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Sample records for baumannii implant-associated osteomyelitis

  1. Efficacy of Colistin Impregnated Beads to Prevent Multi-drug Resistant A. baumannii Implant-Associated Osteomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Crane, Daniel P.; Gromov, Kirill; Li, Dan; Søballe, Kjeld; Wahnes, Christian; Büchner, Hubert; Matthew J. Hilton; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Murray, Clinton K.; Schwarz, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    Osteomyelitis (OM) from multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter has emerged in >30% of combat-related injuries in Iraq and Afghanistan. While most of these strains are sensitive to colistin, the drug is not availible in bone void fillers for local high-dose delivery. To address this we developed a mouse model with MDR strains isolated from wounded military personnel. In contrast to S. aureus OM, which is osteolytic and characterized by biofilm in necrotic bone, A. baumannii OM results in blas...

  2. Efficacy of colistin-impregnated beads to prevent multidrug-resistant A. baumannii implant-associated osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Daniel P; Gromov, Kirill; Li, Dan; Søballe, Kjeld; Wahnes, Christian; Büchner, Hubert; Hilton, Matthew J; O'Keefe, Regis J; Murray, Clinton K; Schwarz, Edward M

    2009-08-01

    Osteomyelitis (OM) from multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter has emerged in >30% of combat-related injuries in Iraq and Afghanistan. While most of these strains are sensitive to colistin, the drug is not available in bone void fillers for local high-dose delivery. To address this, we developed a mouse model with MDR strains isolated from wounded military personnel. In contrast to S. aureus OM, which is osteolytic and characterized by biofilm in necrotic bone, A. baumannii OM results in blastic lesions that do not contain apparent biofilm. We also found that mice mount a specific IgG response against three proteins (40, 47, and 56 kDa) regardless of the strain used, suggesting that these may be immuno-dominant antigens. PCR for the A. baumannii-specific parC gene confirmed a 100% infection rate with 75% of the MDR strains, and in vitro testing confirmed that all strains were sensitive to colistin. We also developed a real-time quantitative PCR (RTQ-PCR) assay that could detect as few as 10 copies of parC in a sample. To demonstrate the efficacy of colistin prophylaxis in this model, mice were treated with either parenteral colistin (0.2 mg colistinmethate i.m. for 7 days), local colistin (PMMA bead impregnated with 1.0 mg colistin sulfate), or an unloaded PMMA bead control. While the parenteral colistin failed to demonstrate any significant effects versus the placebo, the colistin PMMA bead significantly reduced the infection rate such that only 29.2% of the mice had detectable levels of parC at 19 days (p < 0.05 vs. i.m. colistin and placebo). PMID:19173261

  3. Effects of Implant-Associated Osteomyelitis on Cefuroxime Bone Pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttrup, Mikkel; Bue, Mats; Koch, Janne;

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prolonged antibiotic therapy that is often needed for successful management of osteomyelitis may be related to incomplete penetration of antibiotics into the target site. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of implant-associated osteomyelitis on cefuroxime...... penetration into bone. Methods: Implant-associated osteomyelitis using a Staphylococcus aureus strain was induced in the right tibia in ten pigs. After five days and following administration of 1500 mg of cefuroxime, measurements of cefuroxime were obtained using microdialysis for eight hours in the implant...... cavity up to MICs of 2 mg/L compared with the other tissues, but the time was shorter for higher MICs. Conclusions: Cefuroxime penetration into infected cancellous bone was incomplete but comparable with that in healthy bone. The destructive bone processes associated with acute osteomyelitis reduced...

  4. The diagnostic value of [18F]FDG PET for the detection of chronic osteomyelitis and implant-associated infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of osteomyelitis and implant-associated infections in patients with nonspecific laboratory or radiological findings is often unsatisfactory. We retrospectively evaluated the contributions of [18F]FDG PET and [18F]FDG PET/CT to the diagnosis of osteomyelitis and implant-associated infections, enabling timely and appropriate decision-making for further therapy options. [18F]FDG PET or PET/CT was performed in 215 patients with suspected osteomyelitis or implant-associated infections between 2000 and 2013. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of both modalities together and separately with reference to intraoperative microbial findings, with a mean clinical follow-up of 69 ± 49 months. Infections were diagnosed clinically in 101 of the 215 patients. PET and PET/CT scans revealed 87 true-positive, 76 true-negative, 38 false-positive, and 14 false-negative results, indicating a sensitivity of 86 %, a specificity of 67 %, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 70 %, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 84 % and an accuracy of 76 %. The sensitivity of PET/CT was 88 %, but specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy (76 %, 76 %, 89 % and 82 %, respectively) were higher than those of stand-alone PET. [18F]FDG PET is able to identify with high sensitivity the presence of osteomyelitis in orthopaedic surgery patients with nonspecific clinical symptoms of infection. (orig.)

  5. The diagnostic value of [{sup 18}F]FDG PET for the detection of chronic osteomyelitis and implant-associated infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenter, Vera; Albert, Nathalie L.; Lehner, Sebastian; Fendler, Wolfgang P.; Bartenstein, Peter [University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Mueller, Jan-Phillip; Friederichs, Jan; Militz, Matthias; Hungerer, Sven [BG Trauma Center Murnau, Murnau (Germany); PMU Salzburg, Salzburg (Austria); Cyran, Clemens C. [University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Hacker, Marcus [University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-04-15

    The diagnosis of osteomyelitis and implant-associated infections in patients with nonspecific laboratory or radiological findings is often unsatisfactory. We retrospectively evaluated the contributions of [{sup 18}F]FDG PET and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT to the diagnosis of osteomyelitis and implant-associated infections, enabling timely and appropriate decision-making for further therapy options. [{sup 18}F]FDG PET or PET/CT was performed in 215 patients with suspected osteomyelitis or implant-associated infections between 2000 and 2013. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of both modalities together and separately with reference to intraoperative microbial findings, with a mean clinical follow-up of 69 ± 49 months. Infections were diagnosed clinically in 101 of the 215 patients. PET and PET/CT scans revealed 87 true-positive, 76 true-negative, 38 false-positive, and 14 false-negative results, indicating a sensitivity of 86 %, a specificity of 67 %, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 70 %, a negative predictive value (NPV) of 84 % and an accuracy of 76 %. The sensitivity of PET/CT was 88 %, but specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy (76 %, 76 %, 89 % and 82 %, respectively) were higher than those of stand-alone PET. [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is able to identify with high sensitivity the presence of osteomyelitis in orthopaedic surgery patients with nonspecific clinical symptoms of infection. (orig.)

  6. Osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper determines the characteristic appearance and accuracy of MR images in osteomyelitis by comparing prospective and retrospective image interpretations with final diagnoses. MR studies of 130 patients suspected of osteomyelitis were reviewed. Final diagnosis was established in 110 by means of histopathology (n = 81), clinical follow- up (n = 20), or other objective tests (n = 14). The prospective sensitivity of MR imaging was 96%, and the specificity 78%. Bacterial osteomyelitis always showed focal abnormal marrow signal. Nevertheless, 5/8 patients with septic arthritis had studies falsely positive for osteomyelitis

  7. Osteomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone infection; Infection - bone ... Bone infection is most often caused by bacteria. It can also be caused by fungi or other germs. When a person has osteomyelitis: Bacteria or other germs may spread to a ...

  8. Osteomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC MRSA Staph Infections Dealing With Cuts First Aid & Safety Center Cellulitis ... Care Dealing With Broken Bones Osteomyelitis Hand Washing Staph Infections MRSA Bones, Muscles, and Joints Contact Us Print ...

  9. Multimodality imaging of osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a brief introduction outlining some basic principles regarding the diagnosis of osteomyelitis, pathophysiologic aspects are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of each imaging modality and their applications in different forms of osteomyelitis are discussed. The use of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis of special forms of osteomyelitis, including chronic, diabetic foot, and vertebral osteomyelitis, and osteomyelitis associated with orthopedic appliances and sickle cell disease is reviewed. Taking into account the site of suspected osteomyelitis and the presence or absence of underlying pathologic changes and their nature, an algorithm summarizing the use of various imaging modalities in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis is presented. (orig.). With 13 figs., 9 tabs

  10. Multimodality imaging of osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgazzar, A.H. [Cincinnati Univ. Medical Center, OH (United States); Abdel-Dayem, H.M. [Dept. Radiology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States)]|[Dept. of Radiology, St. Vinvent`s Hospital and Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Clark, J.D. [Cincinnati Univ. Medical Center, OH (United States); Maxon, H.R. [Cincinnati Univ. Medical Center, OH (United States)

    1995-09-01

    After a brief introduction outlining some basic principles regarding the diagnosis of osteomyelitis, pathophysiologic aspects are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of each imaging modality and their applications in different forms of osteomyelitis are discussed. The use of different imaging modalities in the diagnosis of special forms of osteomyelitis, including chronic, diabetic foot, and vertebral osteomyelitis, and osteomyelitis associated with orthopedic appliances and sickle cell disease is reviewed. Taking into account the site of suspected osteomyelitis and the presence or absence of underlying pathologic changes and their nature, an algorithm summarizing the use of various imaging modalities in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis is presented. (orig.). With 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Effects of antiresorptive agents on osteomyelitis: novel insights into the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis of the jaw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Dan; Gromov, Kirill; Proulx, Steven T;

    2010-01-01

    The effects of antiresorptive agents (e.g., alendronate [Aln], osteoprotegerin [OPG]) on bone infection are unknown. Thus, their effects on implant-associated osteomyelitis (OM) were investigated in mice using PBS (placebo), gentamycin, and etanercept (TNFR:Fc) controls. None of the drugs affected...

  12. Radionucleotide scanning in osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionucleotide bone scanning can be an excellent adjunct to the standard radiograph and clinical findings in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Bone scans have the ability to detect osteomyelitis far in advance of the standard radiograph. The sequential use of technetium and gallium has been useful in differentiating cellulitis and osteomyelitis. Serial scanning with technetium and gallium may be used to monitor the response of osteomyelitis to antibiotic therapy

  13. Radiodiagnostics of maxillary osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteomyelitis is defined as an inflammation or infection in bone tissues - cancellous bone, bone marrow, bone compacta and periosteum due to invasion of infection from surrounding tissues. Maxillary osteomyelitis is less common disease than osteomyelitis of mandible. This can be explained by anatomical structure of maxilla which is mainly composed of sinuses and thin bone lamellae. Such a structure allows rapid propagation of the infection to the surface. There have been examined and treated 70 patients with osteomyelitis of facial bones within past 15 years at Department of stomatology and maxillo-facial surgery of P.J. Safarik University in Kosice. Only four cases were diagnosed as maxillary osteomyelitis. The aim of this study was to mention the differences in anatomy and symptoms of acute and chronic stage of maxillary osteomyelitis and to give a detailed radiographic picture of this affliction. (authors)

  14. Magnification radiography in osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteomyelitis often eludes early diagnosis because plain film radiography is too insensitive and radionuclide bone scanning is nonspecific. In this study, 90 diabetic patients were studied with plain film and magnification radiographs of their feet. Among the 24 patients with osteomyelitis, plain radiographs suggested the diagnosis in 14 patients and magnification radiography was diagnostic in 18 of these patients. Thus, magnification radiography offers some diagnostic advantage in patients suspected of having osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  15. MR imaging of osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventeen MR studies were performed on 16 children with acute, chronic, or healed osteomyelitis. Abnormality was detected in the soft tissues and bone marrow in all patients with acute or chronic osteomyelitis. Two of three patients with heated osteomyelitis had normal soft tissues and bone marrow. There was overlap in the appearance of acute and chronic osteomyelitis. The patients with acute osteomyelitis, however, tended to have more extensive soft-tissue abnormality, to have more poorly defined margins to the soft-tissue abnormality, and more poorly defined interfaces between normal and diseased bone marrow. The signal characteristics of diseases soft tissue and marrow were compatible with prolongation of T1 and T2 relaxation times as compared with normal muscles

  16. Post-traumatic osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Only 24 patients with post-traumatic osteomyelitis were found from records covering a period of five years. Twenty-two of them with complete medical histories are reviewed here. The radiographs were usually taken through plaster of Paris, and therefore the radiological diagnosis was established later than the clinical one in half of the cases. There were only four cases with a true delay. The primary radiological signs leading to the osteomyelitis diagnosis appeared on average 4.3 months after the assumed time of infection. It is our feeling that the current widespread use of antibiotics causes the diagnosis to be delayed even more than it was in the days of haematogenous osteomyelitis. Continuous formation of periosteal new bone layers indicated poorer prospects for healing of the osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  17. Chronic complicated osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourteen patients with prior trauma and/or surgery of the lower extremity and suspected active chronic osteomyelitis underwent MR imaging. Eleven patients also underwent In-111 scanning. All patients had surgical confirmation, MR imaging could assess the extent of abnormal marrow and distinguish abnormal marrow due to granulation tissue from active osteomyelitis. The presence and extent of soft-tissue infection could be determined and distinguished from bone involvement in spite of tissue distortion. The course and origin of sinus tracts could be followed. MR imaging was more sensitive to active infection than In-111 scanning. All 11 cases of active osteomyelitis were correctly diagnosed with MR imaging. In-111 scans were positive in only five of the eight cases of active infection in which scans were obtained. MR imaging is useful in chronic complicated osteomyelitis

  18. The imaging of osteomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadigh, Sufi; Mankad, Kshitij; Kapse, Nikhil; Rajeswaran, Gajan

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in children and adults. Imaging plays a crucial role in establishing a timely diagnosis and guiding early management, with the aim of reducing long-term complications. Recognition of the imaging features of osteomyelitis requires a good understanding of its pathogenesis. In this review, the key imaging findings in osteomyelitis are correlated with the underlying pathological processes. There is a particular emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is the best available imaging modality owing to its high sensitivity for detecting early osteomyelitis, excellent anatomical detail and superior soft tissue resolution. However, other modalities such as nuclear medicine and computed tomography (CT) are also useful in many clinical contexts, and will also be described in this review. PMID:27190771

  19. Osteomyelitis of frontal bone

    OpenAIRE

    Chaturvedil, V. N.; Raizada, R. M.; Singh, A. K. Kennedy; Puttewar, M. P.; Bali, S.

    2004-01-01

    A case of Osteomyelitis of the frontal bone with a subperiosteal absces s, an extrudural abscess and a frontal sinus fistula is presented here for its rarity. A brief review of literature and management of the condition is also discussed.

  20. Chronic osteomyelitis mimicking sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Gulmann, C; Young, O.; Tolan, M.; O’Riordan, D.; Leader, M

    2003-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of chronic osteomyelitis in a 60 year old man mimicking a soft tissue sarcoma. Chronic osteomyelitis is an infrequent cause of a soft tissue mass and is usually diagnosed clinically by a combination of radiology and microbiology. Rarely, COM can mimic a primary bony neoplasm, but this is the first reported case where it mimicked a soft tissue sarcoma. The clinical, radiological, and histological appearances of this case will be discussed.

  1. Diagnostic strategies in osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium-99 pyrophosphate bone scanning often identifies patients with osteomyelitis before roentgenographic findings appear. However, recent studies have shown that 99Tc bone scanning often gives false-negative results, especially in neonates. The accuracy of computed tomographic scanning and indium-111 leukocyte scanning for diagnosis of early osteomyelitis has not been established. 99Tc bone scanning often gives false-positive results in patients with other conditions leading to bone injury and repair, such as trauma or recent surgery, further limiting the usefulness of this imaging procedure. Newer imaging techniques have not been adequately evaluated to establish their specificity. Because of their high cost and unproved accuracy, these new imaging procedures should not be routinely applied until their usefulness has been established. Bone biopsy remains the procedure of choice for establishing the diagnosis in patients suspected clinically to have osteomyelitis with negative findings on roentgenography and 99Tc bone scanning. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of osteomyelitis, other pathogens cause 30 to 40 percent of cases. Aspiration or biopsy of the involved bone is usually required to choose appropriate antibiotic therapy. Bone biopsy is essential in chronic osteomyelitis, since cultures of sinus drainage are unreliable. Osteomyelitis in diabetics with foot infection and in association with decubitus ulcers presents special problems. Radionuclide scanning often give false-positive results in these patients. Proper diagnosis usually requires careful assessment of clinical and roentgenographic findings. 33 references

  2. Osteomyelitis of the os sacrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the axial skeleton, osteomyelitis of the os sacrum is rare, although it occurs more frequently than tuberculosis of the sacrum. Secondary osteomyelitis as a complication of tumours, metastases or inflammatory processes of the adjacent areas is seen more often than primary sacrial osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  3. Imaging of chronic osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of chronic osteomyelitis is made on the basis of clinical, radiologic and histologic findings. The role of imaging in patients with known chronic osteomyelitis is to detect and to delineate areas of active infection. To correctly interpret the imaging findings, it is essential to take both the individual clinical findings and previous imaging studies into account. Reliable signs of active infection are bone marrow abscess, sequestra and sinus tract formation. Only the combined evaluation of bony changes together with alterations of the adjacent soft tissues provides good diagnostic accuracy. Projection radiography gives an overview of the condition of the bone, which provides the basis for follow-up and the selection of further imaging modalities. Computed tomography can be used to evaluate even discrete or complex bony alterations and to guide percutaneous biopsy or drainage. Magnetic resonance imaging achieves the best diagnostic sensitivity and specificity and provides superior contrast as well as anatomical resolution in both bone marrow and soft tissues. In this paper the features and clinical relevance of imaging in primary chronic osteomyelitis, posttraumatic osteomyelitis, tuberculous spondylitis and osteomyelitis of the diabetic foot are reviewed, with particular respect to MRI. (orig.)

  4. Osteomyelitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the established methods of X-ray radiography, or conventional tomography, for the diagnostic imaging of osteomyelitis in children, ultrasonography is another very useful technique. In many cases, MRI well supplements the range of available methods, but CT is inferior to the latter. Bone scintiscanning is not applicable for a differential diagnosis, i.e. for discriminating osteomyelitis from other lesions such as bone tumors or tumorous lesions. Due to the very small contribution of scintigraphy to differential diagnosis or therapy selection in case of osteomyelitis or other skeletal lesions in children, the radiation dose to the children as a result of scintiscanning is an important factor, with the energy dose to the metaphyseal growth complexes being the crucial dose. Skeletal scintiscanning in children therefore requires extremely accurate indication, and its almost routine application for differential diagnosis of localised bone lesions in children is by no means justified. (orig./MG)

  5. A novel hydroxyapatite film coated with ionic silver via inositol hexaphosphate chelation prevents implant-associated infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funao, Haruki; Nagai, Shigenori; Sasaki, Aya; Hoshikawa, Tomoyuki; Tsuji, Takashi; Okada, Yasunori; Koyasu, Shigeo; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Masaya; Aizawa, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Morio; Ishii, Ken

    2016-03-01

    Various silver-coated implants have been developed to prevent implant-associated infections, and have shown dramatic effects in vitro. However, the in vivo results have been inconsistent. Recent in vitro studies showed that silver exerts antibacterial activity by mediating the generation of reactive oxygen species in the presence of oxygen. To maintain its antibacterial activity in vivo, the silver should remain in an ionic state and be stably bound to the implant surface. Here, we developed a novel bacteria-resistant hydroxyapatite film in which ionic silver is immobilized via inositol hexaphosphate chelation using a low-heat immersion process. This bacteria-resistant coating demonstrated significant antibacterial activity both in vitro and in vivo. In a murine bioluminescent osteomyelitis model, no bacteria were detectable 21 days after inoculation with S. aureus and placement of this implant. Serum interleukin-6 was elevated in the acute phase in this model, but it was significantly lower in the ionic-silver group than the control group on day 2. Serum C-reactive protein remained significantly higher in the control group than the ionic-silver group on day 14. Because this coating is produced by a low-heat immersion process, it can be applied to complex structures of various materials, to provide significant protection against implant-associated infections.

  6. Therapy of haematogenous osteomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Louise Kruse; Koch, Janne; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus;

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that surgery is necessary for the proper treatment of chronic haematogenous osteomyelitis (HO) in children. However, the correct timing of surgery and the technique most effective for debridement of infectious bone tissue is debated. Theoretically, large animal models of HO...

  7. Lymfom fejltolket som osteomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Eske; Klit, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Patients are admitted based on a tentative diagnosis. If that is incorrect it may have negative consequences for the patient and the system. In this case we present an eight-month elucidation with several diagnostic procedures with a tentative diagnosis of osteomyelitis. This diagnosis was kept...

  8. Hematogenous osteomyelitis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, B; Halken, S; Damholt, V

    1986-01-01

    In a 10-year period, 31 children, including 9 infants, were treated for hematogenous osteomyelitis. Fifteen children were treated closed and 16 open. Thirteen of 14 positive cultures were Staphylococcus aureus. Three recurrences could possibly have been prevented by a more aggressive primary...

  9. Osteomyelitis in turkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkey osteomyelitis complex (TOC) is a condition in which apparently healthy, usually male birds have infections that are hidden in their bones, joints, and muscles. Some of these birds have a green liver, which provides a method for detecting these carcasses in the processing plant. Our research h...

  10. Maxillary Osteomyelitis: A Rare Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaaz Habib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis of the maxilla is now a rare event with the advent of antibiotics. The two predominant causes are odontogenic infections and sinusitis. Immunocompromised states such as diabetes, HIV, and malnutrition increase the risk of osteomyelitis. It is important to recognize this early as it is a difficult entity to treat with potentially serious consequences. We report an unusual case of right sided maxillary osteomyelitis in a lady with poorly controlled diabetes in rural Lincolnshire. Biopsy of the right maxillary bone showed features of acute osteomyelitis. This responded well to a prolonged course of oral antibiotics.

  11. Radiodiagnosis of posttraumatic chronic osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    163 patients with posttraumatic chronic osteomyelitis were observed. Osteomyelitis developed after an open fracture in the absence of osteosynthesis in 9 cases only. In the rest 154 cases of osteomyelitis some type of osteosynthesis was used for fracture treatment. The X-ray signs of posttraumatic chronic osteomyelitis are varied. Correct and early recognition of this pathology requires a clear-cut idea of its features with relation to the nature of fracture, the type of osteosynthesis and peculiarity of reparative processes. It requires multiple use of various X-ray methods of which the main are roentgenography, tomography and fistulography

  12. Nanocidals therapy for osteomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, Shahnaz Majid

    Infection is a major medical problem that causes serious complications including patient death. The mortality rate of invasive infection has reduced significantly since the introduction of antibiotherapy. However, the resistance to antibiotic is becoming a serious medical problem that resulted in high medical cost. The overall aim of this study is to evaluate a potential inorganic route (metalo-antibiotic) to treat localized infections that require long-term antibiotic treatment combined with medical and surgical intervention. In this study osteomyelitis (bone infection) was selected as a model to evaluate the inorganic route to treat infection. Osteomyelitis is a progressive infection that could result in amputation and patient death. The metalo-antibiotics are faster to develop than antibiotics and have shown great efficacy against a wide range of bacterial infection. A unique composition of particles with ability to extend their residual efficacy on bacteria for an extended time compared to conventional antibiotics was synthesized and evaluated in this study. The in vitro experiments demonstrated the metalo-antibiotics to treat cellular internal infections without damaging the home cell. The in vivo toxicity experiments demonstrated a tolerance of the particles for doses that are 20 times higher than the anticipated treatment dose. A murine mouse model for osteomyelitis was developed. The efficacy of the metalo-antibiotics on the induced osteomyelitis was evaluated. A significant decrease in infection in the bones treated with nanoparticles was observed. By delivering optimal concentration of nanoparticles in mouse models there was no sign of pathology seen in mouse. Overall, this study has two main impacts: a) creation of inorganic routes to fight against bacterial infection particularly those requiring long-term antibiotic or surgical treatment b) reduction of critical technical risk through generation of pre-clinical data of the employment of inorganic

  13. Mucormycosis causing maxillary osteomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Selvamani, Manickam; Donoghue, Mandana; Bharani, Shiva; G S Madhushankari

    2015-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an opportunistic fungal infection, more commonly observed in immunocompromised patients. The mode of infection is via the inhalation route and infection begins initially in the nose and paranasal sinuses with subsequent invasion into the vascular tissue, eventually leading to thrombosis and necrosis of nearby hard and soft tissues. Here, we report a case of chronic osteomyelitis of the maxillary bone with fungal infection (mucormycosis) and extensive tissue necrosis in an unco...

  14. [Chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskitalo, Paula; Remes-Pakarinen, Terhi; Vähäsalo, Paula; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Kröger, Liisa

    2016-01-01

    Chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis is an autoinflammatory disease occurring mainly in children and adolescents, typically involving recurrent or persistent osteitic foci. The symptom is bone pain, possibly accompanied by soft tissue tenderness. Some patients exhibit symptoms of systemic inflammation. The. precise etiology of the disease is not known, but an imbalance of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines is presumed to play a role in the development of the disease. While an anti-inflammatory analgesic is in most cases sufficient to calm down the osteitis, the use of corticosteroids, anti- TNF-a inhibitors or bisphosphonates is required in some cases. PMID:26939487

  15. Vertebral osteomyelitis without disc involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamani, I.; Syed, I.; Saifuddin, A. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com; Green, R.; MacSweeney, F

    2004-10-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis is most commonly due to pyogenic or granulomatous infection and typically results in the combined involvement of the intervertebral disc and adjacent vertebral bodies. Non-infective causes include the related conditions of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) syndrome. Occasionally, these conditions may present purely within the vertebral body, resulting in various combinations of vertebral marrow oedema and sclerosis, destructive lesions of the vertebral body and pathological vertebral collapse, thus mimicking neoplastic disease. This review illustrates the imaging features of vertebral osteomyelitis without disc involvement, with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings.

  16. Osteomyelitis: a current challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Souza Jorge

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 30 years, the pathogenesis of osteomyelitis has almost been totally elucidated, and many factors responsible for the persistence of this infection have been identified. Numerous antimicrobial agents with distinct spectrums of action, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics have been used in its treatment. Surgical techniques, including muscle grafts, the Ilizarov technique, and antibiotic bone cements, have been applied. However, bone infections are still a challenge. Despite the importance of isolation and identification of microorganisms to determine the antimicrobial treatment of bone infections, there are few systematic national studies about the etiological profile of these diseases. This article describes the current knowledge of osteomyelitis and summarizes published national data based on the experience of different Orthopedic and Traumatology Services. In general, S. aureus was described as an important etiological agent; however, the difference in design of national studies makes a comparison between the prevalence of bone infection, the associated risk factors, and the different therapeutic approaches difficult. In conclusion, effort is necessary in order to stimulate systematic national studies in different Orthopedics and Traumatology Services to obtain a better consensus on preventive measures and therapies of bone infections.

  17. A case of navicular osteomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Atlihan, Dogan; Iltar, Serkan; Sazak, Tamer; Karalezli, Nazim

    2004-01-01

    A five-year-old girl presented with complaints of pain, swelling, and localized fever on the dorsal side of the right foot. A diagnosis of navicular osteomyelitis was made and she underwent surgery. Cultures obtained intraoperatively revealed Staphylococcus aureus and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy was administered. Postoperative follow-up showed no local or systemic signs or symptoms. Because of its rarity during childhood, clinical findings of navicular osteomyelitis are presented, along...

  18. Actinomycotic Osteomyelitis of Mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Hamid; Sheibani, Mohammad Sina Arab

    2016-07-01

    Actinomycosis is an infection of filamentous, gram-positive anaerobic bacteria. Actinomycosis of jaw bone is rare and the diagnosis is often difficult. The aim of this patient report is to present an actinomycotic osteomyelitis of mandible in a 30-year-old male patient. The patient presented with a chief complaint of pain and unhealed dental socket after mandibular teeth extractions. Radiographs showed ill-defined radiolucencies and perforation of buccal and lingual cortical plate; several biopsies and different therapy could not improve the lesion because of fault diagnosis and improper treatment. Finally, the authors' histopathological examination revealed granulation tissue surrounded bacterial colonies compatible with actinomycotic colonies. Follow-up examinations showed that the patient was well 6 months after prolonged treatment without any pain and discharge from dental socket. PMID:27391512

  19. Neonatal osteomyelitis examined by bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-three infants less than six weeks of age and suspected of having osteomyelitis were examined by bone scintigraphy. Each of the 25 sites of proved osteomyelitis in 15 individuals demonstrated abnormal radionuclide localization. Ten additional scintigraphically positive but radiographically normal sites were detected. Optimal quality scintigrams of the growth plate complex and osteomyelitis in neonates appeared similar to those in older children. All neonates suspected of having osteomyelitis should be studied with bone scintigraphy following initial radiographs

  20. 38 CFR 4.43 - Osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Osteomyelitis. 4.43... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.43 Osteomyelitis. Chronic, or recurring, suppurative osteomyelitis, once clinically identified, including chronic inflammation of bone marrow,...

  1. Q Fever Chronic Osteomyelitis in Two Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Beatriz; Morais, Andreia; Santos, Ana Sofia; Tavares, Delfin; Seves, Graça; Gouveia, Catarina

    2015-11-01

    We report 2 cases of chronic Q fever osteomyelitis in 10- and 5-year-old girls who presented with distal right femoral and left parasternal granulomatous osteomyelitis, respectively. Both were treated with ciprofloxacin and rifampin with good response. Q fever osteomyelitis is a challenging diagnosis in children, and the choice of antimicrobial treatment is difficult because of limited available data. PMID:26226441

  2. Chronic osteomyelitis of the clavicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteomyelitis of the clavicle is an uncommon disease, but it should be considered in patients who present with pain, cellulitis, or drainage in the sternoclavicular area following head and neck surgery, irradiation, subclavian vein catheterization, or immunosuppression. An idiopathic presentation is possible. In contrast to primary osteomyelitis of the clavicle, which is occasionally seen in children, secondary osteomyelitis is quite rare. It is often mistaken for a fracture or a possible neoplasm on plain x-rays. Tomograms and CT scanning are confirmatory, and in early cases, technetium-99m bone scanning can be helpful. Treatment must include early, aggressive surgical debridement of all affected tissues, followed by wound coverage with a well-vascularized flap and perioperative antibiotics

  3. Garre′s sclerosing osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suma R

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Garre′s sclerosing osteomyelitis is a specific type of chronic osteomyelitis that mainly affects children and young adults. This disease entity is well-described in dental literature and is commonly associated with an odontogenic infection resulting from dental caries. This paper describes a case of Garre′s osteomyelitis in a 10-year-old boy, in whom the condition arose following pulpoperiapical infection in relation to permanent mandibular right first molar. Clinically the patient presented with bony hard, non-tender swelling and the occlusal radiograph revealed pathognomic feature of "onion skin" appearance. The elimination of periapical infection was achieved by endodontic therapy and the complete bone remodeling was seen radiographically after three months follow-up.

  4. Radiation osteomyelitis of the mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy for the head and neck malignant tumor may often cause osteoradionecrosis of the mandible, leading to radiation osteomyelitis with a source of infection. The present study demonstrates two cases with radiation osteomyelitis of the mandible to discuss the etiology, radiological findings and preventive measure for this type of bone disease. The result indicate that, 1) A higher dose in external radiotherapy may claimed to be a potent factor to cause osteoradionecrosis and post irradiation periodontitis of the tooth associated with pain, may be preliminary symptom of leading radiation osteomyelitis, where a delayed healing of tooth extraction is an accelerating factor responsible for rapid progress of osteomyelitic changes. 2) Once infection sets in post irradiated bone, radio-osteomyelitic change is quite progressive even after various conservative measure. 3) Only radiological change in those cases is a slow formation of sequestrum time ranging from 7 to 10 months, with a gradual separation of dead bone as a large mass. (author)

  5. Acinetobacter baumannii em meio hospitalar

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, Maria José da Costa Pinho

    2011-01-01

    A espécie Acinetobacter baumannii é um microrganismo multirresistente, frequentemente associado a surtos e infecções nos cuidados de saúde. A presença de uma grande variedade de factores determinantes na resistência aos antibióticos, juntamente com a sua capacidade de regular esses mecanismos e se adaptar sob condições ambientais adversas, faz com que esta espécie seja centro de preocupação para a Saúde pública. A sua disseminação na maior parte das vezes clonal, dentro das ...

  6. Nuclear medical diagnosis of osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Static bone scintigraphy is a sensitive but not very specific method of diagnosis of osteomyelitis. The specificity of this method may be increased by sequential use of several radiopharmaceutical drugs or by multi-stage scintigraphy. The possible fields of application of multi-stage scintigraphy for differential diagnosis are discussed in this paper. Multi-stage scintigraphy is indicated in cases of suspected primary osteomyelitis with negative X-ray findings and ambiguous clinical signs. In suspected secondary infections multi-stage scintigraphy also enables the differential diagnosis of instable osteosynthesis and infection to be established. (orig.)

  7. Aspergillus Osteomyelitis of the Skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Simon; King, Richard; Chumas, Paul; Russell, John; Liddington, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Osteomyelitis of the craniofacial skeleton is rare, with fungal pathogens least commonly implicated. The authors present 2 patients of osteomyelitis of the skull caused by Aspergillus spp. and discuss the diagnosis, clinicopathological course, and management strategies.Late recurrence seen in this type of infection warrants long-term follow-up and a high index of suspicion for the clinical signs associated with recurrence.Such patients would benefit from their surgical debridement being planned and managed via a specialist craniofacial unit, so as to utilize the most aesthetically sensitive approach and the experience of specialists from several surgical disciplines. PMID:27391523

  8. Cryptococcal osteomyelitis in the ribs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethi Somika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated cryptococcal osteomyelitis, in an immunocompetent, is rare and only a few cases have been reported in literature. We present the case of a 30-year-old man presented with pain on the left side of chest with fever and gradually increasing swelling in left lateral lower aspect of chest. Investigation revealed a lytic lesion in the anterior end of left 6 th rib with normal CD4 count. He was tested negative for HIV antigen. Excision of the sixth rib, morphologically revealed cryptococcal osteomyelitis and the patient was given anti-fungal treatment for six months.

  9. Reservoirs of Non-baumannii Acinetobacter Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Atrouni, Ahmad; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Hamze, Monzer; Kempf, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are ubiquitous gram negative and non-fermenting coccobacilli that have the ability to occupy several ecological niches including environment, animals and human. Among the different species, Acinetobacter baumannii has evolved as global pathogen causing wide range of infection. Since the implementation of molecular techniques, the habitat and the role of non-baumannii Acinetobacter in human infection have been elucidated. In addition, several new species have been described. In the present review, we summarize the recent data about the natural reservoir of non-baumannii Acinetobacter including the novel species that have been described for the first time from environmental sources and reported during the last years. PMID:26870013

  10. Spinal osteomyelitis caused by Proteus mirabilis in a child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deWeerd, W; Kimpen, JLL; Miedema, CJ

    1997-01-01

    Osteomyelitis due to Proteus mirabilis is rare. Spinal osteomyelitis caused by this organism has only been described in adults. This is the first paediatric case of P. mirabilis vertebral osteomyelitis.

  11. Vertebral osteomyelitis: assessment using MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-seven patients who were clinically suspected of having vertebral osteomyelitis were prospectively evaluated with magnetic resonance (MR), radiography, and radionuclide studies. These findings were correlated with the final clinical, microbiologic, or histologic diagnoses. Based on the results of these latter studies, 23 patients were believed to have osteomyelitis. MR examinations consisted of at least a sagittal image (TE = 30 msec, TR = 0.5 sec) and an image obtained at TE = 120 msec, TR = 2-3 sec. All patients underwent radiographic and MR examinations, 36 underwent technetium 99m-HDP bone scanning, and 20 patients underwent gallium 67 scanning. Nineteen patients underwent both bone and gallium scanning. The imaging studies were reviewed independently by investigators blinded to the final diagnoses. MR had a sensitivity of 96%, specificity of 92%, and accuracy of 94%. Combined gallium and bone scan studies (19 cases) had a sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 100%, and accuracy of 94%. Bone scans alone had a sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 78%, and accuracy of 86%. Plain radiographs had a sensitivity of 82%, specificity of 57%, and accuracy of 73%. The MR appearance of vertebral osteomyelitis in this study was characteristic, and MR was as accurate and sensitive as radionuclide scanning in the detection of osteomyelitis

  12. Cat-scratch disease osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a patient who presented with osteomyelitis of a rib and adjacent abscess as a rare and atypical manifestation of cat-scratch disease. Radiographic findings showed an osteolytic lesion with adjacent mass. Biopsy, serology and polymerase chain reaction technique are essential for the final diagnosis. Prognosis is excellent with full recovery. (orig.)

  13. Reservoirs of Non-baumannii Acinetobacter Species

    OpenAIRE

    Al Atrouni, Ahmad; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Hamze, Monzer; Kempf, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are ubiquitous gram negative and non-fermenting coccobacilli that have the ability to occupy several ecological niches including environment, animals and human. Among the different species, Acinetobacter baumannii has evolved as global pathogen causing wide range of infection. Since the implementation of molecular techniques, the habitat and the role of non-baumannii Acinetobacter in human infection have been elucidated. In addition, several new species have been described....

  14. Antimicrobial resistance and clonality in Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Nemec, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to obtain insight into the epidemiology and molecular basis of multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii at the population level. To this aim a number of studies were performed on strains mainly from the Czech Republic (CR) which have shown in particular that (i) the vast majority of multidrug resistant (MDR) clinical isolates of A. baumannii from CR belong to clonal lineages termed EU clone I and II; (ii) these two clones have predominated among MDR hospital ...

  15. Iron and Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina Gentile; Emanuela Frangipani; Carlo Bonchi; Fabrizia Minandri; Federica Runci; Paolo Visca

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen, responsible for infection outbreaks worldwide. The pathogenicity of this bacterium is mainly due to its multidrug-resistance and ability to form biofilm on abiotic surfaces, which facilitate long-term persistence in the hospital setting. Given the crucial role of iron in A. baumannii nutrition and pathogenicity, iron metabolism has been considered as a possible target for chelation-based antibacterial chemotherapy. In this study, w...

  16. Iron and Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Gentile

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen, responsible for infection outbreaks worldwide. The pathogenicity of this bacterium is mainly due to its multidrug-resistance and ability to form biofilm on abiotic surfaces, which facilitate long-term persistence in the hospital setting. Given the crucial role of iron in A. baumannii nutrition and pathogenicity, iron metabolism has been considered as a possible target for chelation-based antibacterial chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of iron restriction on A. baumannii growth and biofilm formation using different iron chelators and culture conditions. We report substantial inter-strain variability and growth medium-dependence for biofilm formation by A. baumannii isolates from veterinary and clinical sources. Neither planktonic nor biofilm growth of A. baumannii was affected by exogenous chelators. Biofilm formation was either stimulated by iron or not responsive to iron in the majority of isolates tested, indicating that iron starvation is not sensed as an overall biofilm-inducing stimulus by A. baumannii. The impressive iron withholding capacity of this bacterium should be taken into account for future development of chelation-based antimicrobial and anti-biofilm therapies.

  17. Imaging in osteomyelitis: Special features in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prognosis of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children ist mainly influenced by early diagnosis and prompt initiation of antibiotic and surgical therapy. In this age group, two forms of manifestation are differentiated: Osteomyelitis in infants up to 18 months and juvenile osteomyelitis until the closure of the epiphyseal plate. Osteomyelitis in infants is often accompanied by septic arthritis of the adjacent joint. In juvenile osteomyelitis, the disease is mostly confined to the metaphysis. Plain films and ultrasonography represent the basic imaging modalities. Depending on the age of the child, the clinical course of the disease and the availability of the various methods, MRI and multiphase bone scintigraphy can be performed for further imaging. CT is of only limited value and should only be used for special cases concerning chronic osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  18. Heteroresistance to Colistin in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Jian LI; Rayner, Craig R; Nation, Roger L; Owen, Roxanne J.; Spelman, Denis; Tan, Kar Eng; Liolios, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a significant clinical problem worldwide and colistin is being used increasingly as “salvage” therapy. MICs of colistin against A. baumannii indicate its significant activity. However, resistance to colistin in A. baumannii has been reported recently. Clonotypes of 16 clinical A. baumannii isolates and ATCC 19606 were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and colistin MICs were measured. The time-kill kinetics of coli...

  19. Animal Models for the Study of Osteomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Mitul; Rojavin, Yuri; Jamali, Amir A.; Wasielewski, Samantha J.; Salgado, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is an acute or chronic inflammatory process of the bone and its related structures secondary to an infection with pyogenic organisms. Because of the variety in disease presentations and pathophysiology of osteomyelitis, it is very difficult to evaluate in clinical studies. Therefore, animal models have been created for in vivo experimentation. A PubMed and OVID search was performed on March 31, 2008, using keywords osteomyelitis, animal model (rabbit, rat, mouse, avian, dog, she...

  20. Osteomyelitis Pubis: A Rare and Elusive Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Justin Yax; David Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Osteomyelitis pubis is an infectious inflammation of the symphysis pubis and accounts for 2% of hematogenous osteomyelitis. This differs from osteitis pubis, a non-infectious inflammation of the pubic symphysis, generally caused by shear forces in young athletes. Both conditions present with similar symptoms and are usually differentiated on the basis of biopsy and/or culture. A case of osteomyelitis pubis is presented with a discussion of symphisis pubis anatomy, clinical and laboratory pres...

  1. Management of osteomyelitis of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteomyelitis of the skull base is the most severe form of malignant otitis externa. As a result of having treated 13 patients with skull base osteomyelitis over a 4-year period, we have developed a method of staging and monitoring this malady using gallium and technetium scanning techniques. Stage I is localized to soft tissues, stage II is limited osteomyelitis, and stage III represents extensive skull base osteomyelitis. All stages are treated with appropriate antipseudomonal antibiotics. The duration of therapy depends upon the clearing of inflammation as shown on the gallium scan. Each case must be looked at independently and not subjected to an arbitrary treatment protocol

  2. Management of osteomyelitis of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benecke, J.E. Jr. (Otologic Medical Group, Inc., Los Angeles, CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Osteomyelitis of the skull base is the most severe form of malignant otitis externa. As a result of having treated 13 patients with skull base osteomyelitis over a 4-year period, we have developed a method of staging and monitoring this malady using gallium and technetium scanning techniques. Stage I is localized to soft tissues, stage II is limited osteomyelitis, and stage III represents extensive skull base osteomyelitis. All stages are treated with appropriate antipseudomonal antibiotics. The duration of therapy depends upon the clearing of inflammation as shown on the gallium scan. Each case must be looked at independently and not subjected to an arbitrary treatment protocol.

  3. Management of osteomyelitis of the skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benecke, J E

    1989-12-01

    Osteomyelitis of the skull base is the most severe form of malignant otitis externa. As a result of having treated 13 patients with skull base osteomyelitis over a 4-year period, we have developed a method of staging and monitoring this malady using gallium and technetium scanning techniques. Stage I is localized to soft tissues, stage II is limited osteomyelitis, and stage III represents extensive skull base osteomyelitis. All stages are treated with appropriate antipseudomonal antibiotics. The duration of therapy depends upon the clearing of inflammation as shown on the gallium scan. Each case must be looked at independently and not subjected to an arbitrary treatment protocol. PMID:2601534

  4. A Pathogenic Potential of Acinetobacter baumannii-Derived Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Suk Jin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs. A. baumannii OMVs deliver many virulence factors to host cells and then induce cytotoxicity and innate immune response. OMVs secreted from bacteria contribute directly to host pathology during A. baumannii infection.

  5. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an unusual clinical entity. More than 200 cases are described in the literature and it is presented here with special reference to its radiological aspects. It is an acquired disease of the skeleton which occurs predominantly during childhood and adolescence. About ten per cent of cases begin in early or, rarely, in later adult life. This variant is described here for the first time and is discussed as 'adult CRMO'. The underlying pathology is a bland, predominantly lympho-plasma cellular osteomyelitis which is self-limiting and leads to bone sclerosis (Garre). It probably involves an abnormal immune process which follows an infection but remains clinically latent and remains aseptic and sterile. In a quarter of cases there is an association with pustulosis palmo-plantaris and its relationship with psoriatic arthropathy is discussed. The clinical, histopathological and imaging features (radiological and particularly MRT) and the bone changes are described. (orig./AJ)

  6. Neonatal osteomyelitis in Nigerian infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-seven Nigerian infants with osteomyelitis are presented during the first 28 days of life to highlight the severity of the clinical manifestations and the radiological features of this infection. The clinical signs inlcude limitation of movement of the extremities involved and localised swelling. Severe constitutional changes such as fever (>390C) and abdominal distension were common. This contrasts with results from North America and Europe which emphasize the paucity of clinical signs despite involvement of multiple sites. Multiple site involvement was encountered in only eight cases. Staphylococcus aureus, proteus mirabilis and candida albicans were the main pathogens isolated. The long bones were more frequently affected. Aggressive bone destruction was a constant radiological finding peculiar to Staphylococcal osteomyelitis while the formation of Sequestrum, are rare occurrence in the newborn, was present in six patients. The mortality rate was 7.4% and the morbidity rate was equally low. (orig.)

  7. Neonatal osteomyelitis in Nigerian infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omene, J.A.; Okolo, A.A.; Odita, J.C.

    1984-07-01

    Twenty-seven Nigerian infants with osteomyelitis are presented during the first 28 days of life to highlight the severity of the clinical manifestations and the radiological features of this infection. The clinical signs include limitation of movement of the extremities involved and localised swelling. Severe constitutional changes such as fever (>39/sup 0/C) and abdominal distension were common. This contrasts with results from North America and Europe which emphasize the paucity of clinical signs despite involvement of multiple sites. Multiple site involvement was encountered in only eight cases. Staphylococcus aureus, proteus mirabilis and candida albicans were the main pathogens isolated. The long bones were more frequently affected. Aggressive bone destruction was a constant radiological finding peculiar to Staphylococcal osteomyelitis while the formation of Sequestrum, are rare occurrence in the newborn, was present in six patients. The mortality rate was 7.4% and the morbidity rate was equally low.

  8. Bilateral polymicrobial osteomyelitis with Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaldau, Niels Christian; Brorson, Stig; Jensen, Poul Einar;

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of bilateral polymicrobial osteomyelitis with Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei, and review the literature on Candida osteomyelitis.......We present a case of bilateral polymicrobial osteomyelitis with Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei, and review the literature on Candida osteomyelitis....

  9. Role of radiopharmaceuticals in detection of osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteomyelitis can present as a significant diagnostic problem in medicine. Knowledge of the presence and extent of infection involving bone is important in determining treatment. In this paper the authors review the role played by radiopharmaceutical techniques in establishing the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Osteomyelitis has been recognized as one of the most serious complications of emergency surgery to repair severe bone trauma. It is also a complication of surgery for prosthesis placement. In still other instances, osteomyelitis can be of hematogenous origin, without a major wound site. Unlike other infections, it rarely presents with acute symptoms. Osteomyelitis is divided into two categories that are time related: acute, in which clinical signs and symptoms of bone infection have been present for less than 1 month, and chronic, in which symptoms have been present for more than 1 month. The acute type is usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus in children (often secondary to skin infection), whereas in adults it can be secondary to intravenous drug abuse. Predisposing factors such as diabetes mellitus, peripheral vascular disease, and sickle cell disease are important to the outcome of osteomyelitis. One way to determine the microbe causing the infection is direct bone biopsy from the site of suspected osteomyelitis. There is one important limitation for needle biopsy in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Biopsies are contraindicated in the small bones of the hands and feet, because of risk of pathologic fracture (and may be relatively contraindicated after diphosphonate therapy and loss of bone mineral)

  10. Pseudomonas pelvic osteomyelitis in a healthy child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Akhras

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric pelvic osteomyelitis is a rare entity. The diagnosis is frequently delayed due to difficulty in confirming the diagnosis. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of Pseudomonas pelvic osteomyelitis in a previously healthy adolescent boy. The diagnosis was made radiographically and confirmed by culture. The patient was treated with Levofloxacin and Gentamicin resulting in a complete recovery.

  11. Pseudomonas pelvic osteomyelitis in a healthy child

    OpenAIRE

    Akhras, Nour; Blackwood, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric pelvic osteomyelitis is a rare entity. The diagnosis is frequently delayed due to difficulty in confirming the diagnosis. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of Pseudomonas pelvic osteomyelitis in a previously healthy adolescent boy. The diagnosis was made radiographically and confirmed by culture. The patient was treated with Levofloxacin and Gentamicin resulting in a complete recovery.

  12. Multifocal chronic osteomyelitis of unknown etiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five cases of chronic, inflammatory, multifocal bone lesions of unknown etiology are reported. Although bone biopsy confirmed osteomyelitis in each case in none of them were organisms found inspite of an extensive work up. Different clinical course of the disease reflects different aetiology in respective cases. These cases present changing aspects of osteomyelitis emerging since introduction of antibiotics. (orig.)

  13. A doxycycline-loaded polymer-lipid encapsulation matrix coating for the prevention of implant-related osteomyelitis due to doxycycline-resistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsemakers, Willem-Jan; Emanuel, Noam; Cohen, Or; Reichart, Malka; Potapova, Inga; Schmid, Tanja; Segal, David; Riool, Martijn; Kwakman, Paulus H S; de Boer, Leonie; de Breij, Anna; Nibbering, Peter H; Richards, R Geoff; Zaat, Sebastian A J; Moriarty, T Fintan

    2015-07-10

    Implant-associated bone infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens pose significant clinical challenges to treating physicians. Prophylactic strategies that act against resistant organisms, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are urgently required. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy of a biodegradable Polymer-Lipid Encapsulation MatriX (PLEX) loaded with the antibiotic doxycycline as a local prophylactic strategy against implant-associated osteomyelitis. Activity was tested against both a doxycycline-susceptible (doxy(S)) methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) as well as a doxycycline-resistant (doxy(R)) methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). In vitro elution studies revealed that 25% of the doxycycline was released from the PLEX-coated implants within the first day, followed by a 3% release per day up to day 28. The released doxycycline was highly effective against doxy(S) MSSA for at least 14days in vitro. A bolus injection of doxycycline mimicking a one day release from the PLEX-coating reduced, but did not eliminate, mouse subcutaneous implant-associated infection (doxy(S) MSSA). In a rabbit intramedullary nail-related infection model, all rabbits receiving a PLEX-doxycycline-coated nail were culture negative in the doxy(S) MSSA-group and the surrounding bone displayed a normal physiological appearance in both histological sections and radiographs. In the doxy(R) MRSA inoculated rabbits, a statistically significant reduction in the number of culture-positive samples was observed for the PLEX-doxycycline-coated group when compared to the animals that had received an uncoated nail, although the reduction in bacterial burden did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, the PLEX-doxycycline coating on titanium alloy implants provided complete protection against implant-associated MSSA osteomyelitis, and resulted in a significant reduction in the number of culture positive samples when challenged with a

  14. Antimicrobial resistance and clonality in Acinetobacter baumannii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemec, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to obtain insight into the epidemiology and molecular basis of multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii at the population level. To this aim a number of studies were performed on strains mainly from the Czech Republic (CR) which have shown in particular that (i) the

  15. Osteomyelitis Pubis: A Rare and Elusive Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Yax

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis pubis is an infectious inflammation of the symphysis pubis and accounts for 2% of hematogenous osteomyelitis. This differs from osteitis pubis, a non-infectious inflammation of the pubic symphysis, generally caused by shear forces in young athletes. Both conditions present with similar symptoms and are usually differentiated on the basis of biopsy and/or culture. A case of osteomyelitis pubis is presented with a discussion of symphisis pubis anatomy, clinical and laboratory presentation, etiology and risk factors, and optimal imaging studies. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:–0.

  16. Osteomyelitis pubis: a rare and elusive diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yax, Justin; Cheng, David

    2014-11-01

    Osteomyelitis pubis is an infectious inflammation of the symphysis pubis and accounts for 2% of hematogenous osteomyelitis. This differs from osteitis pubis, a non-infectious inflammation of the pubic symphysis, generally caused by shear forces in young athletes. Both conditions present with similar symptoms and are usually differentiated on the basis of biopsy and/or culture. A case of osteomyelitis pubis is presented with a discussion of symphisis pubis anatomy, clinical and laboratory presentation, etiology and risk factors, and optimal imaging studies. PMID:25493141

  17. Candida albicans osteomyelitis of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jang-Gyu; Hong, Hyun-Sook [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Koh, Yoon-Woo [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Kim, Hee-Kyung [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Pathology, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Park, Jung-Mi [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea)

    2008-04-15

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a rare infection that usually develops in immunocompromised patients. Additionally, involvement of the cervical spine by Candida albicans is extremely rare; only three previous cases of Candida vertebral osteomyelitis have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis may be delayed due to nonspecific radiologic findings and a slow progression. We report the CT, MRI, bone scan, and PET-CT findings in a patient who developed Candida osteomyelitis, which was initially misdiagnosed as metastasis, at the atlas and axis following treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer. (orig.)

  18. Candida albicans osteomyelitis of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a rare infection that usually develops in immunocompromised patients. Additionally, involvement of the cervical spine by Candida albicans is extremely rare; only three previous cases of Candida vertebral osteomyelitis have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis may be delayed due to nonspecific radiologic findings and a slow progression. We report the CT, MRI, bone scan, and PET-CT findings in a patient who developed Candida osteomyelitis, which was initially misdiagnosed as metastasis, at the atlas and axis following treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer. (orig.)

  19. Antibiotic Resistance in Acinetobacter Baumannii Strains Isolated from Nosocomial Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Pinar Korkmaz

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen and one of the most important multidrug-resistant microorganisms in hospitals worldwide. A.baumannii most commonly causes ventilator-associated pneumonia and blood stream infections and mortality rates in these infections can reach 35%. In this study, it was aimed to assess the frequency of Acinetobacter baumannii species which were considered to be causative agents of nosocomial infection and their resistance to antimicrobi...

  20. Osteomyelitis: diagnosis with In-111-labeled leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a retrospective review, 485 patients with suspected osteomyelitis were studied. Of these, 453 patients were studied with both bone and indium-111 leukocyte scanning (173 sequentially and 280 simultaneously). The ability to determine that the infection was in bone rather than in adjacent soft tissue was greater with simultaneous bone scan and In-111 leukocyte studies than with sequential studies. The locations of suspected osteomyelitis were divided into central (containing active bone marrow), peripheral (hands and feet), and middle (between central and peripheral). Specificity remained high (about 90%) regardless of the location. Overall sensitivity was significantly lower in the central location than in the peripheral or middle location. Determination of whether the In-111 leukocyte activity was in bone or adjacent soft tissue was also more difficult when the infection was in the central location. For acute osteomyelitis, sensitivity was high regardless of the location. For chronic osteomyelitis, sensitivity was lower in the central location

  1. Quantitative bone gallium scintigraphy in osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallium imaging offers many practical advantages over indium-111-labeled leukocyte imaging, and calculating quantitative ratios in addition to performing the routine bone-gallium images allows accurate and easy evaluation of patients with suspected osteomyelitis. To add objectivity and improve the accuracy and confidence in diagnosis of osteomyelitis, quantitative comparison of abnormalities seen on bone scans and gallium scans was performed. One hundred and ten adult patients with 126 sites of suspected osteomyelitis were evaluated and categorized by gallium-to-bone ratios, gallium-to-background ratios, and spatial incongruency of gallium and bone activity. Combined evaluation using these criteria gave a 70% sensitivity and 93% specificity for the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  2. Congenital multifocal osteomyelitis at 24 weeks' gestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an extremely rare case of congenital nonsyphilitic osteomyelitis in a very preterm infant, providing a unique illustration of the radiological appearances at birth, which may serve as a reference to facilitate diagnosis. (orig.)

  3. Bilateral clavicle osteomyelitis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fevzi Saglam

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: In cases of clavicular osteomyelitis where infection continues despite debridement and antibiotic therapy, excision of the sequestered clavicular section is a successful treatment approach and has been seen to improve quality of life without any functional loss.

  4. Infantile Maxillary Sinus Osteomyelitis Mimicking Orbital Cellulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Nagarajan Krishnan; Nathan Ramamoorthy; Suresh Panchanathan; Balasundaram, Jothiramalingam S

    2014-01-01

    Periorbital soft tissue swelling may result due to primary orbital pathology or from adjacent facio-maxillary or sino-nasal inflammatory causes. Osteomyelitis of maxilla in the pediatric age group is a rare entity in this era of antibiotics. We present an 11-month-old female infant who was brought with peri-orbital selling and purulent nasal discharge. Computed Tomography showed erosions of the walls of maxillary sinus suggestive of osteomyelitis. Culture of sinus scraping showed Staphylococc...

  5. Problems in the scintigraphic detection of osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone imaging has played a major role in the early detection of pediatric osteomyelitis. The single gamma camera view (rather than whole body imaging) successfully delineates the growth zones of the long bones and can detect subtle changes in these regions. If a high suspicion of osteomyelitis is entertained despite a normal bone scan, gallium imaging should be employed. Cases have been reported in which delayed scans were normal but the blood pool image was not

  6. Osteomyelitis of the Mandible in an Adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiore, Peter M; Cerrud, Clinio C; Buckley, Ian A; Demian, Nagi M

    2015-01-01

    A 13-year-old female, who had been experiencing episodes of mandibular pain and swelling for approximately six months, was referred to a university urgent care dental clinic for evaluation after receiving endodontic treatment. At the referral examination, clinical and radiographic findings were suggestive of osteomyelitis. The purpose of this report is to present the possible etiology, clinical and radiographic findings and surgical management of mandibular osteomyelitis in an adolescent patient. PMID:26349798

  7. Periostitis and osteomyelitis in chronic drug addicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Periostitis and osteomyelitis can occur in drug addicts not only by hematogeneous dissemination of the infecting organisms, but as a result of introduction of bacteria by direct injection into periosteum or injection through infected skin and subcutaneous tissues. A spectrum of examples of osteomyelitis of the bones of the forearm in drug addicts is presented to illustrate this phenomenon. Neglect of these infections and the trauma of continued injections can lead to extensive tissue and bone loss. (orig.)

  8. Periostitis and osteomyelitis in chronic drug addicts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.R.; Lawson, J.P.

    1986-03-01

    Periostitis and osteomyelitis can occur in drug addicts not only by hematogeneous dissemination of the infecting organisms, but as a result of introduction of bacteria by direct injection into periosteum or injection through infected skin and subcutaneous tissues. A spectrum of examples of osteomyelitis of the bones of the forearm in drug addicts is presented to illustrate this phenomenon. Neglect of these infections and the trauma of continued injections can lead to extensive tissue and bone loss.

  9. Conditions Affecting Treatment of Pertrochanteric Osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Wen-Neng Ueng

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although osteomyelitis following treatment of pertrochanteric fractures israre, management can be difficult and often results in several physical andeconomic difficulties. Data regarding treatment of patients withpertrochanteric osteomyelitis is currently limited. This retrospective studyevaluates the management of pertrochanteric osteomyelitis and presents ourexperience using a two-stage treatment protocol.Methods: From 1984 to 1998, twenty-three pertrochanteric osteomyelitis cases weretreated with a two-stage protocol comprising of an external skeletal fixator orBuck traction after radical debridement in the first stage and reconstructionin the second stage. The study included sixteen males and seven femaleswith a mean age of 48.3 years (range 16-82 years. Patients were categorizedas “successful” or “difficult” according to the number of operations they hadundergone. Conditions including patient age, compromised host, intervalbefore treatment, fracture severity, nonunion, hip joint involvement, multipleorganisms and the presence of oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureuswere recorded for analysis.Results: Only twelve of the twenty-three (52% cases were successfully managed andinfection recurred in four (17.4% cases at final follow-up. Difficult casesmanaged by the two-stage protocol were more likely to be characterized byyounger age (p = 0.03, unstable fractures (p = 0.003 and nonunions (p =0.027.Conclusion: The use of external skeletal fixation is not recommended for managingpertrochanteric osteomyelitis. Success using a two-stage protocol was difficultto achieve. Initial fracture severity should be carefully assessed whendevising a treatment protocol for pertrochanteric osteomyelitis.

  10. Osteomyelitis caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Shinha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, nonfermenting gram-negative rod and described as a waterborne bacterium since it habits aquatic environments ubiquitously. It has frequently been isolated from aquatic surroundings in the hospital and from various human body sites. Although occasionally considered a non-pathogen, A. xylosoxidans has been associated with outbreaks of nosocomial infection due to contaminated fluids. Moreover, a wide variety of infectious etiologies due to A. xylosoxidans has been reported primarily in immunocompromised individuals. Heightened awareness of this bacterium and associated clinical importance is warranted for clinicians since its broad disease spectrum in humans and frequent multi-drug resistance may result in an increased mortality rate. In this report, we describe a case of osteomyelitis caused by A. xylosoxidans in a patient with a history of diabetes mellitus.

  11. Characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm associated components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossard, Kari A.

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative aerobic coccobaccillus that is a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Infected individuals may develop pneumonia, urinary tract, wound, and other infections that are associated with the use of indwelling medical devices such as catheters and mechanical ventilation. Treatment is difficult because many A. baumannii isolates have developed multi-drug resistance and the bacterium can persist on abiotic surfaces. Persistence and resistance may be due to formation of biofilms, which leads to long-term colonization, evasion of the host immune system and resistance to treatment with antibiotics and disinfectants. While biofilms are complex multifaceted structures, two bacterial components that have been shown to be important in formation and stability are exopolysaccharides (EPS) and the biofilm-associated protein (Bap). An EPS, poly-beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine, PNAG, has been described for E. coli and S. epidermidis. PNAG acts as an intercellular adhesin. Production of this adhesin is dependent on the pga/icaABCD locus. We have identified a homologous locus in A. baumannii 307-0294 that is involved in production of an exopolysaccharide, recognized by an anti-PNAG antibody. We hypothesized that the A. baumannii pgaABCD locus plays a role in biofilm formation, and protection against host innate defenses and disinfectants suggesting that PNAG is a possible virulence factor for the organism. The first aim of this thesis will define the pgaABCD locus. We have previously identified Bap, a protein with similarity to those described for S. aureus and we have demonstrated that this protein is involved in maintaining the stability of biofilms on glass. We hypothesized that A. baumannii Bap plays a role in persistence and pathogenesis and is regulated by quorum sensing. In our second aim we will examine the role of Bap in attachment and biofilm formation on medically relevant surfaces and also determine if Bap is involved in

  12. Chemotherapy-resistant breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Parthasarathy, Muralidharan; Orrell, Julian; Mortimer, Caroline; Ball, Liz

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with a few weeks’ history of discomfort and swelling in her left breast. She had undergone bilateral breast augmentation 8 years previously. There were no risk factors for breast cancer. Clinical examination, mammography and breast ultrasound revealed a large left breast mass adjacent to the breast implant with enlarged axillary lymph nodes. Owing to diagnostic uncertainty, core biopsies were sent to a specialist unit which confirmed breast implant-associated ana...

  13. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy could be a Potential Adjuvant Treatment for Orthopaedic Implant-associated Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-feng Chen; Xiao-lin Li

    2013-01-01

    Over the past half-century, biomaterials have been used in orthopaedic surgery world widely, but orthopaedic implant-associated infections (OIAIs) are still a puzzle for orthopaedic surgeons, which may result in prolonged hospitalisation, poor functional status and high costs. The presence of implants increases the risk of microbial infection; moreover, the formation of bacterial biofilm leads to a higher resistance to antibiotics and local immune response. In such cases, conventional systemi...

  14. Conservative treatment in a patient with diabetic osteomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Sune Møller; Frokjaer, J.; Yderstraede, K.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are commonly complicated by bone involvement and osteomyelitis. Diagnosing diabetic osteomyelitis can be problematic. However, positive findings at clinical examination and X-ray may set the diagnosis. Recent guidelines suggest that selected cases of diabetic osteomyelitis can...... be treated conservatively with antibiotics. We report on the successful treatment of a 52-year-old man with diabetes with osteomyelitis in the distal phalanx of a toe. On X-ray, the affected phalanx appeared completely eroded. However, regeneration of the bone tissue was observed following outpatient...... treatment with antibiotics. We therefore encourage doctors to provide conservative treatment for selected cases of diabetic osteomyelitis....

  15. A Model of Implant-Associated Infection in the Tibial Metaphysis of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Haenle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Implant-associated infections remain serious complications in orthopaedic and trauma surgery. A main scientific focus has thus been drawn to the development of anti-infective implant coatings. Animal models of implant-associated infections are considered helpful in the in vivo testing of new anti-infective implant coatings. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a novel animal model for generation of implant-associated infections in the tibial metaphysis of rats. Materials and Methods. A custom-made conical implant made of Ti6Al4V was inserted bilaterally at the medial proximal tibia of 26 female Sprague-Dawley rats. Staphylococcus aureus in amounts spanning four orders of magnitude and each suspended in 15 μl phosphate buffered saline (PBS was inoculated into the inner cavity of the implant after the implantation into the defined position. Controls were treated accordingly with PBS alone. Animals were then followed for six weeks until sacrifice. Implant-associated infection was evaluated by microbiological investigation using swabs and determination of viable bacteria in the bone around the implant and the biofilm on the implants after sonification. Results. Irrespective of the initial inoculum, all animals in the various groups harbored viable bacteria in the intraoperative swabs as well as the sonication fluid of the implant and the bone samples. No correlation could be established between initially inoculated CFU and population sizes on implant surfaces at sacrifice. However, a significantly higher viable count was observed from peri-implant bone samples for animals inoculated with 106 CFU. Macroscopic signs of animal infection (pus and abscess formation were only observed for implants inoculated with at least 105 CFU S. aureus. Discussion/Conclusion. The results demonstrate the feasibility of this novel animal model to induce an implant-associated infection in the metaphysis of rats, even with comparatively low

  16. In-111 white blood cell sensitivity depends on the location of the osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors studied 76 patients with osteomyelitis and found a sensitivity of 95% in scute appendicular osteomyelitis (16 patients), 91% in chronic appendicular osteomyelitis (43 patients), 100% in acute axial osteomyelitis (three patients), and 57% in chronic axial osteomyelitis (14 patients). Thus, chronic osteomyelitis in the axials skeleton had significantly reduced sensitivity. This difference is due both to the different cellular response to acute and chronic osteomyelitis and to the location of the osteomyelitis. The appendicular skeleton contains no active bone marrow in the adult. The axial skeleton contains active bone marrow, which accumulates In-111 white blood cells, making the localization of the osteomyelitis more difficult

  17. Physeal involvement in chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis is a recently recognized disease characterized by remissions and exacerbations of multiple bone lesions which radiographically and pathologically have the appearance of hematogenous osteomyelitis. No consistent etiology can be identified, and antimicrobial agents seem to have no beneficial effect. A review of the appearances on imaging modalities and the clinical and pathologic manifestations is undertaken in seven cases of CRMO. No therapeutic regimen resulted in consistent clinical or radiographic improvement. We suggest the sequelae of this process are not as benign as previously reported. (orig.)

  18. Physeal involvement in chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manson, D. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Radiology); Wilmot, D.M. (Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Radiology); King, S. (Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Infectious Diseases); Laxer, R.M. (Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada). Div. of Immunology)

    1989-11-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis is a recently recognized disease characterized by remissions and exacerbations of multiple bone lesions which radiographically and pathologically have the appearance of hematogenous osteomyelitis. No consistent etiology can be identified, and antimicrobial agents seem to have no beneficial effect. A review of the appearances on imaging modalities and the clinical and pathologic manifestations is undertaken in seven cases of CRMO. No therapeutic regimen resulted in consistent clinical or radiographic improvement. We suggest the sequelae of this process are not as benign as previously reported. (orig.).

  19. Ceftobiprole: First Reported Experience in Osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A MacDonald

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 74-year-old man with long-standing diabetes presented with advanced infection of the right forefoot associated with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis involving the second and third metatarsophalangeal joints. Polymicrobial infection, which included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, was documented. First-line antibiotic therapy, which included vancomycin, was not tolerated. A durable cure was obtained following a six-week course of intravenous ceftobiprole medocaril combined with local surgery. The present report is the first to administer intravenous ceftobiprole medocaril to a patient with methicillin-resistant S aureus-associated septic arthritis and osteomyelitis.

  20. Drug resistance patterns of acinetobacter baumannii in makkah, saudi arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii causes infections of respiratory, urinary tract, blood stream and surgical sites. Its clinical significance has increased due to its rapidly developing resistance to major groups of antibiotics used for its treatment. There is limited data available on antimicrobial susceptibility of A. baumannii from Saudi Arabia. Objectives: To determine the patterns of drug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii and predisposing factors for its acquisition.Subjects and Methods: In this descriptive study, 72 hospitalized patients infected with A baumannii were studied. The clinical and demographic data of the patients were collected using a predesigned questionnaire. Isolation and identification of A.baumannii from all clinical specimens were done using standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic susce ptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion method recommended by Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute. Results: Majority of the isolates (61.1%) were from respiratory tract infections. A.baumannii isolates showed high drug resistance to piperacil lin (93.1%), aztreonam (80.5%), ticarcillin, ampicillin, and tetracycline (76.4%, each) and cefotaxime (75%). Only amikacin showed low rate of resistance compared to other antibiotics (40.3%). About 36% patients had some underlying diseases with diabetes mellitus (11%) being the predominant underlying disease. Conclusions: High antimicrobial resistance to commonly used antibiotics was seen against A.baumannii isolates. Only amikacin was most effective against it. (author)

  1. Development of immunization trials against Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek A. Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii has recently crossed all lines once considered harmless, pushing its way as a nosocomial pathogen. It had acquired resistance to almost all available chemotherapies and mainly targets intensive care residents; causing pneumonia and major outbreaks with high mortality rates. This urged the need for preventive methods, which include infection control, non-specific immune-therapy, passive, and active immunization in order to offer vulnerable immune-compromised patients a flare in the dark. Several attempts were done for constructing effective vaccines with promising results. These are precisely classified, documented, and discussed in this up-to-date review.

  2. The Macrophage Inflammatory Proteins MIP1α (CCL3 and MIP2α (CXCL2 in Implant-Associated Osteomyelitis: Linking Inflammation to Bone Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Dapunt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections of bones remain a serious complication of endoprosthetic surgery. These infections are difficult to treat, because many bacterial species form biofilms on implants, which are relatively resistant towards antibiotics. Bacterial biofilms elicit a progressive local inflammatory response, resulting in tissue damage and bone degradation. In the majority of patients, replacement of the prosthesis is required. To address the question of how the local inflammatory response is linked to bone degradation, tissue samples were taken during surgery and gene expression of the macrophage inflammatory proteins MIP1α (CCL3 and MIP2α (CXCL2 was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. MIPs were expressed predominantly at osteolytic sites, in close correlation with CD14 which was used as marker for monocytes/macrophages. Colocalisation of MIPs with monocytic cells could be confirmed by histology. In vitro experiments revealed that, aside from monocytic cells, also osteoblasts were capable of MIP production when stimulated with bacteria; moreover, CCL3 induced the differentiation of monocytes to osteoclasts. In conclusion, the multifunctional chemokines CCL3 and CXCL2 are produced locally in response to bacterial infection of bones. In addition to their well described chemokine activity, these cytokines can induce generation of bone resorbing osteoclasts, thus providing a link between bacterial infection and osteolysis.

  3. Radiologic study of osteomyelitis of the jaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author studied age and sex distribution, etiology, affected site and several radiographic features of osteomyelitis of the jaw. And radiologic classification of osteomyelitis was also done. The material consisted of 118 males and 96 females examined and/or treated under the diagnosis of osteomyelitis during past 11 years (1970-1980.6) in SNUDH. The obtained results were as followings. 1. The incidence is the highest in teen ages (22.9%) and the lowest in seventies. (2.8%). 2. 199 cases were found in lower jaw, and 15 cases in upper jaw. 30.8% of all cases were located at the posterior portion of mandibular body comprising alveolar region. 3. Radiographic examination of osteolytic lesion revealed that 21.5% of all patients had periapical and alveolar bone rarefaction combined with osteoporotic changes were present at the same time. 4. Sclerotic lesions were seen in 62.2% of all patients and 21.5% of sclerotic lesion were diffuse or homogenous type. 5. Based on the radiologic study, classification of the osteomyelitis of the jaw was made. Localized osteolytic type was the highest in incidence (38.8%) and localized sclerotic type was the lowest (7.0%).

  4. Osteomyelitis - imaging methods and their ranking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various imaging modalities are used in diagnosis of acute and chronic infectious endogenous osteomyelitis and exogenous ostitis. The pathophysiological changes of osteomyelitis/ostitis in the bone and surrounding soft tissue are known. Findings in plain film radiography show these changes only in relatively advanced stages of disease. Hence, plain film radiographs are useful as a basic imaging modality by excluding other differentials and as a follow-up modality under therapy. Ultrasound -- using advanced technology -- offers diagnostic help in acute osteomyelitis, especially in infants. The various techniques of nuclear medicine show much higher sensitivity for detecting osteomyelitis than plain film radiography, but do not permit good separation for bone involvement and infectious changes in the surrounding soft tissue. While computed tomography offers the ability to display bone and soft tissue separately, it has been widely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging using fat-suppressed sequences and paramagnetic contrast media which show the spread of the infectious changes with higher sensitivity and accuracy. (orig.)

  5. Pyogenic osteomyelitis of long bone: MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness of MR in the osteomyelitis, we reviewed MR examinations of 14 patients with pyogenic osteomyelitis of the long bone. All 14 patients were confirmed to have osteomyelitis either surgically (13/14) or by aspiration (1/14). MRI was performed with 0.5 T (n=8) or 2.0 T (n=6) SE technique, and Gd-DTPA enhanced T1WI was obtained in 10 examinations. Anatomic location of lesions were femur (8/14), tibia (5/14) , and fibula (1/14). The marrow cavity and soft tissue were involved in 13/14, 12/14 respectively. The signals of both intraosseous and extraosseous infected area were iso to low signal intensity to muscles on T1WI and high signal intensity on PDWI and T2WI. Rim or diffuse enhancement of the marrow cavity and soft tissue were seen in all (10/10) case. Sequestra, periosteal reaction, and cortical defect were found in 12/14, 10/14, 9/14. MR provided more accurate and detailed anatomic information including extent of disease and possible activity than bone scintigraphy, CT, or conventional radiography. We conclude that MR might be the choice of modality in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the long bone

  6. Salmonella osteomyelitis by sickle cell anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case report of a 28 year old black sickle cell anemia patient with salmonella osteomyelitis of the radius. Aside from sickle cell anemia patients this skeletal complication of enteric salmonellosis is an extreme rarity. Description of the typical roentgenological features includes intracortical fissures and sequestration. (orig.)

  7. Idiopathic cervical osteomyelitis presenting as dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaly GA; Espeso A; Fish B

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a case of idiopathic cervical epidural abscess, complicated by osteomyelitis, presenting with dysphagia as the main complaint. No predisposing factors were identified and blood cultures were negative. Case was treated conservatively by long course of IV antibiotics. We present a review of presentation of spinal epidural abscesses and indications for surgical intervention.

  8. Assessment of Minocycline and Polymyxin B Combination against Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Bowers, Dana R.; Cao, Henry; Zhou, Jian; Ledesma, Kimberly R.; Sun, Dongxu; Lomovskaya, Olga; Tam, Vincent H.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance among Acinetobacter baumannii is increasing worldwide, often necessitating combination therapy. The clinical utility of using minocycline with polymyxin B is not well established. In this study, we investigated the activity of minocycline and polymyxin B against 1 laboratory isolate and 3 clinical isolates of A. baumannii. Minocycline susceptibility testing was performed with and without an efflux pump inhibitor, phenylalanine-arginine β-naphthylamide (PAβN). The intr...

  9. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy could be a Potential Adjuvant Treatment for Orthopaedic Implant-associated Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-feng Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the past half-century, biomaterials have been used in orthopaedic surgery world widely, but orthopaedic implant-associated infections (OIAIs are still a puzzle for orthopaedic surgeons, which may result in prolonged hospitalisation, poor functional status and high costs. The presence of implants increases the risk of microbial infection; moreover, the formation of bacterial biofilm leads to a higher resistance to antibiotics and local immune response. In such cases, conventional systemic delivery of drugs seems to be fairly inefficient and out-dated. Owing to this, debridement and/or removing the implant always become the only solution. Hence, it needs a simple, minimally invasive and effective therapy to eradicate the problem. There are abundant evidences showing that extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT has favourable effects on stimulating callus formation, inducing angiogenesis, promoting osteogenesis and relieving pain. Studies also indicated that ESWs have a significant bactericidal effect on bacterial strains of bone- and implant-associated infections. Therefore, a hypothesis proposed herein is that ESWT may well be an effective adjuvant treatment for OIAI by controlling infection, inducing bone regeneration and promoting re-osseointegration.

  10. Radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of osteomyelitis and septic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite controversy over its exact role, radionuclide imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of patients suspected of having osteomyelitis. The differentiation between osteomyelitis and cellulitis is best accomplished by using a three-phase technique using Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate (MDP). Frequently, it is necessary to obtain multiple projections and magnification views to adequately assess suspected areas. It is recommended that a Ga-67 or In-111 leukocyte scan be performed in those cases where osteomyelitis is strongly suspected clinically and the routine bone scan is equivocal or normal. Repeated bone scan after 48 to 72 h may demonstrate increased radioactivity in the case of early osteomyelitis with the initial photon-deficient lesion. In-111 leukocyte imaging is useful for the evaluation of suspected osteomyelitis complicating recent fracture or operation, but must be used in conjunction with clinical and radiographic correlation. The recognition of certain imaging patterns appears helpful to separate osteomyelitis from septic arthritis or cellulitis. 83 references

  11. Diode laser osteoperforation and its application to osteomyelitis treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Krochek, Igor V.; Lappa, Alexander V.

    2001-10-01

    Laser osteoperforation, previously studied in experiment in rabbits at treatment for acute purulent osteomyelitis (Privalov V. et.al., SPIE Proc., v.3565., pp. 72-79), was applied in clinic to 36 patients with chronic purulent osteomyelitis and to 6 patients (children) with acute haematogenic osteomyelitis. Diode lasers of 805 and 980 nm wavelength were used. There was achieved full recovery in all acute cases, and stable remission in chronic cases during all the observation period (1 - 2.5 years).

  12. OSTEOMYELITIS AND PATHOLOGICAL FRACTURE OF TIBIA SECONDARY TO PEMPHIGUS VULGARIS

    OpenAIRE

    Shailesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    We would like to present one rare and interesting case of a patient who suffered osteomyelitis and pathological fracture of tibia due to direct spread of infection from a skin lesion of pemphigus vulgaris. Patient had to suffer chronic osteomyelitis and pathological fracture due to delay in diagnosis and management . He had to undergo multiple surgeries before he could be relieved of his symptoms. Time and again it proves that osteomyelitis is always a clinical diagnosis and...

  13. A Rare Case of Cranial Osteomyelitis Caused by Proteus Vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Uslu; Gökşin Şengül; Osman Aktaş

    2011-01-01

    Osteomyelitis of the calvarial bones can cause serious complications such as brain abscess, due to the close proximity to adjacent brain structures. Development of the purulent secretion in surgery and traumatic scalp injuries must be considered as a possibility of osteomyelitis possibility. Generally gram positive, rarely gram negative bacteria and mix agents, can be isolated in infection. Especially chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis agents can be isolated from chronic infections such as tuberc...

  14. Osteomyelitis of the Patella Caused by Legionella anisa

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Martha Cristina; Sebti, Rani; Hassoun, Patrice; Mannion, Ciaran; Goy, Andre H.; Feldman, Tatyana; Mato, Anthony; Hong, Tao

    2013-01-01

    A 51-year-old man with a history of stage IV angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma was diagnosed with osteomyelitis of the patella. Legionella anisa was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and culture. The patient had pneumonia 2 months prior to this osteomyelitis episode. L. anisa was retrospectively detected in his lung tissue by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and was considered the source of the L. anisa that caused his patella osteomyelitis.

  15. Rib osteomyelitis in children. Early radiologic and ultrasonic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The earliest radiographic changes of osteomyelitis in the long bones is deep-seated edema manifesting as soft tissue swelling and obliteration of the intermuscular planes adjacent to the affected bone. Similarly, the early change of rib osteomyelitis is pericostal edema demonstrated by soft tissue swelling of the thoracic wall accompanied by an adjacent inward pleural displacement. In both osteomyelitis of the rib and the long bones, the bony changes will appear 1-2 weeks later. Pericostal edema can be readily diagnosed by ultrasound scan. Pericostal edema, although non specific and can occur in other conditions, yet it is a strong warning sign, set wihin the overall clinical picture of osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  16. Infantile maxillary sinus osteomyelitis mimicking orbital cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Krishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Periorbital soft tissue swelling may result due to primary orbital pathology or from adjacent facio-maxillary or sino-nasal inflammatory causes. Osteomyelitis of maxilla in the pediatric age group is a rare entity in this era of antibiotics. We present an 11-month-old female infant who was brought with peri-orbital selling and purulent nasal discharge. Computed Tomography showed erosions of the walls of maxillary sinus suggestive of osteomyelitis. Culture of sinus scraping showed Staphylococcus aureus growth and the child improved with intravenous cloxacillin therapy. This case is presented due to the rarity of its presentation in this age group and for awareness to consider this entity in children having fever and peri-orbital swelling.

  17. Salmonella Typhi Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Ying Ying; Chen, John L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of Salmonella infection. We report a case of a 57-year-old transgender male who presented with lower back pain for a period of one month following a fall. Physical examination only revealed tenderness over the lower back with no neurological deficits. MRI of the thoracic and lumbar spine revealed a spondylodiscitis at T10-T11 and T12-L1 and right posterior epidural collection at the T9-T10 level. He underwent decompression laminectomy with segmental instrumentation and fusion of T8 to L3 vertebrae. Intraoperatively, he was found to have acute-on-chronic osteomyelitis in T10 and T11, epidural abscess, and discitis in T12-L1. Tissue and wound culture grew Salmonella Typhi and with antibiotics susceptibility guidance he was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for a period of six weeks. He recovered well with no neurological deficits. PMID:27034871

  18. Oral ciprofloxacin for treatment of chronic osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguti, A; Trevisanello, C; Lobo, I M; Carvalho, M C; Bortoletto, M L; Silva, M L; Brasil Filho, R; Levi, G C; Mendonça, J S

    1993-01-01

    Seventeen adult patients with chronic osteomyelitis were treated with oral ciprofloxacin, 750 mg twice daily. Treatment ranged from 28 to 254 days. Efficacy was considered to be good, based upon clinical resolution observed in 13 patients (76%). Clinical and microbiological failure was observed in 3 patients (18%), and there was one case of reinfection. Tolerance was very satisfactory, since the adverse reactions were mild and transitory; these occurred in 7 patients (41%), being cutaneous rash in 4 patients and diarrhoea in 3 patients. No patient had to discontinue treatment. Thus, oral ciprofloxacin may be useful option for the prolonged treatment of chronic osteomyelitis, provided that it is always associated with surgical debridement. Due to the probable development of ciprofloxacin resistance in the S. aureus multiresistant strain, already observed in two patients in the present investigation, it is suggested that for the treatment of such infections another drug with antistaphylococcal activity should be associated with the ciprofloxacin. PMID:8354592

  19. Acute lymphocytic Leukemia masquerading as acute osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two children each developed a focal destructive bone lesion accompanied by intermittent fever, swelling, tenderness and elevated ESR. Blood counts were normal; bone marrow aspiration showed acute leukemia. The bone lesions healed in both patients after anti-leukemic therapy. We suggest that the similar roentgenographic appearance of osteomyelitis, bone infarction and focal destructive lesions in leukemia probably reflects a common, basically ischemic process of bone. (orig.)

  20. Fungal osteomyelitis with vertebral re-ossification

    OpenAIRE

    O′Guinn, Devon J.; Serletis, Demitre; Kazemi, Noojan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We present a rare case of thoracic vertebral osteomyelitis secondary to pulmonary Blastomyces dermatitides. Presentation of case A 27-year-old male presented with three months of chest pains and non-productive cough. Examination revealed diminished breath sounds on the right. CT/MR imaging confirmed a right-sided pre-/paravertebral soft tissue mass and destructive lytic lesions from T2 to T6. CT-guided needle biopsy confirmed granulomatous pulmonary Blastomycosis. Conservative ma...

  1. Optimal management of chronic osteomyelitis: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Pande KC

    2015-01-01

    Ketan C Pande Raja Isteri Pengiran Anak Saleha Hospital, Bandar Seri Begawan, BruneiAbstract: Chronic osteomyelitis is a challenging condition to treat. It is seen mostly after open fractures or in implant-related infections following treatment of fractures and prosthetic joint replacements. Recurrence of infection is well known, and successful treatment requires a multidisciplinary team approach with surgical debridement and appropriate antimicrobial therapy as the cornerstone of treatment. ...

  2. Imaging of acute and chronic osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the diagnosis of acute and chronic osteomyelitis imaging methods have become essential. This paper reviews the potential of the different imaging modalities. When there is clinical suspicion of acute osteomyelitis plain films are still the mainstay of diagnosis. In newborns and young children this primary diagnostic modality will be supplemented by sonography. If there is a need for further imaging, MRI and the different scintigraphic methods may be used interchangeably. However, for the spine and other complex anatomical regions MRI is preferred. In contrast, three-phase bone scanning is mostly accepted as the primary additional tool to radiography and sonography in the newborn and in small children. If an abscess is suspected, MRI is the primary imaging modality. In cases of chronic osteomyelitis radiography still forms the basis for obtaining information about the bone. Further imaging is regularly needed, not only because of its diagnostic value but also because radiographs do not demonstrate the extent of lesions correctly. The evaluation of disease extent in bone is a domain of MRI, while scintigraphic methods, like 111In leucocyte scintigraphy and MRI, are of equivalent diagnostic value. CT may have its role in disclosing a sequestrum when radiographs and MRI are equivocal. (orig.)

  3. Optimal management of chronic osteomyelitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pande KC

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ketan C Pande Raja Isteri Pengiran Anak Saleha Hospital, Bandar Seri Begawan, BruneiAbstract: Chronic osteomyelitis is a challenging condition to treat. It is seen mostly after open fractures or in implant-related infections following treatment of fractures and prosthetic joint replacements. Recurrence of infection is well known, and successful treatment requires a multidisciplinary team approach with surgical debridement and appropriate antimicrobial therapy as the cornerstone of treatment. Staging of the disease and identification of the causative microorganism is essential before initiation of treatment. Important surgical steps include radical debridement of necrotic and devitalized tissue, removal of implants, management of resultant dead space, soft-tissue coverage, and skeletal stabilization or management of skeletal defects. The route of administration and duration of antimicrobial therapy continues to be debated. The role of biofilm is now clearly established in the chronicity of bone infection, and newer modalities are being developed to address various issues related to biofilm formation. The present review addresses various aspects of chronic osteomyelitis of long bones seen in adults, with a review of recent developments. Keywords: osteomyelitis, infection, biofilm, bone, therapy, treatment

  4. Antimicrobial peptides on calcium phosphate-coated titanium for the prevention of implant-associated infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Kindrachuk, Jason; Duan, Ke;

    2010-01-01

    ) bacteria with 106-fold reductions of both bacterial strains within 30 min as assessed by measuring colony-forming units (CFU). Repeated CFU assays on the same CaP-Tet213 specimen demonstrated retention of antimicrobial activity by the CaP-Tet213 surfaces through four test cycles. The susceptibility of......Prevention of implant-associated infections has been one of the main challenges in orthopaedic surgery. This challenge is further complicated by the concern over the development of antibiotic resistance as a result of using traditional antibiotics for infection prophylaxis. The objective of this...... study was to develop a technique that enables the loading and local delivery of a unique group of cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMP) through implant surfaces. A thin layer of micro-porous calcium phosphate (CaP) coating was processed by electrolytic deposition onto the surface of titanium as the drug...

  5. Sonographic evaluation of acute osteomyelitis in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the related sonographic findings and to determine the value of sonography in establishing the diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis in infants. The sonographic findings of eleven infants aged 10 days-4 months (mean, 45 days) with acute osteomyelitis were retrospectively evaluated. The involved bones were the femur (n=5), humerus (n=2), tibia (n=2), rib(n=1), sternum (n=1), and calcaneus (n=1). Discontinuity or destruction of cortical margins, echotexture of the metaphysis and epiphysis, the presence of subperiosteal hypoechoic lesion, adjacent soft tissue swelling, distension of the joint capsule, the echotexture of joint effusion, and dislocation or subluxation of the involved joint were evaluated. The sonographic findings were compared with the plain radiographic (n=12) and MR (n=5) findings, with special attention to the identification of the metaphyseal or epiphyseal bony lesions and the involvement of adjacent joints. The sonographic findings of osteomyelitis were cortical discontinuity or destruction (n=12), hypoechoic lesions with an echogenic rim in the metaphysis (n=12), subperiosteal hypoechoic lesions (n=8), soft tissue swelling (n=9), a distended hip joint, with echogenic fluid (n=5), ill-demarcated echogenic lesions in the capital femoral epiphysis (n=5), and a subluxated hip joint (n=3). Plain radiographs revealed well or ill-defined osteolytic lesions in the metaphysis, accompanied by cortical destruction (n=8), new periosteal bone formation (n=3) and reactive sclerosis (n=2). Abnormality of the femoral epiphyses and joint involvement were not detected on plain radiographs, and in four cases no abnormality was noted. MR imaging showed that at T1WI, affected bony lesions were of low signal intensity and enhaned, with high signal intensity at T2WI. In all cases, both metaphyseal and epiphyseal lesions were demonstrated at MRI, but in one of the three cases in which an epiphyseal lesion was seen at MRI, this was not detected at US. Sonography is

  6. Parenteral and oral antibiotic duration for treatment of pediatric osteomyelitis: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Grimbly, Chelsey; Odenbach, Jeff; Vandermeer, Ben; Forgie, Sarah; Curtis, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Background Pediatric osteomyelitis is a bacterial infection of bones requiring prolonged antibiotic treatment using parenteral followed by enteral agents. Major complications of pediatric osteomyelitis include transition to chronic osteomyelitis, formation of subperiosteal abscesses, extension of infection into the joint, and permanent bony deformity or limb shortening. Historically, osteomyelitis has been treated with long durations of antibiotics to avoid these complications. However, with ...

  7. Osteomyelitis of the head and neck: sequential radionuclide scanning in diagnosis and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, M.; Kaufman, R.A.; Baum, S.

    1985-01-01

    Sequential technetium and gallium scans of the head and neck were used to confirm the diagnosis of osteomyelitis and as an important therapeutic aid to delineate the transformation of active osteomyelitis to inactive osteomyelitis in 11 cases involving sites in the head and neck. Illustrative cases are presented of frontal sinus and cervical spine osteomyelitis and laryngeal osteochondritis.

  8. Osteomyelitis of the head and neck: sequential radionuclide scanning in diagnosis and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequential technetium and gallium scans of the head and neck were used to confirm the diagnosis of osteomyelitis and as an important therapeutic aid to delineate the transformation of active osteomyelitis to inactive osteomyelitis in 11 cases involving sites in the head and neck. Illustrative cases are presented of frontal sinus and cervical spine osteomyelitis and laryngeal osteochondritis

  9. Plasma cellular osteomyelitis of the thoracic spine - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report the case of a young patient suffering from plasmacellular osteomyelitis of the thoracic spine, an unusual localisation of this type of chronic osteomyelitis. They discuss the role of imaging diagnostic modalities in this disease, focussing on MRI. (orig.)

  10. Osteomyelitis Because of Mycobacterium Xenopi in an Immunocompetent Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Martin; Seidl, Maximilian; Henneke, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 6-year-old, immunocompetent boy with chronic osteomyelitis of the calcaneus caused by Mycobacterium xenopi. Of note, typical histopathology was not visible on the first biopsy and developed only later over a period of 6 weeks, highlighting the difficult differential diagnosis of osteomyelitis caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:26418244

  11. Nocardia osteomyelitis in the setting of previously unknown HIV infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a case of primary Nocardia osteomyelitis in the setting of HIV infection. The clinical and radiographic manifestations of musculoskeletal nocardiosis are nonspecific and resemble those of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. To our knowledge no other cases of Nocardia osteomyelitis have been reported in the radiology literature. (orig.)

  12. Screening for Osteomyelitis Using Thermography in Patients with Diabetic Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Oe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most serious complications of diabetic foot (DF is osteomyelitis, and early detection is important. To assess the validity of thermography to screen for osteomyelitis, we investigated thermographic findings in patients with both DF and osteomyelitis. The subjects were 18 diabetic patients with 20 occurrences of DF who visited a dermatology department at a hospital in Tokyo and underwent evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and thermography between June 2010 and July 2012. Osteomyelitis was identified by MRI. Thermographs were taken of the wounds and legs after bed rest of more than 15 minutes. Two wound management researchers evaluated the range of increased skin temperature. There were three types of distribution of increased skin temperature: the periwound, ankle, and knee patterns. Fisher’s exact test revealed that the ankle pattern was significantly more common in the group with osteomyelitis than in the group without osteomyelitis (P=0.011. The positive predictive value was 100%, and the negative predictive value was 71.4%. Our results suggest that an area of increased skin temperature extending to the ankle can be a sign of osteomyelitis. Thermography might therefore be useful for screening for osteomyelitis in patients with DF.

  13. Disseminated Osteomyelitis Caused by Clostridium novyi in a Cat

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, J. K.; Farrow, C. S.; Doige, C E

    1983-01-01

    The history, clinical signs, laboratory and radiological findings of a cat with polyostotic osteomyelitis are described. A disseminated periosteal reaction involving the femur, humerus and tibia bilaterally was evident on radiographs. The joints were not affected. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis was confirmed by bone marrow aspiration and bone biopsy. Clostridium novyi was cultured from the bone marrow.

  14. Osteomyelitis complicating fracture: pitfalls of 111In leukocyte scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    111In-labeled leukocyte imaging has shown greater accuracy and specificity than alternative noninvasive methods in the detection of uncomplicated osteomyelitis. Forty patients with suspected osteomyelitis complicating fractures (with and without surgical intervention) were evaluated with 111In-labeled leukocytes. All five patients with intense focal uptake, but only one of 13 with no uptake, had active osteomyelitis. However, mild to moderate 111In leukocyte uptake, observed in 22 cases, indicated the presence of osteomyelitis in only four of these; the other false-positive results were observed in noninfected callus formation, heterotopic bone formation, myositis ossificans, and sickle-cell disease. These results suggest that 111In-labeled leukocyte imaging is useful for the evaluation of suspected osteomyelitis complicating fracture but must be used in conjunction with clinical and radiographic correlation to avoid false-positive results

  15. MRI in diagnostic evaluation of osteomyelitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several MRI investigations for detecting or excluding acute and non-post-traumatic chronic osteomyelitis were performed in 31 children, osteomyelitis was evident in 21 patients. The sensitivity of MRI for osteomyelitis was 90%, and specificity was 100%. In children with confirmed osteomyelitis 23 follow-up investigations were carried out in order to evaluate duration of the medullary edema. In uncomplicated cases only treated by antibiotics edema regression was evident after 4 weeks and completed after 12-16 weeks. In cases in whom extended concomitant soft-tissue infection was depicted regression of edema was prolonged independent of surgical intervention. The study reveals that at onset of acute osteomyelitis in children MRI can replace technetium 99m-labeled scintigraphy and reduce plain-film investigations. The results support the usefulness of MRI in discrimination of isolated soft-tissue infection and noninfectious diseases of bone. (orig.)

  16. Biofilm may not be Necessary for the Epidemic Spread of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan; He, Lihua; Tao, Xiaoxia; Meng, Fanliang; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm is recognized as a contributing factor to the capacity of Acinetobacter baumannii to persist and prosper in medical settings, but it is still unknown whether biofilms contribute to the spread of A. baumannii. In this study, the biofilm formation of 114 clinical A. baumannii isolates and 32 non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates was investigated using a microtiter plate assay. The clonal relationships among A. baumannii isolates were assessed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing, and one major outbreak clone and 5 other epidemic clones were identified. Compared with the epidemic or outbreak A. baumannii isolates, the sporadic isolates had significantly higher biofilm formation, but no significant difference was observed between the sporadic A. baumannii isolates and the non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates, suggesting that biofilm is not important for the epidemic spread of A. baumannii. Of the multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii isolates in this study, 95.7% were assigned to international clone 2 (IC2) and showed significantly lower biofilm formations than the other isolates, suggesting that biofilm did not contribute to the high success of IC2. These findings have increased our understanding of the potential relationship between biofilm formation and the epidemic capacity of A. baumannii. PMID:27558010

  17. Epidemiologic and Clinical Impact of Acinetobacter baumannii Colonization and Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Macarena; Cano, María E.; Gato, Eva; Garnacho-Montero, José; Miguel Cisneros, José; Ruíz de Alegría, Carlos; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Vila, Jordi; Pascual, Alvaro; Tomás, María; Bou, Germán; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most important antibiotic-resistant nosocomial bacteria. We investigated changes in the clinical and molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii over a 10-year period. We compared the data from 2 prospective multicenter cohort studies in Spain, one performed in 2000 (183 patients) and one in 2010 (246 patients), which included consecutive patients infected or colonized by A. baumannii. Molecular typing was performed by repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The incidence density of A. baumannii colonization or infection increased significantly from 0.14 in 2000 to 0.52 in 2010 in medical services (p < 0.001). The number of non-nosocomial health care-associated cases increased from 1.2% to 14.2%, respectively (p < 0.001). Previous exposure to carbapenems increased in 2010 (16.9% in 2000 vs 27.3% in 2010, p = 0.03). The drugs most frequently used for definitive treatment of patients with infections were carbapenems in 2000 (45%) and colistin in 2010 (50.3%). There was molecular-typing evidence of an increase in the frequency of A. baumannii acquisition in non-intensive care unit wards in 2010 (7.6% in 2000 vs 19.2% in 2010, p = 0.01). By MSLT, the ST2 clonal group predominated and increased in 2010. This epidemic clonal group was more frequently resistant to imipenem and was associated with an increased risk of sepsis, although not with severe sepsis or mortality. Some significant changes were noted in the epidemiology of A. baumannii, which is increasingly affecting patients admitted to conventional wards and is also the cause of non-nosocomial health care-associated infections. Epidemic clones seem to combine antimicrobial resistance and the ability to spread, while maintaining their clinical virulence. PMID:25181313

  18. MRI findings of osteomyelitis of the mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of MRI findings of mandibular osteomyelitis. MR images of 24 patients with mandibular osteomyelitis (14 males and 10 females, average age of 49 years, range 16 to 80 years) were analyzed in relation to clinical findings and clinical outcome. The average duration of symptoms at the time of MR imaging was 17.2 months (range: 2 weeks to 12 years, median of 5 months). Seven patients (29%) were imaged within 1 month after the onset of symptoms. Patients were classified as ''cured'' and ''not cured'' based on the clinical outcome. Sixteen patients were ''cured'' and eight were ''not cured''. Characteristic MR findings were investigated on T1- weighted images (T1WI) and T2- weighted images with fat-suppression (T2WI). Characteristic MRI findings of mandibular osteomyelitis and the frequencies were signal changes in the bone marrow (low on T1WI and high on T2WI) in 24 patients (100%), defect of the cortical bone in 10 (42%), periosteal reaction in 8 (33%), widening of the bone width in 8 (33%), sequestrum in 1 (4%). Fourteen (58%) showed edematous change of surrounding muscles and seven (29%) showed abscess formation in the soft tissues. Six patients (25%) showed only signal changes in the bone marrow. Bone marrow signal change was categorized into 2 types. Fifteen (62.5%) showed homogenous signal changes on both T1WI and T2WI and the other 9 patients (37.5%) showed both high and low signal on T2WI in the area showing a low signal on T1WI (heterogeneous type). These patterns were correlated with the occurrence of bone width change. The non-cured group significantly more frequently showed the heterogeneous type of bone marrow signal change and widening of bone width. The bone marrow signal change pattern and the presence of widening of bone width are indicators of treatment-resistant osteomyelitis of the mandible. (author)

  19. Metastatic spinal abscesses from diabetic foot osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaho, Shang; Khan, Shaila; Huda, M S Bobby; Chowdhury, Tahseen Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with long-standing type 2 diabetes, nephropathy and neuropathy was admitted acutely with an infected left big toe neuropathic ulcer, with underlying osteomyelitis. His condition rapidly deteriorated with sepsis and right lobar pneumonia. Microbiology grew methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Shortly into his admission, he developed flaccid paraparesis, and an MRI showed multiple epidural abscesses with likely cord infarction, not amenable to surgical intervention. His sepsis resolved, but his paraparesis remained severe, requiring spinal rehabilitation. PMID:24920514

  20. Tuberculous osteomyelitis of zygoma: an unusual location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Virendra; Khatana, Shruti; Gupta, Pranav; Bhagol, Amrish; Narwal, Anjali

    2013-09-01

    Tubercular osteomyelitis of midfacial bones is extremely rare, although tuberculosis of long bones and the vertebral column is not uncommon. Because of the rare incidence, myriad presentation, and lack of specific symptoms, this condition presents a challenge in diagnosis and calls for acute clinical awareness. This article presents a case report of a 12-year-old girl with complaints of gradually increasing swelling lateral to and below her right eye for 4 months with pus discharge. She was treated with surgical curettage and 4-drug antitubercular therapy and responded with complete remission of the sinus. PMID:22819461

  1. Impact of prophylactic CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide application on implant-associated Staphylococcus aureus bone infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Shneh; Thormann, Ulrich; Sommer, Ursula; Stötzel, Sabine; Mohamed, Walid; Schnettler, Reinhard; Domann, Eugen; Chakraborty, Trinad; Alt, Volker

    2015-09-01

    TLR-9 ligand CpG oligodeoxynucleotide type B (CpG ODN) induces a proinflammatory environment. We evaluated the effects of a preoperative CpG ODN application in an implant-associated Staphylococcus aureus bone infection model by monitoring bacterial loads and cytokine and chemokine levels. A total of 95 rats were used in four different groups: CpG ODN group (group 1; n=25), non-CpG-ODN group (group 2; n=25); saline pretreatment (group 3; n=25), and one uninfected group (group 4; n=20). A single dose of CpG-ODN was administered to the left tibialis anterior muscle 3days prior to surgery and the tibia midshaft was osteotomized, stabilized by an intramedullary implant and subsequently contaminated with 10(3) colony forming units (CFUs) of S. aureus in groups 1-3. The osteotomy gap in animals of group 4 was not contaminated with S. aureus and those animals did not receive any pretreatment. CpG ODN administration resulted in significant reduction of the bacterial load in tibia tissue homogenate and on the implant surface on day 1 post-infection compared to non-CpG-ODN pretreatment (pmodel, prophylactic administration of a single dose of CpG ODN, resulted in marked reduction of S. aureus load in the infected tibia during the initial stage of infection but failed to prevent development of chronic infection over time. PMID:25959416

  2. Ewing sarcoma versus osteomyelitis: differential diagnosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To find and evaluate characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns for the differentiation between Ewing sarcoma and osteomyelitis. We identified 28 consecutive patients referred to our department for MRI (1.5 T) of an unclear bone lesion with clinical symptoms suggestive of Ewing sarcoma or osteomyelitis. MRI scans were re-evaluated by two experienced radiologists, typical MR imaging features were documented and a diagnostic decision between Ewing sarcoma and osteomyelitis was made. Statistical significance of the association between MRI features and the biopsy-based diagnosis was assessed using Fisher's exact test. The most clear-cut pattern for determining the correct diagnosis was the presence of a sharp and defined margin of the bone lesion, which was found in all patients with Ewing sarcoma, but in none of the patients with osteomyelitis (P < 0.0001). Contrast enhancing soft tissue was present in all cases with Ewing sarcoma and absent in 4 patients with osteomyelitis (P = 0.0103). Cortical destruction was found in all patients with Ewing sarcoma, 4 patients with osteomyelitis did not present any cortical reaction (P = 0.0103). Cystic or necrotic areas were identified in 13 patients with Ewing sarcoma and in 1 patient with osteomyelitis (P = 0.004). Interobserver reliability was very good (kappa = 1) in Ewing sarcoma and moderate (kappa = 0.6) in patients with osteomyelitis. A sharp and defined margin, optimally visualized on T1-weighted images in comparison to short tau inversion recovery (STIR) images, is the most significant feature of Ewing sarcoma in differentiating from osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  3. Ewing sarcoma versus osteomyelitis: differential diagnosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henninger, B.; Glodny, B.; Rudisch, A.; Trieb, T.; Loizides, A.; Judmaier, W.; Schocke, M.F. [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Putzer, D. [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-08-15

    To find and evaluate characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns for the differentiation between Ewing sarcoma and osteomyelitis. We identified 28 consecutive patients referred to our department for MRI (1.5 T) of an unclear bone lesion with clinical symptoms suggestive of Ewing sarcoma or osteomyelitis. MRI scans were re-evaluated by two experienced radiologists, typical MR imaging features were documented and a diagnostic decision between Ewing sarcoma and osteomyelitis was made. Statistical significance of the association between MRI features and the biopsy-based diagnosis was assessed using Fisher's exact test. The most clear-cut pattern for determining the correct diagnosis was the presence of a sharp and defined margin of the bone lesion, which was found in all patients with Ewing sarcoma, but in none of the patients with osteomyelitis (P < 0.0001). Contrast enhancing soft tissue was present in all cases with Ewing sarcoma and absent in 4 patients with osteomyelitis (P = 0.0103). Cortical destruction was found in all patients with Ewing sarcoma, 4 patients with osteomyelitis did not present any cortical reaction (P = 0.0103). Cystic or necrotic areas were identified in 13 patients with Ewing sarcoma and in 1 patient with osteomyelitis (P = 0.004). Interobserver reliability was very good (kappa = 1) in Ewing sarcoma and moderate (kappa = 0.6) in patients with osteomyelitis. A sharp and defined margin, optimally visualized on T1-weighted images in comparison to short tau inversion recovery (STIR) images, is the most significant feature of Ewing sarcoma in differentiating from osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  4. Diabetic foot complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, Maddalena; Imbriaco, Chiara; Rigolon, Riccardo; Mingolla, Lucia; Zamboni, Federica; Dal Molin, Francesca; Cioccoloni, Dario; Sanga, Viola; Bruti, Massimiliano; Brocco, Enrico; Conti, Michela; Ravenna, Giorgio; Perrone, Fabrizia; Stoico, Vincenzo; Bonora, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vertebral osteomyelitis (or spondylodiscitis) is steadily increasing in Western countries and often results from hematogenous seeding, direct inoculation during spinal surgery, or contiguous spread from an infection in the adjacent soft tissue. We present the case of a 67-year-old white patient with type 2 diabetes who went to Hospital for high fever, back pain, and worsening of known infected ulcers in the left foot. Despite intravenous antibiotic treatment and surgical debridement of the foot infection, high fever and lower back pain continued. Bone biopsy and two consecutive blood cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. A spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, revealing serious osteomyelitis in L4 and L5 complicated by an epidural abscess. Contiguous or other distant focuses of infection were not identified. In this case, diabetic foot could be considered as a primary distant focus for vertebral osteomyelitis. Clinicians should consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a ‘possible’ diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by foot infection that is associated with fever and lower back pain. Learning points Vertebral osteomyelitis is increasing in Western countries, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary focus of infection is the genitourinary tract followed by skin, soft tissue, endocarditis, bursitis, septic arthritis, and intravascular access. Diabetic foot could be a rare primary focus of infection for vertebral osteomyelitis, and, however, vertebral osteomyelitis could be a serious, albeit rare, complication of diabetic foot. Clinicians should keep in mind the many potential complications of diabetic foot ulcerations and consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a “possible” diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes and foot ulcers associated with nonspecific symptoms such as lower back pain. Early diagnosis and correct management of vertebral osteomyelitis are crucial to improve clinical outcomes

  5. Nuclear medicine for diagnostic evaluation of osteomyelitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although skeletal scintiscanning has yielded results allowing an early diagnosis of osteomyelitis in children already at a stage prior to detection by X-ray radiography, reports have been published showing that there is quite a number of false negative findings obtained by nuclear medicine techniques, especially in newborns. The article here therefore reports a study on clinical validation of skeletal scintigraphy in case of suspected osteomyelitis in children. The results show that scintiscanning is a very sensitive method of detecting osteomyelitis in children, and also can be a very useful diagnostic tool for examination of newborns, provided the different anatomy of the skeleton in newborns is taken into account. (orig./MG)

  6. Osteomyelitis following extraction of lower third molar during pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Bin; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Lee, Sam Sun [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Ja [Department of Dentistry, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    A 27-year-old female was referred to our hospital postpartum due to rapid aggravation of facial swelling. She was diagnosed with osteomyelitis on clinical, radiological, and histopathological examinations, but the possibility of malignancy was not excluded. Clinical signs and symptoms such as facial swelling and discomfort were improved with four months of antibiotics treatment. This is a case of an osteomyelitis progressed from infected extraction socket in a woman with physiological changes of pregnancy. Decreased immunological response, increased sex hormone and calcium regulatory hormones regulate the response of the bone infection. We report this case for helping the diagnosis of unusual form of osteomyelitis in pregnancy and postpartum.

  7. Periostitis ossificans (Garrè's osteomyelitis): An unusual case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deepesh; Subramaniam, Priya; Bhayya, Panduranga Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Garrè's sclerosing osteomyelitis is a specific type of chronic osteomyelitis that mainly affects children and young adults and is commonly associated with odontogenic infection. The paper describes an unusual case of Garrè's osteomyelitis in an 11-year-old boy, in whom the condition arose following poor oral hygiene and periodontal problems in relation to permanent mandibular left first molar. Clinically the patient presented with bony hard, nontender swelling and the occlusal radiograph revealed pathognomic feature of "onion skin" appearance. PMID:26381640

  8. Primary Osteomyelitis of the Clavicle in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghate, Sushant; Thabet, Ahmed M; Gosey, G Max; Southern, Edward P; Bégué, Rodolfo E; King, Andrew G

    2016-07-01

    Osteomyelitis of the clavicle is a rare entity with a broad differential diagnosis and high potential for complications if not diagnosed promptly and treated appropriately. The threshold for surgical intervention should be low to prevent osteonecrosis and bony resorption. In addition, although rare, life-threatening complications have been reported. This report describes primary osteomyelitis of the clavicle that was diagnosed in a 22-month-old girl on her third clinical evaluation after 4 days of symptoms. She presented to a children's tertiary care emergency department with fever and acute pain and swelling of her right shoulder and arm. The diagnosis was confirmed through clinical, laboratory, and imaging studies including ultrasound; these revealed subperiosteal abscess formation, which may have developed in part as the result of a delayed diagnosis from the 2 prior emergency department visits. The patient was treated initially with intravenous antibiotics and underwent therapeutic as well as diagnostic needle-guided tissue aspiration under ultrasound guidance. This ruled out malignancy but was not curative, and the subperiosteal abscess recurred within 24 hours, prompting formal operative irrigation and debridement. The patient was seen for 12-month follow-up and has had no complications or evidence of recurrence. This case emphasizes the need for a high index of suspicion to prevent diagnostic delays as well as the importance of a low threshold for surgical debridement to minimize the potential for complications that could prolong the treatment course. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e760-e763.]. PMID:27280623

  9. In-111 WBC scintigraphy in adult osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlike pediatric bone infections, adult osteomyelitis is commonly related to trauma, surgery, or direct extension from an overlying soft tissue infection. Because of this, the findings on Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy tend to be nonspecific. Therefore the value of In-111 WBC scintigraphy in the diagnosis of adult osteomyelitis was evaluated. 52 scans were obtained on 51 adult patients who were consecutively referred to the authors' department with this provisional diagnosis. The diagnosis was confirmed by at least two of the following: positive culture, surgery, x-rays, laboratory results, and clinical response to antibiotics. Of the 52 scans studied the sensitivity was 84%, specificity was 82%, and the accuracy was 83%. False positive results occurred most frequently in patients with inflammatory arthritis. False negative examinations occurred in patients who had In-111 WBC concentration in overlying soft tissue obscuring the bony abnormality. Neither the chronicity of the infection, nor prior treatment with antibiotics created difficulty in scan interpretation. It was concluded that although somewhat less sensitive than TcMDP bone scanning, In-111 WBC scintigraphy is more specific than previously studied radiopharmaceuticals in the assessment of bone infections in the adult population

  10. In-111 WBC scintigraphy in adult osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrlich, L.; Martin, R.H.; Saliken, J.

    1984-01-01

    Unlike pediatric bone infections, adult osteomyelitis is commonly related to trauma, surgery, or direct extension from an overlying soft tissue infection. Because of this, the findings on Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy tend to be nonspecific. Therefore the value of In-111 WBC scintigraphy in the diagnosis of adult osteomyelitis was evaluated. 52 scans were obtained on 51 adult patients who were consecutively referred to the authors' department with this provisional diagnosis. The diagnosis was confirmed by at least two of the following: positive culture, surgery, x-rays, laboratory results, and clinical response to antibiotics. Of the 52 scans studied the sensitivity was 84%, specificity was 82%, and the accuracy was 83%. False positive results occurred most frequently in patients with inflammatory arthritis. False negative examinations occurred in patients who had In-111 WBC concentration in overlying soft tissue obscuring the bony abnormality. Neither the chronicity of the infection, nor prior treatment with antibiotics created difficulty in scan interpretation. It was concluded that although somewhat less sensitive than TcMDP bone scanning, In-111 WBC scintigraphy is more specific than previously studied radiopharmaceuticals in the assessment of bone infections in the adult population.

  11. Imaging osteomyelitis and the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical diagnosis of osteomyelitis and the diabetic foot is in most of the patients not possible without imaging the bone. The clinical problem is to diagnose infection as early, as reliable and as cheap as possible to prevent the possible longstanding and life-threatening complications. For imaging a lot of different radiological and nuclear medicine methods are available. This article focuses on the possible results of conventional plain radiography and tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as radiological and on bone scan, autologous white blood cell scintigraphy with 111In-oxin or 99mTc-HMPAO, antigranulocyte antibodies, 99mTc/111In-human immunoglobulin,67 Ga-citrate and 99mTc-nanocelloids. Different methods after different answers. Radiological methods give detailed pathological answers, nuclear medicine methods answer questions of specificity such as leukocyte infiltration. If osteomyelitis is suspected, plain radiography should be the first, three phase bone scintigraphy the second and infection specific radiopharmaceuticals the third step of examination. Only in negative images with high clinical suspicion CT or MRI should be the final imaging procedure. In the diabetic foot imaging cascade should also start with plain radiography, followed by three phase bone scintigraphy or MRI. If clinically neuropathy is present specific nuclear medicine imaging should be performed

  12. Imaging osteomyelitis and the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, W. (Gottingen Univ. (Germany). Dep. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1999-03-01

    The clinical diagnosis of osteomyelitis and the diabetic foot is in most of the patients not possible without imaging the bone. The clinical problem is to diagnose infection as early, as reliable and as cheap as possible to prevent the possible longstanding and life-threatening complications. For imaging a lot of different radiological and nuclear medicine methods are available. This article focuses on the possible results of conventional plain radiography and tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as radiological and on bone scan, autologous white blood cell scintigraphy with [sup 111]In-oxin or [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO, antigranulocyte antibodies, [sup 99m]Tc/[sup 111]In-human immunoglobulin,[sup 67] Ga-citrate and [sup 99m]Tc-nanocelloids. Different methods after different answers. Radiological methods give detailed pathological answers, nuclear medicine methods answer questions of specificity such as leukocyte infiltration. If osteomyelitis is suspected, plain radiography should be the first, three phase bone scintigraphy the second and infection specific radiopharmaceuticals the third step of examination. Only in negative images with high clinical suspicion CT or MRI should be the final imaging procedure. In the diabetic foot imaging cascade should also start with plain radiography, followed by three phase bone scintigraphy or MRI. If clinically neuropathy is present specific nuclear medicine imaging should be performed.

  13. TUBERCULOUS OSTEOMYELITIS OF PATELLA: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu B

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The knee joint is the third most frequent skeletal location for tuberculosis after spine and hip. Isolated patellar osteomyelitis of tubercular etiology is rare with literature reporting an incidence of 0.09% to 0.15%. Here we report a case of tuberculous osteomyelitis affecting the patella. CASE REPORT: A 24 year old young male o f Indian origin, working in Australia for a period of 3 years, presented with complaints of pain in the left knee since 3 months. There was minimal swelling of left knee and tenderness over medial border of patella. There were no signs of involvement of kn ee joint proper. Diagnosis was confirmed by imaging and histopathology studies. Curettage followed by anti - tubercular treatment was given for 9 months. CONCLUSIONS: Tuberculosis of the patella is a rare finding. The diagnosis frequently is delayed because of its rarity and variable presentation, which may be acute with systemic signs or insidious with mild local signs. Surgical debridement combined with ATT for 9 months ensures recovery.

  14. Stress Conditions Induced by Carvacrol and Cinnamaldehyde on Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagu, Angélique; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure; Rossines, Elisabeth; Cayon, Jérome; Kempf, Marie; Saulnier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections. The ability of A. baumannii to display various resistance mechanisms against antibiotics has transformed it into a successful nosocomial pathogen. The limited number of antibiotics in development and the disengagement of the pharmaceutical industry have prompted the development of innovative strategies. One of these strategies is the use of essential oils, especially aromatic compounds that are potent antibacterial molecules. Among them, the combination of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde has already demonstrated antibacterial efficacy against A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to determine the biological effects of these two compounds in A. baumannii, describing their effect on the rRNA and gene regulation under environmental stress conditions. Results demonstrated rRNA degradation by the carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture, and this effect was due to carvacrol. Degradation was conserved after encapsulation of the mixture in lipid nanocapsules. Results showed an upregulation of the genes coding for heat shock proteins, such as groES, groEL, dnaK, clpB, and the catalase katE, after exposure to carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture. The catalase was upregulated after carvacrol exposure wich is related to an oxidative stress. The combination of thiourea (hydroxyl radical scavenger) and carvacrol demonstrated a potent bactericidal effect. These results underline the development of defense strategies of the bacteria by synthesis of reactive oxygen species in response to environmental stress conditions, such as carvacrol. PMID:27486453

  15. Osteomyelitis caused by Veillonella species: Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Jun; Yamagishi, Yuka; Kinjo, Takeshi; Hagihara, Mao; Sakanashi, Daisuke; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Jiro; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-06-01

    Previously, Veillonella species had been considered as nonpathogenic and rarely caused serious infections. We report a case of 25-year-old man with osteomyelitis caused by Veillonella species. He was admitted to the hospital due to an open fracture to the left radial bone caused by industrial washing machine accident, and emergency surgery was performed. However, wound infections occurred one week after the operation. Although Acinetobacter baumannii and Serratia marcescens were cultured from the pus, obligate anaerobic bacteria were not detected at that point. Debridement was repeated and antibiotics were changed according to the result of bacterial culture and drug sensitivity. Despite this, the infection was poorly controlled. On the 5th debridement, granulomatous bone tissues on pseudarthrosis were found for the first time at the infection site. Although no bacteria was detected with aerobic culture, anaerobic incubation revealed Gram-negative cocci which was later identified as Veillonella species by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. His condition improved without any additional debridement after adding effective antibiotics against Veillonella species. It is well known that prolonged infection with aerobes consumes oxygen in the infection site and leads the environment to more favorable conditions for anaerobic bacteria, thus we speculated that prolonged infection with bacteria such as S. marcescens induced the favorable environment for Veillonella species. Physicians should realize the importance of anaerobic culture method in routine practice, especially in complicated cases such as the present case. In this article, we reviewed case reports of Veillonella infection and summarized the clinical features of this organism. PMID:26857179

  16. Early diagnosis of osteomyelitis occurred in the jaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early diagnosis and treatment of osteomyelitis provide good prognosis and prevent severe complications. Therefore, it is important to early diagnose and treat before the bony changes are observed in conventional radiograms. Authors experienced three cases of early osteomyelitis, and scintigrams were useful to differentiate them from other diseases. The purpose of this report was to aid in the early diagnosis and treatment of osteomyelitis occurred in the jaws. The characteristic features were as follows: 1. In clinical examination, the patients complained mild pain and localized swelling in the jaws. 2. In radiographic findings, the conventional radiograms showed relatively mild bony change in the jaws. 3. The more severe periosteal reactions were observed in radiograms in children than in adult patient. 4. It showed marked increased uptake of radioisotopes in all scintigrams. 5. The three phase bone scanning were helpful to differentiate osteomyelitis from soft tissue diseases.

  17. Symphysis Pubis Osteomyelitis with Bilateral Adductor Muscles Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad M. Alqahtani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis of the pubis symphysis is a rare condition. There have been various reports in the literature of inflammation and osteomyelitis as well as septic arthritis of pubic symphysis. However, due to the fact that these conditions are rare and that the usual presenting symptoms are very nonspecific, osteomyelitis of the pubic symphysis is often misdiagnosed, thus delaying definitive treatment. We present a case that to our knowledge is the first case in literature of osteomyelitis of the pubic symphysis in a 17-year-old boy with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, which was initially misdiagnosed and progressed to bilateral adductor abscesses. A high suspicion of such condition should be considered in a JIA patient who presents with symphysis or thigh pain.

  18. Congenital multifocal osteomyelitis at 24 weeks' gestation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raupp, Peter; Shubbar, Adil; Baichoo, Vijaymani; Samson, Gregory [Al Corniche Hospital, Department of Neonatology, P.O. Box 3788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2007-12-15

    We report an extremely rare case of congenital nonsyphilitic osteomyelitis in a very preterm infant, providing a unique illustration of the radiological appearances at birth, which may serve as a reference to facilitate diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. A Case of Pediatric Q Fever Osteomyelitis Managed Without Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ameneh; Sparks, Rebecca T; Marais, Ben J

    2015-12-01

    Q fever osteomyelitis, caused by infection with Coxiella burnetti, is rare but should be included in the differential diagnosis of children with culture-negative osteomyelitis, particularly if there is a history of contact with farm animals, and/or granulomatous change on histologic examination of a bone biopsy specimen. We describe a case of Q fever osteomyelitis in a 6-year-old boy in which a decision was made not to treat the patient with combination antimicrobial agents, balancing possible risks of recurrence against potential side effects of prolonged antibiotic treatment. The patient had undergone surgical debridement of a single lesion and was completely asymptomatic after recovery from surgery. This case suggests that a conservative approach of watchful waiting in an asymptomatic patient with chronic Q fever osteomyelitis may be warranted in select cases when close follow-up is possible. PMID:26574586

  20. Improved Diagnosis of Orthopedic Implant-Associated Infection by Inoculation of Sonication Fluid into Blood Culture Bottles

    OpenAIRE

    Portillo, María Eugenia; Salvadó, Margarita; Trampuz, Andrej; Siverio, Ana; Alier, Albert; Sorli, Lluisa; Martínez, Santos; Pérez-Prieto, Daniel; Horcajada, Juan P.; Puig-Verdie, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Sonication improved the diagnosis of orthopedic implant-associated infections (OIAI). We investigated the diagnostic performance of sonication fluid inoculated into blood culture bottles in comparison with that of intraoperative tissue and sonication fluid cultures. Consecutive patients with removed orthopedic hardware were prospectively included and classified as having OIAI or aseptic failure (AF) according to standardized criteria. The diagnostic procedure included the collection of five i...

  1. Improved diagnosis of orthopedic implant-associated infection by inoculation of sonication fluid into blood culture bottles

    OpenAIRE

    Portillo, Mar??a Eugenia; Salvad??, Margarita; Trampuz, Andrej; Siverio, Ana; Alier, Albert; Sorli Red??, M. Luisa; Mart??nez, Santos; P??rez, Daniel; Horcajada Gallego, Juan Pablo; Puig Verdi??, Lu??s

    2015-01-01

    Sonication improved the diagnosis of orthopedic implant-associated infections (OIAI). We investigated the diagnostic performance of sonication fluid inoculated into blood culture bottles in comparison with that of intraoperative tissue and sonication fluid cultures. Consecutive patients with removed orthopedic hardware were prospectively included and classified as having OIAI or aseptic failure (AF) according to standardized criteria. The diagnostic procedure included the collection of five i...

  2. Clinical and radiological diagnosis of the osteomyelitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors explain the pathogenesis as well as the clinical and the in vitro chemical data obtained in the case of acute, hematogenic osteomyelitis which is the type most frequently occurring in childhood. X-ray radiography still is the imaging method of choice for diagnostic evaluation, and typical findings are explained. It is recommended to start treatment with antibiotics as early as possible, also in case of suspected osteomyelitis. (MG)

  3. Acute Osteomyelitis of the Symphysis Pubis after Inguinal Hernia Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Tekin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis of pubic symphysis is infectious inflammatory condition of the symphysis pubis and rare complication of surgery around inguinal and groin region. It should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lower pelvic pain and should be sought in cases of pelvic insufficiency fractures. Herein, we present a case of a 55-year-old man with osteomyelitis of the symphysis pubis following inguinal hernia surgery for diagnosis and management of this rare condition.

  4. Intravenous Versus Oral Outpatient Antibiotic Therapy for Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Raymond W.; Abaza, Hadeel; Mehta, Priyesh; Bauer, Jennifer; Cooperman, Daniel R.; Gilmore, Allison

    2013-01-01

    The optimal route (oral versus intravenous) of antibiotic administration for pediatric acute osteomyelitis is not well established. Seventy-eight children from our university hospital and 17 children at our county hospital were treated for acute osteomyelitis. The rates of intravenous antibiotics upon discharge were 95% versus 65% (P=0.002), respectively. The recurrence rate and line complication rates were 10% and 24% at the university hospital, compared to 0% (P=0.34) and 6% (P=0.29) at the...

  5. Selection of treatment modalities in children with chronic osteomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Unal, Vuslat Sema; Dayican, Avni; Demirel, Murat; Portakal, Suleyman; Ozkan, Guray; Ucaner, Ahmet

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: We evaluated clinical and follow-up findings and treatment methods of pediatric patients with chronic osteomyelitis. Methods: The study included 22 children (14 boys, 8 girls; mean age 8±7 years) who were treated for chronic osteomyelitis. Infection sites were the femur, tibia, ulna, and radius in 11, 8, 1, and 2 patients, respectively. Sixteen patients had a history of trauma. Fourteen patients had fractures, nine of which were associated with segmentary bone defects. All the ...

  6. Radio-isotope bone scanning in suspected osteomyelitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of radio-isotope bone scanning in suspected osteomyelitis has been widely acclaimed. Fourteen children had rectilinear bone scans performed three hours after injection of Tcsup(99m) methylene diphosphonate. A diagnostic accuracy of 56% was achieved, which is lower than in other series. The reasons for this are discussed and the value of bone scanning in the evaluation of osteomyelitis is questioned. (orig.)

  7. Delayed recognition of pediatric calcaneal osteomyelitis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Mallia, Alvin James; Ashwood, Neil; Arealis, Georgios; Bindi, Frank; Zamfir, Georgiana; Galanopoulos, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The diagnosis of calcaneal osteomyelitis is a challenge, and diagnostic delays have been reported in the literature. The progression is often indolent, laboratory results commonly fail to reveal an underlying infectious process and radiographs changes are seen after 7 days. We discuss the literature on the diagnosis and treatment of calcaneal osteomyelitis which can result in long-term sequelae in the pediatric patient. Case presentation A 9-year-old white boy presented to our in...

  8. Problems in the scintigraphic detection of osteomyelitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate studies in 21 children with acute hematogenous osteomyelitis were compared with radiographic, clinical and surgical findings. Eleven /sup 99m/Tc studies revealed obvious abnormalities, four showed subtle abnormalities, two were misleading, and four were normal. No consistent explanation for the lack of positive radionuclide findings was found. We concluded that pediatric osteomyelitis presents a spectrum of scintigraphic appearances and interpretation is often difficult

  9. Primary tuberculous osteomyelitis of the mandible- A Rare Case Report-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashalata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous osteomyelitis of mandible is an extremely rare condition, particularly in comparison to pyogenic infections andneoplastic diseases involving the mandible. Although a rare occurrence, the differential diagnosis of tuberculous osteomyelitismust always keep in dentist’s mind when the routine therapy fails to respond. Here, we report an unusual case of primarytubercular osteomyelitis of the mandible where the biopsy of the lesion alone has lead to near final diagnosis of the case andthere after antitubercular therapy subsided the swelling.

  10. Phage therapy of staphylococcal chronic osteomyelitis in experimental animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Chandan Kishor; Raghvendra Raman Mishra; Saraf, Shyam K.; Mohan Kumar; Arvind K Srivastav; Gopal Nath

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are the commonest cause of osteomyelitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of an alternative therapy i.e. application of S. aureus specific bacteriophages in cases of osteomyelitis caused by MRSA in animal model. Methods: Twenty two rabbits were included in this study. The first two rabbits were used to test the safety of phage cocktail while the remaining 20 rabbits were divided into three groups; g...

  11. A case of osteomyelitis of mandibular bone in Kimura's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We experienced a case of osteomyelitis of mandibular bone in Kimura's disease. The patient received radiation therapy to head and neck area against the same disease. Bone tissue which received radiation therapy had developed malnutrition as side effect of radiation, and osteomyelitis was induced by infection from the teeth. Even in the benign soft tissue disease like Kimura's disease, especially after radiation therapy, pathologic fracture of bone may happen due to bone damage caused by radiation. (author)

  12. Rapid detection of Acinetobacter baumannii and molecular epidemiology of carbapenem-resistant A.baumannii in two comprehensive hospitals of Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puyuan eLi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunistic pathogen associated with a variety of nosocomial infections. A rapid and sensitive molecular detection in clinical isolates is quite needed for the appropriate therapy and outbreak control of A. baumannii. Group 2 carbapenems have been considered the agents of choice for the treatment of multiple drug resistant A. baumannii. But the prevalence of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB has been steadily increasing in recent years. Here, we developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay for the rapid detection of A. baumannii in clinical samples by using high-specificity primers of the blaOXA-51 gene. Then we investigated the OXA-carbapenemases molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii isolates in 2 comprehensive hospitals in Beijing. The results showed that the LAMP assay could detect target DNA within 60 min at 65°C. The detection limit was 50 pg/μl, which was about 10-fold greater than that of PCR. Furthermore, this method could distinguish A. baumannii from the homologous A. nosocomialis and A. pittii. A total of 228 positive isolates were identified by this LAMP-based method for A. baumannii from 335 ICU patients with clinically suspected multi-resistant infections in 2 hospitals in Beijing. The rates of CRAB are on the rise and are slowly becoming a routine phenotype for A. baumannii. Among the CRABs, 92.3% harbored both the blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-51 genes. Thirty-three pulsotypes were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and the majority belonged to clone C. In conclusion, the LAMP method developed for detecting A. baumannii was faster and simpler than conventional PCR and has great potential for both point-of-care testing and basic research. We further demonstrated a high distribution of class D carbapenemase-encoding genes, mainly OXA-23, which presents an emerging threat in hospitals in China.

  13. Phage therapy of staphylococcal chronic osteomyelitis in experimental animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan Kishor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are the commonest cause of osteomyelitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of an alternative therapy i.e. application of S. aureus specific bacteriophages in cases of osteomyelitis caused by MRSA in animal model. Methods: Twenty two rabbits were included in this study. The first two rabbits were used to test the safety of phage cocktail while the remaining 20 rabbits were divided into three groups; group A (n=4 to assess the establishment of osteomyelitis; group B (n=4 osteomyelitis developed but therapy started only after six weeks; and group C (n=12 osteomyelitis developed and therapy started after three weeks. Groups B and C rabbits were treated with four doses of cocktail of seven virulent bacteriophages at the interval of 48 h. Comparison between three groups was made on the basis of observation of clinical, radiological, microbiological, and histopathological examinations. Results: Experimental group rabbits recovered from the illness in the subsequent two weeks of the therapy. Appetite and activity of the rabbits improved, local oedema, erythema and induration subsided. There were minimal changes associated with osteomyelitis in X-ray and histopathology also showed no signs of infection with new bone formation. Control B group rabbits also recovered well from the infection. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study shows a potential of phage therapy to treat difficult infections caused by multidrug resistant bacteria.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Antimicrobial Compounds in Plant Extracts against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Yoko Miyasaki; John D Rabenstein; Joshua Rhea; Marie-Laure Crouch; Mocek, Ulla M.; Patricia Emmett Kittell; Morgan, Margie A.; Wesley Stephen Nichols; M M Van Benschoten; William David Hardy; Liu, George Y

    2013-01-01

    The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrob...

  15. Detection of colistin sensitivity in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Bahareh Vakili; Hossein Fazeli; Parisa Shoaei; Majid Yaran; Behrooz Ataei; Farzin Khorvash; Moj Khaleghi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nosocomial infection caused by Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a serious problem world-wide. Finding the suitable drug is an important priority. The aim of this study was to determine colistin (polymyxin E) resistance in clinical isolates of A. baumannii from intensive care units (ICUs) of Al Zahra Hospital. Materials and Methods: Sixty isolates of A. baumannii from patients hospitalized in ICU (Al Zahra Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences [IUMS]) were studied....

  16. Immunization against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Effectively Protects Mice in both Pneumonia and Sepsis Models

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Weiwei; Yao, Yufeng; Long, Qiong; Yang, Xu; Sun, Wenjia; Liu, Cunbao; Jin, Xiaomei; LI Yang; Chu, Xiaojie; Chen, Bin; Ma, Yanbing

    2014-01-01

    Objective Acinetobacter baumannii is considered the prototypical example of a multi- or pan- drug-resistant bacterium. It has been increasingly implicated as a major cause of nosocomial and community-associated infections. This study proposed to evaluate the efficacy of immunological approaches to prevent and treat A. baumannii infections. Methods Mice were immunized with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) prepared from a clinically isolated multidrug-resistant strain of A. baumannii. Pneumonia a...

  17. Osteomyelitis of the base of the skull

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, J.R.; Grobman, L.; Quencer, R.; Serafini, A.

    1986-03-01

    Infection in the marrow of the temporal, occipital, and sphenoid bones is an uncommon, but increasing occurrence. It is usually secondary to infections beginning in the external auditory canal and is caused almost uniformly by the gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. Technetium and gallium scintigraphy help in the early detection of such infections while CT scans demonstrate dissolution of bone in well-developed cases. Headache is the predominant symptom. Dysphagia, hoarseness, and aspiration herald the inevitable march of cranial nerves. We have diagnosed and treated 17 cases of osteomyelitis of the skull base. Although the total mortality rate is 53%, it is now a curable disease. Six of our last 8 patients remain alive, although 1 is still under treatment. Treatment is medical and requires the long-term concomitant intravenous administration of an aminoglycoside and a broad spectrum semisynthetic penicillin effective against the causative organism.

  18. Osteomyelitis of the base of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection in the marrow of the temporal, occipital, and sphenoid bones is an uncommon, but increasing occurrence. It is usually secondary to infections beginning in the external auditory canal and is caused almost uniformly by the gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. Technetium and gallium scintigraphy help in the early detection of such infections while CT scans demonstrate dissolution of bone in well-developed cases. Headache is the predominant symptom. Dysphagia, hoarseness, and aspiration herald the inevitable march of cranial nerves. We have diagnosed and treated 17 cases of osteomyelitis of the skull base. Although the total mortality rate is 53%, it is now a curable disease. Six of our last 8 patients remain alive, although 1 is still under treatment. Treatment is medical and requires the long-term concomitant intravenous administration of an aminoglycoside and a broad spectrum semisynthetic penicillin effective against the causative organism

  19. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae endocarditis and presumed osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romney, M; Cheung, S; Montessori, V

    2001-07-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is known to cause infections in humans following exposure to decaying organic matter or animals colonized with the organism, such as swine and fish. Invasive infections with this organism are unusual and are manifested primarily as infective endocarditis. The present report is believed to be the first to report a case of E rhusiopathiae endocarditis and presumptive osteomyelitis. E rhusiopathiae appears to have intrinsic resistance to vancomycin. Because vancomycin is often used empirically for the treatment of endocarditis, rapid differentiation of E rhusiopathiae from other Gram-positive organisms is critical. In patients with endocarditis caused by a Gram-positive bacillus and epidemiological risk factors for E rhusiopathiae exposure, empirical treatment with vancomycin should be reconsidered. PMID:18159347

  20. Candida spp. airway colonization: A potential risk factor for Acinetobacter baumannii ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaojiang; Zhu, Song; Yan, Dongxing; Chen, Weiping; Chen, Ruilan; Zou, Jian; Yan, Jingdong; Zhang, Xiangdong; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2016-08-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to identify potential risk factors for Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and evaluate the association between Candida spp. airway colonization and A. baumannii VAP. Intensive care unit (ICU) patients who were on mechanical ventilation (MV) for ≥48 hours were divided into the following groups: patients with and without Candida spp. airway colonization; colonized patients receiving antifungal treatment or not; patients with A. baumannii VAP and those without VAP. Logistic regression analysis and propensity score matching were used to identify factors independently associated with A. baumannii VAP. Among 618 eligible patients, 264 (43%) had Candida spp. airway colonization and 114 (18%) developed A. baumannii VAP. Along with MV for ≥7 days (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 8.9, 95% confidence intervals [95% CI] 4.9-15.8) and presence of a central venous catheter (aOR 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9), Candida spp. airway colonization (aOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.6-4.3) was identified as an independent risk factor for A. baumannii VAP. Patients with Candida spp. airway colonization were more likely to develop A. baumannii VAP than non-colonized patients (23% vs 15%, P=.01 and 34% vs. 15%, Pmechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours. Candida spp. airway colonization was an independent risk factor for subsequent A. baumannii VAP. PMID:27001670

  1. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis - exclusion by means of turbo-STIR sequence?; Akute haematogene Osteomyelitis - Ausschluss mit Turbo-STIR-Sequenz?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunsch, R.; Darge, K.; Rohrschneider, W.; Zieger, B.; Troeger, J. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Paediatrische Radiologie

    2001-05-01

    The timely diagnosis and early initiation of antibiotic therapy determine the clinical course of an acute hematogenous osteomyelitis. Consequently, a fast and efficient MRI examination protocol is crucial. We retrospectively evaluated various MR sequences used in the examination of 8 children having osteomyelitis. The examinations were conducted using a 0.5 T MR machine. All patients had a high signal intensity of the lesion in the IR sequence with fat suppression (turbo-STIR). An acute osteomyelitis can be excluded in the absence of signal intensity increase in the turbo-STIR sequence without the necessity of having to perform additional sequences. (orig.) [German] Eine schnelle effiziente Diagnostik ist bei der Frage nach einer akuten haematogenen Osteomyelitis besonders wichtig, da der klinische Verlauf vorwiegend durch eine fruehzeitige Diagnose und einen baldmoeglichen Behandlungsbeginn bestimmt wird. Um den Stellenwert der Sequenzen einer magnetresonanztomographischen Untersuchung zu ermitteln, evaluierten wir in einer retrospektiven Studie die Bilder von 8 Kindern mit akuter juveniler Osteomyelitis, welche eine Untersuchung an einem 0,5-Tesla-Geraet erhalten hatten. Auf allen Bildern zeigte sich eine Intensitaetserhoehung in der Turbo-STIR-Sequenz, in 7 von 8 Faellen war ein Kontrastmittelenhancement in einer T1-gewichteten Sequenz mit Fettunterdrueckung nachweisbar. Die Turbo-STIR-Sequenz stellte sich als sensitivste Sequenz heraus. Ist in der Turbo-STIR-Sequenz kein hyperintenses Signal zu erkennen, kann eine akute Osteomyelitis ohne Durchfuehrung weiterer Sequenzen ausgeschlossen werden. (orig.)

  2. Cold defects in in-111 labeled leukocyte imaging of osteomyelitis in the axial skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of In-111 oxine labeled leukocytes in the detection of osteomyelitis of the peripheral skeleton usually presents few problems. However, the diagnosis of osteomyelitis is more difficult in marrow-bearing areas because uptake of indium is normal. Sixty-one In-111 labeled leukocyte scans, that had been performed to exclude osteomyelitis of the axial skeleton, pelvis, and proximal long bones, were reviewed. Eight cold defects were identified at sites of suspected osteomyelitis. Five of these were surgically proven osteomyelitis. Nineteen percent of all cases of osteomyelitis in these areas (5 of 26) presented as cold defects. This incidence of osteomyelitis presenting as cold defects is higher than previously reported. Therefore, the possibility of osteomyelitis should be strongly considered when a cold defect is identified in red marrow areas

  3. Comparison of radionuclide scintigraphy and radiography for the evaluation of diabetic osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide scintigraphy using Tc-99m and radiography were compared in the evaluation of diabetic osteomyelitis in 11 patients. Of the eleven patients, nine showed findings highly suggestive of osteomyelitis by bone scan. Of these nine patients, however, six were considered negative for osteomyelitis based on radiography. Bone imaging appears to be more sensitive diagnostic procedure in determining osteomyelitis than X-rays. (Auth.). 9 refs., 5 tabs

  4. MR imaging of the osteomyelitis of the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the characteristics of MR findings in osteomyelitis, retrospective MR image interpretations were made in 18 patients with osteomyelitis proved either by surgery(n=17) or clinical course(n=1). Osteomyelitis was acute in five patients, subacute in five, chronic in seven, and healed in one. Area of active inflammation had low marrow signal intensity on T1-weighted images, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images inhomogeneously. It has been said that morphologic characteristics of osteomyelitis in MR improved the accuracy in diagnosis of osteomyelitis and that gadolinium enhanced MR images further assisted in the planning of surgery. Our study was performed to observe the signal intensity change or morphologic change of bone marrow, cortex, periosteal reaction, and soft tissue which are specific for osteomyelitis. Multiple inhomogeneous round marrow lesions were noted with central high signal intensity and peripheral low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, and central low signal intensity and peripheral high signal intensity on T2-weighted images in two patients. Intra and extraosseous abscesses showed rim enhancement after gadopentetate dimeglumine injection. The signal intensity of the rim was relatively higher than the internal area of the abscess on T1-weighted images. Cortical bone destruction showed high signal intensities T2-weighted images with destruction patterns of fine radial, circumferential, vertical or wedge shaped. MR imaging, by displaying specific signal intensities and morphological changes of bone marrow, cortex, periosteal reaction and soft tissue, would be an aid in early diagnosis and in planning for appropriate conservative and operative therapeutic procedures for osteomyelitis

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z Y; Liu, P Y; Lau, Y; Lin, Y; Hu, B S; Shir J-M

    1996-02-01

    The in-vitro activity of 18 antimicrobial agents alone or in combination against 248 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Taiwan were tested by agar dilution. The MIC90S of ampicillin, amoxicillin, piperacillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, and amikacin were at least 128 mu g/ml. Ceftazidime, cefepime, sulbactam, clavulanic acid, and tazobactam presented moderate activity with MIC90S of 32, 16, 16, 32, and 32 mu g/ml, respectively. The increased activity of ampicillin/sulbactam, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and piperacillin/tazobactam was due to the intrinsic effect of sulbactam, clavulanic acid, and tazobactam, respectively. Imipenem, meropenem, and ciprofloxacin were the most active antimicrobial agents with MIC90S of 1, 1, and 0.5 mu g/ml, respectively. Nineteen isolates (7.7%) were resistant to all aminoglycosides and beta-lactam antibiotics, except carbapenems and ciprofloxacin. We are concerned about the multidrug resistance of A. baumannii in this study. PMID:9147913

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Singapore.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuah, B G; Kumarasinghe, G; Doran, J.; Chang, H R

    1994-01-01

    The in vitro activities of 17 antimicrobial agents alone or in combination against 70 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Singapore were determined by broth microdilution. The MICs of amoxicillin, ampicillin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, and piperacillin for 90% of the strains were > or = 128 micrograms/ml. Addition of sulbactam to ampicillin produced improved activity, whereas adding tazobactam to piperacillin did not. The MICs of amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem ...

  7. In vitro activity of ceftobiprole against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Marti, Sara; Sánchez-Céspedes, Javier; Espinal, Paula; Vila, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Acinetobacter baumannii is a multiresistant opportunistic nosocomial pathogen responsible for outbreaks worldwide. The main infection caused by this microorganism is nosocomial pneumonia, in particular ventilator-associated pneumonia in patients in Intensive Care Units. Treatment of these nosocomial infections is becoming problematic because the level of resistance to antimicrobial agents is rising. Ceftobiprole is a new cephalosporin with activity against Gram-positive an...

  8. Biofilm formation and biocide resistance of acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Shoukat, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Multi drug resistant (MDR) strains of Acinetobacter baumannii have emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Over the last 20 years a worldwide expansion in Acinetobacter infections has been observed associated with intensive care units (ICUs), long term care facilities and wounded armed forces personnel. The developing resistance patterns seen in Acinetobacter sp suggest that the number of effective antibiotics may shortly be exhau...

  9. Stereochemical insignificance discovered in Acinetobacter baumannii quorum sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Garner

    Full Text Available Stereochemistry is a key aspect of molecular recognition for biological systems. As such, receptors and enzymes are often highly stereospecific, only recognizing one stereoisomer of a ligand. Recently, the quorum sensing signaling molecules used by the nosocomial opportunistic pathogen, Acinetobacter baumannii, were identified, and the primary signaling molecule isolated from this species was N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone. A plethora of bacterial species have been demonstrated to utilize 3-hydroxy-acylhomoserine lactone autoinducers, and in virtually all cases, the (R-stereoisomer was identified as the natural ligand and exhibited greater autoinducer activity than the corresponding (S-stereoisomer. Using chemical synthesis and biochemical assays, we have uncovered a case of stereochemical insignificance in A. baumannii and provide a unique example where stereochemistry appears nonessential for acylhomoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing signaling. Based on previously reported phylogenetic studies, we suggest that A. baumannii has evolutionarily adopted this unique, yet promiscuous quorum sensing system to ensure its survival, particularly in the presence of other proteobacteria.

  10. Acinetobacter baumannii in Localised Cutaneous Mycobacteriosis in Falcons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Gabriele Muller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Between May 2007 and April 2009, 29 falcons with identically localized, yellowish discolored cutaneous lesions in the thigh and lateral body wall region were presented at Abu Dhabi Falcon Hospital. Out of 18 falcons integrated in this study, 16 tested positive to Mycobacterium. avium complex. The 2 negative falcons tested positive in the Mycobacterium genus PCR. Moreover, 1 falcon tested positive to M. avium. paratuberculosis in tissue samples by PCR. In all cases, blood and fecal samples tested negative. In the acid-fast stain, all samples showed the for mycobacteriosis typical rods. Moreover, in 13 samples Acinetobacter baumannii was detected by PCR and proven by DNA sequencing. Clinical features included highly elevated WBCs, heterophilia, lymphocytopenia, monocytosis, severe anemia and weight loss. A. baumannii, a gram-negative bacillus with the ability to integrate foreign DNA, has emerged as one of the major multidrug resistant bacteria. In veterinary medicine, it has so far been detected in dogs, cats, horses and wild birds. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of an A. baumannii infection in falcons and of a veterinary Mycobacterium-Acinetobacter coinfection.

  11. Imaging of chronic osteomyelitis; Chronische Infektionen des Skelettsystems. Bildgebende Diagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, C.; Matzko, M.; Reiser, M. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    2000-06-01

    The diagnosis of chronic osteomyelitis is made on the basis of clinical, radiologic and histologic findings. The role of imaging in patients with known chronic osteomyelitis is to detect and to delineate areas of active infection. To correctly interpret the imaging findings, it is essential to take both the individual clinical findings and previous imaging studies into account. Reliable signs of active infection are bone marrow abscess, sequestra and sinus tract formation. Only the combined evaluation of bony changes together with alterations of the adjacent soft tissues provides good diagnostic accuracy. Projection radiography gives an overview of the condition of the bone, which provides the basis for follow-up and the selection of further imaging modalities. Computed tomography can be used to evaluate even discrete or complex bony alterations and to guide percutaneous biopsy or drainage. Magnetic resonance imaging achieves the best diagnostic sensitivity and specificity and provides superior contrast as well as anatomical resolution in both bone marrow and soft tissues. In this paper the features and clinical relevance of imaging in primary chronic osteomyelitis, posttraumatic osteomyelitis, tuberculous spondylitis and osteomyelitis of the diabetic foot are reviewed, with particular respect to MRI. (orig.) [German] Die Diagnose der chronischen Osteomyelitis wird durch Klinik, Bildgebung und Histologie gestellt. Bei bekannter chronischer Osteomyelitis soll die Bildgebung einen floriden Prozess und die betroffenen Kompartimente herausarbeiten. Die Klinik des Patienten, seine individuelle Krankheitskonstellation und die Verlaufsbeobachtung sind essentiell fuer die Befundinterpretation. Erst die kombinierte Beurteilung der Veraenderungen am Knochen selbst sowie die der umgebenden Weichteile fuehrt zu einer validen Aussage. Sichere Zeichen einer floriden Osteomyelitis sind lediglich (Knochenmarks)abzess, Sequester und Fistelgang. Die Projektionsradiographie gibt

  12. A Rare Case of Cranial Osteomyelitis Caused by Proteus Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Uslu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis of the calvarial bones can cause serious complications such as brain abscess, due to the close proximity to adjacent brain structures. Development of the purulent secretion in surgery and traumatic scalp injuries must be considered as a possibility of osteomyelitis possibility. Generally gram positive, rarely gram negative bacteria and mix agents, can be isolated in infection. Especially chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis agents can be isolated from chronic infections such as tuberculosis. In cranial osteomyelitis diagnosis, radiological diagnosis has a very important place together with the clinical diagnosis. However, infection can usually show late findings radiologically. In treatment, antibiotic treatment is absolutely essential as well as removal of the infected part of the bone. Due to antibiotic treatment lasting between 6-12 weeks, organizing the antibiotic protocols according to the results of culture-antibiograms, which were provided from purulent secretions, has the most important role in the success of surgical treatment. In Proteus sp. infections, for choice of suitable treatment, determination of the type of bacteria is important. For exact diagnosis, histopathological examination of the bone tissue must be carried out. In this report, a case with cranial osteomyelitis caused by Proteus vulgaris which is a gram negative bacteria causing anaerobic infections and classified in the Enterobacteriaceae family is presented. The patient was treated with surgery and appropriate antibiotics. Early recognition of this condition, planning the best treatment strategy and taking precautions to prevent complications, is mandatory for a better outcome.

  13. Microbiota associated with chronic osteomyelitis of the jaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetti-Jardim Júnior, Elerson; Fardin, Angélica Cristiane; Gaetti-Jardim, Ellen Cristina; de Castro, Alvimar Lima; Schweitzer, Christiane Marie; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2010-01-01

    Chronic osteomyelitis of maxilla and mandible is rare in industrialized countries and its occurrence in developing countries is associated with trauma and surgery, and its microbial etiology has not been studied thoroughly. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the microbiota associated with osteomyelitis of mandible or maxilla from some Brazilian patients. After clinical and radiographic evaluation, samples of bone sequestra, purulent secretion, and biopsies of granulomatous tissues from twenty-two patients with chronic osteomyelitis of mandible and maxilla were cultivated and submitted for pathogen detection by using a PCR method. Each patient harbored a single lesion. Bacterial isolation was performed on fastidious anaerobe agar supplemented with hemin, menadione and horse blood for anaerobes; and on tryptic soy agar supplemented with yeast extract and horse blood for facultative bacteria and aerobes. Plates were incubated in anaerobiosis and aerobiosis, at 37oC for 14 and 3 days, respectively. Bacteria were cultivated from twelve patient samples; and genera Actinomyces, Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, and Staphylococcus were the most frequent. By PCR, bacterial DNA was detected from sixteen patient samples. The results suggest that cases of chronic osteomyelitis of the jaws are usually mixed anaerobic infections, reinforcing the concept that osteomyelitis of the jaws are mainly related to microorganisms from the oral environment, and periapical and periodontal infections may act as predisposing factors. PMID:24031586

  14. Microbiota associated with chronic osteomyelitis of the jaws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elerson Gaetti-Jardim Júnior

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic osteomyelitis of maxilla and mandible is rare in industrialized countries and its occurrence in developing countries is associated with trauma and surgery, and its microbial etiology has not been studied thoroughly. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the microbiota associated with osteomyelitis of mandible or maxilla from some Brazilian patients. After clinical and radiographic evaluation, samples of bone sequestra, purulent secretion, and biopsies of granulomatous tissues from twenty-two patients with chronic osteomyelitis of mandible and maxilla were cultivated and submitted for pathogen detection by using a PCR method. Each patient harbored a single lesion. Bacterial isolation was performed on fastidious anaerobe agar supplemented with hemin, menadione and horse blood for anaerobes; and on tryptic soy agar supplemented with yeast extract and horse blood for facultative bacteria and aerobes. Plates were incubated in anaerobiosis and aerobiosis, at 37ºC for 14 and 3 days, respectively. Bacteria were cultivated from twelve patient samples; and genera Actinomyces, Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, and Staphylococcus were the most frequent. By PCR, bacterial DNA was detected from sixteen patient samples. The results suggest that cases of chronic osteomyelitis of the jaws are usually mixed anaerobic infections, reinforcing the concept that osteomyelitis of the jaws are mainly related to microorganisms from the oral environment, and periapical and periodontal infections may act as predisposing factors.

  15. Gallium and Indium: which to use when 2. Nuclear medicine imaging of osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine studies have become increasingly clinically utilized in the diagnostic approach to suspected osteomyelitis. The technetium-99m phosphonate bone scan, with the three- or four-phase modification designed to distinguish between osteomyelitis and cellulitis, the gallium-67 citrate scan, and the indium-111 leukocyte scan. have demonstrated utility in diagnosing acute osteomyelitis or exacerbation of chronic osteomyelitis and monitoring the response to therapy in those patients. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of suspected osteomyelitis continue to be evaluated, but available data indicate that these modalities play a supporting role to radionuclide studies. 34 refs., 3 figs

  16. Cold defects in In-111 leukocyte imaging of osteomyelitis in the axial skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors retrospectively reviewed 61 In-111 leukocyte scans obtained in areas of normal red marrow (the axial skeleton and proximal long bones) to exclude osteomyelitis. Eight cold defects were identified at sites of suspected osteomyelitis. Five of these represented surgically proved osteomyelitis. Overall, five of 26 (19%) cases of osteomyelitis in these areas manifested as cold defects. They found the prevalence of skeletal photopenic defects with In-111 leukocyte imaging to be higher than previously recorded. The possibility of osteomyelitis should be considered when a cold defect is identified

  17. Childhood osteomyelitis-incidence and differentiation from other acute onset musculoskeletal features in a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiseter Tor

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteomyelitis can be difficult to diagnose and there has previously not been a prospective approach to identify all children in a defined geographic area. The aim of this study was to assess the annual incidence of osteomyelitis in children, describe the patient and disease characteristics in those with acute ( Methods In a population-based Norwegian study physicians were asked to refer all children with suspected osteomyelitis. Children with osteomyelitis received follow-up at six weeks, six months and thereafter as long as clinically needed. Results The total annual incidence rate of osteomyelitis was 13 per 100 000 (acute osteomyelitis 8 and subacute osteomyelitis 5 per 100 000. The incidence was higher in patients under the age of 3 than in older children (OR 2.9, 95%: CI 2.3–3.7. The incidence of non-vertebral osteomyelitis was higher than the incidence of vertebral osteomyelitis (10 vs. 3 per 100 000; p = .002. Vertebral osteomyelitis was more frequent in girls than in boys (OR 7.0, 95%: CI 3.3–14.7. ESR ≥ 40 mm/hr had the highest positive predictive laboratory value to identify osteomyelitis patients at 26% and MRI had a positive predictive value of 85%. Long-bone infection was found in 16 (43% patients. ESR, CRP, white blood cell count, neutrophils and platelet count were higher for patients with acute osteomyelitis than for patients with subacute osteomyelitis. Subacute findings on MRI and doctor's delay were more common in subacute osteomyelitis than in acute osteomyelitis patients. Blood culture was positive in 26% of the acute osteomyelitis patients and was negative in all the subacute osteomyelitis patients. Conclusion The annual incidence of osteomyelitis in Norway remains high. ESR values and MRI scan may help to identify osteomyelitis patients and differentiate acute and subacute osteomyelitis.

  18. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis: how to suggest this diagnosis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis is a rare disorder that affects children and teenagers. Clinically, it is characterized by insidious onset of local swelling and pain in several metaphyses. A symmetric, recurrent and multifocal pattern is usual. Spinal involvement is possible. Inconstant association with a cutaneous affection (palmo-plantar pustulosis, acne fulminans, psoriasis), or less frequently with an inflammatory chronic gut disorder is described. Pathogenesis usually recognized is an enthesopathy. Enthesitis may progress to the osseous part of the enthese and produce an aseptic chronic osteomyelitis. Biopsy specimen with culture is certainly necessary to rule out bacterial osteomyelitis and bone tumor. It is particularly true when the bone lesion is isolated. Disease course is benign and self-limited. The clinical course is characterized by recurrences and remissions occurring for 6 to 10 years. Treatment based on non steroid anti-inflammatory drugs is usually effective. (authors)

  19. SPECT/CT in the Diagnosis of Skull Base Osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Kumar, Rakesh; Kumar, Praveen; Jaganthan, Sriram; Patnecha, Manish; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Bandopadhyaya, Gurupad; Malhotra, Arun [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2011-09-15

    Skull base osteomyelitis is a potentially fatal disease. We demonstrate here the utility of SPECT/CT in diagnosing this entity, which was not obvious on a planar bone scan. A {sup 99mT}c MDP bone scan with SPECT/CT was carried out on a patient with clinically suspected skull base osteomyelitis. Findings were correlated with contrast enhanced CT (CECT) and MRI. Planar images were equivocal, but SPECT/CT showed intense uptake in the body of sphenoid and petrous temporal bone as well as the atlas corresponding to irregular bone destruction on CT and MRI. These findings indicate that SPECT/CT may have an additional role beyond planar imaging in the detection of skull base osteomyelitis.

  20. Radiation osteomyelitis of the mandible. Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molla, M.R.; Nishio, Juntaro; Matsuya, Tokuzo; Miyazaki, Tadashi (Osaka Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry)

    1982-12-01

    Radiation therapy for the head and neck malignant tumor may often cause osteoradionecrosis of the mandible, leading to radiation osteomyelitis with a source of infection. The present study demonstrates two cases with radiation osteomyelitis of the mandible to discuss the etiology, radiological findings and preventive measure for this type of bone disease. The results indicate that, 1) A higher dose in external radiotherapy may claimed to be a potent factor to cause osteoradionecrosis and post irradiation periodontitis of the tooth associated with pain, may be preliminary symptom of leading radiation osteomyelitis, where a delayed healing of tooth extraction is an accelerating factor responsible for rapid progress of osteomyelitic changes. 2) Once infection sets in post irradiated bone, radio-osteomyelitic change is quite progressive even after various conservative measure. 3) Only radiological change in those cases is a slow formation of sequestrum time ranging from 7 to 10 months, with a gradual separation of dead bone as a large mass.

  1. Maxillary Chronic Osteomyelitis Caused by Domestic Violence: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamyris Inácio Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maxillary osteomyelitis is a rare condition defined as inflammation of the bone primarily caused by odontogenic bacteria, with trauma being the second leading cause. The present report documents a rare case of maxillary osteomyelitis in a 38-year-old female who was the victim of domestic violence approximately a year prior to presentation. Intraoral examination revealed a lesion appearing as exposed bony sequestrum, with significant destruction of gingiva and alveolar mucosa in the maxillary right quadrant, accompanied by significant pain, local edema, and continued purulence. Teeth numbers 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15 were mobile, not responsive to percussion, and nonvital. Treatment included antibiotic therapy for seven days followed by total enucleation of the necrotic bone tissue and extraction of the involved teeth. Microscopic findings confirmed the clinical diagnosis of chronic suppurative osteomyelitis. Six months postoperatively, the treated area presented complete healing and there was no sign of recurrence of the lesion.

  2. [Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis of the spine : Children and adolescent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Höh, N H; Völker, A; Jeszenszky, D; Heyde, C-E

    2016-06-01

    Chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) in childhood and adolescence is a non-infectious autoinflammatory disease of the bone with partial involvement of adjacent joints and soft tissue. The etiology is unknown. The disease can occur singular or recurrent. Individual bones can be affected and multiple lesions can occur. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) shows the whole picture of CNO. Accompanying but temporally independent of the bouts of osteomyelitis, some patients show manifestations in the skin, eyes, lungs and the gastrointestinal tract. The article gives an overview of the clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, and treatment options for CRMO involvement of the spine based on the current literature and our own cases. PMID:27221306

  3. SPECT/CT in the Diagnosis of Skull Base Osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skull base osteomyelitis is a potentially fatal disease. We demonstrate here the utility of SPECT/CT in diagnosing this entity, which was not obvious on a planar bone scan. A 99mTc MDP bone scan with SPECT/CT was carried out on a patient with clinically suspected skull base osteomyelitis. Findings were correlated with contrast enhanced CT (CECT) and MRI. Planar images were equivocal, but SPECT/CT showed intense uptake in the body of sphenoid and petrous temporal bone as well as the atlas corresponding to irregular bone destruction on CT and MRI. These findings indicate that SPECT/CT may have an additional role beyond planar imaging in the detection of skull base osteomyelitis.

  4. Update: Cytokine Dysregulation in Chronic Nonbacterial Osteomyelitis (CNO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrun R. Hofmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO with its most severe form chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO is a non-bacterial osteitis of yet unknown origin. Secondary to the absence of both high-titer autoantibodies and autoreactive T lymphocytes, and the association with other autoimmune diseases, it was recently reclassified as an autoinflammatory disorder of the musculoskeletal system. Since its etiology is largely unknown, the diagnosis is based on clinical criteria, and treatment is empiric and not always successful. In this paper, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of possible etiopathogenetic mechanisms in CNO.

  5. Technetium bone scintigraphy in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a 5 1/2-year retrospective study of hospitalized children with osteomyelitis who had technetium bone scans, we found that 32 of 38 (84%) had increased radionuclide uptake, 4 (11%) had normal uptake and 2 (5%) had decreased uptake. The two patients with decreased uptake had a stormy course with extensive bone destruction and pathologic fractures in spite of prolonged courses of antibiotic therapy. Decreased uptake on bone scan in patients with clinical evidence of osteomyelitis could indicate a poor prognosis and early surgical drainage is indicated in order to decrease morbidity

  6. Role of radionuclide imaging in the diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade, the role of nuclear medicine studies in the diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis has been discussed in depth in the literature. Yet, the respective roles played in this setting by each of the commonly used radionuclide studies often are confusing. In an attempt to develop a cogent diagnostic strategy, we reviewed the literature published within the last 12 years pertaining to the use of radiophosphate bone scintigraphy as well as gallium and indium WBC imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. Based on our findings, we propose an alternative approach to the evaluation of a patient with suspected acute osteomyelitis. 63 references

  7. Distribution and resistance of pathogens in liver transplant recipients with Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao F

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fei Gao,1 Qifa Ye,2,3 Qiquan Wan,2 Shan Liu,4 Jiandang Zhou51Infectious Disease Department of Henan Province People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou, 2Department of Transplant Surgery, Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 3Department of Transplant Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 4Adelphi University College of Nursing and Public Health, New York, NY, USA; 5Department of Clinical Laboratory of Microbiology, Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: Drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has become a major problem in liver transplant recipients. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical presentation, distribution, and drug susceptibility characteristics in liver recipients with A. baumannii infection.Methods: We retrospectively investigated 17 liver recipients who developed A. baumannii infection between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2014. The distribution of A. baumannii and drug susceptibility characteristics were reviewed.Results: Infectious complications due to A. baumannii appeared in 17 liver recipients, with a total of 24 episodes. Approximately 63% (15/24 of A. baumannii infections occurred within 2 weeks after transplantation. The most common source of infection was multiple culture-positive sites (35.3%, n=6, followed by the intra-abdominal/biliary tract (23.5%, n=4 and lung (23.5%, n=4. Eight patients (47.1% had a body temperature of 38°C or higher at the onset of A. baumannii infection. Nine, seven, and 12 recipients had a serum creatinine level of >1.5 mg/dL, a white blood cell count of >15,000/mm3, and a platelet count of <50,000/mm3, respectively. There were five (29.4% cases of septic shock and eight (47.1% deaths. The rate of antibiotic resistance of A. baumannii to ten of 12 antibiotics investigated was more than 60%. Among the 24 infections caused by A. baumannii, 75% were carbapenem

  8. Vertebral body osteomyelitis in the horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical signs, laboratory data, results of nuclear scintigraphy and radiographic examination of five horses with vertebral body osteomyelitis are described together with response to treatment. Three horses were less than five months of age. Four horses demonstrated hindlimb paresis and in three a focus of pain in the thoracolumbar region could be identified. An umbilical abscess, a caudal lobe lung abscess and a patent urachus were considered primary niduses of infection in each of three horses. Leucocytosis, neutrophilia, anaemia and elevated fibrinogen were the most consistent laboratory abnormalities. Nuclear scintigraphy was performed in three horses and identified the site of the vertebral lesion which was subsequently evaluated radiographically. In the other two horses radiographic examination in the region of areas of focal pain identified a lesion. Radiographic abnormalities included compression fractures of vertebral bodies (two), proliferative new bone (three) and soft tissue swelling ventral to a vertebral body (one). Two horses, including one with a compression fracture of the second lumbar vertebra, received parenteral antimicrobial therapy for 40 and 74 days, respectively. When re-examined six months later they showed no neurological abnormalities. The other three horses failed to respond to antimicrobial treatment and were humanely destroyed. The horse with a lung abscess also had an abscess cranial to the right tuber coxae which extended into the vertebral bodies of the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae from which Streptococcus zooepidemicus was cultured. A horse with proliferative new bone on the ventral aspect of the fifth and sixth thoracic vertebrae had a mediastinal mass associated with these vertebrae and fungal granulomas, from which Aspergillus species was cultured, in the heart and aorta, trachea, spleen and kidney. The horse with a patent urachus and soft tissue swelling ventral to the vertebral body of the 12th thoracic vertebra

  9. Isolation and characterization of antimicrobial compounds in plant extracts against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaki, Yoko; Rabenstein, John D; Rhea, Joshua; Crouch, Marie-Laure; Mocek, Ulla M; Kittell, Patricia Emmett; Morgan, Margie A; Nichols, Wesley Stephen; Van Benschoten, M M; Hardy, William David; Liu, George Y

    2013-01-01

    The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:23630600

  10. Isolation and characterization of antimicrobial compounds in plant extracts against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Miyasaki

    Full Text Available The number of fully active antibiotic options that treat nosocomial infections due to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii is extremely limited. Magnolia officinalis, Mahonia bealei, Rabdosia rubescens, Rosa rugosa, Rubus chingii, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Terminalia chebula plant extracts were previously shown to have growth inhibitory activity against a multidrug-resistant clinical strain of A. baumannii. In this study, the compounds responsible for their antimicrobial activity were identified by fractionating each plant extract using high performance liquid chromatography, and determining the antimicrobial activity of each fraction against A. baumannii. The chemical structures of the fractions inhibiting >40% of the bacterial growth were elucidated by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The six most active compounds were identified as: ellagic acid in Rosa rugosa; norwogonin in Scutellaria baicalensis; and chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, corilagin, and terchebulin in Terminalia chebula. The most potent compound was identified as norwogonin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 128 µg/mL, and minimum bactericidal concentration of 256 µg/mL against clinically relevant strains of A. baumannii. Combination studies of norwogonin with ten anti-Gram negative bacterial agents demonstrated that norwogonin did not enhance the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic antibiotics chosen for this study. In conclusion, of all identified antimicrobial compounds, norwogonin was the most potent against multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. Further studies are warranted to ascertain the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of norwogonin for infections due to multidrug-resistant A. baumannii.

  11. Antibiotic Resistance in Acinetobacter Baumannii Strains Isolated from Nosocomial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Korkmaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen and one of the most important multidrug-resistant microorganisms in hospitals worldwide. A.baumannii most commonly causes ventilator-associated pneumonia and blood stream infections and mortality rates in these infections can reach 35%. In this study, it was aimed to assess the frequency of Acinetobacter baumannii species which were considered to be causative agents of nosocomial infection and their resistance to antimicrobial agents between January 2009 and November 2014 in our hospital. Material and Method: The diagnosis of nosocomial A.baumannii infection was made according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC criteria. Identification of the microorganisms isolated from the specimens of the patients and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of them were performed by using VITEK 2 ID-AST automated system. Susceptibilities of amikacin, ampicillin-sulbactam, gentamicin, tobramycin, netilmycin, imipenem, meropenem, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, tetracycline, tigecycline, colistin and co-trimoxazole were investigated in the species. SPSS 19,0 program was used for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 308 Acinetobacter species were isolated and these species were obtained more frequently from the clinical samples sent from the intensive care unit (92,9% and deep tracheal aspirate samples (64,6%. When all of the species were evaluated, the most efficient antibiotics were determined to be colistin, tigecycline and netilmycin. The susceptibility rates for colistin, tigecycline and netilmycin were determined to be 92,8%, 85,3% and 82%, respectively. These are followed by tobramycin with a susceptibility rate of 76,4%, gentamicin with a susceptibility rate of 47,8% and amikacin with a susceptibility rate of 46,3%. Discussion: In our study, colistin, tigecycline and netilmycin are the most

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuah, B G; Kumarasinghe, G; Doran, J; Chang, H R

    1994-10-01

    The in vitro activities of 17 antimicrobial agents alone or in combination against 70 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from Singapore were determined by broth microdilution. The MICs of amoxicillin, ampicillin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, and piperacillin for 90% of the strains were > or = 128 micrograms/ml. Addition of sulbactam to ampicillin produced improved activity, whereas adding tazobactam to piperacillin did not. The MICs of amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem for 90% of the strains were 32, 32, and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively. PMID:7840598

  13. Osteomyelitis: a review of currently used imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional radiographs remain the initial imaging modality involved in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Bone scintigraphy and its specific agents did not only eliminate the problems of inherent low sensitivity of conventional radiographs, but also increased the specificity to higher degrees. Spiral CT, on the other hand, has solved several diagnostic problems, such as osteomyelitis of the sterno-clavicular junction and hidden areas in the pelvic bones. Magnetic resonance imaging with its multiplanar capability, greater anatomic details and excellent soft tissue bone marrow contrast resolution has a significant role in surgical planning and limb preservation. Ultrasound and US-guided aspiration has recently been involved in the diagnosis and management of osteomyelitis with several advantages particularly in children. Our goal in this review is to outline the ability of various imaging techniques by comparing their strengths and weaknesses in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Finally, we suggest various imaging algorithms for specific clinical scenarios. Spondylitis and septic arthritis are not discussed in this review. (orig.)

  14. Acute osteomyelitis caused by Rhodococcus equi in an immunocompetent child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sistla Sujatha

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is an unusual pathogen causing infections mostly in immunocompromised patients, particularly in those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. It has rarely been reported to affect immunocompetent hosts, where it usually presents as an isolated extrapulmonary lesion. We report a case of osteomyelitis caused by this organism in an immunocompetent host.

  15. The MRI appearances of early vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunbar, J.A.T.; Sandoe, J.A.T. [Department of Microbiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Rao, A.S. [Department of Orthopaedics, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Crimmins, D.W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Baig, W. [Department of Cardiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Rankine, J.J., E-mail: james.rankine@leedsth.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Aim: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances in patients with a clinical history suggestive of vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis who underwent MRI very early in their clinical course. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the database of spinal infections from a spinal microbiological liaison team was performed over a 2 year period to identify cases with clinical features suggestive of spinal infection and an MRI that did not show features typical of vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis. All patients had positive microbiology and a follow up MRI showing typical features of spinal infection. Results: In four cases the features typical of spinal infection were not evident at the initial MRI. In three cases there was very subtle endplate oedema associated with disc degeneration, which was interpreted as Modic type I degenerative endplate change. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was continued prior to repeat MRI examinations. The mean time to the repeat examination was 17 days with a range of 8-22 days. The second examinations clearly demonstrated vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis. Conclusion: Although MRI is the imaging method of choice for vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis in the early stages, it may show subtle, non-specific endplate subchondral changes; a repeat examination may be required to show the typical features.

  16. The importance of skeletal scintigraphy for diagnosis of infant osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the prognosis of osteomyelitis critically depends on early treatment, early detection of the condition is of paramount importance. While bone scans are known to suggest the diagnosis in children before X-rays show structural changes, a major proportion of radionuclide studies, particularly in patients with neonatal osteomyelitis, has repeatedly been reported to be negative. This prompted us to compare clinical signs and symptoms, laboratory parameters, microbiologic and histologic data with the results of X-ray films and bone scans in a retrospective study involving 160 children aged between 9 days and 16 years. Of the 43 children with verified osteomyelitis, only 3 had negative X-rays and bone scans. Negative scans in the presence of X-ray abnormalities were neither seen in newborns and infants nor in older children. But in 8 children bone scans correctly detected the condition at a time at which X-rays were still normal. Of the 117 children in whom suspected osteomyelitis was not confirmed none had positive bone scans. (Author)

  17. Treatment of chronic osteomyelitis with one-stage allograft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wei-ju; LI Bin; BAO Ni-rong; QIAN Hong-bo; ZENG Xiao-feng; XU Bin; CHEN Yong; ZHAO Jian-ning

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To avoid disadvantages of two-stage cancellus bone autograft, we investigated the feasibility of one-stage allograft for reconstructing the bone defect resulting from debridement of chronic osteomyelitis in limbs.Methods: Between Feb. 1999 and Apr. 2004, 35 cases of chronic osteomyelitis (8 cases of nonunion )underwent one-stage allograft after debridement in our hospital.Results: Thirty-five cases were followed up for an average period of 28 months (range, 13 to 55 months), in which 32 cases (91.43%) were found no infection, and 3cases (8.57 %) were confirmed recurrence of infection.Four out of 8 cases of bone nonunion healed in 9.5 months on average (range, 3 to 12 months), and another case also acquired union after redebridement and autograft of ilium due to infection recurrence 35 days after surgery.Renonunion occurred in 3 cases, 2 out of whom healed after secondary operation with autograft. One case of renonunion and 2 cases of infection recurrence refused further treatment.Conclusions: A high rate of infection arrest can be attained when one-stage allograft is used to reconstruct the bone defect of chronic osteomyelitis after debridement in limbs. Therefore, chronic osteomyelitis should not be regarded as a contraindication to one-stage allogeneic bone grafting. Renonuion, however, achieves a relatively high rate, especially in cases of segmental bone defect.

  18. A case of radiation ulcer of chest wall with osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of anterior chest skin ulcer with rib and sternum osteomyelitis following radiation therapy for post operative mammary carcinoma. Operation was performed six times including debridement with sternum and rib resection reconstruction and skin grafting. It took about one and a half years after first operation to heal the ulcer with osteomyelitis. Principle of treatment for radiation ulcer accompanied by osteomyelitis is complete resection of the damaged lesion. However, it is difficult to evaluate the exact area of the damaged lesion. Therefore it is not rare to repeat its recurrence and have trouble with its treatment. In this case, it was considered that the resected area was insufficient on the initial operation. In order to treat for radiation ulcers accompanied by osteomyelitis, enough resection of the damaged lesion in the initial operation is necessary. Ultimately, in our case, the resection of all sternum, part of the right second to fifth rib and part of left second to seventh rib was necessary. It is generally said that reconstructing bone structure is required in the case of wide defect of chest wall. Though, we did not perform reconstruction of the bone structures, there is no problem in the condition of respiratory system. The surrounding soft tissues changed to hard enough to avoid paradoxical breathing. (author)

  19. Chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis in children: a retrospective multicenter study

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Daniela; Bolt, Isabel; Hofer, Michael; Relly, Christa; Berthet, Gerald; Bolz, Dieter; Saurenmann, Traudel

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine the clinical presentation, current treatment and outcome of children with nonbacterial inflammatory bone disease. Methods Retrospective multicenter study of patients entered into the Swiss Pediatric Rheumatology Working Group registry with a diagnosis of chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) and synovitis acne pustulosis hyperostosis osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome. The charts were reviewed for informations about disease presentation, treatment, course and outcome. Result...

  20. Chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis in children: a retrospective multicenter study

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Daniela; Bolt, Isabel; Hofer, Michael; Relly, Christa; Berthet, Gerald; Bolz, Dieter; Saurenmann, Traudel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To determine the clinical presentation, current treatment and outcome of children with nonbacterial inflammatory bone disease. METHODS: Retrospective multicenter study of patients entered into the Swiss Pediatric Rheumatology Working Group registry with a diagnosis of chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) and synovitis acne pustulosis hyperostosis osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome. The charts were reviewed for informations about disease presentation, treatment, course and outcome. ...

  1. The MRI appearances of early vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances in patients with a clinical history suggestive of vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis who underwent MRI very early in their clinical course. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the database of spinal infections from a spinal microbiological liaison team was performed over a 2 year period to identify cases with clinical features suggestive of spinal infection and an MRI that did not show features typical of vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis. All patients had positive microbiology and a follow up MRI showing typical features of spinal infection. Results: In four cases the features typical of spinal infection were not evident at the initial MRI. In three cases there was very subtle endplate oedema associated with disc degeneration, which was interpreted as Modic type I degenerative endplate change. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was continued prior to repeat MRI examinations. The mean time to the repeat examination was 17 days with a range of 8-22 days. The second examinations clearly demonstrated vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis. Conclusion: Although MRI is the imaging method of choice for vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis in the early stages, it may show subtle, non-specific endplate subchondral changes; a repeat examination may be required to show the typical features.

  2. Complications of Candidemia in ICU Patients: Endophthalmitis, Osteomyelitis, Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Carol A

    2015-10-01

    Bloodstream infection with Candida species is not uncommon in the intensive care unit setting and has the potential to distribute organisms to many different organ systems causing secondary infections, such as endophthalmitis, osteomyelitis, and endocarditis. In some patients, these types of infections become manifested shortly after the episode of candidemia. In others, especially vertebral osteomyelitis, weeks pass before the diagnosis is entertained. Endophthalmitis should be sought by a retinal examination in all patients early after an episode of candidemia. Both osteomyelitis and endocarditis are less common complications of candidemia than endophthalmitis. In patients who manifest symptoms or signs suggesting these infections, magnetic resonance imaging and transesophageal echocardiography, respectively, are extremely helpful diagnostic tests. Newer approaches to the treatment of these infections allow the use of better tolerated, safer antifungal agents. Endophthalmitis is often treated with fluconazole or voriconazole, and the echinocandins are increasingly used, instead of amphotericin B, as initial therapy for osteomyelitis and endocarditis before step-down therapy to oral azole agents. PMID:26398531

  3. Multifocal Tubercular Osteomyelitis: A Case with Atypical Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Thawani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal tuberculosis (TB accounts for about 1–2% of all TB cases and 10% of extrapulmonary TB cases. We present a 19-year-old male with multifocal tubercular osteomyelitis, who presented with progressively worsening back pain, weight loss, fatigue, anorexia, decreased mobility, low-grade fever, and night sweats—but without pulmonary involvement.

  4. Candida osteomyelitis and disc space infection of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candida osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of immunosuppressive therapy. Its radiographic manifestations are similar to those of other relatively indolent infectious agents. We report the CT and MR findings in a patient who developed this condition following treatment for acute myelogenous leukemia, and review the imaging literature covering similar cases. (orig.). With 7 figs

  5. Candida osteomyelitis and disc space infection of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munk, P.L. [British Columbia Cancer Agency - Vancouver Center, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]|[British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Lee, M.J. [British Columbia Cancer Agency - Vancouver Center, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Poon, P.Y. [British Columbia Cancer Agency - Vancouver Center, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); O`Connell, J.X. [Department of Pathology, Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Center, and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Coupland, D.B. [Department of Radiology, Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Center, and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Janzen, D.L. [Department of Radiology, Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Center, and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Logan, P.M. [Department of Radiology, Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Center, and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Dvorak, M.F. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Center, and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    1997-01-01

    Candida osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of immunosuppressive therapy. Its radiographic manifestations are similar to those of other relatively indolent infectious agents. We report the CT and MR findings in a patient who developed this condition following treatment for acute myelogenous leukemia, and review the imaging literature covering similar cases. (orig.). With 7 figs.

  6. First Case of Osteomyelitis Due to Shewanella algae

    OpenAIRE

    Botelho-Nevers, E.; Gouriet, F.; Rovery, C.; Paris, P.; Roux, V.; Raoult, D.; Brouqui, P.

    2005-01-01

    Shewanella spp. are infrequently recovered from clinical specimens. We report here on the first case of osteomyelitis due to Shewanella algae. This bacterium, at first misidentified by phenotypic tests as Shewanella putrefaciens, was subsequently identified correctly as S. algae by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

  7. Association between acute motor axonal neuropathy and septic shock due to Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscani, Lucia; Guarducci, Diletta; Matà, Sabrina; Furlan, Tiziana; Ballo, Piercarlo

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we describe a case of acute motoral axonal neuropathy (AMAN) following septic shock due to Acinetobacter baumannii. The aetiology of AMAN is still not fully clarified. An association with a potential infection by Campylobacter jejuni, resulting in stimulation of autoimmune response against gangliosides mediated by a phenomenon of molecular mimicry, is believed to play a major role. Since the lipopolysaccharide of A. baumannii has a structure that is similar to that of C. jejuni, we hypothesise that the infection by A. baumannii in our patient may have had a pathogenic role in the development of the neurological picture via a mechanism of molecular mimicry. PMID:26700086

  8. Locally advanced breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: A case report of successful treatment with radiation and chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Fleighton Estes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL is a rare phenomenon. A typical presentation is an effusion associated with a breast implant. Less commonly, disease can become more advanced locoregionally or distantly. The optimal treatment schema is a topic of debate: localized ALCL can potentially be cured with implant removal alone, while other cases in the literature, including those that are more advanced, have been treated with varying combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, and external beam radiotherapy. This is a case report of breast implant ALCL with pathologically proven lymph node involvement, the fifth such patient reported. Our patient experienced a favorable outcome with radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

  9. The structure of alanine racemase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Emily; Scaletti-Hutchinson, Emma; Opel-Reading, Helen; Nakatani, Yoshio; Krause, Kurt L.

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium which is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections. Numerous antibiotic-resistant strains exist, emphasizing the need for the development of new antimicrobials. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate dependent enzyme that is responsible for racemization between enantiomers of alanine. As d-alanine is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall, its inhibition is lethal to prokaryotes, making it an excellent antibiotic drug target. The crystal structure of A. baumannii alanine racemase (AlrAba) from the highly antibiotic-resistant NCTC13302 strain has been solved to 1.9 Å resolution. Comparison of AlrAba with alanine racemases from closely related bacteria demonstrates a conserved overall fold. The substrate entryway and active site of the enzymes were shown to be highly conserved. The structure of AlrAba will provide the template required for future structure-based drug-design studies. PMID:25195891

  10. Chronic Osteomyelitis of Clavicle in a Neonate: Report of Morbid Complication of Adjoining MRSA Abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suranigi, Shishir Murugharaj; Joshi, Manoj; Deniese, Pascal Noel; Rangasamy, Kanagasabai; Najimudeen, Syed; Gnanadoss, James J

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis of clavicle is rare in neonates. Acute osteomyelitis of clavicle accounts for less than 3% of all osteomyelitis cases. It may occur due to contiguous spread, due to hematogenous spread, or secondary to subclavian catheterization. Chronic osteomyelitis may occur as a complication of residual adjoining abscess due to methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) sepsis. We report a newborn female with right shoulder abscess that developed chronic clavicular osteomyelitis in follow-up period after drainage. She required multiple drainage procedures and was later successfully managed with bone curettage and debridement. We report this case to highlight that a MRSA abscess may recur due to residual infection from a chronic osteomyelitis sinus. It may be misdiagnosed as hypergranulation tissue of nonhealing wound leading to inappropriate delay in treatment. High index of suspicion, aggressive initial management, and regular follow-up are imperative to prevent this morbid complication. PMID:27051549

  11. Chronic Osteomyelitis of Clavicle in a Neonate: Report of Morbid Complication of Adjoining MRSA Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishir Murugharaj Suranigi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis of clavicle is rare in neonates. Acute osteomyelitis of clavicle accounts for less than 3% of all osteomyelitis cases. It may occur due to contiguous spread, due to hematogenous spread, or secondary to subclavian catheterization. Chronic osteomyelitis may occur as a complication of residual adjoining abscess due to methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA sepsis. We report a newborn female with right shoulder abscess that developed chronic clavicular osteomyelitis in follow-up period after drainage. She required multiple drainage procedures and was later successfully managed with bone curettage and debridement. We report this case to highlight that a MRSA abscess may recur due to residual infection from a chronic osteomyelitis sinus. It may be misdiagnosed as hypergranulation tissue of nonhealing wound leading to inappropriate delay in treatment. High index of suspicion, aggressive initial management, and regular follow-up are imperative to prevent this morbid complication.

  12. Role of MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of osteomyelitis in pediatric patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian; S; Pugmire; Randheer; Shailam; Michael; S; Gee

    2014-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a significant cause of morbidity in children throughout the world. Multiple imaging modalities can be used to evaluate for suspected osteomyelitis, however magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) has distinct advantages over other modalities given its ability to detect early changes related to osteomyelitis, evaluate the true extent of disease, depict extraosseous spread of infection, and help guide surgical manage-ment. MRI has assumed a greater role in the evaluation of osteomyelitis with the increase in musculoskeletal infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococ-cus aureus which have unique imaging features that are well-demonstrated with MRI. This review focuses primarily on the use of MRI in the evaluation of osteo-myelitis in children and will include a discussion of the clinically important and characteristic findings on MRI of acute bacterial osteomyelitis and related conditions.

  13. Osteomyelitis and pyogenic infection of the sacroiliac joint. MRI findings and review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haliloglu, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Kleiman, M.B. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Siddiqui, A.R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Cohen, M.D. [Dept. of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Acute pyogenic sacroiliac joint infection and osteomyelitis of adjacent bones often present with severe, poorly localized lower back, pelvic of hip pain. Five cases of sacroiliac joint infection or sacroiliac bone osteomyelitis were evaluated by MRI. MRI may be a helpful diagnostic tool to evaluate early changes of infection in the sacroiliac area. It is very sensitive for detecting bone marrow abnormalities; however, it is non-specific and can not accurately differentiate osteomyelitis from sacroiliitis. (orig.)

  14. Fusobacterium nucleatum Osteomyelitis in 3 Previously Healthy Children: A Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Seth W; Boyce, Thomas G; Larson, A Noelle; Patel, Robin; Jackson, Mary Anne

    2015-12-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a rare cause of monomicrobial osteomyelitis in children. We describe the cases of 3 children with F. nucleatum osteomyelitis of the distal femoral epiphysis with concurrent septic arthritis and review 6 other cases reported in the literature. Our report emphasizes the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for anaerobic osteomyelitis, given its atypical presentation and the unique growth requirements of anaerobic bacteria. PMID:26407282

  15. Osteomyelitis and pyogenic infection of the sacroiliac joint. MRI findings and review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute pyogenic sacroiliac joint infection and osteomyelitis of adjacent bones often present with severe, poorly localized lower back, pelvic of hip pain. Five cases of sacroiliac joint infection or sacroiliac bone osteomyelitis were evaluated by MRI. MRI may be a helpful diagnostic tool to evaluate early changes of infection in the sacroiliac area. It is very sensitive for detecting bone marrow abnormalities; however, it is non-specific and can not accurately differentiate osteomyelitis from sacroiliitis. (orig.)

  16. Role of MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of osteomyelitis in pediatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pugmire, Brian S; Shailam, Randheer; Gee, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a significant cause of morbidity in children throughout the world. Multiple imaging modalities can be used to evaluate for suspected osteomyelitis, however magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has distinct advantages over other modalities given its ability to detect early changes related to osteomyelitis, evaluate the true extent of disease, depict extraosseous spread of infection, and help guide surgical management. MRI has assumed a greater role in the evaluation of osteomyelit...

  17. Radionuclide imaging in early detection of childhood osteomyelitis and its differentiation from cellulitis and bone infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In children, radionuclide skeletal imaging with sup(99m)Tc-phosphate compounds is significantly more sensitive than roentgenographic studies in the early detection of osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. The scintigraphic patterns are usually characteristic. Cellulitis and some cases of early infarction are easily differentiated from osteomyelitis. However, some cases of infarction are indistinguishable from osteomyelitis on sup(99m)Tc-phosphate scan. In these cases 67Ga-citrate may prove helpful

  18. Alterations to Bone Mineral Composition as an Early Indication of Osteomyelitis in the Diabetic Foot

    OpenAIRE

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Esmonde-White, Francis W. L.; Holmes, Crystal M.; Morris, Michael D.; Roessler, Blake J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot is a major risk factor for amputation, but there is a limited understanding of early-stage infection, impeding limb-preserving diagnoses. We hypothesized that bone composition measurements provide insight into the early pathophysiology of diabetic osteomyelitis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Compositional analysis by Raman spectroscopy was performed on bone specimens from patients with a clinical diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the foot requiring surgi...

  19. Periostitis ossificans (Garrè′s osteomyelitis): An unusual case

    OpenAIRE

    Deepesh Singh; Priya Subramaniam; Panduranga Deepak Bhayya

    2015-01-01

    Garrè′s sclerosing osteomyelitis is a specific type of chronic osteomyelitis that mainly affects children and young adults and is commonly associated with odontogenic infection. The paper describes an unusual case of Garrè′s osteomyelitis in an 11-year-old boy, in whom the condition arose following poor oral hygiene and periodontal problems in relation to permanent mandibular left first molar. Clinically the patient presented with bony hard, nontender swelling and the occlusal radiograph reve...

  20. Distribution of AdeABC efflux system genes in genotypically diverse strains of clinical Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Piotr; Sacha, Paweł; Czaban, Sławomir; Hauschild, Tomasz; Ojdana, Dominika; Kowalczuk, Oksana; Milewski, Robert; Poniatowski, Bogusław; Nikliński, Jacek; Tryniszewska, Elżbieta

    2013-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly problematic hospital-associated pathogen. Different mechanisms contribute to the formation of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii, including the AdeABC efflux system. Distribution of the structural and regulatory genes encoding the AdeABC efflux system among genetically diverse clinical A. baumannii strains was achieved by using PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques. The distribution of adeABRS genes is extremely high among our A. baumannii strains, except the adeC gene. We have observed a large proportion of strains presenting multidrug-resistance phenotype for several years. The efflux pump could be an important mechanism in these strains in resistance to antibiotics. PMID:23886790

  1. Inhaled Colistin for Treatment of Pneumonia due to Colistin-Only-Susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hee Kyoung; Kim, Young Keun; Kim, Hyo Youl; Uh, Young

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Colistin is used for the treatment of pneumonia associated with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the best route of administration and dosage is not known. We report our experience with aerosolized colistin in twelve patients with pneumonia caused by colistin-only-susceptible (COS) A. baumannii. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients' medical records who were treated with aerosolized colistin for the treatment of pneum...

  2. Clinical Use of Colistin Induces Cross-Resistance to Host Antimicrobials in Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Napier, Brooke A.; Burd, Eileen M.; Satola, Sarah W.; Cagle, Stephanie M.; Ray, Susan M; McGann, Patrick; Pohl, Jan; Lesho, Emil P.; Weiss, David S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alarming rise in antibiotic resistance has led to an increase in patient mortality and health care costs. This problem is compounded by the absence of new antibiotics close to regulatory approval. Acinetobacter baumannii is a human pathogen that causes infections primarily in patients in intensive care units (ICUs) and is highly antibiotic resistant. Colistin is one of the last-line antibiotics for treating A. baumannii infections; however, colistin-resistant strains are becoming...

  3. Colistin against colistin-only-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii-related infections: Monotherapy or combination therapy?

    OpenAIRE

    F Simsek; Gedik, H; M T Yildirmak; N E Iris; A Türkmen; ERSOY, A.; Ersöz, M; A Gücüyener

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of the patients who were infected with colistin-only-susceptible (COS) Acinetobacter baumannii and treated with either colistin monotherapy or colistin combined therapy. Materials and Methods: This retrospective case-control study was conducted in the training and research hospital with an 800 beds between August 2008 and December 2011. The patients, who were infected with COS A. baumannii and received either colistin monotherapy or colistin combined therapy,...

  4. Meta-analysis of colistin for the treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhijin Chen; Yu Chen; Yaogao Fang; Xiaotian Wang; Yanqing Chen; Qingsong Qi; Fang Huang; Xungang Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistant among Acinetobacter baumannii infection is associated with a high mortality rate and limits the therapeutic options. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of colistin monotherapy vs. other single antibiotic therapy AND colistin-based combination therapy (with other antibiotics) vs. colistin alone for the treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii infection. Online electronic database were searched for studies evaluating colistin with or without other antibi...

  5. Comparison of two methods for quantification of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Saghar Hendiani; Ahya Abdi-Ali; Parisa Mohammadi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: ‏ Medical devices are made from a variety of materials such as polypropylene, polycarbonate, poly styrene, glass and etc. by attaching to this surfaces, Acinetobacter baumannii can form biofilms and then cause several device associated infections. Biofilms are communities of bacteria attached to the surfaces. In this study, biofilm formation ability in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii was assessed by two methods on different surfaces. Materials and methods: ‏ Biof...

  6. Simple Method for Markerless Gene Deletion in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Man Hwan; Lee, Je Chul; Kim, Jungmin; Choi, Chul Hee; Han, Kyudong

    2015-01-01

    The traditional markerless gene deletion technique based on overlap extension PCR has been used for generating gene deletions in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the method is time-consuming because it requires restriction digestion of the PCR products in DNA cloning and the construction of new vectors containing a suitable antibiotic resistance cassette for the selection of A. baumannii merodiploids. Moreover, the availability of restriction sites and the selection of re...

  7. MULTI DRUG RESISTANT ACINETOBACTER BAUMANNII: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW FOR MICROBIAL AND CLINICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddha Bahadur Basnet

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Infections due to Mutli Drug Resistant A. baumannii (MDRAB is now recognized as a major public health problem worldwide. The nosocomial infection due to MDRAB has leaded to increased in morbidity and mortality which has added noticeably to significant challenge to modern antibiotic therapy system. This is due to rapid phenomenon of A. baumannii to acquire antibiotic resistance. Thus, in this review the overview of current knowledge on epidemiology, infections, mechanism of resistance and effective treatment options are briefly highlighted.

  8. Facial ulcerations due to Acinetobacter baumannii: Vessel thrombosis with bacterial mycelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Ming Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old girl presented with a 2-week history of progressive facial ulcerations that did not respond to cephalexin and topical dexamethasone. Biopsy on the ulcer showed rod-shaped bacteria and actinomycetes-like mycelia in the vessel walls and within thrombi. Tissue culture yielded Acinetobacter baumannii, which was resistant to cephalexin. A favourite outcome was achieved with minocycline treatment. This is the first case report of A. baumannii-related vasculitis.

  9. Chronic Osteomyelitis in Sternum Mimicking Bone Metastasis of Lung Cancer Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary sternal osteomyelitis without predisposing factors is a rare condition, and it is hardly differentiated from metastatic bone tumor especially in patient with the history of primary malignancy because osteomyelitis shares frequently common findings with metastatic bone lesion on 18F-FDG PET and bone scan. Although there have been several publications of primary osteomyelitis mimicking bone metastasis in the spine or extremities, we report a case of primary sternal osteomyelitis in the patient with lung cancer, which has, to our knowledge, not been reported before

  10. Chronic Osteomyelitis in Sternum Mimicking Bone Metastasis of Lung Cancer Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Hyung Jun; Kim, Yu Keong; Lee, Sang Mi; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Primary sternal osteomyelitis without predisposing factors is a rare condition, and it is hardly differentiated from metastatic bone tumor especially in patient with the history of primary malignancy because osteomyelitis shares frequently common findings with metastatic bone lesion on {sup 18}F-FDG PET and bone scan. Although there have been several publications of primary osteomyelitis mimicking bone metastasis in the spine or extremities, we report a case of primary sternal osteomyelitis in the patient with lung cancer, which has, to our knowledge, not been reported before.

  11. Differential diagnosis of infantile osteomyelitis - classification according to scintigraphic, radiologic and magnetic resonance tomographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a retrospective study on children with the final diagnosis osteomyelitis, who have been examined in Tuebingen from 1985 to 1991. The different types of infantile osteomyelitis were classified due to the causative organism and findings in 3-phase scintigraphy and X-ray films. For the chronic type of osteomyelitis the study was extended to the years from 1979 to 1991 and the results of an earlier report were included. We worked up 17 cases of acute/peracute osteomyelitis, including 5 cases of early infancy, 2 cases of tuberculosis, 2 Brodie's abscesses, 5 plasmacellular types, 2 cases of primary chronic multifocal osteomyelitis (PCMO), and 5 cases of unspecific chronic osteomyelitis. All cases were examined with scintigraphy, X-ray films and in part with magnetic resonance tomographic imaging. In 23 cases scintigrams and X-ray films were performed in the follow-up. We show the importance of scintigraphy for the early detection and localisation of osteomyelitis, the importance of findings on X-ray films for the specific diagnosis of osteomyelitis, and the importance of magnetic resonance tomography for high-resolution detection of the expansion of osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  12. Use of a stainless steel washer platform to study Acinetobacter baumannii adhesion and biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Orsinger-Jacobsen, Samantha J.; Patel, Shenan S.; Vellozzi, Ernestine M.; Gialanella, Phillip; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Miranda, Kildare; Martinez, Luis R.

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a frequent cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia, and has recently increased in incidence as the causative agent of severe disease in troops wounded in Afghanistan and Iraq. Clinical approaches are limited since A. baumannii strains isolated from patients are extremely resistant to current antimicrobials. A. baumannii can survive desiccation and during outbreaks has been recovered from various sites in the patients’ environment. To better understand its prevalence in...

  13. Evaluate the frequency distribution of nonadhesive virulence factors in carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from clinical samples in Kermanshah

    OpenAIRE

    Mohajeri, Parviz; Sharbati, Saba; Farahani, Abbas; Rezaei, Zhaleh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii which is a Gram-negative bacterium can cause several different infections. The appearance of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii in recent years has made the treatment process more difficult. The identification of virulence factors (VFs), such as nonadhesives in A. baumannii, helps to fight against related infections. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 samples from teaching hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran, were collected during a 24 months period (2011-20...

  14. Safety and effectiveness of colistin compared with tobramycin for multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen Karen; van Zyl-Smit Richard; Bamford Colleen; Gounden Ronald; Maartens Gary

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Nosocomial infections due to multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii are often treated with colistin, but there are few data comparing its safety and efficacy with other antimicrobials. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients treated with colistin or tobramycin for A. baumannii infections in intensive care units (ICUs) at Groote Schuur hospital. Colistin was used for A. baumannii isolates which were resistant to all other available antimicrobials. In the tobr...

  15. Oxacillinase (OXA-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in Brazil: clinical and environmental impact and therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheli Medeiros

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Following a worldwide trend, infections caused by MDR OXA-type (Ambler class D carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii are currently regarded as a clinical and epidemiological emergency in Brazil. OXA-producing A. baumannii strains have been identified in the states of Alagoas, Amazonas, Bahia, Distrito Federal, Espírito Santo, Goiás, Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, Paraná, Pernambuco, Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Norte, Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina and São Paulo. In some settings, the presence of OXA-23- and/or OXA-143 -producing A. baumannii (so far restricted to Brazil has been endemic and A. baumannii strains carrying blaOXA-23 genes have been detected in hospital wastewater effluents, hence a potential risk to the community and the environment. Although molecular typing by multilocus sequence typing (MLST - Bartual scheme, University of Oxford, http://pubmlst.org/abaumannii/ has revealed the international spread of a clonal complex (CC denominated CC92, in Brazil most OXA-23-producing A. baumannii belong to CC113, CC109 or CC104 clonal complexes. Finally, from a clinical point of view, the main problem of A. baumannii infections is the limited use of antibacterial agents with in vitro activity, often restricted to ampicillin/sulbactam, polymyxin B and/or colistin (polymyxin E.

  16. Molecular Typing of Acinetobacter Baumannii Clinical Strains in Tehran by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Farahani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective : Currently, Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen insofar as its hospital outbreaks have been described from various geographical areas. Since the discrimination of strains within a species is important for delineating nosocomial outbreaks, this study was conducted with the aim of genotyping the A. baumannii clinical strains in Tehran via the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE method, which is the most accurate method used for the typing of bacterial species.   Materials & methods: This study was performed on 70 isolates of acinetobacter baumannii isolated from patients from Baqiyatallah, Rasoole Akram, and Milad hospitals in Tehran. Cultural and biochemical methods were used for the identification of the isolates in species level, and then susceptibility tests were carried out on 50 isolates of A. baumannii using the disk diffusion method. The PFGE method was performed on the isolates by Apa I restriction enzyme. Finally, the results of the PFGE were analyzed. Result: Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from hospitals in Tehran showed seven different genetic patterns, two of which were sporadic . Also, genotypic profiles were different in each hospital, and different patterns of genetic resistance to common antibiotics were observed. Conclusion: A lthough diversity was observed among the strains of A. baumannii by the PFGE method in Tehran, no epidemic strains were found among them.  

  17. Code blue: Acinetobacter baumannii, a nosocomial pathogen with a role in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, A M; Abu Kwaik, Y; Lamont, R J

    2015-02-01

    Actinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that can cause a wide range of serious conditions including pneumonia, meningitis, necrotizing fasciitis and sepsis. It is also a major cause of wound infections in military personnel injured during the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, leading to its popular nickname of 'Iraqibacter'. Contributing to its success in clinical settings is resistance to environmental stresses such as desiccation and disinfectants. Moreover, in recent years there has been a dramatic increase in the number of A. baumannii strains with resistance to multiple antibiotic classes. Acinetobacter baumannii is an inhabitant of oral biofilms, which can act as a reservoir for pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Subgingival colonization by A. baumannii increases the risk of refractory periodontitis. Pathogenesis of the organism involves adherence, biofilm formation and iron acquisition. In addition, A. baumannii can induce apoptotic cell death in epithelial cells and kill hyphal forms of Candida albicans. Virulence factors that have been identified include pili, the outer membrane protein OmpA, phospholipases and extracellular polysaccharide. Acinetobacter baumannii can sense blue light through a blue-light sensing using flavin (BLUF) domain protein, BlsA. The resulting conformational change in BlsA leads to changes in gene expression, including virulence genes. PMID:25052812

  18. Aptamer-nanobody based ELASA for specific detection of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulinejad, Samaneh; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi

    2016-08-10

    Acinetobacter baumannii has turned into an important threat in nosocomial outbreak infections and multidrug resistance leading to high mortality rates in the 21st century. In recent years its mortality has increased by 15% which in part could be due to lack of a rapid and sensitive diagnostic test. In this work we introduced a new detection test for A. baumannii with two highly specific aptamer and nanobody molecules. High binding affinity DNA oligonucleotide aptamers toward A. baumannii were selected through 12 rounds of whole cell System Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment process (SELEX). The SELEX procedures was monitored by flow cytometry. The dissociation constant and binding efficiency of the selected aptamer Aci49 was 7.547±1:353pM and 47.50%, respectively. A sandwich enzyme linked aptamer sorbent assay (ELASA) was designed with the biotinylated Aci49 aptamer and our previously developed nanobody against biofilm associated protein (Bap). The assay system was optimized with A. baumannii (ATCC 19606) and 47 clinical isolates of A. baumannii were tested. The threshold of detection in sandwich ELASA process was10(3) CFU/ml. The sensitivity of test toward the clinical isolates was 95.47%. Our results reveal that the sandwich ELASA is sensitive and specific enough for the rapid detection of A. baumannii from clinical isolates. PMID:27234880

  19. Radioactive scanning in diagnosis of acute sacroiliac osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute infection of the pelvic bones and of the sacroiliac joint is uncommonly reported. Morgan and Yates, however, found a frequency of 5 percent among all cases of osteomyelitis and Green and associates reported 11 instances of involvement of a pelvic bone in 99 patients with acute hematogenous osteomyelitis. Difficulty in making the correct diagnosis is related primarily to two factors: (1) The disease usually is not included in the early differential diagnosis of inflammatory disease presenting with immobilization of thigh and hip joint and (2) the initial symptoms in the pediatric patient may be quite variable and misleading. Two case reports are presented to illustrate acute infection of the pelvic bones in children. In each patient the initial roentgenograms were interpreted as normal and the diagnosis was suspected because bone scans were abnormal

  20. Radioactive scanning in diagnosis of acute sacroiliac osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trauner, D.A.; Connor, J.D.

    1975-11-01

    Acute infection of the pelvic bones and of the sacroiliac joint is uncommonly reported. Morgan and Yates, however, found a frequency of 5 percent among all cases of osteomyelitis and Green and associates reported 11 instances of involvement of a pelvic bone in 99 patients with acute hematogenous osteomyelitis. Difficulty in making the correct diagnosis is related primarily to two factors: (1) The disease usually is not included in the early differential diagnosis of inflammatory disease presenting with immobilization of thigh and hip joint and (2) the initial symptoms in the pediatric patient may be quite variable and misleading. Two case reports are presented to illustrate acute infection of the pelvic bones in children. In each patient the initial roentgenograms were interpreted as normal and the diagnosis was suspected because bone scans were abnormal.

  1. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis with MR correlation: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is a rare disorder of unknown etiology. The main characteristics on plain X-rays are a lytic destruction in the metaphyseal region of the long bones followed by progressive sclerosis. CRMO of the tibial and fibular bones is described in a 14-year-old girl, who suffered from pain and soft tissue swelling in both ankles. Initial plain X-rays and laboratory findings were normal. After relapsing clinically, progressive sclerosis of both fibular bones occurred. The diagnostics of CRMO was suggested based on CT and MRI findings. CRMO was confirmed after curettage and bone biopsy. Histopathological findings were consistent with active chronic osteomyelitis. (orig./DG)

  2. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis with MR correlation: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machiels, F. (Dept. of Radiology, Middelheim Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium)); Seynaeve, P. (Dept. of Radiology, Middelheim Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium)); Lagey, C. (Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Children' s Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium)); Mortelmans, L.L. (Dept. of Radiology, Middelheim Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium))

    1992-11-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is a rare disorder of unknown etiology. The main characteristics on plain X-rays are a lytic destruction in the metaphyseal region of the long bones followed by progressive sclerosis. CRMO of the tibial and fibular bones is described in a 14-year-old girl, who suffered from pain and soft tissue swelling in both ankles. Initial plain X-rays and laboratory findings were normal. After relapsing clinically, progressive sclerosis of both fibular bones occurred. The diagnostics of CRMO was suggested based on CT and MRI findings. CRMO was confirmed after curettage and bone biopsy. Histopathological findings were consistent with active chronic osteomyelitis. (orig./DG)

  3. Lumbosacral Osteomyelitis and Discitis with Phlegmon Following Laparoscopic Sacral Colpopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson M D, Amanda V; Scranton, Robert; Antosh, Danielle D; Simpson, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Lumbosacral osteomyelitis and discitis are usually a result of hematogenous spread; rarely it can result from direct inoculation during a surgical procedure. Bacteria may also track along implanted devices to a different location. This is a rare complication seen from pelvic organ prolapse surgery with sacral colpopexy. A 67-year-old female developed increasing lower back pain four months following a laparoscopic sacral colpopexy. Imaging revealed lumbar 5-sacral 1 (L5-S1) osteomyelitis and discitis with associated phlegmon confirmed by percutaneous biopsy and culture. The patient was treated conservatively with antibiotics, but required laparoscopic removal of the pelvic and vaginal mesh followed by twelve weeks of intravenous antibiotics. The patient has experienced clinical improvement of her back pain. This is an uncommon complication of sacral colpopexy, but physicians must be vigilant and manage aggressively to avoid more serious complications and permanent deficit. PMID:27551651

  4. Lumbar spine osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godhania, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 39-year-old male with no previous medical history presented with abdominal and low back pain. Based on clinical and radiological findings he was diagnosed with L1/L2 osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Further history taking revealed recent use of acupuncture for treatment of mechanical back pain. The patient was treated conservatively with an extended course of antibiotics, monitored with repeat MRI scans and had a full recovery with no neurological deficit. This is the first reported case of epidural abscess formation and osteomyelitis after acupuncture in the UK. As acupuncture becomes more commonly used in western countries, it is important to be aware of this rare but serious complication. PMID:26976275

  5. Prophylaxis of radiogenic osteomyelitis of the jaw by thyrocalcitonine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of exogenous thyrocalcitonine (TC) on the result of a fractionated gamma irradiation of the system of teeth and jaws of dogs with a total dose of 60 Gy (756 ret) with a functional overload of their parodontium (FOP) was studied. The FOP was found to intensify radiation injuries, even an osteomyelitis of the jaw may develop. A prophylactic 30-day treatment with parenteral administration of TC in an amount of 1 MRC unit per 1 kg body weight decreased the extent of radiation injuries to the structures of the dental bed, normalized the metabolism of tissues of the region studied and prevented osteomyelitis of the jaw. A repeated prophylactic treatment further improved the results. It is concluded that TC can be recommended as an agent for the prophylaxis of a radioosteomyelitis. (author)

  6. Successful Daptomycin Use in a Pediatric Patient With Acute, Bilateral Osteomyelitis Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Billups, Kelsey L.; Stultz, Jeremy S

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacteria associated with the development of osteomyelitis in pediatric patients. Osteomyelitis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be difficult to safely and effectively treat. Vancomycin, linezolid, and clindamycin are commonly used to treat osteomyelitis caused by MRSA. While adult studies suggest intravenous (IV) daptomycin may by beneficial for the treatment of MRSA osteomyelitis, it is not Food and Drug Administration ...

  7. Three Phase Bone Scintigraphy in Active and Inactive Osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To Appreciate the value of bone scintigraphy in determination of the bony infection, we performed three phase bone scintigraphy in 34 cases of osteomyelitis of extremities prospectively. They were clinically inactive in 11 and active in 23 cases. We confirmed the active osteomyelitis by operation or aspiration within one week after scintigraphy. Perfusion, blood pool and delayed images were analyzed respectively and compared with the plain roentgenograms. All 23 active lesions showed diffusely increased perfusion in affected limbs. The areas of the increased activities on blood pool images were larger than or similar to those on delayed images in 17 cases (73.9%) with active osteomyelitis and smaller in 6 cases (26.1%). 5 of the latter 6 cases showed definite soft tissue activities on blood pool images. In inactive cases bone scintigrams were completely normal in 4 cases. Two of those were normal on plain films and remaining two showed mild focal bony sclerosis. Among 7 inactive lesions, perfusion was normal in 2 cases, diffusely increased in 4 cases and diffusely decreased in 1 case. 6 of these 7 cases showed increased activities both on blood pool and delayed images and the areas of increased activities on blood pool images didn't exceed those on delayed images. Bony sclerosis was noted on plain films in those 7 inactive lesions and the extent of the sclerosis correlated well to delayed images. Large blood pool activity was characteristics of active osteomyelitis. Normal three phase bone scintigram may indicate the time to terminate the treatment, but increased activity on perfusion and blood pool scans is not absolute indication of active lesion if the extent of the lesion on the blood pool image is smaller than that on delayed image and if no definite soft tissue activity is noted on perfusion and blood pool images in clinically inactive patient.

  8. Osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Raj Gopinathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteofibrous dysplasia or ossifying fibroma is an uncommon benign fibro-osseous lesion of childhood, commonly described in the maxilla and the mandible. Among long bones, it usually presents in the tibia as a painless swelling or anterior bowing. Ossifying fibroma of clavicle has never been reported in English literature, to the best of our knowledge. Here, we would like to present an unusual case of osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis.

  9. Successful treatment of multi-focal XDR tuberculous osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshukairi, Abeer N; Alrajhi, Abdulrahman A; Alamri, Abdulfattah W; Alothman, Adel F

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe the nosocomial transmission of a pre-XDR or MDR case of pulmonary tuberculosis in a HIV-negative health care worker in an area endemic for MDR and XDR tuberculosis. Following inadequate therapy and non-compliance, he presented with extra-pulmonary XDR tuberculosis in the form of multi-focal osteomyelitis and encysted pleural effusion. He was cured after two years of treatment with various anti-tuberculous drugs in addition to interferon gamma. PMID:26631433

  10. Primary subacute hematogenous osteomyelitis in children: a clearer bacteriological etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Spyropoulou, Vasiliki; Dhouib Chargui, Amira; Merlini, Laura; Samara, Eleftheria; Valaikaite, Raimonda; Kampouroglou, Georgios; Ceroni, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to describe the spectrum of pediatric primary subacute hematogenous osteomyelitis (PSAHO) and to investigate its bacterial etiology. Methods Sixty-five consecutive cases of PSAHO admitted to our institution over a 16-year period (2000–2015) were retrospectively reviewed to assess their laboratory and radiographic imaging features, as well as their bacteriological etiology. Results On evaluation, white blood cell count and C-reactive protein were normal in 53 (81.5 ...

  11. Fluconazole in the therapy of multiple osteomyelitis in African histoplasmosis

    OpenAIRE

    Onwuasoigwe, O.

    1999-01-01

     Amphotericin B has been the standard treatment for deep mycoses including African histoplasmosis, but its use is complicated by its toxicity. More recently, Fluconazole, a water-soluble triazole with antimycotic activity and little side effects, has become available. A case of African histoplasmosis from Nigeria, manifesting as multiple osteomyelitis and successfully treated with oral Fluconazole, is presented. Fluconazole may be preferred in the therapy of African histoplasmosis.

  12. Calcaneal Osteomyelitis Associated With a Severe Abscess

    OpenAIRE

    Memis, Ali; Mutluoglu, Mesut; Öztürk, Sinan; Kara, Kemal; Ay, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) is a common complication of the diabetic foot and the majority of minor and major amputations are preceded by DFO. The diagnosis and treatment of DFO are both challenging. Early recognition and comprehensive management of diabetic foot infections may obviate DFO, hence the dreadful consequence-resection of the infected bone. Herein, we present the successful management of a patient presenting with DFO and severe abscess formation of the heel.

  13. Calcaneal Osteomyelitis Associated With a Severe Abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memis, Ali; Mutluoglu, Mesut; Öztürk, Sinan; Kara, Kemal; Ay, Hakan

    2014-12-01

    Diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) is a common complication of the diabetic foot and the majority of minor and major amputations are preceded by DFO. The diagnosis and treatment of DFO are both challenging. Early recognition and comprehensive management of diabetic foot infections may obviate DFO, hence the dreadful consequence-resection of the infected bone. Herein, we present the successful management of a patient presenting with DFO and severe abscess formation of the heel. PMID:27104146

  14. Cefoperazone Sodium Impregnated Polycaprolactone Composite Implant for Osteomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Anand A.; Pundir R; Pandian C; Saraf S; Gupta H

    2009-01-01

    The use of local antibiotics from a biodegradable implant for chronic osteomyelitis is an attractive alternative. The implant delivers high antibiotic concentration at tissue levels, obliterates dead space, aids bone repair and does not need to be removed. The purpose of this paper is to develop and evaluate a calcium sulphate and polycaprolactone based composite biodegradable implantable delivery system of cefoperazone sodium. Implants were prepared by modified fabrication technique to avoid...

  15. Lumbar spine osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture

    OpenAIRE

    Godhania, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 39-year-old male with no previous medical history presented with abdominal and low back pain. Based on clinical and radiological findings he was diagnosed with L1/L2 osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Further history taking revealed recent use of acupuncture for treatment of mechanical back pain. The patient was treated conservatively with an extended course of antibiotics, monitored with repeat MRI scans and had a full recovery with no neurological deficit. This is the first reported case...

  16. Chronic Suppurative Osteomyelitis of Subcondylar Region: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, G Ravi; Syed, Basheer Ahmed; Prasad, N.; Praveen, SP

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic suppurative osteomyelitis (CSO) of the maxillofacial region is primarily caused by infections of odontogenic microorganisms. It may also arise as a complication of dental extractions, maxillofacial trauma, inadequate treatment of a fracture and irradiation to the mandible. This condition is characterized by areas of devitalized bone (sequestra) which serves as a nidus for recurrent episodes of infection. This case report describes a case of CSO in an untreated right subcondyl...

  17. Presentation of Osteitis and Osteomyelitis Pubis as Acute Abdominal Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Diane V; Scott, Kendall G

    2007-01-01

    Osteitis pubis is the most common inflammatory condition of the pubic symphysis and may present as acute abdominal, pelvic, or groin pain. Osteomyelitis pubis can occur concurrently and spontaneously with osteitis pubis. Primary care physicians should consider these conditions in patients presenting with abdominal and pelvic pain. A thorough history, including type of physical activity, and a focused physical examination will be useful, and imaging modalities may be helpful. A biopsy and cult...

  18. Osteomyelitis variolosa with fracture: A unique case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep K Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Smallpox has been eradicated completely but its unique pathology and sequlae are still found in routine clinical practice. We present a report of a patient having osteomyelitis variolosa in both elbow joints and wrist with fracture of humerus. The condyles were typically elongated as central portion of distal humerus absorbed. The fracture united uneventfully following stabilization with dynamic compression plate and bone grafting. Patient had satisfactory elbow function at the end of the last follow-up.

  19. Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii: clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Carina; Murray, Gerald L; Paulsen, Ian T; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-05-01

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii (CA-Ab) is a rare but serious cause of community-acquired pneumonia in tropical regions of the world. CA-Ab infections predominantly affect individuals with risk factors, which include excess alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus, smoking and chronic lung disease. CA-Ab pneumonia presents as a surprisingly fulminant course and is characterized by a rapid onset of fever, severe respiratory symptoms and multi-organ dysfunction, with a mortality rate reported as high as 64%. It is unclear whether the distinct clinical syndrome caused by CA-Ab is because of host predisposing factors or unique bacterial characteristics, or a combination of both. Deepening our understanding of the drivers of overwhelming CA-Ab infection will provide important insights into preventative and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25850806

  20. Management of sternal osteomyelitis and mediastinal infection following median sternotomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ju; WANG Wen-zhang; WANG You-li; LU Shu-qiang; CAI Ai-bing; YANG Zhi-fu; HAN Zhi-yi; LI Jiu-jiang; WEN Yu-ming; GENG Feng-yong

    2010-01-01

    Background Median sternotomy is considered the most usually performed procedure in cardiac operations. This study aimed to assess clinical effectiveness of bilateral pectoralis major muscle flaps (BPMMF) for management of sternal osteomyelitis and mediastinal infection following median sternotomy.Methods Clinical data were collected and retrospectively analyzed from twelve patients who underwent the BPMMF transposition for management of sternal osteomyelitis and mediastinal infection following median sternotomy from January 2006 to June 2009. Procedure consisted of rigorous debridement of necrotic tissues, dead space obliteration using the BPMMF, and placement of drainage tubes connected to a negative pressures generator for adequate drainage.Results No patients died of drainage, and all 12 patients had viable BPMMF when discharged from hospital. At 1 week post discharge, 2 patients presented with sternal infection but recovered following local debridement and medication. No patients showed infection recurrence during the follow-up period over 10 months.Conclusions Sternal osteomyelitis and mediastinal infection following median sternotomy may be effectively managed through rigorous debridement of infected soft tissues, resection of the damaged stermal segment, transposition of the BPMMF to fill the damaged sternum resulting from debridement, and adequate postoperative drainage.

  1. A systematic review of animal models for Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Reizner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus osteomyelitis is a significant complication for orthopaedic patients undergoing surgery, particularly with fracture fixation and arthroplasty. Given the difficulty in studying S. aureus infections in human subjects, animal models serve an integral role in exploring the pathogenesis of osteomyelitis, and aid in determining the efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic treatments. Animal models should mimic the clinical scenarios seen in patients as closely as possible to permit the experimental results to be translated to the corresponding clinical care. To help understand existing animal models of S. aureus, we conducted a systematic search of PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE to identify in vivo animal experiments that have investigated the management of S. aureus osteomyelitis in the context of fractures and metallic implants. In this review, experimental studies are categorised by animal species and are further classified by the setting of the infection. Study methods are summarised and the relevant advantages and disadvantages of each species and model are discussed. While no ideal animal model exists, the understanding of a model’s strengths and limitations should assist clinicians and researchers to appropriately select an animal model to translate the conclusions to the clinical setting.

  2. Clinical value of imaging techniques in childhood osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The traditional approach to investigating suspected osteomyelitis in children includes conventional radiography and bone scintigraphy. The roles of US, CT and MR imaging are controversial. Our objective was to determine whether the additional use of these modalities would yield information likely to lead to treatment modification. Material and Methods: Sixty-five children with clinically suspected osteomyelitis took part in a prospective study. All patients underwent conventional radiography and bone scintigraphy. In addition to this, US, CT and MR imaging were all performed in 33 patients; the remaining 32 patients were examined with various combinations of these three modalities. The value of the additional information obtained was estimated retrospectively by a pediatric orthopedic surgeon in terms of possible modification of treatment. Results: MR imaging was the modality with the highest sensitivity and specificity for detecting osteomyelitis. MR yielded information likely to influence treatment in the greatest proportion of patients (45%) followed by US (30%). Conclusion: The standard investigation protocol with the addition of US (because of its ability to detect subperiosteal abscesses early and simply) is adequate in uncomplicated cases. When additional imaging is required to outline a lesion, or in complicated cases, and when bone scintigraphy is inconclusive, MR imaging should also be performed. CT should be considered when MR investigation is not available or when anesthesia is required but cannot be provided. (orig.)

  3. Clinical value of imaging techniques in childhood osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, S.; Jorulf, H. [Karolinska Hospital, Astrid Lindgren Children`s Hospital, Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Hirsch, G. [Karolinska Hospital, Astrid Lindgren Children`s Hospital, Dept. of Pediatric Surgery, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-09-01

    Purpose: The traditional approach to investigating suspected osteomyelitis in children includes conventional radiography and bone scintigraphy. The roles of US, CT and MR imaging are controversial. Our objective was to determine whether the additional use of these modalities would yield information likely to lead to treatment modification. Material and Methods: Sixty-five children with clinically suspected osteomyelitis took part in a prospective study. All patients underwent conventional radiography and bone scintigraphy. In addition to this, US, CT and MR imaging were all performed in 33 patients; the remaining 32 patients were examined with various combinations of these three modalities. The value of the additional information obtained was estimated retrospectively by a pediatric orthopedic surgeon in terms of possible modification of treatment. Results: MR imaging was the modality with the highest sensitivity and specificity for detecting osteomyelitis. MR yielded information likely to influence treatment in the greatest proportion of patients (45%) followed by US (30%). Conclusion: The standard investigation protocol with the addition of US (because of its ability to detect subperiosteal abscesses early and simply) is adequate in uncomplicated cases. When additional imaging is required to outline a lesion, or in complicated cases, and when bone scintigraphy is inconclusive, MR imaging should also be performed. CT should be considered when MR investigation is not available or when anesthesia is required but cannot be provided. (orig.)

  4. Ultrasonographic findings of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in neonatal hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate ultrasonographic findings of neonatal patients who confirmed and treated as hip joint septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. We retrospectively examined clinical feature and radiologic findings of 7 neonatal patients ranging from 8 to 28 days of age who were examined from January 1966 to December 1998 at nursery and were confirmed and treated on the diagnosis of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. Clinical features of the patients were comparatively analyzed with radiologic findings including plain radiographs, ultrasonography, bone scan and MRI. We emphasized importance of ultrasonographic findings of these patients. Ultrasonography was performed first of all in all cases after the symptom onset. Other examinations were performed on the same day or a few days later after ultrasonography. Ultrasonography revealed abnormal finding in 85.7% (6/7) of all cases. Plain radiographs revealed abnormal findings in 28.6% (2/7). Bone scan revealed decreased uptake in 66.7%(2/3). MRI revealed abnormal signal intensity in 100%(3/3). Ultrasonographic findings of the patients were deep soft swelling in 85.7% (6/7) of all cases, periosteal elevation in 57.1% (4/7), synovial thickening in 42.8% (3/7), synovial effusion in 42.8%(3/7), echogenic debris or clot in 28.5% (2/7), cortical erosion in 28.5% (2/7), and subperiosteal abscess in 14.2% (1/7). Ultrasonography is a useful modality to diagnose septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in neonatal hip.

  5. Osteomyelitis diagnosis by {sup 99m}Tc radiolabeled aptamers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, S.R.; Ferreira, I.M.; Andrade, A.S.R., E-mail: sararoberta7@hotmail.com, E-mail: imendesf@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: antero@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Barros, A.L.B.; Cardoso, V.N.; Diniz, O.F., E-mail: brancodebarros@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: valbertcardoso@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: simoneodilia@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia. Departamento de Analises Clinicas e Toxicologicas

    2015-07-01

    Osteomyelitis, which is characterized by progressive inflammatory destruction and new opposition of bone, is still a difficult infection to treat. The clinical diagnosis in late stages is achieved easily, but an early diagnosis is more challenging. Staphylococcus aureus is a common agent found in osteomyelitis and bone prostheses infection. Diagnosis by scintigraphy has advantages because it is a non-invasive procedure and is able to perform an early diagnosis even before anatomic changes. Thus, nuclear medicine could contribute to an accurate diagnosis since specific radiopharmaceuticals were developed. In this study, aptamers selected to Staphylococcus aureus were labeled with {sup 99m}Tc and used for bacteria identification in an osteomyelitis experimental model. The aptamers selected to S. aureus were directly labelled with {sup 99m}Tc and were evaluated by biodistribution studies. Wistar rats with intraosseous infection in the right paw were used. A random aptamer labelled with {sup 99m}Tc was as control. Six animals were used in each group. The aptamers labeled with {sup 99m}Tc were able to identify the infection foci caused by S. aureus displaying a target/non-target ratio of 2,23 ± 0,20, after 3 h. The control group presented a target/non-target ratio 1,08 ± 0.23. The results indicated that the radiolabeled aptamers were able to identify specifically the infection foci and they should be further explored for infection diagnosis by scintigraphy. (author)

  6. Mycobacterium haemophilum osteomyelitis: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Read Ron

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium haemophilum is a slow-growing, fastidious, iron-requiring microorganism that, relative to other non-tuberculous mycobacterial species, has rarely been documented as a cause of human infection. This microorganism appears to be acquired via environmental exposure although its natural habitat and mode of acquisition are unknown. It has primarily been implicated as a cause of ulcerating cutaneous or subcutaneous nodular skin lesions, particularly in immunocompromised patients, although infections at extracutaneous sites have also been described. Osteomyelitis, while rarely documented, appears to be an important complication of infection with M. haemophilum in these patients. Case presentation We describe a unique case of culture-confirmed M. haemophilum osteomyelitis in an adult woman with polycythemia vera and review the world literature on bone infections due to this organism. Conclusion Mycobacterium haemophilum is an important but infrequently encountered cause of osteomyelitis in immunocompromised patients, often requiring months to years of medical therapy, with or without surgery, to effect a clinical cure.

  7. Osteomyelitis in the diabetic foot: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Game, Frances L

    2013-09-01

    Although osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetes remains common in specialist foot clinics across the world, the quality of published work to guide clinicians in the diagnosis and management is generally poor. Diagnosis should be based primarily on clinical signs supported by results of pathologic and radiologic investigations. Although the gold standard comes from the histologic and microbiological examination of bone, clinicians should be aware of the problems of sampling error. This lack of standardization of diagnostic criteria and of consensus on the choice of outcome measures poses further difficulties when seeking evidence to support management decisions. Experts have traditionally recommended surgical removal of infected bone but available evidence suggests that in many cases (excepting those in whom immediate surgery is required to save life or limb) a nonsurgical approach to management of osteomyelitis may be effective for many, if not most, patients with osteomyelitis of the diabetic foot. The benefits and limitations of both approaches need, however, to be established in prospective trials so that appropriate therapy can be offered to appropriate patients at the appropriate time, with the patients' views taken fully into account. PMID:23992902

  8. Osteomyelitis diagnosis by 99mTc radiolabeled aptamers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteomyelitis, which is characterized by progressive inflammatory destruction and new opposition of bone, is still a difficult infection to treat. The clinical diagnosis in late stages is achieved easily, but an early diagnosis is more challenging. Staphylococcus aureus is a common agent found in osteomyelitis and bone prostheses infection. Diagnosis by scintigraphy has advantages because it is a non-invasive procedure and is able to perform an early diagnosis even before anatomic changes. Thus, nuclear medicine could contribute to an accurate diagnosis since specific radiopharmaceuticals were developed. In this study, aptamers selected to Staphylococcus aureus were labeled with 99mTc and used for bacteria identification in an osteomyelitis experimental model. The aptamers selected to S. aureus were directly labelled with 99mTc and were evaluated by biodistribution studies. Wistar rats with intraosseous infection in the right paw were used. A random aptamer labelled with 99mTc was as control. Six animals were used in each group. The aptamers labeled with 99mTc were able to identify the infection foci caused by S. aureus displaying a target/non-target ratio of 2,23 ± 0,20, after 3 h. The control group presented a target/non-target ratio 1,08 ± 0.23. The results indicated that the radiolabeled aptamers were able to identify specifically the infection foci and they should be further explored for infection diagnosis by scintigraphy. (author)

  9. The influence of carbapenem resistance on mortality in solid organ transplant recipients with Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Gouvêa Erika

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has been associated with high morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant recipients. The main objective of this study was to assess the influence of carbapenem resistance and other potential risk factors on the outcome of A. baumannii infection after kidney and liver transplantation. Methods Retrospective study of a case series of A. baumannii infection among liver and renal transplant recipients. The primary outcome was death associated with A. baumannii infection. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the influence of carbapenem resistance and other covariates on the outcome. Results Forty-nine cases of A. baumannii infection affecting 24 kidney and 25 liver transplant recipients were studied. Eighteen cases (37% were caused by carbapenem-resistant isolates. There were 17 (35% deaths associated with A. baumannii infection. In unadjusted analysis, liver transplantation (p = 0.003, acquisition in intensive care unit (p = 0.001, extra-urinary site of infection (p A. baumannii infection. The number of deaths associated with A. baumannii infection was higher among patients infected with carbapenem-resistant isolates, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.28. In multivariate analysis, the risk of A. baumannii-associated mortality was higher in patients with infection acquired in the intensive care unit (odds ratio [OR] = 34.8, p = 0.01 and on mechanical ventilation (OR = 15.2, p = 0.04. Appropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy was associated with significantly lower mortality (OR = 0.04, p = 0.03, but carbapenem resistance had no impact on it (OR = 0.73, p = 0.70. Conclusion These findings suggest that A. baumannii-associated mortality among liver and kidney transplant recipients is influenced by baseline clinical severity and by the early start of appropriate therapy, but not by carbapenem

  10. Acinetobacter baumannii Infection in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMK AL Jarousha

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: To perform a prospective case control study of blood stream infection to determine the infection rate of Acine­tobac­ter baumannii and the risk factors associated with mortality."nMethods:   From February 2004 to January 2005, 579 consecutive episodes of blood stream infection were obtained at two neo­na­tal intensive care units Al Nasser and Al Shifa hospitals in Gaza City. Forty (6.9% isolates of A. baumannii were ob­tained from the neonates under 28 d. Most of the isolates (92% were from hospitalized patients in the intensive care units."nResults: Community acquired infection was 8%.  Sixty three percent of the patients were males. The isolates of A. bauman­nii were resistant to commonly used antibiotics while being sensitive to meropenem (92.5%, imipenem (90%, chloram­pheni­col (80%, ciprofloxacin (75%, gentamicin (57.5%, ceftriaxone (50%, amikacin (37.5%, cefuroxime and ce­fo­taxime (35%. Over all crude mortality rate was 20% with much higher crude mortality among patients with noso­co­mial infec­tion.  Based on logistic regression, the following factors were statistically significant: weight < 1500g, age < 7 d, mean of hospitalization equal 20 days, antibiotic use, and mechanical ventilation, when compared to the control group (P< 0.05."nConclusion:  Infection rate of nosocomial blood stream infection was considerable and alarming in neonatal intensive care unit infants and associated with a significant excess length of NICU stay and a significant economic burden.  

  11. Characterization and antibacterial performance of electrodeposited chitosan-vancomycin composite coatings for prevention of implant-associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordikhani, F; Tamjid, E; Simchi, A

    2014-08-01

    Orthopaedic implant-associated infections are one of the most serious complications in orthopaedic surgery and a major cause of implant failure. In the present work, drug-eluting coatings based on chitosan containing various amounts of vancomycin were prepared by a cathodic electrophoretic deposition process on titanium foils. A three-step release mechanism of the antibiotic from the films in a phosphate-buffered saline solution was noticed. At the early stage, physical encapsulation of the drug in the hydrogel network controlled the release rate. At the late stage, however, in vitro degradation/deattachment of chitosan was responsible for the controlled release. Cytotoxicity evaluation of the drug-eluting coatings via culturing in human osteosarcoma cells (MG-63 osteoblast-like cell line) showed no adverse effect on the biocompatibility. Antibacterial tests against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus also demonstrated that the infection risk of titanium foils was significantly reduced due to the antibiotic release. Additionally, in vitro electrochemical corrosion studies by polarization technique revealed that the corrosion current density was significantly lower for the titanium foils with drug-eluting coatings compared to that of uncoated titanium. PMID:24907757

  12. Biomarkers Provide Clues to Early Events in the Pathogenesis of Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadin, Marshall E; Deva, Anand; Xu, Haiying; Morgan, John; Khare, Pranay; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Van Natta, Bruce W; Adams, William P; Brody, Garry S; Epstein, Alan L

    2016-07-01

    Almost 200 women worldwide have been diagnosed with breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL). The unique location and specific lymphoma type strongly suggest an etio-pathologic link between breast implants and BIA-ALCL. It is postulated that chronic inflammation via bacterial infection may be an etiological factor. BIA-ALCL resembles primary cutaneous ALCL (pcALCL) in morphology, activated T-cell phenotype, and indolent clinical course. Gene expression array analysis, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry were used to study pcALCL and BIA-ALCL cell lines. Clinical samples were also studied to characterize transcription factor and cytokine profiles of tumor cells and surrounding lymphocytes. BIA-ALCL and pcALCL were found to have common expression of transcription factors SOCS3, JunB, SATB1, and a cytokine profile suggestive of a Th1 phenotype. Similar patterns were observed in a CD30+ cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD). The patterns of cytokine and transcription factor expression suggest that BIA-ALCL is likely to arise from chronic bacterial antigen stimulation of T-cells. Further analysis of cytokine and transcription factor profiles may allow early detection and treatment of BIA-ALCL leading to better prognosis and survival. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 5: Risk. PMID:26979456

  13. Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis: An Update on Correlative Imaging Diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection still common 3000 years after initial description by Ancient Egyptians, diagnosis is still difficult in many situations. Inflammation: Nonspecific tissue reaction to injury physical, chemical, radiation, Immunologic or Microorganisms (leading to infection in this case) Osteomyelitis occurs in approximately 15% of diabetic patients mostly due to adjacent infection (ulcers). Foot ulceration occurs 50 times more common in diabetics and is due to abnormal pressure distribution secondary to diabetic neuropathy and vascular disease with diminished blood supply. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common organism causing diabetic foot osteomyelitis. Metatarsal bones and prox. phalanges: most commonly involved. Osteomyelitis was found to occur in 68% of ulcers, 68% of cases of osteomyelitis: silent and not diagnosed clinically and all cases with ulcers exposing bone were associated with osteomyelitis. Clinical diagnosis is not possible in most patients without imaging. The clinical problem is to diagnose infection as early, as reliable and as cost effectively as possible and differentiate it from the common neuroarthropathy. Standard Radiograph is cost effective as no additional Imaging if positive. However it has low sensitivity of 28%. It still is the initial modality of choice. Magnetic resonance imaging provides improved soft tissue contrast resolution and excellent delineation of soft tissue vs. bone infections. Data indicate high accuracy (90% sensitive and 81% specific) in diabetic foot infections. Regarding functional modalities, multiphase bone scan using Tc99m MDP offers early detection (24-48 h after infection), very high sensitivity, whole body imaging helping detect infection at other unsuspected sites. However it is nonspecific (average 30%)* Ga-67 is nonspecific and is positive in inflammation and neuroarthropathy. Labeled leukocyte imaging (WBC) using In111 or Tc99m HMP AO is high specific (88%) for infection (91-94% when combined with bone scan

  14. Rat-bite fever complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ryota; Kuriyama, Akira; Nasu, Michitaka

    2016-08-01

    Rat-bite fever (RBF) is a challenging diagnosis transmitted by the bite of the rats. We present the first reported case of RBF complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis. It is important to consider performing the MRI to differentiate vertebral osteomyelitis from simple back pain to determine the appropriate duration of antibiotic therapy. PMID:26948832

  15. Acute osteomyelitis in children: combined Tc-99m and Ga-67 imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective study was done to determine the value of combined bone (technetium-99m methylene-diphosphonate) and gallium-67 citrate imaging in selected children with complicated clinical situations. Thirty-one children were evaluated for suspected osteomyelitis by bone scan followed within 4 days by a gallium scan. These 31 children represented a subpopulation in whom the Tc-99m scan is known to be potentially unreliable in diagnosing acute osteomyelitis. Eight children had acute osteomyelitis by strict criteria, while 23 did not. The bone scan successfully identified five of the eight with osteomyelitis but was positive in ten of the other 23. The gallium scan correctly identified all eight with osteomyelitis but was positive in seven of the other 23. The gallium scan was significantly less specific when the suspected lesion was in the extremities compared with central locations; causes of false-positive gallium scans included fracture and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Combined gallium and bone scanning increased accuracy of the scintigraphic diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis. Both tests may, however, be abnormal in conditions other than osteomyelitis. These findings emphasize the importance of correlating all imaging studies in detection of osteomyelitis

  16. Autoinflammatory bone disorders with special focus on chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO)

    OpenAIRE

    Hedrich, Christian M.; Hofmann, Sigrun R.; Pablik, Jessica; Morbach, Henner; Girschick, Hermann J.

    2016-01-01

    Sterile bone inflammation is the hallmark of autoinflammatory bone disorders, including chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) with its most severe form chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO). Autoinflammatory osteopathies are the result of a dysregulated innate immune system, resulting in immune cell infiltration of the bone and subsequent osteoclast differentiation and activation. Interestingly, autoinflammatory bone disorders are associated with inflammation of the skin and/or...

  17. MR imaging fails to detect bone marrow oedema in osteomyelitis: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone marrow oedema is the earliest and most sensitive sign in diagnostic imaging of osteomyelitis. In the two demonstrated cases of acute and chronic osteomyelitis, MRI was not able to detect bone marrow oedema due to accompanying haemosiderosis and sclerosis surrounding a bone abscess. (orig.)

  18. Role of computed tomography and radionuclide scintigraphy in the localization of osteomyelitis in flat bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined use of radionuclide scintigraphy and computed tomography is recommended for evaluating children with laboratory and clinical data suggestive of flat bone osteomyelitis despite normal conventional radiographs. In addition, computed tomography may be helpful in the presence of abnormal radiographs in determining the exact location of the focus of osteomyelitis and the most suitable route for appropriate drainage or to obtain culture material

  19. MR imaging fails to detect bone marrow oedema in osteomyelitis: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wingen, M.; Alzen, G.; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1998-03-01

    Bone marrow oedema is the earliest and most sensitive sign in diagnostic imaging of osteomyelitis. In the two demonstrated cases of acute and chronic osteomyelitis, MRI was not able to detect bone marrow oedema due to accompanying haemosiderosis and sclerosis surrounding a bone abscess. (orig.)

  20. Case report 558: Multicentric Klebsiella pneumoniae (Friedlaenders bacillus) osteomyelitis in sickle cell anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patient represents a unique combination of multicentric osteomyelitis due to Klebsiella pneumoniae, lesions in the skull, pathological fracture of a long bone and no evidence of pulmonary disease. That Klebsiella pneumoniae osteomyelitis can occur in sickle cell anemia should be considered when such bone changes are seen. The remarkable resolution on conservative management also needs to be noted. (orig./GDG)

  1. Recurrent Osteomyelitis Caused by Infection with Different Bacterial Strains without Obvious Source of Reinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçkay, Ilker; Assal, Mathieu; Legout, Laurence; Rohner, Peter; Stern, Richard; Lew, Daniel; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Bernard, Louis

    2006-01-01

    Recurrence of osteomyelitis by the same bacterial strain is well known. We report three patients with a second episode of osteomyelitis at the same site caused by different strains of bacteria from the original. Formerly infected and altered bone surface might present a region of diminished resistance for a new infection. PMID:16517930

  2. Recurrent Osteomyelitis Caused by Infection with Different Bacterial Strains without Obvious Source of Reinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Uckay, Ilker; Assal, Mathieu; Legout, Laurence; Rohner, Peter; Stern, Richard; Lew, Daniel Pablo; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Bernard, Louis

    2006-01-01

    Recurrence of osteomyelitis by the same bacterial strain is well known. We report three patients with a second episode of osteomyelitis at the same site caused by different strains of bacteria from the original. Formerly infected and altered bone surface might present a region of diminished resistance for a new infection.

  3. Recurrent osteomyelitis caused by infection with different bacterial strains without obvious source of reinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçkay, Ilker; Assal, Mathieu; Legout, Laurence; Rohner, Peter; Stern, Richard; Lew, Daniel; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Bernard, Louis

    2006-03-01

    Recurrence of osteomyelitis by the same bacterial strain is well known. We report three patients with a second episode of osteomyelitis at the same site caused by different strains of bacteria from the original. Formerly infected and altered bone surface might present a region of diminished resistance for a new infection. PMID:16517930

  4. Low-cost antibiotic delivery system for the treatment of osteomyelitis in developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasyid, Hermawan Nagar

    2009-01-01

    Although application of biomaterials has been one of the major assets in modern medicine to improve the quality of life of patients, occurrence of a chronic osteomyelitis is still a serious health threat to the individual patient. Chronic osteomyelitis can result in morbidity affecting the viability

  5. Risk factors for developing osteomyelitis in patients with diabetic foot wounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavery, Lawrence A.; Peters, Edgar J. G.; Armstrong, David G.; Wendel, Christopher S.; Murdoch, Douglas P.; Lipsky, Benjamin A.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Osteomyelitis worsens the prognosis in the diabetic foot, but predisposing factors remain largely undefined, In a prospectively followed cohort we assessed risk factors for developing osteomyelitis. Methods: We enrolled consecutive persons with diabetes who presented to a managed-care diabetes

  6. Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: Concomitant Contamination of Air and Environmental Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimose, Luis A; Masuda, Eriko; Sfeir, Maroun; Berbel Caban, Ana; Bueno, Maria X; dePascale, Dennise; Spychala, Caressa N; Cleary, Timothy; Namias, Nicholas; Kett, Daniel H; Doi, Yohei; Munoz-Price, L Silvia

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To concomitantly determine the differential degrees of air and environmental contamination by Acinetobacter baumannii based on anatomic source of colonization and type of ICU layout (single-occupancy vs open layout). DESIGN Longitudinal prospective surveillance study of air and environmental surfaces in patient rooms. SETTING A 1,500-bed public teaching hospital in Miami, Florida. PATIENTS Consecutive A. baumannii-colonized patients admitted to our ICUs between October 2013 and February 2014. METHODS Air and environmental surfaces of the rooms of A. baumannii-colonized patients were sampled daily for up to 10 days. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to type and match the matching air, environmental, and clinical A. baumannii isolates. RESULTS A total of 25 A. baumannii-colonized patients were identified during the study period; 17 were colonized in the respiratory tract and 8 were colonized in the rectum. In rooms with rectally colonized patients, 38.3% of air samples were positive for A. baumannii; in rooms of patients with respiratory colonization, 13.1% of air samples were positive (P=.0001). In rooms with rectally colonized patients, 15.5% of environmental samples were positive for A. baumannii; in rooms of patients with respiratory colonization, 9.5% of environmental samples were positive (P=.02). The rates of air contamination in the open-layout and single-occupancy ICUs were 17.9% and 21.8%, respectively (P=.5). Environmental surfaces were positive in 9.5% of instances in open-layout ICUs versus 13.4% in single-occupancy ICUs (P=.09). CONCLUSIONS Air and environmental surface contaminations were significantly greater among rectally colonized patients; however, ICU layout did not influence the rate of contamination. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:777-781. PMID:27045768

  7. Comparative proteomics of inner membrane fraction from carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii with a reference strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishvanath Tiwari

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii has been identified by the Infectious Diseases Society of America as one of the six pathogens that cause majority of hospital infections. Increased resistance of A.baumannii even to the latest generation of β-lactams like carbapenem is an immediate threat to mankind. As inner-membrane fraction plays a significant role in survival of A.baumannii, we investigated the inner-membrane fraction proteome of carbapenem-resistant strain of A.baumannii using Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE followed by DeCyder, Progenesis and LC-MS/MS analysis. We identified 19 over-expressed and 4 down-regulated proteins (fold change>2, p<0.05 in resistant strain as compared to reference strain. Some of the upregulated proteins in resistant strain and their association with carbapenem resistance in A.baumannii are: i β-lactamases, AmpC and OXA-51: cleave and inactivate carbapenem ii metabolic enzymes, ATP synthase, malate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase: help in increased energy production for the survival and iii elongation factor Tu and ribosomal proteins: help in the overall protein production. Further, entry of carbapenem perhaps is limited by controlled production of OmpW and low levels of surface antigen help to evade host defence mechanism in developing resistance in A.baumannii. Present results support a model for the importance of proteins of inner-membrane fraction and their synergistic effect in the mediation of resistance of A.baumannii to carbapenem.

  8. Computerized tomography of pelvic osteomyelitis in patients with spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computerized tomography (CT) was performed in 19 patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) who had large pressure sores and in whom other complications were suspected. CT detected the depth, extent, and degree of undermining of the edges of the pressure sores in 19 of 27 lesions. Conventional radiography detected four cases of pelvic osteomyelitis. CT detected eight additional cases of pelvic osteomyelitis, as well as eight clinically unsuspected peripelvic and intrapelvic abscesses. Technetium-99m bone scanning was not very helpful because of localization in chronic proliferative changes of bone and widespread foci of myositis ossificans, as well as in osteomyelitis. Gallium-67 scanning detected only one of six abscesses. It was not very helpful because of confusion of abscess and osteomyelitis with intense soft tissue swelling and cellulitis, which are often associated with pressure sores in patients with chronic SCI. CT was found to be, by far, the modality of choice for detection of pelvic osteomyelitis and abscess in patients with SCI

  9. Non-infectious osteomyelitis of the mandible in a young woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anne Q; Andersen, Ulrik B; Jørgensen, Niklas R;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We present the case of a patient with non-infectious osteomyelitis of the mandible, which is a recognized but unusual condition of unknown cause. CASE PRESENTATION: A 14-year-old Caucasian girl presented with pain and edema in the left side of her jaw. A clinical examination led to a...... diagnosis of osteomyelitis and she was treated with antibiotics. Our patient continued antibiotic treatment for osteomyelitis and underwent decortication. Histology based on a biopsy showed new bone formation and chronic inflammation, and a diagnosis of sclerotic osteomyelitis was made. Over the next few...... after 12 months. The bone pain was significantly reduced six months after treatment and had disappeared 24 months after treatment. CONCLUSION: We report an unusual localization of non-infectious osteomyelitis of the jaw in a young woman. Even though the presentation was in the jaw, her condition...

  10. Early Diagnosis of Acute Osteomyelitis by 99mTc Pyrophosphate Bone Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiographic diagnosis of osteomyelitis can be suspected early with deep soft tissue swelling, but the actual bone changes of osteomyelitis may be delayed as long as 10 to 14 days after onset or may be totally aborted by antibiotic therapy. Recognition of osteomyelitis by bone imaging is far more rapid than by conventional radiographic examination and can be used on admission to establish the diagnosis. Ten patients suspected of having early, acute osteomyelitis were studied by 99mTc Pyrophosphate bone imaging. Radiographs taken at the same time were all negative. Of these 9 patients showed positive bone images. The bone imaging provides a safe, accurate, noninvasive technique for the early diagnosis of osteomyelitis.

  11. Efficacy of clindamycin in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of clindamycin in the treatment of experimentally induced, posttraumatic Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis was studied in dogs. At the end of the experiment, bacteria could not be isolated from bone marrow of 15 of 16 (93.7%) dogs treated with clindamycin, whereas bacteria could not be isolated from similar specimens obtained from 6 of 13 (46.1%) untreated dogs. None of the 16 dogs treated with clindamycin had histopathologic evidence of osteomyelitis at the end of the experiment. Five of the 13 untreated control dogs had histopathologic evidence of osteomyelitis. The recovery rate was 31% in untreated dogs, whereas 94% of dogs treated with clindamycin recovered from osteomyelitis. Clindamycin, 11 mg/kg of body weight, given orally, q 12 h, for 28 days, was efficacious in the treatment of experimentally induced, posttraumatic S aureus osteomyelitis in dogs

  12. Molecular Identification and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated From Nosocomial Infections of a Teaching Hospital in Isfahan, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Fazeli; Taraghian; Kamali; Poursina; Nasr Esfahani; Moghim

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR) Acinetobacter baumannii are among important causes of nosocomial infections and cause therapeutic problems worldwide. The emergence of extensively drug-resistant A. baumannii (XDRAB) cause serious threats to hospital acquired infections (HAI) worldwide and further limit the treatment options. Objectives The current study aimed to identify and isolate the MDR...

  13. Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a 1000-bed tertiary care hospital in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahbar Mohammad

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a ubiquitous pathogen that has emerged as a major cause of healthcare-associated infections. Acinetobacter baumannii usually causes respiratory tract, urinary tract, blood stream and surgical site infections. They are of increasing importance because of its ability to rapidly develop resistance to the major groups of antibiotics. There are few data available on the antimicrobial susceptibility of A. baumannii in Iran. During the period of study from July 2005 to November 2006, a total of 88 strains of A. baumannii were isolated from clinical specimens obtained from patients hospitalized in an Iranian 1000-bed tertiary care hospital. Conventional bacteriological methods were used for identification of A. baumannii. Susceptibility testing was performed by the method recommended by Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute (CLSI. The majority of isolates were from respiratory tract specimens. The organism showed high rate of resistance to ceftriaxone (90.9%, piperacillin (90.9%, ceftazidime (84.1%, amikacin (85.2% and ciprofloxacin (90.9%. Imipenem was the most effective antibiotic against A. baumannii and the rate of resistance for imipenem was 4.5%. The second most effective antibiotic was tobramycin, and 44.3% of A. baumannii isolates were resistant to this antibiotic. In conclusion, our study showed that the rate of resistance in A. baumannii to imipenem was low. There was a significant relationship between demographic features of patients such as age, undergoing mechanical ventilation, length of hospital stay and drug resistance.

  14. Diversity of Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated in humans, companion animals, and the environment in Reunion Island: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Pailhoriès

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: This study shows that A. baumannii strains are present outside the hospital setting in Reunion Island and show great diversity. Further studies are needed to explore these extra-hospital reservoirs of A. baumannii in Reunion Island in greater detail and to determine their possible means of dissemination.

  15. Place of Colistin-Rifampicin Association in the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Meningitis: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahraoui Souhail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis is an important challenge due to the accumulation of resistance of this bacteria and low meningeal diffusion of several antimicrobial requiring use of an antimicrobial effective combination to eradicate these species. We report a case of Acinetobacter baumannii multidrug-resistant nosocomial meningitis which was successfully treated with intravenous and intrathecal colistin associated with rifampicin.

  16. Breath analysis for noninvasively differentiating Acinetobacter baumannii ventilator-associated pneumonia from its respiratory tract colonization of ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianping; Zou, Yingchang; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Feng; Lang, Lang; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Yong; Ying, Kejing

    2016-01-01

    A number of multiresistant pathogens including Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) place a heavy burden on ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) patients in intensive care units (ICU). It is critically important to differentiate between bacterial infection and colonization to avoid prescribing unnecessary antibiotics. Quantitative culture of lower respiratory tract (LRT) specimens, however, requires invasive procedures. Nowadays, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been studied in vitro and in vivo to identify pathogen-derived biomarkers. Therefore, an exploratory pilot study was conceived for a proof of concept that the appearance and level of A. baumannii-derived metabolites might be correlated with the presence of the pathogen and its ecological niche (i.e. the infection and colonization states) in ICU ventilated patients. Twenty patients with A. baumannii VAP (infection group), 20 ventilated patients with LRT A. baumannii colonization (colonization group) and 20 ventilated patients with neurological disorders, but without pneumonia or A. baumannii colonization (control group) were enrolled in the in vivo pilot study. A clinical isolate of A. baumannii strains was used for the in vitro culture experiment. The adsorptive preconcentration (solid-phase microextraction fiber and Tenax(®) TA) and analysis technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were applied in the studies. Breath profiles could be visually differentiated between A. baumannii cultivation in vitro and culture medium, and among in vivo groups. In the in vitro experiment, nine compounds of interest (2,5-dimethyl-pyrazine, 1-undecene, isopentyl 3-methylbutanoate, decanal, 1,3-naphthalenediol, longifolene, tetradecane, iminodibenzyl and 3-methyl-indene) in the headspace were found to be possible A. baumannii derivations. While there were eight target VOCs (1-undecene, nonanal, decanal, 2,6,10-trimethyl-dodecane, 5-methyl-5-propyl-nonane, longifolene, tetradecane and 2-butyl-1-octanol

  17. In vitro efficacy of doripenem against pseudomonas aeruginosa and acinetobacter baumannii by e-test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the in vitro efficacy of doripenem against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii using Epsilometer strips. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad, from May 2014 to September 2014. Methodology: A total of 60 isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected from various clinical samples received from Military Hospital were included in the study. The specimens were inoculated onto blood, MacConkey and chocolate agars. The isolates were identified using Gram staining, motility, catalase test, oxidase test and API 20NE (Biomeriux, France). Organisms identified as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were included in the study. Bacterial suspensions equivalent to 0.5 McFarland turbidity standard of the isolates were prepared and applied on Mueller Hinton agar. Epsilometer strip was placed in the center of the plate and incubated for 18-24 hours. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was taken to be the point where the epsilon intersected the E-strip. MIC of all the isolates was noted. Results: For Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, MIC50 was 12 micro g/mL and MIC90 was 32 micro g/mL. For Acinetobacter baumannii MIC 50 and MIC90 was 32 micro g/mL. Conclusion: Doripenem is no more effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii in our setting. (author)

  18. Colistin and anti-Gram-positive bacterial agents against Acinetobacter baumannii

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    Bin Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Acinetobacter baumannii has attained an alarming level of resistance to antibacterial drugs. Clinicians are now considering the use of older agents or unorthodox combinations of licensed drugs against multidrug-resistant strains to bridge the current treatment gap. We investigated the in vitro activities of combination treatments that included colistin with vancomycin, norvancomycin or linezolid against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Methods The fractional inhibitory concentration index and time-kill assays were used to explore the combined effects of colistin with vancomycin, norvancomycin or linezolid against 40 clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Transmission electron microscopy was performed to evaluate the interactions in response to the combination of colistin and vancomycin. Results The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of vancomycin and norvancomycin for half of the isolates decreased below the susceptibility break point, and the MIC of linezolid for one isolate was decreased to the blood and epithelial lining fluid concentration using the current dosing regimen. When vancomycin or norvancomycin was combined with subinhibitory doses of colistin, the multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii test samples were eradicated. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that subinhibitory doses of colistin were able to disrupt the outer membrane, facilitating a disruption of the cell wall and leading to cell lysis. Conclusions Subinhibitory doses of colistin significantly enhanced the antibacterial activity of vancomycin, norvancomycin, and linezolid against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

  19. Emergence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii producing OXA-23 Carbapenemase in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolain, J-M; Loucif, L; Al-Maslamani, M; Elmagboul, E; Al-Ansari, N; Taj-Aldeen, S; Shaukat, A; Ahmedullah, H; Hamed, M

    2016-05-01

    The objective of our study was to describe the molecular support of carbapenem resistance from randomly selected clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii as a pilot study from the Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC), Qatar. Results of our report will be used to study carbapenemases using molecular techniques in all isolated MDR A. baumannii. Forty-eight MDR A. baumannii were randomly selected from isolates preserved at HMC. Identification of all isolates was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Antibiotic resistance was tested phenotypically by Phoenix and confirmed by Etest. The molecular support of carbapenemases (bla OXA-23, bla OXA-24, bla OXA-58, bla NDM) was investigated by real-time PCR. The epidemiologic relatedness of the isolates was verified by phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of CsuE and bla OXA-51 genes. All 48 isolates were identified as A. baumannii and were confirmed to be resistant to most antibiotics, especially meropenem, imipenems, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, amikacin, gentamicin and most of the β-lactams; they were sensitive to colistin. All the isolates were positive for bla OXA-23 and negative for the other tested carbapenemase genes. Clonality analysis demonstrated that different lineages were actually circulating in Qatar; and we suggest that an outbreak occurred in the medical intensive care unit of HMC between 2011 and 2012. Here we report the emergence of MDR A. baumannii producing the carbapenemase OXA-23 in Qatar. PMID:27054039

  20. The population structure of Acinetobacter baumannii: expanding multiresistant clones from an ancestral susceptible genetic pool.

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    Laure Diancourt

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of hospital infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains are of increasing concern worldwide. Although it has been reported that particular outbreak strains are geographically widespread, little is known about the diversity and phylogenetic relatedness of A. baumannii clonal groups. Sequencing of internal portions of seven housekeeping genes (total 2,976 nt was performed in 154 A. baumannii strains covering the breadth of known diversity and including representatives of previously recognized international clones, and in 19 representatives of other Acinetobacter species. Restricted amounts of diversity and a star-like phylogeny reveal that A. baumannii is a genetically compact species that suffered a severe bottleneck in the recent past, possibly linked to a restricted ecological niche. A. baumannii is neatly demarcated from its closest relative (genomic species 13TU and other Acinetobacter species. Multilocus sequence typing analysis demonstrated that the previously recognized international clones I to III correspond to three clonal complexes, each made of a central, predominant genotype and few single locus variants, a hallmark of recent clonal expansion. Whereas antimicrobial resistance was almost universal among isolates of these and a novel international clone (ST15, isolates of the other genotypes were mostly susceptible. This dichotomy indicates that antimicrobial resistance is a major selective advantage that drives the ongoing rapid clonal expansion of these highly problematic agents of nosocomial infections.

  1. The Population Structure of Acinetobacter baumannii: Expanding Multiresistant Clones from an Ancestral Susceptible Genetic Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diancourt, Laure; Passet, Virginie; Nemec, Alexandr; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Brisse, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Outbreaks of hospital infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains are of increasing concern worldwide. Although it has been reported that particular outbreak strains are geographically widespread, little is known about the diversity and phylogenetic relatedness of A. baumannii clonal groups. Sequencing of internal portions of seven housekeeping genes (total 2,976 nt) was performed in 154 A. baumannii strains covering the breadth of known diversity and including representatives of previously recognized international clones, and in 19 representatives of other Acinetobacter species. Restricted amounts of diversity and a star-like phylogeny reveal that A. baumannii is a genetically compact species that suffered a severe bottleneck in the recent past, possibly linked to a restricted ecological niche. A. baumannii is neatly demarcated from its closest relative (genomic species 13TU) and other Acinetobacter species. Multilocus sequence typing analysis demonstrated that the previously recognized international clones I to III correspond to three clonal complexes, each made of a central, predominant genotype and few single locus variants, a hallmark of recent clonal expansion. Whereas antimicrobial resistance was almost universal among isolates of these and a novel international clone (ST15), isolates of the other genotypes were mostly susceptible. This dichotomy indicates that antimicrobial resistance is a major selective advantage that drives the ongoing rapid clonal expansion of these highly problematic agents of nosocomial infections. PMID:20383326

  2. The induction and identification of novel Colistin resistance mutations in Acinetobacter baumannii and their implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi Khanh Nhu, Nguyen; Riordan, David W; Do Hoang Nhu, Tran; Thanh, Duy Pham; Thwaites, Guy; Huong Lan, Nguyen Phu; Wren, Brendan W; Baker, Stephen; Stabler, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a significant cause of opportunistic hospital acquired infection and has been identified as an important emerging infection due to its high levels of antimicrobial resistance. Multidrug resistant A. baumannii has risen rapidly in Vietnam, where colistin is becoming the drug of last resort for many infections. In this study we generated spontaneous colistin resistant progeny (up to >256 μg/μl) from four colistin susceptible Vietnamese isolates and one susceptible reference strain (MIC <1.5 μg/μl). Whole genome sequencing was used to identify single nucleotide mutations that could be attributed to the reduced colistin susceptibility. We identified six lpxACD and three pmrB mutations, the majority of which were novel. In addition, we identified further mutations in six A. baumannii genes (vacJ, pldA, ttg2C, pheS and conserved hypothetical protein) that we hypothesise have a role in reduced colistin susceptibility. This study has identified additional mutations that may be associated with colistin resistance through novel resistance mechanisms. Our work further demonstrates how rapidly A. baumannii can generate resistance to a last resort antimicrobial and highlights the need for improved surveillance to identified A. baumannii with an extensive drug resistance profile. PMID:27329501

  3. Molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in central intensive care unit in Kosova Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raka, Lul; Kalenć, Smilja; Bosnjak, Zrinka; Budimir, Ana; Katić, Stjepan; Sijak, Dubravko; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Zoutman, Dick; Jaka, Arbëresha

    2009-12-01

    Infections caused by bacteria of genus Acinetobacter pose a significant health care challenge worldwide. Information on molecular epidemiological investigation of outbreaks caused by Acinetobacter species in Kosova is lacking. The present investigation was carried out to enlight molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in the Central Intensive Care Unit (CICU) of a University hospital in Kosova using pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). During March - July 2006, A. baumannii was isolated from 30 patients, of whom 22 were infected and 8 were colonised. Twenty patients had ventilator-associated pneumonia, one patient had meningitis, and two had coinfection with bloodstream infection and surgical site infection. The most common diagnoses upon admission to the ICU were politrauma and cerebral hemorrhage. Bacterial isolates were most frequently recovered from endotracheal aspirate (86.7%). First isolation occurred, on average, on day 8 following admission (range 1-26 days). Genotype analysis of A. baumannii isolates identified nine distinct PFGE patterns, with predominance of PFGE clone E represented by isolates from 9 patients. Eight strains were resistant to carbapenems. The genetic relatedness of Acinetobacter baumannii was high, indicating cross-transmission within the ICU setting. These results emphasize the need for measures to prevent nosocomial transmission of A. baumannii in ICU. PMID:20464330

  4. Locally Advanced Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma: A Case Report of Successful Treatment with Radiation and Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Estes, Christopher F.; Zhang, Da; Reyes, Ruben; Korentager, Richard; McGinness, Marilee; Lominska, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The development of breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare phenomenon. A typical presentation is an effusion associated with a breast implant. Less commonly, disease can be more advanced locoregionally or distantly. The optimal treatment schema is a topic of debate: localized ALCL can potentially be cured with implant removal alone, while other cases in the literature, including those that are more advanced, have been treated with varying combinations of surg...

  5. Identification of an Acinetobacter baumannii zinc acquisition system that facilitates resistance to calprotectin-mediated zinc sequestration.

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    M Indriati Hood

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that accounts for up to 20 percent of infections in intensive care units worldwide. Furthermore, A. baumannii strains have emerged that are resistant to all available antimicrobials. These facts highlight the dire need for new therapeutic strategies to combat this growing public health threat. Given the critical role for transition metals at the pathogen-host interface, interrogating the role for these metals in A. baumannii physiology and pathogenesis could elucidate novel therapeutic strategies. Toward this end, the role for calprotectin- (CP-mediated chelation of manganese (Mn and zinc (Zn in defense against A. baumannii was investigated. These experiments revealed that CP inhibits A. baumannii growth in vitro through chelation of Mn and Zn. Consistent with these in vitro data, Imaging Mass Spectrometry revealed that CP accompanies neutrophil recruitment to the lung and accumulates at foci of infection in a murine model of A. baumannii pneumonia. CP contributes to host survival and control of bacterial replication in the lung and limits dissemination to secondary sites. Using CP as a probe identified an A. baumannii Zn acquisition system that contributes to Zn uptake, enabling this organism to resist CP-mediated metal chelation, which enhances pathogenesis. Moreover, evidence is provided that Zn uptake across the outer membrane is an energy-dependent process in A. baumannii. Finally, it is shown that Zn limitation reverses carbapenem resistance in multidrug resistant A. baumannii underscoring the clinical relevance of these findings. Taken together, these data establish Zn acquisition systems as viable therapeutic targets to combat multidrug resistant A. baumannii infections.

  6. Imaging findings of synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteomyelitis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the imaging characteristics of SAPHO syndrome in 11 cases. Methods: Clinical features and imaging findings from 11 patients (6 male, 5 female, 28 to 68 years old) with SAPHO syndrome were analyzed retrospectively Including DR in 9 cases, CT in 10 cases, MRI and radioisotope scanning in 3 cases. Results: Multi-bones of anterior chest wall disorders were shown in 9 cases on DR images including superior sternum, anterior first rib and clavicle hyperostosis. Bony fusion and bony bridge were also seen in these cases. Hyperostosis osteosclerosis, bone destruction and bony fusion of sternoclavicular articulation and first rib were shown on CT images in 9 cases. Osteosclerosis of the joint between manubrium and midsternum was seen in 1 case on CT image. The sign of flying sea gull was seen in 2 cases on axial anterior chest wall CT images. The disorders of anterior chest wall were bilateral in 8 cases and unilateral in 2 cases. Sacroiliitis and osteomyelitis of ilium were found accompanied in 1 case. Osteomyelitis of thoracic vertebrae were found in 2 cases, while sclerosing osteitis of lumbar vertebrae and osteoarthritis of bilateral hands were observed respectively in 1 case. The thicken soft tissue surround clavicle head, thoracic vertebra disease with long T1, jumbly T2 and high fat suppression signal, long T1 and short T2 signal under sacroiliac joint were shown on MRI. Radioisotope scanning displayed higher radioactive uptake of radionuclides, with T shape in sternoclavicular area in 3 cases. Conclusions: Multi-bones of anterior chest wall involvement was the common imaging characteristics in 11 patients. Sacroiliitis, osteomyelitis of' vertebrae and ilium, sclerosing osteitis, ostearthritis of hand could be seen in some cases. (authors)

  7. Chronic multifocal non-bacterial osteomyelitis in hypophosphatasia mimicking malignancy

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    Warmuth-Metz Monika

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypophosphatasia (HP is characterized by a genetic defect in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP gene and predominantly an autosomal recessive trait. HP patients suffer from reduced bone mineralization. Biochemically, elevated concentrations of substrates of TNSALP, including pyridoxal-5'-phosphate and inorganic pyrophosphate occur in serum, tissues and urine. The latter has been associated with chronic inflammation and hyperprostaglandinism. Case presentation We report on 2 affected children presenting with multifocal inflammatory bone lesions mimicking malignancy: A 6 years old girl with short stature had been treated with human growth hormone since 6 months. Then she started to complain about a painful swelling of her left cheek. MRI suggested a malignant bone lesion. Bone biopsy, however, revealed chronic inflammation. A bone scan showed a second rib lesion. Since biopsy was sterile, the descriptive diagnosis of chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis (CNO was established. The diagnostic tests related to growth failure were repeated and subsequent analyses demonstrated a molecular defect in the TNSALP gene. The second girl (10 years old complained about back pain after she had fallen from her bike. X rays of her spine revealed compressions of 2 thoracic vertebrae. At first these were considered trauma related, however a bone scan did show an additional lesion in the right 4th rib. A biopsy of this rib revealed a sterile lympho- plasmocytoid osteomyelitis suggesting multifocal CNO. Further analyses did show a decreased TNSALP in leukocytes and elevated pyridoxal phosphate in plasma, suggesting a heterozygous carrier status of HP. Conclusion Chronic bone oedema in adult HP and chronic hyper-prostaglandinism in childhood HP do suggest that in some HP patients bone inflammation is present in conjunction with the metabolic defect. Sterile multifocal osteomyelitis could be demonstrated. Non-steroidal anti

  8. Uncommon mandibular osteomyelitis in a cat caused by Nocardia africana

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    de Farias Marconi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nocardiosis is an unusual infection in companion animals characterized by suppurative to pyogranulomatous lesions, localized or disseminated. Cutaneous-subcutaneous, pulmonary and systemic signs are observed in feline nocardiosis. However, osteomyelitis is a rare clinical manifestation in cats. Nocardia cyriacigeorgica (formerly N. asteroides sensu stricto, Nocardia brasiliensis, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, and Nocardia nova are the most common pathogenic species identified in cats, based on recent molecular classification (16S rRNA gene. The present report is, to our knowledge, the first case of mandibular osteomyelitis in a cat caused by Nocardia africana, diagnosed based upon a combination of methods, including molecular techniques. Case presentation A one-year-old non-neutered female cat, raised in a rural area, was admitted to the Companion Animal Hospital-PUCPR, São José dos Pinhais, State of Paraná, Brazil, with a history a progressive facial lesion, difficulty apprehending food, loss of appetite, apathy and emaciation. Clinical examination showed fever, submandibular lymphadenitis, and a painless, 8 cm diameter mass, which was irregularly-shaped, of firm consistency, and located in the region of the left mandible. The skin around the lesion was friable, with diffuse inflammation (cellulitis, multiple draining sinuses, and exudation of serosanguinous material containing whitish “sulfur” granules. Diagnosis was based initially in clinical signs, microbiological culture, cytological, and histopathological findings, and radiographic images. Molecular sequencing of 16S rRNA of isolate allowed diagnosis of Nocardia africana. Despite supportive care and antimicrobial therapy based on in vitro susceptibility testing the animal died. Conclusion The present report describes a rare clinical case of feline osteomyelitis caused by Nocardia africana, diagnosed based upon a combination of clinical signs, microbiological

  9. Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis: a rare cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is a common presenting symptom with a broad differential. Life-threatening cardiac and pulmonary etiologies of chest pain should be evaluated first. However, it is critical to perform a thorough assessment for other sources of chest pain in order to limit morbidity and mortality from less common causes. We present a rare case of a previously healthy 45 year old man who presented with focal, substernal, reproducible chest pain and Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was later found to have primary Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis.

  10. Diagnostic flowcharts in osteomyelitis, spondylodiscitis and prosthetic joint infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infections of the bone, spine and prosthetic joints are serious and complex conditions to diagnose and to treat. Structured diagnostic workup may very well improve the accuracy and speed of diagnosis, thereby improving the outcome since treatment may very well be more successful and less harmful if timely management is started. Literature shows no uniform advise on diagnosis. The EANM organized a consensus meeting with representatives from the involved disciplines in order to develop common flowcharts for the diagnosis of osteomyelitis, spondylodiscitis and prosthetic joint infections. In this report the proceedings of this consensus meeting, including the proposed flowcharts for diagnosis, are published.

  11. Rare site for tubercular osteomyelitis with HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Bohra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis of the scapula is a rare clinical entity. Few cases have been reported in the literature so far. We report a case of tuberculosis of the scapula in a HIV positive patient, which was managed successfully with antitubercular drugs. This case illustrates the difficulties in diagnosing tubercular osteomyelitis of the scapula as it has an insidious onset, paucity of constitutional symptoms and frequent absence of associated pulmonary involvement. Pitfall in diagnosis is the delay in considering the diagnosis of bony tuberculosis, especially in patients who have normal chest radiographs.

  12. Postcraniofacial trauma multidrug resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii infection treated with intravenous colistin: A rare complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Rastogi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial meningitis is a rare complication of combined craniofacial and neurosurgical procedures. The increase in meningitis caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR Acinetobacter baumannii has resulted in a significant reduction in available treatment options. We report a case of 52-year-old man who sustained a complex craniofacial trauma, who developed nosocomial MDR infection caused by A. baumannii in the wound. Patient was at significant risk of developing meningitis but, he was successfully treated with intravenous colistin. To conclude, patients with complex maxillofacial trauma are at high risk of MDR A. baumannii meningitis, especially in craniofacial intensive care units, and adequate infection control measures with proper institution of antibiotics, should be used to reduce the risk of this infection

  13. Early dissemination of OXA-72-producing Acinetobacter baumannii strain in Colombia: a case report

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    Sandra Yamile Saavedra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates have reached epidemic levels in past decades. Currently this microorganism is responsible for outbreaks of difficult eradication and with high mortality rates worldwide. We herein report a rare case of an OXA-72-producing A. baumannii isolate colonizing a 47-year-old male patient with peritonitis due to abdominal stab wound, four years earlier than the first report of this carbapenemase in Acinetobacter pittii in Colombia. Although OXA-72 presents a low prevalence compared with OXA-23, our study demonstrated that A. baumannii isolates carrying the blaOXA-72 gene were present in the hospital environment in Colombia and could act as a reservoir for further spread to other Acinetobacter species, like A. pittii, causing carbapenem-resistance.

  14. Prevalence of carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii in high complexity hospital

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    Ana Milda Karsten Baumgart

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii are Gram-negative bacilli that in the last decades have become prevalent agents of hospital infection due to high antimicrobial resistance developed by these microorganisms. The present study is a retrospective analysis of all positive cultures for these microorganisms in the period of January 2004 to December 2008. Resistance levels of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa to carbapenems was high and showed a trend to increase during the period of study. In recent years the increasing incidence and resistance levels of A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa to the antimicrobials used for their treatment in the hospital setting underscores the relevance of infections caused by these bacteria. The selective pressure caused by indiscriminated use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in empirical hospital infections is probably the main reason for such an increase with the consequent impact upon patient morbidity and mortality

  15. Structural and bioinformatic characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii type II carrier protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented. Microorganisms produce a variety of natural products via secondary metabolic biosynthetic pathways. Two of these types of synthetic systems, the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), use large modular enzymes containing multiple catalytic domains in a single protein. These multidomain enzymes use an integrated carrier protein domain to transport the growing, covalently bound natural product to the neighboring catalytic domains for each step in the synthesis. Interestingly, some PKS and NRPS clusters contain free-standing domains that interact intermolecularly with other proteins. Being expressed outside the architecture of a multi-domain protein, these so-called type II proteins present challenges to understand the precise role they play. Additional structures of individual and multi-domain components of the NRPS enzymes will therefore provide a better understanding of the features that govern the domain interactions in these interesting enzyme systems. The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented here. Comparison with the closest structural homologs of other carrier proteins identifies the requirements for a conserved glycine residue and additional important sequence and structural requirements within the regions that interact with partner proteins

  16. Effects of silver nanoparticles in combination with antibiotics on the resistant bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan G

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Guoqing Wan,1,2 Lingao Ruan,2,3 Yu Yin,2,3 Tian Yang,2,3 Mei Ge,2 Xiaodong Cheng1,4 1School of Life Science and Technology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 2Shanghai Laiyi Center for Biopharmaceutical R&D, 3School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Integrative Biology & Pharmacology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Acinetobacter baumannii resistance to carbapenem antibiotics is a serious clinical challenge. As a newly developed technology, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs show some excellent characteristics compared to older treatments, and are a candidate for combating A. baumannii infection. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, we combined AgNPs with antibiotics to treat carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (aba1604. Our results showed that single AgNPs completely inhibited A. baumannii growth at 2.5 µg/mL. AgNP treatment also showed synergistic effects with the antibiotics polymixin B and rifampicin, and an additive effect with tigecyline. In vivo, we found that AgNPs–antibiotic combinations led to better survival ratios in A. baumannii-infected mouse peritonitis models than that by single drug treatment. Finally, we employed different antisense RNA-targeted Escherichia coli strains to elucidate the synergistic mechanism involved in bacterial responses to AgNPs and antibiotics. Keywords: Acinetobacter baumannii, AgNPs, synergistic, antibiotic combination, anti­sense RNA 

  17. Simple Method for Markerless Gene Deletion in Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Man Hwan; Lee, Je Chul; Kim, Jungmin; Choi, Chul Hee; Han, Kyudong

    2015-05-15

    The traditional markerless gene deletion technique based on overlap extension PCR has been used for generating gene deletions in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the method is time-consuming because it requires restriction digestion of the PCR products in DNA cloning and the construction of new vectors containing a suitable antibiotic resistance cassette for the selection of A. baumannii merodiploids. Moreover, the availability of restriction sites and the selection of recombinant bacteria harboring the desired chimeric plasmid are limited, making the construction of a chimeric plasmid more difficult. We describe a rapid and easy cloning method for markerless gene deletion in A. baumannii, which has no limitation in the availability of restriction sites and allows for easy selection of the clones carrying the desired chimeric plasmid. Notably, it is not necessary to construct new vectors in our method. This method utilizes direct cloning of blunt-end DNA fragments, in which upstream and downstream regions of the target gene are fused with an antibiotic resistance cassette via overlap extension PCR and are inserted into a blunt-end suicide vector developed for blunt-end cloning. Importantly, the antibiotic resistance cassette is placed outside the downstream region in order to enable easy selection of the recombinants carrying the desired plasmid, to eliminate the antibiotic resistance cassette via homologous recombination, and to avoid the necessity of constructing new vectors. This strategy was successfully applied to functional analysis of the genes associated with iron acquisition by A. baumannii ATCC 19606 and to ompA gene deletion in other A. baumannii strains. Consequently, the proposed method is invaluable for markerless gene deletion in multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:25746991

  18. Structural and bioinformatic characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii type II carrier protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, C. Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M., E-mail: gulick@hwi.buffalo.edu [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented. Microorganisms produce a variety of natural products via secondary metabolic biosynthetic pathways. Two of these types of synthetic systems, the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), use large modular enzymes containing multiple catalytic domains in a single protein. These multidomain enzymes use an integrated carrier protein domain to transport the growing, covalently bound natural product to the neighboring catalytic domains for each step in the synthesis. Interestingly, some PKS and NRPS clusters contain free-standing domains that interact intermolecularly with other proteins. Being expressed outside the architecture of a multi-domain protein, these so-called type II proteins present challenges to understand the precise role they play. Additional structures of individual and multi-domain components of the NRPS enzymes will therefore provide a better understanding of the features that govern the domain interactions in these interesting enzyme systems. The high-resolution crystal structure of a free-standing carrier protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that belongs to a larger NRPS-containing operon, encoded by the ABBFA-003406–ABBFA-003399 genes of A. baumannii strain AB307-0294, that has been implicated in A. baumannii motility, quorum sensing and biofilm formation, is presented here. Comparison with the closest structural homologs of other carrier proteins identifies the requirements for a conserved glycine residue and additional important sequence and structural requirements within the regions that interact with partner proteins.

  19. Predictors of mortality in patients with extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ik Sung; Lee, Yu Ji; Wi, Yu Mi; Kwan, Byung Soo; Jung, Kae Hwa; Hong, Woong Pyo; Kim, June Myong

    2016-08-01

    The ratio of the area under the free (unbound) concentration-time curve to minimum inhibitory concentration (fAUC/MIC) was proposed to be the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index most strongly linked to the antibacterial effect of colistin against Acinetobacter baumannii. A retrospective study of patients who received colistin to treat pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii over a 4-year period was performed to assess the impact of the colistin MIC on mortality. A total of 227 patients were included in the analysis. The 7-day and 14-day mortality rates of patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy were 15.0% and 23.8%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, days from index culture to first dose of colistin, underlying tumour and septic shock at presentation were independent predictors of mortality in patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy. In the univariate analysis, the colistin dose based on ideal body weight (IBW) correlated with patient outcome. Therefore, the use of IBW appeared to be more appropriate to calculate the colistin dosage. In addition, these results highlight the clinical significance of colistin MIC in patients with XDR A. baumannii pneumonia receiving colistin therapy. Although MICs were in the 'susceptible' range, patients infected with isolates with high colistin MICs showed a poorer clinical response rate than patients infected with isolates with low colistin MICs. Further clinical studies are needed to evaluate the roles of colistin MIC for predicting mortality in XDR A. baumannii pneumonia with a high colistin MIC. PMID:27423416

  20. Epidemiologic and clinical impact of Acinetobacter baumannii colonization and infection: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Macarena; Cano, María E; Gato, Eva; Garnacho-Montero, José; Miguel Cisneros, José; Ruíz de Alegría, Carlos; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Vila, Jordi; Pascual, Alvaro; Tomás, María; Bou, Germán; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús

    2014-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most important antibiotic-resistant nosocomial bacteria. We investigated changes in the clinical and molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii over a 10-year period. We compared the data from 2 prospective multicenter cohort studies in Spain, one performed in 2000 (183 patients) and one in 2010 (246 patients), which included consecutive patients infected or colonized by A. baumannii. Molecular typing was performed by repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The incidence density of A. baumannii colonization or infection increased significantly from 0.14 in 2000 to 0.52 in 2010 in medical services (p < 0.001). The number of non-nosocomial health care-associated cases increased from 1.2% to 14.2%, respectively (p < 0.001). Previous exposure to carbapenems increased in 2010 (16.9% in 2000 vs 27.3% in 2010, p = 0.03). The drugs most frequently used for definitive treatment of patients with infections were carbapenems in 2000 (45%) and colistin in 2010 (50.3%). There was molecular-typing evidence of an increase in the frequency of A. baumannii acquisition in non-intensive care unit wards in 2010 (7.6% in 2000 vs 19.2% in 2010, p = 0.01). By MSLT, the ST2 clonal group predominated and increased in 2010. This epidemic clonal group was more frequently resistant to imipenem and was associated with an increased risk of sepsis, although not with severe sepsis or mortality. Some significant changes were noted in the epidemiology of A. baumannii, which is increasingly affecting patients admitted to conventional wards and is also the cause of non-nosocomial health care-associated infections. Epidemic clones seem to combine antimicrobial resistance and the ability to spread, while maintaining their clinical virulence. PMID:25181313

  1. Outbreak of resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: measures and proposal for prevention and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Maia de Castro Romanelli

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii colonization and infection, frequent in Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients, is commonly associated with high morbimortality. Several outbreaks due to multidrug-resistant (MDR A. baumanii have been reported but few of them in Brazil. This study aimed to identify risk factors associated with colonization and infection by MDR and carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii strains isolated from patients admitted to the adult ICU at HC/UFMG. A case-control study was performed from January 2007 to June 2008. Cases were defined as patients colonized or infected by MDR/carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii, and controls were patients without MDR/carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii isolation, in a 1:2 proportion. For statistical analysis, due to changes in infection control guidelines, infection criteria and the notification process, this study was divided into two periods. During the first period analyzed, from January to December 2007, colonization or infection by MDR/carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii was associated with prior infection, invasive device utilization, prior carbapenem use and clinical severity. In the multivariate analysis, prior infection and mechanical ventilation proved to be statistically significant risk factors. Carbapenem use showed a tendency towards a statistical association. During the second study period, from January to June 2008, variables with a significant association with MDR/carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii colonization/infection were catheter utilization, carbapenem and third-generation cephalosporin use, hepatic transplantation, and clinical severity. In the multivariate analysis, only CVC use showed a statistical difference. Carbapenem and third-generation cephalosporin use displayed a tendency to be risk factors. Risk factors must be focused on infection control and prevention measures considering A. baumanni dissemination.

  2. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis - exclusion by means of turbo-STIR sequence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The timely diagnosis and early initiation of antibiotic therapy determine the clinical course of an acute hematogenous osteomyelitis. Consequently, a fast and efficient MRI examination protocol is crucial. We retrospectively evaluated various MR sequences used in the examination of 8 children having osteomyelitis. The examinations were conducted using a 0.5 T MR machine. All patients had a high signal intensity of the lesion in the IR sequence with fat suppression (turbo-STIR). An acute osteomyelitis can be excluded in the absence of signal intensity increase in the turbo-STIR sequence without the necessity of having to perform additional sequences. (orig.)

  3. Leucocyte scintiscanning and skeleton scintiscanning in case of acute or chronic osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigations were intended to show whether a combination of the two nuclear medicine techniques results in better diagnosis and follow-up of osteomyelitis. It was found that in case of acute osteomyelitis, the combination of leucocyte scintiscanning and skeleton scintiscanning provided highly sensitive and specific diagnostic data, allowing good distinction between osteomyelitis and the soft tissue effects. Leucocyte scintiscanning is a suitable tool for therapeutical follow-up examination, preferably to be made about four weeks after termination of therapy. (orig./MG)

  4. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis in children by combined blood pool and bone imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differentiation of osteomyelitis from cellulitis or septic arthritis can be difficult. The radiological examination often does not have the characteristic features. Seventy of 71 children with osteomyelitis had focal areas of increased radioactivity demonstrated by /sup 99m/Tc methylene diphosphonate bone scans at the site of the infection. The addition of blood pool images aids in the interpretation of the study as they permit evaluation of the effect of hyperemia. The 13 children with cellulitis had diffuse increase in radioactivity involving both the bones and soft tissues. Bone imaging as the initial screening procedure for osteomyelitis is recommended. (auth)

  5. The clinical significance of radionuclide bone and gallium scanning in osteomyelitis of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyek, A.M.; Kirsh, J.C.; Greyson, N.D.; Wortzman, G.; Jazrawy, H.; Freeman, J.L.; Blair, R.L.; Chapnik, J.S.

    1984-05-01

    Osteomyelitis of the head and neck remains a difficult clinical problem both in diagnosis and treatment evaluation. The purpose of this manuscript is to review our clinical experience with 25 cases of osteomyelitis distributed evenly among the temporal bone and skull base, the paranasal sinuses, and the mandible. Radionuclide bone and gallium scan images accurately depicted the biologic activity of the disease process and permitted accurate treatment evaluation and patient monitoring. This work demonstrates the potentials and limitations of radionuclide imaging with bone and gallium scan agents and attempts to define a role for their contemporary use in the management of osteomyelitis of the head and neck.

  6. A longitudinal insufficiency fracture of the tibia in association with a healed chronic osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longitudinal stress fracture of the tibia often present with an atypical clinical presentation which can be mistaken for osseous tumor or osteomyelitis. We present a case of longitudinal stress fracture of the tibia which occurred in a patient with healed chronic osteomyelitis of the tibia. Magnetic resonance imaging failed to make the correct diagnosis. Accurate diagnosis was only obtained by helical CT which showed the longitudinal fracture line. Magnetic resonance imaging showed only non-specific signs of bone marrow edema, suggesting recurrence of osteomyelitis. Magnetic resonance imaging can be misleading in the absence of direct visualization of the fracture line. (orig.)

  7. A longitudinal insufficiency fracture of the tibia in association with a healed chronic osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feydy, A.; Carlier, R.; Mutschler, C.; Leriverend, V.; Vallee, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Raymond Poincare, Garches (France); Bernard, L. [Dept. of Infectious Diseases, Hopital Raymond Poincare, Garches (France)

    2000-12-01

    Longitudinal stress fracture of the tibia often present with an atypical clinical presentation which can be mistaken for osseous tumor or osteomyelitis. We present a case of longitudinal stress fracture of the tibia which occurred in a patient with healed chronic osteomyelitis of the tibia. Magnetic resonance imaging failed to make the correct diagnosis. Accurate diagnosis was only obtained by helical CT which showed the longitudinal fracture line. Magnetic resonance imaging showed only non-specific signs of bone marrow edema, suggesting recurrence of osteomyelitis. Magnetic resonance imaging can be misleading in the absence of direct visualization of the fracture line. (orig.)

  8. Cryptococcal osteomyelitis: a report of 5 cases and a review of the recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medaris, Leigh Ann; Ponce, Brent; Hyde, Zane; Delgado, Dennis; Ennis, David; Lapidus, William; Larrison, Matthew; Pappas, Peter G

    2016-06-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen associated with advanced HIV disease and other disorders associated with immune dysfunction. The pulmonary and the central nervous system are the most common manifestations of the disease. Localised osteomyelitis as the sole manifestation of extrapulmonary disease is rare. Herein, we present five cases of Cryptococcus osteomyelitis as the only manifestation of extrapulmonary disease. We also identified 84 additional cases of isolated cryptococcal osteomyelitis in the literature. Using these data, we have made some general recommendations regarding an approach to treatment of this uncommon clinical entity. PMID:26968335

  9. Osteomyelitis or Charcot neuro-osteoarthropathy? Differentiating these disorders in diabetic patients with a foot problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent M. Ertugrul

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Both osteomyelitis and Charcot neuro-osteoarthropathy (CN are potentially limb-threatening complications of diabetic neuropathy, but they require quite different treatments. Almost all bone infections in the diabetic foot originate from an infected foot ulcer while diabetic osteoarthropathy is a non-infectious process in which peripheral neuropathy plays the critical role. Differentiating between diabetic foot osteomyelitis and CN requires careful evaluation of the patient, including the medical history, physical examination, selected laboratory findings, and imaging studies. Based on available studies, we review the approaches to the diagnostic differentiation of osteomyelitis from CN of the foot in diabetic patients.

  10. Osteomyelitis or Charcot neuro-osteoarthropathy? Differentiating these disorders in diabetic patients with a foot problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertugrul, Bulent M; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Savk, Oner

    2013-01-01

    Both osteomyelitis and Charcot neuro-osteoarthropathy (CN) are potentially limb-threatening complications of diabetic neuropathy, but they require quite different treatments. Almost all bone infections in the diabetic foot originate from an infected foot ulcer while diabetic osteoarthropathy is a non-infectious process in which peripheral neuropathy plays the critical role. Differentiating between diabetic foot osteomyelitis and CN requires careful evaluation of the patient, including the medical history, physical examination, selected laboratory findings, and imaging studies. Based on available studies, we review the approaches to the diagnostic differentiation of osteomyelitis from CN of the foot in diabetic patients. PMID:24205433

  11. Treatment of osteoradionecrosis combined with pathologic fracture and osteomyelitis of the mandible with electromagnetic stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteoradionecrosis, complicated by pathologic fracture and osteomyelitis, is difficult to treat. Electromagnetic stimulation therapy may present a solution to this problem. A case of a 66-year old woman, suffering from osteoradionecrosis, pathologic fracture and osteomyelitis of the mandible, 6 years after irradiation therapy and partial resection of the mandible for squamous cell carcinoma of the gingiva, treated by electromagnetic stimulation, is presented. After 9 months of treatment, the patient was asymptomatic. Radiographic examination and bone scintigraphy carried out upon termination of the treatment, proved that healing of osteoradionecrosis and osteomyelitis had occurred. As far as we know, no previous reports have been published regarding this type of treatment. (author)

  12. The clinical significance of radionuclide bone and gallium scanning in osteomyelitis of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteomyelitis of the head and neck remains a difficult clinical problem both in diagnosis and treatment evaluation. The purpose of this manuscript is to review our clinical experience with 25 cases of osteomyelitis distributed evenly among the temporal bone and skull base, the paranasal sinuses, and the mandible. Radionuclide bone and gallium scan images accurately depicted the biologic activity of the disease process and permitted accurate treatment evaluation and patient monitoring. This work demonstrates the potentials and limitations of radionuclide imaging with bone and gallium scan agents and attempts to define a role for their contemporary use in the management of osteomyelitis of the head and neck

  13. Mycotic osteomyelitis due to Scedosporium Apiospermum: MR imaging-pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sydnor, Malcolm K.; Knight, Thomas E. [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Virginia Hospital, Virginia Commonwealth University, P. O. Box 980615, Richmond, 23298-0615, VA (United States); Kaushik, Shaifali [Department of Radiology, VA Medical Center, 100 Emancipation Drive, 23667, Hampton, VA (United States); Department of Radiology, Medical College of Virginia Hospital, Virginia Commonwealth University, P. O. Box 980615, Richmond, 23298-0615, VA (United States); Bridges, C.Lee [Department of Pathology, Medical College of Virginia Hospital, Virginia Commonwealth University, P.O. Box 980662, Richmond, 23298-0662, VA (United States); McCarty, John M. [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical College of Virginia Hospital, Virginia Commonwealth University, P.O. Box 980157, Richmond, 23298-0662, VA (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Mycotic osteomyelitis is rare and occurs in immunocompromised patients after inoculation of the pathogen at a penetrating trauma site. Mycotic osteomyelitis due to Scedosporium Apiospermum is extremely rare, with only 13 cases of septic arthritis reported previously. Ours is only the third case of S. apiospermum osteomyelitis in an immunocompromised patient and the only patient with a histopathologic diagnosis from an amputation specimen. Recognition of this pathogen may be delayed due to insidious onset and negative joint fluid cultures, often requiring synovial or bone biopsies to establish the diagnosis. Delay in appropriate treatment may result in disseminating infection or even death. (orig.)

  14. Periostitis ossificans (Garrè′s osteomyelitis: An unusual case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepesh Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Garrè′s sclerosing osteomyelitis is a specific type of chronic osteomyelitis that mainly affects children and young adults and is commonly associated with odontogenic infection. The paper describes an unusual case of Garrè′s osteomyelitis in an 11-year-old boy, in whom the condition arose following poor oral hygiene and periodontal problems in relation to permanent mandibular left first molar. Clinically the patient presented with bony hard, nontender swelling and the occlusal radiograph revealed pathognomic feature of "onion skin" appearance.

  15. [Contribution to the treatment of acute haematogenous anc chronic secondary osteomyelitis in children (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillich, J; Továrek, J; Fait, M

    1978-02-01

    The possibility of utilizing antistaphylococcal vaccine and local phage lysate for complex therapy of chronic and acute haematogenous osteomyelitis in children is demonstrated on three clinical cases. The study reassurmes good experience with this therapy in adult patients with chronic osteomyelitis. The results obtained so far in children suggest that the application of antistaphylococcal vaccine and of local phage lysate positively influences the course of the osteomyelitic disease and reduces the number of relpases. In order to specify and intensify the clinical effect of the above mentioned preparations, this method is being employed in other cases of chronic and acute haematogenous osteomyelitis. PMID:148797

  16. Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in young children - clinical and radiological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis is a bacterial infectious disease which mainly affects the paediatrics age group. The incidence seems to decline through the last decade. The authors analyzed the clinical, bacteriological and radiological features of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis in 49 young children. Their age ranged from 12 days to 2.9 years (19 new-born and 30 babies). The most affected locus was the femur (46.9 %), followed by the humerus (40.9 %) and tibia (6.2 %). The adjacent joint was involved in 38.8 %. Up to the third day after onset of symptoms were admitted 32 children (65.3 %). A bacteriological diagnosis has been achieved in only 19 cases (38.8 %) which underwent different surgical procedures. Staphylococcus aureus (9 children; 64.3 %) was the most common causative microbe. Radiological characteristic showed mainly widening of joints, destruction of cartilage, bone destruction and osteoporosis. The median duration of antibiotic therapy was 31 days. Nine children underwent needle aspiration while another 10 required locus incision or open surgery with debridement or sequestrectomy. Definitive clinical restoration was observed in 42 cases (85.7%). (authors)

  17. Treatment of osteomyelitis with antibiotic-soaked porous glass ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanabe, K; Okada, Y; Matsusue, Y; Iida, H; Nakamura, T

    1998-05-01

    We have developed a new drug delivery system using porous apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic (A-W GC) to treat osteomyelitis. A-W GC (porosity, 70% and 20% to 30%), or porous hydroxyapatite (HA) blocks (porosity 35% to 48%) used as controls, were soaked in mixtures of two antibiotics, isepamicin sulphate (ISP) and cefmetazole (CMZ) under high vacuum. We evaluated the release concentrations of the antibiotics from the blocks. The bactericidal concentration of ISP from A-W GC was maintained for more than 42 days, but that from HA decreased to below the detection limit after 28 days. The concentrations of CMZ from both materials were lower than those of ISP. An in vivo study using rabbit femora showed that an osseous concentration of ISP was maintained at eight weeks after implantation. Osteoconduction of the A-W GC block was good. Four patients with infected hip arthroplasties and one with osteomyelitis of the tibia have been treated with the new delivery system with excellent results. PMID:9619951

  18. Vertebral manifestation of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is a systemic osteo-articular disease that is characterized by a sterile, primarily chronic osteomyelitis with various distribution patterns of the individual lesions. In this article, we describe the 'axial type' with predominant involvement of the spine, which represents 13 of our 41 CMRO cases of different age groups. The important element of its diagnosis is the typical lympho-plasmacellular spondylitis that can be detected and staged by scintigraphy, MRI and conventional radiography. Potentially affected are all vertebrae from the mid-cervical spine to the sacrum. One or several segments can be involved, sometimes as transient inflammatory edema, sometimes as 'migratory spondylitis' or 'saltatory spondylitis', but also as chronic sclerosing type with early radiographically detectable manifestation. Vertebral deformity due to compression and total collapse (vertebra plana) are rare. A complicated course with patulous perivertebral edema can lead to concomitant symptomatic inflammatory changes in adjacent regions and organs. In the course of CRMO, spondylodiscitis only develops as secondary destruction following the spondylitis. This can help to differentiate spondyloarthropathies from CRMO that is initially detected as primary lesion in the spine. While CRMO generally has a good prognosis, its radiological differentiation from rheumatology conditions plays an important role. (orig.)

  19. Cefoperazone sodium impregnated polycaprolactone composite implant for osteomyelitis

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    Anand A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of local antibiotics from a biodegradable implant for chronic osteomyelitis is an attractive alternative. The implant delivers high antibiotic concentration at tissue levels, obliterates dead space, aids bone repair and does not need to be removed. The purpose of this paper is to develop and evaluate a calcium sulphate and polycaprolactone based composite biodegradable implantable delivery system of cefoperazone sodium. Implants were prepared by modified fabrication technique to avoid solvent use. Interaction studies were carried out to check any incompatibility between ingredients. Prepared implants were evaluated for various in vitro parameters like dimensions, hardness, tensile strength, drug release profile and sterility. Morphological changes in pellet before and after drug release were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The pellet were also tested for microbiological efficacy and compared with plain drug solution in different concentrations. Developed pellets are regular in shape and size with good tensile strength. The release profile displayed drug levels above MIC continuously up to 2 months. Wide zone of inhibition by pellet against Staph. aureus as compared to drug solution proves its efficacy in treatment of osteomyelitis.

  20. Fulminating septicemia due to persistent pan-resistant community-acquired metallo-β-lactamase (IMP-1-positive Acinetobacter baumannii

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    Nilima V Telang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is considered as an emerging nosocomial pathogen and is renowned for its multi-drug resistance. We report a case of community-acquired pan-resistant A. baumannii caused fulminating septicemia. The treatment failure led to death. The A. baumannii strain isolated from blood, pus, urine and tracheal aspirate was confirmed by 16S r-RNA sequence homology and found positive for metallo-β-lactamase IMP-1, and was found to be a strong biofilm producer. The isolate was only susceptible (moderately to colistin.

  1. Chronic osteomyelitis: bone and gallium scan patterns associated with active disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone and gallium scans are used to assess osteomyelitis patients with prior bone disease. To refine the criteria for interpreting these scans, the data from 136 consecutive patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis were reviewed. Active osteomyelitis was diagnosed with surgery or biopsy and culture in 49 patients, excluded with the same criteria in 16, and excluded by clinical follow-up for at least 6 months in 71. Five different scintigraphic patterns were found. The true-positive and false-positive ratios, the likelihood ratios, and posterior probabilities for active osteomyelitis in each pattern were calculated. Only one pattern (gallium uptake exceeding bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical uptake) was indicative of active disease. Other patterns slightly raised or decreased the probability of disease. The extent of these changes varies directly with the prior probability of disease, determined from patient-specific factors (e.g., clinical data, laboratory data, findings on plain films) known best by the referring clinician

  2. Progress of imaging research on the early diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The imaging diagnostic techniques include X-ray plain film, ultrasound, CT, MRI and radionuclide imaging. X-ray plain film is less sensitive to early acute osteomyelitis. Ultrasound can detect abscesses in the soft tissues and subperiosteal space earlier, but there are variations in image quality based on the different operators' levels of proficiency. High-resolution CT can find minimal lesions on bone, but it has a low sensitivity to predict acute osteomyelitis. MRI is superior to other imaging techniques at visualizing bone marrow lesions, but it is less sensitive in detecting sequestrum and calcification than CT. A variety of radionuclide imaging agents have been used in the early diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis in order to find a more sensitive and specific imaging technique. In this paper, different imaging diagnostic techniques of acute osteomyelitis are reviewed. (authors)

  3. Extra-osseous fat fluid level: a specific sign for osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteomyelitis may pose as a diagnostic dilemma on various imaging modalities and may be confused with neoplasms and other pathology. Although a rare finding, extra-osseous fat fluid level, especially when associated with spongy bone destruction, can be considered a specific sign of osteomyelitis. Previously, only two cases of extra-osseous fat fluid level in osteomyelitis have been reported, one on computed tomography (CT) and the other on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The former was a case of septic arthritis with intra-articular fat fluid level. A case of osteomyelitis is presented with the demonstration of extra-osseous fat fluid level. Our case is unique in providing exquisite CT and MRI correlation. (orig.)

  4. The scintigraphic and radiographic appearance of the ischiopubic synchondroses in normal children and in osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five cases of hematogenous osteomyelitis of the ischiopubic synchondrosis (IPS) were encountered amoung 180 patients with osteomyelitis treated over a 5-year period. Symptoms were poorly localized in all these IPS osteomyelitis patients. The IPS can normally show expansion and irregular mineralization radiographically and focal hyperconcentration of radiophosphates on scintigrams. Findings are frequently asymmetrical negating comparison with the contralateral side. In the cases of osteomyelitis, radiographs were abnormal at the time of presentation in only one of these five cases. In two of the four patients who had radionuclide bone scans, activity at the IPS exceeded that seen in a normal control population, but all showed loss of definition of the IPS and regional increased uptake permitting an early diagnosis. (orig.)

  5. Leukocyte scintigraphy with 111In in acute and chronic osteomyelitis of experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on 28 New Zealand white rabbits with experimentally induced osteomyelitis show that 111In-leukocyte scans turn negative when inflammation changes from the acute stage (histologically represented mainly by granulocytes and only small development of collageneous fibres) into the chronic stage (histologically showing marked lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and increased development of connective tissue). Falsely negative scans (i.e. cold lesions) are due to marked medullar necroses accompanied by diminished development of an abscess wall and reduced concentration of granulocytes within the necroses. Truly negative scans (i.e. cold lesions) are seen in chronic osteomyelitis with extended medullar fibrosis accompanied by reduced blood flow in comparison to the normal medullar bone of the contralateral side. The histological course of experimental osteomyelitis in rabbits is in some respect comparable with the stages of osteomyelitis in man and allows to predict the result of the leukocyte scan. (orig.)

  6. Combined bone marrow and gallium imaging. Differentiation of osteomyelitis and infarction in sickle hemoglobinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical records and scintigrams of patients with sickle hemoglobinopathy who underwent combined Tc-99m bone marrow imaging and Ga-67 imaging to differentiate osteomyelitis from bony infarction were reviewed. Of 18 paired examinations in 15 patients, osteomyelitis was diagnosed correctly in six cases; in all six, gallium uptake at the symptomatic site was incongruently increased relative to the bone marrow activity. Of the 12 episodes of infarction, 11 showed congruent activity on both Tc-99m and Ga-67 images. The remaining study was interpreted incorrectly as osteomyelitis due to incongruent Tc-99m and Ga-67 uptake. The use of sequential Tc-99m bone marrow and Ga-67 imaging is an effective means of distinguishing osteomyelitis from bony infarction in patients with sickle hemoglobinopathy

  7. Septic Arthritis and Concern for Osteomyelitis in a Child with Rat Bite Fever

    OpenAIRE

    Flannery, Dustin D.; Akinboyo, Ibukunoluwa; Ty, Jennifer M.; Averill, Lauren W.; Freedman, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Rat bite fever is a rare infection usually caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis. A case of septic arthritis and possible osteomyelitis as sequelae of rat bite fever in a pediatric patient is described.

  8. MRI diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the cuboid bone in two infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe two infants in whom MRI diagnosed osteomyelitis of the cuboid bone when conventional X-rays were negative. Neoplastic, traumatic and ischaemic aetiologies could be excluded with the initial MR examinations. (orig.)

  9. Detoxification of Indole by an Indole-Induced Flavoprotein Oxygenase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

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    Guang-Huey Lin

    Full Text Available Indole, a derivative of the amino acid tryptophan, is a toxic signaling molecule, which can inhibit bacterial growth. To overcome indole-induced toxicity, many bacteria have developed enzymatic defense systems to convert indole to non-toxic, water-insoluble indigo. We previously demonstrated that, like other aromatic compound-degrading bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii can also convert indole to indigo. However, no work has been published investigating this mechanism. Here, we have shown that the growth of wild-type A. baumannii is severely inhibited in the presence of 3.5 mM indole. However, at lower concentrations, growth is stable, implying that the bacteria may be utilizing a survival mechanism to oxidize indole. To this end, we have identified a flavoprotein oxygenase encoded by the iifC gene of A. baumannii. Further, our results suggest that expressing this recombinant oxygenase protein in Escherichia coli can drive indole oxidation to indigo in vitro. Genome analysis shows that the iif operon is exclusively present in the genomes of A. baumannii and Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis also indicate that the iif operon is activated by indole through the AraC-like transcriptional regulator IifR. Taken together, these data suggest that this species of bacteria utilizes a novel indole-detoxification mechanism that is modulated by IifC, a protein that appears to be, at least to some extent, regulated by IifR.

  10. Detoxification of Indole by an Indole-Induced Flavoprotein Oxygenase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guang-Huey; Chen, Hao-Ping; Shu, Hung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Indole, a derivative of the amino acid tryptophan, is a toxic signaling molecule, which can inhibit bacterial growth. To overcome indole-induced toxicity, many bacteria have developed enzymatic defense systems to convert indole to non-toxic, water-insoluble indigo. We previously demonstrated that, like other aromatic compound-degrading bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii can also convert indole to indigo. However, no work has been published investigating this mechanism. Here, we have shown that the growth of wild-type A. baumannii is severely inhibited in the presence of 3.5 mM indole. However, at lower concentrations, growth is stable, implying that the bacteria may be utilizing a survival mechanism to oxidize indole. To this end, we have identified a flavoprotein oxygenase encoded by the iifC gene of A. baumannii. Further, our results suggest that expressing this recombinant oxygenase protein in Escherichia coli can drive indole oxidation to indigo in vitro. Genome analysis shows that the iif operon is exclusively present in the genomes of A. baumannii and Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis also indicate that the iif operon is activated by indole through the AraC-like transcriptional regulator IifR. Taken together, these data suggest that this species of bacteria utilizes a novel indole-detoxification mechanism that is modulated by IifC, a protein that appears to be, at least to some extent, regulated by IifR. PMID:26390211

  11. Thai ethnomedicinal plants as resistant modifying agents for combating Acinetobacter baumannii infections

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    Phatthalung Pinanong

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts Background Acinetobacter baumannii is well-recognized as an important nosocomial pathogen, however, due to their intrinsic resistance to several antibiotics, treatment options are limited. Synergistic effects between antibiotics and medicinal plants, particularly their active components, have intensively been studied as alternative approaches. Methods Fifty-one ethanol extracts obtained from 44 different selected medicinal plant species were tested for resistance modifying agents (RMAs of novobiocin against A. baumannii using growth inhibition assay. Results At 250 μg/ml, Holarrhena antidysenterica, Punica granatum, Quisqualis indica, Terminalia bellirica, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia sp. that possessed low intrinsic antibacterial activity significantly enhanced the activity of novobiocin at 1 μg/ml (1/8xminimum inhibitory concentration against this pathogen. Holarrhena antidysenterica at 7.8 μg/ml demonstrated remarkable resistant modifying ability against A. baumannii in combination with novobiocin. The phytochemical study revealed that constituents of this medicinal plant contain alkaloids, condensed tannins, and triterpenoids. Conclusion The use of Holarrhena antidysenterica in combination with novobiocin provides an effective alternative treatment for multidrug resistant A. baumannii infections.

  12. Colistin Methanesulfonate against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an In Vitro Pharmacodynamic Model▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kroeger, Lisa A.; Hovde, Laurie B.; Mitropoulos, Isaac F.; Schafer, Jeremy; Rotschafer, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model, a multidrug-resistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii was exposed to colistin methanesulfonate alone and in combination with ceftazidime. Pre- and postexposure colistin sulfate MICs were determined. A single daily dose of colistin methanesulfonate combined with continuous-infusion ceftazidime prevented regrowth and postexposure MIC increases.

  13. Comparison of two methods for quantification of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation

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    Saghar Hendiani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: ‏ Medical devices are made from a variety of materials such as polypropylene, polycarbonate, poly styrene, glass and etc. by attaching to this surfaces, Acinetobacter baumannii can form biofilms and then cause several device associated infections. Biofilms are communities of bacteria attached to the surfaces. In this study, biofilm formation ability in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii was assessed by two methods on different surfaces. Materials and methods: ‏ Biofilm formation by 75 clinical isolates of A. baumannii was evaluated on polycarbonate surface (microtiter plate and polypropylene surface (falcon by crystal violet and 2,3-Bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide salt (XTT tetrazolium sodium salt assay methods. Falcon or tube method was carried out under static and agitation conditions. Results: ‏ Results showed the most isolates can form biofilm but higher numbers of isolates form biofilm on polypropylene surface under agitation. XTT method confirmed strong biofilm formation ability of 10 isolates. Discussion and conclusion: Each of the two assays showed an excellent applicability for the quantification of biofilms. The Crystal violet assay is cheap, easy and is usually used for the quantification of biofilms formed by microorganisms but XTT is more reliable and repeatable. Most of A. baumannii isolates have potential to form biofilm on the medical devices which may result in device-associated infections.

  14. In vitro effects of sulbactam combinations with different antibiotic groups against clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveci, Aydin; Coban, Ahmet Yilmaz; Acicbe, Ozlem; Tanyel, Esra; Yaman, Gorkem; Durupinar, Belma

    2012-10-01

    Treatment of multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii infections causes some problems as a result of possessing various antibacterial resistance mechanisms against available antibiotics. Combination of antibiotics, acting by different mechanisms, is used for the treatment of MDR bacterial infections. It is an important factor to determine synergy or antagonism between agents in the combination for the constitution of effective therapy. The study aimed to determine In vitro interactions interpreted according to calculated fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index between sulbactam and ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, meropenem, tigecycline, and colistin. Ten clinical isolates of A. baumannii were tested for determination of synergistic effects of sulbactam with different antimicrobial combinations. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of both sulbactam and combined antibiotics decreased 2- to 128-fold. Synergy and partial synergy were determined in combination of sulbactam with ceftazidime and gentamicin (FIC index: ≤ 0.5 or >0.5 to sulbactam. Although synergistic and partial synergistic effects were observed in the combination of sulbactam and ceftriaxone, all isolates remained resistant to ceftriaxone. The effect of cefepime-sulbactam combination was synergy in five, partial synergy in one and indifferent in four isolates. Meropenem and sulbactam showed a partial synergistic effect (FIC index: >0.5 to 1-2) in six isolates. Antagonism was not determined in any combination for clinical A. baumannii isolates in the study. In conclusion, sulbactam is a good candidate for combination treatment regimes for MDR A. baumannii infections. PMID:23182043

  15. Screening of Herbal-Based Bioactive Extract Against Carbapenem-Resistant Strain of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Monalisa; Roy, Ranita; Tiwari, Vishvanath

    2016-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is grouped in the ESKAPE pathogens by Infectious Disease Society of America, which is linked to high degree of morbidity, mortality, and increased costs. The high level of acquired and intrinsic resistance mechanisms of these bacteria makes it an urgent requirement to find a suitable alternative to carbapenem, a commonly prescribed drug for Acinetobacter infection. In this study, methanolic extracts of six medicinal plants were subjected to phytochemical screening and their antimicrobial activity was tested against two strains of A. baumannii (ATCC 19606, carbapenem-sensitive strain, and RS 307, carbapenem-resistant strain). Synergistic effect of the plant extracts and antibiotics was also tested. Bael or Aegle marmelos contains tannin, phenol, terpenoids, glycoside, alkaloids, coumarine, steroid, and quinones. Flowers of madar or Calotropis procera possess tannin, phenol, terpenoids, glycoside, quinone, anthraquinone, anthocyanin, coumarin, and steroid. An inhibitory growth curve was seen for both the bacterial strains when treated with A. marmelos, Curcuma longa, and leaves and flowers of C. procera. Antibiotics alone showed a small zone of inhibition, but when used with herbal extracts they exhibited larger zone of inhibition. Synergistic effect of A. marmelos and imipenem was the best against both the strains of A. baumannii. From this study, it can be concluded that extracts from A. marmelos and leaves and flowers of C. procera exhibited the most effective antibacterial activity. These herbal extracts may be used to screen the bioactive compound against the carbapenem-resistant strain of A. baumannii. PMID:26910023

  16. Biofilm formation in clinical isolates of nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii and its relationship with multidrug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ebrahim Babapour; Azam Haddadi; Reza Mirnejad; Seyed-Abdolhamid Angaji; Nour Amirmozafari

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To check biofilm formation by Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) clinical isolates and show their susceptibility to different antibiotics and investigate a possible link between establishment of biofilm and multidrug resistance. Methods: This study was performed on clinical samples collected from patients with nosocomial infections in three hospitals of Tehran. Samples were initially screened by culture and biochemical tests for the presence of different species of Acinetobacter. Iden-tifications were further confirmed by PCR assays. Their susceptibilities to 11 antibiotics of different classes were determined by disc diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. The ability to produce biofilm was investigated using methods:culture on Congo red agar, microtiter plate, and test tube method. Results: From the overall clinical samples, 156 specimens were confirmed to contain A. baumannii. The bacteria were highly resistant to most antibiotics except polymyxin B. Of these isolates, 10.26% were able to produce biofilms as shown on Congo red agar. However, the percentage of bacteria with positive biofilm in test tube, standard microtiter plate, and modified microtiter plate assays were 48.72%, 66.66%, and 73.72%, respec-tively. At least 92%of the biofilm forming isolates were multidrug resistant. Conclusions: Since most of the multidrug resistant strains produce biofilm, it seems necessary to provide continuous monitoring and determination of antibiotic susceptibility of clinical A. baumannii. This would help to select the most appropriate antibiotic for treatment.

  17. Acinetobacter baumannii phenylacetic acid metabolism influences infection outcome through a direct effect on neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Md Saruar; Ellett, Felix; Murray, Gerald L; Kostoulias, Xenia; Cerqueira, Gustavo M; Schulze, Keith E; Mahamad Maifiah, Mohd Hafidz; Li, Jian; Creek, Darren J; Lieschke, Graham J; Peleg, Anton Y

    2016-08-23

    Innate cellular immune responses are a critical first-line defense against invading bacterial pathogens. Leukocyte migration from the bloodstream to a site of infection is mediated by chemotactic factors that are often host-derived. More recently, there has been a greater appreciation of the importance of bacterial factors driving neutrophil movement during infection. Here, we describe the development of a zebrafish infection model to study Acinetobacter baumannii pathogenesis. By using isogenic A. baumannii mutants lacking expression of virulence effector proteins, we demonstrated that bacterial drivers of disease severity are conserved between zebrafish and mammals. By using transgenic zebrafish with fluorescent phagocytes, we showed that a mutation of an established A. baumannii global virulence regulator led to marked changes in neutrophil behavior involving rapid neutrophil influx to a localized site of infection, followed by prolonged neutrophil dwelling. This neutrophilic response augmented bacterial clearance and was secondary to an impaired A. baumannii phenylacetic acid catabolism pathway, which led to accumulation of phenylacetate. Purified phenylacetate was confirmed to be a neutrophil chemoattractant. These data identify a previously unknown mechanism of bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis in vivo, providing insight into the role of bacterial metabolism in host innate immune evasion. Furthermore, the work provides a potentially new therapeutic paradigm of targeting a bacterial metabolic pathway to augment host innate immune responses and attenuate disease. PMID:27506797

  18. Enhanced Efficacy of Combinations of Pexiganan with Colistin Versus Acinetobacter Baumannii in Experimental Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirioni, Oscar; Simonetti, Oriana; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Barucca, Alessandra; Ghiselli, Roberto; Orlando, Fiorenza; Pelloni, Maria; Minardi, Daniele; Trombettoni, Maria Michela Cappelletti; Guerrieri, Mario; Offidani, Annamaria; Giacometti, Andrea; Provinciali, Mauro

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the efficacy of colistin combined with pexiganan in experimental mouse models of Acinetobacter baumannii infection.Adult male BALB/c mice received intraperitoneally 1 mL saline containing 2 × 10 CFU of susceptible and multiresistant A. baumannii. Two hours after bacterial challenge, animals received 1 mg/kg of colistin, 1 mg/kg of pexiganan, or 1 mg/kg of colistin plus 1 mg/kg of pexiganan.Blood culture positivity, the quantities of bacteria in the intra-abdominal fluid, the rate of lethality and immunological studies, such as immunophenotyping and NK cytotoxicity, were evaluated.In the in vitro study, A. baumannii showed susceptibility to colistin and pexiganan and a strong synergy was observed by testing colistin combined with pexiganan with fractionary inhibitory concentration index of 0.312 for both strains.In the in vivo study colistin or pexiganan alone showed a good antimicrobial efficacy. When colistin was combined with pexiganan, the positive interaction produced low bacterial counts that were statistically significant versus singly treated groups. For both strains the highest rate of survival was observed in combined-treated groups (90%).Pexiganan increased NK cytotoxic activity over the levels of infected and colistin-treated animals.In conclusion, pexiganan combined with colistin was found to be efficacious against A. baumannii infection. PMID:26849630

  19. Whole-Genome Sequencing Elucidates Epidemiology of Nosocomial Clusters of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Stefanie; Kampmeier, Stefanie; Bletz, Stefan; Kossow, Annelene; Köck, Robin; Kipp, Frank; Mellmann, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    We characterized two epidemiologically similar Acinetobacter baumannii clusters from two separate intensive care units (ICU) using core genome multilocus sequence typing. Clonal spread was confirmed in ICU-1 (12 of 14 isolates shared genotypes); in ICU-2, all genotypes (13 isolates) were diverse, thus excluding transmissions and enabling adequate infection control measures. PMID:27358465

  20. Molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in central intensive care unit in Kosova teaching hospital

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    Lul Raka

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by bacteria of genus Acinetobacter pose a significant health care challenge worldwide. Information on molecular epidemiological investigation of outbreaks caused by Acinetobacter species in Kosova is lacking. The present investigation was carried out to enlight molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacterbaumannii in the Central Intensive Care Unit (CICU of a University hospital in Kosova using pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. During March - July 2006, A. baumannii was isolated from 30 patients, of whom 22 were infected and 8 were colonised. Twenty patients had ventilator-associated pneumonia, one patient had meningitis, and two had coinfection with bloodstream infection and surgical site infection. The most common diagnoses upon admission to the ICU were politrauma and cerebral hemorrhage. Bacterial isolates were most frequently recovered from endotracheal aspirate (86.7%. First isolation occurred, on average, on day 8 following admission (range 1-26 days. Genotype analysis of A. baumannii isolates identified nine distinct PFGE patterns, with predominance of PFGE clone E represented by isolates from 9 patients. Eight strains were resistant to carbapenems. The genetic relatedness of Acinetobacter baumannii was high, indicating cross-transmission within the ICU setting. These results emphasize the need for measures to prevent nosocomial transmission of A. baumannii in ICU.

  1. The First Outbreak Caused by Acinetobacter baumannii ST208 and ST195 in China

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    Junyan Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics of patients and molecular mechanisms of the first outbreak mainly caused by sequence types (STs 208 multidrug resistant (MDR Acinetobacter baumannii in China. A total of 10 clinical samples were collected from 5 patients who were involved in the outbreak. Bacterial identification and antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed by the VITEK-2 COMPACT automated system. MICs of tigecycline for clinical isolates were determined using broth microdilution. The clonal relatedness of A. baumannii clinical isolates in our local settings was determinated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. A total of 7 A. baumannii strains were isolated and all were MDR strains; two of them were carbapenem-nonsusceptible strains. blaOXA-23 was the only acquired carbapenemase gene in the isolates. The isolates belonged to a single clonal pulsotype determined by PFGE and two sequences types (STs determined by MLST. The isolates belonged to the globally disseminated clonal complex 92, among which ST195 and ST208 were the most common sequence types (71.43% and 28.57%. The outbreak was successfully controlled by stringent infection control measures, especially improving the hand hygiene compliance and enhancing antimicrobial stewardship. In conclusion, this is the first description of an outbreak caused mainly by A. baumannii of ST208 in China. Infection control measures should be strengthened when infection outbreaks in hospital.

  2. The First Outbreak Caused by Acinetobacter baumannii ST208 and ST195 in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Junyan; Du, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics of patients and molecular mechanisms of the first outbreak mainly caused by sequence types (STs) 208 multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii in China. A total of 10 clinical samples were collected from 5 patients who were involved in the outbreak. Bacterial identification and antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed by the VITEK-2 COMPACT automated system. MICs of tigecycline for clinical isolates were determined using broth microdilution. The clonal relatedness of A. baumannii clinical isolates in our local settings was determinated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 7 A. baumannii strains were isolated and all were MDR strains; two of them were carbapenem-nonsusceptible strains. blaOXA-23 was the only acquired carbapenemase gene in the isolates. The isolates belonged to a single clonal pulsotype determined by PFGE and two sequences types (STs) determined by MLST. The isolates belonged to the globally disseminated clonal complex 92, among which ST195 and ST208 were the most common sequence types (71.43% and 28.57%). The outbreak was successfully controlled by stringent infection control measures, especially improving the hand hygiene compliance and enhancing antimicrobial stewardship. In conclusion, this is the first description of an outbreak caused mainly by A. baumannii of ST208 in China. Infection control measures should be strengthened when infection outbreaks in hospital. PMID:27144176

  3. Genetic Environment and Transcription of ampC in an Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolate

    OpenAIRE

    Segal, Heidi; Nelson, E C; Elisha, B. Gay

    2004-01-01

    An ampC gene was cloned from a clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii (strain RAN). DNA sequencing and primer extension studies showed that ampC is transcribed from a promoter contained within a putative insertion sequence element which has been found to abut several different genes in Acinetobacter spp.

  4. Functional Exposed Amino Acids of BauA as Potential Immunogen Against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefid, Fatemeh; Rasooli, Iraj; Jahangiri, Abolfazl; Bazmara, Hadise

    2015-06-01

    Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii is recognized to be among the most difficult antimicrobial-resistant gram negative bacilli to control and treat. One of the major challenges that the pathogenic bacteria face in their host is the scarcity of freely available iron. To survive under such conditions, bacteria express new proteins on their outer membrane and also secrete iron chelators called siderophores. Antibodies directed against these proteins associated with iron uptake exert a bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect against A. baumanii in vitro, by blocking siderophore mediated iron uptake pathways. Attempts should be made to discover peptides that could mimic protein epitopes and possess the same immunogenicity as the whole protein. Subsequently, theoretical methods for epitope prediction have been developed leading to synthesis of such peptides that are important for development of immunodiagnostic tests and vaccines. The present study was designed to in silico resolving the major obstacles in the control or in prevention of the diseases caused by A. baumannii. We exploited bioinformatic tools to better understand and characterize the Baumannii acinetobactin utilization structure of A. baumannii and select appropriate regions as effective B cell epitopes. In conclusion, amino acids 26-191 of cork domain and 321-635 of part of the barrel domain including L4-L9, were selected as vaccine candidates. These two regions contain functional exposed amino acids with higher score of B cell epitopes properties. Majority of amino acids are hydrophilic, flexible, accessible, and favorable for B cells from secondary structure point of view. PMID:25840681

  5. Clinical importance and cost of bacteremia caused by nosocomial multi drug resistant acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugba Arslan Gulen

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that the occurrence of MDR A.baumannii bacteremia was related with the usage of the wide spectrum antibiotics, and mortality rates were increased in patients that high SAPS II scores, long term hospitalization. Infection control procedures and limited antibiotic usage are very important for prevent nosocomial infections.

  6. Bacterial osteomyelitis: Is it a form of spondylitis or of spondylodiskitis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a retrospective study of 43 patients with pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis. Results obtained with several diagnostic methods, including myelography and CT are described and the usefulness of the different methods is assessed. The frequency of occurrence of the pathogenic bacteria, the focal localization, and the interval between early symptoms and diagnosis are determined. Involvement of intervertebral disc and adjacent vertebrae indicates the development of spondylodiskitis. There are several reasons to characterize the vertebral osteomyelitis as spondylodiskitis too. (orig.)

  7. Odontoid Osteomyelitis in Children: Illustrative Case Reports and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Petra; Ritz, Nicole; Stranzinger, Enno

    2016-08-01

    Odontoid osteomyelitis is a rare disease which is frequently misdiagnosed as torticollis, leading to a delay in diagnosis. We present 2 illustrative cases and a systematic literature review summarizing previously reported cases. Odontoid osteomyelitis should be considered in children presenting with decreased head movements and with elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, particularly without improvement while receiving antiinflammatory treatment. Plain radiographs can be misleading, and magnetic resonance imaging should be performed for better visualization. PMID:27164466

  8. Neglected Foreign Body, the Cause of Navicular Osteomyelitis in A Paediatric Foot: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrashekara C.M; George M.A; Bader Said Khamis Al-Marboi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Foreign body injuries with date thorns, metal and wooden splinters are common in Middle East region, as most of it is desert. Some of the injuries lead to cellulitis or abscess formation, if neglected or improperly managed results in osteomyelitis or septic arthritis of foot structures. This is the first report of isolated navicular osteomyelitis following neglected foreign body in a paediatric foot. Case Report: A 10 year old male patient presented with discharging sinus in...

  9. Skull involvement in a pediatric case of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Toru; Ono, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Yoshitaka; Otsuki, Yoshiro; Shirai, Masami; Endoh, Akira; Naito, Masaaki; Inoue, Yoshiya; Hongo, Teruaki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT An 11-year-old boy was diagnosed with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and presented with right sacro-femoral and occipital lesions. Initially, a tumor was suspected. However, the bone biopsy showed osteomyelitis with a negative bacterial culture. Bone scintigraphy revealed inflammatory changes on multiple bone lesions. The slight elevation in inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein was of little clinical value. He was diagnosed with CRMO by sacral biopsy, an...

  10. Problems in the scintigraphic detection of osteomyelitis in children. [/sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, D.C.; Rosenfield, N.S.; Ogden, J.; Gottschalk, A.

    1980-06-01

    /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate studies in 21 children with acute hematogenous osteomyelitis were compared with radiographic, clinical and surgical findings. Eleven /sup 99m/Tc studies revealed obvious abnormalities, four showed subtle abnormalities, two were misleading, and four were normal. No consistent explanation for the lack of positive radionuclide findings was found. We concluded that pediatric osteomyelitis presents a spectrum of scintigraphic appearances and interpretation is often difficult.

  11. Continuous Infusion of Nafcillin for Sternal Osteomyelitis in an Infant After Cardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Knoderer, Chad A.; Morris, Jennifer L.; Cox, Elaine G.

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of the continuous infusion of nafcillin for the treatment of an infant who had methicillinsusceptible Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis not responsive to traditional nafcillin dosing. The patient was successfully treated with surgical debridement and the continuous infusion of nafcillin. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the successful use of the continuous infusion of nafcillin to treat an infant who had sternal osteomyelitis after cardiac surg...

  12. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Castellazzi; Marco Mantero; Susanna Esposito

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of paren...

  13. Diabetic foot infections: effective microorganisms and factors affecting the frequency of osteomyelitis and amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Sonmezer, Meliha Cagla; TULEK, Necla; Ozsoy, Metin; Erdinc, Fatma; Ertem, Gunay

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Diabetic foot infections are common reason for hospitalization and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. We aimed to evaluate the clinic features and predisposed causes of osteomyelitis and amputation of patients with diabetic foot infections. Methods. Patients with diabetic foot infections who admitted and hospitalized at Infection Diseases and Clinical Microbiology department between January 2012 and July 2014 were included. Osteomyelitis was evaluated using magnetic...

  14. Salvage of Diffuse Ankle Osteomyelitis by Single-Stage Resection and Circumferential Frame Compression Arthrodesis

    OpenAIRE

    Saltzman, Charles L

    2005-01-01

    Salvage of diffuse ankle osteomyelitis, especially in compromised hosts, is a challenging problem. The purpose of this report was to evaluate early complications and results using a standardized salvage protocol. Eight patients with diffuse ankle osteomyelitis were treated by resection of all infected tissue and hybrid-frame compression arthrodesis. At presentation, five had open wounds. According to the Cierny/Mader classification, all had diffuse anatomic involvement and six of eight were c...

  15. Osteomyelitis or Charcot neuroosteoarthropathy? Differentiating these disorders in diabetic patients with a foot problem

    OpenAIRE

    Bulent M. Ertugrul; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Savk, Oner

    2013-01-01

    Both osteomyelitis and Charcot neuro-osteoarthropathy (CN) are potentially limb-threatening complications of diabetic neuropathy, but they require quite different treatments. Almost all bone infections in the diabetic foot originate from an infected foot ulcer while diabetic osteoarthropathy is a non-infectious process in which peripheral neuropathy plays the critical role. Differentiating between diabetic foot osteomyelitis and CN requires careful evaluation of the patient, including the med...

  16. Conservative Surgery of Diabetic Forefoot Osteomyelitis: How Can I Operate on This Patient Without Amputation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Lázaro-Martínez, Jose L; Alvaro-Afonso, Francisco Javier; Molinés-Barroso, Raúl

    2015-06-01

    Surgery is necessary in many cases of diabetic foot osteomyelitis. The decision to undertake surgery should be based on the clinical presentation of diabetic foot osteomyelitis. Surgery is required when the bone is protruding through the ulcer, there is extensive bone destruction seen on x-ray or progressive bone damage on sequential x-ray while undergoing antibiotic treatment, the soft tissue envelope is destroyed, and there is gangrene or spreading soft tissue infection. Several issues should be taken into account when considering surgery for treating diabetic foot osteomyelitis. It is necessary to have a surgeon available with diabetic foot expertise. Regarding location of diabetic foot osteomyelitis, it is important to consider whether isolated bone or a joint is involved. In cases in which osteomyelitis is associated with a bone deformity, surgery should be able to correct this. The surgeon should always reflect about whether extensive/radical surgery could destabilize the foot. The forefoot is the most frequent location of diabetic foot osteomyelitis and is associated with better prognosis than midfoot and hindfoot osteomyelitis. Many surgical procedures can be performed in patients with diabetes and forefoot ulcers complicated by osteomyelitis while avoiding amputations. Performing conservative surgeries without amputations of any part of the foot is not always feasible in cases in which the infection has destroyed the soft tissue envelope. Attempting conservative surgery in such cases risks infected tissues remaining in the wound bed leading to failure. The election of different surgical options depends on the expertise of the surgeons selected for the multidisciplinary teams. It is the aim of this article to provide a sample of surgical techniques in order to remove the bone infection from the forefoot while avoiding amputations. PMID:25256285

  17. Surgical complications associated with primary closure in patients with diabetic foot osteomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    García-Morales, Esther; Lázaro-Martínez, Jose Luis; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Almudena, Cecilia-Matilla; García-Álvarez, Yolanda; Beneit-Montesinos, Juan Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of complications associated with primaryclosure in surgical procedures performed for diabetic foot osteomyelitis compared to those healed bysecondary intention. In addition, further evaluation of the surgical digital debridement for osteomyelitis withprimary closure as an alternative to patients with digital amputation was also examined in our study.Methods: Comparative study that included 46 patients with diabetic foot ulcerati...

  18. Actinomycetes as the causative organism of osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case of a 17-year-old girl with sickle cell anaemia who presented with extensive osteomyelitis due to actinomycetes is reported. Osteomyelitis in the long bones due to actinomycosis is extremely rare. A review of the literature reveals only six cases in which actinomycetes have been isolated from lesions affecting a long bone. The occurence of this condition in sickle cell haemoglobinopathy has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  19. Phalangeal fractures and metacarpophalangeal luxations subsequent to post-traumatic osteomyelitis and cellulitis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley-Hobbs, S J; Lascelles, B D X

    2004-07-01

    A working Border collie suffered a puncture wound to the metacarpal pad. No fractures or luxations were identified at initial presentation. Treatment was instigated with various antibacterials for a period of months. At subsequent visits, the dog's condition progressed with development of metacarpophalangeal joint luxation and phalangeal fractures secondary to cellulitis and chronic osteomyelitis. Amputation was curative. Prompt treatment of the acute condition with debridement and drainage may have prevented osteomyelitis becoming established in the first instance. PMID:15266860

  20. Relationship between antimicrobial resistance and aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme gene expressions in Acinetobacter baumannii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Wei-feng; JIANG Jian-ping; MI Zu-huang

    2005-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the main gram-negative bacilli in clinical practice. Nosocomial infections caused by multi-drug resistance Acinetobacter baumannii is very difficult to treat. This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial resistance characteristics and four resistant gene expressions of aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes including N-acetyltransferases and O-phosphotransferases in Acinetobacter baumannii. Methods Bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility test were performed by PhoenixTM system in 247 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of seven aminoglycosides including gentamicin, amikacin, kanamycin, tobramycin, netilmicin, neomycin and streptomycin in 15 strains of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii were detected by agar dilution. Four aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and verified by DNA sequencer.Results The resistance rates of 247 strains of Acinetobacter baumannii against cefotaxime, levofloxacin, piperacillin, aztreonam, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol were more than 50%. Imipenem and meropenem showed high antibacterial activities with resistance rates of 3.2% and 4.1%. MIC50 and MIC90 of gentamicin, amikacin, streptomycin and kanamycin in 15 strains of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanii were all more than 1024 mg/L, and the resistance rates were 100%, 100%, 100% and 93.3%, respectively. But their resistance rates to tobramycin, netilmicin and neomycin were 86.7%, 93.3% and 46.7%, respectively. Three modifying enzyme genes, including aacC1, aacC2 and aacA4 genes, were found in 15 strains, but aphA6 had not been detected. Their positive rates were 93.3%, 20.0% and 20.0%, respectively. These three genes existed simultaneously in No.19 strain. Nucleotide sequences of aacC1, aacC2 and aacA4 genes shared 100%, 97.9% and 99.7% identities with GenBank genes (AY307113, S68058 and AY

  1. Isolation and Characterization of a Virulent Bacteriophage AB1 of Acinetobacter baumannii

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    Jia Shiru

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen worldwide with increasing prevalence of multi-drug and pan-drug resistance. A. baumannii exists widely in natural environment, especially in health care settings, and has been shown difficult to be eradicated. Bacteriophages are often considered alternative agent for controlling bacterial infection and contamination. In this study, we described the isolation and characterization of one virulent bacteriophage AB1 capable of specifically infecting A. baumannii. Results A virulent bacteriophage AB1, specific for infecting a clinical strain A. baumannii KD311, was first isolated from marine sediment sample. Restriction analysis indicated that phage AB1 was a dsDNA virus with an approximate genome size of 45.2 kb to 46.9 kb. Transmission electron microscopy showed that phage AB1 had an icosahedral head with a non-contractile tail and collar or whisker structures, and might be tentatively classified as a member of the Siphoviridae family. Proteomic pattern of phage AB1, generated by SDS-PAGE using purified phage particles, revealed five major bands and six minor bands with molecular weight ranging from 14 to 80 kilo-dalton. Also determined was the adsorption rate of phage AB1 to the host bacterium, which was significantly enhanced by addition of 10 mM CaCl2. In a single step growth test, phage AB1 was shown having a latent period of 18 minutes and a burst size of 409. Moreover, pH and thermal stability of phage AB1 were also investigated. At the optimal pH 6.0, 73.2% of phages survived after 60 min incubation at 50°C. When phage AB1 was used to infect four additional clinical isolates of A. baumannii, one clinical isolate of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa lab strains PAK and PAO1, none of the tested strains was found susceptible, indicating a relatively narrow host range for phage AB1. Conclusion Phage AB1 was capable of eliciting efficient lysis

  2. Micro-CT analyses of historical bone samples presenting with osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteomyelitis is an inflammation of the bone marrow mainly caused by bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. It typically affects long bones, e.g. femora, tibiae and humeri. Recently micro-computed tomography (μCT) techniques offer the opportunity to investigate bone micro-architecture in great detail. Since there is no information on long bone microstructure in osteomyelitis, we studied historic bone samples with osteomyelitis by μCT. We investigated 23 femora of 22 individuals suffering from osteomyelitis provided by the Collection of Anatomical Pathology, Museum of Natural History, Vienna (average age 44 ±19 years); 9 femora from body donors made available by the Department of Applied Anatomy, Medical University of Vienna (age range, 56-102 years) were studied as controls. Bone microstructure was assessed by μCT VISCOM X 8060 II with a minimal resolution of 18 μm. In the osteomyelitic femora, most prominent alterations were seen in the cortical compartment. In 71.4 % of the individuals with osteomyelitis, cortical porosity occurred. 57.1 % of the individuals showed cortical thinning. In 42.9 % trabecularisation of cortical bone was observed. Osteomyelitis is associated with severe alterations of cortical bone structure otherwise typically observed at old age such as cortical porosity and cortical thinning. (orig.)

  3. Quantum dot-based diabetic foot mapping for diagnosing osteomyelitis and Charcot neuroarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Farzaneh; Nabipour, Iraj; Kalantarhormozi, Mohammadreza; Assadi, Tahereh; Raeisi, Alireza; Assadi, Majid

    2015-07-01

    The location of osteomyelitis is very important in Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN), especially when a physician is considering amputation of the affected extremity. In diabetic CN, the presence of osteomyelitis is likely. Thus, to identify the infected tissue that needs to be removed, the specific area of infection must be correctly identified. Both CN and osteomyelitis have high mortality rates, but osteomyelitis is more life threatening and needs aggressive treatment. We propose a QD-based method for distinguishing CN with sterile inflammation from osteomyelitis that does not require multiple and frequent imaging modalities. The method utilizes two different colored QDs (i.e., red and green). The red QD is attached to a UBI, an antimicrobial peptide, which attaches to bacteria, enabling their detection. The green QD is attached to MDP, which accumulates in areas of inflammation. When these QDs are injected intravenously at the same time, the red QD-UBI accumulates in infected areas and attaches to bacteria, and the green QD-MDP accumulates both in areas with sterile inflammation and infected areas. The accumulation of only green QDs in the suspect extremity signifies a sterile inflammation process (CN). However, the accumulation of both the red and green QDs signify infectious and inflammation processes (i.e., osteomyelitis or a soft tissue infection, depending on the location). In the latter case, the treatment needs to be more intensive, with even amputation considered. PMID:25801484

  4. Calcaneal Osteomyelitis due to Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tae-Im; Choe, Yeo-Reum; Kim, Joo-Sup; Kwon, Kye-Won

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a bone infection caused by bacteria or other germs. Gram-positive cocci are the most common etiological organisms of calcaneal osteomyelitis; whereas, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are rarely documented. We reported a case of NTM calcaneal osteomyelitis in a 51-year-old female patient. She had been previously treated in many local clinics with multiple local steroid injection over 50 times and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy over 20 times with the impression of plantar fasciitis for 3 years prior. Diagnostic workup revealed a calcaneal osteomyelitis and polymerase chain reaction assay on bone aspirate specimens confirmed the diagnosis of non-tuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis. The patient had a partial calcanectomy with antitubercular therapy. Six months after surgery, a follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed localized chronic osteomyelitis with abscess formation. We continued anti-tubercular therapy without operation. At 18-month follow-up after surgery and comprehensive rehabilitation therapy, she was ambulating normally and able to carry out her daily activities without any discomfort. PMID:26949685

  5. Micro-CT analyses of historical bone samples presenting with osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamm, C.; Pietschmann, P. [Medical University Vienna (MUV), Department of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research, Center for Pathophysiology, Infectiology and Immunology, Vienna (Austria); Dockner, M.; Weber, G.W. [University of Vienna, Department of Anthropology, Vienna (Austria); University of Vienna, Core Facility for Micro-Computed Tomography, Vienna (Austria); Pospischek, B.; Winter, E.; Patzak, B. [Museum of Natural History (NHM), Collection of Anatomical Pathology in the Madhouse Tower, Vienna (Austria); Pretterklieber, M. [Medical University of Vienna (MUV), Department of Applied Anatomy, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    Osteomyelitis is an inflammation of the bone marrow mainly caused by bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. It typically affects long bones, e.g. femora, tibiae and humeri. Recently micro-computed tomography (μCT) techniques offer the opportunity to investigate bone micro-architecture in great detail. Since there is no information on long bone microstructure in osteomyelitis, we studied historic bone samples with osteomyelitis by μCT. We investigated 23 femora of 22 individuals suffering from osteomyelitis provided by the Collection of Anatomical Pathology, Museum of Natural History, Vienna (average age 44 ±19 years); 9 femora from body donors made available by the Department of Applied Anatomy, Medical University of Vienna (age range, 56-102 years) were studied as controls. Bone microstructure was assessed by μCT VISCOM X 8060 II with a minimal resolution of 18 μm. In the osteomyelitic femora, most prominent alterations were seen in the cortical compartment. In 71.4 % of the individuals with osteomyelitis, cortical porosity occurred. 57.1 % of the individuals showed cortical thinning. In 42.9 % trabecularisation of cortical bone was observed. Osteomyelitis is associated with severe alterations of cortical bone structure otherwise typically observed at old age such as cortical porosity and cortical thinning. (orig.)

  6. Calcaneal Osteomyelitis due to Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tae-Im; Ha, Seung-A; Choe, Yeo-Reum; Kim, Joo-Sup; Kwon, Kye-Won

    2016-02-01

    Osteomyelitis is a bone infection caused by bacteria or other germs. Gram-positive cocci are the most common etiological organisms of calcaneal osteomyelitis; whereas, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are rarely documented. We reported a case of NTM calcaneal osteomyelitis in a 51-year-old female patient. She had been previously treated in many local clinics with multiple local steroid injection over 50 times and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy over 20 times with the impression of plantar fasciitis for 3 years prior. Diagnostic workup revealed a calcaneal osteomyelitis and polymerase chain reaction assay on bone aspirate specimens confirmed the diagnosis of non-tuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis. The patient had a partial calcanectomy with antitubercular therapy. Six months after surgery, a follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed localized chronic osteomyelitis with abscess formation. We continued anti-tubercular therapy without operation. At 18-month follow-up after surgery and comprehensive rehabilitation therapy, she was ambulating normally and able to carry out her daily activities without any discomfort. PMID:26949685

  7. Synergistic effects of sulbactam in multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Temocin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acinetobacter baumannii is a frequently isolated etiologic agent of nosocomial infections, especially in intensive care units. With the increase in multi-drug resistance of A. baumannii isolates, finding appropriate treatment alternatives for infections caused by these bacteria has become more difficult, and available alternate treatments include the use of older antibiotics such as colistin or a combination of antibiotics. The current study aimed to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of various antibiotic combinations against multi-drug resistant A. baumannii strains. Thirty multi-drug and carbapenem resistant A. baumannii strains isolated at the Ankara Training and Research Hospital between June 2011 and June 2012 were used in the study. Antibiotic susceptibility tests and species-level identification were performed using conventional methods and the VITEK 2 system. The effects of meropenem, ciprofloxacin, amikacin, tigecycline, and colistin alone and in combination with sulbactam against the isolates were studied using Etest (bioMérieux in Mueller-Hinton agar medium. Fractional inhibitory concentration index (FIC was used to determine the efficacy of the various combinations. While all combinations showed a predominant indifferent effect, a synergistic effect was also observed in 4 of the 5 combinations. Synergy was demonstrated in 43% of the isolates with the meropenem-sulbactam combination, in 27% of the isolates with tigecycline-sulbactam, and in 17% of the isolates with colistin-sulbactam and amikacin-sulbactam. No synergy was detected with the sulbactam-ciprofloxacin combination and antagonism was detected only in the sulbactam-colistin combination (6.66% of the isolates. Antibiotic combinations can be used as an alternative treatment approach in multi-drug resistant A. baumannii infections.

  8. Contribution of Acinetobacter-derived cephalosporinase-30 to sulbactam resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii

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    Shu-Chen eKuo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The sulbactam resistance rate in Acinetobacter baumannii has increased worldwide. Previous reports have shown that the β-lactamase blaTEM-1 confers resistance to sulbactam in A. baumannii. The purpose of this study was to examine whether other β-lactamases including, the Acinetobacter-derived cephalosporinase (ADC, OXA-23, OXA-24/72, and OXA-58 families, also contribute to sulbactam resistance in A. baumannii. The correlation between these β-lactamases and the sulbactam minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined using A. baumannii clinical isolates from diverse clonality, which were collected in a nationwide surveillance program from 2002 to 2010 in Taiwan. A possible association between the genetic structure of ISAba1-blaADC-30 and sulbactam resistance was observed because this genetic structure was detected in 97% of sulbactam-resistant strains compared with 10% of sulbactam-susceptible strains. Transformation of ISAba1-blaADC-30 into susceptible strains increased the sulbactam MIC from 2 to 32 μg/ml, which required blaADC-30 overexpression using an upstream promoter in ISAba1. Flow cytometry showed that ADC-30 production increased in response to sulbactam, ticarcillin, and ceftazidime treatment. This effect was regulated at the RNA level but not by an increase in the blaADC-30 gene copy number as indicated by quantitative PCR. Purified ADC-30 decreased the inhibitory zone created by sulbactam or ceftazidime, similarly to TEM-1. In conclusion, ADC-30 overexpression conferred resistance to sulbactam in diverse clinical A. baumannii isolates.

  9. Acinetobacter baumannii in intensive care unit: A novel system to study clonal relationship among the isolates

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    Leonardis Francesca

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nosocomial infections surveillance system must be strongly effective especially in highly critic areas, such as Intensive Care Units (ICU. These areas are frequently an epidemiological epicentre for transmission of multi-resistant pathogens, like Acinetobacter baumannii. As an epidemic outbreak occurs it is very important to confirm or exclude the genetic relationship among the isolates in a short time. There are several molecular typing systems used with this aim. The Repetitive sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR has been recognized as an effective method and it was recently adapted to an automated format known as the DiversiLab system. Methods In the present study we have evaluated the combination of a newly introduced software package for the control of hospital infection (VIGI@ct with the DiversiLab system. In order to evaluate the reliability of the DiversiLab its results were also compared with those obtained using f-AFLP. Results The combination of VIGI@ct and DiversiLab enabled an earlier identification of an A. baumannii epidemic cluster, through the confirmation of the genetic relationship among the isolates. This cluster regards 56 multi-drug-resistant A. baumannii isolates from several specimens collected from 13 different patients admitted to the ICU in a ten month period. The A. baumannii isolates were clonally related being their similarity included between 97 and 100%. The results of the DiversiLab were confirmed by f-AFLP analysis. Conclusion The early identification of the outbreak has led to the prompt application of operative procedures and precautions to avoid the spread of pathogen. To date, 6 months after the last A. baumannii isolate, no other related case has been identified.

  10. Emergence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii producing OXA-23 Carbapenemase in Qatar

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    J.-M. Rolain

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to describe the molecular support of carbapenem resistance from randomly selected clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant (MDR Acinetobacter baumannii as a pilot study from the Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC, Qatar. Results of our report will be used to study carbapenemases using molecular techniques in all isolated MDR A. baumannii. Forty-eight MDR A. baumannii were randomly selected from isolates preserved at HMC. Identification of all isolates was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Antibiotic resistance was tested phenotypically by Phoenix and confirmed by Etest. The molecular support of carbapenemases (blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24, blaOXA-58, blaNDM was investigated by real-time PCR. The epidemiologic relatedness of the isolates was verified by phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of CsuE and blaOXA-51 genes. All 48 isolates were identified as A. baumannii and were confirmed to be resistant to most antibiotics, especially meropenem, imipenems, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, amikacin, gentamicin and most of the β-lactams; they were sensitive to colistin. All the isolates were positive for blaOXA-23 and negative for the other tested carbapenemase genes. Clonality analysis demonstrated that different lineages were actually circulating in Qatar; and we suggest that an outbreak occurred in the medical intensive care unit of HMC between 2011 and 2012. Here we report the emergence of MDR A. baumannii producing the carbapenemase OXA-23 in Qatar.

  11. Immunization against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii effectively protects mice in both pneumonia and sepsis models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Huang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Acinetobacter baumannii is considered the prototypical example of a multi- or pan- drug-resistant bacterium. It has been increasingly implicated as a major cause of nosocomial and community-associated infections. This study proposed to evaluate the efficacy of immunological approaches to prevent and treat A. baumannii infections. METHODS: Mice were immunized with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs prepared from a clinically isolated multidrug-resistant strain of A. baumannii. Pneumonia and sepsis models were used to evaluate the efficacy of active and passive immunization with OMVs. The probable effective mechanisms and the protective potential of clonally distinct clinical isolates were investigated in vitro using an opsonophagocytic assay. RESULTS: Intramuscular immunization with OMVs rapidly produced high levels of OMV-specific IgG antibodies, and subsequent intranasal challenge with A. baumannii elicited mucosal IgA and IgG responses. Both active and passive immunization protected the mice from challenges with homologue bacteria in a sepsis model. Bacterial burden in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF, lung, and spleen, inflammatory cell infiltration in BALF and lung, and inflammatory cytokine accumulation in BALF was significantly suppressed in the pneumonia model by both active and passive immunization strategies. The antisera from immunized mice presented with significant opsonophagocytic activities in a dose-dependent manner against not only homologous strains but also five of the other six clonally distinct clinical isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Utilizing immunological characteristics of outer membrane proteins to elevate protective immunity and circumvent complex multidrug-resistance mechanisms might be a viable approach to effectively control A. baumannii infections.

  12. Deforming mandibular osteomyelitis in a cow caused by Trueperella pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Antas Caffaro

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study reports an unusual case of deforming mandibular osteomyelitis in a cow caused by Trueperella (Arcanobacterium pyogenes, on the face of the ventrolateral caudal portion of the right branch of the mandible. Fragment aspired of lesion by fine needle allowed cytological characterization, isolation and identification of T. pyogenes. Radiographic examination showed marked periosteal reaction in the right mandible, numerous lytic areas and cortical bone destruction. Despite of treatment based on in vitro antimicrobial sensitivity test, it was recommended the euthanasia due to progressive worsening of the cow's condition. Multiple abscesses were observed in the mandibular region at necropsy. Pyogranuloma was characterized in histological exam. Sampled material collected from the lesion after necropsy resulted in microbiological reisolation of T. pyogenes

  13. Severe maxillary osteomyelitis in a Gray Wolf (Canis lupus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber-Meyer, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Dental injuries to or abnormalities in functionally important teeth and associated bones in predators may significantly reduce the ability to kill and consume prey (Lazar et al. 2009). This impairment is likely exacerbated in coursing predators, such as Gray Wolves, that bite and hold onto fleeing and kicking prey with their teeth. Damage to carnassials (upper fourth premolar, P4, and lower first molar, M1) and associated bones in Gray Wolves may especially inhibit the consumption of prey because these teeth slice meat and crush bone. Here I report maxillary osteomyelitis involving the carnassials in a wild Gray Wolf from northeastern Minnesota of such severity that I hypothesize it ultimately caused the Gray Wolf to starve to death.

  14. Osteomyelitis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar derby in boa constrictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Suyene O; Casagrande, Renata A; Guerra, Priscila R; Cruz, Cláudio E F; Veit, Evandro; Cardoso, Marisa R I; Driemeier, David

    2014-09-01

    After demonstrating chronic weight loss, prostration, and muscle flaccidness, a captive-bred 9-mo-old boa constrictor (Boa constrictor constrictor) died and was submitted for necropsy. Along the spinal column there were multiple, yellowish white, macroscopic nodules of 1-5 mm in diameter in the ventral side of the vertebral body and in the intervertebral spaces. Severe multifocal necrotizing osteomyelitis associated with granulomatous inflammation was the main histologic finding in the vertebral column. In the liver, there was discrete but similar granulomatous changes. Positive anti-Salmonella immunostaining was observed in the spinal column and in the liver. Salmonella enterica serovar Derby was isolated from fragments of the spinal column. These bacteria are important cause of disease in captive reptiles. PMID:25314834

  15. Skull Base Osteomyelitis in the Emergency Department: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Burak Sayhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Skull base osteomyelitis (SBO is a rare clinical presentation and usually occurs as a complication of trauma or sinusitis. A 5-year-old child presented to the emergency department with a three-week history of fever associated with drowsiness and left parietal headache, and a week's history of swelling on the left frontoparietal soft tissue. He had suffered a penetrating scalp injury four month ago. On physical examination, there was a tender swelling with purulent stream on the lateral half of his scalp. His vital signs are within normal limits. Plain X-ray of the skull showed a lytic lesion on the left frontoparietal bone. A cranial computed tomography (CT scan demonstrated a large subgaleal abscess at the left frontoparietal region. SBO possesses a high morbidity and mortality; therefore, prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment are mandatory to prevent further complications and to reduce morbidity and mortality significantly.

  16. MR imaging detection of early periostitis in acute experimental osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on thirty cases of acute experimental Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in New Zealand white rabbits imaged with MR imaging, unenhanced CT, and plain film radiography (PFR) 4 days following infection. Periostitis was histologically present in 26 cases. Periosteal reaction was demonstrated by PFR and CT in 20 (77%) of cases each. Periosteal new bone formation present histologically in 22 cases accounts for this finding. MR imaging depicted the ossification in the elevated periosteum in 19 cases. However, evidence of periostitis was demonstrated by MR imaging in all 26 cases (100%). The sensitivities of MR imaging, CT, and PFR were 100%, 77%, and 77%, respectively; the specificities, 85%, 100%, and 100%; and the accuracies, 95%, 85%, and 85%

  17. Osteomyelitis: A rare complication of pancreatitis and PPP-syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenhan, Ronny; Reimers, Niklas; Probst, Axel

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic diseases can be accompanied by periarthritis with bone necrosis and panniculitis (PPP-syndrome). It is postulated that this is caused by systemic activity of pancreatic enzymes leading to microcirculatory disturbances and fat necrosis. The morbidity and mortality of the PPP-syndrome is high. Successful treatment of pancreatitis can lead to resolution of accompanying panniculitis and periarthritis without adverse sequelae, but weeks or months after pancreatitis, asymptomatic necrosis of the bone may become symptomatic by fracturing spontaneously. In this report, we also describe osteomyelitis as a severe septic complication of bone necrosis caused by pancreatitis, in one case as acute tissue necrosis and in another case months after pancreatitis spread haematogenously. PMID:26471414

  18. Endogenous Candida endophthalmitis and osteomyelitis associated with CARD9 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nicholas; Garcez, Tomaz; Newman, William; Denning, David

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman presented with unilateral red eye and visual blur, and was found to have panuveitis with an inflammatory white mass at the macula, initially presumed to be Toxoplasma retinitis. After failure to respond, she underwent vitrectomy, which produced Candida albicans. Despite intraocular and systemic antifungal treatment, she lost all vision in that eye. Two years later, she developed unilateral hip osteomyelitis leading to total hip replacement and also revealing Candida infection. By clinical exome sequencing, she was then found to have caspase recruitment domain 9 (CARD9) deficiency, an autosomal recessive disorder that causes a specific susceptibility to candidal infections. She remains otherwise well but on lifelong fluconazole prophylaxis. PMID:26941346

  19. Antibiogram of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from clinical specimens at King Hussein Medical Centre, Jordan: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batarseh, A; Al-Sarhan, A; Maayteh, M; Al-Khatirei, S; Alarmouti, M

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and the local antibiogram of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in Al-Hussein Hospital at King Hussein Medical Centre in Amman, Jordan. In a retrospective study from January to December 2013, data on 116 non-repetitive positive clinical samples were retrieved from patients' laboratory records. The resistance rates of A. baumannii isolates were high for ceftriaxone, cefotaxime and ticarcillin (100%), ceftazidime, cefepime and piperacillin (98.3%), imipenem (97.4%), piperacillin/tazobactam (96.6%), quinolones (94.8%), ampicillin/sulbactam (89.7%), gentamicin, (87.9%), tobramycin and tetracycline (76.7%) and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (75.9%), but lower for minocycline (26.7%) and colistin (1.7%). A. baumannii in our hospital were highly resistant to all antibiotics, including tigecycline, except for minocycline and colistin which are considered the last resort treatment for multidrug-resistant A. baumannii. PMID:26857720

  20. Abrp, a new gene, confers reduced susceptibility to tetracycline, glycylcine, chloramphenicol and fosfomycin classes in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Quan, J; Yang, Y; Ji, J; Liu, L; Fu, Y; Hua, X; Chen, Y; Pi, B; Jiang, Y; Yu, Y

    2016-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a non-fermenting gram-negative coccobacillus, is a major pathogen responsible for a variety of healthcare-associated infections, including pneumonia, urinary tract and bloodstream infections. Moreover, A. baumannii is associated with alarming increases in drug resistance rates to almost all available antibiotics leaving limited treatment options. Here, we characterize the biological functions of a novel gene, abrp, which encodes a peptidase C13 family. We demonstrate that the abrp is associated with decreased susceptibility to tetracycline, minocycline, doxycycline, tigecycline, chloramphenicol and fosfomycin. Deletion of abrp was able to increase cell membrane permeability and display slower cell growth rate. Results from the present study show that abrp plays an important role in conferring reduced susceptibility to different classes of antibiotics and cell growth in A. baumannii. The change of antibiotic sensitivities may result from modifications to the cell membrane permeability of A. baumannii. PMID:27220329

  1. Streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis: multiple faces of the same disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, O; Roset, A; Sobrino, B; Lora-Tamayo, J; Verdaguer, R; Jiménez-Mejias, E; Nolla, J M; Colmenero, J de D; Ariza, J

    2014-01-01

    The role of Streptococcus species as an aetiological microorganism of vertebral osteomyelitis (VO) is considered to be of little relevance. We aimed to describe a large number of cases of streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis (SVO), to analyze the clinical features associated with different Streptococcus species, and to compare them with a cohort of patients with VO caused by Staphylococcus aureus. An incidence study and a retrospective, multicenter, observational clinical study of cases of SVO (1991-2011) were performed. Statistical comparison of SVO by different species and between them and staphylococcal VO was carried out. Over the whole period there was an increasing incidence in the number of VOs and SVOs per year (p <0.05). Among 58 cases of SVO, those caused by non-viridans streptococcus (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus pyogenes; n = 26) mimicked VO by S. aureus, and presented with more fever, neurological symptoms and paravertebral abscesses in comparison with those caused by the viridans group (remaining species). In contrast, the latter have a sub-acute clinical picture and were associated with the presence of endocarditis (p <0.05). Among non-viridans SVOs, concomitant infection was specifically related to S. pneumoniae (p <0.05). In conclusion, SVO presents a wide range of clinical patterns. The relationship between VO and diagnosis of endocarditis was established with SVO caused by the viridans group. Whereas non-viridans SVO mimics acute characteristics of VO caused by S. aureus, cases of viridans SVO are significantly more likely to have a sub-acute clinical presentation. The increased incidence of SVO during the last decades could support a new epidemiological scenario. PMID:23889700

  2. Activities of colistin- and minocycline-based combinations against extensive drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from intensive care unit patients

    OpenAIRE

    Li Jian; Zhu De-mei; Huang Jun; Liu Xiao-fang; Liang Wang; Zhang Jing

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Extensive drug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii is a serious problem in the clinical setting. It is therefore important to find active antibiotic combinations that could be effective in the treatment of infections caused by this problematic 'superbug'. In this study, we analyzed the in vitro activities of three colistin-based combinations and a minocycline-based combination against clinically isolated extensive drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDR-AB) strains. ...

  3. Pyocyanin stimulates quorum sensing-mediated tolerance to oxidative stress and increases persister cell populations in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Nidhi; Sharma, Prince; Capalash, Neena

    2014-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are nosocomial pathogens with overlapping sites of infection. This work reports that the two can coexist stably in mixed-culture biofilms. In a study intended to improve our understanding of the mechanism of their coexistence, it was found that pyocyanin, produced by P. aeruginosa that generally eliminates competition from other pathogens, led to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A. baumannii cells, which in response showed a significant (P ≤ 0.05) increase in production of enzymes, specifically, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD). This work shows for the first time that the expression of catalase and SOD is under the control of a quorum-sensing system in A. baumannii. In support of this observation, a quorum-sensing mutant of A. baumannii (abaI::Km) was found to be sensitive to pyocyanin compared to its wild type and showed significantly (P ≤ 0.001) lower levels of the antioxidant enzymes, which increased on addition of 5 μM N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. Likewise, in wild-type A. baumannii, there was a significant (P quencher of quorum sensing. In the presence of amikacin and carbenicillin, A. baumannii formed 0.07 and 0.02% persister cells, which increased 4- and 3-fold, respectively, in the presence of pyocyanin. These findings show that pyocyanin induces a protective mechanism in A. baumannii against oxidative stress and also increases its persistence against antibiotics which could be of clinical significance in the case of coinfections with A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa. PMID:24891106

  4. Assessment of Biofilm Formation and Resistance to Imipenem and Ciprofloxacin among Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii in Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    Abdi-Ali, Ahya; Hendiani, Saghar; Mohammadi, Parisa; Gharavi, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Biofilms are communities of bacteria attached to the surfaces in an extracellular polymeric matrix which are associated with many chronic infections in humans. Acinetobacter spp. are emerging as a major cause of nosocomial infections and Acinetobacter baumannii is the predominant species associated with this kind of infections. Objectives: In the present study, the potential of biofilm formation of clinical isolates, A. baumannii, was assessed by using crystal violet method. Furth...

  5. Antibacterial Effects of Origanum vulgare Essence Against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated From Selected Hospitals of Tehran, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Saghi; Bahador; Khaledi; Ataee Kachoei; Amiri Dastjerdi; Esmaeili

    2015-01-01

    Background Infection due to Acinetobacter baumannii has become a significant challenge to modern healthcare systems. The rapid emergence and global dissemination of A. baumannii as a major nosocomial pathogen is remarkable and it demonstrates its successful adaptation to the 21st century hospital environment. Recent studies have discussed about essential oil of Origanum vulgare against a range of bacteria, including various species of Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Esc...

  6. Prevalence and Characterization of Integrons in Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Eastern China: A Multiple-Hospital Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Chen; Hong Li; Jinsong Yang; Rong Zhan; Aiping Chen; Yansheng Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this multiple-hospital study was to investigate the prevalence of integrons in multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) in Eastern China, and characterize the integron-integrase genes, so as to provide evidence for the management and appropriate antibiotic use of MDRAB infections. Methods: A total of 425 clinical isolates of A. baumannii were collected from 16 tertiary hospitals in 11 cities of four provinces (Fujian, Jiangsu, Zhejiang and Shandong) from Janua...

  7. Molecular Identification and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated From Nosocomial Infections of a Teaching Hospital in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazeli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Multidrug resistant (MDR and extensively drug resistant (XDR Acinetobacter baumannii are among important causes of nosocomial infections and cause therapeutic problems worldwide. The emergence of extensively drug-resistant A. baumannii (XDRAB cause serious threats to hospital acquired infections (HAI worldwide and further limit the treatment options. Objectives The current study aimed to identify and isolate the MDR and XDR Acinetobacter baumannii from different wards of a teaching hospital in Isfahan, Iran, and determine the susceptibility pattern of these bacteria. Materials and Methods One hundred and twenty one (121 isolates of A. baumannii collected from a teaching hospital in Isfahan, Iran, within eight months (between September 2013 and April 2014 were included in the current study. The samples were isolated from different wards and different specimens. To confirm the species of A. baumannii, Polymerase chain reaction (PCRwas conducted to identify blaoxa-51 gene. Disk diffusion method was employed to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility against cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, ampicillin-sulbactam, cefepime, meropenem, tobramycin, amikacin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim- sulfamethoxazole, and aztreonam. Results Among the 121 isolated A. baumannii, 44% and 56% were isolated from female and male, respectively. Samples cultured from the trachea (36%, urine (15%, blood (10%, wound (10%, cerebrospinal fluid (7%, bronchial (4% and the others (18%. Most of the isolates (50% were obtained from intensive care unit (ICU. Isolated A. baumannii showed high resistance to the evaluated antibiotics except ampicillin-sulbactam, which showed only 33.9% resistance. Also, 62.8% and 100% of the isolates were identified as XDR and MDR. Conclusions The result of the current study showed the growing number of nosocomial infections associated with XDR A. baumannii causing difficulties in antibiotic therapy. Resistant strains increasingly cause

  8. Dissemination of multiple carbapenem-resistant clones of Acinetobacter baumannii in the Eastern District of Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Sultan, Abdulrahman A.; Evans, Benjamin A.; Aboulmagd, Elsayed; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A; Bohol, Marie Fe F.; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N.; Opazo, Andres F.; Amyes, Sebastian G. B.

    2015-01-01

    It has previously been shown that carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii are frequently detected in Saudi Arabia. The present study aimed to identify the epidemiology and distribution of antibiotic resistance determinants in these bacteria. A total of 83 A. baumannii isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and screened by PCR for carbapenemase genes and insertion sequences. Antibiotic sensitivity to imipenem, meropenem, tigecycline, and colistin were determined. ...

  9. First report of an OXA-23 carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate related to Tn2006 in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinal, P; Macià, M D; Roca, I; Gato, E; Ruíz, E; Fernández-Cuenca, F; Oliver, A; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Bou, G; Tomás, M; Vila, J

    2013-01-01

    A carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolate belonging to European clone II and sequence type 2 was recovered from a patient in the Son Espases hospital in Mallorca, Spain. Genetic analysis showed the presence of the bla(OXA-23) gene in association with the widely disseminated transposon Tn2006. This is the first reported identification of A. baumannii carrying bla(OXA-23) in Spain. PMID:23070166

  10. Intravesical colistin irrigation to treat multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii urinary tract infection: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Volkow-Fernández Patricia; Rodríguez Cecilia Franco; Cornejo-Juárez Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacteria and a significant nosocomial pathogen in hospitals. Multidrug-resistant A. baumannii have emerged as a cause of nosocomial infections in critically ill patients. This microorganism has the ability to produce biofilms on different surfaces, which could explain their ability to persist in clinical environments and their role in device-related infections. Case presentation We present the case of a 33-year-old Hispanic man ...

  11. Contribution of Efflux Pumps, Porins, and B-Lactamases to Multidrug Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Rumbo, C.; Gato, E.; López, M.; Ruiz de Alegría, C.; Fernández-Cuenca, F.; Martínez-Martínez, L.; Vila, J.; Pachón, J.; J. M. Cisneros; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; A. Pascual; Bou,G.; Tomás, M.

    2013-01-01

    Weinvestigated the mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, glycylcyclines, tetracyclines, and quinolones in 90 multiresistant clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from two genetically unrelated A. baumannii clones: clone PFGEROC- 1 (53 strains producing the OXA-58B-lactamase enzyme and 18 strains with the OXA-24B-lactamase) and clone PFGE-HUI-1 (19 strains susceptible to carbapenems).Weused real-time reverse transcriptase PCR to correlate antimicrobi...

  12. Colistin and Fusidic Acid, a Novel Potent Synergistic Combination for Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Phee, Lynette M.; Betts, Jonathan W.; Bharathan, Binutha; Wareham, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) has led to the renaissance of colistin (COL), often the only agent to which MDRAB remains susceptible. Effective therapy with COL is beset with problems due to unpredictable pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and the rapid selection of resistance. Here, we describe a potent synergistic interaction when COL was combined with fusidic acid (FD) against A. baumannii. Synergy in vitro was assessed against 11 MDRAB isolates using disc diffu...

  13. Immunization with a 22-kDa outer membrane protein elicits protective immunity to multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Weiwei Huang; Yufeng Yao; Shijie Wang; Ye Xia; Xu Yang; Qiong Long; Wenjia Sun; Cunbao Liu; Yang Li; Xiaojie Chu; Hongmei Bai; Yueting Yao; Yanbing Ma

    2016-01-01

    A. baumannii infections are becoming more and more serious health issues with rapid emerging of multidrug and extremely drug resistant strains, and therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of nonantibiotic-based intervention strategies. This study aimed at identifying whether an outer membrane protein with molecular weight of about 22 kDa (Omp22) holds the potentials to be an efficient vaccine candidate and combat A. baumannii infection. Omp22 which has a molecule length of 217 ...

  14. Effect of colistin exposure and growth phase on the surface properties of live Acinetobacter baumannii cells examined by atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Soon, Rachel L; Nation, Roger L; Harper, Marina; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D.; Tan, Chun-Hong; Jian LI; Larson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    The diminishing antimicrobial development pipeline has forced the revival of colistin as a last line of defence against infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative ‘superbugs’ such as Acinetobacter baumannii. The complete loss of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediates colistin resistance in some A. baumannii strains. Atomic force microscopy was used to examine the surface properties of colistin-susceptible and -resistant A. baumannii strains at mid-logarithmic and stationary growth phas...

  15. Synergistic Activity of Colistin and Rifampin Combination against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in an In Vitro Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hee Ji; Bergen, Phillip J.; Bulitta, Jurgen B.; Tsuji, Brian; Forrest, Alan; Nation, Roger L; Jian LI

    2013-01-01

    Combination therapy may be required for multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. This study systematically investigated bacterial killing and emergence of colistin resistance with colistin and rifampin combinations against MDR A. baumannii. Studies were conducted over 72 h in an in vitro pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) model at inocula of ∼106 and ∼108 CFU/ml using two MDR clinical isolates of A. baumannii, FADDI-AB030 (colistin susceptible) and FADDI-AB156 (colistin resis...

  16. Triclosan Can Select for an AdeIJK-Overexpressing Mutant of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978 That Displays Reduced Susceptibility to Multiple Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando, Dinesh M.; Xu, Wayne; Loewen, Peter C.; Zhanel, George G; Kumar, Ayush

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine if triclosan can select for mutants of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978 that display reduced susceptibilities to antibiotics, we isolated a triclosan-resistant mutant, A. baumannii AB042, by serial passaging of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 in growth medium supplemented with triclosan. The antimicrobial susceptibility of AB042 was analyzed by the 2-fold serial dilution method. Expression of five different resistance-nodulation-division (RND) pump-encoding genes (adeB, adeG, ...

  17. Diversity of Acinetobacter baumannii in four French military hospitals, as assessed by multiple locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolande Hauck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infections by A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii (ACB complex isolates represent a serious threat for wounded and burn patients. Three international multidrug-resistant (MDR clones (EU clone I-III are responsible for a large proportion of nosocomial infections with A. baumannii but other emerging strains with high epidemic potential also occur. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We automatized a Multiple locus variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR analysis (MLVA protocol and used it to investigate the genetic diversity of 136 ACB isolates from four military hospitals and one childrens hospital. Acinetobacter sp other than baumannii isolates represented 22.6% (31/137 with a majority being A. pittii. The genotyping protocol designed for A.baumannii was also efficient to cluster A. pittii isolates. Fifty-five percent of A. baumannii isolates belonged to the two international clones I and II, and we identified new clones which members were found in the different hospitals. Analysis of two CRISPR-cas systems helped define two clonal complexes and provided phylogenetic information to help trace back their emergence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The increasing occurrence of A. baumannii infections in the hospital calls for measures to rapidly characterize the isolates and identify emerging clones. The automatized MLVA protocol can be the instrument for such surveys. In addition, the investigation of CRISPR/cas systems may give important keys to understand the evolution of some highly successful clonal complexes.

  18. Early detection of metallo-β-lactamase NDM-1- and OXA-23 carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii in Libyan hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathlouthi, Najla; El Salabi, Allaaeddin Ali; Ben Jomàa-Jemili, Mariem; Bakour, Sofiane; Al-Bayssari, Charbel; Zorgani, Abdulaziz A; Kraiema, Abdulmajeed; Elahmer, Omar; Okdah, Liliane; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Chouchani, Chedly

    2016-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen causing various nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to characterise the molecular support of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii clinical isolates recovered from two Libyan hospitals. Bacterial isolates were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion and Etest methods, and carbapenem resistance determinants were studied by PCR amplification and sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed for typing of the isolates. All 36 imipenem-resistant isolates tested were identified as A. baumannii. The blaOXA-23 gene was detected in 29 strains (80.6%). The metallo-β-lactamase blaNDM-1 gene was detected in eight isolates (22.2%), showing dissemination of multidrug-resistant (MDR) A. baumannii in Tripoli Medical Center and Burn and Plastic Surgery Hospital in Libya, including one isolate that co-expressed the blaOXA-23 gene. MLST revealed several sequence types (STs). Imipenem-resistant A. baumannii ST2 was the predominant clone (16/36; 44.4%). This study shows that NDM-1 and OXA-23 contribute to antibiotic resistance in Libyan hospitals and represents the first incidence of the association of these two carbapenemases in an autochthonous MDR A. baumannii isolated from patients in Libya, indicating that there is a longstanding infection control problem in these hospitals. PMID:27216382

  19. Complete genome sequence of Acinetobacter baumannii XH386 (ST208, a multi-drug resistant bacteria isolated from pediatric hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youhong Fang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an important bacterium that emerged as a significant nosocomial pathogen worldwide. The rise of A. baumannii was due to its multi-drug resistance (MDR, while it was difficult to treat multi-drug resistant A. baumannii with antibiotics, especially in pediatric patients for the therapeutic options with antibiotics were quite limited in pediatric patients. A. baumannii ST208 was identified as predominant sequence type of carbapenem resistant A. baumannii in the United States and China. As we knew, there was no complete genome sequence reproted for A. baumannii ST208, although several whole genome shotgun sequences had been reported. Here, we sequenced the 4087-kilobase (kb chromosome and 112-kb plasmid of A. baumannii XH386 (ST208, which was isolated from a pediatric hospital in China. The genome of A. baumannii XH386 contained 3968 protein-coding genes and 94 RNA-only encoding genes. Genomic analysis and Minimum inhibitory concentration assay showed that A. baumannii XH386 was multi-drug resistant strain, which showed resistance to most of antibiotics, except for tigecycline. The data may be accessed via the GenBank accession number CP010779 and CP010780.

  20. Osteomyelitis of a long bone due to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Actinomyces meyeri in an immunocompetent adult: A case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Min; Ha Young; Park Hye; Lee Jun; Lee Yoon; Sung Ki; Kang Cheol-In; Chung Doo; Song Jae-Hoon; Peck Kyong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Fusobacterium species are uncommon causes of osteomyelitis. These organisms are normal flora of the oral cavity. Therefore, they mostly cause osteomyelitis of the head and neck. Hematogenous osteomyelitis at distant sites other than the head and neck has rarely been reported in pediatric or immunocompromised patients. Here, we report the first case of osteomyelitis of a long bone combined with a muscle abscess due to Fusobacterium nucleatum in an otherwise healthy adult. C...

  1. Systematic approach to treat chronic osteomyelitis through localized drug delivery system: Bench to bed side

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic osteomyelitis is a challenging setback to the orthopedic surgeons in deciding an optimal therapeutic strategy. Conversely, patients feel frustrated of the therapeutic outcomes and development of adverse drug effects, if any. Present investigation deals with extensive approach incorporating in vivo animal experimentation and human application to treat chronic osteomyelitis, using antibiotic loaded porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Micro- to macro-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds impregnated with antibiotic ceftriaxone–sulbactam sodium (CFS) were fabricated and subsequently evaluated by in vivo animal model after developing osteomyelitis in rabbit tibia. Finally 10 nos. of human osteomyelitis patients involving long bone and mandible were studied for histopathology, radiology, pus culture, 3D CT etc. up to 8–18 months post-operatively. It was established up to animal trial stage that 50N50H samples [with 50–55% porosity, average pore size 110 μm, higher interconnectivity (10–100 μm), and moderately high drug adsorption efficiency (50%)] showed efficient drug release up to 42 days than parenteral group based on infection eradication and new bone formation. In vivo human bone showed gradual evidence of new bone formation and fracture union with organized callus without recurrence of infection even after 8 months. This may be a new, alternative, cost effective and ideal therapeutic strategy for chronic osteomyelitis treatment in human patients. - Highlights: • Chronic osteomyelitis is challenging setback to decide optimal therapeutic strategy. • Micro- to macro-porous antibiotic CFS impregnated HAp scaffolds were fabricated. • Complete in vivo animal trial done after developing osteomyelitis in rabbit tibia. • Clinical trial showed fracture union without recurrence of infection after 8 months. • This may be a new, alternative, cost effective and ideal therapeutic strategy

  2. Systematic approach to treat chronic osteomyelitis through localized drug delivery system: Bench to bed side

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Rupnarayan [Department of Plastic Surgery, R. G. Kar Medical College and Hospital (RGKMCH), Kolkata 700004 (India); Kundu, Biswanath, E-mail: biswa_kundu@rediffmail.com [Biocermics and Coating Division, CSIR — Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CSIR-CGCRI), Kolkata 700032 (India); Nandi, Samit Kumar, E-mail: samitnandi1967@gmail.com [Department of Veterinary Surgery and Radiology, West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences (WBUAFS), Kolkata 700037 (India); Basu, Debabrata [Biocermics and Coating Division, CSIR — Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CSIR-CGCRI), Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Chronic osteomyelitis is a challenging setback to the orthopedic surgeons in deciding an optimal therapeutic strategy. Conversely, patients feel frustrated of the therapeutic outcomes and development of adverse drug effects, if any. Present investigation deals with extensive approach incorporating in vivo animal experimentation and human application to treat chronic osteomyelitis, using antibiotic loaded porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Micro- to macro-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds impregnated with antibiotic ceftriaxone–sulbactam sodium (CFS) were fabricated and subsequently evaluated by in vivo animal model after developing osteomyelitis in rabbit tibia. Finally 10 nos. of human osteomyelitis patients involving long bone and mandible were studied for histopathology, radiology, pus culture, 3D CT etc. up to 8–18 months post-operatively. It was established up to animal trial stage that 50N50H samples [with 50–55% porosity, average pore size 110 μm, higher interconnectivity (10–100 μm), and moderately high drug adsorption efficiency (50%)] showed efficient drug release up to 42 days than parenteral group based on infection eradication and new bone formation. In vivo human bone showed gradual evidence of new bone formation and fracture union with organized callus without recurrence of infection even after 8 months. This may be a new, alternative, cost effective and ideal therapeutic strategy for chronic osteomyelitis treatment in human patients. - Highlights: • Chronic osteomyelitis is challenging setback to decide optimal therapeutic strategy. • Micro- to macro-porous antibiotic CFS impregnated HAp scaffolds were fabricated. • Complete in vivo animal trial done after developing osteomyelitis in rabbit tibia. • Clinical trial showed fracture union without recurrence of infection after 8 months. • This may be a new, alternative, cost effective and ideal therapeutic strategy.

  3. A CLINICO-MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY OF OSTEOMYELITIS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN KARNATAKA

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    Anjana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Bone and joint infections are painful for patients and frustrating for both doctors and patients. Osteomyelitis presents a variety of challenges to the physician. The severity of the disease is staged depending upon the infection’s particular features, including its aetiology, pathogenesis, extent of bone involvement, duration, and host factors. The high success rates of antimicrobial therapy in most infectious diseases have not yet been achieved in bone and joint infections. AIM To determine the microbiological profile and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of organisms isolated from cases of osteomyelitis. METHODS Pus samples were collected for bacterial culture from 90 cases of osteomyelitis between June 2013 and August 2015 and processed in the laboratory. RESULTS Among the 90 patients studied, most of them were men (79, with median age group 30-50 years, affected by chronic osteomyelitis (77% or acute osteomyelitis (22%, with predominant involvement of lower limbs (90.5%. A total of 70 isolates of bacteria were obtained from 90 clinical samples. The most frequently isolated pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus (51.4%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.4%, Enterococcus faecalis (8.5%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis (7%. Susceptibility of gram positive organisms to linezolid, tetracycline, vancomycin and gentamicin was 100%. Gram negative organisms are highly susceptible to aminoglycosides, levofloxacin, piperacillin and tazobactam (87.5%. Four methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus were isolated. CONCLUSION Osteomyelitis remains a serious therapeutic challenge, especially when associated with gram negative bacteria. We emphasize the need to consider these agents in diagnosed cases of osteomyelitis, so that an ideal antimicrobial treatment can be administered since the very beginning of the therapy.

  4. Multiple drug resistant carbapenemases producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates harbours multiple R-plasmids

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    Rajagopalan Saranathan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The nosocomial human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii has high propensity to develop resistance to antimicrobials and to become multidrug resistant (MDR, consequently complicating the treatment. This study was carried out to investigate the presence of resistant plasmids (R-plasmids among the clinical isolates of A. baumannii. In addition, the study was performed to check the presence of common β-lactamases encoding genes on these plasmids. Methods: A total of 55 clinical isolates of A. baumannii were included in the study and all were subjected to plasmid DNA isolation, followed by PCR to check the presence of resistance gene determinants such as blaOXA-23 , blaOXA-51, blaOXA-58 and blaIMP-1 on these plasmids that encode for oxacillinase (OXA and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL type of carbapenemases. Plasmid curing experiments were carried out on selected isolates using ethidium bromide and acridine orange as curing agents and the antibiotic resistance profiles were evaluated before and after curing. Results: All the isolates were identified as A. baumannii by 16SrDNA amplification and sequencing. Plasmid DNA isolated from these isolates showed the occurrence of multiple plasmids with size ranging from 500bp to ≥ 25 kb. The percentage of blaOXA-51 and blaOXA-23 on plasmids were found to be 78 and 42 per cent, respectively and 20 isolates (36% carried blaIMP-1 gene on plasmids. Significant difference was observed in the antibiograms of plasmid cured isolates when compared to their parental ones. The clinical isolates became susceptible to more than two antibiotic classes after curing of plasmids indicating plasmid borne resistance. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study determined the plasmid mediated resistance mechanisms and occurrence of different resistance genes on various plasmids isolated from MDR A. baumannii. The present findings showed the evidence for antibiotic resistance mediated through multiple plasmids in

  5. [Antibiotic resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from clinical specimens in the "Marius Nasta" Pneumology Institute, Bucharest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisoiu, Adriana; Ionită, Monica; Sârbu, Lăcrămioara; Stoica, Corina; Grigoriu, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients who are in critical condition in hospitals and especially in intensive care units (ICU). Long time considered a bacterium with low virulence, A. baumannii has more recently become a cause for major concern in clinical practice due to its high level of antimicrobial resistance. The extend of infections with Acinetobacter baumannii in ICU is caused by multiple factors, such as mechanical ventilation, invasive procedures, the use of a large number of broad spectrum antibiotics and transmission through the hands of medical staff In this study we evaluated the resistance to antibiotics of 213 non-duplicated strains of A. baumannii isolated in the bacteriology laboratory of the "Marius Nasta" lnstitute of Pneumophtisiology (IPMN) from January 2012 to December 2013. These strains originated from patients in medical wards (56), ICU (143) and surgery (14). Strains identification was performed by classical methods on multitest media and with API kits (Bio Merieux). The antibiotic sensitivity was performed on Mueller-Hinton media in accordance with CLSI2013. Analysis of the resistance to antibiotics was the following: carbenicilin (87.3%), ceftriaxone (87.3%), cefoperazone with sulbactam (84.9%), ceftazidime (79.3%), carbapenems (imipenem and/or meropenem--75.1%), fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin and/orlevofloxacin--73.7%), cefepime (66.6%), piperacilin with tazobactam (62.4%), amikacin (50.2%), netilmicin (45%), gentamicin (42.7%) and tobramycin (35.6%). In our study, we only found two strains of Acinetobacter baumannii with resistance to colistin and 70 (32.8%) strains sensitive only to colistin, but resistant to all other antibiotics tested. A. baumannii is a pathogen with rapid spread and extended resistance to even newer antimicrobial agents. Due to its ability to survive in the hospital environment, A. baumannii has the immense potential to cause nosocomial

  6. Temporal Bone Osteomyelitis: The Relationship with Malignant Otitis Externa, the Diagnostic Dilemma, and Changing Trends

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    Jia-Cheng Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-five patients hospitalized for osteomyelitis of the temporal bone between 1990 and 2011 were divided into two study groups: group 1 was patients collected from 1990 to 2001 and group 2 was composed of patients between 2002 and 2011. Clinical diagnostic criteria and epidemiologic data were analyzed to illustrate the altering features of osteomyelitis of the temporal bone. Group 1 patients were characterized by high prevalence of diabetes and more commonly suffered from otalgia, otitis externa and granulation tissue in the external auditory canal and higher positive culture for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Noticeable changing trends were found between both groups, including declining prevalence of diabetes, fewer patients complaining of pain or presenting with otitis externa, and canal granulation, and increased variety of pathogens in group 2. We should highlight the index of clinical suspicion for osteomyelitis of the temporal bone, even in nondiabetic or immunocompetent patients. Painless otorrhea patients were also at risk of osteomyelitis of the temporal bone, especially patients with previous otologic operation. Increased multiplicity of pathogens amplified the difficulty of diagnosis for osteomyelitis of the temporal bone.

  7. Radionuclide imaging of spinal osteomyelitis: prospective comparison of FDG-PET and Ga-SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: MRI is currently recognized as the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis. Radionuclide imaging with 67Ga citrate (Ga) is usually reserved for those situations in which the MRI cannot be performed or is inconclusive. The delay between injection of radiogallium and imaging, typically 48 -72 hours, as well as the unfavorable imaging characteristics of this radionuclide are disadvantages of the procedure. There are data that suggest that 18F-FDG-PET (FDG-PET) imaging may be useful for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis. We are prospectively studying the role of FDG-PET in the diagnosis of spinal osteomyelitis, and comparing it to Ga for this purpose. Materials and Methods: To date, 8 patients, 5 males and 3 females, 44 - 74 years old have undergone Ga-SPECT and FDG-PET imaging within 48 hours of each other. The regions of concern were: cervical spine (n=1), thoracic spine (n=2), and lumbar spine (n=5). Results: Five patients had spinal osteomyelitis; one patient also had an adjacent psoas abscess. Final diagnoses in the 3 remaining patients were degenerative joint disease, soft tissue infection, and chronic demyelinating polyneuropathy. Imaging results are presented. FDG-PET vs Gallium-SPECT. Results of FDG-PET and Ga-SPECT were concordant in all 8 patients. Conclusion: Although further study in a larger population is needed, FDG-PET, which is rapidly completed and has superior image quality, may emerge as the radionuclide imaging procedure of choice for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis

  8. Detection of osteomyelitis using a Tc-99m labeled antigranulocyte antibody immunoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of Tc-99m labeled antigranulocyte antibody immunoscintigraphy in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis and compare with the results of triphasic bone scan. The study population was 39 patients (22 male, 17 female) who had uncertain diagnoses of osteomyelitis. Fifteen patients had history of orthopedic surgery, and 5 had previous fracture. One milligram of monoclonal antibody against NCA-95 was labeled with 370 MBq of Tc-99m, injected intravenously, and 4 hour images were obtained. Triphasic bone scan images were obtained in 30 patients. The final diagnosis was confirmed by bacteriologic culture, biopsy or long term clinical follow up. Twenty one patients were confirmed to have osteomyelitis (1 acute, 20 chronic). Eighteen patients were without osteomyelitis. Antigranulocyte antibody immunoscintigraphy had a sensitivity of 71% (15/21), and a specificity of 89% (16/18), while the sensitivity and specificity of triphasic bone scan was 93% (13/14) and 38% (6/16), respectively. Antigranulocyte antibody scan showed higher specificity of 100% (11/11) in comparison with 33% (3/9) of triphasic bone scan in patients with history of orthopedic surgery or fracture. Antigranulocyte antibody immunoscintigraphy is more specific than that of triphasic bone scan and may be helpful in patients with history of surgery or fracture. However, sensitivity is lower than triphasic bone scan in the detection of chronic osteomyelitis

  9. Intramedullary and extramedullary fat globules on magnetic resonance imaging as a diagnostic sign for osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively studied the frequency of persistent foci of fat signal on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in osteomyelitis to assess its frequency, cause and diagnostic value. The radiographs and MR scans of 100 patients with a final diagnosis of osteomyelitis referred to a specialist orthopaedic oncology service with the presumptive diagnosis of a bone tumour were reviewed. The MR signal and morphological characteristics were recorded with particular attention to the presence of persistent fat signal within the infected area, which was classified as diffuse or focal. Seventeen cases were classified on radiographic grounds as acute, 63 as subacute and 20 as chronic osteomyelitis. In the acute group 12 (70%) showed replacement of the marrow with fluid containing residual fatty signal, diffuse in seven and focal in five cases. Two cases showed predominantly fatty marrow with very early marrow oedema and three cases (18%) showed replacement of marrow fat with fluid and no residual fatty foci. None of the subacute group showed foci of fatty signal and two cases of inactive sclerosing osyeomyelitis in the chronic group showed restoration of normal marrow. Persistent fatty signal within the bone as well as soft tissues on MR imaging is a frequent finding in acute osteomyelitis. Radiological-pathological correlation suggests that the increasing intramedullary pressure leads to septic necrosis with death of the lipocytes and release of free fatty globules. This characteristic, but not pathognomonic, MR finding supports the diagnosis of osteomyelitis and may help to exclude the presence of a tumour. (orig.)

  10. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients: Value of 111In-leukocyte scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The noninvasive diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients with currently available radiologic and radionuclide imaging techniques is often difficult. Recently, 111In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy has been proposed as an attractive alternative. Accordingly, the authors retrospectively reviewed 51 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, 49 technetium-99m bone scans, and 49 plain radiographs obtained in 51 adults with diabetes in whom osteomyelitis of the foot was suspected. The sensitivity and specificity of these techniques were evaluated in all patients, as well as in a subgroup of 11 patients with neuroarthropathy. Results with 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were also examined in subsets of patients with soft-tissue ulcers (n = 35) and those receiving antibiotics during investigation (n = 20). Confirmation or exclusion of osteomyelitis was made surgically in 28 patients and clinically in 23. Fourteen patients had osteomyelitis. Bone scans were most sensitive (93%) but least specific (43%); plain radiographs were most specific (83%) but least sensitive (43%). 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were both sensitive (79%) and specific (78%), and remained useful in patients with neuroarthropathy, soft-tissue ulcers, and antibiotic treatment. Poor spatial resolution contributed to the false-negative and false-positive 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, suggesting that this technique should not be interpreted independent of other tests. 111In-labeled leukocyte scans are a valuable diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis in diabetic patients

  11. Scintigraphic evaluation of chronic osteomyelitis with technetium 99 m labeled polyclonal immunoglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active chronic osteomyelitis or complicating osteomyelitis are difficult to be diagnosed by radiological imaging modalities, such as plain radiograph and CT. They frequently cause increased bone remodeling, leading to nonspecific uptake of Tc 99 m-bone scan agents and gallium-67. New radiopharmaceuticals with greater infection avidity are being developed, including the nonspecific polyclonal immunoglobulin (IgG) labeled with technetium 99 m. Tc 99 m-IgG may be available as a ready to use kit, with no reported side effects, low patient absorbed radiation dose and low cost. Material and Methods: 23 bone segments with suspected active chronic osteomyelitis or violated bone osteomyelitis were studied by Tc 99 m IgG scintigraphy. All patients underwent standard three phase bone scintigraphy using methylene diphosphonate (Tc 99 m MDP), gallium 67 scintigraphy and plain radiographs, compared with clinical evaluation and laboratory tests values. Results: Infection was found in 8 sites. Sensitivity and specificity for Tc-99 m MDP, gallium 67 and Tc 99 m IgG scintigraphy were, respectively, 88 and 36%, 75 and 73%, 88 and 82%. Conclusion: Tc-99 m IgG may be useful in the scintigraphic evaluation of osteomyelitis. (author)

  12. Neglected Foreign Body, the Cause of Navicular Osteomyelitis in A Paediatric Foot: A Case Report

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    Chandrashekara C.M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Foreign body injuries with date thorns, metal and wooden splinters are common in Middle East region, as most of it is desert. Some of the injuries lead to cellulitis or abscess formation, if neglected or improperly managed results in osteomyelitis or septic arthritis of foot structures. This is the first report of isolated navicular osteomyelitis following neglected foreign body in a paediatric foot. Case Report: A 10 year old male patient presented with discharging sinus in left mid-foot 3 years after penetrating injury with wooden splinter. The diagnosis of navicular osteomelitis is confirmed with plain radio-graphs. The ultrasound of foot was done to localize the foreign bodies. Patient was treated with complete removal of foreign body (wooden splinters, surgical debridement and combination of IV and oral cloxacillin for period of 6 weeks. At 18 months follow up, patient had painless foot with no recurrence or collapse of navicular bone. Conclusion: The neglected foreign body can result in osteomyelitis of small bones of foot in pediatric patient. The ultrasound is more useful tool in localizing foreign bodies; those are not radio-opaque. Early and prompt diagnosis with adequate treatment of established osteomyelitis by complete removal of foreign body, curettage and antibiotics can give good results. Keywords: Osteomyelitis; Navicular bone; Foreign body; Paediatric.

  13. Systematic approach to treat chronic osteomyelitis through localized drug delivery system: bench to bed side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Rupnarayan; Kundu, Biswanath; Nandi, Samit Kumar; Basu, Debabrata

    2013-10-01

    Chronic osteomyelitis is a challenging setback to the orthopedic surgeons in deciding an optimal therapeutic strategy. Conversely, patients feel frustrated of the therapeutic outcomes and development of adverse drug effects, if any. Present investigation deals with extensive approach incorporating in vivo animal experimentation and human application to treat chronic osteomyelitis, using antibiotic loaded porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Micro- to macro-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds impregnated with antibiotic ceftriaxone-sulbactam sodium (CFS) were fabricated and subsequently evaluated by in vivo animal model after developing osteomyelitis in rabbit tibia. Finally 10 nos. of human osteomyelitis patients involving long bone and mandible were studied for histopathology, radiology, pus culture, 3D CT etc. up to 8-18 months post-operatively. It was established up to animal trial stage that 50N50H samples [with 50-55% porosity, average pore size 110 μm, higher interconnectivity (10-100 μm), and moderately high drug adsorption efficiency (50%)] showed efficient drug release up to 42 days than parenteral group based on infection eradication and new bone formation. In vivo human bone showed gradual evidence of new bone formation and fracture union with organized callus without recurrence of infection even after 8 months. This may be a new, alternative, cost effective and ideal therapeutic strategy for chronic osteomyelitis treatment in human patients. PMID:23910305

  14. Mycobacterial Osteomyelitis of the Spine Following Intravesical BCG Therapy for Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackel, Charles E; Burke, Shane M; Huhta, Taylor; Riesenburger, Ron; Weller, Simcha J

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone that can involve the vertebral column. A rare cause of vertebral osteomyelitis is Mycobacterium bovis after intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) therapy for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. In this report, we describe the case of a 64-year-old male presenting with constitutional symptoms, progressive thoracic kyphosis, and intractable T11 and T12 radiculopathies over the proceeding six months. A CT scan revealed erosive, lytic changes of the T12 and L1 vertebrae with compression of the T12 vertebra. An MRI demonstrated T11-12 osteomyelitis with intervening discitis and extensive paraspinal enhancement with a corresponding hyperintensity on a short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequence. A needle aspiration grew out Mycobacterial tuberculosis complex that was pansensitive to all antimicrobial agent therapies, except pyrazinamide on culture, a finding consistent with an M. bovis infection. The patient's infection and neurologic compromise resolved after transthoracic T11-12 vertebrectomies with decompression of the spinal cord and nerve roots as well as T10-L1 instrumented fusion and protracted antimicrobial therapy. The epidemiology and natural history of M. bovis osteomyelitis are reviewed and the authors emphasize a mechanism of vertebral inoculation to explain the predilection of M. bovis osteomyelitis in males after intravesical BCG therapy. PMID:27158574

  15. Herpes Zoster Induced Osteomyelitis in the Immunocompromised Patients: A 10-year Multicenter Study

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    Reza Tabrizi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Alveolar bone necrosis induced by Herpes zoster infection is considered as a rare manifestation of osteomyelitis and few case reports are presented in the literature. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate mandibular osteomyelitis caused by herpes zoster in the immunocompromised patients with histopathologically documented osteomyelitis in the mandible and herpes zoster infection. Materials and Method: 30 patients were recruited in this cross-sectional study. 19 patients were completely edentulous, 4 patients were partially edentulous and 7 with complete dentition. In all cases, specimens were analyzed using a conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR test for varicella zoster virus. Results: 16 patients underwent dialysis, 9 patients received chemotherapy treat-ments and 5 patients had transplantation (four kidneys and one liver. Histopa-thological assessment demonstrated a nonspecific bone necrosis exhibiting an eosinophilic, homogeneous non-vital bone tissue with peripheral resorption sur-rounded by reactive connective tissue. PCR test was positive in 21 cases. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the frequency of osteomyelitis induced by herpes zoster could be more than the records provided by previous studies. Histopathological findings might be nonspecific in such patients. PCR test was not positive for all HZ induced osteomyelitis patients.

  16. Molecular typing of Acinetobacter baumannii by automated repetitive-sequence-based PCR

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    Giuseppe Russello

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii has been increasingly reported as a significant causative organism of various nosocomial infections. Here we describe three different outbreaks of multidrug resistant A. baumannii started in the Intensitive Care Unit and then involving other wards of San Carlo Borromeo hospital in Milan, Italy. In order to characterize the clinical strains isolates, molecular typing using semi-automated repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR was performed.Among the sixty-one strains analyzed, three main cluster (C1, C2, C3 were detected: C1 included six indistinguishable strains, C2 five and C3 thirty. No correlation was observed between chemosensitivity and ribotyping pattern and an high rate of carbapenems resistance was founded.

  17. Colistin against colistin-only-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii-related infections: Monotherapy or combination therapy?

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    F Simsek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of the patients who were infected with colistin-only-susceptible (COS Acinetobacter baumannii and treated with either colistin monotherapy or colistin combined therapy. Materials and Methods: This retrospective case-control study was conducted in the training and research hospital with an 800 beds between August 2008 and December 2011. The patients, who were infected with COS A. baumannii and received either colistin monotherapy or colistin combined therapy, were included into the study. Results: In total, 51 patients fulfilling study criteria were evaluated. Colistin monotherapy was found effective as much as colistin combined therapy in terms of clinical and microbiological responses in patients with ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP and also in patients with blood stream infections. Conclusion: Although there is no randomised controlled study yet, colistin monotherapy and colistin combined therapy are likely to achieve similar treatment responses rates. Heteroresistant strains can emerge in patients who receive colistin monotherapy

  18. Biofilm Formation and Motility Depend on the Nature of the Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Saranya; Rajenderan, Sangeetha; Laishram, Shakti; Anandan, Shalini; Balaji, Veeraraghavan; Biswas, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen involved in various infections ranging from minor soft-tissue infections to more severe infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and bacteremia. The severity and the type of infections depend on the genetic and phenotypic variations of the strains. In this study, we compared the extent of biofilm formation and motility displayed by 60 multidrug-resistant A. baumannii clinical strains isolated from blood and sputum samples from patients from Southern India. Our results showed that isolates from the sputum samples formed significantly more robust biofilm compared to the blood isolates. On the other hand, we observed that the blood isolates were more motile than the sputum isolates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that systematically evaluated the correlation between these two phenotypic traits and the nature of the isolates. PMID:27252939

  19. Emerging broad-spectrum resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii: Mechanisms and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potron, Anaïs; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    Multidrug resistance is quite common among non-fermenting Gram-negative rods, in particular among clinically relevant species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. These bacterial species, which are mainly nosocomial pathogens, possess a diversity of resistance mechanisms that may lead to multidrug or even pandrug resistance. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) conferring resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporins, carbapenemases conferring resistance to carbapenems, and 16S rRNA methylases conferring resistance to all clinically relevant aminoglycosides are the most important causes of concern. Concomitant resistance to fluoroquinolones, polymyxins (colistin) and tigecycline may lead to pandrug resistance. The most important mechanisms of resistance in P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii and their most recent dissemination worldwide are detailed here. PMID:25857949

  20. Detection of acute osteomyelitis with indium-111 labeled white blood cells in a patient with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A young patient with sickle cell disease (SCD) and multiple hospitalizations for crisis was admitted because of suspected osteomyelitis. Initial laboratory work, radiographs, and bone images were not contributory. An In-111 white blood cell (WBC) study demonstrated two areas of increased radionuclide uptake consistent with osteomyelitis. One of these had associated soft tissue infection. No other areas of active osteomyelitis were visualized, in spite of the presence of several additional infection sites. Imaging with In-111 WBC is probably not justified for routine diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis in areas free of previous disease, where conventional bone images are highly efficient. In-111 WBC imaging, however, may be helpful in detecting osteomyelitis in selected patients with SCD in whom Tc-99m bone images and radiographs are usually abnormal and difficult to interpret due to previous bone infarcts. Localization of the infection focus is very important in choosing the aspiration site for bacteriologic studies. A negative study, however, should be interpreted cautiously

  1. Antimicrobial Combinations against Pan-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates with Different Resistance Mechanisms.

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    Gleice Cristina Leite

    Full Text Available The study investigated the effect of antibiotic combinations against 20 clinical isolates of A. baumannii (seven colistin-resistant and 13 colistin-susceptible with different resistance mechanisms. Clinical data, treatment, and patient mortality were evaluated. The following methods were used: MIC, PCRs, and outer membrane protein (OMP analysis. Synergy was investigated using the checkerboard and time-kill methods. Clonality was evaluated by PFGE. Based on clonality, the whole genome sequence of six A. baumannii isolates was analyzed. All isolates were resistant to meropenem, rifampicin, and fosfomycin. OXA-23 and OXA-143 were the most frequent carbapenemases found. Four isolates showed loss of a 43kDa OMP. The colistin-susceptible isolates belonged to different clones and showed the highest synergistic effect with fosfomycin-amikacin. Among colistin-resistant isolates, the highest synergistic effect was observed with the combinations of colistin-rifampicin followed by colistin-vancomycin. All colistin-resistant isolates harbored blaOXA-23-like and belonged to CC113. Clinical and demographic data were available for 18 of 20 patients. Fourteen received treatment and eight patients died during treatment. The most frequent site of infection was the blood in 13 of 14 patients. Seven patients received vancomycin plus an active drug against A. baumannii; however, mortality did not differ in this group. The synergistic effect was similar for colistin-susceptible isolates of distinct clonal origin presenting with the same resistance mechanism. Overall mortality and death during treatment was high, and despite the high synergism in vitro with vancomycin, death did not differ comparing the use or not of vancomycin plus an active drug against A. baumannii.

  2. Infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Khalid Ahmed Al-Anazi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii is a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, non-fermentative coccobacillus which is widely distributed in nature. Recently, it has emerged as a major cause of health care-associated infections in addition to its capacity to cause community acquired infections. Risk factors for A. baumannii infections and bacteremia in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation include: severe underlying illness such as hematological malignancy, prolonged use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, invasive instrumentation such as central venous catheters or endotracheal intubation, colonization of respiratory, gastrointestinal or urinary tracts in addition to severe immunosuppression caused by using corticosteroids for treating graft versus host disease. The organism causes a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, but serious complications such as bacteremia, septic shock, ventilator-associated pneumonia, extensive soft tissue necrosis and rapidly progressive systemic infections that ultimately lead to multiorgan failure and death are prone to occur in severely immunocompromised hosts. The organism is usually resistant to many antimicrobials including penicillins, cephalosporins, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, almost all flouroquinolones and most of the aminoglycosides. The recently increasing resistance to carbapenems, colistin and polymyxins is alarming. Additionally, there are geographic variations in the resistance patterns and several globally and regionally resistant strains have already been described. Successful management of A.baumannii infections depends upon appropriate utilization of antibiotics and strict application of preventive and infection control measures. In uncomplicated infections, the use of a single active beta-lactam may be justified, while definitive treatment of complicated infections in critically ill individuals may require drug combinations such as colistin and rifampicin or colistin and

  3. Characterising the Transmission Dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii in Intensive Care Units Using Hidden Markov Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Tan N; Kong, David C M; Marshall, Caroline; Kirkpatrick, Carl M J; McBryde, Emma S

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the transmission dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii in hospitals, despite such information being critical for designing effective infection control measures. In the absence of comprehensive epidemiological data, mathematical modelling is an attractive approach to understanding transmission process. The statistical challenge in estimating transmission parameters from infection data arises from the fact that most patients are colonised asymptomatically and therefore the transmission process is not fully observed. Hidden Markov models (HMMs) can overcome this problem. We developed a continuous-time structured HMM to characterise the transmission dynamics, and to quantify the relative importance of different acquisition sources of A. baumannii in intensive care units (ICUs) in three hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. The hidden states were the total number of patients colonised with A. baumannii (both detected and undetected). The model input was monthly incidence data of the number of detected colonised patients (observations). A Bayesian framework with Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm was used for parameter estimations. We estimated that 96-98% of acquisition in Hospital 1 and 3 was due to cross-transmission between patients; whereas most colonisation in Hospital 2 was due to other sources (sporadic acquisition). On average, it takes 20 and 31 days for each susceptible individual in Hospital 1 and Hospital 3 to become colonised as a result of cross-transmission, respectively; whereas it takes 17 days to observe one new colonisation from sporadic acquisition in Hospital 2. The basic reproduction ratio (R0) for Hospital 1, 2 and 3 was 1.5, 0.02 and 1.6, respectively. Our study is the first to characterise the transmission dynamics of A. baumannii using mathematical modelling. We showed that HMMs can be applied to sparse hospital infection data to estimate transmission parameters despite unobserved events and imperfect detection of the organism

  4. Characterising the Transmission Dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii in Intensive Care Units Using Hidden Markov Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan N Doan

    Full Text Available Little is known about the transmission dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii in hospitals, despite such information being critical for designing effective infection control measures. In the absence of comprehensive epidemiological data, mathematical modelling is an attractive approach to understanding transmission process. The statistical challenge in estimating transmission parameters from infection data arises from the fact that most patients are colonised asymptomatically and therefore the transmission process is not fully observed. Hidden Markov models (HMMs can overcome this problem. We developed a continuous-time structured HMM to characterise the transmission dynamics, and to quantify the relative importance of different acquisition sources of A. baumannii in intensive care units (ICUs in three hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. The hidden states were the total number of patients colonised with A. baumannii (both detected and undetected. The model input was monthly incidence data of the number of detected colonised patients (observations. A Bayesian framework with Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm was used for parameter estimations. We estimated that 96-98% of acquisition in Hospital 1 and 3 was due to cross-transmission between patients; whereas most colonisation in Hospital 2 was due to other sources (sporadic acquisition. On average, it takes 20 and 31 days for each susceptible individual in Hospital 1 and Hospital 3 to become colonised as a result of cross-transmission, respectively; whereas it takes 17 days to observe one new colonisation from sporadic acquisition in Hospital 2. The basic reproduction ratio (R0 for Hospital 1, 2 and 3 was 1.5, 0.02 and 1.6, respectively. Our study is the first to characterise the transmission dynamics of A. baumannii using mathematical modelling. We showed that HMMs can be applied to sparse hospital infection data to estimate transmission parameters despite unobserved events and imperfect detection of

  5. The Prevalence of ESBL Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

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    Parviz Mohajeri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones are used for treating infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, including Acinetobacter baumannii strains some time have extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL, but ESBL production is rather rare. Resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics is mediated by lactamases and other mechanisms of resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate of the prevalence of ESBL production and clonal relatedness of A. baumannii in Iran. Materials and Methods: A. baumannii isolates identified from patients at hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran, were studied. The double disk method was used for detection of ESBL production. The susceptibility to different antibiotics was determined by the disk diffusion method (CLSI. Clonal relatedness was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and processed by Bionumerics 7.0 software. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS-16.0. Results: This study showed high prevalence of resistance to ampicillin and cefpodoxim (98.1 and 92.3%. Fifty-two of the 84 isolates were identified as ESBL producers. Only colistin and tigecycline remained active against all isolates tested. The PFGE identified eight distinct pulsotypes: A (N=9, B (N=10, C (N=2, D (N=5, E (N=9, F (N=15, G (N=1 and H (N=1. The PFGE profiles A, B and F were believed to be endemic (specially clone F that was dominant across different wards of the hospitals and appeared to be endemic in the ICU, emergency, pediatric and infection area throughout the years. Conclusion: Early and timely detection of ESBL-producing A. baumannii clones is useful for preventing their spread within the hospital. PFGE analysis is helpful for detection of common strains in different wards and prevention of further spread of these pulsotypes to other hospital environment.

  6. Is inhaled colistin beneficial in ventilator associated pneumonia or nosocomial pneumonia caused by Acinetobacter baumannii?

    OpenAIRE

    Demirdal, Tuna; Sari, Ummu Sena; Nemli, Salih Atakan

    2016-01-01

    Background In the present study, our objective was to evaluate and compare the clinical and microbiological results in patients receiving systemic and systemic plus inhaled colistin therapy due to nosocomial pneumonia (NP) or ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by Acinetobacter baumannii. Methods A retrospective matched case–control study was performed at the ICUs at Izmir Katip Celebi University Ataturk Training and Research Hospital from January 2013 to December 2014. Eighty patien...

  7. In vitro synergism of combinations of colistin with selected antibiotics against colistin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The in vitro activity of colistin in combination with sulbactam, netilmicin, and vancomycin against colistin-resistant A. baumannii strains was investigated. Furthermore, the clonal relationship of the strains was analyzed. Methods: Clonal relationship was investigated using rep-PCR. To screen for synergysm, the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) was calculated using checkerboard assay. The killing kinetics of the combination of colistin with vancomycin was assessed using t...

  8. Characterization of colistin-resistant A. baumannii isolated in Intensive Care Unit of an Italian Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Erika Coppo; Pier Andrea Dusi; Monica Dotta; Eugenio A. Debbia; Anna Marchese

    2013-01-01

    We report the characterization of an Acinetobacter baumannii resistant to colistin isolated from a patient treated with colistin for 22 days. The identification and initial susceptibility testing of the strain was performed at ASL3 Imperiese with the Vitek-2 automated system and than the strain was re-identified at the Sezione di Microbiologia with APINE. In vitro activity of antimicrobial agents was determined by the microdiluition methods. The detection of the beta-lactamase gene was perfor...

  9. In vitro synergism of combinations of colistin with selected antibiotics against colistin-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Percin, D; Akyol, S; Kalin, G

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The in vitro activity of colistin in combination with sulbactam, netilmicin, and vancomycin against colistin-resistant A. baumannii strains was investigated. Furthermore, the clonal relationship of the strains was analyzed. Methods: Clonal relationship was investigated using rep-PCR. To screen for synergysm, the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) was calculated using checkerboard assay. The killing kinetics of the combination of colistin with vancomycin was assessed usin...

  10. Impaired Virulence and In Vivo Fitness of Colistin-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    López-Rojas, Rafael; Domínguez-Herrera, Juan; McConnell, Michael J.; Docobo-Pérez, Fernando; Smani, Younes; Fernández-Reyes, María; Rivas, Luis; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii (American Type Culture Collection strain 19606) acquires mutations in the pmrB gene during the in vitro development of resistance to colistin. The colistin-resistant strain has lower affinity for colistin, reduced in vivo fitness (competition index, .016), and decreased virulence, both in terms of mortality (0% lethal dose, 6.9 vs 4.9 log colony-forming units) and survival in a mouse model of peritoneal sepsis. These results may explain the low incidence and disseminat...

  11. Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis and Transport of Acinetobactin in Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Tarik; Choi, Chul Hee; Oh, Man Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria survive in iron-limited host environments by using several iron acquisition mechanisms. Acinetobacter baumannii, causing serious infections in compromised patients, produces an iron-chelating molecule, called acinetobactin, which is composed of equimolar quantities of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), L-threonine, and N-hydroxyhistamine, to compete with host cells for iron. Genes that are involved in the production and transport of acinetobactin are clustered within the ge...

  12. Biochemical and Structural Analysis of Inhibitors Targeting the ADC-7 Cephalosporinase of Acinetobacter baumannii

    OpenAIRE

    Powers, Rachel A.; Swanson, Hollister C.; Taracila, Magdalena A.; Florek, Nicholas W.; Romagnoli, Chiara; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; Bonomo, Robert A.; Wallar, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    β-Lactam resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii presents one of the greatest challenges to contemporary antimicrobial chemotherapy. Much of this resistance to cephalosporins derives from the expression of the class C β-lactamase enzymes, known as Acinetobacter-derived cephalosporinases (ADCs). Currently, β-lactamase inhibitors are structurally similar to β-lactam substrates and are not effective inactivators of this class C cephalosporinase. Herein, two boronic acid transition state inhibitors...

  13. Wide Distribution of Carbapenem Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Burns Patients in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    zahra eFarshadzadeh; Farhad Bonakdar Hashemi; Sara eRahimi; Babak ePourakbari; Davoud eEsmaeili; Mohammad Ali Haghighi; Ali eMajidpour; Saeed eShojaa; Maryam eRahmani; Samira eGharesi; Masoud eAziemzadeh; Abbas eBahador

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in carbapenem non-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii (CNSAb) is a major public health concern globally. This study determined the antibiotic resistance and molecular epidemiology of CNSAb isolates from a referral burn center in Tehran, Iran.Sixty-nine CNSAb isolates were tested for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents using the E-test methodology. Multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), Multilocus sequence typing and multiplex PCR were perform...

  14. Wide distribution of carbapenem resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in burns patients in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Farshadzadeh, Zahra; Farhad B. Hashemi; Rahimi, Sara; Pourakbari, Babak; Esmaeili, Davoud; Haghighi, Mohammad A.; Majidpour, Ali; Shojaa, Saeed; Rahmani, Maryam; Gharesi, Samira; Aziemzadeh, Masoud; BAHADOR, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in carbapenem non-susceptible Acinetobacter baumannii (CNSAb) is a major public health concern globally. This study determined the antibiotic resistance and molecular epidemiology of CNSAb isolates from a referral burn center in Tehran, Iran. Sixty-nine CNSAb isolates were tested for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents using the E test methodology. Multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and multiplex PCR were...

  15. Predictors of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Infections in Surgical Intensive Care Patients: A Retrospective Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Aynur Camkıran; Aycan Kundakcı; Coşkun Araz; Arash Pirat; Pınar Zeyneloğlu; Hande Arslan; Gülnaz Arslan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB) is an important cause of hospital acquired infection and leads to an increasing morbidity and mortality in intensive care units (ICU). The aim of this study was to investigate the predictors of MRAB infection in surgical ICU patients. Material and Method: The charts of the patients who were admitted to the ICU between January 2008 and August 2010 were reviewed to identify patients with MRAB infection. Recorded data were as fo...

  16. Antimicrobial Combinations against Pan-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates with Different Resistance Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Gleice Cristina; Oliveira, Maura Salaroli; Perdigão-Neto, Lauro Vieira; Rocha, Cristiana Kamia Dias; Guimarães, Thais; Rizek, Camila; Levin, Anna Sara; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of antibiotic combinations against 20 clinical isolates of A. baumannii (seven colistin-resistant and 13 colistin-susceptible) with different resistance mechanisms. Clinical data, treatment, and patient mortality were evaluated. The following methods were used: MIC, PCRs, and outer membrane protein (OMP) analysis. Synergy was investigated using the checkerboard and time-kill methods. Clonality was evaluated by PFGE. Based on clonality, the whole genome sequence of six A. baumannii isolates was analyzed. All isolates were resistant to meropenem, rifampicin, and fosfomycin. OXA-23 and OXA-143 were the most frequent carbapenemases found. Four isolates showed loss of a 43kDa OMP. The colistin-susceptible isolates belonged to different clones and showed the highest synergistic effect with fosfomycin-amikacin. Among colistin-resistant isolates, the highest synergistic effect was observed with the combinations of colistin-rifampicin followed by colistin-vancomycin. All colistin-resistant isolates harbored blaOXA-23-like and belonged to CC113. Clinical and demographic data were available for 18 of 20 patients. Fourteen received treatment and eight patients died during treatment. The most frequent site of infection was the blood in 13 of 14 patients. Seven patients received vancomycin plus an active drug against A. baumannii; however, mortality did not differ in this group. The synergistic effect was similar for colistin-susceptible isolates of distinct clonal origin presenting with the same resistance mechanism. Overall mortality and death during treatment was high, and despite the high synergism in vitro with vancomycin, death did not differ comparing the use or not of vancomycin plus an active drug against A. baumannii. PMID:26998609

  17. Carbapenem resistance and phenotypic detection of carbapenemases in clinical isolates of acinetobacter baumannii

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    Gomty Mahajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-Ab reported worldwide has become one of the most difficult nosocomially acquired Gram-negative pathogens to control and treat. The clinical utility of carbapenems is under threat with the emergence of acquired carbapenemases, particularly Ambler class B metallo-lactamases (MBL. Because of the global increase in the occurrence and dissemination of MBLs, early detection is critical. This study was undertaken to detect resistance to carbapenems in clinical isolates of A. baumannii from hospitalized patients by both disk-diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC methods and to assess the rate of carbapenemase and MBL production among the isolates. Materials and Methods : A. baumannii were identified from various clinical samples and antibiotic susceptibility profile was determined by the standard disk-diffusion method. Meropenem-resistant strains were tested further by agar dilution MIC for meropenem. Resistant isolates were screened for carbapenemase production by the modified Hodge test and positive isolates were further checked for metallo-β-lacatmase production by the EDTA disk synergy test. Results : 42 isolates (31.81% showed resistance to meropenem by the disk diffusion method. 47.6% were carbapenemase positive by the modified Hodge test and 19% were MBL producers phenotypically by the EDTA disc synergy test (EDS. These meropenem-resistant isolates were resistant to most of the other antibiotics tested. These 42 isolates were recovered mostly from patients admitted to intensive care units. Four isolates of the A. baumannii complex were pan drug resistant and showed resistance to even tigecycline and polymyxin B. Conclusion : Carbapenem resistance has been increasingly reported, necessitating their detection. This study reports simple, carbapenemase, and MBL detection method that can be easily incorporated into the daily routine of a clinical laboratory.

  18. Epidemiology of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii in Mediterranean Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Nassima Djahmi; Catherine Dunyach-Remy; Alix Pantel; Mazouz Dekhil; Albert Sotto; Jean-Philippe Lavigne

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and global spread of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii are of great concern to health services worldwide. These β -lactamases hydrolyse almost all β -lactams, are plasmid-encoded, and are easily transferable among bacterial species. They are mostly of the KPC, VIM, IMP, NDM, and OXA-48 types. Their current extensive spread worldwide in Enterobacteriaceae is an important source of concern. Infections caused by these bacteria have limited treat...

  19. CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb in Acinetobacter baumannii: evolution and utilization for strain subtyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karah, Nabil; Samuelsen, Ørjan; Zarrilli, Raffaele; Sahl, Jason W; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are polymorphic elements found in the genome of some or all strains of particular bacterial species, providing them with a system of acquired immunity against invading bacteriophages and plasmids. Two CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified in Acinetobacter baumannii, an opportunistic pathogen with a remarkable capacity for clonal dissemination. In this study, we investigated the mode of evolution and diversity of spacers of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in a global collection of 76 isolates of A. baumannii obtained from 14 countries and 4 continents. The locus has basically evolved from a common ancestor following two main lineages and several pathways of vertical descent. However, this vertical passage has been interrupted by occasional events of horizontal transfer of the whole locus between distinct isolates. The isolates were assigned into 40 CRISPR-based sequence types (CST). CST1 and CST23-24 comprised 18 and 9 isolates, representing two main sub-clones of international clones CC1 and CC25, respectively. Epidemiological data showed that some of the CST1 isolates were acquired or imported from Iraq, where it has probably been endemic for more than one decade and occasionally been able to spread to USA, Canada, and Europe. CST23-24 has shown a remarkable ability to cause national outbreaks of infections in Sweden, Argentina, UAE, and USA. The three isolates of CST19 were independently imported from Thailand to Sweden and Norway, raising a concern about the prevalence of CST19 in Thailand. Our study highlights the dynamic nature of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in A. baumannii, and demonstrates the possibility of using a CRISPR-based approach for subtyping a significant part of the global population of A. baumannii. PMID:25706932

  20. CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb in Acinetobacter baumannii: evolution and utilization for strain subtyping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Karah

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR are polymorphic elements found in the genome of some or all strains of particular bacterial species, providing them with a system of acquired immunity against invading bacteriophages and plasmids. Two CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified in Acinetobacter baumannii, an opportunistic pathogen with a remarkable capacity for clonal dissemination. In this study, we investigated the mode of evolution and diversity of spacers of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in a global collection of 76 isolates of A. baumannii obtained from 14 countries and 4 continents. The locus has basically evolved from a common ancestor following two main lineages and several pathways of vertical descent. However, this vertical passage has been interrupted by occasional events of horizontal transfer of the whole locus between distinct isolates. The isolates were assigned into 40 CRISPR-based sequence types (CST. CST1 and CST23-24 comprised 18 and 9 isolates, representing two main sub-clones of international clones CC1 and CC25, respectively. Epidemiological data showed that some of the CST1 isolates were acquired or imported from Iraq, where it has probably been endemic for more than one decade and occasionally been able to spread to USA, Canada, and Europe. CST23-24 has shown a remarkable ability to cause national outbreaks of infections in Sweden, Argentina, UAE, and USA. The three isolates of CST19 were independently imported from Thailand to Sweden and Norway, raising a concern about the prevalence of CST19 in Thailand. Our study highlights the dynamic nature of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in A. baumannii, and demonstrates the possibility of using a CRISPR-based approach for subtyping a significant part of the global population of A. baumannii.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies against the iron regulated outer membrane Proteins of Acinetobacter baumannii are bactericidal

    OpenAIRE

    Goel, Vikas Kumar; Kapil, Arti

    2001-01-01

    Background Iron is an important nutrient required by all forms of life.In the case of human hosts,the free iron availability is 10-18M,which is far less than what is needed for the survival of the invading bacterial pathogen.To survive in such conditions, bacteria express new proteins in their outer membrane and also secrete iron chelators called siderophores. Results/ Discussion Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, a nosocomial pathogen which grows under iron restricted conditions, expresses ...

  2. Emerging broad-spectrum resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii: Mechanisms and epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Potron, Anaïs; Poirel , Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is quite common among non-fermenting Gram-negative rods, in particular among clinically relevant species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. These bacterial species, which are mainly nosocomial pathogens, possess a diversity of resistance mechanisms that may lead to multidrug or even pandrug resistance. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) conferring resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporins, carbapenemases conferring resistance to carbapenem...

  3. Eradication of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii in burn wounds by antiseptic pulsed electric field

    OpenAIRE

    Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Vecchio, Daniela; Khan, Saiqa; Hamblin, Michael R.; Austen, William G.; Sheridan, Robert L.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging bacterial resistance to multiple drugs is an increasing problem in burn wound management. New non-pharmacologic interventions are needed for burn wound disinfection. Here we report on a novel physical method for disinfection: antiseptic pulsed electric field (PEF) applied externally to the infected burns. In a mice model, we show that PEF can reduce the load of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii present in a full thickness burn wound by more than four orders of magnitude, as...

  4. Locally advanced breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: a case report of successful treatment with radiation and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Christopher F; Zhang, Da; Reyes, Ruben; Korentager, Richard; McGinness, Marilee; Lominska, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The development of breast implant-associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare phenomenon. A typical presentation is an effusion associated with a breast implant. Less commonly, disease can be more advanced locoregionally or distantly. The optimal treatment schema is a topic of debate: localized ALCL can potentially be cured with implant removal alone, while other cases in the literature, including those that are more advanced, have been treated with varying combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, and external beam radiotherapy. This is a case report of breast implant ALCL with pathologically proven lymph node involvement, the fifth such patient reported. Our patient experienced a favorable outcome with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. PMID:25741471

  5. Antibacterial activity of a newly developed peptide-modified lysin against Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang eYang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The global emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR bacteria is a growing threat to public health worldwide. Natural bacteriophage lysins are promising alternatives in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive pathogens, but not Gram-negative ones, like Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, due to the barriers posed by their outer membranes. Recently, modifying a natural lysin with an antimicrobial peptide was found able to break the barriers, and to kill Gram-negative pathogens. Herein, a new peptide-modified lysin (PlyA was constructed by fusing the cecropin A peptide residues 1–8 (KWKLFKKI with the OBPgp279 lysin and its antibacterial activity was studied. PlyA showed good and broad antibacterial activities against logarithmic phase A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, but much reduced activities against the cells in stationary phase. Addition of outer membrane permeabilizers (EDTA and citric acid could enhance the antibacterial activity of PlyA against stationary phase cells. Finally, no antibacterial activity of PlyA could be observed in some bio-matrices, such as culture media, milk, and sera. In conclusion, we reported here a novel peptide-modified lysin with significant antibacterial activity against both logarithmic (without OMPs and stationary phase (with OMPs A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa cells in buffer, but further optimization is needed to achieve broad activity in diverse bio-matrices.

  6. Emergence and clonal dissemination of carbapenem-hydrolysing OXA-58-producing Acinetobacter baumannii isolates in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevillano, Elena; Fernández, Elena; Bustamante, Zulema; Zabalaga, Silvia; Rosales, Ikerne; Umaran, Adelaida; Gallego, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging multidrug-resistant pathogen and very little information is available regarding its imipenem resistance in Latin American countries such as Bolivia. This study investigated the antimicrobial resistance profile of 46 clinical strains from different hospitals in Cochabamba, Bolivia, from March 2008 to July 2009, and the presence of carbapenemases as a mechanism of resistance to imipenem. Isolates were obtained from 46 patients (one isolate per patient; 30 males,16 females) with an age range of 1 day to 84 years, and were collected from different sample types, the majority from respiratory tract infections (17) and wounds (13). Resistance to imipenem was detected in 15 isolates collected from different hospitals of the city. These isolates grouped into the same genotype, named A, and were resistant to all antibiotics tested including imipenem, with susceptibility only to colistin. Experiments to detect carbapenemases revealed the presence of the OXA-58 carbapenemase. Further analysis revealed the location of the bla(OXA-58) gene on a 40 kb plasmid. To our knowledge, this is the first report of carbapenem resistance in A. baumannii isolates from Bolivia that is conferred by the OXA-58 carbapenemase. The presence of this gene in a multidrug-resistant clone and its location within a plasmid is of great concern with regard to the spread of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii in the hospital environment in Bolivia. PMID:21873380

  7. Crystal structure of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase from the ESKAPE pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Kristin A; Breen, Jennifer; Russo, Thomas A; Schultz, L Wayne; Umland, Timothy C

    2016-03-01

    The enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase catalyzes the sixth step of the seven-step shikimate pathway. Chorismate, the product of the pathway, is a precursor for the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids, siderophores and metabolites such as folate, ubiquinone and vitamin K. The shikimate pathway is present in bacteria, fungi, algae, plants and apicomplexan parasites, but is absent in humans. The EPSP synthase enzyme produces 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate and phosphate from phosphoenolpyruvate and shikimate 3-phosphate via a transferase reaction, and is the target of the herbicide glyphosate. The Acinetobacter baumannii gene encoding EPSP synthase, aroA, has previously been demonstrated to be essential during host infection for the growth and survival of this clinically important drug-resistant ESKAPE pathogen. Prephenate dehydrogenase is also encoded by the bifunctional A. baumannii aroA gene, but its activity is dependent upon EPSP synthase since it operates downstream of the shikimate pathway. As part of an effort to evaluate new antimicrobial targets, recombinant A. baumannii EPSP (AbEPSP) synthase, comprising residues Ala301-Gln756 of the aroA gene product, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystal structure, determined to 2.37 Å resolution, is described in the context of a potential antimicrobial target and in comparison to EPSP synthases that are resistant or sensitive to the herbicide glyphosate. PMID:26919521

  8. Activity of Gallium Meso- and Protoporphyrin IX against Biofilms of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a challenging pathogen due to antimicrobial resistance and biofilm development. The role of iron in bacterial physiology has prompted the evaluation of iron-modulation as an antimicrobial strategy. The non-reducible iron analog gallium(III nitrate, Ga(NO33, has been shown to inhibit A. baumannii planktonic growth; however, utilization of heme-iron by clinical isolates has been associated with development of tolerance. These observations prompted the evaluation of iron-heme sources on planktonic and biofilm growth, as well as antimicrobial activities of gallium meso- and protoporphyrin IX (Ga-MPIX and Ga-PPIX, metal heme derivatives against planktonic and biofilm bacteria of multidrug-resistant (MDR clinical isolates of A. baumannii in vitro. Ga(NO33 was moderately effective at reducing planktonic bacteria (64 to 128 µM with little activity against biofilms (≥512 µM. In contrast, Ga-MPIX and Ga-PPIX were highly active against planktonic bacteria (0.25 to 8 µM. Cytotoxic effects in human fibroblasts were observed following exposure to concentrations exceeding 128 µM of Ga-MPIX and Ga-PPIX. We observed that the gallium metal heme conjugates were more active against planktonic and biofilm bacteria, possibly due to utilization of heme-iron as demonstrated by the enhanced effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation.

  9. Epidemiology of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii in Mediterranean Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassima Djahmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and global spread of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii are of great concern to health services worldwide. These β-lactamases hydrolyse almost all β-lactams, are plasmid-encoded, and are easily transferable among bacterial species. They are mostly of the KPC, VIM, IMP, NDM, and OXA-48 types. Their current extensive spread worldwide in Enterobacteriaceae is an important source of concern. Infections caused by these bacteria have limited treatment options and have been associated with high mortality rates. Carbapenemase producers are mainly identified among Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and A. baumannii and still mostly in hospital settings and rarely in the community. The Mediterranean region is of interest due to a great diversity and population mixing. The prevalence of carbapenemases is particularly high, with this area constituting one of the most important reservoirs. The types of carbapenemase vary among countries, partially depending on the population exchange relationship between the regions and the possible reservoirs of each carbapenemase. This review described the epidemiology of carbapenemases produced by enterobacteria and A. baumannii in this part of the world highlighting the worrisome situation and the need to screen and detect these enzymes to prevent and control their dissemination.

  10. Safety and effectiveness of colistin compared with tobramycin for multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections

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    Cohen Karen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nosocomial infections due to multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii are often treated with colistin, but there are few data comparing its safety and efficacy with other antimicrobials. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients treated with colistin or tobramycin for A. baumannii infections in intensive care units (ICUs at Groote Schuur hospital. Colistin was used for A. baumannii isolates which were resistant to all other available antimicrobials. In the tobramycin group, 53% of the isolates were only susceptible to tobramycin and colistin. We assessed ICU mortality, nephrotoxicity and time to the first negative culture. Results 32 patients, with similar admission APACHE scores and serum creatinine, were treated with each antimicrobial. There were no significant differences between the colistin and tobramycin groups in ICU mortality (p = 0.54, nephrotoxicity (p = 0.67, change in creatinine from baseline to highest subsequent value (p = 0.11 and time to microbiological clearance (p = 0.75. The hazard ratio for total in-hospital survival in patients treated with colistin compared to tobramycin was 0.43 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.99. Conclusion Our study suggests that colistin and tobramycin have similar risks of nephrotoxicity and are equally efficacious. Colistin is an acceptable antibiotic for the treatment of A. baumanii infections when the organism is resistant to other available antimicrobials.

  11. Characterisation of pellicles formed by Acinetobacter baumannii at the air-liquid interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassine Nait Chabane

    Full Text Available The clinical importance of Acinetobacter baumannii is partly due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms and, interestingly, A. baumannii can form pellicles at the air-liquid interface more readily than other less pathogenic Acinetobacter species. Pellicles from twenty-six strains were morphologically classified into three groups: I egg-shaped (27%; II ball-shaped (50%; and III irregular pellicles (23%. One strain representative of each group was further analysed by Brewster's Angle Microscopy to follow pellicle development, demonstrating that their formation did not require anchoring to a solid surface. Total carbohydrate analysis of the matrix showed three main components: Glucose, GlcNAc and Kdo. Dispersin B, an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG polysaccharide, inhibited A. baumannii pellicle formation, suggesting that this exopolysaccharide contributes to pellicle formation. Also associated with the pellicle matrix were three subunits of pili assembled by chaperon-usher systems: the major CsuA/B, A1S_1510 (presented 45% of identity with the main pilin F17-A from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pili and A1S_2091. The presence of both PNAG polysaccharide and pili systems in matrix of pellicles might contribute to the virulence of this emerging pathogen.

  12. Characterisation of pellicles formed by Acinetobacter baumannii at the air-liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nait Chabane, Yassine; Marti, Sara; Rihouey, Christophe; Alexandre, Stéphane; Hardouin, Julie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Vila, Jordi; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Jouenne, Thierry; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    The clinical importance of Acinetobacter baumannii is partly due to its natural ability to survive in the hospital environment. This persistence may be explained by its capacity to form biofilms and, interestingly, A. baumannii can form pellicles at the air-liquid interface more readily than other less pathogenic Acinetobacter species. Pellicles from twenty-six strains were morphologically classified into three groups: I) egg-shaped (27%); II) ball-shaped (50%); and III) irregular pellicles (23%). One strain representative of each group was further analysed by Brewster's Angle Microscopy to follow pellicle development, demonstrating that their formation did not require anchoring to a solid surface. Total carbohydrate analysis of the matrix showed three main components: Glucose, GlcNAc and Kdo. Dispersin B, an enzyme that hydrolyzes poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) polysaccharide, inhibited A. baumannii pellicle formation, suggesting that this exopolysaccharide contributes to pellicle formation. Also associated with the pellicle matrix were three subunits of pili assembled by chaperon-usher systems: the major CsuA/B, A1S_1510 (presented 45% of identity with the main pilin F17-A from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pili) and A1S_2091. The presence of both PNAG polysaccharide and pili systems in matrix of pellicles might contribute to the virulence of this emerging pathogen. PMID:25360550

  13. Activity of Gallium Meso- and Protoporphyrin IX against Biofilms of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, David; Garcia, Rebecca A; Akers, Kevin S; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton K; Wenke, Joseph C; Sanchez, Carlos J

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a challenging pathogen due to antimicrobial resistance and biofilm development. The role of iron in bacterial physiology has prompted the evaluation of iron-modulation as an antimicrobial strategy. The non-reducible iron analog gallium(III) nitrate, Ga(NO₃)₃, has been shown to inhibit A. baumannii planktonic growth; however, utilization of heme-iron by clinical isolates has been associated with development of tolerance. These observations prompted the evaluation of iron-heme sources on planktonic and biofilm growth, as well as antimicrobial activities of gallium meso- and protoporphyrin IX (Ga-MPIX and Ga-PPIX), metal heme derivatives against planktonic and biofilm bacteria of multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolates of A. baumannii in vitro. Ga(NO₃)₃ was moderately effective at reducing planktonic bacteria (64 to 128 µM) with little activity against biofilms (≥512 µM). In contrast, Ga-MPIX and Ga-PPIX were highly active against planktonic bacteria (0.25 to 8 µM). Cytotoxic effects in human fibroblasts were observed following exposure to concentrations exceeding 128 µM of Ga-MPIX and Ga-PPIX. We observed that the gallium metal heme conjugates were more active against planktonic and biofilm bacteria, possibly due to utilization of heme-iron as demonstrated by the enhanced effects on bacterial growth and biofilm formation. PMID:26999163

  14. Pathology and biofilm formation in a porcine model of staphylococcal osteomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, L K; Koch, J; Frees, D;

    2012-01-01

    A porcine model was used to examine the potential of human and porcine Staphylococcus aureus isolates to induce haematogenously spread osteomyelitis. Pigs were inoculated in the right femoral artery with one of the following S. aureus strains: S54F9 (from a porcine lung abscess; n = 3 animals......), NCTC-8325-4 (a laboratory strain of human origin; n = 3 animals) and UAMS-1 (a human osteomyelitis isolate; n = 3 animals). Two pigs were sham inoculated with saline. At 11 or 15 days post infection the animals were scanned by computed tomography before being killed and subjected to necropsy...... examination. Osteomyelitis lesions were present in the right hind limb of all pigs inoculated with strain S54F9 and in one pig inoculated with strain NCTC-8325-4. Microscopically, there was extensive loss of bone tissue with surrounding granulation tissue. Sequestrated bone trabeculae were intermingled with...

  15. Diagnostic imaging of pediatric hematogenous osteomyelitis: lessons learned from a multi-modality approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellado Santos, Jose M. [Hospital Reina Sofia de Tudela, Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Tudela, Navarra (Spain)

    2006-09-15

    Pediatric hematogenous osteomyelitis may present highly variable radiological expression, which is influenced by the age and condition of the patient, the virulence of the causative agent, the stage of the disease, or the selected imaging tool. Given the multiplicity of available modalities and the multi-faceted nature of the process, purposeful imaging of pediatric hematogenous osteomyelitis may be difficult. In order to avoid diagnostic delays and complications, familiarity with the variable expression of the disease and assumption of the potentialities, roles and limitations of the various imaging modalities is required. In this pictorial essay we review, illustrate and discuss, in a multi-modality approach, the various radiological patterns that may be found in pediatric hematogenous osteomyelitis, with emphasis on strategies, staging, uncommon distribution patterns, and differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellazzi, Luca; Mantero, Marco; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients. PMID:27258258

  17. Diagnostic imaging of pediatric hematogenous osteomyelitis: lessons learned from a multi-modality approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pediatric hematogenous osteomyelitis may present highly variable radiological expression, which is influenced by the age and condition of the patient, the virulence of the causative agent, the stage of the disease, or the selected imaging tool. Given the multiplicity of available modalities and the multi-faceted nature of the process, purposeful imaging of pediatric hematogenous osteomyelitis may be difficult. In order to avoid diagnostic delays and complications, familiarity with the variable expression of the disease and assumption of the potentialities, roles and limitations of the various imaging modalities is required. In this pictorial essay we review, illustrate and discuss, in a multi-modality approach, the various radiological patterns that may be found in pediatric hematogenous osteomyelitis, with emphasis on strategies, staging, uncommon distribution patterns, and differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  18. Update on the Management of Pediatric Acute Osteomyelitis and Septic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Castellazzi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis are two infections whose frequencies are increasing in pediatric patients. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis need to be carefully assessed, diagnosed, and treated to avoid devastating sequelae. Traditionally, the treatment of acute osteoarticular infection in pediatrics was based on prolonged intravenous anti-infective therapy. However, results from clinical trials have suggested that in uncomplicated cases, a short course of a few days of parenteral antibiotics followed by oral therapy is safe and effective. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians an update on recent controversies and advances regarding the management of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children. In recent years, the emergence of bacterial species resistant to commonly used antibiotics that are particularly aggressive highlights the necessity for further research to optimize treatment approaches and to develop new molecules able to fight the war against acute osteoarticular infection in pediatric patients.

  19. Alterations of blood serum parameters in patients with chronic hematogenous osteomyelitis

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    Sadrudin Magomedov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine metabolic disorders of major components of organic basis of bone tissue in patients with chronic hematogenous osteomyelitis and response to surgical treatment. Methods: The cubital vein puncture was conducted to take blood for analysis in patients with chronic hematogenous osteomyelitis. The activity of collagenase and hyaluronidase, elastin, elastase and total content of glycosaminoglycans were measured in blood serum. Results: The study revealed an enhancement of catabolic phase of metabolism of the main components in bone organic matrix during the relapse of inflammation. It was evidenced by indicators reflecting the synthetic and catabolic phases of the main components of the connective tissue collagen and glycosaminoglycans. The effective therapeutic treatments led to the reduction and normalization of studied compounds. Conclusions: The initial development of hematogenous osteomyelitis happens in a background of metabolic disorders of the main components of organic matrix of bone tissue, and normalizes upon effective therapy.

  20. Osteomyelitis and infarction in sickle cell hemoglobinopathies: differentiation by combined technetium and gallium scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical records and scintigrams were reviewed of 18 patients with sickle cell hemoglobinophaties who had undergone combined technetium and gallium scintigraphy during 22 separate episodes of suspected osseous infection. The combined scintigrams were correctly interpreted as indicating osteomyelitis in four studies. Of 18 studies in patients with infarction, the combined scintigrams were correctly interpreted in 16 and showed either no local accumulation of Ga-67 or less accumulation than that of Tc-99m MDP at symptomatic sites. In the other two studies, the scintigrams were falsely interpreted as indicating osteomyelitis and showed congruent, increased accumulation of both Tc-99, MDP and Ga-67. This pattern must be considered indeterminate. Overall, the results indicate that the combination of technetium and gallium scintigraphy is an effective means to distinguish osteomyelitis from infarction in patients with sickle cell hemoglobinopathies