of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Ann-Judith

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms regulating neuronal migration during development remain largely undefined. Extracellular matrix cues, target site released factors, and components of the migratory neurons themselves are likely all coordinated in time and space directing neurons to their appropriate locations. We have studied the effects of proteases and their inhibitors on the extracellular matrix and the consequences to the migration of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH neurons in the embryonic chick. Chick GnRH neurons differentiate in the olfactory epithelium, migrate along the olfactory nerve and enter the forebrain. The accessibility of this coherent cell group make it amenable for studying protease/inhibitor roles in migratory processes. Results Affigel blue beads were used to deliver a serine protease inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1, and a target protease, trypsin, to the olfactory epithelium coincident with initiation of GnRH neuronal migration. PN-1 inhibited neuronal migration while trypsin accelerated their transit into the CNS. Prior to initiation of migration, neither PN-1 nor trypsin altered the timing of neuronal exit. Trypsin did, however, accelerate the timing of neuronal crossing into the nerve-forebrain junction. Conclusions These data support the hypothesis that protease activity modulates neuronal movements across barriers. Moreover, the data suggest, for the first time, that aspects of GnRH neuronal migration may be cell autonomous but modulated by ECM alterations.

  10. Mast Cell Protease 5 Mediates Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury of Mouse Skeletal Muscle1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abonia, J. Pablo; Friend, Daniel S.; Austen, William G.; Moore, Francis D.; Carroll, Michael C.; Chan, Rodney; Afnan, Jalil; Humbles, Alison; Gerard, Craig; Knight, Pamela; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Morokawa, Nasa; Austen, K. Frank; Stevens, Richard L.; Gurish, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    Ischemia with subsequent reperfusion (IR) injury is a significant clinical problem that occurs after physical and surgical trauma, myocardial infarction, and organ transplantation. IR injury of mouse skeletal muscle depends on the presence of both natural IgM and an intact C pathway. Disruption of the skeletal muscle architecture and permeability also requires mast cell (MC) participation, as revealed by the fact that IR injury is markedly reduced in c-kit defective, MC-deficient mouse strains. In this study, we sought to identify the pathobiologic MC products expressed in IR injury using transgenic mouse strains with normal MC development, except for the lack of a particular MC-derived mediator. Histologic analysis of skeletal muscle from BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice revealed a strong positive correlation (R2 = 0.85) between the extent of IR injury and the level of MC degranulation. Linkage between C activation and MC degranulation was demonstrated in mice lacking C4, in which only limited MC degranulation and muscle injury were apparent. No reduction in injury was observed in transgenic mice lacking leukotriene C4 synthase, hemopoietic PGD2 synthase, N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-2 (enzyme involved in heparin biosynthesis), or mouse MC protease (mMCP) 1. In contrast, muscle injury was significantly attenuated in mMCP-5-null mice. The MCs that reside in skeletal muscle contain abundant amounts of mMCP-5 which is the serine protease that is most similar in sequence to human MC chymase. We now report a cytotoxic activity associated with a MC-specific protease and demonstrate that mMCP-5 is critical for irreversible IR injury of skeletal muscle. PMID:15905575

  11. Mast cell protease 5 mediates ischemia-reperfusion injury of mouse skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abonia, J Pablo; Friend, Daniel S; Austen, William G; Moore, Francis D; Carroll, Michael C; Chan, Rodney; Afnan, Jalil; Humbles, Alison; Gerard, Craig; Knight, Pamela; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Morokawa, Nasa; Austen, K Frank; Stevens, Richard L; Gurish, Michael F

    2005-06-01

    Ischemia with subsequent reperfusion (IR) injury is a significant clinical problem that occurs after physical and surgical trauma, myocardial infarction, and organ transplantation. IR injury of mouse skeletal muscle depends on the presence of both natural IgM and an intact C pathway. Disruption of the skeletal muscle architecture and permeability also requires mast cell (MC) participation, as revealed by the fact that IR injury is markedly reduced in c-kit defective, MC-deficient mouse strains. In this study, we sought to identify the pathobiologic MC products expressed in IR injury using transgenic mouse strains with normal MC development, except for the lack of a particular MC-derived mediator. Histologic analysis of skeletal muscle from BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice revealed a strong positive correlation (R(2) = 0.85) between the extent of IR injury and the level of MC degranulation. Linkage between C activation and MC degranulation was demonstrated in mice lacking C4, in which only limited MC degranulation and muscle injury were apparent. No reduction in injury was observed in transgenic mice lacking leukotriene C(4) synthase, hemopoietic PGD(2) synthase, N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-2 (enzyme involved in heparin biosynthesis), or mouse MC protease (mMCP) 1. In contrast, muscle injury was significantly attenuated in mMCP-5-null mice. The MCs that reside in skeletal muscle contain abundant amounts of mMCP-5 which is the serine protease that is most similar in sequence to human MC chymase. We now report a cytotoxic activity associated with a MC-specific protease and demonstrate that mMCP-5 is critical for irreversible IR injury of skeletal muscle.

  12. Rice bifunctional phytocystatin is a dual modulator of legumain and papain-like proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoff, Ana Paula; Passaia, Gisele; Salvati, Caroline; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Margis, Rogerio

    2016-09-01

    Phytocystatins are well-known inhibitors of C1A cysteine proteinases. However, previous research has revealed legumain (C13) protease inhibition via a carboxy-extended phytocystatin. Among the 12 phytocystatins genes in rice, OcXII is the only gene possessing this carboxy-terminal extension. The specific legumain inhibition activity was confirmed, in our work, using a recombinant OcXII harboring only the carboxy-terminal domain and this part did not exhibit any effect on papain-like activities. Meanwhile, rice plants silenced at the whole OcXII gene presented higher legumain and papain-like proteolytic activities, resulting in a faster initial seedling growth. However, when germinated under stressful alkaline conditions, OcXII-silenced plants exhibited impaired root formation and delayed shoot growth. Interestingly, the activity of OcXII promoter gene was detected in the rice seed scutellum region, and decreases with seedling growth. Seeds from these plants also exhibited slower growth at germination under ABA or alkaline conditions, while maintaining very high levels of OcXII transcriptional activation. This likely reinforces the proteolytic control necessary for seed germination and growth. In addition, increased legumain activity was detected in OcXII RNAi plants subjected to a fungal elicitor. Overall, the results of this study highlight the association of OcXII with not only plant development processes, but also with stress response pathways. The results of this study reinforce the bifunctional ability of carboxy-extended phytocystatins in regulating legumain proteases via its carboxy-extended domain and papain-like proteases by its amino-terminal domain.

  13. Evolution under Drug Pressure Remodels the Folding Free-Energy Landscape of Mature HIV-1 Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, John M; Roche, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Using high-pressure NMR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, we investigate the folding landscape of the mature HIV-1 protease homodimer. The cooperativity of unfolding was measured in the absence or presence of a symmetric active site inhibitor for the optimized wild type protease (PR), its inactive variant PRD25N, and an extremely multidrug-resistant mutant, PR20. The individual fit of the pressure denaturation profiles gives rise to first order, ∆GNMR, and second order, ∆VNMR (the derivative of ∆GNMR with pressure); apparent thermodynamic parameters for each amide proton considered. Heterogeneity in the apparent ∆VNMR values reflects departure from an ideal cooperative unfolding transition. The narrow to broad distribution of ∆VNMR spanning the extremes from inhibitor-free PR20D25N to PR-DMP323 complex, and distinctively for PRD25N-DMP323 complex, indicated large variations in folding cooperativity. Consistent with this data, the shape of thermal unfolding transitions varies from asymmetric for PR to nearly symmetric for PR20, as dimer-inhibitor ternary complexes. Lack of structural cooperativity was observed between regions located close to the active site, including the hinge and tip of the glycine-rich flaps, and the rest of the protein. These results strongly suggest that inhibitor binding drastically decreases the cooperativity of unfolding by trapping the closed flap conformation in a deep energy minimum. To evade this conformational trap, PR20 evolves exhibiting a smoother folding landscape with nearly an ideal two-state (cooperative) unfolding transition. This study highlights the malleability of retroviral protease folding pathways by illustrating how the selection of mutations under drug pressure remodels the free-energy landscape as a primary mechanism.

  14. Protease expression by microorganisms and its relevance to crucial physiological/pathological events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AndréLuis; Souza; dos; Santos

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of infections caused by fungi and trypanosomatids is difficult due to the eukaryotic nature of these microbial cells,which are similar in several biochemical and genetic aspects to host cells.Aggravating this scenario,very few antifungal and anti-trypanosomatidal agents are in clinical use and,therefore,therapy is limited by drug safety considerations and their narrow spectrum of activity,efficacy and resistance. The search for new bioactive agents against fungi and trypanosomatids has been expanded because progress in biochemistry and molecular biology has led to a better understanding of important and essential pathways in these microorganisms including nutrition,growth, proliferation,signaling,differentiation and death.In this context,proteolytic enzymes produced by these eukaryotic microorganisms are appointed and,in some cases,proven to be excellent targets for searching novel natural and/or synthetic pharmacological compounds,in order to cure or prevent invasive fungal/trypanosomatid diseases.With this task in mind,our research group and others have focused on aspartic-type proteases,since the activity of this class of hydrolytic enzymes is directly implicated in several facets of basic biological processes of both fungal and trypanosomatid cells as well as due to the participation in numerous events of interaction between these microorganisms and host structures.In the present paper,a concise revision of the beneficial effects of aspartic protease inhibitors,with emphasis on the aspartic protease inhibitors used in the anti-human immunodeficiency virus therapy,will be presented and discussed using our experience with the following microbial models:the yeast Candida albicans,the filamentous fungus Fonsecaea pedrosoi and the protozoan trypanosomatid Leishmania amazonensis.

  15. Expression, purification and molecular modeling of the NIa protease of Cardamom mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebasingh, T; Pandaranayaka, Eswari P J; Mahalakshmi, A; Kasin Yadunandam, A; Krishnaswamy, S; Usha, R

    2013-01-01

    The NIa protease of Potyviridae is the major viral protease that processes potyviral polyproteins. The NIa protease coding region of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) is amplified from the viral cDNA, cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. NIa protease forms inclusion bodies in E.coli. The inclusion bodies are solubilized with 8 M urea, refolded and purified by Nickel-Nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. Three-dimensional modeling of the CdMV NIa protease is achieved by threading approach using the homologous X-ray crystallographic structure of Tobacco etch mosaic virus NIa protease. The model gave an insight in to the substrate specificities of the NIa proteases and predicted the complementation of nearby residues in the catalytic triad (H42, D74 and C141) mutants in the cis protease activity of CdMV NIa protease.

  16. Protease increases fermentation rate and ethanol yield in dry-grind ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, David B; McAloon, Andrew J

    2014-02-01

    The effects of acid protease and urea addition during the fermentation step were evaluated. The fermentations were also tested with and without the addition of urea to determine if protease altered the nitrogen requirements of the yeast. Results show that the addition of the protease had a statistically significant effect on the fermentation rate and yield. Fermentation rates and yields were improved with the addition of the protease over the corresponding controls without protease. Protease addition either with or with added urea resulted in a higher final ethanol yield than without the protease addition. Urea addition levels >1200 ppm of supplemental nitrogen inhibited ethanol production. The economic effects of the protease addition were evaluated by using process engineering and economic models developed at the Eastern Regional Research Center. The decrease in overall processing costs from protease addition was as high as $0.01/L (4 ¢/gal) of denatured ethanol produced.

  17. The structure of a universally employed enzyme: V8 protease from Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Lata; Leduc, Yvonne; Hayakawa, Koto; Delbaere, Louis T.J. (Saskatchewan)

    2008-06-27

    V8 protease, an extracellular protease of Staphylococcus aureus, is related to the pancreatic serine proteases. The enzyme cleaves peptide bonds exclusively on the carbonyl side of aspartate and glutamate residues. Unlike the pancreatic serine proteases, V8 protease possesses no disulfide bridges. This is a major evolutionary difference, as all pancreatic proteases have at least two disulfide bridges. The structure of V8 protease shows structural similarity with several other serine proteases, specifically the epidermolytic toxins A and B from S. aureus and trypsin, in which the conformation of the active site is almost identical. V8 protease is also unique in that the positively charged N-terminus is involved in determining the substrate-specificity of the enzyme.

  18. Protease inhibitor from Moringa oleifera with potential for use as therapeutic drug and as seafood preservative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijina, B; Chellappan, Sreeja; Krishna, Jissa G; Basheer, Soorej M; Elyas, K K; Bahkali, Ali H; Chandrasekaran, M

    2011-07-01

    Protease inhibitors are well known to have several applications in medicine and biotechnology. Several plant sources are known to return potential protease inhibitors. In this study plants belonging to different families of Leguminosae, Malvaceae, Rutaceae, Graminae and Moringaceae were screened for the protease inhibitor. Among them Moringa oleifera, belonging to the family Moringaceae, recorded high level of protease inhibitor activity after ammonium sulfate fractionation. M. oleifera, which grows throughout most of the tropics and having several industrial and medicinal uses, was selected as a source of protease inhibitor since so far no reports were made on isolation of the protease inhibitor. Among the different parts of M. oleifera tested, the crude extract isolated from the mature leaves and seeds showed the highest level of inhibition against trypsin. Among the various extraction media evaluated, the crude extract prepared in phosphate buffer showed maximum recovery of the protease inhibitor. The protease inhibitor recorded high inhibitory activity toward the serine proteases thrombin, elastase, chymotrypsin and the cysteine proteases cathepsin B and papain which have more importance in pharmaceutical industry. The protease inhibitor also showed complete inhibition of activities of the commercially available proteases of Bacillus licheniformis and Aspergillus oryzae. However, inhibitory activities toward subtilisin, esperase, pronase E and proteinase K were negligible. Further, it was found that the protease inhibitor could prevent proteolysis in a commercially valuable shrimp Penaeus monodon during storage indicating the scope for its application as a seafood preservative. This is the first report on isolation of a protease inhibitor from M. oleifera.

  19. Secreted proteases. Regulation of their activity and their possible role in metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, G I; Frisch, S M; He, C; Wilhelm, S M; Reich, R; Collier, I E

    1990-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteases are secreted by the resident cells of the tissue in a proenzyme form, and their extracellular activity is regulated at the level of gene expression, proenzyme activation, and interaction with inhibitors. To understand the molecular mechanisms that control the activity of ECM metalloproteases and their effect on the cellular phenotype, we have established cell lines in which the transcription of the protease genes is repressed. We also have undertaken a detailed study of the pathway of extracellular activation of interstitial procollagenase. Stable transfection of three human tumor cell lines--H-ras-transformed bronchial epithelial cells TBE-1, fibrosarcoma cells HT1080, and melanoma cells A2058--with the adenovirus E1A gene dramatically repressed the expression of the secreted proteases, type IV and interstitial collagenases, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Concomitantly, E1A-expressing cells showed reduced metastatic activity in vivo and reduced ability to traverse a reconstituted basement membrane in vitro. Monospecific anti-type IV collagenase antibody inhibited the invasive activity of parental tumor cell lines in the in vitro system, suggesting a possible causal relationship between the effect of E1A on the expression of secreted proteases and the reduced metastatic potential of the E1A-expressing transformants. We have also studied the mechanism of regulation of metalloprotease activity at the level of extracellular activation by investigating the cascade of proteolytic events that results in the activation of interstitial procollagenase. Cocultivation of the major cellular components of skin, dermal fibroblasts, and epidermal keratinocytes induces activation of interstitial procollagenase and prostromelysin in the presence of plasminogen. This activation occurs through a uPA-plasmin-dependent pathway in which plasmin catalyzes the first step in activation of both collagenase and stromelysin by amino

  20. Targeted Deletion of a Plasmodium Site-2 Protease Impairs Life Cycle Progression in the Mammalian Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koussis, Konstantinos; Goulielmaki, Evi; Chalari, Anna; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Siden-Kiamos, Inga; Matuschewski, Kai; Loukeris, Thanasis G

    2017-01-01

    Site-2 proteases (S2P) belong to the M50 family of metalloproteases, which typically perform essential roles by mediating activation of membrane-bound transcription factors through regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP). Protease-dependent liberation of dormant transcription factors triggers diverse cellular responses, such as sterol regulation, Notch signalling and the unfolded protein response. Plasmodium parasites rely on regulated proteolysis for controlling essential pathways throughout the life cycle. In this study we examine the Plasmodium-encoded S2P in a murine malaria model and show that it is expressed in all stages of Plasmodium development. Localisation studies by endogenous gene tagging revealed that in all invasive stages the protein is in close proximity to the nucleus. Ablation of PbS2P by reverse genetics leads to reduced growth rates during liver and blood infection and, hence, virulence attenuation. Strikingly, absence of PbS2P was compatible with parasite life cycle progression in the mosquito and mammalian hosts under physiological conditions, suggesting redundant or dispensable roles in vivo.

  1. Targeted Deletion of a Plasmodium Site-2 Protease Impairs Life Cycle Progression in the Mammalian Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulielmaki, Evi; Chalari, Anna; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Siden-Kiamos, Inga; Matuschewski, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Site-2 proteases (S2P) belong to the M50 family of metalloproteases, which typically perform essential roles by mediating activation of membrane–bound transcription factors through regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP). Protease-dependent liberation of dormant transcription factors triggers diverse cellular responses, such as sterol regulation, Notch signalling and the unfolded protein response. Plasmodium parasites rely on regulated proteolysis for controlling essential pathways throughout the life cycle. In this study we examine the Plasmodium-encoded S2P in a murine malaria model and show that it is expressed in all stages of Plasmodium development. Localisation studies by endogenous gene tagging revealed that in all invasive stages the protein is in close proximity to the nucleus. Ablation of PbS2P by reverse genetics leads to reduced growth rates during liver and blood infection and, hence, virulence attenuation. Strikingly, absence of PbS2P was compatible with parasite life cycle progression in the mosquito and mammalian hosts under physiological conditions, suggesting redundant or dispensable roles in vivo. PMID:28107409

  2. Impact of the Pla protease substrate α2-antiplasmin on the progression of primary pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Justin L; Schroeder, Jay A; Zimbler, Daniel L; Bellows, Lauren E; Lathem, Wyndham W

    2015-12-01

    Many pathogens usurp the host hemostatic system during infection to promote pathogenesis. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, expresses the plasminogen activator protease Pla, which has been shown in vitro to target and cleave multiple proteins within the fibrinolytic pathway, including the plasmin inhibitor α2-antiplasmin (A2AP). It is not known, however, if Pla inactivates A2AP in vivo; the role of A2AP during respiratory Y. pestis infection is not known either. Here, we show that Y. pestis does not appreciably cleave A2AP in a Pla-dependent manner in the lungs during experimental pneumonic plague. Furthermore, following intranasal infection with Y. pestis, A2AP-deficient mice exhibit no difference in survival time, bacterial burden in the lungs, or dissemination from wild-type mice. Instead, we found that in the absence of Pla, A2AP contributes to the control of the pulmonary inflammatory response during infection by reducing neutrophil recruitment and cytokine production, resulting in altered immunopathology of the lungs compared to A2AP-deficient mice. Thus, our data demonstrate that A2AP is not significantly affected by the Pla protease during pneumonic plague, and although A2AP participates in immune modulation in the lungs, it has limited impact on the course or ultimate outcome of the infection.

  3. Newly generated cells are increased in hippocampus of adult mice lacking a serine protease inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sticker Melanie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone occurs throughout the life of mammals and newly generated neurons can integrate functionally into established neuronal circuits. Neurogenesis levels in the dentate gyrus are modulated by changes in the environment (enrichment, exercise, hippocampal-dependent tasks, NMDA receptor (NMDAR activity, sonic hedgehog (SHH and/or other factors. Results previously, we showed that Protease Nexin-1 (PN-1, a potent serine protease inhibitor, regulates the NMDAR availability and activity as well as SHH signaling. Compared with wild-type (WT, we detected a significant increase in BrdU-labeled cells in the dentate gyrus of mice lacking PN-1 (PN-1 -/- both in controls and after running exercise. Patched homologue 1 (Ptc1 and Gli1 mRNA levels were higher and Gli3 down-regulated in mutant mice under standard conditions and to a lesser extent after running exercise. However, the number of surviving BrdU-positive cells did not differ between WT and PN-1 -/- animals. NMDAR availability was altered in the hippocampus of mutant animals after exercise. Conclusion All together our results indicate that PN-1 controls progenitors proliferation through an effect on the SHH pathway and suggest an influence of the serpin on the survival of newly generated neurons through modulation of NMDAR availability.

  4. Modeling and structural analysis of PA clan serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laskar Aparna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteases account for over a third of all known proteolytic enzymes; they are involved in a variety of physiological processes and are classified into clans sharing structural homology. The PA clan of endopeptidases is the most abundant and over two thirds of this clan is comprised of the S1 family of serine proteases, which bear the archetypal trypsin fold and have a catalytic triad in the order Histidine, Aspartate, Serine. These proteases have been studied in depth and many three dimensional structures have been experimentally determined. However, these structures mostly consist of bacterial and animal proteases, with a small number of plant and fungal proteases and as yet no structures have been determined for protozoa or archaea. The core structure and active site geometry of these proteases is of interest for many applications. This study investigated the structural properties of different S1 family serine proteases from a diverse range of taxa using molecular modeling techniques. Results Our predicted models from protozoa, archaea, fungi and plants were combined with the experimentally determined structures of 16 S1 family members and used for analysis of the catalytic core. Amino acid sequences were submitted to SWISS-MODEL for homology-based structure prediction or the LOOPP server for threading-based structure prediction. Predicted models were refined using INSIGHT II and SCRWL and validated against experimental structures. Investigation of secondary structures and electrostatic surface potential was performed using MOLMOL. The structural geometry of the catalytic core shows clear deviations between taxa, but the relative positions of the catalytic triad residues were conserved. Some highly conserved residues potentially contributing to the stability of the structural core were identified. Evolutionary divergence was also exhibited by large variation in secondary structure features outside the core

  5. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A. (UMASS, MED)

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  6. A novel neutral protease from thermophilic Bacillus strain HUTBS62

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAZEM AQEL

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel neutral highly thermostable protease was detected in the culture medium of thermophilic Bacillus strain HUTBS62 isolated from hot-spring located near to the Dead Sea, Jordan. The enzyme was purified by precipitation with 55-60% ammonium sulfate, gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 and DEAE ion exchange chromatography. The enzyme was purified 53-fold with 2% yield. The optimum pH and temperature for catalytic activity of protease was pH 6.8 and 80ºC, respectively, and 31% activity of protease remained even after heat treatment at 100ºC for 60 min. The relative activity of the enzyme was highly stable (90% at 50ºC for 2 h. The half-life of the enzyme at 90ºC, 80ºC and 70ºC was estimated to be 3, 4 and 6 h, respectively. The activation energy of denaturation of purified enzyme was 21.7 kJmol-1. Iron, sodium, calcium, and manganese increased protease activity. On the other hand, magnesium, cobalt and zinc variably decreased the residual activity. But cadmium and copper drastically inhibited the enzyme activity. The enzymatic activity was highly stable in the presence of 1 and 2 mM EDTA at pH 6.8 and 80ºC. The neutral protease therefore could be defined as a highly thermostable with new properties make the present enzyme applicable for many biotechnological purposes.

  7. Purification and characterization of an extracellular protease from Clonostachys rosea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; HUANG Xiao-wei; ZHANG Ke-qin

    2004-01-01

    @@ An extracellular protease from Clonostachys rosea (syn. Gliocladium roseum) was purified to SDSPAGE homogeneity with 14-fold purification by ultrafiltration、 ammonium sulfate precipetation、hydrophobic interaction chromatography and anion exchange chromatography. The molecular weight of the protease was 32 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE. The N-terminal sequence of first 10 amino acids was A-T-Q-S-N-A-P-W-G-L. This enzyme exhibited pH and temperature optima of 9-10 and 60℃, respectively, and was stable over a wide range of pH 4-10 and temperature 4-50 ℃. It did not require Ca2+ for activity and thermal stability. Pre-incubation of enzyme with Zn2+ , Cu2+ , Hg2+,Fe3+ inhibited most of the enzyme activity, but Mn2+ increased enzyme activity up to 38%. It remained stable in the presence of Tween20, H2O2, EDTA. The inhibition profile of the enzymes by PMSF, suggested that this purified protease belongs to the serine protease family. The protease could immobilize nematodes (Panagrellus redivirus) in bioassays and hydrolyzed proteins of the purified cuticle.

  8. Mitochondrial cereblon functions as a Lon-type protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Nakamura, China; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-07-15

    Lon protease plays a major role in the protein quality control system in mammalian cell mitochondria. It is present in the mitochondrial matrix, and degrades oxidized and misfolded proteins, thereby protecting the cell from various extracellular stresses, including oxidative stress. The intellectual disability-associated and thalidomide-binding protein cereblon (CRBN) contains a large, highly conserved Lon domain. However, whether CRBN has Lon protease-like function remains unknown. Here, we determined if CRBN has a protective function against oxidative stress, similar to Lon protease. We report that CRBN partially distributes in mitochondria, suggesting it has a mitochondrial function. To specify the mitochondrial role of CRBN, we mitochondrially expressed CRBN in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The resulting stable SH-SY5Y cell line showed no apparent effect on the mitochondrial functions of fusion, fission, and membrane potential. However, mitochondrially expressed CRBN exhibited protease activity, and was induced by oxidative stress. In addition, stably expressed cells exhibited suppressed neuronal cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that CRBN functions specifically as a Lon-type protease in mitochondria.

  9. Role of salivary leukocyte protease inhibitor in periodontal disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pateel Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Proteases play a major role in the tissue destruction involved in periodontal disease. It is known that the balance between proteases and their inhibitors is a major determinant in maintaining tissue integrity. The association between the proteases and periodontitis is well established, but not many studies have been carried out to know the role played by a protease inhibitor like salivary leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI in periodontitis. Aim: The aim of the present study was to correlate SLPI with periodontitis. Settings and Design: Case-control study. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five clinically confirmed cases of periodontitis and 20 controls were included in the study. A detailed case history and periodontal index (PI were recorded. Two milliliters of unstimulated saliva samples was obtained and subjected to quantification of SLPI leaves using SLPI in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kit. Based on the periodontal index score of the individuals, the cases and controls were divided into groups A, B and C, and the obtained SLPI levels were compared among the groups. Statistical Analysis: Mann-Whitney U test and correlation coefficient test. Results: The results showed that in the initial stages of periodontitis there is a tendency of SLPI levels to be raised. The SLPI levels were found to be reduced in the terminal stages of periodontitis. Conclusion: It appears that SLPI accumulates in the local environment, at least in the initial stages of the periodontal disease, probably to inhibit the action of increased elastic activity.

  10. Synthesis of glycinamides using protease immobilized magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abha Sahu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, Bacillus subtilis was isolated from slaughterhouse waste and screened for the production of protease enzyme. The purified protease was successfully immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs and used for the synthesis of series of glycinamides. The binding and thermal stability of protease on MNPs was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy and TGA analysis. The surface morphology of MNPs before and after protease immobilization was carried out using SEM analysis. XRD pattern revealed no phase change in MNPs after enzyme immobilization. The processing parameters for glycinamides synthesis viz. temperature, pH, and time were optimized using Response Surface Methodology (RSM by using Design Expert (9.0.6.2. The maximum yield of various amides 2 butyramidoacetic acid (AMD-1,83.4%, 2-benzamidoacetic acid (AMD-2,80.5% and 2,2′((carboxymethyl amino-2-oxoethyl-2-hydroxysuccinylbis(azanediyldiacetic acid (AMD-3,80.8% formed was observed at pH-8, 50 °C and 30 min. The synthesized immobilized protease retained 70% of the initial activity even after 8 cycles of reuse.

  11. Microbial aspartic proteases: current and potential applications in industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, Louwrens W; Divol, Benoit

    2014-11-01

    Aspartic proteases are a relatively small group of proteolytic enzymes that are active in acidic environments and are found across all forms of life. Certain microorganisms secrete such proteases as virulence agents and/or in order to break down proteins thereby liberating assimilable sources of nitrogen. Some of the earlier applications of these proteolytic enzymes are found in the manufacturing of cheese where they are used as milk-clotting agents. Over the last decade, they have received tremendous research interest because of their involvement in human diseases. Furthermore, there has also been a growing interest on these enzymes for their applications in several other industries. Recent research suggests in particular that they could be used in the wine industry to prevent the formation of protein haze while preserving the wines' organoleptic properties. In this mini-review, the properties and mechanisms of action of aspartic proteases are summarized. Thereafter, a brief overview of the industrial applications of this specific class of proteases is provided. The use of aspartic proteases as alternatives to clarifying agents in various beverage industries is mentioned, and the potential applications in the wine industry are thoroughly discussed.

  12. Alkaline protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 mitigates industrial pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Amit; Ansari, Mohammad W; Anwar, Mohmmad S; Agrawal, Ruchi; Agrawal, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    Proteases have found a wide application in the several industrial processes, such as laundry detergents, protein recovery or solubilization, prion degradation, meat tenderizations, and in bating of hides and skins in leather industries. But the main hurdle in industrial application of proteases is their economical production on a large scale. The present investigation aimed to exploit the locally available inexpensive agricultural and household wastes for alkaline protease production using Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 via solid-state fermentation (SSF) technique. The alkaline enzyme is potentially useful as an additive in commercial detergents to mitigate pollution load due to extensive use of caustic soda-based detergents. Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 showed good protease production under SSF conditions of 55 °C, pH 9, and 50 % moisture content with potato peels as solid substrate. The presented findings revealed that crude alkaline protease produced by Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 via SSF is of potential application in silver recovery from used X-ray films.

  13. The role of proteases and inflammatory molecules in triggering neovascular age-related macular degeneration: basic science to clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Sivaraman A; Krishna Kumar, Kaavya; Baird, Paul N

    2014-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) causes severe vision impairment in aged individuals. The health impact and cost of the disease will dramatically increase over the years, with the increase in the aging population. Currently, antivascular endothelial growth factor agents are routinely used for managing late-stage AMD, and recent data have shown that up to 15%-33% of patients do not respond to this treatment. Henceforth, there is a need to develop better treatment options. One avenue is to investigate the role proteases and inflammatory molecules might have in regulating and being regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor. Moreover, emerging data indicate that proteases and inflammatory molecules might be critical in the development and progression of AMD. This article reviews recent literature that investigates proteases and inflammatory molecules involved in the development of AMD. Gaining insights into the proteolytic and inflammatory pathways associated with the pathophysiology of AMD could enable the development of additional or alternative drug strategies for the treatment of AMD.

  14. Enhanced Peptide Stability Against Protease Digestion Induced by Intrinsic Factor Binding of a Vitamin B12 Conjugate of Exendin-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorso, Ron L; Chepurny, Oleg G; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Holz, George G; Doyle, Robert P

    2015-09-08

    Peptide digestion from proteases is a significant limitation in peptide therapeutic development. It has been hypothesized that the dietary pathway of vitamin B12 (B12) may be exploited in this area, but an open question is whether B12-peptide conjugates bound to the B12 gastric uptake protein intrinsic factor (IF) can provide any stability against proteases. Herein, we describe a new conjugate of B12 with the incretin peptide exendin 4 that demonstrates picomolar agonism of the glugacon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1-R). Stability studies reveal that Ex-4 is digested by pancreatic proteases trypsin and chymotrypsin and by the kidney endopeptidase meprin β. Prebinding the B12 conjugate to IF, however, resulted in up to a 4-fold greater activity of the B12-Ex-4 conjugate relative to Ex-4, when the IF-B12-Ex-4 complex was exposed to 22 μg/mL of trypsin, 2.3-fold greater activity when exposed to 1.25 μg/mL of chymotrypsin, and there was no decrease in function at up to 5 μg/mL of meprin β.

  15. Thermolysin damages animal life through degradation of plasma proteins enhanced by rapid cleavage of serpins and activation of proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lulu; Lu, Anrui; Guan, Jingmin; Yang, Bing; Li, Muwang; Hillyer, Julián F; Ramarao, Nalini; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Liu, Chaoliang; Ling, Erjun

    2015-01-01

    Thermolysin, a metallopeptidase secreted by pathogenic microbes, is concluded as an important virulence factor due to cleaving purified host proteins in vitro. Using the silkworm Bombyx mori as a model system, we found that thermolysin injection into larvae induces the destruction of the coagulation response and the activation of hemolymph melanization, which results in larval death. Thermolysin triggers the rapid degradation of insect and mammalian plasma proteins at a level that is considerably greater than expected in vitro and/or in vivo. To more specifically explore the mechanism, thermolysin-induced changes to key proteins belonging to the insect melanization pathway were assessed as a window for observing plasma protein cleavage. The application of thermolysin induced the rapid cleavage of the melanization negative regulator serpin-3, but did not directly activate the melanization rate-limiting enzyme prophenoloxidase (PPO) or the terminal serine proteases responsible for PPO activation. Terminal serine proteases of melanization are activated indirectly after thermolysin exposure. We hypothesize that thermolysin induces the rapid degradation of serpins and the activation of proteases directly or indirectly, boosting uncontrolled plasma protein degradation in insects and mammalians.

  16. LON is the master protease that protects against protein aggregation in human mitochondria through direct degradation of misfolded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Brodie, Erica J; Dougan, David A; Truscott, Kaye N

    2015-12-02

    Maintenance of mitochondrial protein homeostasis is critical for proper cellular function. Under normal conditions resident molecular chaperones and proteases maintain protein homeostasis within the organelle. Under conditions of stress however, misfolded proteins accumulate leading to the activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)). While molecular chaperone assisted refolding of proteins in mammalian mitochondria has been well documented, the contribution of AAA+ proteases to the maintenance of protein homeostasis in this organelle remains unclear. To address this gap in knowledge we examined the contribution of human mitochondrial matrix proteases, LONM and CLPXP, to the turnover of OTC-∆, a folding incompetent mutant of ornithine transcarbamylase, known to activate UPR(mt). Contrary to a model whereby CLPXP is believed to degrade misfolded proteins, we found that LONM, and not CLPXP is responsible for the turnover of OTC-∆ in human mitochondria. To analyse the conformational state of proteins that are recognised by LONM, we examined the turnover of unfolded and aggregated forms of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and OTC. This analysis revealed that LONM specifically recognises and degrades unfolded, but not aggregated proteins. Since LONM is not upregulated by UPR(mt), this pathway may preferentially act to promote chaperone mediated refolding of proteins.

  17. Fundamental Roles of the Golgi-Associated Toxoplasma Aspartyl Protease, ASP5, at the Host-Parasite Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudi, Pierre-Mehdi; Jacot, Damien; Mueller, Christina; Di Cristina, Manlio; Dogga, Sunil Kumar; Marq, Jean-Baptiste; Romano, Julia; Tosetti, Nicolò; Dubrot, Juan; Emre, Yalin; Lunghi, Matteo; Coppens, Isabelle; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Sojka, Daniel; Pino, Paco; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii possesses sets of dense granule proteins (GRAs) that either assemble at, or cross the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) and exhibit motifs resembling the HT/PEXEL previously identified in a repertoire of exported Plasmodium proteins. Within Plasmodium spp., cleavage of the HT/PEXEL motif by the endoplasmic reticulum-resident protease Plasmepsin V precedes trafficking to and export across the PVM of proteins involved in pathogenicity and host cell remodelling. Here, we have functionally characterized the T. gondii aspartyl protease 5 (ASP5), a Golgi-resident protease that is phylogenetically related to Plasmepsin V. We show that deletion of ASP5 causes a significant loss in parasite fitness in vitro and an altered virulence in vivo. Furthermore, we reveal that ASP5 is necessary for the cleavage of GRA16, GRA19 and GRA20 at the PEXEL-like motif. In the absence of ASP5, the intravacuolar nanotubular network disappears and several GRAs fail to localize to the PVM, while GRA16 and GRA24, both known to be targeted to the host cell nucleus, are retained within the vacuolar space. Additionally, hypermigration of dendritic cells and bradyzoite cyst wall formation are impaired, critically impacting on parasite dissemination and persistence. Overall, the absence of ASP5 dramatically compromises the parasite’s ability to modulate host signalling pathways and immune responses. PMID:26473595

  18. Fundamental Roles of the Golgi-Associated Toxoplasma Aspartyl Protease, ASP5, at the Host-Parasite Interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Mehdi Hammoudi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii possesses sets of dense granule proteins (GRAs that either assemble at, or cross the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM and exhibit motifs resembling the HT/PEXEL previously identified in a repertoire of exported Plasmodium proteins. Within Plasmodium spp., cleavage of the HT/PEXEL motif by the endoplasmic reticulum-resident protease Plasmepsin V precedes trafficking to and export across the PVM of proteins involved in pathogenicity and host cell remodelling. Here, we have functionally characterized the T. gondii aspartyl protease 5 (ASP5, a Golgi-resident protease that is phylogenetically related to Plasmepsin V. We show that deletion of ASP5 causes a significant loss in parasite fitness in vitro and an altered virulence in vivo. Furthermore, we reveal that ASP5 is necessary for the cleavage of GRA16, GRA19 and GRA20 at the PEXEL-like motif. In the absence of ASP5, the intravacuolar nanotubular network disappears and several GRAs fail to localize to the PVM, while GRA16 and GRA24, both known to be targeted to the host cell nucleus, are retained within the vacuolar space. Additionally, hypermigration of dendritic cells and bradyzoite cyst wall formation are impaired, critically impacting on parasite dissemination and persistence. Overall, the absence of ASP5 dramatically compromises the parasite's ability to modulate host signalling pathways and immune responses.

  19. Evaluation of a D-amino-acid-containing fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptide library for profiling prokaryotic proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaman, W.E.; Voskamp-Visser, I.; de Jongh, D.M.C.; Endtz, H.P.; van Belkum, A.; Hays, J.P.; Bikker, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial proteases play an important role in a broad spectrum of processes, including colonization, proliferation, and virulence. In this respect, bacterial proteases are potential biomarkers for bacterial diagnosis and targets for novel therapeutic protease inhibitors. To investigate these potenti

  20. The Cysteine Protease–Cysteine Protease Inhibitor System Explored in Soybean Nodule Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Dorcas Quain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all protease families have been associated with plant development, particularly senescence, which is the final developmental stage of every organ before cell death. Proteolysis remobilizes and recycles nitrogen from senescent organs that is required, for example, seed development. Senescence-associated expression of proteases has recently been characterized using large-scale gene expression analysis seeking to identify and characterize senescence-related genes. Increasing activities of proteolytic enzymes, particularly cysteine proteases, are observed during the senescence of legume nodules, in which a symbiotic relationship between the host plant and bacteria (Rhizobia facilitate the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. It is generally considered that cysteine proteases are compartmentalized to prevent uncontrolled proteolysis in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In addition, the activities of cysteine proteases are regulated by endogenous cysteine protease inhibitors called cystatins. These small proteins form reversible complexes with cysteine proteases, leading to inactivation. However, very little is currently known about how the cysteine protease-cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin system is regulated during nodule development. Moreover, our current understanding of the expression and functions of proteases and protease inhibitors in nodules is fragmented. To address this issue, we have summarized the current knowledge and techniques used for studying proteases and their inhibitors including the application of “omics” tools, with a particular focus on changes in the cysteine protease-cystatin system during nodule development.

  1. Screening of Alkaline Protease-Producing Streptomyces diastaticus and Optimization of Enzyme Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Dawoodi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Alkaline proteases are used in pharmaceutical, film and photography, silk production and food, leather and detergent industries. Actinomycetes are gram positive bacteria that produce different enzymes such as proteases. The aims of this research were isolation of native alkaline protease-producing Actinomycete spp. from different soil samples as well as optimizing the conditions for enzyme production. Materials and Methods: The different soil samples were collected from different locations of the provinces of Khouzestan, Chahar Mahalo Bakhtiari and Isfahan, Iran. After determining of the best alkaline protease producing species using Lowry method, the optimization of alkaline protease was performed. Results: The alkaline protease producing Actinomycete spp. was isolated from soil. The most enzyme activity was measured in S.diastaticus. The best concentration of sucrose as the carbon source for the highest production of alkaline protease was 10 g/l. The optimum pH and temperature for the alkaline protease production by S. diastaticus were 10 and 30°C respectively. The maximum activity of alkaline protease was measured at 200 rpm as the best aeration speed. Conclusions: This is the first report of alkaline protease production by Streptomyces diastaticus in Iran. The accomplished examinations in this research confirmed the previous theories of alkaline protease production by Actinomycetes relatively. Regarding the immense applications of alkaline proteases in several industries and isolation of a native alkaline protease producing Actinomycete, The production potential of this enzyme in our country could be accessible in the near future.

  2. Accelerated evolution of crotalinae snake venom gland serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshimaru, M; Ogawa, T; Nakashima, K; Nobuhisa, I; Chijiwa, T; Shimohigashi, Y; Fukumaki, Y; Niwa, M; Yamashina, I; Hattori, S; Ohno, M

    1996-11-11

    Eight cDNAs encoding serine proteases isolated from Trimeresurus flavoviridis (habu snake) and T. gramineus (green habu snake) venom gland cDNA libraries showed that nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions have accumulated in the mature protein-coding regions to cause amino acid changes. Southern blot analysis of T. flavoviridis genomic DNAs using two proper probes indicated that venom gland serine protease genes form a multigene family in the genome. These observations suggest that venom gland serine proteases have diversified their amino acid sequences in an accelerating manner. Since a similar feature has been previously discovered in crotalinae snake venom gland phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isozyme genes, accelerated evolution appears to be universal in plural isozyme families of crotalinae snake venom gland.

  3. The binding mechanism of a peptidic cyclic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Svane, Anna S P; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases are classical objects for studies of catalytic and inhibitory mechanisms as well as interesting as therapeutic targets. Since small-molecule serine protease inhibitors generally suffer from specificity problems, peptidic inhibitors, isolated from phage-displayed peptide libraries...... inhibitory mechanism and an unusually high specificity. Using a number of modified variants of upain-1, we characterised the upain-1-urokinase-type plasminogen activator complex using X-ray crystal structure analysis, determined a model of the peptide in solution by NMR spectroscopy, and analysed binding...... kinetics and thermodynamics by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. We found that upain-1 changes both main-chain conformation and side-chain orientations as it binds to the protease, in particular its Trp3 residue and the surrounding backbone. The properties of upain-1...

  4. Tobacco Etch Virus protease: A shortcut across biotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaratto, Francesca; Burrone, Oscar R; Petris, Gianluca

    2016-08-10

    About thirty years ago, studies on the RNA genome of Tobacco Etch Virus revealed the presence of an efficient and specific protease, called Tobacco Etch Virus protease (TEVp), that was part of the Nuclear Inclusion a (NIa) enzyme. TEVp is an efficient and specific protease of 27kDa that has become a valuable biotechnological tool. Nowadays TEVp is a unique endopeptidase largely exploited in biotechnology from industrial applications to in vitro and in vivo cellular studies. A number of TEVp mutants with different rate of cleavage, stability and specificity have been reported. Similarly, a panel of different target cleavage sites, derived from the canonical ENLYFQ-G/S site, has been established. In this review we describe these aspects of TEVp and some of its multiple applications. A particular focus is on the use and molecular biology of TEVp in living cells and organisms.

  5. Allostery in trypsin-like proteases suggests new therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohara, David W; Di Cera, Enrico

    2011-11-01

    Trypsin-like proteases (TLPs) are a large family of enzymes responsible for digestion, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, development, fertilization, apoptosis and immunity. A current paradigm posits that the irreversible transition from an inactive zymogen to the active protease form enables productive interaction with substrate and catalysis. Analysis of the entire structural database reveals two distinct conformations of the active site: one fully accessible to substrate (E) and the other occluded by the collapse of a specific segment (E*). The allosteric E*-E equilibrium provides a reversible mechanism for activity and regulation in addition to the irreversible zymogen to protease conversion and points to new therapeutic strategies aimed at inhibiting or activating the enzyme. In this review, we discuss relevant examples, with emphasis on the rational engineering of anticoagulant thrombin mutants.

  6. New therapeutic strategies in HCV: second-generation protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Virginia C; Peter, Joy A; Nelson, David R

    2013-02-01

    Telaprevir and boceprevir are the first direct-acting antiviral agents approved for use in HCV treatment and represent a significant advance in HCV therapy. However, these first-generation drugs also have significant limitations related to thrice-daily dosing, clinically challenging side-effect profiles, low barriers to resistance and a lack of pan-genotype activity. A second wave of protease inhibitors are in phase II and III trials and promise to provide a drug regimen with a better dosing schedule and improved tolerance. These second-wave protease inhibitors will probably be approved in combination with PEG-IFN and Ribavirin (RBV), as well as future all-oral regimens. The true second-generation protease inhibitors are in earlier stages of development and efficacy data are anxiously awaited as they may provide pan-genotypic antiviral activity and a high genetic barrier to resistance. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Protease-specific nanosensors for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Eyk; Rudloff, Franziska; Warmuth, Carsten; Taupitz, Matthias; Hamm, Bernd; Schnorr, Jörg

    2008-12-01

    Imaging of enzyme activity is a central goal of molecular imaging. With the introduction of fluorescent smart probes, optical imaging has become the modality of choice for experimental in vivo detection of enzyme activity. Here, we present a novel high-relaxivity nanosensor that is suitable for in vivo imaging of protease activity by magnetic resonance imaging. Upon specific protease cleavage, the nanoparticles rapidly switch from a stable low-relaxivity stealth state to become adhesive, aggregating high-relaxivity particles. To demonstrate the principle, we chose a cleavage motif of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), an enzyme important in inflammation, atherosclerosis, tumor progression, and many other diseases with alterations of the extracellular matrix. On the basis of clinically tested very small iron oxide particles (VSOP), the MMP-9-activatable protease-specific iron oxide particles (PSOP) have a hydrodynamic diameter of only 25 nm. PSOP are rapidly activated, resulting in aggregation and increased T2*-relaxivity.

  8. Ultrasensitive Scaffold-Dependent Protease Sensors with Large Dynamic Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Viktor; Nabi, Masuda; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2017-03-28

    The rational construction of synthetic protein switches with predefined input-output parameters constitutes a key goal of synthetic biology with many potential applications ranging from metabolic engineering to diagnostics. Yet, generally applicable strategies to construct tailor-engineered protein switches have so far remained elusive. Here, we use SpyTag/SpyCatcher-mediated protein ligation to engineer modularly organized, scaffold-dependent protease sensors that exploit a combination of affinity targeting and protease-inducible protein-protein interactions. We use this architecture to create a suite of integrated signal sensing and amplification circuits that can detect the activity of α-thrombin and prostate specific antigen with a dynamic range covering 5 orders of magnitude. We determine the key design features critical for signal transmission between protease-based sensors, transducers, and actuators.

  9. Cleaning protocols for crystallization robots: preventing protease contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naschberger, Andreas; Fürnrohr, Barbara G; Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Bonagura, Christopher A; Wright, David; Scheffzek, Klaus; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The protease in the commonly used commercial low-foam enzyme cleaner Zymit cannot be completely blocked by EDTA, a widely used inhibitor of metalloproteases, at concentrations of up to 5 mM. Severe protein degradation was observed in crystallization drops after EDTA-containing wash steps unless residual Zymit protease was removed with NaOH at a concentration of at least 0.1 M. Wash steps with 0.1% SDS were also ineffective in completely removing the remaining Zymit activity. Protocols including wash steps with at least 0.1 M NaOH, as for example specified in the original ZENM protocol, are recommended to completely deactivate Zymit protease activity.

  10. Protease-triggered siRNA delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozema, David B; Blokhin, Andrei V; Wakefield, Darren H; Benson, Jonathan D; Carlson, Jeffrey C; Klein, Jason J; Almeida, Lauren J; Nicholas, Anthony L; Hamilton, Holly L; Chu, Qili; Hegge, Julia O; Wong, So C; Trubetskoy, Vladimir S; Hagen, Collin M; Kitas, Eric; Wolff, Jon A; Lewis, David L

    2015-07-10

    The safe and efficacious delivery of membrane impermeable therapeutics requires cytoplasmic access without the toxicity of nonspecific cytoplasmic membrane lysis. We have developed a mechanism for control of cytoplasmic release which utilizes endogenous proteases as a trigger and results in functional delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA). The delivery approach is based on reversible inhibition of membrane disruptive polymers with protease-sensitive substrates. Proteolytic hydrolysis upon endocytosis restores the membrane destabilizing activity of the polymers thereby allowing cytoplasmic access of the co-delivered siRNA. Protease-sensitive polymer masking reagents derived from polyethylene glycol (PEG), which inhibit membrane interactions, and N-acetylgalactosamine, which targets asialoglycoprotein receptors on hepatocytes, were synthesized and used to formulate masked polymer-siRNA delivery vehicles. The size, charge and stability of the vehicles enable functional delivery of siRNA after subcutaneous administration and, with modification of the targeting ligand, have the potential for extrahepatic targeting.

  11. Peptide synthesis in neat organic solvents with novel thermostable proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplak, Ana; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; Wu, Bian; Janssen, Dick B

    2015-06-01

    Biocatalytic peptide synthesis will benefit from enzymes that are active at low water levels in organic solvent compositions that allow good substrate and product solubility. To explore the use of proteases from thermophiles for peptide synthesis under such conditions, putative protease genes of the subtilase class were cloned from Thermus aquaticus and Deinococcus geothermalis and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes were highly thermostable and catalyzed efficient peptide bond synthesis at 80°C and 60°C in neat acetonitrile with excellent conversion (>90%). The enzymes tolerated high levels of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) as a cosolvent (40-50% v/v), which improved substrate solubility and gave good conversion in 5+3 peptide condensation reactions. The results suggest that proteases from thermophiles can be used for peptide synthesis under harsh reaction conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-10

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  13. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology. PMID:26861509

  14. Lectin Complement Pathway Proteins in Healthy Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Anne; Hansen, Annette; Hansen, Søren W K

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the lectin pathway of complement activation, numerous clinical cohorts have been examined for one or more of the proteins, with the intention of uncovering the functions of the proteins or with the aim of discovering new biomarkers or diagnostic tools. To unveil the abnormal......, it is pivotal to know the normal. Our aim was to describe the concentrations of the eleven known proteins of the lectin pathway in serum and plasma and to uncover possible gender differences, age and diurnal variations, which must be taken into account for investigations in different cohorts. We examined...... the concentrations of all lectin pathway proteins (mannan-binding lectin (MBL), H-ficolin, L-ficolin, M-ficolin, collectin-K1, collectin-L1, MBL-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2), MASP-3, MBL associated protein of 44 kDa (MAp44) and MAp19 in 300 Danish blood donors in serum and EDTA plasma in established assays...

  15. Taspase1: a 'misunderstood' protease with translational cancer relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünsch, D; Hahlbrock, A; Jung, S; Schirmeister, T; van den Boom, J; Schilling, O; Knauer, S K; Stauber, R H

    2016-06-30

    Proteolysis is not only a critical requirement for life, but the executing enzymes also play important roles in numerous pathological conditions, including cancer. Therefore, targeting proteases is clearly relevant for improving cancer patient care. However, to effectively control proteases, a profound knowledge of their mechanistic function as well as their regulation and downstream signalling in health and disease is required. The highly conserved protease Threonine Aspartase1 (Taspase1) is overexpressed in numerous liquid and solid malignancies and was characterized as a 'non-oncogene addiction' protease. Although Taspase1 was shown to cleave various regulatory proteins in humans as well as leukaemia provoking mixed lineage leukaemia fusions, our knowledge on its detailed functions and the underlying mechanisms contributing to cancer is still incomplete. Despite superficial similarity to type 2 asparaginases as well as Ntn proteases, such as the proteasome, Taspase1-related research so far gives us the picture of a unique protease exhibiting special features. Moreover, neither effective genetic nor chemical inhibitors for this enzyme are available so far, thus hampering not only to further dissect Taspase1's pathobiological functions but also precluding the assessment of its clinical impact. Based on recent insights, we here critically review the current knowledge of Taspase1's structure-function relationship and its mechanistic relevance for tumorigenesis obtained from in vitro and in vivo cancer models. We provide a comprehensive overview of tumour entities for which Taspase1 might be of predictive and therapeutic value, and present the respective experimental evidence. To stimulate progress in the field, a comprehensive overview of Taspase1 targeting approaches is presented, including coverage of Taspase1-related patents. We conclude by discussing future inhibition strategies and relevant challenges, which need to be resolved by the field.

  16. Polymorphic exocellular protease expression in clinical isolates of Trichophyton tonsurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, S M

    2001-01-01

    Tinea capitis continues to be an overwhelmingly prevalent disease in children. Despite the fact that it was recognized over a century ago, the factors that dictate the divergent clinical presentations seen with tinea capitis (e.g., carrier state, chronic non-inflammatory infection, acute severely-inflammatory infection) remain unknown. Given the pathogenic role of exocellular proteases in dermatophyte infections and their potential immunogenic role, this investigation was designed to characterize strain-specific variability in fungal protease expression and activity in Trichophyton tonsurans isolates identified from children with tinea capitis.

  17. [Cytokines and proteases involved in pathogenesis of COPD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaya, Atsuyo; Osanai, Kazuhiro

    2011-10-01

    COPD is characterized by persistence of chronic inflammation in small airways and alveoli. Macrophages, neutrophils, and a specialized subset of T lymphocytes orchestrate the mild inflammation. This article focuses on humoral factors such as cytokines and chemokines that recruit these inflammatory and immune cells to the lungs, and proteases/antiproteases that ultimately cause structural derangement in the terminal respiratory zones. In addition to the classical protease and antiprotease imbalance hypothesis, alveolar homeostasis abnormality that comes from imbalance of lung constitutional cell apoptosis and regeneration may play a role in emphysema development. Also, autoimmunity to elastin degradation products may take part in the disease.

  18. Alkaline protease production by solid state fermentation on polyurethane foam

    OpenAIRE

    Hongzhang, Chen; Hui, Wang; Aijun, Zhang; Zuohu, Li

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigated the process of solid state fermentation (SSF) using PUF (polyurethane foam) as inert solid support to produce alkaline protease. Maximal enzyme activity was 2185U/ml at pH 9.0, incubation temperature 32 0C inoculum amount of 1.0 % (v/v) , nutrient solution3.75 ml/g PUF, incubation time for 2 h and 15.0 mM of added CaCl2. Under the same conditions, the yield of alkaline protease produced by SSF using PUF as support is higher than that by submerged fermentation (SMF).

  19. A New Pepstatin-Insensitive Thermopsin-Like Protease Overproduced in Peptide-Rich Cultures of Sulfolobus solfataricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gogliettino

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we gain insight into the extracellular proteolytic system of Sulfolobus solfataricus grown on proteinaceous substrates, providing further evidence that acidic proteases were specifically produced in response to peptide-rich media. The main proteolytic component was the previously isolated SsMTP (Sulfolobus solfataricus multi-domain thermopsin-like protease, while the less abundant (named SsMTP-1 one was purified, characterized and identified as the sso1175 gene-product. The protein revealed a multi-domain organization shared with the cognate SsMTP with a catalytic domain followed by several tandemly-repeated motifs. Moreover, both enzymes were found spread across the Crenarchaeota phylum and belonging to the thermopsin family, although segregated into diverse phylogenetic clusters. SsMTP-1 showed a 75-kDa molecular mass and was stable in the temperature range 50–90 °C, with optimal activity at 70 °C and pH 2.0. Serine, metallo and aspartic protease inhibitors did not affect the enzyme activity, designating SsMTP-1 as a new member of the pepstatin-insensitive aspartic protease family. The peptide-bond-specificity of SsMTP-1 in the cleavage of the oxidized insulin B chain was uncommon amongst thermopsins, suggesting that it could play a distinct, but cooperative role in the protein degradation machinery. Interestingly, predictions of the transmembrane protein topology of SsMTP and SsMTP-1 strongly suggest a possible contribution in signal-transduction pathways.

  20. Semi-continuous in situ magnetic separation for enhanced extracellular protease productionmodeling and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerff, M.; Scholz, A.; Käppler, T.;

    2013-01-01

    In modern biotechnology proteases play a major role as detergent ingredients. Especially the production of extracellular protease by Bacillus species facilitates downstream processing because the protease can be directly harvested from the biosuspension. In situ magnetic separation (ISMS......) constitutes an excellent adsorptive method for efficient extracellular protease removal during cultivation. In this work, the impact of semi‐continuous ISMS on the overall protease yield has been investigated. Results reveal significant removal of the protease from Bacillus licheniformis cultivations....... Bacitracin‐functionalized magnetic particles were successfully applied, regenerated and reused up to 30 times. Immediate reproduction of the protease after ISMS proved the biocompatibility of this integrated approach. Six subsequent ISMS steps significantly increased the overall protease yield up to 98...

  1. An assay for the mannan-binding lectin pathway of complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steen Vang; Thiel, S; Jensen, L;

    2001-01-01

    The mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation has been established as the third pathway of complement activation. MBL is a carbohydrate-binding serum protein, which circulates in complex with serine proteases known as mannan-binding lectin associated serine proteases (MASPs...... activation. Therefore, in a generally applicable complement activation assay specific for the MBL pathway, the activity of the classical pathway must be inhibited. This can be accomplished by exploiting the finding that high ionic strength buffers inhibit the binding of C1q to immune complexes and disrupt...... the C1 complex, whereas the carbohydrate-binding activity of MBL and the integrity of the MBL complex is maintained under hypertonic conditions. In the assay described here, the specific C4b-depositing capacity of the MBL pathway was determined by incubating serum diluted in buffer containing 1 M Na...

  2. PENGEMPUKAN DAGING DENGAN ENZIM PROTEASE TANAMAN BIDURI (Calotropis gigantea [Meat Tenderization using Protease of Biduri Plant (Calotropis gigantea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erni Sofia Murtini1

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Tenderness is the main attribute quality of meat, which influences consumer acceptability. Protease enzyme (like papain, bromelin and ficin are known to be used for improving tenderness of meat trough degradation of the protein. Biduri plant (Calotropis gigantea contains protease enzyme in its latex or the young tissue (0-20 cm plant tip. After isolation of crude enzyme using ammonium sulphate, the enzyme was the applied to tenderise meat at concentrations 0 ; 0,25; 0,5; 0,75 and 1,0%. The result showed that concentration of protease enzyme affected to meat tenderness that determined by compression test and tensile strength. The enzyme (0.5% was enough to tenderise meat indicated by decreasing its compression test value to 201,160 N 9 from control of 228,582 N and tensile strength value to 4,618 N (from control 9,588N

  3. Localized serine protease activity and the establishment of Drosophila embryonic dorsoventral polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David; Cho, Yong Suk; Stevens, Leslie M

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila embryo dorsoventral polarity is established by a maternally encoded signal transduction pathway in which three sequentially acting serine proteases, Gastrulation Defective, Snake and Easter, generate the ligand that activates the Toll receptor on the ventral side of the embryo. The spatial regulation of this pathway depends upon ventrally restricted expression of the Pipe sulfotransferase in the ovarian follicle during egg formation. Several recent observations have advanced our understanding of the mechanism regulating the spatially restricted activation of Toll. First, several protein components of the vitelline membrane layer of the eggshell have been determined to be targets of Pipe-mediated sulfation. Second, the processing of Easter by Snake has been identified as the first Pipe-dependent, ventrally-restricted processing event in the pathway. Finally, Gastrulation Defective has been shown to undergo Pipe-dependent, ventral localization within the perivitelline space and to facilitate Snake-mediated processing of Easter. Together, these observations suggest that Gastrulation Defective, localized on the interior ventral surface of the eggshell in association with Pipe-sulfated eggshell proteins, recruits and mediates an interaction between Snake and Easter. This event leads to ventrally-restricted processing and activation of Easter and consequently, localized formation of the Toll ligand, and Toll activation.

  4. Analysis of regulatory protease sequences identified through bioinformatic data mining of the Schistosoma mansoni genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minchella Dennis J

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New chemotherapeutic agents against Schistosoma mansoni, an etiological agent of human schistosomiasis, are a priority due to the emerging drug resistance and the inability of current drug treatments to prevent reinfection. Proteases have been under scrutiny as targets of immunological or chemotherapeutic anti-Schistosoma agents because of their vital role in many stages of the parasitic life cycle. Function has been established for only a handful of identified S. mansoni proteases, and the vast majority of these are the digestive proteases; very few of the conserved classes of regulatory proteases have been identified from Schistosoma species, despite their vital role in numerous cellular processes. To that end, we identified protease protein coding genes from the S. mansoni genome project and EST library. Results We identified 255 protease sequences from five catalytic classes using predicted proteins of the S. mansoni genome. The vast majority of these show significant similarity to proteins in KEGG and the Conserved Domain Database. Proteases include calpains, caspases, cytosolic and mitochondrial signal peptidases, proteases that interact with ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like molecules, and proteases that perform regulated intramembrane proteolysis. Comparative analysis of classes of important regulatory proteases find conserved active site domains, and where appropriate, signal peptides and transmembrane helices. Phylogenetic analysis provides support for inferring functional divergence among regulatory aspartic, cysteine, and serine proteases. Conclusion Numerous proteases are identified for the first time in S. mansoni. We characterized important regulatory proteases and focus analysis on these proteases to complement the growing knowledge base of digestive proteases. This work provides a foundation for expanding knowledge of proteases in Schistosoma species and examining their diverse function and potential as targets

  5. Boosted protease inhibitors and the electrocardiographic measures of QT and PR durations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Elsayed Z; Lundgren, Jens D; Roediger, Mollie P;

    2011-01-01

    There are contradictory reports regarding the effects of protease inhibitors on the ECG measures of QT and PR interval durations. The effect of interrupting use of protease inhibitors on QT and PR progression is also unknown.......There are contradictory reports regarding the effects of protease inhibitors on the ECG measures of QT and PR interval durations. The effect of interrupting use of protease inhibitors on QT and PR progression is also unknown....

  6. 21 CFR 184.1150 - Bacterially-derived protease enzyme preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bacterially-derived protease enzyme preparation... RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1150 Bacterially-derived protease enzyme preparation. (a) Bacterially-derived protease enzyme preparation is obtained from the...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1027 - Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product. 184... RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1027 Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product. (a) Mixed carbohydrase and protease enzyme product is an enzyme preparation that...

  8. Specific and efficient cleavage of fusion proteins by recombinant plum pox virus NIa protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nuoyan; Pérez, José de Jesús; Zhang, Zhonghui; Domínguez, Elvira; Garcia, Juan Antonio; Xie, Qi

    2008-02-01

    Site-specific proteases are the most popular kind of enzymes for removing the fusion tags from fused target proteins. Nuclear inclusion protein a (NIa) proteases obtained from the family Potyviridae have become promising due to their high activities and stringencies of sequences recognition. NIa proteases from tobacco etch virus (TEV) and tomato vein mottling virus (TVMV) have been shown to process recombinant proteins successfully in vitro. In this report, recombinant PPV (plum pox virus) NIa protease was employed to process fusion proteins with artificial cleavage site in vitro. Characteristics such as catalytic ability and affecting factors (salt, temperature, protease inhibitors, detergents, and denaturing reagents) were investigated. Recombinant PPV NIa protease expressed and purified from Escherichia coli demonstrated efficient and specific processing of recombinant GFP and SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein, with site F (N V V V H Q black triangle down A) for PPV NIa protease artificially inserted between the fusion tags and the target proteins. Its catalytic capability is similar to those of TVMV and TEV NIa protease. Recombinant PPV NIa protease reached its maximal proteolytic activity at approximately 30 degrees C. Salt concentration and only one of the tested protease inhibitors had minor influences on the proteolytic activity of PPV NIa protease. Recombinant PPV NIa protease was resistant to self-lysis for at least five days.

  9. Teaching Foundational Topics and Scientific Skills in Biochemistry within the Conceptual Framework of HIV Protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    HIV protease has served as a model protein for understanding protein structure, enzyme kinetics, structure-based drug design, and protein evolution. Inhibitors of HIV protease are also an essential part of effective HIV/AIDS treatment and have provided great societal benefits. The broad applications for HIV protease and its inhibitors make it a…

  10. Higher Desolvation Energy Reduces Molecular Recognition in Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislau C. Kovari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing HIV-1 protease inhibitors that overcome drug-resistance is still a challenging task. In this study, four clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases that exhibit resistance to all the US FDA-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors and also reduce the substrate recognition ability were examined. A multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease isolate, MDR 769, was co-crystallized with the p2/NC substrate and the mutated CA/p2 substrate, CA/p2 P1’F. Both substrates display different levels of molecular recognition by the wild-type and multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease. From the crystal structures, only limited differences can be identified between the wild-type and multi-drug resistant protease. Therefore, a wild-type HIV-1 protease and four multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases in complex with the two peptides were modeled based on the crystal structures and examined during a 10 ns-molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results reveal that the multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases require higher desolvation energy to form complexes with the peptides. This result suggests that the desolvation of the HIV-1 protease active site is an important step of protease-ligand complex formation as well as drug resistance. Therefore, desolvation energy could be considered as a parameter in the evaluation of future HIV-1 protease inhibitor candidates.

  11. A Kunitz-type cysteine protease inhibitor from cauliflower and Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halls, C.E.; Rogers, S. W.; Ouffattole, M.

    2006-01-01

    active. This observation raised the question of whether the protease inhibitor might have the ability to interact with the granulin domain protease. Here we express an Arabidopsis homolog of the protease inhibitor as a recombinant protein and demonstrate that it is a potent inhibitor of the recombinant...

  12. Conditional Depletion of the Chlamydomonas Chloroplast ClpP Protease Activates Nuclear Genes Involved in Autophagy and Plastid Protein Quality Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramundo, Silvia; Casero, David; Mühlhaus, Timo; Hemme, Dorothea; Sommer, Frederik; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Rahire, Michèle; Schroda, Michael; Rusch, Jannette; Goodenough, Ursula; Pellegrini, Matteo; Perez-Perez, Maria Esther; Crespo, José Luis; Schaad, Olivier; Civic, Natacha; Rochaix, Jean David

    2014-05-01

    Plastid protein homeostasis is critical during chloroplast biogenesis and responses to changes in environmental conditions. Proteases and molecular chaperones involved in plastid protein quality control are encoded by the nucleus except for the catalytic subunit of ClpP, an evolutionarily conserved serine protease. Unlike its Escherichia coli ortholog, this chloroplast protease is essential for cell viability. To study its function, we used a recently developed system of repressible chloroplast gene expression in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Using this repressible system, we have shown that a selective gradual depletion of ClpP leads to alteration of chloroplast morphology, causes formation of vesicles, and induces extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization that is reminiscent of autophagy. Analysis of the transcriptome and proteome during ClpP depletion revealed a set of proteins that are more abundant at the protein level, but not at the RNA level. These proteins may comprise some of the ClpP substrates. Moreover, the specific increase in accumulation, both at the RNA and protein level, of small heat shock proteins, chaperones, proteases, and proteins involved in thylakoid maintenance upon perturbation of plastid protein homeostasis suggests the existence of a chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling pathway involved in organelle quality control. We suggest that this represents a chloroplast unfolded protein response that is conceptually similar to that observed in the endoplasmic reticulum and in mitochondria.

  13. Conditional Depletion of the Chlamydomonas Chloroplast ClpP Protease Activates Nuclear Genes Involved in Autophagy and Plastid Protein Quality Control[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramundo, Silvia; Casero, David; Mühlhaus, Timo; Hemme, Dorothea; Sommer, Frederik; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Rahire, Michèle; Schroda, Michael; Rusch, Jannette; Goodenough, Ursula; Pellegrini, Matteo; Perez-Perez, Maria Esther; Crespo, José Luis; Schaad, Olivier; Civic, Natacha; Rochaix, Jean David

    2014-01-01

    Plastid protein homeostasis is critical during chloroplast biogenesis and responses to changes in environmental conditions. Proteases and molecular chaperones involved in plastid protein quality control are encoded by the nucleus except for the catalytic subunit of ClpP, an evolutionarily conserved serine protease. Unlike its Escherichia coli ortholog, this chloroplast protease is essential for cell viability. To study its function, we used a recently developed system of repressible chloroplast gene expression in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Using this repressible system, we have shown that a selective gradual depletion of ClpP leads to alteration of chloroplast morphology, causes formation of vesicles, and induces extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization that is reminiscent of autophagy. Analysis of the transcriptome and proteome during ClpP depletion revealed a set of proteins that are more abundant at the protein level, but not at the RNA level. These proteins may comprise some of the ClpP substrates. Moreover, the specific increase in accumulation, both at the RNA and protein level, of small heat shock proteins, chaperones, proteases, and proteins involved in thylakoid maintenance upon perturbation of plastid protein homeostasis suggests the existence of a chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling pathway involved in organelle quality control. We suggest that this represents a chloroplast unfolded protein response that is conceptually similar to that observed in the endoplasmic reticulum and in mitochondria. PMID:24879428

  14. Delay of Iris flower senescence by protease inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pak, C.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2005-01-01

    asterisk inside a circle sign Visible senescence of the flag tepals in Iris x hollandica (cv. Blue Magic) was preceded by a large increase in endoprotease activity. Just before visible senescence about half of total endoprotease activity was apparently due to cysteine proteases, somewhat less than h

  15. Activity profiling of papain-like cysteine proteases in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, van der R.A.L.; Leeuwenburgh, M.A.; Bogyo, M.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.; Peck, S.C.

    2004-01-01

    Transcriptomic and proteomic technologies are generating a wealth of data that are frequently used by scientists to predict the function of proteins based on their expression or presence. However, activity of many proteins, such as transcription factors, kinases, and proteases, depends on posttransl

  16. Protease Inhibitors Do Not Affect Antibody Responses to Pneumococcal Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Rosa, Indhira; Munjal, Iona M; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria; Yu, Xiaoying; Pirofski, Liise-Anne; Mendoza, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    HIV(+) subjects on optimal antiretroviral therapy have persistently impaired antibody responses to pneumococcal vaccination. We explored the possibility that this effect may be due to HIV protease inhibitors (PIs). We found that in humans and mice, PIs do not affect antibody production in response to pneumococcal vaccination.

  17. Structural Basis for Specific Recognition of Substrates by Sapovirus Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru eYokoyama

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sapovirus (SaV protease catalyzes cleavage of the peptide bonds at six sites of a viral polyprotein for the viral replication and maturation. However, the mechanisms by which the protease recognizes the distinct sequences of the six cleavage sites remain poorly understood. Here we examined this issue by computational and experimental approaches. A structural modeling and docking study disclosed two small clefts on the SaV protease cavity that allow the stable and functional binding of substrates to the catalytic cavity via aromatic stacking and electrostatic interactions. An information entropy study and a site-directed mutagenesis study consistently suggested variability of the two clefts under functional constraints. Using this information, we identified three chemical compounds that had structural and spatial features resembling those of the substrate amino acid residues bound to the two clefts and that exhibited an inhibitory effect on SaV protease in vitro. These results suggest that the two clefts provide structural base points to realize the functional binding of various substrates.

  18. Design, synthesis, and activity of nanocellulosic protease sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we contrast the molecular assembly, and biochemical utility of nanocellulosic materials prepared from cotton and wood as protease sensors. The cotton-based nanocellulosic substrates were prepared in a variety of ways to produce nanocrystals, films and aerogels, which were derivatized with eithe...

  19. Prions in Variably Protease-Sensitive Prionopathy: An Update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zou, W.Q.; Gambetti, P.; Xiao, X.; Yuan, J.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Pirisinu, L.

    2013-01-01

    Human prion diseases, including sporadic, familial, and acquired forms such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), are caused by prions in which an abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) derived from its normal cellular isoform (PrPC) is the only known component. The recently-identified variably protease-sensi

  20. Intervention with Serine Protease Activity with Small Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    , plasma kallikrein, which contributes to the pathogenesis in hereditary angioedema. According to the X-ray crystal structure analysis, we proposed a principle for designing inhibitors of other serine proteases from mupain-1. In order to be able to evaluate the inhibitory activities of our peptides in vivo...

  1. Milk Clotting Activity of Protease, Extracted from Rhizome of Taffin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2017-03-07

    Mar 7, 2017 ... substituting calf rennet in the food industries, particularly in cheese making processes. Keywords: Ginger ..... practice (Macedo et al., 1993). Ginger ... evaluation procedure, the protease MCA/PA ratio has been a ... Quantities of Protein Utilizing the Principle .... proteolysis and sensory quality of Peshawari.

  2. THE USE OF DIFFERENT PROTEASES TO HYDROLYZE GLIADINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Socha

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Gliadins represent alcohol-soluble fraction of wheat storage proteins which is responsible for development of celiac disease. The only and effective treatment for celiac disease is strict adherence to a gluten-free diet excluding any food made with wheat, as well as rye, barley and possibly oat flour. Enzymatic modification of wheat gliadins seems to be an alternative method for decreasing of celiac activity. The aim of our study was a trial of enzymatic modification of wheat gliadins using fungal (Aspergillus sp., Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus niger and bacterial (Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Bacillus thermoproteolyticus, Streptomyces griseus proteases. The reaction was performed up to 60 min, stopped by addition of appropriate synthetic inhibitor and products of limited proteolysis were analyzed by SDS-PAGE method. From fungal proteases most effective proteolytic activity was observed using acid proteinase from A. niger since wheat gliadins and low molecular weight peptides were completely degraded. Bacterial proteases form B. licheniformis and B. thermoproteolyticus acted very effective and as the result of hydrolysis, the products of lower molecular weight (<15 kDa occurred. Most of the wheat gliadins were susceptible to proteolysis by examined bacterial enzymes (exception were protease from B. stearothermophilus and S. griseus. Although wheat gliadins are susceptible to enzymatic degradation, further analysis (e.g. immunochemical or mass spectrometry are desirable to confirm if the products of proteolysis have lost or at least partially decrease their celiac activity.

  3. ElaD, a Deubiquitinating protease expressed by E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Catic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubl are designed to modify polypeptides in eukaryotes. Covalent binding of ubiquitin or Ubls to substrate proteins can be reversed by specific hydrolases. One particular set of cysteine proteases, the CE clan, which targets ubiquitin and Ubls, has homologs in eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and viruses. FINDINGS: We have cloned and analyzed the E. coli protein elaD, which is distantly related to eukaryotic CE clan members of the ULP/SENP protease family that are specific for SUMO and Nedd8. Previously misannotated as a putative sulfatase/phosphatase, elaD is an efficient and specific deubiquitinating enzyme in vitro. Interestingly, elaD is present in all intestinal pathogenic E. coli strains, but conspicuously absent from extraintestinal pathogenic strains (ExPECs. Further homologs of this protease can be found in Acanthamoeba Polyphaga Mimivirus, and in Alpha-, Beta-and Gammaproteobacteria. CONCLUSION: The expression of ULP/SENP-related hydrolases in bacteria therefore extends to plant pathogens and medically relevant strains of Escherichia coli, Legionella pneumophila, Rickettsiae, Chlamydiae, and Salmonellae, in which the elaD ortholog sseL has recently been identified as a virulence factor with deubiquitinating activity. As a counterpoint, our phylogenetic and functional examination reveals that ancient eukaryotic ULP/SENP proteases also have the potential of ubiquitin-specific hydrolysis, suggesting an early common origin of this peptidase clan.

  4. graal: a Drosophila gene coding for several mosaic serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munier, Anne Isabelle; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Janeway, Charles A; Doucet, Daniel; Capovilla, Maria; Lagueux, Marie

    2004-10-01

    Serine proteases play vital roles in several biological processes such as development and immunity. We have characterized Graal, a large multi-domain serine protease from Drosophila. Graal is spliced in at least three transcripts that are present throughout development. The domains found in Graal proteins are: chitin-binding domains (CBD), scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains, low density lipoprotein receptor cysteine-rich (LDLR-CR) domains, histidine and proline-rich domains, a NGGYQPP-repeat domain and a serine protease domain. The last 2370 nucleotides of these RNAs are identical and encode a His-rich domain, two SRCR domains, two LDLR-CR domains and a protease domain. The transcription of graal is upregulated after fungal or bacterial infection. Analysis of the Iso1 (y;cn,sp,bw) strain shows that graal transcription is impaired in this fly line due to the insertion of a retrotransposon in the sixth exon. However, no phenotype could be observed consecutive to the absence of graal full length transcripts, particularly in the context of an immune challenge.

  5. Breakdown of the innate immune system by bacterial proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarman, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria have developed many strategies to circumvent our immune system to survive and colonize human tissues. One of these strategies is by secreting proteases that specifically target the innate immune system. Aureolysin is a metalloprotease from Staphylococcus aureus which target the main compone

  6. Purification and characterization of a pineapple crown leaf thiol protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, L Rupachandra; Devi, Th Premila; Devi, S Kunjeshwori

    2004-02-01

    A thiol protease was isolated and purified from the crown leaf of pineapple, Ananas comosus (L.) Merr. cv. Queen, by an immunoaffinity procedure. After the purification to electrophoretic homogeneity, the enzyme was characterized with respect to some of its physico-chemical and kinetic properties. The molecular weight of the protease (22.4-22.9 kDa), Km (97 microM) and kcat (8.8 s(-1)) for its esterolytic cleavage of the synthetic protease substrate N(alpha)-CBZ-L-lysine p-nitrophenyl ester, the concentration of its thiol activator L-cysteine required for half maximal activation A0.5 (9.9 microM), optimum pH (6.5) for its proteolytic action on azocasein, T(1/2) (60 degrees C) for inactivation by heating the enzyme (35.5 microg protein/mL) in citrate buffer pH 6.0 for 15 min, and SH-group content (0.98 mol/mol enzyme) were determined. Most of these physicochemical and kinetic properties were found to be similar to those of the already well-characterized stem bromelain (EC 3.4.22.32). Thus, the immunoaffinity purified crown leaf protease appeared to be closely related to stem bromelain.

  7. Extracellular acid protease from Aspergillus niger I1: purification and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... Proteases with high activity and stability in acid pH range have .... at a flow rate of 25 ml/h after elution with the same buffer. Protein content (abs. at ..... Role of the hydrophobic amino acid residue in the bitterness of peptides.

  8. Delay of Iris flower senescence by protease inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pak, C.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2005-01-01

    asterisk inside a circle sign Visible senescence of the flag tepals in Iris x hollandica (cv. Blue Magic) was preceded by a large increase in endoprotease activity. Just before visible senescence about half of total endoprotease activity was apparently due to cysteine proteases, somewhat less than

  9. Factor VII activating protease. Single nucleotide polymorphisms light the way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanse, S M; Etscheid, M

    2011-08-01

    Factor VII activating protease (FSAP) is a circulating serine protease with high homology to fibrinolytic enzymes. A role in the regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis is suspected based on in vitro studies demonstrating activation of FVII or pro-urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). However, considering the paucity of any studies in animal models or any correlative studies in humans the role of FSAP in haemostasis remains unclear. In relation to vascular remodeling processes or inflammation it has been convincingly shown that FSAP interacts with growth factors as well as protease activated receptors (PAR). Against this sparse background there are a plethora of studies which have investigated the linkage of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the FSAP gene (HABP2) to various diseases. The G534E SNP of FSAP is associated with a low proteolytic activity due to an amino acid exchange in the protease domain. This and other SNPs have been linked to carotid stenosis, stroke as well as thrombosis in the elderly and plaque calcification. These SNP analyses indicate an important role for FSAP in the regulation of the haemostasis system as well as fibroproliferative inflammatory processes.

  10. Molecular pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    that 45% of deaths in the developed world are linked to fibrotic disease. Fibrosis and cancer are known to be inextricably linked; however, we are only just beginning to understand the common and overlapping molecular pathways between the two. Here, we discuss what is known about the intersection...... of fibrosis and cancer, with a focus on cancer metastasis, and highlight some of the exciting new potential clinical targets that are emerging from analysis of the molecular pathways associated with these two devastating diseases. Clin Cancer Res; 20(14); 3637-43. ©2014 AACR....

  11. Safety of protease inhibitors in HIV-infected pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chougrani I

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Imène Chougrani,1 Dominique Luton,1,2 Sophie Matheron,3 Laurent Mandelbrot,2,4 Elie Azria1,2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bichat Claude Bernard Hospital, Paris Diderot University, Paris, 2Departement Hospitalo-Universitaire "Risk and Pregnancy", Paris, 3Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Bichat Claude Bernard Hospital, Paris Diderot University, Paris, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Louis Mourier Hospital, Paris Diderot University, Colombes, France Abstract: The dire conditions of the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome epidemic and the immense benefits of antiretroviral prophylaxis in prevention of mother-to-child transmission far outweigh the potential for adverse effects and undeniably justify the rapid and widespread use of this therapy, despite incomplete safety data. Highly active antiretroviral therapy has now become standard care, and more than half the validated regimens include protease inhibitors. This paper reviews current knowledge of the safety of these drugs during pregnancy, in terms of maternal and fetal outcomes. Transfer of protease inhibitors across the placenta is known to be minimal, and current data about birth defects and fetal malignancies are reassuring. Maternal liver function and glucose metabolism should be monitored in women treated with protease inhibitor-based regimens, but concerns about the development of maternal resistance, should treatment be discontinued, have been shown to be groundless. Neonates should be screened for hematologic abnormalities, although these are rarely severe or permanent and are not usually related to the protease inhibitor component of the antiretroviral combination. Current findings concerning pre-eclampsia and growth restriction are discordant, and further research is needed to address the question of placental vascular complications. The increased risk of preterm birth attributed to protease inhibitors should be

  12. In-cell protease assay systems based on trans-localizing molecular beacon proteins using HCV protease as a model system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Hee Kim

    Full Text Available This study describes a sensitive in-cell protease detection system that enables direct fluorescence detection of a target protease and its inhibition inside living cells. This live-cell imaging system provides a fluorescent molecular beacon protein comprised of an intracellular translocation signal sequence, a protease-specific cleavage sequence, and a fluorescent tag sequence(s. The molecular beacon protein is designed to change its intracellular localization upon cleavage by a target protease, i.e., from the cytosol to a subcellular organelle or from a subcellular organelle to the cytosol. Protease activity can be monitored at the single cell level, and accordingly the entire cell population expressing the protease can be accurately enumerated. The clear cellular change in fluorescence pattern makes this system an ideal tool for various life science and drug discovery research, including high throughput and high content screening applications.

  13. Properties of hemolysin and protease produced by Aeromonas trota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eizo Takahashi

    Full Text Available We examined the properties of exotoxins produced by Aeromonas trota (A. enteropelogenes, one of the diarrheagenic species of Aeromonadaceae. Nine of 19 A. trota isolates that grew on solid media containing erythrocytes showed hemolytic activity. However, the hemolytic activities of the culture supernatants of these hemolytic strains of A. trota were markedly lower than those of A. sobria when cultured in liquid medium, and the amount of hemolysin detected by immunoblotting using antiserum against the hemolysin produced by A. sobria was also low. A mouse intestine loop assay using living bacterial cells showed that A. trota 701 caused the significant accumulation of fluid, and antiserum against the hemolysin produced suppressed the enterotoxic action of A. trota 701. These results indicated that A. trota 701 was diarrheagenic and the hemolysin produced was the causative agent of the enterotoxic activity of A. trota. The hemolysin in A. sobria was previously shown to be secreted in a preform (inactive form and be activated when the carboxy-terminal domain was cleaved off by proteases in the culture supernatant. Since mature hemolysin was detected in the culture supernatants of A. trota, we analyzed the extracellular protease produced by A. trota. Fifteen of 19 A. trota isolates that grew on solid media containing skim milk showed proteolytic activity. We subsequently found that most A. trota isolates possessed the serine protease gene, but not the metalloprotease gene. Therefore, we determined the nucleotide sequence of the serine protease gene and its chaperone A. trota gene. The results obtained revealed that the deduced amino acid sequences of serine protease and the chaperone were homologous to those of A. sobria with identities of 83.0% and 75.8%, respectively.

  14. Structural Mechanisms of Inactivation in Scabies Mite Serine Protease Paralogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Katja; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Irving, James A.; Reynolds, Simone; Willis, Charlene; Beckham, Simone; Law, Ruby H.P.; Yang, Sundy; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; McGowan, Sheena; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Kemp, David J.; Buckle, Ashley M.; (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.)

    2009-08-07

    The scabies mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) is a parasite responsible for major morbidity in disadvantaged communities and immuno-compromised patients worldwide. In addition to the physical discomfort caused by the disease, scabies infestations facilitate infection by Streptococcal species via skin lesions, resulting in a high prevalence of rheumatic fever/heart disease in affected communities. The scabies mite produces 33 proteins that are closely related to those in the dust mite group 3 allergen and belong to the S1-like protease family (chymotrypsin-like). However, all but one of these molecules contain mutations in the conserved active-site catalytic triad that are predicted to render them catalytically inactive. These molecules are thus termed scabies mite inactivated protease paralogues (SMIPPs). The precise function of SMIPPs is unclear; however, it has been suggested that these proteins might function by binding and protecting target substrates from cleavage by host immune proteases, thus preventing the host from mounting an effective immune challenge. In order to begin to understand the structural basis for SMIPP function, we solved the crystal structures of SMIPP-S-I1 and SMIPP-S-D1 at 1.85 {angstrom} and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both structures adopt the characteristic serine protease fold, albeit with large structural variations over much of the molecule. In both structures, mutations in the catalytic triad together with occlusion of the S1 subsite by a conserved Tyr200 residue is predicted to block substrate ingress. Accordingly, we show that both proteases lack catalytic function. Attempts to restore function (via site-directed mutagenesis of catalytic residues as well as Tyr200) were unsuccessful. Taken together, these data suggest that SMIPPs have lost the ability to bind substrates in a classical 'canonical' fashion, and instead have evolved alternative functions in the lifecycle of the scabies mite.

  15. The S8 serine, C1A cysteine and A1 aspartic protease families in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Eric P; Jones, Alan M; Dickerman, Allan W

    2004-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome has over 550 protease sequences representing all five catalytic types: serine, cysteine, aspartic acid, metallo and threonine (MEROPS peptidase database, http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), which probably reflect a wide variety of as yet unidentified functions performed by plant proteases. Recent indications that the 26S proteasome, a T1 family-threonine protease, is a regulator of light and hormone responsive signal transduction highlight the potential of proteases to participate in many aspects of plant growth and development. Recent discoveries that proteases are required for stomatal distribution, embryo development and disease resistance point to wider roles for four additional multigene families that include some of the most frequently studied (yet poorly understood) plant proteases: the subtilisin-like, serine proteases (family S8), the papain-like, cysteine proteases (family C1A), the pepsin-like, aspartic proteases (family A1) and the plant matrixin, metalloproteases (family M10A). In this report, 54 subtilisin-like, 30 papain-like and 59 pepsin-like proteases from Arabidopsis, are compared with S8, C1A and A1 proteases known from other plant species at the functional, phylogenetic and gene structure levels. Examples of structural conservation between S8, C1A and A1 genes from rice, barley, tomato and soybean and those from Arabidopsis are noted, indicating that some common, essential plant protease roles were established before the divergence of monocots and eudicots. Numerous examples of tandem duplications of protease genes and evidence for a variety of restricted expression patterns suggest that a high degree of specialization exists among proteases within each family. We propose that comprehensive analysis of the functions of these genes in Arabidopsis will firmly establish serine, cysteine and aspartic proteases as regulators and effectors of a wide range of plant processes.

  16. The Multifaceted Poliovirus 2A Protease: Regulation of Gene Expression by Picornavirus Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Castelló

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After entry into animal cells, most viruses hijack essential components involved in gene expression. This is the case of poliovirus, which abrogates cellular translation soon after virus internalization. Abrogation is achieved by cleavage of both eIF4GI and eIF4GII by the viral protease 2A. Apart from the interference of poliovirus with cellular protein synthesis, other gene expression steps such as RNA and protein trafficking between nucleus and cytoplasm are also altered. Poliovirus 2Apro is capable of hydrolyzing components of the nuclear pore, thus preventing an efficient antiviral response by the host cell. Here, we compare in detail poliovirus 2Apro with other viral proteins (from picornaviruses and unrelated families as regard to their activity on key host factors that control gene expression. It is possible that future analyses to determine the cellular proteins targeted by 2Apro will uncover other cellular functions ablated by poliovirus infection. Further understanding of the cellular proteins hydrolyzed by 2Apro will add further insight into the molecular mechanism by which poliovirus and other viruses interact with the host cell.

  17. Genome-wide survey of prokaryotic serine proteases: Analysis of distribution and domain architectures of five serine protease families in prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Lokesh P

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteases are one of the most abundant groups of proteolytic enzymes found in all the kingdoms of life. While studies have established significant roles for many prokaryotic serine proteases in several physiological processes, such as those associated with metabolism, cell signalling, defense response and development, functional associations for a large number of prokaryotic serine proteases are relatively unknown. Current analysis is aimed at understanding the distribution and probable biological functions of the select serine proteases encoded in representative prokaryotic organisms. Results A total of 966 putative serine proteases, belonging to five families, were identified in the 91 prokaryotic genomes using various sensitive sequence search techniques. Phylogenetic analysis reveals several species-specific clusters of serine proteases suggesting their possible involvement in organism-specific functions. Atypical phylogenetic associations suggest an important role for lateral gene transfer events in facilitating the widespread distribution of the serine proteases in the prokaryotes. Domain organisations of the gene products were analysed, employing sensitive sequence search methods, to infer their probable biological functions. Trypsin, subtilisin and Lon protease families account for a significant proportion of the multi-domain representatives, while the D-Ala-D-Ala carboxypeptidase and the Clp protease families are mostly single-domain polypeptides in prokaryotes. Regulatory domains for protein interaction, signalling, pathogenesis, cell adhesion etc. were found tethered to the serine protease domains. Some domain combinations (such as S1-PDZ; LON-AAA-S16 etc. were found to be widespread in the prokaryotic lineages suggesting a critical role in prokaryotes. Conclusion Domain architectures of many serine proteases and their homologues identified in prokaryotes are very different from those observed in eukaryotes

  18. Characterization of the Protease Activity of Detergents: Laboratory Practicals for Studying the Protease Profile and Activity of Various Commercial Detergents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body…

  19. Some Investigations on Protease Enzyme Production Kinetics Using Bacillus licheniformis BBRC 100053 and Effects of Inhibitors on Protease Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ghobadi Nejad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to great commercial application of protease, it is necessary to study kinetic characterization of this enzyme in order to improve design of enzymatic reactors. In this study, mathematical modeling of protease enzyme production kinetics which is derived from Bacillus licheniformis BBRC 100053 was studied (at 37°C, pH 10 after 73 h in stationary phase, and 150 rpm. The aim of the present paper was to determine the best kinetic model and kinetic parameters for production of protease and calculating Ki (inhibition constant of different inhibitors to find the most effective one. The kinetic parameters Km (Michaelis-Menten constant and Vm (maximum rate were calculated 0.626 mM and 0.0523 mM/min. According to the experimental results, using DFP (diisopropyl fluorophosphate and PMSF (phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride as inhibitors almost 50% of the enzyme activity could be inhibited when their concentrations were 0.525 and 0.541 mM, respectively. Ki for DFP and PMSF were 0.46 and 0.56 mM, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed that the Lineweaver-Burk model was the best fitting model for protease production kinetics DFP was more effective than PMSF and both of them should be covered in the group of noncompetitive inhibitors.

  20. Characterization of the Protease Activity of Detergents: Laboratory Practicals for Studying the Protease Profile and Activity of Various Commercial Detergents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body…

  1. A role in immunity for Arabidopsis cysteine protease RD21, the ortholog of the tomato immune protease C14.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Shindo

    Full Text Available Secreted papain-like Cys proteases are important players in plant immunity. We previously reported that the C14 protease of tomato is targeted by cystatin-like EPIC proteins that are secreted by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans (Pinf during infection. C14 has been under diversifying selection in wild potato species coevolving with Pinf and reduced C14 levels result in enhanced susceptibility for Pinf. Here, we investigated the role C14-EPIC-like interactions in the natural pathosystem of Arabidopsis with the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa. In contrast to the Pinf-solanaceae pathosystem, the C14 orthologous protease of Arabidopsis, RD21, does not evolve under diversifying selection in Arabidopsis, and rd21 null mutants do not show phenotypes upon compatible and incompatible Hpa interactions, despite the evident lack of a major leaf protease. Hpa isolates express highly conserved EPIC-like proteins during infections, but it is unknown if these HpaEPICs can inhibit RD21 and one of these HpaEPICs even lacks the canonical cystatin motifs. The rd21 mutants are unaffected in compatible and incompatible interactions with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, but are significantly more susceptible for the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, demonstrating that RD21 provides immunity to a necrotrophic pathogen.

  2. The threonine protease activity of testes-specific protease 50 (TSP50 is essential for its function in cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Yin Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Testes-specific protease 50 (TSP50, a newly discovered threonine enzyme, has similar amino acid sequences and enzymatic structures to those of many serine proteases. It may be an oncogene. TSP50 is up-regulated in breast cancer epithelial cells, and ectopic expression of TSP50 in TSP50-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells has been found to promote cell proliferation. However, the mechanisms by which TSP50 exerts its growth-promoting effects are not yet fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To delineate whether the threonine protease activity of TSP50 is essential to its function in cell proliferation, we constructed and characterized a mutant TSP50, called TSP50 T310A, which was identified as a protease-dead mutant of TSP50. By a series of proliferation analyses, colony formation assays and apoptosis analyses, we showed that T310A mutation significantly depresses TSP50-induced cell proliferation in vitro. Next, the CHO stable cell line expressing either wild-type or T310A mutant TSP50 was injected subcutaneously into nude mice. We found that the T310A mutation could abolish the tumorigenicity of TSP50 in vivo. A mechanism investigation revealed that the T310A mutation prevented interaction between TSP50 and the NF-κBIκBα complex, which is necessary for TSP50 to perform its function in cell proliferation. CONCLUSION: Our data highlight the importance of threonine 310, the most critical protease catalytic site in TSP50, to TSP50-induced cell proliferation and tumor formation.

  3. Cloning, Expression and Activity Analysis of a Novel Fibrinolytic Serine Protease fromArenicola cristata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chunling; JU Jiyu

    2015-01-01

    The full-length cDNA of a protease gene from a marine annelid Arenicola cristata was amplified through rapid amplifi-cation of cDNA ends technique and sequenced. The size of the cDNA was 936 bp in length, including an open reading frame encod-ing a polypeptide of 270 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequnce consisted of pro- and mature sequences. The protease belonged to the serine protease family because it contained the highly conserved sequence GDSGGP. This protease was novel as it showed a low amino acid sequence similarity (<40%) to other serine proteases. The gene encoding the active form ofA. cristata serine protease was cloned and expressed inE. coli. Purified recombinant protease in a supernatant could dissolve an artificial fibrin plate with plasminogen-rich fibrin, whereas the plasminogen-free fibrin showed no clear zone caused by hydrolysis. This result sug-gested that the recombinant protease showed an indirect fibrinolytic activity of dissolving fibrin, and was probably a plasminogen activator. A rat model with venous thrombosis was established to demonstrate that the recombinant protease could also hydrolyze blood clotin vivo. Therefore, this recombinant protease may be used as a thrombolytic agent for thrombosis treatment. To our knowledge, this study is the first of reporting the fibrinolytic serine protease gene inA. cristata.

  4. Cloning, expression and activity analysis of a novel fibrinolytic serine protease from Arenicola cristata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunling; Ju, Jiyu

    2015-06-01

    The full-length cDNA of a protease gene from a marine annelid Arenicola cristata was amplified through rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique and sequenced. The size of the cDNA was 936 bp in length, including an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 270 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequnce consisted of pro- and mature sequences. The protease belonged to the serine protease family because it contained the highly conserved sequence GDSGGP. This protease was novel as it showed a low amino acid sequence similarity (< 40%) to other serine proteases. The gene encoding the active form of A. cristata serine protease was cloned and expressed in E. coli. Purified recombinant protease in a supernatant could dissolve an artificial fibrin plate with plasminogen-rich fibrin, whereas the plasminogen-free fibrin showed no clear zone caused by hydrolysis. This result suggested that the recombinant protease showed an indirect fibrinolytic activity of dissolving fibrin, and was probably a plasminogen activator. A rat model with venous thrombosis was established to demonstrate that the recombinant protease could also hydrolyze blood clot in vivo. Therefore, this recombinant protease may be used as a thrombolytic agent for thrombosis treatment. To our knowledge, this study is the first of reporting the fibrinolytic serine protease gene in A. cristata.

  5. Proteases of Wood Rot Fungi with Emphasis on the Genus Pleurotus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Dorneles Inácio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteases are present in all living organisms and they play an important role in physiological conditions. Cell growth and death, blood clotting, and immune defense are all examples of the importance of proteases in maintaining homeostasis. There is growing interest in proteases due to their use for industrial purposes. The search for proteases with specific characteristics is designed to reduce production costs and to find suitable properties for certain industrial sectors, as well as good producing organisms. Ninety percent of commercialized proteases are obtained from microbial sources and proteases from macromycetes have recently gained prominence in the search for new enzymes with specific characteristics. The production of proteases from saprophytic basidiomycetes has led to the identification of various classes of proteases. The genus Pleurotus has been extensively studied because of its ligninolytic enzymes. The characteristics of this genus are easy cultivation techniques, high yield, low nutrient requirements, and excellent adaptation. There are few studies in the literature about proteases of Pleurotus spp. This review gathers together information about proteases, especially those derived from basidiomycetes, and aims at stimulating further research about fungal proteases because of their physiological importance and their application in various industries such as biotechnology and medicine.

  6. Identification and characterization of a chymotrypsin-like serine protease from periodontal pathogen, Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockensmith, K; Dillard, K; Sanders, B; Harville, B A

    2016-11-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a bacteria associated with severe periodontal disease. This study reports identification and characterization of a membrane-associated serine protease from T. forsythia. The protease was isolated from T. forsythia membrane fractions and shown to cleave both gelatin and type I collagen. The protease was able to cleave both substrates over a wide range of pH values, however optimal cleavage occurred at pH 7.5 for gelatin and 8.0 for type I collagen. The protease was also shown to cleave both gelatin and type I collagen at the average reported temperature for the gingival sulcus however it showed a lack of thermal stability with a complete loss of activity by 60 °C. When treated with protease inhibitors the enzyme's activity could only be completely inhibited by serine protease inhibitors antipain and phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF). Further characterization of the protease utilized serine protease synthetic peptides. The protease cleaved N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide but not Nα-benzoyl-dl-arginine p-nitroanilide (BAPNA) or N-methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val p-nitroanilide indicating that the protease is a chymotrypsin-like serine protease. Since type I collagen is a major component in the gingival tissues and periodontal ligament, identification and characterization of this enzyme provides important information regarding the role of T. forsythia in periodontal disease.

  7. In silico prediction of mutant HIV-1 proteases cleaving a target sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Jan H; Winther, Jakob R; De Vico, Luca

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 protease represents an appealing system for directed enzyme re-design, since it has various different endogenous targets, a relatively simple structure and it is well studied. Recently Chaudhury and Gray (Structure (2009) 17: 1636 -- 1648) published a computational algorithm to discern the specificity determining residues of HIV-1 protease. In this paper we present two computational tools aimed at re-designing HIV-1 protease, derived from the algorithm of Chaudhuri and Gray. First, we present an energy-only based methodology to discriminate cleavable and non cleavable peptides for HIV-1 proteases, both wild type and mutant. Secondly, we show an algorithm we developed to predict mutant HIV-1 proteases capable of cleaving a new target substrate peptide, different from the natural targets of HIV-1 protease. The obtained in silico mutant enzymes were analyzed in terms of cleavability and specificity towards the target peptide using the energy-only methodology. We found two mutant proteases as best candidate...

  8. Development of marine biotechnology as a resource for novel proteases and their role in modern biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homaei, Ahmad; Lavajoo, Fatemeh; Sariri, Reyhaneh

    2016-07-01

    Marine environment consists of the largest sources diversified genetic pool of material with an enormous potential for a wide variety of enzymes including proteases. A protease hydrolyzes the peptide bond and most of proteases possess many industrial applications. Marine proteases differ considerably from those found in internal or external organs of invertebrates and vertebrates. In common with all enzymes, external factors such as temperature, pH and type of media are important for the activity, catalytic efficiency, stability and proper functioning of proteases. In this review valuable characteristics of proteases in marine organisms and their applications are gathered from a wide literature survey. Considering their biochemical significance and their increasing importance in biotechnology, a thorough understanding of marine proteases functioning could be of prime importance.

  9. Depressed activation of the lectin pathway of complement in hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, L; Széplaki, G; Laki, J

    2008-01-01

    ) in three complement activation pathways. Functional activity of the CP, LP and AP were measured in the sera of 68 adult patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE) and 64 healthy controls. In addition, the level of C1q, MBL, MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2), C4-, C3- and C1INH was measured...

  10. Toward a structure-based comprehension of the lectin pathway of complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Troels R; Thiel, Steffen; Andersen, Gregers R

    2013-01-01

    To initiate the lectin pathway of complement pattern recognition molecules bind to surface-linked carbohydrates or acetyl groups on pathogens or damaged self-tissue. This leads to activation of the serine proteases MASP-1 and MASP-2 resulting in deposition of C4 on the activator and assembly...

  11. Influence of major surgery on the mannan-binding lectin pathway of innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, Henriette; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Basse, L.

    2006-01-01

    The mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation is important in host defence against pathogens and possibly against cancer. We investigated the effect of major surgery on two central components of the MBL pathway; MBL and the MBL-associated serine protease MASP-2, and for compari......The mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation is important in host defence against pathogens and possibly against cancer. We investigated the effect of major surgery on two central components of the MBL pathway; MBL and the MBL-associated serine protease MASP-2...... comprised 27 patients undergoing elective, open surgery for colorectal cancer, and was included in order to cover blood sampling between days 2 and 6. As expected, the surgical stress induced a marked acute phase response, as evidenced by a large increase in IL-6 (18-fold) and CRP (13-fold) levels...... cohorts (r = 0.71, P surgery influenced only marginally the two...

  12. Establishment of a simple assay in vitro for hepatitis C virus NS3 serine protease based on recombinant substrate and single-chain protease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Xin Du; Li-Hua Hou; Rong-Bin Guan; Yi-Gang Tong; Hai-Tao Wang

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To establish a simple and convenient assay in vitro for the Hepatitis C virus NS3 serine protease based on the recombinant protease and substrate, and to evaluate its feasibility in screening the enzyme inhibitors. METHODS: Based on the crystallographic structure of hepatitis C virus (HCV) serine protease, a novel single-chain serine protease was designed, in which the central sequence of cofactor NS4A was linked to the N-terminus of NS3 serine protease domain via a flexible linker GSGS. The fusion gene was obtained by two-step PCR that was carried out with three primers and then cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pQE30, and the recombinant clone was verified by DNA sequencing. The single-chain recombinant protease was expressed when the E.coliwas induced with IPTG and the expression conditions were optimized to produce large amount of soluble protease. The recombinant substrate NS5ab that covers the cleavage point NS5A/B was also expressed in E.coli. Both of the protease and substrate were purified by using Ni-NTA agarose metal affinity resin, then they were mixed together in a specific buffer, and the mixture was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The cleavage system was used to evaluate some compounds for their inhibitory activity on serine protease.RESULTS: The single-chain recombinant protease was overexpressed as soluble protein when the E. coliwas induced at a low dosage of IPTG (0.2 mM) and cultured at a low temperature (15℃). The protease was purified by using Ni-NTA agarose metal affinity resin (the purity is over 95 %).The recombinant substrate NS5ab was expressed in an insoluble form and could refold successfully after purification and dialysis. A simple and convenient assay in vitro was established, in which the purified single-chain serine protease could cleave the recombinant substrate NS5ab into two fragments that were visualized by SDS-PAGE. PMSF had an effect on inhibiting activity of serine protease, while EDTA had not.CONCLUSION: A simple

  13. Protease cleavage leads to formation of mature trimer interface in HIV-1 capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Meng

    Full Text Available During retrovirus particle maturation, the assembled Gag polyprotein is cleaved by the viral protease into matrix (MA, capsid (CA, and nucleocapsid (NC proteins. To form the mature viral capsid, CA rearranges, resulting in a lattice composed of hexameric and pentameric CA units. Recent structural studies of assembled HIV-1 CA revealed several inter-subunit interfaces in the capsid lattice, including a three-fold interhexamer interface that is critical for proper capsid stability. Although a general architecture of immature particles has been provided by cryo-electron tomographic studies, the structural details of the immature particle and the maturation pathway remain unknown. Here, we used cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM to determine the structure of tubular assemblies of the HIV-1 CA-SP1-NC protein. Relative to the mature assembled CA structure, we observed a marked conformational difference in the position of the CA-CTD relative to the NTD in the CA-SP1-NC assembly, involving the flexible hinge connecting the two domains. This difference was verified via engineered disulfide crosslinking, revealing that inter-hexamer contacts, in particular those at the pseudo three-fold axis, are altered in the CA-SP1-NC assemblies compared to the CA assemblies. Results from crosslinking analyses of mature and immature HIV-1 particles containing the same Cys substitutions in the Gag protein are consistent with these findings. We further show that cleavage of preassembled CA-SP1-NC by HIV-1 protease in vitro leads to release of SP1 and NC without disassembly of the lattice. Collectively, our results indicate that the proteolytic cleavage of Gag leads to a structural reorganization of the polypeptide and creates the three-fold interhexamer interface, important for the formation of infectious HIV-1 particles.

  14. Cytoplasmic translocation, aggregation, and cleavage of TDP-43 by enteroviral proteases modulate viral pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, G; Shi, J; Deng, H; Hou, J; Wang, C; Hong, A; Zhang, J; Jia, W; Luo, H

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that infection by coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a positive-stranded RNA enterovirus, results in the accumulation of insoluble ubiquitin–protein aggregates, which resembles the common feature of neurodegenerative diseases. The importance of protein aggregation in viral pathogenesis has been recognized; however, the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain ill-defined. Transactive response DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) is an RNA-binding protein that has an essential role in regulating RNA metabolism at multiple levels. Cleavage and cytoplasmic aggregation of TDP-43 serves as a major molecular marker for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration and contributes significantly to disease progression. In this study, we reported that TDP-43 is translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm during CVB3 infection through the activity of viral protease 2A, followed by the cleavage mediated by viral protease 3C. Cytoplasmic translocation of TDP-43 is accompanied by reduced solubility and increased formation of protein aggregates. The cleavage takes place at amino-acid 327 between glutamine and alanine, resulting in the generation of an N- and C-terminal cleavage fragment of ~35 and ~8 kDa, respectively. The C-terminal product of TDP-43 is unstable and quickly degraded through the proteasome degradation pathway, whereas the N-terminal truncation of TDP-43 acts as a dominant-negative mutant that inhibits the function of native TDP-43 in alternative RNA splicing. Lastly, we demonstrated that knockdown of TDP-43 results in an increase in viral titers, suggesting a protective role for TDP-43 in CVB3 infection. Taken together, our findings suggest a novel model by which cytoplasmic redistribution and cleavage of TDP-43 as a consequence of CVB3 infection disrupts the solubility and transcriptional activity of TDP-43. Our results also reveal a mechanism evolved by enteroviruses to support efficient viral infection. PMID

  15. Intracellular serine protease inhibitor SERPINB4 inhibits granzyme M-induced cell death.

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    Pieter J A de Koning

    Full Text Available Granzyme-mediated cell death is the major pathway for cytotoxic lymphocytes to kill virus-infected and tumor cells. In humans, five different granzymes (i.e. GrA, GrB, GrH, GrK, and GrM are known that all induce cell death. Expression of intracellular serine protease inhibitors (serpins is one of the mechanisms by which tumor cells evade cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated killing. Intracellular expression of SERPINB9 by tumor cells renders them resistant to GrB-induced apoptosis. In contrast to GrB, however, no physiological intracellular inhibitors are known for the other four human granzymes. In the present study, we show that SERPINB4 formed a typical serpin-protease SDS-stable complex with both recombinant and native human GrM. Mutation of the P2-P1-P1' triplet in the SERPINB4 reactive center loop completely abolished complex formation with GrM and N-terminal sequencing revealed that GrM cleaves SERPINB4 after P1-Leu. SERPINB4 inhibited GrM activity with a stoichiometry of inhibition of 1.6 and an apparent second order rate constant of 1.3×10(4 M(-1 s(-1. SERPINB4 abolished cleavage of the macromolecular GrM substrates α-tubulin and nucleophosmin. Overexpression of SERPINB4 in tumor cells inhibited recombinant GrM-induced as well as NK cell-mediated cell death and this inhibition depended on the reactive center loop of the serpin. As SERPINB4 is highly expressed by squamous cell carcinomas, our results may represent a novel mechanism by which these tumor cells evade cytotoxic lymphocyte-induced GrM-mediated cell death.

  16. The human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir is potentially active against urological malignancies

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    Sato A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Akinori Sato Department of Urology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Japan Abstract: The human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir has recently been shown to have antineoplastic activity, and its use in urological malignancies is under investigation with an eye toward drug repositioning. Ritonavir is thought to exert its antineoplastic activity by inhibiting multiple signaling pathways, including the Akt and nuclear factor-kappaB pathways. It can increase the amount of unfolded proteins in the cell by inhibiting both the proteasome and heat shock protein 90. Combinations of ritonavir with agents that increase the amount of unfolded proteins, such as proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, or heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, therefore, induce endoplasmic reticulum stress cooperatively and thereby kill cancer cells effectively. Ritonavir is also a potent cytochrome P450 3A4 and P-glycoprotein inhibitor, increasing the intracellular concentration of combined drugs by inhibiting their degradation and efflux from cancer cells and thereby enhancing their antineoplastic activity. Furthermore, riotnavir’s antineoplastic activity includes modulation of immune system activity. Therapies using ritonavir are thus an attractive new approach to cancer treatment and, due to their novel mechanisms of action, are expected to be effective against malignancies that are refractory to current treatment strategies. Further investigations using ritonavir are expected to find new uses for clinically available drugs in the treatment of urological malignancies as well as many other types of cancer. Keywords: drug repositioning, novel treatment

  17. 蛋白酶活性检定及其在特定基质1D与2D凝胶中的特性:一种生物样品中分离、鉴定新的活性型蛋白酶的方法%Protease activity assay and characterization in substrate-specific 1D and 2D gels: A powerful method to separate and identify novel proteases in active form in biological samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Zhenjun; Russell Pamela J

    2003-01-01

    @@ The emergence of bacterial pathogen resistance to common antibiotics strongly supports the necessity to develop alternative mechanisms for combating drug-resistant forms of these infective organisms. Currently, few pharmaceutical companies have attempted to investigate the possibility of interrupting metabolic pathways other than those that are known to be involved in cell wall biosynthesis. Bacterial proteases have been showed to play an important role during infection and their inhibitors can retard the growth, proliferation and invasion of bacterial pathogens. To separate and identify these proteases, we have developed a specific, sensitive assay in SDS-polyacrylamide gels after 2D electrophoresis. This method allows simultaneous determination of protease cleavage specificity, molecular weight, isoelectric point, and if necessary, amino acid sequencing.

  18. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru; Motley, Evangeline D

    2016-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca(2+)-dependent using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  19. Protease Substrate Profiling by N-Terminal COFRADIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staes, An; Van Damme, Petra; Timmerman, Evy; Ruttens, Bart; Stes, Elisabeth; Gevaert, Kris; Impens, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Detection of (neo-)N-terminal peptides is essential for identifying protease cleavage sites . We here present an update of a well-established and efficient selection method for enriching N-terminal peptides out of peptide mixtures: N-terminal COFRADIC (COmbined FRActional DIagonal Chromatography). This method is based on the old concept of diagonal chromatography, which involves a peptide modification step in between otherwise identical chromatographic separations, with this modification step finally allowing for the isolation of N-terminal peptides by longer retention of non-N-terminal peptides on the resin. N-terminal COFRADIC has been successfully applied in many protease-centric studies, as well as for studies on protein alpha-N-acetylation and on characterizing alternative translation initiation events.

  20. The role of lysosomal cysteine proteases in crustacean immune response

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    FL Garcia-Carreño

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the long course of evolution and under the selective pressure exerted by pathogens and parasites, animals have selectively fixed a number of defense mechanisms against the constant attack of intruders. The immune response represents a key component to optimize the biological fitness of individuals. Two decades ago, prevention and control of diseases in crustacean aquaculture systems were considered priorities in most shrimp-producing countries, but knowledge was scarce and various pathogens have severely affected aquaculture development around the world. Scientific contributions have improved our understanding of the crustacean immune response. Several studies confirm the central role played by proteases in the immune response of animals, and the cooperative interaction of these enzymes in a wide variety of organisms is well known. This review summarizes the current information regarding the role of cysteine proteases in the immune system of Crustacea and points to aspects that are needed to provide a better integration of our knowledge.

  1. Intestinal proteases of free-living and parasitic astigmatid mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Deborah C; Burgess, Stewart T G; Reynolds, Simone L; Mahmood, Wajahat; Fischer, Katja

    2013-02-01

    Among arthropod pests, mites are responsible for considerable damage to crops, humans and other animals. However, detailed physiological data on these organisms remain sparse, mainly because of their small size but possibly also because of their extreme diversity. Focusing on intestinal proteases, we draw together information from three distinct mite species that all feed on skin but have separately adapted to a free-living, a strictly ecto-parasitic and a parasitic lifestyle. A wide range of studies involving immunohistology, molecular biology, X-ray crystallography and enzyme biochemistry of mite gut proteases suggests that these creatures have diverged considerably as house dust mites, sheep scab mites and scabies mites. Each species has evolved a particular variation of a presumably ancestral repertoire of digestive enzymes that have become specifically adapted to their individual environmental requirements.

  2. Protease-dependent mechanisms of complement evasion by bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempa, Michal; Potempa, Jan

    2012-09-01

    The human immune system has evolved a variety of mechanisms for the primary task of neutralizing and eliminating microbial intruders. As the first line of defense, the complement system is responsible for rapid recognition and opsonization of bacteria, presentation to phagocytes and bacterial cell killing by direct lysis. All successful human pathogens have mechanisms of circumventing the antibacterial activity of the complement system and escaping this stage of the immune response. One of the ways in which pathogens achieve this is the deployment of proteases. Based on the increasing number of recent publications in this area, it appears that proteolytic inactivation of the antibacterial activities of the complement system is a common strategy of avoiding targeting by this arm of host innate immune defense. In this review, we focus on those bacteria that deploy proteases capable of degrading complement system components into non-functional fragments, thus impairing complement-dependent antibacterial activity and facilitating pathogen survival inside the host.

  3. Design and Validation of Novel Chikungunya Virus Protease Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pratyush Kumar; Puusepp, Laura; Varghese, Finny S; Utt, Age; Ahola, Tero; Kananovich, Dzmitry G; Lopp, Margus; Merits, Andres; Karelson, Mati

    2016-12-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV; genus Alphavirus) is the causative agent of chikungunya fever. CHIKV replication can be inhibited by some broad-spectrum antiviral compounds; in contrast, there is very little information about compounds specifically inhibiting the enzymatic activities of CHIKV replication proteins. These proteins are translated in the form of a nonstructural (ns) P1234 polyprotein precursor from the CHIKV positive-strand RNA genome. Active forms of replicase enzymes are generated using the autoproteolytic activity of nsP2. The available three-dimensional (3D) structure of nsP2 protease has made it a target for in silico drug design; however, there is thus far little evidence that the designed compounds indeed inhibit the protease activity of nsP2 and/or suppress CHIKV replication. In this study, a set of 12 compounds, predicted to interact with the active center of nsP2 protease, was designed using target-based modeling. The majority of these compounds were shown to inhibit the ability of nsP2 to process recombinant protein and synthetic peptide substrates. Furthermore, all compounds found to be active in these cell-free assays also suppressed CHIKV replication in cell culture, the 50% effective concentration (EC50) of the most potent inhibitor being ∼1.5 μM. Analysis of stereoisomers of one compound revealed that inhibition of both the nsP2 protease activity and CHIKV replication depended on the conformation of the inhibitor. Combining the data obtained from different assays also indicates that some of the analyzed compounds may suppress CHIKV replication using more than one mechanism.

  4. Epsilon substituted lysinol derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kristen L G; Holloway, M Katharine; Su, Hua-Poo; Carroll, Steven S; Burlein, Christine; Touch, Sinoeun; DiStefano, Daniel J; Sanchez, Rosa I; Williams, Theresa M; Vacca, Joseph P; Coburn, Craig A

    2010-07-15

    A series of HIV-1 protease inhibitors containing an epsilon substituted lysinol backbone was synthesized. Two novel synthetic routes using N-boc-L-glutamic acid alpha-benzyl ester and 2,6-diaminopimelic acid were developed. Incorporation of this epsilon substituent enabled access to the S2 pocket of the enzyme, affording high potency inhibitors. Modeling studies and synthetic efforts suggest the potency increase is due to both conformational bias and van der Waals interactions with the S2 pocket.

  5. Schistosome serine protease inhibitors: parasite defense or homeostasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landys A. Lopez Quezada

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Serpins are a structurally conserved family of macromolecular inhibitors found in numerous biological systems. The completion and annotation of the genomes of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum has enabled the identification by phylogenetic analysis of two major serpin clades. S. mansoni shows a greater multiplicity of serpin genes, perhaps reflecting adaptation to infection of a human host. Putative targets of schistosome serpins can be predicted from the sequence of the reactive center loop (RCL. Schistosome serpins may play important roles in both post-translational regulation of schistosome-derived proteases, as well as parasite defense mechanisms against the action of host proteases.Serpinas são uma família de inibidores macromoleculares estruturalmente conservados encontrados em inúmeros sistemas biológicos. O término e a anotação dos genomas de Schistosoma mansoni e de Schistosoma japonicum permitiram a identificação por análise filogenética de dois principais clados de serpinas. S. mansoni mostra uma multiplicidade maior de genes de serpinas, talvez refletindo uma adaptação à infecção de um hospedeiro humano. Alvos putativos das serpinas de esquistossomos podem ser preditos a partir da sequência do "loop" do centro reativo. Serpinas de esquistossomos podem ter importantes papeis tanto na regulação pós-traducional de proteases derivadas do esquistossoma, quanto nos mecanismos de defesa contra a ação de proteases do hospedeiro.

  6. Operating Conditions Effects Onenzyme Activity: Case Enzyme Protease

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    Adel Oueslati

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Proteases an enzyme added to detergents to degrade the protein spots origin.Their action is manifested through its activity the middle of washing clothes. This activity depends on the operating conditions. In this article, the effects of temperature and pH of the reaction and the substrate concentration and time of washing medium on the enzyme activity were studied. There action mechanism has been shown. The activity measurements were made by absorption spectrometry

  7. Divergent Inhibitor Susceptibility among Airway Lumen-Accessible Tryptic Proteases.

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    Shilpa Nimishakavi

    Full Text Available Tryptic serine proteases of bronchial epithelium regulate ion flux, barrier integrity, and allergic inflammation. Inhibition of some of these proteases is a strategy to improve mucociliary function in cystic fibrosis and asthmatic inflammation. Several inhibitors have been tested in pre-clinical animal models and humans. We hypothesized that these inhibitors inactivate a variety of airway protease targets, potentially with bystander effects. To establish relative potencies and modes of action, we compared inactivation of human prostasin, matriptase, airway trypsin-like protease (HAT, and β-tryptase by nafamostat, camostat, bis(5-amidino-2-benzimidazolylmethane (BABIM, aprotinin, and benzamidine. Nafamostat achieved complete, nearly stoichiometric and very slowly reversible inhibition of matriptase and tryptase, but inhibited prostasin less potently and was weakest versus HAT. The IC50 of nafamostat's leaving group, 6-amidino-2-naphthol, was >104-fold higher than that of nafamostat itself, consistent with suicide rather than product inhibition as mechanisms of prolonged inactivation. Stoichiometric release of 6-amidino-2-naphthol allowed highly sensitive fluorometric estimation of active-site concentration in preparations of matriptase and tryptase. Camostat inactivated all enzymes but was less potent overall and weakest towards matriptase, which, however was strongly inhibited by BABIM. Aprotinin exhibited nearly stoichiometric inhibition of prostasin and matriptase, but was much weaker towards HAT and was completely ineffective versus tryptase. Benzamidine was universally weak. Thus, each inhibitor profile was distinct. Nafamostat, camostat and aprotinin markedly reduced tryptic activity on the apical surface of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial monolayers, suggesting prostasin as the major source of such activity and supporting strategies targeting prostasin for inactivation.

  8. Plant caspase-like proteases in plant programmed cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Qixian; Zhang, Lingrui

    2009-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically-controlled disassembly of the cell. In animal systems, the central core execution switch for apoptotic PCD is the activation of caspases (Cysteine-containing Aspartate-specific proteases). Accumulating evidence in recent years suggests the existence of caspase-like activity in plants and its functional involvement in various types of plant PCD, although no functional homologs of animal caspases were identified in plant genome. In this mini-review, ...

  9. Detection of extracellular proteases from microorganisms on agar plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alane Beatriz Vermelho

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available We present herein an improved assay for detecting the presence of extracellular proteases from microorganisms on agar plates. Using different substrates (gelatin, BSA, hemoglobin incorporated into the agar and varying the culture medium composition, we were able to detect proteolytic activities from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Micrococcus luteus and Serratia marcescens as well as the influence that these components displayed in the expression of these enzymes. For all microorganisms tested we found that in agar-BHI or yeast extract medium containing gelatin the sensitivity of proteinase detection was considerably greater than in BSA-agar or hemoglobin-agar. However, when BSA or hemoglobin were added to the culture medium, there was an increase in growth along with a marked reduction in the amount of proteinase production. In the case of M. luteus the incorporation of glycerol in BHI or yeast extract gelatin-agar induced protease liberation. Our results indicate that the technique described here is of value for detecting extracellular proteases directly in the culture medium, by means of a qualitative assay, simple, inexpensive, straight forward method to assess the presence of the proteolytic activity of a given microorganism colony with great freedom in substrate selection.

  10. Semi purifikasi dan karakterisasi enzim protease Bacillus sp.

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    Elidar Naiola

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to find the partial purified of enzyme protease from Bacillus sp. The crude enzyme of protease was produce in rice brand medium (100 gram of rice brand in a liter tofu liquid waste. The enzyme was semi-purified by the procedure of precipitation using ethanol in different percentages of saturation, gel filtration using Sephadex G 100 and Ion Exchanged Chromatography using DEAE Sephadex A50. Specific activities of the enzyme during purification were 5.71 U/mg (crude enzyme; 6.75 U/mg (ethanol precipitations; 37.16 U/mg (gel filtration and 43.02 U/mg (Ion Exchanged Chromatography. The optimum temperature for enzyme reaction was 45 €“50 °C, while the optimum pH was 7.0 €“8.0. Protease was relatively stable after heating until 37 €“50 °C for 60 minutes. Metal ions had different effects to the enzyme. CaCl2, FeCl3, MnCl2, ZnCl2 and MgCl2 increased enzyme activity, CdCl2 and HgCl2 gave an inhibitory effect, and another of metal ions had no effects to the enzyme.

  11. Peptide-modified optical filters for detecting protease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Kristopher A; Böcking, Till; Gaus, Katharina; Gal, Michael; Gooding, J Justin

    2007-11-01

    The organic derivatization of silicon-based nanoporous photonic crystals is presented as a method to immobilize peptides for the detection of protease enzymes in solution. A narrow-line-width rugate filter, a one-dimensional photonic crystal, is fabricated that exhibits a high-reflectivity optical resonance that is sensitive to small changes in the refractive index at the pore walls. To immobilize peptide in the pore of the photonic crystal, the hydrogen-terminated silicon surface was first modified with the alkene 10-succinimidyl undecenoate via hydrosilylation. The monolayer with the succinimide ester moiety at the distal end served the dual function of protecting the underlying silicon from oxidation as well as providing a surface suitable for subsequent derivatization with amines. The surface was further modified with 1-aminohexa(ethylene glycol) (EG(6)) to resist nonspecific adsorption of proteins common in complex biological samples. The distal hydroxyl of the EG(6) is activated using the solid-phase coupling reagent disuccinimidyl carbonate for selective immobilization of peptides as protease recognition elements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis reveals high activation and coupling efficiency at each stage of the functionalization. Exposure of the peptide-modified crystals to the protease subtilisin in solution causes a change in the refractive index, resulting in a shift of the resonance to shorter wavelengths, indicating cleavage of organic material within the pores. The lowest detected concentration of enzyme was 37 nM (7.4 pmol in 200 microL).

  12. Protease activity in cockroach and basidiomycete allergen extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongtim, S; Lehrer, S B; Salvaggio, J E; Horner, W E

    1993-01-01

    Inherent proteolytic activity was estimated in cockroach and basidiomycete extracts by quantifying acid soluble peptides that were released by incubating extracts with 1% bovine serum albumin as measured by Lowry (Sigma). Reference proteases released 740 (Proteinase K, 0.1 U), 248 (Trypsin, 1.0 U), and 533 micrograms/ml (Pronase, 0.5 U) of soluble peptides. American whole body cockroach extract (0.1 mg dry weight) released 330 micrograms/ml of soluble peptides, representing 13 trypsin equivalent units (TEU)/mg. Extracts from spores of the mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus released 230 micrograms/ml (0.9 TEU/mg) and Pleurotus cap extract released 112 micrograms/ml (0.5 TEU/mg). Mycelium of Pleurotus and the mushroom Psilocybe cubensis and spores of Psilocybe and the puffball Calvatia cyathiformis showed negligible amounts of proteolytic activity. The protease inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride reduced the proteolytic activity of American whole body cockroach extract by 80% (@1 mM) and the inhibitor ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid inhibited the proteolytic activity of Pleurotus spores by 95% (@1 mM). Loss of allergen activity as determined by RAST inhibition and immunoprinting correlated with protease activity. Thus, in the preparation and handling of allergen extracts, one should employ conditions that minimize proteolysis.

  13. HIV Protease Inhibitors: Effect on the Opportunistic Protozoan Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Yenisey; Monzote, Lianet

    2011-01-01

    The impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the natural history of AIDS disease has been allowed to prolong the survival of people with HIV infection, particularly whose with increased HIV viral load. Additionally, the antiretroviral therapy could exert a certain degree of protection against parasitic diseases. A number of studies have been evidenced a decrease in the incidence of opportunistic parasitic infections in the era of HAART. Although these changes have been attributed to the restoration of cell-mediated immunity, induced by either non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or HIV protease inhibitors, in combination with at least two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors included in HAART, there are evidence that the control of these parasitic infections in HIV-positive persons under HAART, is also induced by the inhibition of the proteases of the parasites. This review focuses on the principal available data related with therapeutic HIV-protease inhibitors and their in vitro and in vivo effects on the opportunistic protozoan parasites.

  14. Conformational study of a putative HLTV-1 retroviral protease inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llido, S; d'Estaintot, B L; Dautant, A; Geoffre, S; Picard, P; Precigoux, G

    1993-05-01

    The crystal structure of prolyl-glutaminyl-valyl-statyl-alanyl-leucine (Pro-Gln-Val-Sta-Ala-Leu, C(32)H(57)N(7)0(9).5H(2)0, M(r) = 683.9 + 90.1), a putative HTLV-1 protease inhibitor based on one of the consensus retroviral protease cleavage sequences, and containing the statine residue [(4S,3S)-4-amino-3-hydroxy-6-methylheptanoic acid], has been determined by X-ray diffraction. The same molecule has been modelled in the active site of the HTLV-1 protease and both conformations have been compared. The peptide crystallizes as a pentahydrate in space group P2(1) with a = 10.874(2), b = 9.501(2), c = 21.062(5) A, beta = 103.68 (1) degrees, Z = 2, V= 2114.3 A(3), D(x) = 1.21 g cm(-3), micro = 8.02 cm(-1), T= 293 K, lambda(Cu Kalpha) = 1.5418 A. The structure has been refined to an R value of 0.070 for 2152 observed reflections. The peptide main chain can be described as extended and adopts the usual zigzag conformation from the prolyl to the statyl residue. The main difference in conformation between the individual observed and modelled molecules is located on the Sta, Ala and Leu residues with the main chain of the modelled molecule rotated by about 180 degrees as compared to the observed conformation in the crystal state.

  15. (Processing and targeting of the thiol protease aleurain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Our goal for work during the past two years under this Grant was to characterize the barley thiol protease, aleurain, to determine if it is secreted or retained intracellularly in aleurone cells, and to begin to elucidate structural features that might control targeting of the protein to its final destination. We have shown that aleurain is synthesized as a proenzyme with two N-linked oligosaccharide chains, one high mannose-type and one complex-type. Aleurain undergoes processing to mature form by removal of an Nterminal prosegment, and is retained intracellularly; it cannot be detected among proteins secreted from aleurone cells. Treatment of aleurone cells with tunicamycin to prevent glycosylation of aleurain does not prevent processing of the unglycosylated form. The N-terminal portion of aleurain's prosegment is homologous to the comparable region in two yeast vacuolar proteases, where that region is known to contain the signal necessary for targeting the proteases to the vacuole. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Enzyme histochemical studies of membrane proteases in rat subfornical organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bault, L E; Mitro, A

    1994-12-01

    Localization of membrane proteases glutamyl aminopeptidase (EAP), microsomal alanyl aminopeptidase (mAAP), dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma-GTP) were studied in vessels of the rat subfornical organ (SFO), ependyma which cover the surface of the SFO, and adjacent brain structures. Results of enzyme histochemical reactions showed strong activity for EAP, mAAP, and gamma-GTP, but absence of DPP IV in microvessels of SFO. The ependyma which cover the SFO was positive for gamma-GTP, but negative for other studied proteases. Our results showed that the spectrum of enzymes in the majority of the vessels of SFO is similar to that of the microvessels of the adjacent brain tissue which were positive for EAP, mAAP, and gamma-GTP, but negative for DPP IV. The relative intensity of the enzyme reactions in vessels varied from central to lateral locations in the SFO and the adjacent brain tissue. There was also a difference in the relative reaction intensity from one enzyme to the other. The presence and heterogeneous distribution of the enzymes are consistent with the hypothesis that membrane proteases of the microvascular endothelium constitute an enzyme-barrier between blood and parenchyma of the SFO and between blood and brain tissue, and may be involved in metabolism or modulation of various peptides when they contact the plasma membrane of the endothelial cells of the vessels.

  17. Disruption of TLR3 signaling due to cleavage of TRIF by the hepatitis A virus protease-polymerase processing intermediate, 3CD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Qu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 and cytosolic RIG-I-like helicases (RIG-I and MDA5 sense viral RNAs and activate innate immune signaling pathways that induce expression of interferon (IFN through specific adaptor proteins, TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-β (TRIF, and mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS, respectively. Previously, we demonstrated that hepatitis A virus (HAV, a unique hepatotropic human picornavirus, disrupts RIG-I/MDA5 signaling by targeting MAVS for cleavage by 3ABC, a precursor of the sole HAV protease, 3C(pro, that is derived by auto-processing of the P3 (3ABCD segment of the viral polyprotein. Here, we show that HAV also disrupts TLR3 signaling, inhibiting poly(I:C-stimulated dimerization of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3, IRF-3 translocation to the nucleus, and IFN-β promoter activation, by targeting TRIF for degradation by a distinct 3ABCD processing intermediate, the 3CD protease-polymerase precursor. TRIF is proteolytically cleaved by 3CD, but not by the mature 3C(pro protease or the 3ABC precursor that degrades MAVS. 3CD-mediated degradation of TRIF depends on both the cysteine protease activity of 3C(pro and downstream 3D(pol sequence, but not 3D(pol polymerase activity. Cleavage occurs at two non-canonical 3C(pro recognition sequences in TRIF, and involves a hierarchical process in which primary cleavage at Gln-554 is a prerequisite for scission at Gln-190. The results of mutational studies indicate that 3D(pol sequence modulates the substrate specificity of the upstream 3C(pro protease when fused to it in cis in 3CD, allowing 3CD to target cleavage sites not normally recognized by 3C(pro. HAV thus disrupts both RIG-I/MDA5 and TLR3 signaling pathways through cleavage of essential adaptor proteins by two distinct protease precursors derived from the common 3ABCD polyprotein processing intermediate.

  18. Disruption of TLR3 signaling due to cleavage of TRIF by the hepatitis A virus protease-polymerase processing intermediate, 3CD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Qu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 and cytosolic RIG-I-like helicases (RIG-I and MDA5 sense viral RNAs and activate innate immune signaling pathways that induce expression of interferon (IFN through specific adaptor proteins, TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-β (TRIF, and mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS, respectively. Previously, we demonstrated that hepatitis A virus (HAV, a unique hepatotropic human picornavirus, disrupts RIG-I/MDA5 signaling by targeting MAVS for cleavage by 3ABC, a precursor of the sole HAV protease, 3C(pro, that is derived by auto-processing of the P3 (3ABCD segment of the viral polyprotein. Here, we show that HAV also disrupts TLR3 signaling, inhibiting poly(I:C-stimulated dimerization of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3, IRF-3 translocation to the nucleus, and IFN-β promoter activation, by targeting TRIF for degradation by a distinct 3ABCD processing intermediate, the 3CD protease-polymerase precursor. TRIF is proteolytically cleaved by 3CD, but not by the mature 3C(pro protease or the 3ABC precursor that degrades MAVS. 3CD-mediated degradation of TRIF depends on both the cysteine protease activity of 3C(pro and downstream 3D(pol sequence, but not 3D(pol polymerase activity. Cleavage occurs at two non-canonical 3C(pro recognition sequences in TRIF, and involves a hierarchical process in which primary cleavage at Gln-554 is a prerequisite for scission at Gln-190. The results of mutational studies indicate that 3D(pol sequence modulates the substrate specificity of the upstream 3C(pro protease when fused to it in cis in 3CD, allowing 3CD to target cleavage sites not normally recognized by 3C(pro. HAV thus disrupts both RIG-I/MDA5 and TLR3 signaling pathways through cleavage of essential adaptor proteins by two distinct protease precursors derived from the common 3ABCD polyprotein processing intermediate.

  19. Cysteine proteases: Modes of activation and future prospects as pharmacological targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eVerma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria and parasite to the higher organisms (mammals. Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases and metallo-proteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a pro-domain (regulatory and a mature domain (catalytic. The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases.

  20. Enterovirus type 71 2A protease functions as a transcriptional activator in yeast

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    Lai Meng-Jiun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterovirus type 71 (EV71 2A protease exhibited strong transcriptional activity in yeast cells. The transcriptional activity of 2A protease was independent of its protease activity. EV71 2A protease retained its transcriptional activity after truncation of 40 amino acids at the N-terminus but lost this activity after truncation of 60 amino acids at the N-terminus or deletion of 20 amino acids at the C-terminus. Thus, the acidic domain at the C-terminus of this protein is essential for its transcriptional activity. Indeed, deletion of amino acids from 146 to 149 (EAME in this acidic domain lost the transcriptional activity of EV71 2A protein though still retained its protease activity. EV71 2A protease was detected both in the cytoplasm and nucleus using confocal microscopy analysis. Coxsackie virus B3 2A protease also exhibited transcriptional activity in yeast cells. As expected, an acidic domain in the C-terminus of Coxsackie virus B3 2A protease was also identified. Truncation of this acidic domain resulted in the loss of transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this acidic region of poliovirus 2A protease is critical for viral RNA replication. The transcriptional activity of the EV71 or Coxsackie virus B3 2A protease should play a role in viral replication and/or pathogenesis.

  1. Optimum Production and Characterization of an Acid Protease from Marine Yeast Metschnikowia reukaufii W6b

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; PENG Ying; WANG Xianghong; CHI Zhenming

    2010-01-01

    The marine yeast strain W6b isolated from sediment of the South China Sea was found to produce a cell-bound acid protease.The crude acid protease produced by this marine yeast showed the highest activity at pH 3.5 and 40 ℃.The optimal pH and temperature for the crude acid protease were in agreement with those for acid protease produced by the terrestrial yeasts.The optimal medium of the acid protease production was seawater containing 1.0% glucose,1.5% casein,and 0.5% yeast extract,and the optimal cultivation conditions of the acid protease production were pH 4.0,a temperature of 25 ℃ and a shaking speed of 140 rmin-1.Under the optimal conditions,72.5 UmL-1 of acid protease activity could be obtained in cell suspension within 48 h of fermentation at shake flask level.The acid protease production was induced by high-molecular-weight nitrogen sources and repressed by low-molecular-weight nitrogen sources.Skimmed-milk-clotting test showed that the crude acid protease from the cell suspension of the yeast W6b had high skimmed milk coagulability.The acid protease produced by M.reukaufii W6b may have highly potential applications in cheese,food and fermentation industries.

  2. Isolation and characterization of protease from Bacillus subtilis 1012M15

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    ELFI SUSANTI

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A local strain of Bacillus sp. BAC4, is known to produce penicillin G acylase (PGA enzyme with relatively high activity. This strain secretes the PGA into the culture medium. However, it has been reported that PGA activity fall and rise during culture, and the activity plummets during storege at –200C, which probably due to usage protease activity of Bacillus sp. BAC4. To study the possible use of Bacillus subtilis 1012M15 as a host cell for cloning the pga gene from Bacillus sp. BAC4, the protease activity of Bacillus subtilis 1012M15 were studied. Protease activity was determined by Horikoshi method. In this experiment, maximum protease activity in Bacillus subtilis 1012M15 culture was obsereved after 8 hours. At this optimum condition, protease activity of Bacillus sp. BAC4 is five time higher than that of Bacillus subtilis 1012M15. This situation promised the possible usage of Bacillus subtilis 1012M15 as a host cell for pga expression. For protease characterization, the bacterial culture had been separated from the cell debris by centrifugation. The filtrate was concentrated by freeze drying, fractionated by ammonium sulphate, dialyzed in selovan tube, and then fractionated by ion exchance chromatography employing DEAE-cellulose. The five peaks resulted indicated the presence of five protease. Based on inhibitor and activator influence analysis, it could be concluded that proteases from Bacillus subtilis 1012M15 contained of serin protease as well as metalloprotease and serin protease mixture.

  3. A Culture-Based Method for Determining the Production of Secreted Protease Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, David; Bermudes, David

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a culture-based method for determining the production of secreted protease inhibitors. The assay utilizes standard proteolysis detection plates to support microbial growth followed by infiltrating the plate with a protease and subsequently detecting the remaining protein by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation, or by bromocreosol green (BCG) or Ponseau S (PS) staining. The presence of a protease inhibitor can be observed in the form of a protected zone of protein around the protease inhibitor-producing strain. Using the protease inhibitors α-2-macroglobulin, aprotinin, leupeptin, and bestatin and the primary and secondary forms of Photorhabdus luminescens in combination with the protease trypsin, we were able to demonstrate that the assay is specific for the cognate inhibitor of the protease and for bacteria secreting protease inhibitors. In addition, when casein-containing plates were used, the size of the diffusion zone was inversely correlated with the molecular weight of the inhibitor allowing a relative estimation of the protease inhibitor molecular weight. This assay is useful for detecting the presence of microbial secreted protease inhibitors and may reveal their production by microorganisms that were not previously recognized to produce them. PMID:24632514

  4. Autoprocessing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease miniprecursor fusions in mammalian cells

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    Chen Chaoping

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV protease (PR is a virus-encoded aspartic protease that is essential for viral replication and infectivity. The fully active and mature dimeric protease is released from the Gag-Pol polyprotein as a result of precursor autoprocessing. Results We here describe a simple model system to directly examine HIV protease autoprocessing in transfected mammalian cells. A fusion precursor was engineered encoding GST fused to a well-characterized miniprecursor, consisting of the mature protease along with its upstream transframe region (TFR, and small peptide epitopes to facilitate detection of the precursor substrate and autoprocessing products. In HEK 293T cells, the resulting chimeric precursor undergoes effective autoprocessing, producing mature protease that is rapidly degraded likely via autoproteolysis. The known protease inhibitors Darunavir and Indinavir suppressed both precursor autoprocessing and autoproteolysis in a dose-dependent manner. Protease mutations that inhibit Gag processing as characterized using proviruses also reduced autoprocessing efficiency when they were introduced to the fusion precursor. Interestingly, autoprocessing of the fusion precursor requires neither the full proteolytic activity nor the majority of the N-terminal TFR region. Conclusions We suggest that the fusion precursors provide a useful system to study protease autoprocessing in mammalian cells, and may be further developed for screening of new drugs targeting HIV protease autoprocessing.

  5. Optimum production and characterization of an acid protease from marine yeast Metschnikowia reukaufii W6b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Peng, Ying; Wang, Xianghong; Chi, Zhenming

    2010-12-01

    The marine yeast strain W6b isolated from sediment of the South China Sea was found to produce a cell-bound acid protease. The crude acid protease produced by this marine yeast showed the highest activity at pH 3.5 and 40 °C. The optimal pH and temperature for the crude acid protease were in agreement with those for acid protease produced by the terrestrial yeasts. The optimal medium of the acid protease production was seawater containing 1.0% glucose, 1.5% casein, and 0.5% yeast extract, and the optimal cultivation conditions of the acid protease production were pH 4.0, a temperature of 25 °C and a shaking speed of 140 rmin-1. Under the optimal conditions, 72.5 UmL-1 of acid protease activity could be obtained in cell suspension within 48 h of fermentation at shake flask level. The acid protease production was induced by high-molecular-weight nitrogen sources and repressed by low-molecular-weight nitrogen sources. Skimmed-milk-clotting test showed that the crude acid protease from the cell suspension of the yeast W6b had high skimmed milk coagulability. The acid protease produced by M. reukaufii W6b may have highly potential applications in cheese, food and fermentation industries.

  6. ISOLASI DAN KARAKTERISASI PROTEASE ALKALIN DARI ISOLAT BAKTERI LIMBAH TERNAK DI EXFARM FAKULTAS PETERNAKAN UNSOED

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    Zusfahair

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Protease is one of the widely used enzymes for the industry. The potential resource of microorganism that produced protease is milk cow waste. In this research, isolation and characterization has been done toward isolated protease from milk cow waste of the Exfarm’s Animal Husbandry Faculty at University of Jenderal Soedirman, Purwokerto. The research used experiment method and the parameters observed were the genus of bacteria which produce protease and the activity of protease. The characterizations of protease were determination of optimum pH and temperature, the influence of metal ions, EDTA, surfactant, and commercial detergent toward enzyme activity, and also the study of enzyme stability. The results from the research showed that the isolated bacteria from the Exfarm’s of Animal Husbandry Faculty of UNSOED, which produced protease was Salmonella sp. Characterization of isolated Salmonella sp. from 45% ammonium sulphate fraction indicated that the optimum temperature was 50 ºC, optimum pH was 8, the enzyme was activated by Ca2+ dan Mg2+ ion, whereas it was inhibited by Zn2+, Cu2+ ions and EDTA. The addition of Tween-80 with the concentration of 0.2% and 0.4% increased protease activity, however the addition of Tween-80 with concentration higher than 0.6% decreased the protease activity. Enzyme protease from isolated Salmonella sp. was relatively stable with the addition of commercial detergent such as Attack, Surf, and Bukrim.

  7. Antigenic heterogeneity of immunoglobulin A1 proteases from encapsulated and non-encapsulated Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, M; Thomsen, B

    1983-10-01

    Indirect evidence suggests that immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases may be factors in the pathogenesis of certain infectious diseases, including meningitis, gonorrhoea, and destructive periodontitis. Bacterial IgA1 proteases are therefore potential candidates as vaccines. In this study, IgA1 proteases from 166 clinical isolates and reference strains of Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus aegyptius were compared with regard to specific activity and pattern of enzyme inhibition by antisera raised against IgA1 protease from nine selected strains of H. influenzae. A total of 93% of H. influenzae strains and all H. aegyptius strains had detectable IgA1 protease activity. The majority of strains cleaved a prolyl-seryl or a prolyl-threonyl peptide bond in the alpha 1 hinge region, whereas occasional H. influenzae strains possessed two separate IgA1 proteases with these two specific activities. Of the 155 IgA1 protease-producing strains, all except 12 could be assigned to one of 14 IgA1 protease "inhibition types," each defined by a characteristic pattern of inhibition by the nine antisera. There was no correlation between IgA1 protease type and biotype of the strains. However, among 92 encapsulated H. influenzae strains, a close correlation between capsular serotype and IgA1 protease type was observed. With the exception of serotype f, strains of all capsular serotypes produced an exclusive antigenic type of IgA1 protease. All 38 strains of serotype b produced IgA1 protease of inhibition type 1, which was never demonstrated in non-encapsulated H. influenzae strains. These results facilitate the detection of an antibody response against specific IgA1 proteases and are of practical value for a possible future vaccine against H. influenzae serotype b infections.

  8. Designing pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, John Damm

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical background in this chapter is organizational studies and especially theories about design and design processes in organizations. The concept of design is defined as a particular kind of work aimed at making arrangements in order to change existing situations into desired ones....... The illustrative case example is the introduction of clinical pathways in a psychiatric department. The contribution to a general core of design research is the development of the concept of design work and a critical discussion of the role of technological rules in design work....

  9. Designing pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical background in this chapter is organizational studies and especially theories about design and design processes in organizations. The concept of design is defined as a particular kind of work aimed at making arrangements in order to change existing situations into desired ones....... The illustrative case example is the introduction of clinical pathways in a psychiatric department. The contribution to a general core of design research is the development of the concept of design work and a critical discussion of the role of technological rules in design work....

  10. A low dose of fermented soy germ alleviates gut barrier injury, hyperalgesia and faecal protease activity in a rat model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Moussa

    Full Text Available Pro-inflammatory cytokines like macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF, IL-1β and TNF-α predominate in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and TNBS colitis. Increased levels of serine proteases activating protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2 are found in the lumen and colonic tissue of IBD patients. PAR-2 activity and pro-inflammatory cytokines impair epithelial barrier, facilitating the uptake of luminal aggressors that perpetuate inflammation and visceral pain. Soy extracts contain phytoestrogens (isoflavones and serine protease inhibitors namely Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBI. Since estrogens exhibit anti-inflammatory and epithelial barrier enhancing properties, and that a BBI concentrate improves ulcerative colitis, we aimed to evaluate if a fermented soy germ extract (FSG with standardized isoflavone profile and stable BBI content exert cumulative or synergistic protection based on protease inhibition and estrogen receptor (ER-ligand activity in colitic rats. Female rats received orally for 15 d either vehicle or FSG with or without an ER antagonist ICI 182.780 before TNBS intracolonic instillation. Macroscopic and microscopic damages, myeloperoxidase activity, cytokine levels, intestinal paracellular permeability, visceral sensitivity, faecal proteolytic activity and PAR-2 expression were assessed 24 h, 3 d and 5 d post-TNBS. FSG treatment improved the severity of colitis, by decreasing the TNBS-induced rise in gut permeability, visceral sensitivity, faecal proteolytic activity and PAR-2 expression at all post-TNBS points. All FSG effects were reversed by the ICI 182.780 except the decrease in faecal proteolytic activity and PAR-2 expression. In conclusion, the anti-inflammatory properties of FSG treatment result from two distinct but synergic pathways i.e an ER-ligand and a PAR-2 mediated pathway, providing rationale for potential use as adjuvant therapy in IBD.

  11. Contribution of Gag and protease to variation in susceptibility to protease inhibitors between different strains of subtype B human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Katherine A; Mbisa, Jean L; Cane, Patricia A; Pillay, Deenan; Parry, Chris M

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag can directly affect susceptibility to protease inhibitors (PIs) in the absence of known resistance mutations in protease. Inclusion of co-evolved Gag alongside protease in phenotypic drug susceptibility assays can alter PI susceptibility in comparison with protease with a WT Gag. Using a single-replication-cycle assay encompassing full-length Gag together with protease we demonstrated significant variation in PI susceptibility between a number of PI-naïve subtype B viruses. Six publicly available subtype B molecular clones, namely HXB2, NL4-3, SF2, YU2, JRFL and 89.6, displayed up to nine-fold reduced PI susceptibility in comparison with the assay reference strain. For two molecular clones, YU2 and JRFL, Gag contributed solely to the observed reduction in susceptibility, with the N-terminal region of Gag contributing significantly. Gag and protease from treatment-naïve, patient-derived viruses also demonstrated significant variation in susceptibility, with up to a 17-fold reduction to atazanavir in comparison with the assay reference strain. In contrast to the molecular clones, protease was the main determinant of the reduced susceptibility. Common polymorphisms in protease, including I13V, L63P and A71T, were shown to contribute to this reduction in PI susceptibility, in the absence of major resistance mutations. This study demonstrated significant variation in PI susceptibility of treatment-naïve patient viruses, and provided further evidence of the independent role of Gag, the protease substrate and in particular the N-terminus of Gag in PI susceptibility. It also highlighted the importance of considering co-evolved Gag and protease when assessing PI susceptibility.

  12. A macrocyclic HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor interacts with protease and helicase residues in the complex with its full-length target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiering, Nikolaus; D’Arcy, Allan; Villard, Frederic; Simić, Oliver; Kamke, Marion; Monnet, Gaby; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Pulfer, Ruth; Eder, Jörg; Raman, Prakash; Bodendorf, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a global health burden with over 170 million people infected worldwide. In a significant portion of patients chronic hepatitis C infection leads to serious liver diseases, including fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The HCV NS3 protein is essential for viral polyprotein processing and RNA replication and hence viral replication. It is composed of an N-terminal serine protease domain and a C-terminal helicase/NTPase domain. For full activity, the protease requires the NS4A protein as a cofactor. HCV NS3/4A protease is a prime target for developing direct-acting antiviral agents. First-generation NS3/4A protease inhibitors have recently been introduced into clinical practice, markedly changing HCV treatment options. To date, crystal structures of HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors have only been reported in complex with the protease domain alone. Here, we present a unique structure of an inhibitor bound to the full-length, bifunctional protease-helicase NS3/4A and show that parts of the P4 capping and P2 moieties of the inhibitor interact with both protease and helicase residues. The structure sheds light on inhibitor binding to the more physiologically relevant form of the enzyme and supports exploring inhibitor-helicase interactions in the design of the next generation of HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors. In addition, small angle X-ray scattering confirmed the observed protease-helicase domain assembly in solution. PMID:22160684

  13. A macrocyclic HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor interacts with protease and helicase residues in the complex with its full-length target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiering, Nikolaus; D'Arcy, Allan; Villard, Frederic; Simic, Oliver; Kamke, Marion; Monnet, Gaby; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Svergun, Dmitri I; Pulfer, Ruth; Eder, Jörg; Raman, Prakash; Bodendorf, Ursula

    2011-12-27

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a global health burden with over 170 million people infected worldwide. In a significant portion of patients chronic hepatitis C infection leads to serious liver diseases, including fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The HCV NS3 protein is essential for viral polyprotein processing and RNA replication and hence viral replication. It is composed of an N-terminal serine protease domain and a C-terminal helicase/NTPase domain. For full activity, the protease requires the NS4A protein as a cofactor. HCV NS3/4A protease is a prime target for developing direct-acting antiviral agents. First-generation NS3/4A protease inhibitors have recently been introduced into clinical practice, markedly changing HCV treatment options. To date, crystal structures of HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors have only been reported in complex with the protease domain alone. Here, we present a unique structure of an inhibitor bound to the full-length, bifunctional protease-helicase NS3/4A and show that parts of the P4 capping and P2 moieties of the inhibitor interact with both protease and helicase residues. The structure sheds light on inhibitor binding to the more physiologically relevant form of the enzyme and supports exploring inhibitor-helicase interactions in the design of the next generation of HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors. In addition, small angle X-ray scattering confirmed the observed protease-helicase domain assembly in solution.

  14. Antiretroviral activity of protease inhibitors against Toxoplasma gondii Terapia antiretroviral de inibidores da protease contra Toxoplasma gondii

    OpenAIRE

    Lianet Monzote; Marta Rodríguez; Yenisey Alfonso; Raymundo Cox

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has caused a marked reduction in the occurrence and severity of parasitic infections, including the toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE). These changes have been attributed to the restoration of cell-mediated immunity. This study was developed to examine the activity of six antiretroviral protease inhibitors (API) on Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites. The six API showed anti-Toxoplasma activity, with IC50 value between 1.4 and 6.6 µg/mL. F...

  15. Pathway collages: personalized multi-pathway diagrams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Suzanne; O'Maille, Paul E; Weaver, Daniel; Karp, Peter D

    2016-12-13

    Metabolic pathway diagrams are a classical way of visualizing a linked cascade of biochemical reactions. However, to understand some biochemical situations, viewing a single pathway is insufficient, whereas viewing the entire metabolic network results in information overload. How do we enable scientists to rapidly construct personalized multi-pathway diagrams that depict a desired collection of interacting pathways that emphasize particular pathway interactions? We define software for constructing personalized multi-pathway diagrams called pathway-collages using a combination of manual and automatic layouts. The user specifies a set of pathways of interest for the collage from a Pathway/Genome Database. Layouts for the individual pathways are generated by the Pathway Tools software, and are sent to a Javascript Pathway Collage application implemented using Cytoscape.js. That application allows the user to re-position pathways; define connections between pathways; change visual style parameters; and paint metabolomics, gene expression, and reaction flux data onto the collage to obtain a desired multi-pathway diagram. We demonstrate the use of pathway collages in two application areas: a metabolomics study of pathogen drug response, and an Escherichia coli metabolic model. Pathway collages enable facile construction of personalized multi-pathway diagrams.

  16. Variability and resistance mutations in the hepatitis C virus NS3 protease in patients not treated with protease inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Bonome Zeminian

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of treatment of chronic hepatitis C is to achieve a sustained virological response, which is defined as exhibiting undetectable hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA levels in serum following therapy for at least six months. However, the current treatment is only effective in 50% of patients infected with HCV genotype 1, the most prevalent genotype in Brazil. Inhibitors of the serine protease non-structural protein 3 (NS3 have therefore been developed to improve the responses of HCV-infected patients. However, the emergence of drug-resistant variants has been the major obstacle to therapeutic success. The goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of resistance mutations and genetic polymorphisms in the NS3 genomic region of HCV from 37 patients infected with HCV genotype 1 had not been treated with protease inhibitors. Plasma viral RNA was used to amplify and sequence the HCV NS3 gene. The results indicate that the catalytic triad is conserved. A large number of substitutions were observed in codons 153, 40 and 91; the resistant variants T54A, T54S, V55A, R155K and A156T were also detected. This study shows that resistance mutations and genetic polymorphisms are present in the NS3 region of HCV in patients who have not been treated with protease inhibitors, data that are important in determining the efficiency of this new class of drugs in Brazil.

  17. Potential elucidation of a novel CTL epitope in HIV-1 protease by the protease inhibitor resistance mutation L90M.

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    Werner Smidt

    Full Text Available The combination of host immune responses and use of antiretrovirals facilitate partial control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection and result in delayed progression to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS. Both treatment and host immunity impose selection pressures on the highly mutable HIV-1 genome resulting in antiretroviral resistance and immune escape. Researchers have shown that antiretroviral resistance mutations can shape cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immunity by altering the epitope repertoire of HIV infected cells. Here it was discovered that an important antiretroviral resistance mutation, L90M in HIV protease, occurs at lower frequencies in hosts that harbor the B*15, B*48 or A*32 human leukocyte antigen subtypes. A likely reason is the elucidation of novel epitopes by L90M. NetMHCPan predictions reveal increased affinity of the peptide spanning the HIV protease region, PR 89-97 and PR 90-99 to HLA-B*15/B*48 and HLA-A*32 respectively due to the L90M substitution. The higher affinity could increase the chance of the epitope being presented and recognized by Cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and perhaps provide additional immunological pressures in the presence of antiretroviral attenuating mutations. This evidence supports the notion that knowledge of HLA allotypes in HIV infected individuals could augment antiretroviral treatment by the elucidation of epitopes due to antiretroviral resistance mutations in HIV protease.

  18. Proteases from Latex of Euphorbia spp. and Its Application on Milk Clot Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidia Fibriana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Crude proteases were extracted from Euphorbiaceae family, i.e. E. milii var imperata, E. trigona, and E. maculata. Among those three crude proteases, the activity of protease from E. trigona was the highest (812.50 U/ml, whereas E. milii and E. maculata crude proteases activity were 298.60 U/ml and 95.80 U/ml, respectively. E. maculata protein concentration was the highest among those three crude enzymes (1.206 mg/ml. The optimum pH and temperature of the enzymes were pH 7.0, pH 6.0, pH 6.5 and 60 °C, 50 °C, and 50 °C, respectively. Crude protease from E. milii var imperata, E. trigona, and E. maculata retained proteolytic activity over a wide range of pH (5.0–9.0 and temperature (up to 65 °C with casein as substrate. All crude proteases showed milk clotting activity ranged from 0.58 U/ml to 1.01 U/ml. Thus, these crude proteases are potential to be applied in dairy industries. However, further study on enzyme purification and characterization are necessary to obtain high purity of proteases before its application.Protease kasar berhasil diekstrak dari tanaman family Euphorbiaceae, yaitu E. milii var imperata, E. trigona, dan E. maculata. Diantara ketiga protease tersebut, aktivitas protease tertinggi diperoleh dari E. trigona (812,50 U/ml, sedangkan aktivitas protease dari E. milii dan E. maculata adalah 298,60 U/ml dan 95,80 U/ml, berturut-turut. Konsentrasi total protein tertinggi terdapat pada protease kasar E. maculata (1,206 mg/ml. pH dan suhu optimum ketiga enzim tersebut adalah pH 7.0, pH 6.0, pH 6.5 dan suhu 60 °C, 50 °C, and 50 °C, berturut-turut. Protease kasar dari E. milii var imperata, E. trigona, dan E. maculata menunjukkan aktivitas proteolitik pada rentang pH 5.0–9.0 dan rentang suhu sampai 65 °C menggunakan kasein sebagai substrat. Semua protease kasar menunjukkan aktivitas penggumpalan susu dengan rentang dari 0,58 U/ml sampai 1,01 U/ml. Berdasarkan hasil yang diperoleh, protease kasar dari ketiga jenis tanaman ini

  19. Proteolytic Pathways Induced by Herbicides That Inhibit Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Villamor, Joji Grace; Zabalza, Ana; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Royuela, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicides glyphosate (Gly) and imazamox (Imx) inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling. Results Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined. PMID:24040092

  20. Lessons learned from mice deficient in lectin complement pathway molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genster, Ninette; Takahashi, Minoru; Sekine, Hideharu

    2014-01-01

    in complement activation, pathogen infection, coagulation, host tissue injury and developmental biology have been revealed by in vivo investigations. This review provides an overview of the mice deficient in lectin pathway molecules and highlights some of the most important findings that have resulted from......The lectin pathway of the complement system is initiated when the pattern-recognition molecules, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins or collectin-11, bind to invading pathogens or damaged host cells. This leads to activation of MBL/ficolin/collectin-11 associated serine proteases (MASPs), which...... in turn activate downstream complement components, ultimately leading to elimination of the pathogen. Mice deficient in the key molecules of lectin pathway of complement have been generated in order to build knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the lectin pathway in health and disease. Despite...

  1. Proteases and antiproteases in chronic neutrophilic lung disease - relevance to drug discovery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2009-10-01

    Chronic inflammatory lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and emphysema are characterized by higher-than-normal levels of pulmonary proteases. While these enzymes play important roles such as bacterial killing, their dysregulated expression or activity can adversely impact on the inflammatory process. The existence of efficient endogenous control mechanisms that can dampen or halt this overexuberant protease activity in vivo is essential for the effective resolution of inflammatory lung disease. The function of pulmonary antiproteases is to fulfil this role. Interestingly, in addition to their antiprotease activity, protease inhibitors in the lung also often possess other intrinsic properties that contribute to microbial killing or termination of the inflammatory process. This review will outline important features of chronic inflammation that are regulated by pulmonary proteases and will describe the various mechanisms by which antiproteases attempt to counterbalance exaggerated protease-mediated inflammatory events. These proteases, antiproteases and their modifiers represent interesting targets for therapeutic intervention.

  2. A tobacco etch virus protease with increased substrate tolerance at the P1' position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renicke, Christian; Spadaccini, Roberta; Taxis, Christof

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific proteases are important tools for in vitro and in vivo cleavage of proteins. They are widely used for diverse applications, like protein purification, assessment of protein-protein interactions or regulation of protein localization, abundance or activity. Here, we report the development of a procedure to select protease variants with altered specificity based on the well-established Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenine auxotrophy-dependent red/white colony assay. We applied this method on the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease to obtain a protease variant with altered substrate specificity at the P1' Position. In vivo experiments with tester substrates showed that the mutated TEV protease still efficiently recognizes the sequence ENLYFQ, but has almost lost all bias for the amino acid at the P1' Position. Thus, we generated a site-specific protease for synthetic approaches requiring in vivo generation of proteins or peptides with a specific N-terminal amino acid.

  3. Nanoplatforms for highly sensitive fluorescence detection of cancer-related proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwang; Udukala, Dinusha N; Samarakoon, Thilani N; Basel, Matthew T; Kalita, Mausam; Abayaweera, Gayani; Manawadu, Harshi; Malalasekera, Aruni; Robinson, Colette; Villanueva, David; Maynez, Pamela; Bossmann, Leonie; Riedy, Elizabeth; Barriga, Jenny; Wang, Ni; Li, Ping; Higgins, Daniel A; Zhu, Gaohong; Troyer, Deryl L; Bossmann, Stefan H

    2014-02-01

    Numerous proteases are known to be necessary for cancer development and progression including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue serine proteases, and cathepsins. The goal of this research is to develop an Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticle-based system for clinical diagnostics, which has the potential to measure the activity of cancer-associated proteases in biospecimens. Nanoparticle-based "light switches" for measuring protease activity consist of fluorescent cyanine dyes and porphyrins that are attached to Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticles via consensus sequences. These consensus sequences can be cleaved in the presence of the correct protease, thus releasing a fluorescent dye from the Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticle, resulting in highly sensitive (down to 1 × 10(-16) mol l(-1) for 12 proteases), selective, and fast nanoplatforms (required time: 60 min).

  4. Effect of amino acids on the repression of alkaline protease synthesis in haloalkaliphilic Nocardiopsis dassonvillei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit K. Sharma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A newly isolated salt-tolerant alkaliphilic actinomycete, Nocardiopsis dassonvillei strain OK-18 grows on mineral salts medium with glucose as carbon source. It also grows and produces protease with amino acids as sole carbon source. The synthesis of extracellular alkaline protease parallel to growth was repressible by substrate concentrations. The absolute production of the protease was delinked with growth under nutritional stress, as protease production was high, despite poor growth. When amino acids served as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, the enzyme production was significantly controlled by the number of amino acids. Maximal protease production was achieved with proline, asparagine, tyrosine, alanine, methionine and valine as sole source of carbon and nitrogen in minimal medium. With the increasing number of different amino acids in the presence and absence of glucose, the protease production was synergistically lower as compared to complex medium.

  5. Development of activity-based probes for trypsin-family serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhengying; Jeffery, Douglas A; Chehade, Kareem; Beltman, Jerlyn; Clark, James M; Grothaus, Paul; Bogyo, Matthew; Baruch, Amos

    2006-06-01

    A series of diphenylphosphonate-based probes were developed for the trypsin-like serine proteases. These probes selectively target serine proteases rather than general serine hydrolases that are targets for fluorophosphonate-based probes. This increased selectivity allows detection of low abundance serine proteases in complex proteomes using simple SDS-PAGE methods. We present here the application of multiple probes in enzyme activity profiling of intact mast cells, a type of inflammatory cell implicated in allergy and autoimmune diseases.

  6. Flexible catalytic site conformations implicated in modulation of HIV-1 protease autoprocessing reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chaoping

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV-1 protease is initially synthesized as part of the Gag-Pol polyprotein in the infected cell. Protease autoprocessing, by which the protease domain embedded in the precursor catalyzes essential cleavage reactions, leads to liberation of the free mature protease at the late stage of the replication cycle. To examine autoprocessing reactions in transfected mammalian cells, we previously described an assay using a fusion precursor consisting of the mature protease (PR along with its upstream transframe region (p6* sandwiched between GST and a small peptide epitope. Results In this report, we studied two autoprocessing cleavage reactions, one between p6* and PR (the proximal site and the other in the N-terminal region of p6* (the distal site catalyzed by the embedded protease, using our cell-based assay. A fusion precursor carrying the NL4-3 derived protease cleaved both sites, whereas a precursor with a pseudo wild type protease preferentially autoprocessed the proximal site. Mutagenesis analysis demonstrated that several residues outside the active site (Q7, L33, N37, L63, C67 and H69 contributed to the differential substrate specificity. Furthermore, the cleavage reaction at the proximal site mediated by the embedded protease in precursors carrying different protease sequences or C-terminal fusion peptides displayed varied sensitivity to inhibition by darunavir, a catalytic site inhibitor. On the other hand, polypeptides such as a GCN4 motif, GFP, or hsp70 fused to the N-terminus of p6* had a minimal effect on darunavir inhibition of either cleavage reaction. Conclusions Taken together, our data suggest that several non-active site residues and the C-terminal flanking peptides regulate embedded protease activity through modulation of the catalytic site conformation. The cell-based assay provides a sensitive tool to study protease autoprocessing reactions in mammalian cells.

  7. Deep-sea fungi as a source of alkaline and cold-tolerant proteases

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Damare, S.; Raghukumar, C.; Muraleedharan, U.; Raghukumar, S.

    and Chang CS. Bleach resistant alkaline protease produced by a Bacillus sp. Isolated from the Korean polychaete, Periserrula leucophryna. Proc Biochem 2004;39:1441-7. [12] Turkiewicz M, Gromek E, Kalinowska H and Zielinska M, Biosynthesis and properties... o C Serine protease [33] Paecilomyces lilacinus Biocontrol agent Azocasein [34] Bacillus sp Korean polychaete Casein 1?g tyrosine min -1 10.0 45-50 o C Serine protease [11] Aspergillus ustus NIOCC #20 Deep-sea sediment Azocasein 1639 ACU m...

  8. Involvement of serine proteases in the excystation and metacystic development of Entamoeba invadens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makioka, Asao; Kumagai, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Seiki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2009-10-01

    Although the functions of cysteine proteases involved in the pathogenicity and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica have been demonstrated, little is known about the functions of serine proteases. We examined the involvement of serine proteases in amoebic excystation and metacystic development using inhibitors specific for serine proteases. Entamoeba invadens IP-1 strain was used as the model of excystation and metacystic development of E. histolytica. Four serine protease inhibitors, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), 4-(2-aminoethyl) bezensulfonylfluoride hydrochloride, 3, 4-dichloroisocoumarin, and N-tosyl-phe-chloromethylketone, decreased the number of metacystic amoebae in a dose-dependent manner, without showing cytotoxicity to cysts. PMSF inhibited not only the increase but also the development of metacystic amoebae as determined by the change of nucleus number from four- to one-nucleate amoebae. The protease activity in cyst lysates was also inhibited by PMSF and the band of protease on gelatin sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was weaker than controls when treated with PMSF. Three serine protease families, S28 (three types), S9 (two), and S26 (one) were retrieved from the database of E. invadens. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that amebic enzymes from the serine protease families formed different clades from those from other organisms. The expression levels of these serine proteases in cysts 5 h after the induction of excystation as assessed by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were higher than those observed prior to induction assayed by real-time RT-PCR; the increase in one type of S9 (named S9-3) expression was the highest. The expression of S9 enzymes also increased from cysts to trophozoites higher than the other family serine proteases. Thus, the results show that Entamoeba uses their serine proteases in the excystation and metacystic development, which leads to successful infection.

  9. Genome and secretome analyses provide insights into keratin decomposition by novel proteases from the non-pathogenic fungus Onygena corvina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yuhong; Kamp Busk, Peter; Herbst, Florian Alexander

    2015-01-01

    of proteases in keratin-degrading and non-keratin-degrading fungi indicated that 18 putative secreted proteases from four protease families (M36, M35, M43, and S8) may be responsible for keratin decomposition. Twelve of the 18 predicted protease genes could be amplified from O. corvina grown on keratinaceous...... materials and were transformed into Pichia pastoris. One of the recombinant proteases belonging to the S8 family showed high keratin-degrading activity. Furthermore, 29 different proteases were identified by mass spectrometry in the culture broth of O. corvina grown on feathers and bristle. The culture...... broth was fractionated by ion exchange chromatography to isolate active fractions with five novel proteases belonging to three protease families (S8, M28, and M3). Enzyme blends composed of three of these five proteases, one from each family, showed high degree of degradation of keratin in vitro...

  10. Comparison of four feed proteases for improvement of nutritive value of poultry feather meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Brøgger; Yu, S; Plumstead, P

    2012-01-01

    Feed industries are seeking new ways to cope with increased raw material costs, and one approach is to apply enzymatic treatment in the production of feed ingredients from animal by-products. Keratinases, a group of proteases, are capable of hydrolyzing keratin-rich material and have been applied...... such as dithiothreitol (DTT) and Na2SO3. In general, the protease from B. subtilis was more efficient in degrading feather keratin compared to the other 3 feed proteases at both pH 5.5 and 7.0. For commercial production, the application of protease from B. subtilis is even more advantageous considering the lower cost-in-use....

  11. Heterologous expression and purification of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach

    2011-01-01

    The mobilization of protein during germination of barley seeds is essential and Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins [1]. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme until activated through reduction...... of the active site cysteines and via removal of the pro-domain. The complement of cysteine proteases is comprehensive and for detailed studies of the individual components of this complement, a fast and efficient eukaryotic expression platform is highly desirable. The barley key cysteine protease, endoprotease...

  12. Purification and characterization of an alkaline protease from Micrococcus sp. isolated from the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Enling; Xia, Tao; Zhang, Zhaohui; Mao, Xiangzhao

    2017-04-01

    Protease is wildly used in various fields, such as food, medicine, washing, leather, cosmetics and other industrial fields. In this study, an alkaline protease secreted by Micrococcus NH54PC02 isolated from the South China Sea was purified and characterized. The growth curve and enzyme activity curve indicated that the cell reached a maximum concentration at the 30th hour and the enzyme activity reached the maximum value at the 36th hour. The protease was purified with 3 steps involving ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography and hydrophobic chromatography with 8.22-fold increase in specific activity and 23.68% increase in the recovery. The molecular mass of the protease was estimated to be 25 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis. The optimum temperature and pH for the protease activity were 50°C and pH 10.0, respectively. The protease showed a strong stability in a wide range of pH values ranging from 6.0-11.0, and maintained 90% enzyme activity in strong alkaline environment with pH 11.0. Inhibitor trials indicated that the protease might be serine protease. But it also possessed the characteristic of metalloprotease as it could be strongly inhibited by EDTA and strongly stimulated by Mn2+. Evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight MS (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS) showed that the protease might belong to the peptidase S8 family.

  13. A primitive enzyme for a primitive cell: the protease required for excystation of Giardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, W; Alvarado, L; Rawlings, N D; Engel, J C; Franklin, C; McKerrow, J H

    1997-05-02

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Giardia are one of the earliest lineages of eukaryotic cells. To initiate infection, trophozoites emerge from a cyst in the host. Excystation is blocked by specific cysteine protease inhibitors. Using a biotinylated inhibitor, the target protease was identified and its corresponding gene cloned. The protease was localized to vesicles that release their contents just prior to excystation. The Giardia protease is the earliest known branch of the cathepsin B family. Its phylogeny confirms that the cathepsin B lineage evolved in primitive eukaryotic cells, prior to the divergence of plant and animal kingdoms, and underscores the diversity of cellular functions that this enzyme family facilitates.

  14. Synthesis and herbicidal evaluation of novel benzothiazole derivatives as potential inhibitors of D1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tonghui; Sun, Jie; An, Lin; Zhang, Lixian; Han, Cuiping

    2016-04-01

    D1 protease is a C-terminal processing protease that has been predicted to be an ideal herbicidal target. Three novel series of benzothiazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their herbicidal activities against Brassica napus (rape) and Echinochloa crusgalli (barnyard grass). The preliminary bioassay indicated that most of the synthesized compounds possess promising D1 protease inhibitory activities and considerable herbicidal activities. Molecular docking was performed to position representative compounds into the active site of D1 protease to determine a probable binding model.

  15. A metagenomic alkaline protease from saline habitat: cloning, over-expression and functional attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Megha K; Singh, Satya P

    2013-02-01

    Metagenomics has opened new horizon to unlock the biotechnological potential for novel enzymes. An alkaline protease gene was obtained from the total environmental DNA extracted from a saline habitat. After cloning and sequencing, it was identified that the protease gene related to uncultivable bacteria (HM219181). The protease was over expressed at 6h of induction with optimum induction at 1mM IPTG and 27°C. The purified enzyme was characterized with respect to various factors; temperature, pH, NaCl and chemical denaturant. The sequence analysis indicated a hydrophobic tendency of the protein, while the predicted 3D structure indicated the enzyme as a serine protease.

  16. A biochemical comparison of proteases from pathogenic naegleria fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria gruberi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Cervantes-Sandoval, Isaac; Tsutsumi, Victor; Shibayama, Mineko

    2007-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is the etiologic agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Proteases have been suggested to be involved in tissue invasion and destruction during infection. We analyzed and compared the complete protease profiles of total crude extract and conditioned medium of both pathogenic N. fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria gruberi trophozoites. Using SDS-PAGE, we found differences in the number and molecular weight of proteolytic bands between the two strains. The proteases showed optimal activity at pH 7.0 and 35 degrees C for both strains. Inhibition assays showed that the main proteolytic activity in both strains is due to cysteine proteases although serine proteases were also detected. Both N. fowleri and N. gruberi have a variety of different protease activities at different pH levels and temperatures. These proteases may allow the amoebae to acquire nutrients from different sources, including those from the host. Although, the role of the amoebic proteases in the pathogenesis of PAM is not clearly defined, it seems that proteases and other molecules of the parasite as well as those from the host, could be participating in the damage to the human central nervous system.

  17. Potent inhibition of feline coronaviruses with peptidyl compounds targeting coronavirus 3C-like protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunjeong; Mandadapu, Sivakoteswara Rao; Groutas, William C; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2013-02-01

    Feline coronavirus infection is common among domestic and exotic felid species and usually associated with mild or asymptomatic enteritis; however, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal disease of cats that is caused by systemic infection with a feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), a variant of feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). Currently, there is no specific treatment approved for FIP despite the importance of FIP as the leading infectious cause of death in young cats. During the replication process, coronavirus produces viral polyproteins that are processed into mature proteins by viral proteases, the main protease (3C-like [3CL] protease) and the papain-like protease. Since the cleavages of viral polyproteins are an essential step for virus replication, blockage of viral protease is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Previously, we reported the generation of broad-spectrum peptidyl inhibitors against viruses that possess a 3C or 3CL protease. In this study, we further evaluated the antiviral effects of the peptidyl inhibitors against feline coronaviruses, and investigated the interaction between our protease inhibitor and a cathepsin B inhibitor, an entry blocker, against a feline coronavirus in cell culture. Herein we report that our compounds behave as reversible, competitive inhibitors of 3CL protease, potently inhibited the replication of feline coronaviruses (EC(50) in a nanomolar range) and, furthermore, combination of cathepsin B and 3CL protease inhibitors led to a strong synergistic interaction against feline coronaviruses in a cell culture system.

  18. Technical Brief: a novel strategy for enrichment of trabecular meshwork protease proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciani, Renata; Junk, Anna K; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2008-05-14

    We present a novel and simple enrichment strategy to capture trabecular meshwork (TM) protease proteome. The method relies on fractionation of TM tissue into cytosolic and nuclear extracts and subsequent affinity enrichment of proteases on peptide inhibitors. A large repertoire of available protease substrate analog peptides enables an improved capture of TM protease proteome compared to SDS-PAGE fractionation alone. Peptide analog inhibitors of protease substrates are immobilized on a protein A or G column using 254 nm intense ultraviolet (UV) light. The TM cytosolic protein extract incubated on the column is eluted with salt or a buffer with a low hydrogen ion concentration. The resultant protein solution is precipitated with acetone, fractionated on SDS-PAGE, in situ trypsin digested, and subjected to mass spectrometry. This relatively simple protocol enables improved capture of cytosolic proteases. We identified 20 previously reported TM proteins from a single donor tissue using affinity enrichment. The majority of identified proteins were either intracellular proteases or known protease inhibitors. Both serine and cysteine proteases were captured using this strategy with improved coverage compared to our previous identification without affinity enrichment.

  19. INFLUENCE OF VARIOUS ENVIRONMENTAL PARAMETERS ON PROTEASE SECRETION FROM BACILLUS SUBTILIS DKMNR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kezia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A protease producing microorganism was isolated from soil collected from garden soil samples around the department of Chemical Engineering, Andhra University, Vizag, A.P, India and identified as bacillus species. The isolate DKMNR produced alkaline protease the optimum conditions for protease activity was 330C at pH 9 with 2% inoculum in the medium after 24 h of incubation with an agitation speed of 200 rpm and EDTA was found to be inhibitor of alkaline protease. The extracellular production of the enzyme, its alkaline nature and compatibility with most commercial detergents are features which suggest its application in the detergent industry.

  20. Comparative analysis on the distribution of protease activities among fruits and vegetable resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qian; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Qiao-Juan; Jiang, Zheng-Qiang

    2016-12-15

    In this study, a comparative analysis on the distribution of protease activities among 90 plant resources, including fruits and vegetables, has been performed. Protease activities of plant extracts were assayed at different pH values (pH 3.0, pH 7.5 and pH 10.5) using casein as a substrate. Ten fruits and thirteen vegetables show protease activities above 10U/g. Pineapple, fig and papaya, which are used for commercial protease production, exhibited high protease activities. Additionally, high protease activities were detected in kiwifruit (28.8U/g), broccoli (16.9U/g), ginger (16.6U/g), leek (32.7U/g) and red pepper (15.8U/g) at different pH values. SDS-PAGE and zymograms confirmed that various types of proteases existed in the five plant extracts and might be explored. Furthermore, five plant extracts were treated by different protease inhibitors. These results show that there are still many plant resources unexplored, which may be promising candidates for plant-derived protease production.

  1. Scouring Potential of Mesophile Acidic Proteases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for Grey Cotton Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, D.

    2013-04-01

    Mesophile, acidic proteases were produced using the microbial source, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with wider thermal tolerances. Process conditions of scouring treatment were optimized using Taguchi method for optimum temperature, time, pH and concentration of protease. Treatment with the protease lower weight loss values compared to the alkali scouring, however, significant improvement in the absorbency compared to the grey samples was observed. Large amounts of pectin left out in the samples resulted in higher extractable impurities, substantiated by the FTIR results. Relatively, lower reduction in the tear strengths was observed in both warp and weft directions after protease treatment of the cotton fabrics.

  2. Nine Crystal Structures Determine the Substrate Envelope of the MDR HIV-1 Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C. (WSU-MED); (NWU)

    2012-03-27

    Under drug selection pressure, emerging mutations render HIV-1 protease drug resistant, leading to the therapy failure in anti-HIV treatment. It is known that nine substrate cleavage site peptides bind to wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease in a conserved pattern. However, how the multidrug-resistant (MDR) HIV-1 protease binds to the substrate cleavage site peptides is yet to be determined. MDR769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, and 90) was selected for present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. MDR769 HIV-1 protease was co-crystallized with nine substrate cleavage site hepta-peptides. Crystallographic studies show that MDR769 HIV-1 protease has an expanded substrate envelope with wide open flaps. Furthermore, ligand binding energy calculations indicate weaker binding in MDR769 HIV-1 protease-substrate complexes. These results help in designing the next generation of HIV-1 protease inhibitors by targeting the MDR HIV-1 protease.

  3. A mechanism for the induction of type 2 immune responses by a protease allergen in the genital tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Eun; Oh, Dong Sun; Jung, Hi Eun

    2017-01-01

    The genital mucosa is a barrier that is constantly exposed to a variety of pathogens, allergens, and external stimuli. Although both allergen exposure and parasite infections frequently occur in the genital area, the mechanism by which immune responses—particularly type 2 immunity—are induced has rarely been studied in the genital mucosa. Here, we demonstrate the induction of T helper type 2 (Th2) immunity in the genital mucosa in response to a model allergen, the protease papain. Intravaginal papain immunization induced type 2 immunity in a manner that was dependent on protease activity and the estrous phase of the mice. In addition, IL-33 was released from the vaginal epithelia after intravaginal papain immunization, leading to the activation of type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s). Moreover, the IL-33–MyD88 (myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88) signaling pathway was critical for the induction of type 2 immunity. We also found that Th2 differentiation in response to intravaginal papain treatment requires a specific dendritic cell (DC) subset that is controlled by interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4). These findings suggest that type 2 immunity is induced by a unique mechanism in the genital tract, which is an important, but often overlooked, barrier surface. PMID:28137851

  4. The coxsackievirus B 3C protease cleaves MAVS and TRIF to attenuate host type I interferon and apoptotic signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitava Mukherjee

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The host innate immune response to viral infections often involves the activation of parallel pattern recognition receptor (PRR pathways that converge on the induction of type I interferons (IFNs. Several viruses have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to attenuate antiviral host signaling by directly interfering with the activation and/or downstream signaling events associated with PRR signal propagation. Here we show that the 3C(pro cysteine protease of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 cleaves the innate immune adaptor molecules mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS and Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-beta (TRIF as a mechanism to escape host immunity. We found that MAVS and TRIF were cleaved in CVB3-infected cells in culture. CVB3-induced cleavage of MAVS and TRIF required the cysteine protease activity of 3C(pro, occurred at specific sites and within specialized domains of each molecule, and inhibited both the type I IFN and apoptotic signaling downstream of these adaptors. 3C(pro-mediated MAVS cleavage occurred within its proline-rich region, led to its relocalization from the mitochondrial membrane, and ablated its downstream signaling. We further show that 3C(pro cleaves both the N- and C-terminal domains of TRIF and localizes with TRIF to signalosome complexes within the cytoplasm. Taken together, these data show that CVB3 has evolved a mechanism to suppress host antiviral signal propagation by directly cleaving two key adaptor molecules associated with innate immune recognition.

  5. Effects of MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) on liquefaction and ulceration in rabbit skin model of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinfang; Luo, Yanping; Gao, Qi; Lu, Xiaoling; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Xun; Zhang, Lifeng; Wang, Jingqiu; Ma, Xingming; Zhu, Bingdong

    2016-10-01

    Tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease, which caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It typically affects the functions of the lung and causes high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. The lectin pathway, one of the complement cascade systems, provides the primary line of defense against invading pathogens. However, what is the specific effection between tuberculosis and complement is unknown. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a recognition subunit, binds to arrays of carbohydrates on the surfaces of pathogens, which results in the activation of MBL-associated serine protease-2 to trigger a downstream reaction cascade of complement system. The effects of human MBL-associated serine protease-2 (hMASP-2) were assessed in a rabbit-skin model by intradermal injection of 5 × 10(6) viable BCG bacilli. The rAd-hMASP-2 accelerated the formation of liquefaction and healing of the granuloma lesions, reduced the bacteria loads of the skin nodules. The serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ were significantly increasing during the granuloma and liquefaction phases in the rAd-hMASP-2 group. This study suggests that hMASP-2 can induce a protective efficacy in BCG-infected rabbit skin models, which affects both the progress of lesions and the survival of the mycobacteria within them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Metabolic pathways of OGCP and the influence of parkin protein on the metabolism of OGCP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-yu; Cao, Li; Tang, Bei-sha; Zhang, Hai-nan; Guo, Ji-feng; Liao, Shu-sheng; Tang, Jian-guang; Yan, Xin-riang; Tan, Li-ming

    2011-03-01

    To study the metabolic pathways of 2-oxoglutarate carrier protein (OGCP)and the influence of parkin protein on the metabolism of OGCP. The OGCP metabolic pathways were identified through inhibiting proteasome activities with specific proteasome inhibitors and protease inhibitors. The isotope pulse-chase experiments were performed to measure the turnover rate of OGCP and to study the influence of parkin protein on the metabolism of OGCP. Proteasome inhibitors and protease inhibitors inhibited OGCP degradation. The OGCP metabolism had a half-life of about 8-10 h. Overexpression of parkin protein accelerated the OGCP degradation. OGCP degrades through proteasome and lysosome degradation pathways. The degradation of parkin protein can promote the degradation of OGCP.

  7. Plant Protease Inhibitors in Therapeutics-Focus on Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Sandhya; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Plants are known to have many secondary metabolites and phytochemical compounds which are highly explored at biochemical and molecular genetics level and exploited enormously in the human health care sector. However, there are other less explored small molecular weight proteins, which inhibit proteases/proteinases. Plants are good sources of protease inhibitors (PIs) which protect them against diseases, insects, pests, and herbivores. In the past, proteinaceous PIs were considered primarily as protein-degrading enzymes. Nevertheless, this view has significantly changed and PIs are now treated as very important signaling molecules in many biological activities such as inflammation, apoptosis, blood clotting and hormone processing. In recent years, PIs have been examined extensively as therapeutic agents, primarily to deal with various human cancers. Interestingly, many plant-based PIs are also found to be effective against cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, inflammatory diseases and neurological disorders. Several plant PIs are under further evaluation in in vitro clinical trials. Among all types of PIs, Bowman-Birk inhibitors (BBI) have been studied extensively in the treatment of many diseases, especially in the field of cancer prevention. So far, crops such as beans, potatoes, barley, squash, millet, wheat, buckwheat, groundnut, chickpea, pigeonpea, corn, and pineapple have been identified as good sources of PIs. The PI content of such foods has a significant influence on human health disorders, particularly in the regions where people mostly depend on these kind of foods. These natural PIs vary in concentration, protease specificity, heat stability, and sometimes several PIs may be present in the same species or tissue. However, it is important to carry out individual studies to identify the potential effects of each PI on human health. PIs in plants make them incredible sources to determine novel PIs with specific pharmacological and therapeutic effects due

  8. Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Sprouting Angiogenesis: Proteases Pave the Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenzana, A; Fibbi, G; Margheri, F; Biagioni, A; Luciani, C; Del Rosso, M; Chillà, A

    2015-01-01

    Sprouting angiogenesis consists of the expansion and remodelling of existing vessels, where the vascular sprouts connect each other to form new vascular loops. Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) are a subtype of stem cells, with high proliferative potential, able to differentiate into mature Endothelial Cells (ECs) during the neovascularization process. In addition to this direct structural role EPCs improve neovascularization, also secreting numerous pro-angiogenic factors able to enhance the proliferation, survival and function of mature ECs, and other surrounding progenitor cells. While sprouting angiogenesis by mature ECs involves resident ECs, the vasculogenic contribution of EPCs is a high hurdle race. Bone marrowmobilized EPCs have to detach from the stem cell niche, intravasate into bone marrow vessels, reach the hypoxic area or tumour site, extravasate and incorporate into the new vessel lumen, thus complementing the resident mature ECs in sprouting angiogenesis. The goal of this review is to highlight the role of the main protease systems able to control each of these steps. The pivotal protease systems here described, involved in vascular patterning in sprouting angiogenesis, are the matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs), the serineproteinases urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) associated with its receptor (uPAR) and receptorassociated plasminogen/plasmin, the neutrophil elastase and the cathepsins. Since angiogenesis plays a critical role not only in physiological but also in pathological processes, such as in tumours, controlling the contribution of EPCs to the angiogenic process, through the regulation of the protease systems involved, could yield new opportunities for the therapeutic prospect of efficient control of pathological angiogenesis.

  9. Phytochelatin synthase: of a protease a peptide polymerase made.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Philip A

    2012-05-01

    Of the mechanisms known to protect vascular plants and some algae, fungi and invertebrates from the toxic effects of non-essential heavy metals such as As, Cd or Hg, one of the most sophisticated is the enzyme-catalyzed synthesis of phytochelatins (PCs). PCs, (γ-Glu-Cys)(n) Gly polymers, which serve as high-affinity, thiol-rich cellular chelators and contribute to the detoxification of heavy metal ions, are derived from glutathione (GSH; γ-Glu-Cys-Gly) and related thiols in a reaction catalyzed by phytochelatin synthases (PC synthases, EC 2.3.2.15). Using the enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPCS1) as a model, the reasoning and experiments behind the conclusion that PC synthases are novel papain-like Cys protease superfamily members are presented. The status of S-substituted GSH derivatives as generic PC synthase substrates and the sufficiency of the N-terminal domain of the enzyme from eukaryotic and its half-size equivalents from prokaryotic sources, for net PC synthesis and deglycylation of GSH and its derivatives, respectively, are emphasized. The question of the common need or needs met by PC synthases and their homologs is discussed. Of the schemes proposed to account for the combined protease and peptide polymerase capabilities of the eukaryotic enzymes vs the limited protease capabilities of the prokaryotic enzymes, two that will be considered are the storage and homeostasis of essential heavy metals in eukaryotes and the metabolism of S-substituted GSH derivatives in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes.

  10. Full length and protease domain activity of chikungunya virus nsP2 differ from other alphavirus nsP2 proteases in recognition of small peptide substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Sillapee, Pornpan; Sinsirimongkol, Kwanhathai; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Alphavirus nsP2 proteins are multifunctional and essential for viral replication. The protease role of nsP2 is critical for virus replication as only the virus protease activity is used for processing of the viral non-structural polypeptide. Chikungunya virus is an emerging disease problem that is becoming a world-wide health issue. We have generated purified recombinant chikungunya virus nsP2 proteins, both full length and a truncated protease domain from the C-terminus of the nsP2 protein. ...

  11. Proteolytic processing, deubiquitinase and interferon antagonist activities of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus papain-like protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingxing; Chen, Xiaojuan; Bian, Guangxing; Tu, Jian; Xing, Yaling; Wang, Yayun; Chen, Zhongbin

    2014-03-01

    The emerging Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe pulmonary disease in humans and represents the second example of a highly pathogenic coronavirus (CoV) following severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Genomic studies revealed that two viral proteases, papain-like protease (PLpro) and 3C-like protease (3CLpro), process the polyproteins encoded by the MERS-CoV genomic RNA. We previously reported that SARS-CoV PLpro acts as both deubiquitinase (DUB) and IFN antagonist, but the function of the MERS-CoV PLpro was poorly understood. In this study, we characterized MERS-CoV PLpro, which is a protease and can recognize and process the cleavage sites (CS) of nsp1-2, nsp2-3 and nsp3-4. The LXGG consensus cleavage sites in the N terminus of pp1a/1ab, which is generally essential for CoV PLpro-mediated processing, were also characterized in MERS-CoV. MERS-CoV PLpro, like human SARS-CoV PLpro and NL63-CoV PLP2, is a viral deubiquitinating enzyme. It acts on both K48- and K63-linked ubiquitination and ISG15-linked ISGylation. We confirmed that MERS-CoV PLpro acts as an IFN antagonist through blocking the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). These findings indicate that MERS-CoV PLpro acts as a viral DUB and suppresses production of IFN-β by an interfering IRF3-mediated signalling pathway, in addition to recognizing and processing the CS at the N terminus of replicase polyprotein to release the non-structural proteins. The characterization of proteolytic processing, DUB and IFN antagonist activities of MERS-CoV PLpro would reveal the interactions between MERS-CoV and its host, and be applicable to develop strategies targeting PLpro for the effective control of MERS-CoV infection.

  12. Protease inhibitors activity in lepromatous leprosy and lepra reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemul, V L; Sengupta, S R; Dhole, T N

    1983-01-01

    Serum alpha one antitrypsin levels were measured in 50 healthy age and sex matched controls with 45 lepromatous leprosy cases and 5 cases of lepra reaction. It was noted that the mean level in healthy controls was 281.00 mg%, while the mean levels in LL patients was 421.00 mg% and in LR 570.00 mg%. The elevation of Alpha one antitrypsin was statistically significant in LL patients. It is possible that the rise is a reaction to release of proteases and or higher complement activity, which are the results of a high bacillary loading to formation of immune complexes.

  13. Cleavage of desmin by cysteine proteases: Calpains and cathepsin B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline; Jacobsen, S.; Purslow, P.P.

    2004-01-01

    The intermediate filament protein, desmin, was purified from pork longissimus dorsi and incubated with either P-calpain, m-calpain or cathepsin B. Proteolysis of desmin was followed using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. After incubation of desmin with the proteases, cleavage sites on the desmin...... a sequential C-terminal degradation pattern characteristic of this dipeptylpeptidase. The substrate primary structure was not found to be essential for regulation of the proteolytic activity of the cysteine peptidases studied. However, the degradation patterns obtained imply that calpains are involved...

  14. Staphylococcal Proteases Aid in Evasion of the Human Complement System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that presents severe health care concerns due to the prevalence of multiple antibiotic-resistant strains. New treatment strategies are urgently needed, which requires an understanding of disease causation mechanisms. Complement is one of the first...... lines of defense against bacterial pathogens, and S. aureus expresses several specific complement inhibitors. The effect of extracellular proteases from this bacterium on complement, however, has been the subject of limited investigation, except for a recent report regarding cleavage of the C3 component...

  15. Antiretroviral activity of protease inhibitors against Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianet Monzote

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has caused a marked reduction in the occurrence and severity of parasitic infections, including the toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE. These changes have been attributed to the restoration of cell-mediated immunity. This study was developed to examine the activity of six antiretroviral protease inhibitors (API on Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites. The six API showed anti-Toxoplasma activity, with IC50 value between 1.4 and 6.6 µg/mL. Further studies at the molecular level should be performed to clarify if the use of API could be beneficial or not for AIDS patients with TE.

  16. The nucleolar SUMO-specific protease SMT3IP1/SENP3 attenuates Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Tamotsu, E-mail: nishida@gene.mie-u.ac.jp [Department of Human Functional Genomics, Life Science Research Center, Mie University, 1577 Kurima-machiya, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan); Yamada, Yoshiji [Department of Human Functional Genomics, Life Science Research Center, Mie University, 1577 Kurima-machiya, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan)

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} SMT3IP1 interacts with p53 and Mdm2, and desumoylates both proteins. {yields} SMT3IP1 competes with p53 for binding to the central acidic domain of Mdm2. {yields} SMT3IP1 binding to Mdm2 inhibits Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation. {yields} We postulate that SMT3IP1 acts as a new regulator of the p53-Mdm2 pathway. -- Abstract: SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification plays multiple roles in several cellular processes. Sumoylation is reversibly regulated by SUMO-specific proteases. SUMO-specific proteases have recently been implicated in cell proliferation and early embryogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that a nucleolar SUMO-specific protease, SMT3IP1/SENP3, controls the p53-Mdm2 pathway. We found that SMT3IP1 interacts with p53 and Mdm2, and desumoylates both proteins. Overexpression of SMT3IP1 in cells resulted in the accumulation of Mdm2 in the nucleolus and increased stability of the p53 protein. In addition, SMT3IP1 bound to the acidic domain of Mdm2, which also mediates the p53 interaction, and competed with p53 for binding. Increasing expression of SMT3IP1 suppressed Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Interestingly, the desumoylation activity of SMT3IP1 was not necessary for p53 stabilization. These results suggest that SMT3IP1 is a new regulator of the p53-Mdm2 pathway.

  17. Oxidative stress-induced cell cycle blockage and a protease-independent programmed cell death in  microaerophilic Giardia lamblia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esha Ghosh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Esha Ghosh1, Arjun Ghosh1, Amar Nath Ghosh2, Tomoyoshi Nozaki3, Sandipan Ganguly11Division of Parasitology; 2Division of Electron Microscopy, National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, Beliaghata, Kolkata, West Bengal, India; 3Division of Parasitology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Giardia lamblia is a microaerophilic human gastrointestinal parasite and considered as an early-diverged eukaryote. In vitro oxidative stress generation plays a significant role in cell cycle progression and cell death of this parasite. In the present study hydrogen peroxide, metronidazole, and a modified growth medium without cysteine and ascorbic acid have been chosen as oxidative stress-inducing agents. Cell cycle progression has been found to be regulated by different types of oxidative stresses. Apoptosis is not an established pathway in Giardia, which is devoid of ideal mitochondria, but in the present investigation, apoptosis-like programmed cell death has been found by the experiments like AnnexinV-FITC assay, DNA fragmentation pattern, etc. On the contrary, Caspase-9 assay, which confirms the caspase-mediated apoptotic pathway, has been found to be negative in all the stress conditions. Protease inhibitor assay confirmed that, even in absence of any proteases, programmed cell death does occur in this primitive eukaryote. All these results signify a novel pathway of programmed suicidal death in Giardia lamblia under oxidative stress. This is the first demonstration of protease-independent programmed cell death regulation in Giardia exclusive for its own specialties.Keywords: Giardia lamblia, oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, programmed cell death, apoptosis, early branching eukaryotes

  18. Identification and characterization of MOR-CP, a cysteine protease induced by ozone and developmental senescence in maize (Zea mays L.) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rafiq; Zuily-Fodil, Yasmine; Passaquet, Chantal; Bethenod, Olivier; Roche, Romain; Repellin, Anne

    2014-08-01

    Among the different classes of endoproteases, cysteine proteases are consistently associated with senescence, defense signaling pathways and cellular responses to abiotic stresses. The objectives of this work were to study the effects of various concentrations of ozone on gene expression and enzymatic activity for papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCPs), in the leaves of maize plants grown under field conditions. Leaves from ranks 12 and 10 (cob leaf) were harvested regularly over a long-term artificial ozone fumigation experiment (50 d). Tissues were tested for transcriptional and activity changes concerning cysteine proteases, using qRT-PCR for the newly identified ozone-responsive PLCP gene (Mor-CP) and synthetic oligopeptide Boc-Val-Leu-Lys-AMC as a PLCP-specific substrate, respectively. Results showed that developmental senescence induced a significant and progressive rise in CP activity, only in the older leaves 10 and had no effect on Mor-CP gene expression levels. On the other hand, ozone dramatically enhanced Mor-CP mRNA levels and global PLCP enzymatic activity in leaves 12 and 10, particularly toward the end of the treatment. Ozone impact was more pronounced in the older leaves 10. Together, these observations concurred to conclude that ozone stress enhances natural senescence processes, such as those related to proteolysis.

  19. Understanding the specificity of serpin-protease complexes through interface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Qudsia; Kapil, Charu; Singh, Poonam; Kumari, Vineeta; Jairajpuri, Mohamad Aman

    2015-01-01

    Serpins such as antithrombin, heparin cofactor II, plasminogen activator inhibitor, antitrypsin, antichymotrypsin, and neuroserpin are involved in important biological processes by inhibiting specific serine proteases. Initially, the protease recognizes the mobile reactive loop of the serpin eliciting conformational changes, where the cleaved loop together with the protease inserts into β-sheet A, translocating the protease to the opposite side of inhibitor leading to its inactivation. Serpin interaction with proteases is governed mainly by the reactive center loop residues (RCL). However, in some inhibitory serpins, exosite residues apart from RCL have been shown to confer protease specificity. Further, this forms the basis of multi-specificity of some serpins, but the residues and their dimension at interface in serpin-protease complexes remain elusive. Here, we present a comprehensive structural analysis of the serpin-protease interfaces using bio COmplexes COntact MAPS (COCOMAPS), PRotein Interface Conservation and Energetics (PRICE), and ProFace programs. We have carried out interface, burial, and evolutionary analysis of different serpin-protease complexes. Among the studied complexes, non-inhibitory serpins exhibit larger interface region with greater number of residue involvement as compared to the inhibitory serpins. On comparing the multi-specific serpins (antithrombin and antitrypsin), a difference in the interface area and residue number was observed, suggestive of a differential mechanism of action of these serpins in regulating their different target proteases. Further, detailed study of these multi-specific serpins listed few essential residues (common in all the complexes) and certain specificity (unique to each complex) determining residues at their interfaces. Structural mapping of interface residues suggested that individual patches with evolutionary conserved residues in specific serpins determine their specificity towards a particular protease.

  20. An antibiotic, heavy metal resistant and halotolerant Bacillus cereus SIU1 and its thermoalkaline protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Surendra

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many workers have reported halotolerant bacteria from saline conditions capable of protease production. However, antibiotic resistance and heavy metal tolerance pattern of such organisms is not documented very well. Similarly, only a few researchers have reported the pattern of pH change of fermentation medium during the course of protease production. In this study, we have isolated a halotolerant Bacillus cereus SIU1 strain from a non-saline environment and studied its antibiotic and heavy metal resistance pattern. The isolate produces a thermoalkaline protease and changes the medium pH during the course of fermentation. Thermostability of protease was also studied for 30 min. Results Seventy bacterial strains isolated from the soils of Eastern Uttar Pradesh, India were screened for protease production. All of them exhibited protease activity. However, 40% bacterial isolates were found good protease producers as observed by caseinolytic zones on milk agar plates. Among them, culture S-4 was adjudged as the best protease producer, and was identified as Bacillus cereus by morphological, biochemical and 16 S rDNA sequence analyses. The isolate was resistant to heavy metals (As2+, Pb2+, Cs1+ and antibiotics (penicillin, lincomycin, cloxacillin, pefloxacin. Its growth behavior and protease production was studied at 45°C and pH 9.0. The protease units of 88 ml-1 were noted in unoptimized modified glucose yeast extract (GYE medium during early stationary phase at 20 h incubation period. The enzyme was stable in the temperature range of 35°-55°C. Conclusions An antibiotic and heavy metal resistant, halotolerant Bacillus cereus isolate is capable of producing thermoalkaline protease, which is active and stable at pH 9.0 and 35°-55°C. This isolate may be useful in several industrial applications owing to its halotolerance and antibiotic and heavy metal resistance characteristics.

  1. 植物类Caspase及其调控细胞程序性死亡的研究进展%Progress in Caspase-Like Proteases and Their Regulatory Roles in Programmed Cell Death in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹洁; 何虎翼; 李文; 何龙飞

    2012-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) plays an important role in the development and adaptation of plants under different environmental stresses. Cysteine-aspartic acid proteases (caspase) are responsible for initiating, executing and signal transduction of animal PCD. The existence of caspase-like proteases has been also demonstrated experimentally in plants by the applications of artificial synthesized substrates and inhibitors of caspase. Caspase-like proteases can be divided into three classes including metacaspases, vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) and saspases. In the paper, the progresses of the types, structures, locations, functions of caspase-like proteases and their regulatory roles in plant PCD are reviewed. Subsequently, a regulatory pathway of caspase-like proteases in plant PCD is also suggested. It can support a new insight into further study of caspase-like proteases and their effects in plant PCD.%植物细胞程序性死亡(PCD)在植物生长发育和逆境适应中发挥重要作用.半胱氨酸蛋白酶(caspase)调控动物PCD的启动、执行及信号转导.通过人工合成底物、动物caspase抑制剂等方法已证实在植物中存在类caspase,可分为metacas-pases、VPEs (vacuolar processing enzymes)和saspases等.本文综述了植物类caspase的种类、结构、定位、功能及其调控PCD的研究进展,提出植物PCD中类caspase作用的调控途径,为深入研究植物PCD提供参考.

  2. Pre- and postoperative levels in serum of mannan-binding lectin associated serine protease-2 -a prognostic marker in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, H; Christensen, IJ; Thiel, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) is the initiating enzyme of the lectin pathway of complement activation. High preoperative serum levels of MASP-2 are associated with recurrence and poor survival in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study we investigate...... the prognostic role of MASP-2 in patients curatively resected for primary CRC. Serum concentrations of MASP-2 were determined in 281 patients prior to surgery and 7 months postoperatively using a time-resolved immunofluorometric assay. End points were recurrent cancer and death within a median follow-up time...

  3. The chaperone and potential mannan-binding lectin (MBL) co-receptor calreticulin interacts with MBL through the binding site for MBL-associated serine proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Rasmus; Duus, Karen; Laursen, Inga;

    2008-01-01

    was immobilized on a solid surface or bound to mannan on a surface. The binding was non-covalent and biphasic with an initial salt-sensitive phase followed by a more stable salt-insensitive interaction. For plasma-derived MBL, known to be complexed with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs), no binding...... with calreticulin. Comparative analysis of MBL with complement component C1q, its counterpart of the classical pathway, revealed that they display similar binding characteristics for calreticulin, providing further indication that calreticulin is a common co-receptor/chaperone for both proteins. In conclusion...

  4. Identification of the site of human mannan-binding lectin involved in the interaction with its partner serine proteases: the essential role of Lys55

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teillet, F; Lacroix, M; Thiel, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is an oligomeric lectin that binds neutral carbohydrates on pathogens, forms complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASP)-1, -2, and -3 and 19-kDa MBL-associated protein (MAp19), and triggers the complement lectin pathway through activation of MASP-2. To ident...... centered on residue Lys(55), which may form an ionic bond representing the major component of the MBL-MASP interaction. The binding sites for MASP-2/MAp19 and MASP-1/3 have common features but are not strictly identical....

  5. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics of ligands binding into protein: The case of HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dechang; Liu, Ming S.; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Kehchih; Huang, Yonggang

    2009-06-01

    Binding dynamics and pathways of ligands or inhibitors to target proteins are challenging both experimental and theoretical biologists. A dynamics understanding of inhibitors interacting with protein is essential for the design of novel potent drugs. In this work we applied a coarse-grained molecular dynamics method for simulating inhibitors entering the binding cavity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (PR). It shows that the coarse-grained dynamics, consistent with the experimental results, can capture the essential molecular dynamics of various inhibitors binding into PR. The primary driving force for the binding processes is the nonbond interaction between inhibitors and PR. The size and topology of inhibitors and the interacting strength between inhibitors and PR have great influence on the binding mode and processes. The interaction strength between the PR and various inhibitors is also analyzed by atomistic molecular mechanics and Poisson-Boltzmann solvation area method.

  6. Organ Length Control by an ADAMTS Extracellular Protease in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yukimasa; Kawakado, Yuri; Hori, Noriyoshi; Tanaka, Kota; Inoue, Ryo; Takano, Tomomi; Kubota, Yukihiko; Nishiwaki, Kiyoji

    2016-01-01

    MIG-17, a secreted protease of the ADAMTS family, acts in the directed migration of gonadal distal tip cells (DTCs) through regulation of the gonadal basement membrane in Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we show that MIG-17 is also required for the control of pharynx elongation during animal growth. We found that the pharynx was elongated in mig-17 mutants compared with wild type. MIG-17 localized to the pharyngeal basement membrane as well as to the gonadal basement membrane. The number of nuclei in the pharynx, and the pumping rate of the pharynx, were not affected in mig-17 mutants, suggesting that cells constituting the pharynx are elongated, although the pharynx functions normally in these mutants. In contrast to the control of DTC migration, MIG-18, a secreted cofactor of MIG-17, was not essential for pharynx length regulation. In addition, the downstream pathways of MIG-17 involving LET-2/type IV collagen, FBL-1/fibulin-1, and NID-1/nidogen, partly diverged from those in gonad development. These results indicate that basement membrane remodeling is important for organ length regulation, and suggest that MIG-17/ADAMTS functions in similar but distinct molecular machineries in pharyngeal and gonadal basement membranes. PMID:26994289

  7. Purification and biophysical characterization of the core protease domain of anthrax lethal factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkazonis, Petros V; Dalkas, Georgios A; Chasapis, Christos T; Vlamis-Gardikas, Alexios; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2010-06-04

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) stands for the major virulence factor of the anthrax disease. It comprises a 90kDa highly specific metalloprotease, the anthrax lethal factor (LF). LF possesses a catalytic Zn(2+) binding site and is highly specific against MAPK kinases, thus representing the most potent native biomolecule to alter and inactivate MKK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) kinases] signalling pathways. Given the importance of the interaction between LF and substrate for the development of anti-anthrax agents as well as the potential treatment of nascent tumours, the analysis of the structure and dynamic properties of the LF catalytic site are essential to elucidate its enzymatic properties. Here we report the recombinant expression and purification of a C-terminal part of LF (LF(672-776)) that harbours the enzyme's core protease domain. The biophysical characterization and backbone assignments ((1)H, (13)C, (15)N) of the polypeptide revealed a stable, well folded structure even in the absence of Zn(2+), suitable for high resolution structural analysis by NMR.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus thiaminase II: oligomerization warrants proteolytic protection against serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Afshan; Drebes, Julia; Kikhney, Alexey; Müller, Ingrid B; Perbandt, Markus; Svergun, Dmitri; Wrenger, Carsten; Betzel, Christian

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus TenA (SaTenA) is a thiaminase type II enzyme that catalyzes the deamination of aminopyrimidine, as well as the cleavage of thiamine into 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (HMP) and 5-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole (THZ), within thiamine (vitamin B1) metabolism. Further, by analogy with studies of Bacillus subtilis TenA, SaTenA may act as a regulator controlling the secretion of extracellular proteases such as the subtilisin type of enzymes in bacteria. Thiamine biosynthesis has been identified as a potential drug target of the multi-resistant pathogen S. aureus and therefore all enzymes involved in the S. aureus thiamine pathway are presently being investigated in detail. Here, the structure of SaTenA, determined by molecular replacement and refined at 2.7 Å resolution to an R factor of 21.6% with one homotetramer in the asymmetric unit in the orthorhombic space group P212121, is presented. The tetrameric state of wild-type (WT) SaTenA was postulated to be the functional biological unit and was confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments in solution. To obtain insights into structural and functional features of the oligomeric SaTenA, comparative kinetic investigations as well as experiments analyzing the structural stability of the WT SaTenA tetramer versus a monomeric SaTenA mutant were performed.

  9. The inhibitory effect of IFN-γ on protease HTRA1 expression in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yuzhu; Lin, Haijiang; Zhu, Linnan; Liu, Zhaoting; Hu, Fanlei; Shi, Jianfeng; Yang, Tao; Shi, Xiaoyun; Guo, Huifang; Tan, Xiaotian; Zhang, Lianfeng; Wang, Qiang; Li, Zhanguo; Zhao, Yong

    2014-07-01

    The high temperature requirement A1 (HTRA1) is a potent protease involved in many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the regulatory mechanisms that control HTRA1 expression need to be determined. In this study, we demonstrated that IFN-γ significantly inhibited the basal and LPS-induced HTRA1 expression in fibroblasts and macrophages, which are two major cells for HTRA1 production in RA. Importantly, the inhibitory effect of IFN-γ on HTRA1 expression was evidenced in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse models and in human RA synovial cells. In parallel with the enhanced CIA incidence and pathological changes in IFN-γ-deficient mice, HTRA1 expression in the joint tissues was also increased as determined by real-time PCR and Western blots. IFN-γ deficiency increased the incidence of CIA and the pathological severity in mice. Neutralization of HTRA1 by Ab significantly reversed the enhanced CIA frequency and severity in IFN-γ-deficient mice. Mechanistically, IFN-γ negatively controls HTRA1 expression through activation of p38 MAPK/STAT1 pathway. Dual luciferase reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that STAT1 could directly bind to HTRA1 promoter after IFN-γ stimulation. This study offers new insights into the molecular regulation of HTRA1 expression and its role in RA pathogenesis, which may have significant impact on clinical therapy for RA and possibly other HTRA1-related diseases, including osteoarthritis, age-related macular degeneration, and cancer.

  10. Ubiquitin-specific protease 14 regulates cardiac hypertrophy progression by increasing GSK-3β phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ningning; Chai, Renjie; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Zhenhui; Zhang, Shuangwei; Zhang, Jingzhi; Liao, Yuning; Cai, Jianyu; Xia, Xiaohong; Li, Aiqun; Liu, Jinbao; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Shiming

    2016-09-23

    Cardiac hypertrophy, a compensatory response to various stimuli in the heart, independently predicts cardiovascular ailments and related deaths. Increasing evidence indicates ubiquitin-proteasome signaling contributes to cardiac hypertrophy regulation. Here, we identified ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (USP14), a 19S proteasome associated deubiquitinase (DUB), as a novel target for cardiac hypertrophy therapy via inhibition of the GSK-3β pathway. Indeed, USP14 expression was increased in an animal model of abdominal aorta constriction. In an angiotensin II (AngII) induced primary neonatal rat cardiomyocyte hypertrophy model, USP14 expression was increased in a time-dependent manner, and reduced USP14 deubiquitinase activity or USP14 knockdown resulted in lower expression levels of the myocardial hypertrophy specific marker β-MHC, and subsequent decreased GSK-3β phosphorylation. In conclusion, USP14 mediates the development of cardiac hypertrophy by promoting GSK-3β phosphorylation, suggesting that USP14 might represent a novel therapeutic target for cardiac hypertrophy treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Moringa oleifera Lam.: Protease activity against blood coagulation cascade

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    A Satish

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The present study evaluated the protease activity of aqueous extracts of Moringa oleifera (Moringaceae leaf (MOL and root (MOR. Materials and Methods : Protease activity was assayed using casein, human plasma clot and human fibrinogen as substrates. Results : Caseinolytic activity of MOL was significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05 than that of MOR. Similar observations were found in case of human plasma clot hydrolyzing activity, wherein MOL caused significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05 plasma clot hydrolysis than MOR. Zymographic techniques were used to detect proteolytic enzymes following electrophoretic separation in gels. Further, both the extracts exhibited significant procoagulant activity as reflected by a significant decrease (P ≤ 0.05 in recalcification time, accompanied by fibrinogenolytic and fibrinolytic activities; clotting time was decreased from 180 ± 10 sec to 119 ± 8 sec and 143 ± 10 sec by MOL and MOR, respectively, at a concentration of 2.5 mg/mL. Fibrinogenolytic (human fibrinogen and fibrinolytic activity (human plasma clot was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, plate method and colorimetric method. Zymographic profile indicated that both the extracts exerted their procoagulant activity by selectively hydrolyzing Aa and Bb subunits of fibrinogen to form fibrin clot, thereby exhibiting fibrinogenolytic activity. However, prolonged incubation resulted in degradation of the formed fibrin clot, suggesting fibrinolytic like activity. Conclusions : These findings support the traditional usage of M. oleifera extracts for wound healing.

  12. Regulation of Adrenal Aldosterone Production by Serine Protease Prostasin

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    Takehiro Ko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A serine protease prostasin has been demonstrated to have a pivotal role in the activation of the epithelial sodium channel. Systemic administration of adenovirus carrying human prostasin gene in rats resulted in an increase in plasma prostasin and aldosterone levels. However, the mechanism by which the elevation of prostasin levels in the systemic circulation stimulated the plasma aldosterone levels remains unknown. Therefore, we examined if prostasin increases the aldosterone synthesis in a human adrenocortical cell line (H295R cells. Luciferase assay using CYP11B2 promoter revealed that prostasin significantly increased the transcriptional activity of CYP11B2. Prostasin significantly increased both CYP11B2 mRNA expression and aldosterone production in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, treatment with camostat mesilate, a potent prostasin inhibitor, had no effect on the aldosterone synthesis by prostasin and also a protease-dead mutant of prostasin significantly stimulated the aldosterone production. A T-type/L-type calcium channel blocker and a protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor significantly reduced the aldosterone synthesis by prostasin. Our findings suggest a stimulatory effect of prostasin on the aldosterone synthesis by adrenal gland through the nonproteolytic action and indicate a new role of prostasin in the systemic circulation.

  13. Recent patents on microbial proteases for the dairy industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijoo-Siota, Lucía; Blasco, Lucía; Rodríguez-Rama, José Luis; Barros-Velázquez, Jorge; Miguel, Trinidad de; Sánchez-Pérez, Angeles; Villa, Tomás G

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the general characteristics of exo and endopeptidases of microbial origin currently used in the milk industry. It also includes recent patents developed either to potentiate the enzymatic activity or to improve the resulting milk derivatives. The main application of these proteases is in the cheese-making industry. Although this industry preferentially uses animal rennets, and in particular genetically engineered chymosins, it also utilizes milk coagulants of microbial origin. Enzymes derived from Rhizomucor miehei, Rhizomucor pusillus and Cryphonectria parasitica are currently used to replace the conventional milk-clotting enzymes. In addition, the dairy industry uses microbial endo and exoproteases for relatively new applications, such as debittering and flavor generation in cheese, accelerated cheese ripening, manufacture of protein hydrolysates with improved functional properties, and production of enzyme-modified cheeses. Lactic acid bacteria play an essential role in these processes, hence these bacteria and the proteases they produce are currently being investigated by the dairy industry and are the subject of many of their patent applications.

  14. Short hydrogen bonds in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases

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    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The survey of crystallographic data from the Protein Data Bank for 37 structures of trypsin and other serine proteases at a resolution of 0.78–1.28 Å revealed the presence of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the enzymes, which are formed between the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues and are on average 2.7 Å long. This is the typical bond length for normal hydrogen bonds. The geometric properties of the hydrogen bonds in the active site indicate that the H atom is not centered between the heteroatoms of the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues in the active site. Taken together, these findings exclude the possibility that short “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds are formed in the ground state structure of the active sites examined in this work. Some time ago, it was suggested by Cleland that the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis is operative in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases, and requires the presence of short hydrogen bonds around 2.4 Å long in the active site, with the H atom centered between the catalytic heteroatoms. The conclusions drawn from this work do not exclude the validity of the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis at all, but they merely do not support it in this particular case, with this particular class of enzymes.

  15. MOFzyme: Intrinsic protease-like activity of Cu-MOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Chen, Daomei; Wang, Jiaqiang; Yan, Zhiying; Jiang, Liang; Deliang Duan; He, Jiao; Luo, Zhongrui; Zhang, Jinping; Yuan, Fagui

    2014-10-24

    The construction of efficient enzyme mimetics for the hydrolysis of peptide bonds in proteins is challenging due to the high stability of peptide bonds and the importance of proteases in biology and industry. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) consisting of infinite crystalline lattices with metal clusters and organic linkers may provide opportunities for protease mimic which has remained unknown. Herein, we report that Cu₂(C₉H₃O₆)₄/₃ MOF (which is well known as HKUST-1 and denoted as Cu-MOF here), possesses an intrinsic enzyme mimicking activity similar to that found in natural trypsin to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and casein. The Michaelis constant (Km) of Cu-MOF is about 26,000-fold smaller than that of free trypsin indicating a much higher affinity of BSA for Cu-MOF surface. Cu-MOF also exhibited significantly higher catalytic efficiency than homogeneous artificial metalloprotease Cu(II) complexes and could be reused for ten times without losing in its activity. Moreover, Cu-MOF was successfully used to simulate trypsinization in cell culture since it dissociated cells in culture even without EDTA.

  16. Antimalarial activity of HIV-1 protease inhibitor in chromone series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerdsirisuk, Pradith; Maicheen, Chirattikan; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2014-12-01

    Increasing parasite resistance to nearly all available antimalarial drugs becomes a serious problem to human health and necessitates the need to continue the search for new effective drugs. Recent studies have shown that clinically utilized HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) inhibitors can inhibit the in vitro and in vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a series of chromone derivatives possessing HIV-1 PR inhibitory activity has been tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum (K1 multi-drug resistant strain). Chromone 15, the potent HIV-1 PR inhibitor (IC50=0.65μM), was found to be the most potent antimalarial compound with IC50=0.95μM while primaquine and tafenoquine showed IC50=2.41 and 1.95μM, respectively. Molecular docking study of chromone compounds against plasmepsin II, an aspartic protease enzyme important in hemoglobin degradation, revealed that chromone 15 exhibited the higher binding affinity (binding energy=-13.24kcal/mol) than the known PM II inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 PR inhibitor in chromone series has the potential to be a new class of antimalarial agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Kunitz-type protease inhibitors group B from Solanum palustre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speransky, Anna S; Cimaglia, Fabio; Krinitsina, Anastasya A; Poltronieri, Palmiro; Fasano, Pasqua; Bogacheva, Anna M; Valueva, Tatiana A; Halterman, Dennis; Shevelev, Alexei B; Santino, Angelo

    2007-11-01

    Five Kunitz protease inhibitor group B genes were isolated from the genome of the diploid non-tuber-forming potato species Solanum palustre. Three of five new genes share 99% identity to the published KPI-B genes from various cultivated potato accessions, while others exhibit 96% identity. Spls-KPI-B2 and Spls-KPI-B4 proteins contain unique substitutions of the most conserved residues usually involved to trypsin and chymotrypsin-specific binding sites of Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (KPI)-B, respectively. To test the inhibition of trypsin and chymotrypsin by Spls-KPI proteins, five of them were produced in E. coli purified using a Ni-sepharose resin and ion-exchange chromatography. All recombinant Spls-KPI-B inhibited trypsin; K(i) values ranged from 84.8 (Spls-KPI-B4), 345.5 (Spls-KPI-B1), and 1310.6 nM (Spls-KPI-B2) to 3883.5 (Spls-KPI-B5) and 8370 nM (Spls-KPI-B3). In addition, Spls-KPI-B1 and Spls-KPI-B4 inhibited chymotrypsin. These data suggest that regardless of substitutions of key active-center residues both Spls-KPI-B4 and Spls-KPI-B1 are functional trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitors.

  18. Targeting of a chlamydial protease impedes intracellular bacterial growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan G Christian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that propagate in a cytosolic vacuole. Recent work has shown that growth of Chlamydia induces the fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus (GA into ministacks, which facilitates the acquisition of host lipids into the growing inclusion. GA fragmentation results from infection-associated cleavage of the integral GA protein, golgin-84. Golgin-84-cleavage, GA fragmentation and growth of Chlamydia trachomatis can be blocked by the peptide inhibitor WEHD-fmk. Here we identify the bacterial protease chlamydial protease-like activity factor (CPAF as the factor mediating cleavage of golgin-84 and as the target of WEHD-fmk-inhibition. WEHD-fmk blocked cleavage of golgin-84 as well as cleavage of known CPAF targets during infection with C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae. The same effect was seen when active CPAF was expressed in non-infected cells and in a cell-free system. Ectopic expression of active CPAF in non-infected cells was sufficient for GA fragmentation. GA fragmentation required the small GTPases Rab6 and Rab11 downstream of CPAF-activity. These results define CPAF as the first protein that is essential for replication of Chlamydia. We suggest that this role makes CPAF a potential anti-infective therapeutic target.

  19. Bovine leukemia virus: purification and characterization of the aspartic protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, A; Mamoun, R Z; Geoffre, S; Castroviejo, M; Raymond, S; Precigoux, G; Hospital, M; Guillemain, B

    1993-04-01

    To develop efficient bovine leukemia virus (BLV) protease (PR) inhibitors, pure enzyme is required. For this, we have developed a two-step chromatographic nondenaturing purification protocol of PR from virions. As expected, the purified protein presents a molecular weight (14 kDa) and a NH2 terminal end fitting with previously reported data. The enzymatic activity of BLV PR was characterized using a synthetic peptide containing a potential cleavage site of the BLV gag-pro polypeptide precursor as substrate. The protease was most active at pH 6, 40 degrees, and high salt concentration (1-2 M NaCl or ammonium sulfate). In contrast, using a natural substrate such as a human T-cell leukemia virus recombinant gag precursor, BLV PR activity was higher at a low salt concentration (0.5 M NaCl). Besides, the use of different potentially cleavable molecules revealed that PR activity may be influenced by the substrate conformational structure around the cleavage site. Replacement of the two amino acids of a synthetic substrate cleavable site by a statin residue completely inhibited the enzymatic activity of the BLV PR.

  20. Processing and targeting of the thiol protease, aleurain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    We have identified a cDNA clone from barley aleurone mRNA that encodes a protein with unusual homologies: the C-terminal portion, about 270 amino acids, is 65% identical to the mammalian thiol protease, cathepsin H. This degree of sequence conservation indicates that the enzyme must have some specific function in both plants and mammals that cannot tolerate further divergence. The N-terminal 1/3 of the protein, about 140 amino acids, has no detectable homologies to other known protein sequences; its function is unknown. In aleurone tissue, the mRNA level is increased by gibberellic acid and decreased by abscisic acid, but is expressed apparently constitutively at high levels in leaf and root tissues. The amino acid sequence and cathepsin H homology suggest that the protein will be both secreted into the endoplasmic reticulum and glycosylated. Using our cDNA clone in a bacterial expression system, we have made a fusion protein containing the protease domain of aleurain, and have used it to raise specific antisera in rabbits. These antibodies identify a 32 kd protein in extracts of aleurone layers that is induced with GA treatment but not secreted; a similarly sized protein is specifically identified in extracts of leaf tissue. Experiments are underway to characterize the pattern of expression in different tissues, to identify the subcellular locations of the protein, to characterize processing of the precursor to the 32 kd mature form, and to purify the enzyme from barley. 2 figs.

  1. Supplementation of laying japanese quail with amylase, phytase and protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimar Santana Ribeiro

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of supplementation of diets for laying Japanese quail with amylase, phytase and protease alone or in combination. Three-hundred quail were assigned to a completely randomized design consisting of five treatments and six repetitions, with 10 animals per experimental unit. The treatments were: a control diet and diets supplemented with 300 ppm amylase, 300 ppm protease and 500 phytase units (FTU/kg and the combination of these enzymes. In the diets containing the enzymes, the nutritional requirements of one or more of the following components were reduced: protein, digestible amino acids, energy, calcium and phosphorus, giving priority to the use of enzymes. The evaluations were performed over four periods of 21 days each. Performance (mean egg production, feed intake, mean egg weight, and feed conversion, egg quality (proportion of egg constituents and specific egg weight, and dietary nutrient digestibility (apparent digestibility coefficient of dry matter and crude protein were evaluated. There was no significant effect of the treatments on the variables analyzed (P>0.05, indicating that the enzymes, alone or in combination, have beneficial effects, maintaining performance and egg quality of Japanese quail.

  2. Purification and characterization of alkaline protease from Lysinibacillus fusiformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suppiah S*

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel alkaline protease producing bacterium was isolated from the gut of an estuarine fish Etroplus suratensis. The strain was identified by sequencing the fragment of their bacterial 16s rRNA and its homology was 97% closest to the Lysinibacillus fusiformis. An extracellular protease from this organism was purified by acetone precipitation, ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography methods and the specific activity of the purified enzyme was found to be 20.39 U/mg, 169.46U/mg and 352.0U/mg respectively. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme was determined to be 29kDa through SDS/PAGE analysis. The enzyme showed that the maximum at pH 9.0 and temperature at 40ºC. The purified enzyme remains active in the presence of various metal ions and it was strongly stimulated by the addition of Ca2+. Among the tested surfactants, the optimum activity was observed in SDS when compared to the other tested surfactants. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  3. Establishment of a simple assay in vitro for hepatitis C virus NS3 serine protease based on recombinant substrate and single—Chain protease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-BinGuan; Yi-GangTong; Hai-TaoWang; Gui-XinDu; Li-HuaHou

    2002-01-01

    AIM:To establish a simple and convenient assay in vitro for the Hepatitis C virus NS3 serine prtease based on the recombinant protease and substrate,and to evaluate its feasibility in screening the enzyme inhibitors.

  4. Role of Protease-Activated Receptor 2 in Regulating Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background /Aims: The underlying mechanisms leading to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS are lacking. In this report, we examined the role of protease-activated receptors (PARs subtype PAR2 and its downstream signals in regulating the pathophysiological process of FSGS. Methods: Nephropathy was induced by intravenous injections of adriamycin (ADR in rats to study FSGS. Western Blot analysis and ELISA were employed to determine the protein expression levels of PAR2 and its downstream signal pathways as well as the levels of PICs. Results: In ADR rats, expression of PAR2, PKCε and PKA was amplified and this was accompanied with increases of pro-inflammatory cytokines (PICs including IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Inhibition of PAR2 signal by systemic administration of FSLLRY-NH2 (FSL attenuated amplification of PICs. Notably, FSL further influenced key molecular mediators during development of FSGS. i.e., it specifically restored the impaired nephrin and attenuated the exaggerated transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1, caspase-9 and desmin thereby improving worsened renal functions and glomerular injury. Consistent with this, in cultured podocytes FSL also largely restored downregulation of nephrin and attenuated amplifications of caspase-9 and desmin induced by TGF-β1. Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that PAR2 plays an important role in mediating renal injury induced by glomerulosclerosis. Inhibition of PAR2 signal pathway has a protective effect on FSGS mainly via PIC and TGF-β1 mechanisms. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of FSGS observed in patients.

  5. SARS hCoV papain-like protease is a unique Lys48 linkage-specific di-distributive deubiquitinating enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Békés, Miklós; Rut, Wioletta; Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; Mulder, Monique P C; Ovaa, Huib; Drag, Marcin; Lima, Christopher D; Huang, Tony T

    2015-06-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) and the Ub-like (Ubl) modifier interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) participate in the host defence of viral infections. Viruses, including the severe acute respiratory syndrome human coronavirus (SARS hCoV), have co-opted Ub-ISG15 conjugation pathways for their own advantage or have evolved effector proteins to counter pro-inflammatory properties of Ub-ISG15-conjugated host proteins. In the present study, we compare substrate specificities of the papain-like protease (PLpro) from the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) hCoV to the related protease from SARS, SARS PLpro. Through biochemical assays, we show that, similar to SARS PLpro, MERS PLpro is both a deubiquitinating (DUB) and a deISGylating enzyme. Further analysis of the intrinsic DUB activity of these viral proteases revealed unique differences between the recognition and cleavage specificities of polyUb chains. First, MERS PLpro shows broad linkage specificity for the cleavage of polyUb chains, whereas SARS PLpro prefers to cleave Lys48-linked polyUb chains. Secondly, MERS PLpro cleaves polyUb chains in a 'mono-distributive' manner (one Ub at a time) and SARS PLpro prefers to cleave Lys48-linked polyUb chains by sensing a di-Ub moiety as a minimal recognition element using a 'di-distributive' cleavage mechanism. The di-distributive cleavage mechanism for SARS PLpro appears to be uncommon among USP (Ub-specific protease)-family DUBs, as related USP family members from humans do not display such a mechanism. We propose that these intrinsic enzymatic differences between SARS and MERS PLpro will help to identify pro-inflammatory substrates of these viral DUBs and can guide in the design of therapeutics to combat infection by coronaviruses.

  6. The m-AAA Protease Associated with Neurodegeneration Limits MCU Activity in Mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konig, T.; Troder, S.E.; Bakka, K.; Korwitz, A.; Richter-Dennerlein, R.; Lampe, P.A.; Patron, M.; Muhlmeister, M.; Guerrero-Castillo, S.; Brandt, U.; Decker, T.; Lauria, I.; Paggio, A.; Rizzuto, R.; Rugarli, E.I.; Stefani, D. De; Langer, T.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in subunits of mitochondrial m-AAA proteases in the inner membrane cause neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA28) and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP7). m-AAA proteases preserve mitochondrial proteostasis, mitochondrial morphology, and efficient OXPHOS activity, but the cause

  7. Crystallographic Refinement by Incorporation of Molecular Dynamics : Thermostable Serine Protease Thermitase Complexed with Eglin c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gros, Piet; Fujinaga, Masao; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Kalk, Kor H.; Hol, W G J

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate the principles of protein thermostability, the crystal structure of thermitase from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, a thermostable member of the subtilisin family of serine proteases, has been determined in a complex with eglin c. Eglin c is a serine protease inhibitor from the l

  8. A modular system to evaluate the efficacy of protease inhibitors against HIV-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahdi

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV protease is a homodimeric aspartyl protease that is crucial for the viral life-cycle, cleaving proviral polyproteins, hence creating mature protein components that are required for the formation of an infectious virus. With diagnostic measures and clinically used protease inhibitors focusing on HIV-1, due to its higher virulence and prevalence, studies of the efficacy of those inhibitors on HIV-2 protease remain widely lacking. Utilizing a wild-type HIV-2 vector backbone and cloning techniques we have developed a cassette system where the efficacy of clinically used protease inhibitors can be studied for various serotypes of HIV-2 protease both in enzymatic and cell culture assays. In our experiments, optimization of the expression protocol led to a relatively stable enzyme, for cell culture assays, the efficiency of transfection and transduction capability of the modified vector was tested and was not found to differ from that of the wild-type, moreover, a 2nd generation protease inhibitor was used to demonstrate the usefulness of the system. The combination of assays performed with our cassette system is expected to provide an accurate measure of the efficacy of currently used; as well as experimental protease inhibitors on HIV-2.

  9. Biochemical analysis and investigation on the prospective applications of alkaline protease from a Bacillus cereus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Mahjabeen; Rehman, Atiqa; Yasmin, Riffat; Munir, Bushra

    2012-06-01

    Proteases have prospective financial and environment-friendly applications; hence attention is focused currently on the finding of new protease producing microorganism so as to meet the requirements of industry. A thermophilic bacterial strain producing extracellular protease activity was isolated from soil and identified as Bacillus cereus by analysis of 16S rRNA. Protease production by the microorganism was improved by studying the impact of the type of nitrogen and carbon source, fermentation period, growth temperature and initial pH of the culture medium in cultivation optimization experiments. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity in two step procedure involving Sephadex G-75 and Q-Sepharose chromatography. The molecular weight of purified enzyme was found to be 58 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Protease exhibited a pH and temperature optima of 7.5 and 60°, respectively. The enzyme was active in the pH range of 6.0-9.0 and stable up to 70°C. Histological analysis of protease treated goat and cow skin pelts showed complete removal of non leather forming structures such as hair shaft, hair follicles and glandular structures. The protease showed the stain removing property from blood stained cotton cloth and found to be compatible with six commercially available detergents. The protease could release peptides from natural proteins after digestion of coagulated egg albumin and blood clot.

  10. Conserved hydrogen bonds and water molecules in MDR HIV-1 protease substrate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Harbor Hospital Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Yong [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Yedidi, Ravikiran S. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dewdney, Tamaria G. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Reiter, Samuel J. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Brunzelle, Joseph S. [Northwestern Univ. Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Kovari, Iulia A. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Kovari, Ladislau C. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)

    2012-12-19

    Success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in anti-HIV therapy is severely compromised by the rapidly developing drug resistance. HIV-1 protease inhibitors, part of HAART, are losing their potency and efficacy in inhibiting the target. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, 90) was selected for the present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. The nine crystal structures of MDR769 HIV-1 protease substrate hepta-peptide complexes were analyzed in order to reveal the conserved structural elements for the purpose of drug design against MDR HIV-1 protease. Our structural studies demonstrated that highly conserved hydrogen bonds between the protease and substrate peptides, together with the conserved crystallographic water molecules, played a crucial role in the substrate recognition, substrate stabilization and protease stabilization. Additionally, the absence of the key flap-ligand bridging water molecule might imply a different catalytic mechanism of MDR769 HIV-1 protease compared to that of wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease.

  11. Hormone therapy affects plasma measures of factor VII-activating protease in younger postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Jørn Sidelmann; Skouby, S.O.; Vitzthum, F.;

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Current reviews indicate that hormone therapy (HT) has a protective role in coronary heart disease (CHD) in younger postmenopausal women, whereas HT contributes to CHD in older women Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) is a serine protease that accumulates in unstable atherosclerotic...

  12. A novel extracellular protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa MCM B-327: enzyme production and its partial characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambare, Vasudeo; Nilegaonkar, Smita; Kanekar, Pradnya

    2011-02-28

    The focus of this study was on production, purification and characterization of dehairing protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa MCM B-327, isolated from vermicompost pit soil. Optimum protease activity, 395 U mL(-1), was observed in the medium containing soybean meal and tryptone, at pH 7 and 30 °C. The crude enzyme exhibited dehairing activity. As compared to chemical method, enzymatic method of dehairing showed reduction in COD, TDS and TSS by 34.28%, 37.32% and 51.58%, respectively. Zymogram of crude enzyme on native-PAGE presented two bands with protease activity of molecular weights of 56 and 67 kDa. Both proteases showed dehairing activity. Out of these, 56kDa protease (PA02) was purified 3.05-folds with 2.71% recovery. The enzyme was active in pH range 7-9 and temperature 20-50 °C with optimum pH of 8 and temperature 35°C. Moreover, the enzyme activity of PA02 protease was not strongly inhibited by specific inhibitor showing the novel nature of enzyme compared to serine, cysteine, aspartyl and metalloproteases. Kinetic studies indicated that substrate specificity of PA02 protease was towards various natural and synthetic proteolytic substrates but inactive against collagen and keratin. These findings suggest protease secreted by P. aeruginosa MCM B-327 may have application in dehairing for environment-friendly leather processing.

  13. The effect of environmental conditions on extracellular protease activity in controlled fermentations of Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braaksma, M.; Smilde, A.K.; Werf, M.J. van der; Punt, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Proteolytic degradation by host proteases is one of the key issues in the application of filamentous fungi for non-fungal protein production. In this study the influence of several environmental factors on the production of extracellular proteases of Aspergillus niger was investigated systematically

  14. Cellular lysis in Bacillus subtilis; the affect of multiple extracellular protease deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephenson, K; Bron, S; Harwood, CR

    1999-01-01

    Cellular lysis properties of strains of Bacillus subtilis deficient in the synthesis of extracellular proteases was investigated. In all cases, extracellular protease deficiency was found to increase the extent of cellular lysis of batch cultured strains following the transition to stationary phase,

  15. A novel serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities from edible basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iketani, Aya; Nakamura, Mayumi; Suzuki, Yuya; Awai, Koichiro; Shioi, Yuzo

    2013-03-01

    A serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities from basidiocarps of the edible basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes was characterized. The protease was purified to near homogeneity by three steps of chromatography using acetyl-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide (Ac-YVAD-MCA) as a substrate. The enzyme was termed FvSerP (F. velutipes serine protease). This enzyme activity was completely inhibited by the caspase-specific inhibitor, Ac-YVAD-CHO, as well as moderately inhibited by serine protease inhibitors. Based on the N-terminal sequence, the cDNA of FvSerP was identified. The deduced protease sequence was a peptide composed of 325 amino acids with a molecular mass of 34.5 kDa. The amino acid sequence of FvSerP showed similarity to neither caspases nor to the plant subtilisin-like serine protease with caspase-like activity called saspase. FvSerP shared identity to the functionally unknown genes from class of Agaricomycetes, with similarity to the peptidase S41 domain of a serine protease. It was thus concluded that this enzyme is likely a novel serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities belonging to the peptidase S41 family and distributed in the class Agaricomycetes. This enzyme possibly functions in autolysis, a type of programmed cell death that occurs in the later stages of development of basidiocarps with reference to their enzymatic functions.

  16. Protease inhibition by Heterodera glycines cyst content: evidence for effects on the Meloidogyne incognita proteasome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteases from Heterodera glycines and Meloidogyne incognita juveniles were inhibited by heat-stable content of H. glycines female cysts (HglCE), and by the plant polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). General protease activities detected using the nematode peptide KSAYMRFa were inhibited by EG...

  17. Expression dynamics of secreted protease genes in Trichophyton rubrum induced by key host's proteinaceous components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Wenchuan; Liu, Tao; Wang, Jin; Li, Ruoyu; Jin, Qi

    2009-11-01

    Trichophyton rubrum is the most common agent of dermatophytosis, a disease that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Its molecular pathogenicity mechanisms are still not completely elucidated. It has been widely recognized that proteases secreted by T. rubrum are the key virulence factors during host infection. However, our knowledge about the expression of its secreted proteases in host infection is still obscure. This investigation provides the expression patterns and dynamics of secreted protease genes belonging to the subtilisins (SUB) and metalloproteases (MEP) gene families in T. rubrum. The data was obtained under simulated host infection conditions through relative quantification of real time PCR. Keratin, collagen, and elastin induced the expression of similar protease genes, and the expression patterns and dynamics of these protease genes in media containing human skin sections were different from those in media containing individual protein substrates. According to the expression dynamics of these protease genes, we conclude that Sub3, Sub4, and Mep4 may be the dominant proteases secreted by T. rubrum during host infection, and that these proteases could be good targets for new antifungal chemotherapy and molecular diagnostic markers. This work presents useful molecular details to further our understanding of the pathogenesis of dermatophytosis.

  18. Inactivation of brain mitochondrial Lon protease by peroxynitrite precedes electron transport chain dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanyer, Lee; Jørgensen, Wenche; Hori, Osamu;

    2008-01-01

    more sensitive than basal Lon protease activity. Furthermore, supplementation of mitochondrial matrix extracts with reduced glutathione, following ONOO(-) exposure, resulted in partial restoration of basal and ATP-stimulated activity, thus suggesting possible redox regulation of this enzyme complex....... Taken together these findings suggest that Lon protease may be particularly vulnerable to inactivation in conditions associated with GSH depletion and elevated oxidative stress....

  19. Interdomain Contacts and the Stability of Serralysin Protease from Serratia marcescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhang

    Full Text Available The serralysin family of bacterial metalloproteases is associated with virulence in multiple modes of infection. These extracellular proteases are members of the Repeats-in-ToXin (RTX family of toxins and virulence factors, which mediated virulence in E. coli, B. pertussis, and P. aeruginosa, as well as other animal and plant pathogens. The serralysin proteases are structurally dynamic and their folding is regulated by calcium binding to a C-terminal domain that defines the RTX family of proteins. Previous studies have suggested that interactions between N-terminal sequences and this C-terminal domain are important for the high thermal and chemical stabilities of the RTX proteases. Extending from this, stabilization of these interactions in the native structure may lead to hyperstabilization of the folded protein. To test this hypothesis, cysteine pairs were introduced into the N-terminal helix and the RTX domain and protease folding and activity were assessed. Under stringent pH and temperature conditions, the disulfide-bonded mutant showed increased protease activity and stability. This activity was dependent on the redox environment of the refolding reaction and could be blocked by selective modification of the cysteine residues before protease refolding. These data demonstrate that the thermal and chemical stability of these proteases is, in part, mediated by binding between the RTX domain and the N-terminal helix and demonstrate that stabilization of this interaction can further stabilize the active protease, leading to additional pH and thermal tolerance.

  20. Discovery of MK-8718, an HIV Protease Inhibitor Containing a Novel Morpholine Aspartate Binding Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bungard, Christopher J; Williams, Peter D; Ballard, Jeanine E; Bennett, David J; Beaulieu, Christian; Bahnck-Teets, Carolyn; Carroll, Steve S; Chang, Ronald K; Dubost, David C; Fay, John F; Diamond, Tracy L; Greshock, Thomas J; Hao, Li; Holloway, M Katharine; Felock, Peter J; Gesell, Jennifer J; Su, Hua-Poo; Manikowski, Jesse J; McKay, Daniel J; Miller, Mike; Min, Xu; Molinaro, Carmela; Moradei, Oscar M; Nantermet, Philippe G; Nadeau, Christian; Sanchez, Rosa I; Satyanarayana, Tummanapalli; Shipe, William D; Singh, Sanjay K; Truong, Vouy Linh; Vijayasaradhi, Sivalenka; Wiscount, Catherine M; Vacca, Joseph P; Crane, Sheldon N; McCauley, John A

    2016-07-14

    A novel HIV protease inhibitor was designed using a morpholine core as the aspartate binding group. Analysis of the crystal structure of the initial lead bound to HIV protease enabled optimization of enzyme potency and antiviral activity. This afforded a series of potent orally bioavailable inhibitors of which MK-8718 was identified as a compound with a favorable overall profile.

  1. Factor Xa stimulates proinflammatory and profibrotic responses in fibroblasts via protease-activated receptor-2 activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borensztajn, Keren; Stiekema, Jurrieen; Nijmeijer, Sebastiaan; Reitsmalf, Pieter H.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold

    Coagulation proteases have been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of tissue remodeling and fibrosis. We therefore assessed the proinflammatory and fibroproliferative effects of coagulation protease factor (F)Xa. We show that FXa elicits a signaling response in C2C12 and NIH3T3

  2. Cyanobacterial protease inhibitor microviridin J causes a lethal molting disruption in Daphnia pulicaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrlack, Thomas; Christoffersen, Kirsten; Kaebernick, Melanie; Neilan, Brett A

    2004-08-01

    Laboratory experiments identified microviridin J as the source of a fatal molting disruption in Daphnia species organisms feeding on Microcystis cells. The molting disruption was presumably linked to the inhibitory effect of microviridin J on daphnid proteases, suggesting that hundreds of further cyanobacterial protease inhibitors must be considered potentially toxic to zooplankton.

  3. Crystal Structure of a Novel Viral Protease with a Serine/Lysine Catalytic Dyad Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman,A.; Lee, J.; Delmas, B.; Paetzel, M.

    2006-01-01

    The blotched snakehead virus (BSNV), an aquatic birnavirus, encodes a polyprotein (NH2-pVP2-X-VP4-VP3-COOH) that is processed through the proteolytic activity of its own protease (VP4) to liberate itself and the viral proteins pVP2, X and VP3. The protein pVP2 is further processed by VP4 to give rise to the capsid protein VP2 and four structural peptides. We report here the crystal structure of a VP4 protease from BSNV, which displays a catalytic serine/lysine dyad in its active site. This is the first crystal structure of a birnavirus protease and the first crystal structure of a viral protease that utilizes a lysine general base in its catalytic mechanism. The topology of the VP4 substrate binding site is consistent with the enzymes substrate specificity and a nucleophilic attack from the si-face of the substrates scissile bond. Despite low levels of sequence identity, VP4 shows similarities in its active site to other characterized Ser/Lys proteases such as signal peptidase, LexA protease and Lon protease. Together, the structure of VP4 provides insights into the mechanism of a recently characterized clan of serine proteases that utilize a lysine general base and reveals the structure of potential targets for antiviral therapy, especially for other related and economically important viruses, such as infectious bursal disease virus in poultry and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in aquaculture.

  4. Screening and molecular classification of low-temperature protease from Antarctic microorganism and its characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    107 strains producing protease were screened from 260 strains of Antarctic psychrophilic bacteria, among which proteolytic activity of five strains was more than 45 U ml-1. The 16S rRNA gene sequences homology and phylogenetic analysis of five Antarctic psychrophilic bacteria showed that NJ276、 NJ5-9、NJ16-70、NJ345 belonged to the described genus Pseudoalteromonas and NJ341belonged to the genus Colwellia. The growth and the protease characteristic of four Antarctic psychrophilic bacteria had been studied, and the result showed that the optimal temperature for growth and protease-producing of four strains was about 10 ℃. Their growth and protease-producing were still high during incubating 2-5 days. The maximum proteolytic activity occurred at pH 9 for four Antarctic psychrophilic bacteria. The optimal temperature of protease action of both strains NJ276 and NJ5-9 was about 50 ℃, however, the optimal temperature of protease action of both strains NJ341 and NJ345 was about 40 ℃, and their proteolytic activity under 0 ℃ exhibited nearly 30% of the maximum activity,but their thermal stabilities were weaker. These results indicated that proteases from NJ341 and NJ345 were low-temperature proteases.

  5. Protease inhibitor in scorpion (Mesobuthus eupeus) venom prolongs the biological activities of the crude venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hakim; Xiao-Peng, Tang; Yang, Shi-Long; Lu, Qiu-Min; Lai, Ren

    2016-08-01

    It is hypothesized that protease inhibitors play an essential role in survival of venomous animals through protecting peptide/protein toxins from degradation by proteases in their prey or predators. However, the biological function of protease inhibitors in scorpion venoms remains unknown. In the present study, a trypsin inhibitor was purified and characterized from the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which enhanced the biological activities of crude venom components in mice when injected in combination with crude venom. This protease inhibitor, named MeKTT-1, belonged to Kunitz-type toxins subfamily. Native MeKTT-1 selectively inhibited trypsin with a Kivalue of 130 nmol·L(-1). Furthermore, MeKTT-1 was shown to be a thermo-stable peptide. In animal behavioral tests, MeKTT-1 prolonged the pain behavior induced by scorpion crude venom, suggesting that protease inhibitors in scorpion venom inhibited proteases and protect the functionally important peptide/protein toxins from degradation, consequently keeping them active longer. In conclusion, this was the first experimental evidence about the natural existence of serine protease inhibitor in the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which preserved the activity of venom components, suggests that scorpions may use protease inhibitors for survival. Copyright © 2016 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Isolation, identification and optimization of alkaline protease production by Candida viswanathii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Lotfi

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Due to the high demand for industrial enzymes in the Country and the high activity of alkaline proteases produced by strain. It seems that the native strain can achieve high production of alkaline proteases.These native strains could be resulted in the independence of our country in industrial enzymes production.

  7. Activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria in the human airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher-Friebertshäuser, Eva; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Garten, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Influenza is an acute infection of the respiratory tract, which affects each year millions of people. Influenza virus infection is initiated by the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) through receptor binding and fusion of viral and endosomal membranes. HA is synthesized as a precursor protein and requires cleavage by host cell proteases to gain its fusion capacity. Although cleavage of HA is crucial for virus infectivity, little was known about relevant proteases in the human airways for a long time. Recent progress in the identification and characterization of HA-activating host cell proteases has been considerable however and supports the idea of targeting HA cleavage as a novel approach for influenza treatment. Interestingly, certain bacteria have been demonstrated to support HA activation either by secreting proteases that cleave HA or due to activation of cellular proteases and thereby may contribute to virus spread and enhanced pathogenicity. In this review, we give an overview on activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria with the main focus on recent progress on HA cleavage by proteases HAT and TMPRSS2 in the human airway epithelium. In addition, we outline investigations of HA-activating proteases as potential drug targets for influenza treatment. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Crystal structure of the high-alkaline serine protease PB92 from Bacillus alcalophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, J.M.; Teplyakov, A.V.; Kelders, H.; Kalk, K.H.; Misset, O.; Mulleners, L.J.S.M.; Dijkstra, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    The crystal structure of a serine protease from the alkalophilic strain Bacillus alcalophilus PB92 has been determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.75 Å resolution. The structure has been solved by molecular replacement using the atomic model of subtilisin Carlsberg. The model of the PB92 protease has

  9. The Use of Protease Inhibitors in Pregnancy: Maternal and Fetal Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Duryea

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies examining protease inhibitor use in pregnancy and the rate of preterm and small-for-gestational-age infants have yielded conflicting results. Methods. This was a retrospective study of HIV-infected women who delivered singleton infants at our institution between 1984 and 2014. Women with protease inhibitor use were compared to women on regimens without a protease inhibitor as well as those who received no antepartum antiretroviral therapy. Infants were considered preterm if less than 37 completed weeks of gestation and small-for-gestational-age if less than 10th percentile. Results. During the study period 1,004 pregnancies met inclusion criteria. Of those, 597 received a protease inhibitor as part of their regimen, 230 ART without a protease inhibitor, and 177 no ART. There was no difference in the rate of preterm birth between groups who received ART with or without a protease inhibitor, 14% versus 13%. There was no difference in the rate of small-for-gestational-age infants between the three groups. Use of a protease inhibitor was associated with a greater fall in viral load during pregnancy, p<0.001. Conclusion. In this population with access to prenatal care and ART, treatment with protease inhibitors was associated with a greater fall in viral load, but not an increase in small or preterm infants.

  10. The biology of cystatin M/E and its cognate target proteases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.J.M.; Cheng, T.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2009-01-01

    Cystatin M/E is a member of a superfamily of evolutionarily-related cysteine protease inhibitors that provide regulatory and protective functions against uncontrolled proteolysis by cysteine proteases. Although most cystatins are ubiquitously expressed, high levels of cystatin M/E expression are mai

  11. Structural basis for substrate specificity of alphavirus nsP2 proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Andrew T; Malmstrom, Robert D; White, Mark A; Watowich, Stanley J

    2010-08-24

    The alphavirus nsP2 protease is essential for correct processing of the alphavirus nonstructural polyprotein (nsP1234) and replication of the viral genome. We have combined molecular dynamics simulations with our structural studies to reveal features of the nsP2 protease catalytic site and S1'-S4 subsites that regulate the specificity of the protease. The catalytic mechanism of the nsP2 protease appears similar to the papain-like cysteine proteases, with the conserved catalytic dyad forming a thiolate-imidazolium ion pair in the nsP2-activated state. Substrate binding likely stabilizes this ion pair. Analysis of bimolecular complexes of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) nsP2 protease with each of the nsP1234 cleavage sites identified protease residues His(510), Ser(511), His(546) and Lys(706) as critical for cleavage site recognition. Homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations of diverse alphaviruses and their cognate cleavage site sequences revealed general features of substrate recognition that operate across alphavirus strains as well as strain specific covariance between binding site and cleavage site residues. For instance, compensatory changes occurred in the P3 and S3 subsite residues to maintain energetically favourable complementary binding surfaces. These results help explain how alphavirus nsP2 proteases recognize different cleavage sites within the nonstructural polyprotein and discriminate between closely related cleavage targets.

  12. Development of a protease activity assay using heat-sensitive Tus-GFP fusion protein substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askin, Samuel P; Morin, Isabelle; Schaeffer, Patrick M

    2011-08-15

    Proteases are implicated in various diseases and several have been identified as potential drug targets or biomarkers. As a result, protease activity assays that can be performed in high throughput are essential for the screening of inhibitors in drug discovery programs. Here we describe the development of a simple, general method for the characterization of protease activity and its use for inhibitor screening. GFP was genetically fused to a comparatively unstable Tus protein through an interdomain linker containing a specially designed protease site, which can be proteolyzed. When this Tus-GFP fusion protein substrate is proteolyzed it releases GFP, which remains in solution after a short heat denaturation and centrifugation step used to eliminate uncleaved Tus-GFP. Thus, the increase in GFP fluorescence is directly proportional to protease activity. We validated the protease activity assay with three different proteases, i.e., trypsin, caspase 3, and neutrophil elastase, and demonstrated that it can be used to determine protease activity and the effect of inhibitors with small sample volumes in just a few simple steps using a fluorescence plate reader.

  13. A specific inhibitor of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum protease from kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosolov, V V; Loginova, M D; Malova, E L; Benken, I I

    1979-01-01

    A specific protein-an inhibitor of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum protease-was isolated from kidney bean seeds in a homogeneous form. The purification procedure included gel filtration, isoelectric focusing and affinity chromatography on trypsin-Sepharose column. The latter was introduced to separate the fungal protease inhibitor from closely related trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors present in kidney bean seeds.

  14. OPTIMIZATION OF MEDIA CONSTITUENTS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ALKALINE PROTEASE FROM BACILLUS LICHENIFORMIS Mohideen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohideen Askar Nawas P

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Production of alkaline protease by Bacillus licheniformis has been investigated under submerged fermentation. The physical and chemical parameters influencing submerged fermentation were optimized. The effect of incubation time, temperature, pH, carbon sources and nitrogen sources and additional nutrients on the production of alkaline protease was characterized. The optimum conditions for the protease production by Bacillus licheniformis were found to be at pH 9.0 and temperature at 40ºC. The outcome of carbon and inorganic nitrogen sources on protease production proved that glucose and casein were the effective medium ingredients for Bacillus licheniformis respectively. The maximum amount of protease production was recorded in medium supplemented with ammonium sulphate. Among the tested metal ions, the level of protease yield was found to be high in medium supplemented with magnesium chloride. The protease production was amplified in the presence of 1.5% sodium chloride. The extreme stability towards Triton X-100, Tween 20 and SDS was observed in Bacillus licheniformis alkaline protease.

  15. Protease Activities of Semi-purified Pseudomonas fluorescensin Protein Degradation of Pasteurized Milk at Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatik Khusniati

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein on stored milks spoiled due to protease activities of Pseudomonas fluorescens. To know protease effect on milks, protease activities of semi-purified P. fluorescens on protein degradation in stored pasteurized milks were detected. Protease was semi-purified by ethanol 70%. Protease activities were detected by modified Lowry method, protein degradation by formol titration, and protein content by Kjeldahl method. Milk storage' times were conducted on 0 day (4 days before expired date up to 12 days (8 days after expired date. The results show that the longer the storage times the higher protease activities and protein degradation of milks. At storage 12 days, protease activities on control were 0.2556 Unit/mL (skim and 0.2116 Unit/mL (whole, and on inoculated milk (crude was 2.2044 Unit/mL (skim and 1.5378 Unit/mL (whole; while on inoculated milk (semi-purified was 3.5355 Unit/mL (skim and 1.6778 Unit/mL (whole, respectively. The decrease of inoculated milk' homogeneous were faster than that of control. Protein degradation on control, inoculated skim milks (crude and semi-purified on 12 days were 4.48%, 7.28% and 7.62%, while that on whole milks were 3.81%, 7.28% and 6.04%, respectively. Based on protease, protein degradation and homogeneous, it can be concluded that skim milk spoiled faster than whole milk.

  16. Cellular lysis in Bacillus subtilis; the affect of multiple extracellular protease deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephenson, K; Bron, S; Harwood, CR

    Cellular lysis properties of strains of Bacillus subtilis deficient in the synthesis of extracellular proteases was investigated. In all cases, extracellular protease deficiency was found to increase the extent of cellular lysis of batch cultured strains following the transition to stationary phase,

  17. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cysteine proteases: heterologous expression, purification and characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach

    2011-01-01

    During germination of barley seeds, mobilization of protein is essential and cysteine proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme and is activated through reduction of the active...

  18. Inhibition of viral proteases by Zingiberaceae extracts and flavones isolated from Kaempferia parviflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookkongwaree, K; Geitmann, M; Roengsumran, S; Petsom, A; Danielson, U H

    2006-08-01

    In order to identify novel lead compounds with antiviral effect, methanol and aqueous extracts of eight medicinal plants in the Zingiberaceae family were screened for inhibition of proteases from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). In general, the methanol extracts inhibited the enzymes more effectively than the aqueous extracts. HIV-1 protease was strongly inhibited by the methanol extract of Alpinia galanga. This extract also inhibited HCV and HCMV proteases, but to a lower degree. HCV protease was most efficiently inhibited by the extracts from Zingiber officinale, with little difference between the aqueous and the methanol extracts. Many of the methanol extracts inhibited HCMV protease, but the aqueous extracts showed weak inhibition. In a first endeavor to identify the active constituents, eight flavones were isolated from the black rhizomes of Kaempferia parviflora. The most effective inhibitors, 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone and 5,7-dimethoxyflavone, inhibited HIV-1 protease with IC50 values of 19 microM. Moreover, 5-hydroxy-3,7-dimethoxyflavone inhibited HCV protease and HCMV protease with IC50 values of 190 and 250 microM, respectively.

  19. A computational module assembled from different protease family motifs identifies PI PLC from Bacillus cereus as a putative prolyl peptidase with a serine protease scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón-Ramírez, Adela; Shukla, Manish; Oda, Masataka; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Minda, Renu; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Goñi, Félix M; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2013-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes have evolved several mechanisms to cleave peptide bonds. These distinct types have been systematically categorized in the MEROPS database. While a BLAST search on these proteases identifies homologous proteins, sequence alignment methods often fail to identify relationships arising from convergent evolution, exon shuffling, and modular reuse of catalytic units. We have previously established a computational method to detect functions in proteins based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the catalytic residues (CLASP). CLASP identified a promiscuous serine protease scaffold in alkaline phosphatases (AP) and a scaffold recognizing a β-lactam (imipenem) in a cold-active Vibrio AP. Subsequently, we defined a methodology to quantify promiscuous activities in a wide range of proteins. Here, we assemble a module which encapsulates the multifarious motifs used by protease families listed in the MEROPS database. Since APs and proteases are an integral component of outer membrane vesicles (OMV), we sought to query other OMV proteins, like phospholipase C (PLC), using this search module. Our analysis indicated that phosphoinositide-specific PLC from Bacillus cereus is a serine protease. This was validated by protease assays, mass spectrometry and by inhibition of the native phospholipase activity of PI-PLC by the well-known serine protease inhibitor AEBSF (IC50 = 0.018 mM). Edman degradation analysis linked the specificity of the protease activity to a proline in the amino terminal, suggesting that the PI-PLC is a prolyl peptidase. Thus, we propose a computational method of extending protein families based on the spatial and electrostatic congruence of active site residues.

  20. A computational module assembled from different protease family motifs identifies PI PLC from Bacillus cereus as a putative prolyl peptidase with a serine protease scaffold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Rendón-Ramírez

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzymes have evolved several mechanisms to cleave peptide bonds. These distinct types have been systematically categorized in the MEROPS database. While a BLAST search on these proteases identifies homologous proteins, sequence alignment methods often fail to identify relationships arising from convergent evolution, exon shuffling, and modular reuse of catalytic units. We have previously established a computational method to detect functions in proteins based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the catalytic residues (CLASP. CLASP identified a promiscuous serine protease scaffold in alkaline phosphatases (AP and a scaffold recognizing a β-lactam (imipenem in a cold-active Vibrio AP. Subsequently, we defined a methodology to quantify promiscuous activities in a wide range of proteins. Here, we assemble a module which encapsulates the multifarious motifs used by protease families listed in the MEROPS database. Since APs and proteases are an integral component of outer membrane vesicles (OMV, we sought to query other OMV proteins, like phospholipase C (PLC, using this search module. Our analysis indicated that phosphoinositide-specific PLC from Bacillus cereus is a serine protease. This was validated by protease assays, mass spectrometry and by inhibition of the native phospholipase activity of PI-PLC by the well-known serine protease inhibitor AEBSF (IC50 = 0.018 mM. Edman degradation analysis linked the specificity of the protease activity to a proline in the amino terminal, suggesting that the PI-PLC is a prolyl peptidase. Thus, we propose a computational method of extending protein families based on the spatial and electrostatic congruence of active site residues.

  1. Protease-dependent activation of epithelial cells by fungal allergens leads to morphologic changes and cytokine production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffman, HF; Tomee, JFC; van de Riet, MA; Timmerman, AJB; Borger, P

    2000-01-01

    Background: Proteases in extracts of Aspergillus fumigatus cause epithelial cell desquamation and release of proinflammatory cytokines. Objective: We sought to assess protease activity in Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium herbarum, and Aspergillus fumigatus extracts and study the ability of these e

  2. Isolation, purification and characterization of extracellular protease produced by marine-derived endophytic fungus Xylaria psidii KT30

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bugi Ratno Budiarto; Apon Zaenal Mustopa; Kustiariyah Tarman

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To isolate, purify and characterize extracellular protease produced by Xylaria psidii (X. psidii) KT30. Methods:In the present study, the extracellular protease secreted by X. psidii KT30 was isolated and purified by using three steps of protein purification, then the purified protease was characterized by applying qualitative and quantitative enzymatic assays. Results:Extracellular protease with molecular mass 71 kDa has been purified successfully by applying diethylaminoethanol-Sepharose followed by sephadex SG75 with its final specific protease activity of 0.091 IU/mg. Protease was the most active at temperature 60 °C and pH 7. The activity of enzyme was abolished mostly by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, showing it is family of serine protease. Conclusions:Extracellular serine protease produced by X. psidii KT30 with good biochemical properties displayed some promising results for its further application in field of biotechnology or medicine.

  3. Isolation, purification and characterization of extracellular protease produced by marine-derived endophytic fungus Xylaria psidii KT30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugi Ratno Budiarto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate, purify and characterize extracellular protease produced by Xylaria psidii (X. psidii KT30. Methods: In the present study, the extracellular protease secreted by X. psidii KT30 was isolated and purified by using three steps of protein purification, then the purified protease was characterized by applying qualitative and quantitative enzymatic assays. Results: Extracellular protease with molecular mass 71 kDa has been purified successfully by applying diethylaminoethanol-Sepharose followed by sephadex SG75 with its final specific protease activity of 0.091 IU/mg. Protease was the most active at temperature 60 °C and pH 7. The activity of enzyme was abolished mostly by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, showing it is family of serine protease. Conclusions: Extracellular serine protease produced by X. psidii KT30 with good biochemical properties displayed some promising results for its further application in field of biotechnology or medicine.

  4. Selection of suitable detergents for obtaining an active dengue protease in its natural form from E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Lynette Sin Yee; Lee, Michelle Yueqi; Wong, Ying Lei; Cheng, Jinting; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2016-05-01

    Dengue protease is a two-component enzyme and is an important drug target against dengue virus. The protease activity and protein stability of dengue nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) require a co-factor region from a four-span membrane protein NS2B. A natural form of dengue protease containing full-length NS2B and NS3 protease domain NS2BFL-NS3pro will be useful for dengue drug discovery. In current study, detergents that can be used for protease purification were tested. Using a water soluble protease construct, 39 detergents were selected for both NS2B and NS2BFL-NS3pro purification. The results showed that 18 detergents were able to sustain the activity of the natural dengue protease and 11 detergents could be used for NS2B purification. The results obtained in this study will be useful for biochemical and biophysical studies on dengue protease.

  5. Full length and protease domain activity of chikungunya virus nsP2 differ from other alphavirus nsP2 proteases in recognition of small peptide substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Sillapee, Pornpan; Sinsirimongkol, Kwanhathai; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-04-22

    Alphavirus nsP2 proteins are multifunctional and essential for viral replication. The protease role of nsP2 is critical for virus replication as only the virus protease activity is used for processing of the viral non-structural polypeptide. Chikungunya virus is an emerging disease problem that is becoming a world-wide health issue. We have generated purified recombinant chikungunya virus nsP2 proteins, both full length and a truncated protease domain from the C-terminus of the nsP2 protein. Enzyme characterization shows that the protease domain alone has different properties compared with the full length nsP2 protease. We also show chikungunya nsP2 protease possesses different substrate specificity to the canonical alphavirus nsP2 polyprotein cleavage specificity. Moreover, the chikungunya nsP2 also appears to differ from other alphavirus nsP2 in its distinctive ability to recognize small peptide substrates.

  6. Clitocypin, a fungal cysteine protease inhibitor, exerts its insecticidal effect on Colorado potato beetle larvae by inhibiting their digestive cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmid, Ida; Rotter, Ana; Gruden, Kristina; Brzin, Jože; Buh Gašparič, Meti; Kos, Janko; Žel, Jana; Sabotič, Jerica

    2015-07-01

    Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, CPB) is a major potato pest that adapts readily to insecticides. Several types of protease inhibitors have previously been investigated as potential control agents, but with limited success. Recently, cysteine protease inhibitors from parasol mushroom, the macrocypins, were reported to inhibit growth of CPB larvae. To further investigate the insecticidal potential and mode of action of cysteine protease inhibitors of fungal origin, clitocypin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from clouded agaric (Clitocybe nebularis), was evaluated for its lethal effects on CPB larvae. Clitocypin isolated from fruiting bodies and recombinant clitocypin produced in Escherichia coli slowed growth and reduced survival of CPB larvae in a concentration dependent manner. Clitocypin was also expressed by transgenic potato, but only at low levels. Nevertheless, it reduced larval weight gain and delayed development. We have additionally shown that younger larvae are more susceptible to the action of clitocypin. The inhibition of digestive cysteine proteases, intestains, by clitocypin was shown to be the underlying mode of action. Protease inhibitors from mushrooms are confirmed as promising candidates for biopesticides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Expression, purification, and characterization of a thermophilic neutral protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus in Bacillus subtilis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The gene coding for a thermophilic neutral protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus was expressed in Bacillus subtilis DB104, under the control of the sacB gene promoter. This was followed by either the native signal peptide sequence of this protease or the signal peptide sequence of the sacB gene. The protease was purified 3.8-fold, with a specific activity of 16530 U mg-1. As analyzed by SDS-PAGE, the molecular mass of the expressed protease was about 35 kDa, and the optimal temperature and pH of the protease were 65℃ and 7.5, respectively. Moreover, it still had about 80% activity after 1 h reaction at 65 ℃ .

  8. Expression, purification, and characterization of a thermophilic neutral protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus in Bacillus subtilis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The gene coding for a thermophilic neutral protease from Bacillus stearothermophilus was expressed in Bacillus subtilis DB104, under the control of the sacB gene promoter. This was followed by either the native signal peptide sequence of this protease or the signal peptide sequence of the sacB gene. The protease was purified 3.8-fold, with a specific activity of 16530 U mg-1. As analyzed by SDS-PAGE, the molecular mass of the expressed protease was about 35 kDa, and the optimal temperature and pH of the protease were 65℃ and 7.5, respectively. Moreover, it still had about 80% activity after 1 h reaction at 65℃.

  9. Regulation of human ADAM 12 protease by the prodomain. Evidence for a functional cysteine switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Overgaard, M T; Oxvig, C

    1999-01-01

    , with the prodomain maintaining the protease in a latent form. We now provide evidence that the latency mechanism of ADAM 12 can be explained by the cysteine switch model, in which coordination of Zn2+ in the active site of the catalytic domain by a cysteine residue in the prodomain is critical for inhibition...... of the protease. Replacing Cys179 with other amino acids results in an ADAM 12 proform that is proteolytically active, but latency can be restored by placing cysteine at other positions in the propeptide. None of the amino acids adjacent to the crucial cysteine residue is essential for blocking activity...... of the protease domain. In addition to its latency function, the prodomain is required for exit of ADAM 12 protease from the endoplasmic reticulum. Tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease-1, -2, and -3 were not found to block proteolytic activity of ADAM 12, hence a physiological inhibitor of ADAM 12 protease...

  10. Characterization of two cysteine proteases secreted by Blastocystis ST7, a human intestinal parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Texier, Catherine; Poirier, Philippe; Viscogliosi, Eric; Tan, Kevin S W; Delbac, Frédéric; El Alaoui, Hicham

    2012-09-01

    Blastocystis spp. are unicellular anaerobic intestinal parasites of both humans and animals and the most prevalent ones found in human stool samples. Their association with various gastrointestinal disorders raises the questions of its pathogenicity and of the molecular mechanisms involved. Since secreted proteases are well-known to be implicated in intestinal parasite virulence, we intended to determine whether Blastocystis spp. possess such pathogenic factors. In silico analysis of the Blastocystis subtype 7 (ST7) genome sequence highlighted 22 genes coding proteases which were predicted to be secreted. We characterized the proteolytic activities in the secretory products of Blastocystis ST7 using specific protease inhibitors. Two cysteine proteases, a cathepsin B and a legumain, were identified in the parasite culture supernatant by gelatin zymographic SDS-PAGE gel and MS/MS analysis. These proteases might act on intestinal cells and disturb gut function. This work provides serious molecular candidates to link Blastocystis spp. and intestinal disorders.

  11. Efficient proteolysis and application of an alkaline protease from halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Srivastava, A K; Khare, S K

    2014-10-03

    A salt-stable alkaline protease from moderately halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9, isolated from the western coast of India, is described. This protease was capable of efficiently removing silver from used/waste X-Ray films, as well as hydrolyzing defatted soy flour with 31% degree of hydrolysis (DH). Production of the protease was optimized by using response surface methodology. Ca(2+) and NaCl were the most critical factors in enhancing the yield. Under optimized culture conditions, a maximum of 369 U protease/mL was obtained, which is quite comparable to the yields of commercial proteases. The elevated production level coupled with ability to efficiently hydrolyze protein-laden soy flour and complete recovery of silver from used X-Ray films makes it a prospective industrial enzyme.

  12. Effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on oviposition rate of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annadana, S; Peters, J; Gruden, K; Schipper, A; Outchkourov, N S; Beekwilder, M J.; Udayakumar, M; Jongsma, M A.

    2002-07-01

    Proteolytic activity in whole insect extracts of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, was found to belong predominantly to the class of cysteine proteases. The pH optimum of the general proteolytic activity was determined to be 3.5, which is low when compared to other insects using cysteine proteases for protein digestion. The proteinaceous cysteine protease inhibitors chicken cystatin, potato cystatin and sea anemone equistatin inhibited in vitro more than 90% of the protease activity. To test in vivo the biological effect of such inhibitors on the oviposition rate of western flower thrips, recombinant potato cystatin and equistatin were fed to adult females. A gradual reduction in oviposition rate to about 45% of control was observed when reared on these PIs for a period of 5 days, with no increase in mortality. These results are discussed in the light of the application of protease inhibitors in transgenic plants to control this insect pest.

  13. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2015-11-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy.

  14. Conservation of sequence and function in fertilization of the cortical granule serine protease in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulhen, Nathalie; Xu, Dongdong; Wessel, Gary M

    2014-08-01

    Conservation of the cortical granule serine protease during fertilization in echinoderms was tested both functionally in sea stars, and computationally throughout the echinoderm phylum. We find that the inhibitor of serine protease (soybean trypsin inhibitor) effectively blocks proper transition of the sea star fertilization envelope into a protective sperm repellent, whereas inhibitors of the other main types of proteases had no effect. Scanning the transcriptomes of 15 different echinoderm ovaries revealed sequences of high conservation to the originally identified sea urchin cortical serine protease, CGSP1. These conserved sequences contained the catalytic triad necessary for enzymatic activity, and the tandemly repeated LDLr-like repeats. We conclude that the protease involved in the slow block to polyspermy is an essential and conserved element of fertilization in echinoderms, and may provide an important reagent for identification and testing of the cell surface proteins in eggs necessary for sperm binding.

  15. The protease activity of the paracaspase MALT1 is controlled by monoubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelzer, Christiane; Cabalzar, Katrin; Wolf, Annette; Gonzalez, Montserrat; Lenz, Georg; Thome, Margot

    2013-04-01

    The protease activity of the paracaspase MALT1 is central to lymphocyte activation and lymphomagenesis, but how this activity is controlled remains unknown. Here we identify a monoubiquitination of MALT1 on Lys644 that activated the protease function of MALT1. Monoubiquitinated MALT1 had enhanced protease activity, whereas a ubiquitination-deficient MALT1 mutant with replacement of that lysine with arginine (MALT1(K644R)) had less protease activity, which correlated with impaired induction of interleukin 2 (IL-2) via the T cell antigen receptor in activated T cells. Expression of MALT1(K644R) diminished the survival of cells derived from diffuse large B cell lymphoma of the activated B cell-like subtype (ABC DLBCL), which require constitutive protease activity of MALT1 for survival. Thus, monoubiquitination of MALT1 is essential for its catalytic activation and is therefore a potential target for the treatment of ABC-DLBCL and for immunomodulation.

  16. A novel class of cysteine protease inhibitors: solution structure of staphostatin A from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, Grzegorz; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Stec-Niemczyk, Justyna; Bochtler, Matthias; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Adam; Holak, Tad A

    2003-11-25

    A series of secreted proteases are included among the virulence factors documented for Staphylococcus aureus. In light of increasing antibiotic resistance of this dangerous human pathogen, these proteases are considered as suitable targets for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The recent discovery of staphostatins, endogenous, highly specific, staphylococcal cysteine protease inhibitors, opened a possibility for structure-based design of low molecular weight analogues. Moreover, the crystal structure of staphostatin B revealed a distinct folding pattern and an unexpected, substrate-like binding mode. The solution structure of staphostatin A reported here confirms that staphostatins constitute a novel, distinct class of cysteine protease inhibitors. In addition, the structure knowledge-based mutagenesis studies shed light on individual structural features of staphostatin A, the inhibition mechanism, and the determinants of distinct specificity of staphostatins toward their target proteases.

  17. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asrar Alam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes are found in P. falciparum, of which serine proteases are of particular interest due to their involvement in parasite-specific processes of egress and invasion. In P. falciparum, a number of serine proteases belonging to chymotrypsin, subtilisin, and rhomboid clans are found. This review focuses on the potential of P. falciparum serine proteases as antimalarial drug targets.

  18. Role of Allergen Source-Derived Proteases in Sensitization via Airway Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Matsumura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Protease activity is a characteristic common to many allergens. Allergen source-derived proteases interact with lung epithelial cells, which are now thought to play vital roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Allergen source-derived proteases act on airway epithelial cells to induce disruption of the tight junctions between epithelial cells, activation of protease-activated receptor-2, and the production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin. These facilitate allergen delivery across epithelial layers and enhance allergenicity or directly activate the immune system through a nonallergic mechanism. Furthermore, they cleave regulatory cell surface molecules involved in allergic reactions. Thus, allergen source-derived proteases are a potentially critical factor in the development of allergic sensitization and appear to be strongly associated with heightened allergenicity.

  19. α-ketoheterocycles as inhibitors of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steert, Koen; Berg, Maya; Mottram, Jeremy C; Westrop, Gareth D; Coombs, Graham H; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Joossens, Jurgen; Van der Veken, Pieter; Haemers, Achiel; Augustyns, Koen

    2010-10-04

    Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes and also play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites. Inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas disease, and leishmaniasis. Inspired by the in vivo antiparasitic activity of the vinylsulfone-based cysteine protease inhibitors, a series of α-ketoheterocycles were developed as reversible inhibitors of a recombinant L. mexicana cysteine protease, CPB2.8. Three isoxazoles and especially one oxadiazole compound are potent reversible inhibitors of CPB2.8; however, in vitro whole-organism screening against a panel of protozoan parasites did not fully correlate with the observed inhibition of the cysteine protease.

  20. Apoptosis Mediated by HIV Protease is Preceded by Cleavage of Bcl-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, Peter R.; West Frey, Michelle; Rizzo, Christopher J.; Cordova, Beverly; George, Henry J.; Meade, Raymond; Ho, Siew Peng; Corman, Jeanne; Tritch, Radonna; Korant, Bruce D.

    1996-09-01

    Expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) protease in cultured cells leads to apoptosis, preceded by cleavage of bcl-2, a key negative regulator of cell death. In contrast, a high level of bcl-2 protects cells in vitro and in vivo from the viral protease and prevents cell death following HIV infection of human lymphocytes, while reducing the yields of viral structural proteins, infectivity, and tumor necrosis factor α . We present a model for HIV replication in which the viral protease depletes the infected cells of bcl-2, leading to oxidative stress-dependent activation of NFkappa B, a cellular factor required for HIV transcription, and ultimately to cell death. Purified bcl-2 is cleaved by HIV protease between phenylalanine 112 and alanine 113. The results suggest a new option for HIV gene therapy; bcl-2 muteins that have noncleavable alterations surrounding the HIV protease cleavage site.