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  1. HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV and Opportunistic Infections, Coinfections, and Conditions Home Understanding ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) Last Reviewed: June 14, 2018 ...

  2. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  3. TB Testing for People Living with HIV

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-23

    Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, explains why it is important for people living with HIV to be tested for TB.  Created: 7/23/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 7/23/2012.

  4. HIV-Associated TB: Facts 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2012 . Around 75% of these people live in sub-Saharan Africa.  TB is the leading cause of death among ... adopted by policy makers and implemented by all health facilities offering HIV care services.  The number of ...

  5. Prospective use of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor to screen TB co-infected with HIV patient among TB patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Yudani Mardining Raras

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Plasma suPAR level of TB patients co-infected with HIV showed significantly difference from that of TB-AFB(+ patients suggested its potential to screen the TB/HIV among pulmonary TB-AFB(+ patients.

  6. HIV/TB co-infection:perspectives of TB patients and providers on the integrated HIV/TB pilot program in Tamilnadu, India

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshminarayanan, Mahalakshmi

    2009-01-01

    The WHO recommends routine HIV testing among TB patients as a key strategy to combat the dual HIV/TB epidemic. India has integrated its HIV and TB control programs and is offering provider initiated HIV testing for all TB patients since 2007. Using a mixed methods approach, this study aims to understand the perspectives of TB patients and providers on the integrated HIV/TB pilot program in Tamilnadu, India. A survey conducted by the Tuberculosis Research Center, India on 300 TB patients is th...

  7. Antiretroviral treatment uptake in patients with HIV associated TB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Delivery of integrated care for patients with HIV-associated TB is challenging. We assessed the uptake and timing of antiretroviral treatment (ART) among eligible patients attending a primary care service with co-located ART and TB clinics. Methods. In a retrospective cohort study, all HIV-associated TB patients ...

  8. TB and HIV Therapeutics: Pharmacology Research Priorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly E. Dooley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An unprecedented number of investigational drugs are in the development pipeline for the treatment of tuberculosis. Among patients with tuberculosis, co-infection with HIV is common, and concurrent treatment of tuberculosis and HIV is now the standard of care. To ensure that combinations of anti-tuberculosis drugs and antiretrovirals are safe and are tested at doses most likely to be effective, selected pharmacokinetic studies based on knowledge of their metabolic pathways and their capacity to induce or inhibit metabolizing enzymes of companion drugs must be conducted. Drug interaction studies should be followed up by evaluations in larger populations to evaluate safety and pharmacodynamics more fully. Involving patients with HIV in trials of TB drugs early in development enhances the knowledge gained from the trials and will ensure that promising new tuberculosis treatments are available to patients with HIV as early as possible. In this review, we summarize current and planned pharmacokinetic and drug interaction studies involving investigational and licensed tuberculosis drugs and antiretrovirals and suggest priorities for tuberculosis-HIV pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and drug-drug interaction studies for the future. Priority studies for children and pregnant women with HIV and tuberculosis co-infection are briefly discussed.

  9. Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search The CDC Health Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB Note: Javascript is disabled or ... Other Pacific Islanders MMWR Publications HIV and AIDS Viral Hepatitis STDs Tuberculosis Training and Networking Resources Call for ...

  10. Antiretroviral treatment uptake in patients with HIV- associated TB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ART results in a 64 - 95% reduction in mortality risk 5 and is an essential component of care. How soon to start. ART after TB treatment initiation has become clearer from randomised controlled trials. These show that integration of ART and TB treatment in all HIV-associated TB patients regardless of CD4 count significantly.

  11. Optimization of TB/HIV co-treatment in Ethiopian patients

    OpenAIRE

    Degu, Wondwossen Amogne

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and HIV infection act with deadly synergy. HIV is the most important risk factor for latent TB reactivation and active TB progression following exposure or reinfection while TB accelerates HIV progression. TB is the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV infection. Anti-TB therapy (ATT) must precede initiation of combination Antiretroviral Therapy (cART), TB being the most immediate threat. Undoubtedly cART benefits; however, important clinical ...

  12. HIV-positive father wins visitation battle in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-03-24

    [Name removed], after a four-year court battle, has been awarded visitation rights with his three daughters. [Name removed] separated from his wife [name removed] in [name removed] 1991 after telling her he was diagnosed with HIV. The custody dispute originally centered around not only [name removed]'s HIV status, but also his homosexuality (he had left his wife for the family friend and godfather to one of the couple's daughter's). Custody judge Audrey E. Melbourne allowed [name removed] to see his daughters at his home, excluding overnight, weekday or holiday visits. [Name removed]'s appeal focused on the medical aspects of HIV transmission in the household. Since Mrs. [Name removed]' expert witness conceded that he knew of no recorded instances of a person transmitting HIV to another person through bathing, cooking or breathing, the judge agreed the risk of transmission was so small as to pose no threat to the children's safety. [Name removed] was awarded visitation on alternating weekends, plus alternating Federal holidays.

  13. Non-adherence to anti-TB drugs among TB/HIV co-infected patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-adherence to anti-TB drugs among TB/HIV co-infected patients in Mbarara Hospital ... and its associated factors have not been studied in these patients in Uganda. ... Methods: A cross-sectional study with qualitative and quantitative data ...

  14. Lay beliefs of TB and TB/HIV co-infection in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frich Jan C

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about lay beliefs of etiology, transmission and treatment of TB, and lay perceptions of the relationship between TB and HIV is important for understanding patients' health seeking behavior and adherence to treatment. We conducted a study to explore lay beliefs about TB and TB/HIV co-infection in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Findings We conducted a qualitative study using in-depth interviews with 15 TB/HIV co-infected patients and 9 health professionals and focus group discussions with 14 co-infected patients in Addis-Ababa, Ethiopia. We found that a predominant lay belief was that TB was caused by exposure to cold. Excessive sun exposure, exposure to mud, smoking, alcohol, khat and inadequate food intake were also reported as causes for TB. Such beliefs initially led to self-treatment. The majority of patients were aware of an association between TB and HIV. Some reported that TB could transform into HIV, while others said that the body could be weakened by HIV and become more susceptible to illnesses such as TB. Some patients classified TB as either HIV-related or non-HIV-related, and weight loss was a hallmark for HIV-related TB. The majority of patients believed that people in the community knew that there was an association between TB and HIV, and some feared that this would predispose them to HIV-related stigma. Conclusion There is a need for culturally sensitive information and educational efforts to address misperceptions about TB and HIV. Health professionals should provide information about causes and treatment of TB and HIV to co-infected patients.

  15. HIV screening among TB patients and co-trimoxazole preventive therapy for TB/HIV patients in Addis Ababa: facility based descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegetu, Amenu Wesen; Dolamo, Bethabile Lovely

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative TB/HIV management is essential to ensure that HIV positive TB patients are identified and treated appropriately, and to prevent tuberculosis (TB) in HIV positive patients. The purpose of this study was to assess HIV case finding among TB patients and Co-trimoxazole Preventive Therapy (CPT) for HIV/TB patients in Addis Ababa. A descriptive cross-sectional, facility-based survey was conducted between June and July 2011. Data was collected by interviewing 834 TB patients from ten health facilities in Addis Ababa. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to summarize and analyze findings. The proportion of TB patients who (self reported) were offered for HIV test, tested for HIV and tested HIV positive during their anti-TB treatment follow-up were; 87.4%, 69.4% and 20.2%; respectively. Eighty seven HIV positive patients were identified, who knew their status before diagnosed for the current TB disease, bringing the cumulative prevalence of HIV among TB patients to 24.5%. Hence, the proportion of TB patients who knew their HIV status becomes 79.9%. The study revealed that 43.6% of those newly identified HIV positives during anti-TB treatment follow-up were actually treated with CPT. However, the commutative proportion of HIV positive TB patients who were ever treated with CPT was 54.4%; both those treated before the current TB disease and during anti-TB treatment follow-up. HIV case finding among TB patients and provision of CPT for TB/HIV co-infected patients needs boosting. Hence, routine offering of HIV test and provision of CPT for PLHIV should be strengthened in-line with the national guidelines.

  16. Profile of HIV-1 RNA viral load among HIV-TB co-infected patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Profile of HIV-1 RNA viral load among HIV-TB co-infected patients in a tertiary health facility in Maiduguri, Northeastern Nigeria. ... This study aims to estimate the HIV-1 RNA viral load and impact of anti TB therapy (ATT) ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  17. Health Inequities and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, TB, and STDs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP), discusses health inequities in the United States and how NCHHSTP research, policies, and programs can address them.

  18. Health Inequities and HIV, Viral Hepatitis, TB, and STDs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-15

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP), discusses health inequities in the United States and how NCHHSTP research, policies, and programs can address them.  Created: 9/15/2010 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.   Date Released: 9/15/2010.

  19. The association between ARV and TB drug resistance on TB treatment outcome among Kazakh TB/HIV patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Kathryn; Alaei, Kamiar; Alikeyeva, Elmira; Paynter, Christopher; Aringazina, Altyn; Alaei, Arash

    2018-02-26

    TB drug resistance poses a serious threat to the public health of Kazakhstan. This paper presents findings related to TB treatment outcome and drug resistant status among people coinfected with HIV and TB in Kazakhstan. Cohort study using data were provided by the Kazakhstan Ministry of Health's National Tuberculosis Program for 2014 and 2015. Chi-square and logistical regression were performed to understand factors associated with drug resistant TB status and TB treatment outcome. In bivariate analysis, drug resistant status was significantly associated with year of TB diagnosis (p=0.001) viral load (p=0.03). TB treatment outcome was significantly associated with age at diagnosis (p=01), ARV treatment (p <0.0001), and TB drug resistant status (p=0.02). In adjusted analysis, drug resistance was associated with increased odds of successful completion of treatment with successful result compared to treatment failure (OR 6.94, 95% CI: 1.39-34.44) CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that being drug resistant is associated with higher odds of completing treatment with successful outcome, even when controlling for receipt of ARV therapy. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The role of antiretroviral therapy in reducing TB incidence and mortality in high HIV-TB burden countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D Harries

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With the adoption of the new Sustainable Development Goals in 2016, all countries have committed to end the tuberculosis (TB epidemic by 2030, defined as dramatic reductions in TB incidence and mortality combined with zero TB-induced catastrophic costs for families. This paper explores how antiretroviral therapy (ART in high HIV-TB burden countries may help in reducing TB incidence and mortality and thus contribute to the ambitious goal of ending TB. ART in people living with HIV has a potent TB preventive effect, with this being most apparent in those with the most advanced immunodeficiency. Early ART also significantly reduces the risk of TB, and with new World Health Organization guidance released in 2015 about initiating ART in all persons living with HIV irrespective of CD4 count, there is the potential for enormous benefit at the population level. Already, several countries with high HIVTB burdens have seen dramatic declines in TB case notification rates since ART scale up started in 2004. In patients already diagnosed with HIV-associated TB, mortality can be significantly decreased by ART, especially if started within 2–8 weeks of anti-TB treatment. The benefits of ART on TB incidence and TB mortality can be further augmented respectively by the addition of isoniazid preventive therapy and cotrimoxazole preventive therapy. These interventions must be effectively implemented and scaled up in order to end the TB epidemic by 2030.

  1. Integration of HIV and TB Services Results in Improved TB Treatment Outcomes and Earlier Prioritized ART Initiation in a Large Urban HIV Clinic in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Sabine M.; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Katabira, Catherine; Mbidde, Peter; Lange, Joep M. A.; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Coutinho, Alex; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization recommends that treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-infected patients should be integrated with HIV care. In December 2008, a separate outdoor-integrated TB/HIV clinic was instituted for attendees of a large urban HIV clinic in Uganda. We sought to

  2. Integration of HIV and TB services results in improved TB treatment outcomes and earlier prioritized ART initiation in a large urban HIV clinic in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Sabine M; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Katabira, Catherine; Mbidde, Peter; Lange, Joep M A; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Coutinho, Alex; Manabe, Yukari C

    2012-06-01

    The World Health Organization recommends that treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-infected patients should be integrated with HIV care. In December 2008, a separate outdoor-integrated TB/HIV clinic was instituted for attendees of a large urban HIV clinic in Uganda. We sought to evaluate associated TB and HIV treatment outcomes. Routinely collected clinical, pharmacy, and laboratory data were merged with TB clinic data for patients initiating TB treatment in 2009 and with TB register data for patients in 2007. TB treatment outcomes and (timing of) antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in ART-naive patients [overall and stratified by CD4+ T cell (CD4) count] in 2007 and 2009 were compared. Nosocomial transmission rates could not be assessed. Three hundred forty-six patients were initiated on TB treatment in 2007 and 366 in 2009. Median CD4 counts at TB diagnosis did not differ. TB treatment cure or completion increased from 62% to 68%, death or default decreased from 33% to 25% (P ART-naive TB patients were initiated on ART in 2009 versus 2007 (57% and 66%, P = 0.031), but this decrease was only in patients with CD4 counts >250 cells per cubic millimeter (19% vs. 48%, P = 0.003). More patients were started on ART during TB treatment (94% vs. 78%, P ART initiation. This supports rollout of a fully integrated TB/HIV service delivery model throughout high-prevalence TB and HIV settings.

  3. AtriplaR/anti-TB combination in TB/HIV patients. Drug in focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semvua Hadija H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-administration of anti-tuberculosis and antiretroviral therapy is often inevitable in high-burden countries where tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection associated with HIV/AIDS. Concurrent use of rifampicin and several antiretroviral drugs is complicated by pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction. Method Pubmed and Google search following the key words tuberculosis, HIV, emtricitabine, tenofovir efavirenz, interaction were used to find relevant information on each drug of the fixed dose combination AtriplaR Results Information on generic name, trade name, pharmacokinetic parameter, metabolism and the pharmacokinetic interaction with Anti-TB drugs of emtricitabine, tenofovir, and efavirenz was obtained. Conclusion Fixed dose combination of emtricitabine/tenofovir/efavirenz (ATRIPLAR which has been approved by Food and Drug Administration shows promising results as far as safety and efficacy is concerned in TB/HIV co-infection patients, hence can be considered effective and safe antiretroviral drug in TB/HIV management for adult and children above 3 years of age.

  4. The Characteristics of TB Epidemic and TB/HIV Co-Infection Epidemic: A 2007-2013 Retrospective Study in Urumqi, Xinjiang Province, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to find out epidemiologic characteristic of tuberculosis (TB cases, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive cases among TB patients (TB/HIV co-infection through demographic, temporal, and spatial study in Urumqi.Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression were applied to identify the epidemiologic characteristics and risk factors of TB epidemic and TB/HIV co-infection epidemic. All addresses of each TB case, TB/HIV co-infection case, and administrative street were transformed into geographical coordinate. Subsequently, the geocoded address for 82 streets was transformed into a dot map used as the basis of spatial datasets. In addition, the paper also used quantile map and the spatial scan statistic in order to identify the spatial distribution and spatial clusters of TB epidemic and TB/HIV co-infection epidemic.There was a declining trend of the notification rates of TB epidemic from 2007 to 2009, as well as a rising trend from 2010 to 2013. However, the notification rates of TB/HIV co-infection epidemic showed a rising trend from 2007 to 2010, and a declining trend from 2011 to 2013. Moreover, a significant share of TB epidemic and TB/HIV co-infection epidemic happened between the age of 15 to 45 years old, indicating an increase in risk of TB and TB/HIV infection. It is worth noting that the risk of HIV infection for male TB patients was 2.947 times (95% CI [2.178, 3.988] than that of female patients. Han ethnicity and Uygur ethnicity in urban region accounted for a large proportion of total TB and TB/HIV co-infection cases. Most of the TB cases of minorities in Urumqi showed a statistically significant increase in risk of HIV infection than Han ethnicity in Urumqi. In addition, the spatial distribution of TB epidemic and TB/HIV co-infection epidemic was highly skewed. Most of the local clusters were located in urban area and rural-urban continuum where showed an increase in risk of TB and TB/HIV

  5. HIV-associated TB syndemic: A growing clinical challenge worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Theresa Montales

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The association of tuberculosis (TB with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS over the past several years has become an emerging syndemic. Approximately 10% of people living with HIV (PLHIV with latent TB infection will develop active TB disease each year. In this review, we highlight that this phenomenon is not limited to high endemic regions like Afro-Asian nations, but globalization/migration is causing increased case detection even in developed nations such as the United States (US. Active screening should be performed for tuberculosis in PLHIV. A high degree of clinical suspicion for tuberculosis is warranted in PLHIV presenting with fever, cough and unintentional weight loss. HIV-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB coinfection is often paucibacillary, precluding diagnosis by conventional diagnostics and/or smear-microscopy/culture. Improved detection of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis is now possible by incorporation of the GeneXPERT MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid Inc, Sunnyvale, USA. The World Health Organization (WHO recommends instituting immediate therapy for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in conjunction with ongoing or newly introduced antiretroviral therapy (ART. Vigilance is required to detect drug-induced organ injuries, and early-treatment induced immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS. Collaborating MTB and HIV activities in concentrated HIV epidemic settings should become a high public health priority.

  6. Provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling for TB patients and suspects in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhiambo, J; Kizito, W; Njoroge, A; Wambua, N; Nganga, L; Mburu, M; Mansoer, J; Marum, L; Phillips, E; Chakaya, J; De Cock, K M

    2008-03-01

    Integrated tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) services in a resource-constrained setting. Pilot provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling (PITC) for TB patients and suspects. Through partnerships, resources were mobilised to establish and support services. After community sensitisation and staff training, PITC was introduced to TB patients and then to TB suspects from December 2003 to December 2005. Of 5457 TB suspects who received PITC, 89% underwent HIV testing. Although not statistically significant, TB suspects with TB disease had an HIV prevalence of 61% compared to 63% for those without. Of the 614 suspects who declined HIV testing, 402 (65%) had TB disease. Of 2283 patients referred for cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, 1951 (86%) were enrolled, and of 1727 patients assessed for antiretroviral treatment (ART), 1618 (94%) were eligible and 1441 (83%) started treatment. PITC represents a paradigm shift and is feasible and acceptable to TB patients and TB suspects. Clear directives are nevertheless required to change practice. When offered to TB suspects, PITC identifies large numbers of persons requiring HIV care. Community sensitisation, staff training, multitasking and access to HIV care contributed to a high acceptance of HIV testing. Kenya is using this experience to inform national response and advocate wide PITC implementation in settings faced with the TB-HIV epidemic.

  7. CD4 cell count recovery in HIV/TB co-infected patients versus TB uninfected HIV patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanchu A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is lack of data comparing the improvement in CD4 count following antitubercular (ATT and antiretroviral therapy (ART in patients presenting with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Tuberculosis (HIV/TB dual infection compared with CD4 matched cohort of TB uninfected HIV patients initiated on ART. We sought to test the hypothesis; TB additionally contributes to reduction in CD4 count in HIV/TB co-infected patients and this would result in greater improvement in count following treatment compared with CD4 matched TB uninfected individuals. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective cohort study design we studied the change in CD4 cell counts in two groups of patients - those with CD4 cell count >100 cells / mm 3 (Group 1 and <100/mm 3 (Group 2 at presentation. In each group the change in CD4 cell count in dually infected patients following six-month ATT and ART was compared to cohorts of CD4 matched TB uninfected patients initiated on ART. Results: In Group 1 (52 patients dually infected subjects′ CD4 count improved from 150 cells/ mm 3 to 345 cells/mm 3 (P=0.001. In the control TB uninfected patients, the change was from 159 cells/mm 3 to 317 cells/mm 3 (P=0.001. Additional improvement in dually infected patients compared to the control group was not statistically significant (P=0.24. In Group 2 (65 patients dually infected subjects count improved from 49 cells/mm3 to 249 cells/mm 3 (P=0.001 where as in control TB uninfected patients improvement was from 50 cells/ mm 3 to 205 cells/mm 3 (P=0.001, there being statistically significant additional improvement in dually infected subjects (P=0.01. Conclusion: Greater increment in CD4 counts with ATT and ART in dually infected patients suggests that TB additionally influences the reduction of CD4 counts in HIV patients.

  8. Management of MDR-TB in HIV co-infected patients in Eastern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efsen, A M W; Schultze, A; Miller, R F

    2018-01-01

    below the target of 90%, reflecting the challenging patient population and the environment in which health care is provided. Urgent improvement of management of patients with TB/HIV in EE, in particular for those with MDR-TB, is needed and includes widespread access to rapid TB diagnostics, better......OBJECTIVES: Mortality among HIV patients with tuberculosis (TB) remains high in Eastern Europe (EE), but details of TB and HIV management remain scarce. METHODS: In this prospective study, we describe the TB treatment regimens of patients with multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB and use of antiretroviral...... access to and use of second-line TB drugs, timely ART initiation with viral load monitoring, and integration of TB/HIV care....

  9. HIV and intestinal parasites in adult TB patients in a teaching hospital in Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassu, Afework; Mengistu, Getahun; Ayele, Belete; Diro, Ermias; Mekonnen, Firew; Ketema, Dereje; Moges, Feleke; Mesfin, Tsehay; Getachew, Assefa; Ergicho, Bahiru; Elias, Daniel; Wondmikun, Yared; Aseffa, Abraham; Ota, Fusao

    2007-10-01

    The level of HIV infection and intestinal parasitoses among TB patients was assessed in a hospital-based cross-sectional study involving 257 patients in Gondar, Ethiopia. In TB patients, our study reported co-infection with HIV (52.1%) and intestinal parasites (40.9%) The high prevalence of HIV and intestinal parasites indicates an increased morbidity inTB patients and emphasized the importance of continued HIV sero-surveillance, stool analysis and treatment.

  10. Oxidative Stress Markers in Tuberculosis and HIV/TB Co-Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajopadhye, Shreewardhan Haribhau; Mukherjee, Sandeepan R; Chowdhary, Abhay S; Dandekar, Sucheta P

    2017-08-01

    Dysfunction of redox homeostasis has been implicated in many pathological conditions. An imbalance of pro- and anti-oxidants have been observed in Tuberculosis (TB) and its co-morbidities especially HIV/AIDS. The pro inflammatory milieu in either condition aggravates the physiological balance of the redox mechanisms. The present study therefore focuses on assessing the redox status of patients suffering from TB and HIV-TB co-infection. To assess the oxidative stress markers in the HIV-TB and TB study cohort. The current prospective study was conducted in Haffkine Institute, Parel, Maharashtra, India, during January 2013 to December 2015. Blood samples from 50 patients each suffering from active TB and HIV-TB co-infection were collected from Seth G.S.Medical College and KEM Hospital Mumbai and Group of Tuberculosis Hospital, Sewree Mumbai. Samples were processed and the experiments were carried out at the Department of Biochemistry, Haffkine Institute. Samples from 50 healthy volunteers were used as controls. Serum was assessed for pro-oxidant markers such as Nitric Oxide (NO), Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Species (TBARS), C-Reactive Protein (CRP), superoxide anion. Antioxidant markers such as catalase and Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) were assessed. Total serum protein, was also assessed. Among the pro-oxidants, serum NO levels were decreased in TB group while no change was seen in HIV-TB group. TBARS and CRP levels showed significant increase in both groups; superoxide anion increased significantly in HIV-TB group. Catalase levels showed decreased activities in TB group. SOD activity significantly increased in HIV-TB but not in TB group. The total serum proteins were significantly increased in HIV-TB and TB groups. The values of Control cohort were with the normal reference ranges. In the present study, we found the presence of oxidative stress to be profound in the TB and HIV-TB co-infection population.

  11. Immunoendocrine Interactions during HIV-TB Coinfection: Implications for the Design of New Adjuvant Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Veronica Suarez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, around 14 million individuals are coinfected with both tuberculosis (TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. In coinfected individuals, both pathogens weaken immunological system synergistically through mechanisms that are not fully understood. During both HIV and TB infections, there is a chronic state of inflammation associated to dramatic changes in immune cytokine and endocrine hormone levels. Despite this, the relevance of immunoendocrine interaction on both the orchestration of an effective immune response against both pathogens and the control of the chronic inflammation induced during HIV, TB, or both infections is still controversial. The present study reviews immunoendocrine interactions occurring during HIV and TB infections. We also expose our own findings on immunoendocrine cross talk in HIV-TB coinfection. Finally, we evaluate the use of adrenal hormones and their derivatives in immune-therapy and discuss the use of some of these compounds like the adjuvant for the prevention and treatment of TB in HIV patients.

  12. The progression of tb diagnosis in the hiv era: from microscopes to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    smear-negative pulmonary TB, hospitalised. HIV-infected patients with advanced and disseminated disease, young children and patients with extrapulmonary forms of TB, clinical case definitions and algorithms can be beneficial for guiding the empiric use of anti-TB treatment. Multiple clinical case definitions and algorithms ...

  13. Current integration of tuberculosis (TB and HIV services in South Africa, 2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C Chehab

    Full Text Available SETTING: Public Health Facilities in South Africa. OBJECTIVE: To assess the current integration of TB and HIV services in South Africa, 2011. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of 49 randomly selected health facilities in South Africa. Trained interviewers administered a standardized questionnaire to one staff member responsible for TB and HIV in each facility on aspects of TB/HIV policy, integration and recording and reporting. We calculated and compared descriptive statistics by province and facility type. RESULTS: Of the 49 health facilities 35 (71% provided isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT and 35 (71% offered antiretroviral therapy (ART. Among assessed sites in February 2011, 2,512 patients were newly diagnosed with HIV infection, of whom 1,913 (76% were screened for TB symptoms, and 616 of 1,332 (46% of those screened negative for TB were initiated on IPT. Of 1,072 patients newly registered with TB in February 2011, 144 (13% were already on ART prior to Tb clinical diagnosis, and 451 (42% were newly diagnosed with HIV infection. Of those, 84 (19% were initiated on ART. Primary health clinics were less likely to offer ART compared to district hospitals or community health centers (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: As of February 2011, integration of TB and HIV services is taking place in public medical facilities in South Africa. Among these services, IPT in people living with HIV and ART in TB patients are the least available.

  14. The implementation of isoniazid preventive therapy in HIV clinics: the experience from the TB/HIV in Rio (THRio) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durovni, Betina; Cavalcante, Solange C; Saraceni, Valeria; Vellozo, Vitoria; Israel, Giselle; King, Bonnie S; Cohn, Silvia; Efron, Anne; Pacheco, Antonio G; Moulton, Lawrence H; Chaisson, Richard E; Golub, Jonathan E

    2010-11-01

    The TB/HIV in Rio (THRio) study was launched in September 2005 to assess the impact of integrated tuberculosis (TB) and HIV treatment strategies in 29 HIV clinics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. THRio is a cluster-randomized trial (CRT) to determine whether routine screening for and treatment of latent TB in HIV clinic patients with access to antiretroviral therapy will reduce TB incidence at the clinic level. THRio is part of the Consortium to Respond Effectively to AIDS/TB Epidemic that is implementing research studies to assess the impact of bold, new public health paradigms for controlling the AIDS/TB epidemic. Twenty-nine public primary HIV clinics were randomly assigned a date to begin implementing TB screening procedures and provision of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) for TB/HIV coinfected patients. Final analysis of the CRT is expected in 2011. Starting at date of tuberculin skin test (TST)/IPT implementation at each clinic through August 2010, 1670 HIV-infected patients initiated IPT, of which 215 are still receiving treatment. Of the remaining 1455 patients, 1230 (85%) completed therapy and only 20 (1.2%) patients initiating IPT reported adverse reactions leading to discontinuation of therapy. IPT completion was higher among HIV-infected patients receiving HAART (87%) than those not yet receiving HAART (79%, P effort requires a package of activities including training, advocacy and reorganization of services.

  15. Global evidence directing regional preventive strategies in Southeast Asia for fighting TB/HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Myo Nyein; Moolphate, Saiyud; Paudel, Damodar; Jayathunge Ph, Mangalasiri; Duangrithi, Duangjai; Wangdi, Kinley; Aung, Thin Nyein Nyein; Lorga, Thaworn; Higuchi, Kazue

    2013-03-14

    Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-epidemics form a huge burden of disease in the Southeast Asia region. Five out of eleven nations in this region are high TB/HIV burden countries: Myanmar, Thailand, India, Indonesia and Nepal. The trends of TB incidence in these countries have been rising in recent years, in contrast to a falling global trend. Experts in the field of TB control and health service providers have been perplexed by the association of TB and HIV infections which causes a mosaic clinical presentation, a unique course with poor treatment outcomes including death. We conducted a review of contemporary evidence relating to TB/HIV control with the aims of assisting integrated health system responses in Southeast Asia and demystifying current evidence to facilitate translating it into practice.

  16. TB and HIV co-infection: when to start antiretroviral therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-10-02

    Oct 2, 2011 ... HIV and TB treatment in co-infected patients is a critical one. Previously, TB ... Indications for ART are based on an assessment of individual risk- benefit analysis of ..... An HIV test was positive, a lumbar puncture was acellular ...

  17. Management of TB/HIV Co-Infection in the Context of the DOTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reason for this deterioration in both developed and developing countries are mainly due to improper diagnosis and treatment, poor drug compliance, increase travel and migration, multi-resistant TB, increase number of refugee from wars and famine and lately to the pandemic of HIV/AIDS(4). Key Words: TB/HIV, ...

  18. HIV and TB co-infection in South Sudan: a three year retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dual HIV/TB co-infection is in Africa in which one-third ... HIV and TB rates. A high commercial sex workers presence in the towns. •. [10]. .... but lower than prevalences found in studies conducted .... A retrospective cohort study in South African.

  19. Prevalence and associated factors of TB/HIV co-infection among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Tuberculosis is one of the world's most common causes of death in the era of Human immunodeficiency virus. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated factors of TB/HIV co-infection. Methods: Hospital based retrospective studies were conducted among adult ...

  20. Prevalence and associated factors of TB/HIV co-infection among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of ART, patients whose marital status was single were significant predictors for ..... Table 1 Summary result of TB/HIV co-infection vs. socio-demographic, economic and clinical, and risk .... persons are younger than married persons and have a.

  1. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Elsa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Methods Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Results Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. Conclusions The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings.

  2. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patricia J; Cotrina, Armando; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gonzalez, Elsa; Buffardi, Anne L

    2010-09-28

    There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB) control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings.

  3. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB) control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Methods Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Results Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. Conclusions The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings. PMID:20875140

  4. Testing for TB Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adverse Events TB Treatment of Persons Living with HIV TB Treatment and Pregnancy TB Treatment for Children Drug-Resistant TB Research TB Epidemiologic Studies Consortium Research Projects Publications TB Trials Consortium Study ...

  5. Interferon gamma release assays for the diagnosis of latent TB infection in HIV-infected individuals in a low TB burden country.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cheallaigh, Clíona Ní

    2013-01-01

    Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) are used to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection. Two IGRAs are commercially available: the Quantiferon TB Gold In Tube (QFT-IT) and the T-SPOT.TB. There is debate as to which test to use in HIV+ individuals. Previous publications from high TB burden countries have raised concerns that the sensitivity of the QFT-IT assay, but not the T-SPOT.TB, may be impaired in HIV+ individuals with low CD4+ T-cell counts. We sought to compare the tests in a low TB burden setting.

  6. HIV screening among newly diagnosed TB patients: a cross sectional study in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Suzanne; Mejía, Fernando; Rojas, Marlene; Seas, Carlos; Van der Stuyft, Patrick; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Otero, Larissa

    2018-03-20

    Since 2006, the Peruvian National TB program (NTP) recommends voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) for all tuberculosis (TB) patients. Responding to the differential burden of both diseases in Peru, TB is managed in peripheral health facilities while HIV is managed in referral centers. This study aims to determine the coverage of HIV screening among TB patients and the characteristics of persons not screened. From March 2010 to December 2011 we enrolled new smear-positive pulmonary TB adults in 34 health facilities in a district in Lima. NTP staff offered VCT to all TB patients. Patients with an HIV positive result were referred for confirmation tests and management. We interviewed patients to collect their demographic and clinical characteristics and registered if patients opted in or out of the screening. Of the 1295 enrolled TB patients, nine had a known HIV diagnosis. Of the remaining, 76.1% (979) were screened for HIV. Among the 23.9% (307) not screened, 38.4% (118) opted out of the screening. TB patients at one of the health care facilities of the higher areas of the district (OR = 3.38, CI 95% 2.17-5.28 for the highest area and OR = 2.82, CI 95% 1.78-4.49 for the high area) as well as those reporting illegal drug consumption (OR = 1.65, CI 95% 1.15-2.37) were more likely not to be screened. Twenty-four were HIV positive (1.9% of all patients 1295, or 2.4% of those screened). Of 15 patients diagnosed with HIV during the TB episode, ten were enrolled in an HIV program. The median time between the result of the HIV screening and the first consultation at the HIV program was 82 days (IQR, 32-414). The median time between the result of the HIV screening and antiretroviral initiation was 148.5 days (IQR 32-500). An acceptable proportion of TB patients were screened for HIV in Lima. Referral systems of HIV positive patients should be strengthened for timely ART initiation.

  7. Major Challenges in Clinical Management of TB/HIV Coinfected Patients in Eastern Europe Compared with Western Europe and Latin America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efsen, Anne Marie W; Schultze, Anna; Post, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rates of TB/HIV coinfection and multi-drug resistant (MDR)-TB are increasing in Eastern Europe (EE). We aimed to study clinical characteristics, factors associated with MDR-TB and predicted activity of empiric anti-TB treatment at time of TB diagnosis among TB/HIV coinfected patients......% of participants in EE compared with 90-96% in other regions (pmanagement of TB/HIV patients in EE requires...... better access to TB diagnostics including DSTs, empiric anti-TB therapy directed at both susceptible and MDR-TB, and more widespread use of cART....

  8. Assessing the effect of TB-HIV collaborative activities on knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessing the effect of TB-HIV collaborative activities on knowledge and perception of TB patients ... Tanzania Journal of Health Research ... which requires to be corrected as soon as possible so as to enable patients to undertake active steps ...

  9. Treatment outcome of tb/hiv positive and negative smear positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In our previous study we found that half of the patients treated at the Nylon District Hospital tuberculosis (TB) treatment centre were seropositive. HIV does not only fuel the number of tuberculosis (TB) cases worldwide but it is also at least in part, responsible for the non-achievement of the 85% cure rate target.

  10. TB/HIV integration at primary care level: A quantitative assessment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-02

    Sep 2, 2012 ... Public Health Leadership Program, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. L Evarts, MPH. WitkoppenHealth ..... for TB symptoms. • 10% of TB suspects assessed by smear microscopy. Percentage of new HIV-positive patients starting. IPT (indicator B.2.1). 100%. 124 059 (12%). • 0% at 2 clinics.

  11. Utility of urine lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in diagnosing tuberculosis and predicting mortality with and without HIV: prospective TB cohort from the Thailand Big City TB Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanpimolkul, Gompol; Kawkitinarong, Kamon; Manosuthi, Weerawat; Sophonphan, Jiratchaya; Gatechompol, Sivaporn; Ohata, Pirapon June; Ubolyam, Sasiwimol; Iampornsin, Thatri; Katerattanakul, Pairaj; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the applicability and accuracy of the urine lipoarabinomannan (LAM) test in tuberculosis (TB)/HIV co-infected patients and HIV-negative patients with disseminated TB. Frozen urine samples obtained at baseline from patients in the TB research cohort with proven culture-positive TB were selected for blinded urine LAM testing. One hundred and nine patients were categorized into four groups: (1) HIV-positive patients with TB; (2) HIV-negative patients with disseminated TB; (3) HIV-negative immunocompromised patients with TB; and (4) patients with diseases other than TB. The sensitivity of urine LAM testing for culture-positive TB, specificity of urine LAM testing for patients without TB, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were assessed. The sensitivity of the urine LAM test in group 1 patients with a CD4 T-cell count of >100, ≤100, and ≤50 cells/mm 3 was 38.5%, 40.6%, and 45%, respectively. The specificity and PPV of the urine LAM test were >80%. The sensitivity of the test was 20% in group 2 and 12.5% in group 3, and the specificity and PPV were 100% for both groups. A positive urine LAM test result was significantly associated with death. This promising diagnostic tool could increase the yield of TB diagnosis and may predict the mortality rate of TB infection, particularly in TB/HIV co-infected patients. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Household HIV Testing Uptake among Contacts of TB Patients in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavindhran Velen

    Full Text Available In high HIV prevalence settings, offering HIV testing may be a reasonable part of contact tracing of index tuberculosis (TB patients. We evaluated the uptake of HIV counselling and testing (HCT among household contacts of index TB patients and the proportion of newly diagnosed HIV-infected persons linked into care as part of a household TB contact tracing study.We recruited index TB patients at public health clinics in two South African provinces to obtain consent for household contact tracing. During scheduled household visits we offered TB symptom screening to all household members and HCT to individuals ≥14years of age. Factors associated with HCT uptake were investigated using a random effects logistic regression model.Out of 1,887 listed household members ≥14 years old, 984 (52% were available during a household visit and offered HCT of which 108 (11% self-reported being HIV infected and did not undergo HCT. Of the remaining 876, a total of 304 agreed to HCT (35%; 26 (8.6% were newly diagnosed as HIV positive. In multivariable analysis, factors associated with uptake of HCT were prior testing (odds ratio 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-2.3 and another member in the household testing (odds ratio 2.4; 95% CI: 1.7-3.4. Within 3 months of testing HIV-positive, 35% reported initiating HIV care.HCT as a component of household TB contact tracing reached individuals without prior HIV testing, however uptake of HIV testing was poor. Strategies to improve HIV testing in household contacts should be evaluated.

  13. HIV-TB Coinfection among 57 Million Pregnant Women, Obstetric Complications, Alcohol Use, Drug Abuse, and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Dorian; Salami, Imoleayo; Davis, Janelle; Mbah, Florence; Kazeem, Aisha; Ash, Abreah; Babino, Justin; Carter, Laquiesha; Salemi, Jason L; Spooner, Kiara K; Olaleye, Omonike A; Salihu, Hamisu M

    2018-01-01

    HIV and tuberculosis represent diseases of major public health importance worldwide. Very little is known about HIV-TB coinfection among pregnant women, especially from industrialized settings. In this study, we examined the association between TB, HIV, and HIV-TB coinfection among pregnant mothers and obstetric complications, alcohol use, drug abuse, and depression. We examined inpatient hospital discharges in the United States from January 1, 2002, through December 31, 2014. We employed multivariable survey logistic regression to generate adjusted estimates for the association between infection status and study outcomes. We analyzed approximately 57 million records of pregnant women and their delivery information. HIV-TB coinfection was associated with the highest risks for several obstetric complications, alcohol use, and drug abuse. The risk for alcohol abuse was more than twice as high among HIV-monoinfected as compared to TB-monoinfected mothers. That risk gap more than doubled with HIV-TB coinfection. Both HIV-monoinfected and HIV-TB coinfected mothers experienced similarly increased risks for depression. Mothers with HIV-TB coinfection experienced relatively heightened risks for obstetric complications, alcohol use, and drug abuse. The findings of this study underscore the importance of augmenting and enhancing social and structural support systems for HIV-TB coinfected pregnant women.

  14. Tuberculosis: The Connection between TB and HIV (the AIDS Virus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Regimen for Latent TB Infection-Patient Education Brochure Posters Mantoux Tuberculin Skin Test Wall Chart World TB ... site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple ...

  15. TB-HIV co-infection among pregnant women in Karnataka, South India: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Shastri; Sharath, Burugina N; Anita, Shet; Lalitha, Ravindra; Prasad, Tripathy J; Rewari, Bharat B

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a significant contributor to mortality in HIV-infected patients. Concurrent TB infection is also a significant contributing factor to maternal mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected pregnant women. Studies addressing the outcomes of TB and HIV co-infection among pregnant women are generally infrequent. Although limited, the records maintained by the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) and the National AIDS Control Programme (NACP) in Karnataka State, Southern India provide information about the numbers of pregnant women who are co-infected with TB and HIV and their pregnancy outcomes. We reviewed the data and conducted this study to understand how TB-HIV co-infection influences the outcomes of pregnancy in this setting. We sought to determine the incidence and treatment and delivery outcomes of TB-HIV co-infected pregnant women in programmatic settings in Karnataka State in southern India. The study participants were all the HIV-infected pregnant women who were screened for tuberculosis under the NACP from 2008 to 2012. For the purposes of this study, the program staff in the field gathered the data regarding on treatment and delivery outcomes of pregnant women. A total of seventeen pregnant women with TB-HIV co-infection were identified among 3,165,729 pregnant women (for an incidence of 5.4 per million pregnancies). The median age of these pregnant women was 24 years, and majority were primiparous women with WHO HIV stage III disease and were on a stavudine-based ART regimen. The maternal mortality rates were 18% before delivery and 24% after delivery. The abortion rate was 24%, and the neonatal mortality rate was 10%. The anti-tuberculosis treatment and anti-retroviral treatment outcome mortality rates were 30% and 53%, respectively. Although the incidence of TB among the HIV-infected pregnant women was marginally less than that among the non-HIV-infected women, the delivery outcomes were relatively

  16. Institutional factors and HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines the principal institutional factors affecting the slow progress in reaching agreed targets in Africa regarding the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria. It focuses on three key factors: political analysis, strategic business approach and international inputs. Most of the analyses tend to look at the technical aspects of disease prevention and control, of political analysis there is a marked absence. Yet, we know that wider contextual or macro factors such as power and political decision making can make or break a programme. Many senior managers in public sector institutions are preoccupied with day-to-day work. Successful businesses in the private sector have some things in common with each other. Outstanding leadership, a strategic and action orientated culture, highly focused on comparative strengths on priorities and quality being some of the key ones. Adopting such successful business characteristics might make the difference to public institutions. The move to results based institutions by focussing on outputs and outcomes is for the better. However, we still need to rigorously examine the quality of inputs that the increasing availability of funds is being used on. This is especially so in relation to needing a better balance between aid for health services and that for institutional and health systems development. In addition, technical advisers from development partners need to work more across a ministry of health on institutional and management change to have a greater impact on achieving targets. 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  17. HIV, multidrug-resistant TB and depressive symptoms: when three conditions collide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mrinalini; Isaakidis, Petros; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Kumar, Ajay M V; Nagaraja, Sharath Burugina; Valikayath, Asmaa; Jha, Santosh; Jadhav, Bindoo; Ladomirska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Management of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is highly challenging. Such patients are subject to long and potentially toxic treatments and may develop a number of different psychiatric illnesses such as anxiety and depressive disorders. A mental health assessment before MDR-TB treatment initiation may assist in early diagnosis and better management of psychiatric illnesses in patients already having two stigmatising and debilitating diseases. To address limited evidence on the baseline psychiatric conditions of HIV-infected MDR-TB patients, we aimed to document the levels of depressive symptoms at baseline, and any alteration following individualized clinical and psychological support during MDR-TB therapy, using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) tool, among HIV-infected patients. This was a retrospective review of the medical records of an adult (aged >15 years) HIV/MDR-TB cohort registered for care during the period of August 2012 through to March 2014. A total of 45 HIV/MDR-TB patients underwent baseline assessment using the PHQ-9 tool, and seven (16%) were found to have depressive symptoms. Of these, four patients had moderate to severe depressive symptoms. Individualized psychological and clinical support was administered to these patients. Reassessments were carried out for all patients after 3 months of follow-up, except one, who died during the period. Among these 44 patients, three with baseline depressive symptoms still had depressive symptoms. However, improvements were observed in all but one after 3 months of follow-up. Psychiatric illnesses, including depressive symptoms, during MDR-TB treatment demand attention. Routine administration of baseline mental health assessments by trained staff has the potential to assist in determining appropriate measures for the management of depressive symptoms during MDR-TB treatment, and help in improving overall treatment outcomes. We recommend

  18. TB/HIV risk factors identified from a General Household Survey of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sathiya Susuman Appunni

    2014-05-13

    May 13, 2014 ... SAHARA-J: Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS: An. Open Access ... Analyses have been undertaken based on data from the General. Household .... with HIV and/or TB from an epidemiological perspective in. South Africa. ... The South Africa GHS (2006) is the large-scale data source used in this article.

  19. Treatment: Latent TB Infection (LTBI) and TB Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adverse Events TB Treatment of Persons Living with HIV TB Treatment and Pregnancy TB Treatment for Children Drug-Resistant TB Research TB Epidemiologic Studies Consortium Research Projects Publications TB Trials Consortium Study ...

  20. The multi-step process of building TB/HIV collaboration in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eang Mao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS have synergistic health impacts in terms of disease development and progression. Therefore, collaborative TB and HIV/AIDS activities are a logical health systems response. However, the establishment of these activities presents a challenge for countries that have strong vertical disease programs that differ in their implementation philosophies. Here, we review the process by which TB/HIV collaboration was established in Cambodia. A cycle of overlapping and mutually reinforcing initiatives – local research; piloted implementation with multiple options; and several rounds of policy formulation guided by a cross-functional Technical Working Group – was used to drive nationwide introduction of a full set of TB/HIV collaborative activities. Senior Ministry of Health officials and partner organizations brought early attention to TB/HIV. Both national programs implemented initial screening and testing interventions, even in the absence of a detailed, overarching framework. The use of multiple options for HIV testing identified which programmatic options worked best, and early implementation and pilots determined what unanswered questions required further research. Local conduct of this research – on co-treatment timing and TB symptom screening – speeded adoption of the results into policy guidance, and clarified the relative roles of the two programs. Roll-out is continuing, and results for a variety of key indicators, including screening PLHIV for TB, and testing TB patients for HIV, are at 70-80% and climbing. This experience in Cambodia illustrates the influence of health research on policy, and demonstrates that clear policy guidance, the pursuit of incremental advances, and the use of different approaches to generate evidence can overcome structural barriers to change and bring direct benefits to patients.

  1. Impact of ART on TB case fatality stratified by CD4 count for HIV-positive TB patients in Cape Town, South Africa (2009-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Richard; Caldwell, Judy; Middelkoop, Keren; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Wood, Robin

    2014-08-15

    To identify determinants of tuberculosis (TB) case fatality including the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) at different CD4 thresholds for HIV-positive adult and adolescent TB patients. Through a retrospective analysis of the electronic TB database, we identified the HIV status of newly registered patients aged ≥15 years. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine the risk factors for TB case fatality in these patients. In 2009, 2010, and 2011, 25,841, 26,104, and 25,554 newly registered adult TB patients were treated in primary health care clinics in Cape Town, of whom 49.7%, 50.4%, and 50.9% were HIV positive. ART uptake increased over 3 years from 43% to 64.9%, and case fatality of the HIV-positive patients decreased from 7.0% to 5.8% (P ART had a substantial decrease in case fatality. The difference in case fatality between patients on ART and not on ART was most pronounced at low CD4 counts with the positive influence of ART noted up to a CD4 count threshold of 350 cells per cubic millimeter (P ART uptake, in 2011, 21% of the patients with CD4 counts ART during TB treatment. This study showed a relatively poor uptake of ART among severely immune-compromised TB patients. Patients with CD4 counts ART during TB treatment, and ART initiation should be prioritized for this category of patients.

  2. Viral hepatitis and HIV-associated tuberculosis: Risk factors and TB treatment outcomes in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likanonsakul Sirirat

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The occurrence of tuberculosis (TB, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, and viral hepatitis infections in the same patient poses unique clinical and public health challenges, because medications to treat TB and HIV are hepatotoxic. We conducted an observational study to evaluate risk factors for HBsAg and/or anti-HCV reactivity and to assess differences in adverse events and TB treatment outcomes among HIV-infected TB patients. Methods Patients were evaluated at the beginning, during, and at the end of TB treatment. Blood samples were tested for aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, total bilirubin (BR, complete blood count, and CD4+ T lymphocyte cell count. TB treatment outcomes were assessed at the end of TB treatment according to international guidelines. Results Of 769 enrolled patients, 752 (98% had serologic testing performed for viral hepatitis: 70 (9% were reactive for HBsAg, 237 (31% for anti-HCV, and 472 (63% non-reactive for both markers. At the beginning of TB treatment, 18 (26% patients with HBsAg reactivity had elevated liver function tests compared with 69 (15% patients non-reactive to any viral marker (p = 0.02. At the end of TB treatment, 493 (64% were successfully treated. Factors independently associated with HBsAg reactivity included being a man who had sex with men (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–4.3 and having low TB knowledge (AOR, 1.8; CI, 1.0–3.0. Factors most strongly associated with anti-HCV reactivity were having injection drug use history (AOR, 12.8; CI, 7.0–23.2 and living in Bangkok (AOR, 15.8; CI, 9.4–26.5. The rate of clinical hepatitis and death during TB treatment was similar in patients HBsAg reactive, anti-HCV reactive, both HBsAg and anti-HCV reactive, and non-reactive to any viral marker. Conclusion Among HIV-infected TB patients living in Thailand, markers of viral hepatitis infection, particularly hepatitis C virus

  3. Integration of TB-HIV services at an ANC facility in Frances Baard District, Northern Cape, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, J A; Heunis, C; Kigozi, G; Osoba, T; van der Walt, M

    2015-03-21

    Integrated tuberculosis-human immunodeficiency virus (TB-HIV) service delivery as part of maternal health services, including antenatal care (ANC), is widely recommended. This study assessed the implementation of collaborative TB-HIV service delivery at a hospital-based ANC service unit. A record review of a random sample of 308 pregnant women attending the ANC service between April 2011 and February 2012 was conducted. Data were extracted from registers and patient case notes. Outcomes included the proportion of women who underwent HIV counselling and testing (HCT), CD4 count testing, antiretroviral treatment (ART), cotrimoxazole preventive treatment (CPT), TB screening and isoniazid preventive treatment (IPT). Analysis measured variations in patient characteristics associated with service delivery. All women underwent HCT; 80% of those who tested HIV-positive were screened for TB. Most (85.9%) of the HIV-positive women received a CD4 count. However, only 12.9% of eligible women received ART prophylaxis onsite, only 35.7% were referred for initiation of ART, only 42.3% commenced IPT and none received CPT or further investigations for TB. HIV-negative women had 2.6 higher odds (95%CI 1.3-5.3) of receiving TB screening than their HIV-positive counterparts. Although the identification of HIV-positive women and TB suspects was adequate, implementation of other TB-HIV collaborative activities was sub-optimal.

  4. HIV/TB CO-INFECTION:THE CHALLENGES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-02

    Dec 2, 2013 ... latent MTB infection to active TB disease, in which the annual risk of developing TB disease from MTB ... fresh air ventilation; exposure of highly vulnerable individuals; and reduced efficacy or failure of .... Consequently, some patients may develop acute renal failure or acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  5. Effect of vitamin A and vitamin C supplementation on oxidative stress in HIV and HIV-TB co-infection at Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, Oluwamayowa; Rotimi, Kunle; Ikumawoyi, Victor; Adeyemo, Titilope; Olayemi, Sunday

    2017-06-01

    HIV and TB infections are both associated with elevated oxidative stress parameters. Anti-oxidant supplementation may offer beneficial effects in positively modulating oxidative stress parameters in HIV and HIV-TB infected patients. We investigated the effects of vitamin A and C supplementation on oxidative stress in HIV infected and HIV-TB co-infected subjects. 40 HIV/TB co-infected and 50 HIV mono-infected patients were divided into 2 equal groups. Participants provided demographic information and blood was collected to determine oxidative stress parameters before and after vitamin A (5000 IU) and C (2600 mg) supplementation for 1 month. There was a significantly (p < 0.05) higher level of Malondialdehyde (MDA) at baseline for HIV infected subjects compared with HIV-TB co-infected subjects. There was a significantly (p < 0.05) lower level of MDA and higher level of Catalase (CAT) in subjects administered supplementation compared to subjects without supplementation for the HIV infected group. There was a significantly lower level of Reduced Glutathione (GSH), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and higher level of MDA after one month of supplementation compared with baseline levels for HIV/TB co infected subjects. A similar result was also obtained for the HIV mono-infected groups which had a significantly lower level of SOD, MDA and CAT compared to the baseline. There was a significantly lower level of GSH and SOD, and higher level of MDA after supplementation compared with the baseline for HIV/TB co-infected subjects. Comparing the indices at baseline and post no-supplementation in HIV/TB co-infection showed no significant differences in the oxidative stress parameters. HIV/TB co-infection and HIV mono-infection seems to diminish the capacity of the anti-oxidant system to control oxidative stress, however exogenous anti-oxidant supplementation appears not to have beneficial roles in positively modulating the associated oxidative stress.

  6. The high burden of tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in a large Zambian prison: a public health alert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henostroza, German; Topp, Stephanie M; Hatwiinda, Sisa; Maggard, Katie R; Phiri, Winifreda; Harris, Jennifer B; Krüüner, Annika; Kapata, Nathan; Ayles, Helen; Chileshe, Chisela; Reid, Stewart E

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) represent two of the greatest health threats in African prisons. In 2010, collaboration between the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia, the Zambia Prisons Service, and the National TB Program established a TB and HIV screening program in six Zambian prisons. We report data on the prevalence of TB and HIV in one of the largest facilities: Lusaka Central Prison. Between November 2010 and April 2011, we assessed the prevalence of TB and HIV amongst inmates entering, residing, and exiting the prison, as well as in the surrounding community. The screening protocol included complete history and physical exam, digital radiography, opt-out HIV counseling and testing, sputum smear and culture. A TB case was defined as either bacteriologically confirmed or clinically diagnosed. A total of 2323 participants completed screening. A majority (88%) were male, median age 31 years and body mass index 21.9. TB symptoms were found in 1430 (62%). TB was diagnosed in 176 (7.6%) individuals and 52 people were already on TB treatment at time of screening. TB was bacteriologically confirmed in 88 cases (3.8%) and clinically diagnosed in 88 cases (3.8%). Confirmed TB at entry and exit interventions were 4.6% and 5.3% respectively. Smear was positive in only 25% (n = 22) of bacteriologically confirmed cases. HIV prevalence among inmates currently residing in prison was 27.4%. Ineffective TB and HIV screening programs deter successful disease control strategies in prison facilities and their surrounding communities. We found rates of TB and HIV in Lusaka Central Prison that are substantially higher than the Zambian average, with a trend towards concentration and potential transmission of both diseases within the facility and to the general population. Investment in institutional and criminal justice reform as well as prison-specific health systems is urgently required.

  7. The High Burden of Tuberculosis (TB) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in a Large Zambian Prison: A Public Health Alert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henostroza, German; Topp, Stephanie M.; Hatwiinda, Sisa; Maggard, Katie R.; Phiri, Winifreda; Harris, Jennifer B.; Krüüner, Annika; Kapata, Nathan; Ayles, Helen; Chileshe, Chisela; Reid, Stewart E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) represent two of the greatest health threats in African prisons. In 2010, collaboration between the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia, the Zambia Prisons Service, and the National TB Program established a TB and HIV screening program in six Zambian prisons. We report data on the prevalence of TB and HIV in one of the largest facilities: Lusaka Central Prison. Methods Between November 2010 and April 2011, we assessed the prevalence of TB and HIV amongst inmates entering, residing, and exiting the prison, as well as in the surrounding community. The screening protocol included complete history and physical exam, digital radiography, opt-out HIV counseling and testing, sputum smear and culture. A TB case was defined as either bacteriologically confirmed or clinically diagnosed. Results A total of 2323 participants completed screening. A majority (88%) were male, median age 31 years and body mass index 21.9. TB symptoms were found in 1430 (62%). TB was diagnosed in 176 (7.6%) individuals and 52 people were already on TB treatment at time of screening. TB was bacteriologically confirmed in 88 cases (3.8%) and clinically diagnosed in 88 cases (3.8%). Confirmed TB at entry and exit interventions were 4.6% and 5.3% respectively. Smear was positive in only 25% (n = 22) of bacteriologically confirmed cases. HIV prevalence among inmates currently residing in prison was 27.4%. Conclusion Ineffective TB and HIV screening programs deter successful disease control strategies in prison facilities and their surrounding communities. We found rates of TB and HIV in Lusaka Central Prison that are substantially higher than the Zambian average, with a trend towards concentration and potential transmission of both diseases within the facility and to the general population. Investment in institutional and criminal justice reform as well as prison-specific health systems is urgently required. PMID

  8. TB-IRIS and remodelling of the T cell compartment in highly immunosuppressed HIV+ patients with TB: the CAPRI T (ANRS-12614) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, V.; Pean, P.; Jasenosky, L.D.; Madec, Y.; Laureillard, D.; Sok, T.; Sath, S.; Borand, L.; Marcy, O.; Chan, S.; Tsitsikov, E.; Delfraissy, J.-F.; Blanc, F.-X.; Goldfeld, A.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of tuberculosis (TB)-associated immune reconstitution syndrome (IRIS) upon immunological recovery and the T cell compartment after initiation of TB and antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design and methods We prospectively evaluated T cell immunophenotypes by flow cytometry and cytokines by Luminex assays in a subset (n=154) of highly immunosuppressed HIV+ patients with TB from the CAMELIA randomized clinical trial. We compared findings from patients who developed TB-IRIS to findings from patients who did not develop TB-IRIS. Data were evaluated with mixed effect linear regression, Kaplan-Meier estimates, and Wilcoxon rank sum tests, and q-values were calculated to control for multiple comparisons. Results Development of TB-IRIS was associated with significantly greater pre-ART frequencies of HLA-DR+CD45RO+CD4+, CCR5+CD4+, OX40+CD4+, and Fas+ effector memory (EM) CD8+ T cells, and significantly elevated levels of plasma IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-10 and viral load. Post-ART initiation, EM CD4+ and Fas+ EM CD4+ T cell frequencies significantly expanded, and central memory (CM) CD4+ T cell frequencies significantly contracted in patients who experienced TB-IRIS. By week 34 post-TB treatment initiation, EM/CM CD4+ T cell ratios were markedly higher in TB-IRIS versus non-TB-IRIS patients. Conclusions A distinct pattern of pre-ART T cell and cytokine markers appear to poise the immune response to develop TB-IRIS. Experience of TB-IRIS is then associated with long-term remodeling of the CD4+ T cell memory compartment towards an EM-dominated phenotype. We speculate that these pre- and post-ART TB-IRIS-associated immune parameters may contribute to superior immune control of TB/HIV co-infection and better clinical outcome. PMID:25486415

  9. Empirical evidence for synchrony in the evolution of TB cases and HIV+ contacts among the San Francisco homeless.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdeh Mohtashemi

    Full Text Available The re-emergence of tuberculosis (TB in the mid-1980s in many parts of the world, including the United States, is often attributed to the emergence and rapid spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. Although it is well established that TB transmission is particularly amplified in populations with high HIV prevalence, the epidemiology of interaction between TB and HIV is not well understood. This is partly due to the scarcity of HIV-related data, a consequence of the voluntary nature of HIV status reporting and testing, and partly due to current practices of screening high risk populations through separate surveillance programs for HIV and TB. The San Francisco Department of Public Health, TB Control Program, has been conducting active surveillance among the San Francisco high-risk populations since the early 1990s. We present extensive TB surveillance data on HIV and TB infection among the San Francisco homeless to investigate the association between the TB cases and their HIV+ contacts. We applied wavelet coherence and phase analyses to the TB surveillance data from January 1993 through December 2005, to establish and quantify statistical association and synchrony in the highly non-stationary and ostensibly non-periodic waves of TB cases and their HIV+ contacts in San Francisco. When stratified by homelessness, we found that the evolution of TB cases and their HIV+ contacts is highly coherent over time and locked in phase at a specific periodic scale among the San Francisco homeless, but no significant association was observed for the non-homeless. This study confirms the hypothesis that the dynamics of HIV and TB are significantly intertwined and that HIV is likely a key factor in the sustenance of TB transmission among the San Francisco homeless. The findings of this study underscore the importance of contact tracing in detection of HIV+ individuals that may otherwise remain undetected, and

  10. Antiretroviral Treatment Scale-Up and Tuberculosis Mortality in High TB/HIV Burden Countries: An Econometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Isabel; Bendavid, Eran; Korenromp, Eline L

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces mortality in patients with active tuberculosis (TB), but the population-level relationship between ART coverage and TB mortality is untested. We estimated the reduction in population-level TB mortality that can be attributed to increasing ART coverage across 41 high HIV-TB burden countries. We compiled TB mortality trends between 1996 and 2011 from two sources: (1) national program-reported TB death notifications, adjusted for annual TB case detection rates, and (2) WHO TB mortality estimates. National coverage with ART, as proportion of HIV-infected people in need, was obtained from UNAIDS. We applied panel linear regressions controlling for HIV prevalence (5-year lagged), coverage of TB interventions (estimated by WHO and UNAIDS), gross domestic product per capita, health spending from domestic sources, urbanization, and country fixed effects. Models suggest that that increasing ART coverage was followed by reduced TB mortality, across multiple specifications. For death notifications at 2 to 5 years following a given ART scale-up, a 1% increase in ART coverage predicted 0.95% faster mortality rate decline (p = 0.002); resulting in 27% fewer TB deaths in 2011 alone than would have occurred without ART. Based on WHO death estimates, a 1% increase in ART predicted a 1.0% reduced TB death rate (peconometric analysis supports a substantial impact of ART on population-level TB mortality realized already within the first decade of ART scale-up, that is apparent despite variable-quality mortality data.

  11. Factors associated with linkage to HIV care and TB treatment at community-based HIV testing services in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Sue-Ann; Sloot, Rosa; Draper, Heather R; Naidoo, Pren; Burger, Ronelle; Beyers, Nulda

    2018-01-01

    Diagnosing HIV and/or TB is not sufficient; linkage to care and treatment is conditional to reduce the burden of disease. This study aimed to determine factors associated with linkage to HIV care and TB treatment at community-based services in Cape Town, South Africa. This retrospective cohort study utilized routinely collected data from clients who utilized stand-alone (fixed site not attached to a health facility) and mobile HIV testing services in eight communities in the City of Cape Town Metropolitan district, between January 2008 and June 2012. Clients were included in the analysis if they were ≥12 years and had a known HIV status. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) logistic regression models were used to assess the association between determinants (sex, age, HIV testing service and co-infection status) and self-reported linkage to HIV care and/or TB treatment. Linkage to HIV care was 3 738/5 929 (63.1%). Linkage to HIV care was associated with the type of HIV testing service. Clients diagnosed with HIV at mobile services had a significantly reduced odds of linking to HIV care (aOR 0.7 (CI 95%: 0.6-0.8), p<0.001. Linkage to TB treatment was 210/275 (76.4%). Linkage to TB treatment was not associated with sex and service type, but was associated with age. Clients in older age groups were less likely to link to TB treatment compared to clients in the age group 12-24 years (all, p-value<0.05). A large proportion of clients diagnosed with HIV at mobile services did not link to care. Almost a quarter of clients diagnosed with TB did not link to treatment. Integrated community-based HIV and TB testing services are efficient in diagnosing HIV and TB, but strategies to improve linkage to care are required to control these epidemics.

  12. Clinical and laboratory profile of patients with TB/HIV coinfection: A case series of 50 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand K Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis (TB is said to be one of the commonest opportunistic infection in patients with HIV/AIDS. Objective: To study the clinical and laboratory profile of patients with HIV/TB coinfection. Materials and Methods: Fifty adult TB patients having confirmed HIV seropositivity were included in randomized manner. A detailed history and thorough physical examination was done. Laboratory and radiological investigations were carried out as appropriately warranted. Results: Most of the patients were farm workers (30% followed by manual laborers (22% and transport drivers (16%. Heterosexual route was found in 86% of patients. Cough was present in 94% while fever and weight loss in 86% and 78% of patients, respectively. Out of 50 patients, 40% had only pulmonary TB (PTB, 46% had pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB, 10% had only EPTB and 4% had multisystemic EPTB. Mediastinal lymphadenopathy was present in 34% while pleural effusion and extra-thoracic lymph nodes was present in 20% and 18% of patients, respectively. Positive smear for acid-fast bacilli (AFB was found in 25.58% while positive Mantoux test was found in 32.14% of patients. Conclusion: HIV/TB coinfection is more common in sexually active age group and commonest mode of HIV infection is heterosexual transfer. Sputum smear AFB and Mantoux test positivity is low in TB patients having HIV. Disseminated TB is common in HIV. Mediastinal lymphadenopathy is common site among extra-pulmonary tuberculosis.

  13. A stochastic spatial model of HIV dynamics with an asymmetric battle between the virus and the immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Hai; Shuai, J W

    2010-01-01

    A stochastic spatial model based on the Monte Carlo approach is developed to study the dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We aim to propose a more detailed and realistic simulation frame by incorporating many important features of HIV dynamics, which include infections, replications and mutations of viruses, antigen recognitions, activations and proliferations of lymphocytes, and diffusions, encounters and interactions of virions and lymphocytes. Our model successfully reproduces the three-phase pattern observed in HIV infection, and the simulation results for the time distribution from infection to AIDS onset are also in good agreement with the clinical data. The interactions of viruses and the immune system in all the three phases are investigated. We assess the relative importance of various immune system components in the acute phase. The dynamics of how the two important factors, namely the viral diversity and the asymmetric battle between HIV and the immune system, result in AIDS are investigated in detail with the model.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of the rapid urine lipoarabinomannan test for pulmonary tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults in Ghana-findings from the DETECT HIV-TB study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Stephanie; Kenu, Ernest; Lartey, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rapid diagnostic tests are urgently needed to mitigate HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB) mortality. We evaluated diagnostic accuracy of the rapid urine lipoarabinomannan (LAM) test for pulmonary TB and assessed the effect of a two-sample strategy. METHODS: HIV-infected adults eligible...

  15. Role of oral candidiasis in TB and HIV co-infection: AIDS Clinical Trial Group Protocol A5253.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiboski, C H; Chen, H; Ghannoum, M A; Komarow, L; Evans, S; Mukherjee, P K; Isham, N; Katzenstein, D; Asmelash, A; Omozoarhe, A E; Gengiah, S; Allen, R; Tripathy, S; Swindells, S

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the association between oral candidiasis and tuberculosis (TB) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa, and to investigate oral candidiasis as a potential tool for TB case finding. Protocol A5253 was a cross-sectional study designed to improve the diagnosis of pulmonary TB in HIV-infected adults in high TB prevalence countries. Participants received an oral examination to detect oral candidiasis. We estimated the association between TB disease and oral candidiasis using logistic regression, and sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. Of 454 participants with TB culture results enrolled in African sites, the median age was 33 years, 71% were female and the median CD4 count was 257 cells/mm(3). Fifty-four (12%) had TB disease; the prevalence of oral candidiasis was significantly higher among TB cases (35%) than among non-TB cases (16%, P oral candidiasis when controlling for CD4 count and antifungals (95%CI 1.2-4.7, P = 0.01). The sensitivity of oral candidiasis as a predictor of TB was 35% (95%CI 22-48) and the specificity 85% (95%CI 81-88). We found a strong association between oral candidiasis and TB disease, independent of CD4 count, suggesting that in resource-limited settings, oral candidiasis may provide clinical evidence for increased risk of TB and contribute to TB case finding.

  16. Catching the missing million: experiences in enhancing TB & DR-TB detection by providing upfront Xpert MTB/RIF testing for people living with HIV in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Raizada

    Full Text Available A critical challenge in providing TB care to People Living with HIV (PLHIV is establishing an accurate bacteriological diagnosis. Xpert MTB/RIF, a highly sensitive and specific rapid tool, offers a promising solution in addressing these challenges. This study presents results from PLHIV taking part in a large demonstration study across India wherein upfront Xpert MTB/RIF testing was offered to all presumptive PTB cases in public health facilities.The study covered a population of 8.8 million across 18 sub-district level tuberculosis units (TU, with one Xpert MTB/RIF platform established at each TU. All HIV-infected patients suspected of TB (both TB and Drug Resistant TB (DR-TB accessing public health facilities in study area were prospectively enrolled and provided upfront Xpert MTB/RIF testing.2,787 HIV-infected presumptive pulmonary TB cases were enrolled and 867 (31.1%, 95% Confidence Interval (CI 29.4‒32.8 HIV-infected TB cases were diagnosed under the study. Overall 27.6% (CI 25.9-29.3 of HIV-infected presumptive PTB cases were positive by Xpert MTB/RIF, compared with 12.9% (CI 11.6-14.1 who had positive sputum smears. Upfront Xpert MTB/RIF testing of presumptive PTB and DR-TB cases resulted in diagnosis of 73 (9.5%, CI 7.6‒11.8 and 16 (11.2%, CI 6.7‒17.1 rifampicin resistance cases, respectively. Positive predictive value (PPV for rifampicin resistance detection was high 97.7% (CI 89.3‒99.8, with no significant difference with or without prior history of TB treatment.The study results strongly demonstrate limitations of using smear microscopy for TB diagnosis in PLHIV, leading to low TB and DR-TB detection which can potentially lead to either delayed or sub-optimal TB treatment. Our findings demonstrate the usefulness and feasibility of addressing this diagnostic gap with upfront of Xpert MTB/RIF testing, leading to overall strengthening of care and support package for PLHIV.

  17. Semi-Analytic Solution of HIV and TB Co-Infection Model BOLARIN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    HIV/TB co-infection is the most powerful known risk factor for ... homotopy transform to generate a convergent series solution of ... the boundary of the domain Ω. The operator A can be divided into two parts L and N, where L is the linear part,.

  18. The impact of HIV status and antiretroviral treatment on TB treatment outcomes of new tuberculosis patients attending co-located TB and ART services in South Africa: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nglazi, Mweete D; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Wood, Robin; Kaplan, Richard

    2015-11-19

    The implementation of collaborative TB-HIV services is challenging. We, therefore, assessed TB treatment outcomes in relation to HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) among TB patients attending a primary care service with co-located ART and TB clinics in Cape Town, South Africa. In this retrospective cohort study, all new TB patients aged ≥ 15 years who registered and initiated TB treatment between 1 October 2009 and 30 June 2011 were identified from an electronic database. The effects of HIV-infection and ART on TB treatment outcomes were analysed using a multinomial logistic regression model, in which treatment success was the reference outcome. The 797 new TB patients included in the analysis were categorized as follows: HIV- negative, in 325 patients (40.8 %); HIV-positive on ART, in 339 patients (42.5 %) and HIV-positive not on ART, in 133 patients (16.7 %). Overall, bivariate analyses showed no significant difference in death and default rates between HIV-positive TB patients on ART and HIV-negative patients. Statistically significant higher mortality rates were found among HIV-positive patients not on ART compared to HIV-negative patients (unadjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.25; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.53-6.91). When multivariate analyses were conducted, the only significant difference between the patient categories on TB treatment outcomes was that HIV-positive TB patients not on ART had significantly higher mortality rates than HIV-negative patients (adjusted OR 4.12; 95 % CI 1.76-9.66). Among HIV-positive TB patients (n = 472), 28.2 % deemed eligible did not initiate ART in spite of the co-location of TB and ART services. When multivariate analyses were restricted to HIV-positive patients in the cohort, we found that being HIV-positive not on ART was associated with higher mortality (adjusted OR 7.12; 95 % CI 2.95-18.47) and higher default rates (adjusted OR 2.27; 95 % CI 1.15-4.47). There was no significant difference in death and

  19. Strategy to better select HIV-infected individuals for latent TB treatment in BCG-vaccinated population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Hui Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the T-SPOT.TB interferon-γ releasing assay and the tuberculin skin test (TST, for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection(LTBI and the development of subsequent active tuberculosis, in BCG-vaccinated HIV-infected individuals. METHODS: HIV-infected individuals without clinical suspicion of active TB or a past history of TB were enrolled from 1 January 2008 to 30 November 2010. Both T-SPOT.TB test and TST were offered to the participants whom were followed up prospectively until April 30, 2012 for development of TB. RESULTS: Among the 909 participants, 25% had positive TST reactions with cut-off point of 5 mm and 15% had positive T-SPOT.TB results. After a median follow-up of 2.97 years, there were 5 cases developed culture-confirmed active TB (all had dual positive TST and T-SPOT.TB results, and the incidence was 0.17 per 100 person-years. The relative risks (RRs for subsequent active TB in HIV-infected individuals with positive TST results, positive T-SPOT.TB results and dual positive results compared with the risk for individuals with negative results were 40.6 (95% CI 2.1-767.9, 73.9 (95% CI 3.9-1397.7 and 226.5 (95% CI 12.0-4284, respectively. The number needed to treat to prevent one subsequent TB case among patients with a positive TST, a positive T-SPOT.TB and dual positive results was 35, 22 and 8 respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Adopting positive results of the TST and T-SPOT.TB to screen LTBI among BCG-vaccinated HIV-infected individuals might be feasible. Number needed to treat for isoniazid preventive therapy could be reduced significantly by using dual positive strategy.

  20. Prevalence of post-traumatic stress symptoms and associated factors in tuberculosis (TB), TB retreatment and/or TB-HIV co-infected primary public health-care patients in three districts in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Naidoo, Pamela; Matseke, Gladys; Louw, Julia; McHunu, Gugu; Tutshana, Bomkazi

    2013-01-01

    High rates of tuberculosis (TB) and TB/HIV co-infection is often linked with mental health issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, which is further associated with poor health outcomes. In a country such as South Africa where rates of these infectious diseases are high, it is concerning that there is limited/no data on prevalence rates of mental disorders such as PTSD and its associated factors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of PTSD symptoms and associated factors in TB, TB retreatment and/or TB-HIV co-infected primary public health-care patients in three districts in South Africa. Brief screening self-report tools were used to measure: PTSD symptoms, psychological distress (anxiety and depression) and alcohol misuse. Other relevant measures, such as adherence to medication, stressful life events and sexual risk-taking behaviours, were obtained through structured questions. A total of 4900 public primary care adult patients from clinics in high TB burden districts from three provinces in South Africa participated. All the patients screened positive for TB (either new or retreatment cases). The prevalence of PTSD symptoms was 29.6%. Patients who screened positive for PTSD symptoms and psychological distress were more likely to be on antidepressant medication. Factors that predicted PTSD symptoms were poverty, residing in an urban area, psychological distress, suicide attempt, alcohol and/or drug use before sex, unprotected sex, TB-HIV co-infected and the number of other chronic conditions. Health-care systems should be strengthened to improve delivery of mental health care, by focusing on existing programmes and activities, such as those which address the prevention and treatment of TB and HIV.

  1. High variability of TB, HIV, hepatitis C treatment and opioid substitution therapy among prisoners in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jana; Schmidt, Daniel; Kollan, Christian; Lehmann, Marc; Bremer, Viviane; Zimmermann, Ruth

    2017-10-25

    In Germany, medical care of prisoners is completely separated from extramural health care. The extent and quality of medical care among prisoners in Germany are therefore largely unknown. We performed a secondary data analysis of pharmacy sales data for tuberculosis (TB), HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and opioid substitution treatment (OST) delivered to prisons in 11 federal states (FS) in Germany between 01/2012 and 03/2013. The aims of this study were to assess (i) the treatment availability for the selected diseases and OST in German prisons, (ii) the proportion of prisoners treated per FS and overall for TB, HIV, HCV and OST during the study period. Substances unique to or typically used for the treatment of each disease were defined as marker substances with defined daily doses (DDD). For each marker substance we assessed the cumulative number of DDD, the average daily number of DDD (DDD d ) and average treatment prevalence per day in percent (adTP). Accordingly, the DDD d represents one person treated per day and the adTP means the proportion of prisoners treated per day. We compared the adTP of the diseases with previously measured prevalences. We obtained data from pharmacies supplying prisons in 11 of 16 German FS. Of the included prisons, 41% were supplied with medicines for TB, 71% for HIV and 58% for HCV and OST. Twice as many delivered marker substances for TB were indicated for the continuation phase and chemoprevention than the intensive phase. The HIV adTP ranged from 0.06% to 0.94%, HCV adTP ranged from 0.03% to 0.59% and OST adTP ranged from 0% to 7.90%. The overall adTP for the respective treatment was 0.39% for HIV, 0.12% for HCV and 2.18% for OST. According to our findings treatment rates for TB were consistent with the expected TB prevalence, at least in Berlin. HIV treatment seems to be offered to an adequate proportion of estimated infected prisoners. In contrast, the HCV treatment prevalence was low. High variation among FS in provision of all

  2. Hypovitaminosis D increases TB co-infection risk on HIV patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayatri, Y. A. A. A.; Sukmawati, D. D.; Utama, S. M.; Somia, I. K. A.; Merati, T. P.

    2018-03-01

    Tuberculosis is causes of mortality and morbidity in patients with HIV. Hypovitaminosis D, a defective cell-mediated immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been extensively described in HIV patients, but studies assessing the role of vitamin D in TB-HIV co-infection are lacking. We, therefore, conducted a 1:1 pair- matched case-control study to verify hypovitaminosis D possible risk factor of TB- HIV co- infection. Consecutive HIV patients starting ARV and sex, age and CD4 cell count matched were by recruiting. Tuberculosis has confirmed by thepresence of acid-fast bacilli in sputum or mycobacterium detected in specimens culture/Gene Xpert/PCR. Vitamin D levels were by measuring direct chemiluminescent immunoassay on a LIAISON®25OH analyzer. The study comprised 25 cases and 25 controls, median (interquartile range) 25(OH)D3 serum concentration were 19.80 (12.15-27.45) ng/mL in cases and 33.30 (27.2-39.4) ng/mL in controls (PHIV patients.(OR 26.154 (90% CI: 4.371-156.541); p HIV co-infection.

  3. Adverse Events among HIV/MDR-TB Co-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral and Second Line Anti-TB Treatment in Mumbai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaakidis, Petros; Varghese, Bhanumati; Mansoor, Homa; Cox, Helen S.; Ladomirska, Joanna; Saranchuk, Peter; Da Silva, Esdras; Khan, Samsuddin; Paryani, Roma; Udwadia, Zarir; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Reid, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Background Significant adverse events (AE) have been reported in patients receiving medications for multidrug- and extensively-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB & XDR-TB). However, there is little prospective data on AE in MDR- or XDR-TB/HIV co-infected patients on antituberculosis and antiretroviral therapy (ART) in programmatic settings. Methods Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is supporting a community-based treatment program for drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a slum setting in Mumbai, India since 2007. Patients are being treated for both diseases and the management of AE is done on an outpatient basis whenever possible. Prospective data were analysed to determine the occurrence and nature of AE. Results Between May 2007 and September 2011, 67 HIV/MDR-TB co-infected patients were being treated with anti-TB treatment and ART; 43.3% were female, median age was 35.5 years (Interquartile Range: 30.5–42) and the median duration of anti-TB treatment was 10 months (range 0.5–30). Overall, AE were common in this cohort: 71%, 63% and 40% of patients experienced one or more mild, moderate or severe AE, respectively. However, they were rarely life-threatening or debilitating. AE occurring most frequently included gastrointestinal symptoms (45% of patients), peripheral neuropathy (38%), hypothyroidism (32%), psychiatric symptoms (29%) and hypokalaemia (23%). Eleven patients were hospitalized for AE and one or more suspect drugs had to be permanently discontinued in 27 (40%). No AE led to indefinite suspension of an entire MDR-TB or ART regimen. Conclusions AE occurred frequently in this Mumbai HIV/MDR-TB cohort but not more frequently than in non-HIV patients on similar anti-TB treatment. Most AE can be successfully managed on an outpatient basis through a community-based treatment program, even in a resource-limited setting. Concerns about severe AE in the management of co-infected patients are justified, however, they should not cause delays

  4. Training social workers to enhance patient-centered care for drug-resistant TB-HIV in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelnick, J R; Seepamore, B; Daftary, A; Amico, K R; Bhengu, X; Friedland, G; Padayatchi, N; Naidoo, K; O'Donnell, M R

    2018-03-21

    KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, is the epicenter of an epidemic of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection, characterized by low rates of medication adherence and retention in care. Social workers may have a unique role to play in improving DR-TB-HIV outcomes. We designed, implemented and evaluated a model-based pilot training course on patient-centered care, treatment literacy in DR-TB and HIV coinfection, patient support group facilitation, and self-care. Ten social workers participated in a 1-day training course. Post-training questionnaire scores showed significant overall gains ( P = 0.003). A brief training intervention may be a useful and feasible way to engage social workers in patient-centered care for DR-TB and HIV coinfection.

  5. Hierarchy Low CD4+/CD8+ T-Cell Counts and IFN-γ Responses in HIV-1+ Individuals Correlate with Active TB and/or M.tb Co-Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lingyun; Zhang, Xinyun; Gao, Yan; Xu, Yunya; Zhang, Shu; Yu, Shenglei; Weng, Xinhua; Shen, Hongbo; Chen, Zheng W; Jiang, Weimin; Zhang, Wenhong

    2016-01-01

    Detailed studies of correlation between HIV-M.tb co-infection and hierarchy declines of CD8+/CD4+ T-cell counts and IFN-γ responses have not been done. We conducted case-control studies to address this issue. 164 HIV-1-infected individuals comprised of HIV-1+ATB, HIV-1+LTB and HIV-1+TB- groups were evaluated. Immune phenotyping and complete blood count (CBC) were employed to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts; T.SPOT.TB and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) were utilized to detect ESAT6, CFP10 or PPD-specific IFN-γ responses. There were significant differences in median CD4+ T-cell counts between HIV-1+ATB (164/μL), HIV-1+LTB (447/μL) and HIV-1+TB- (329/μL) groups. Hierarchy low CD4+ T-cell counts (500/μL) were correlated significantly with active TB but not M.tb co-infection. Interestingly, hierarchy low CD8+ T-cell counts were not only associated significantly with active TB but also with M.tb co-infection (PHierarchy low CD8+ T-cell counts and effector function in HIV-1-infected individuals are correlated with both M.tb co-infection and active TB. Hierarchy low CD4+ T-cell counts and Th1 effector function in HIV-1+ individuals are associated with increased frequencies of active TB, but not M.tb co-infection.

  6. Abandono do tratamento de tuberculose em co-infectados TB/HIV Abandono del tratamiento de la tuberculosis en coinfectados TB/HIV Abandonment of tuberculosis treatment among patinets co-infected with TB/HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaneide Leal Ataide Rodrigues

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetivou analisar os motivos que levam os pacientes coinfectados TB/HIV a abandonar o tratamento da TB e conhecer a conduta da equipe de saúde frente a esse abandono. A abordagem foi qualitativa. Utilizou-se a entrevista semiestruturada, aplicada a quarenta e cinco profissionais que atuam em uma Unidade de Referência no Pará. Após análise temática, foram construídas duas unidades: fatores relacionados aos doentes que dificultam adesão ao tratamento da TB; e fatores relacionados ao serviço que contribuem para o abandono. Mostrou-se, com relação aos pacientes, que a baixa condição socioeconômica foi o fator mais frequente que propicia o abandono. Também efeitos adversos dos medicamentos, uso de drogas lícitas, e pouca motivação pessoal facilitam esse desfecho. Quanto ao Serviço, as questões relacionadas à estrutura física, organização do processo de trabalho e acesso mostraram-se relevantes para não adesão. Os resultados apontam para a necessidade de alterar as práticas desenvolvidas nos Serviços.Este estudio objetivó analizar los motivos que llevan a los pacientes coinfectados de TB/VIH a abandonar el tratamiento de la TB y conocer la conducta del equipo de salud frente a dicho abandono. El abordaje fue cualitativo. Se utilizó la entrevista semiestructurada, aplicada a cuarenta y cinco profesionales que actúan en una Unidad de Referencia en Pará. Luego del análisis temático fueron construidas dos unidades: factores relativos a los enfermos que dificultan su adhesión al tratamiento de la TB y factores relativos al servicio que contribuyen al abandono. Se demostró, con respecto a los pacientes, que la baja condición socio-económica fue el factor más frecuente que propicia el abandono. También los efectos adversos de los medicamentos, el uso de drogas lícitas y la poca motivación personal facilitan ese desenlace. Respecto del Servicio, las cuestiones relacionadas a la estructura f

  7. Addressing challenges in scaling up TB and HIV treatment integration in rural primary healthcare clinics in South Africa (SUTHI): a cluster randomized controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Kogieleum; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Yende-Zuma, Nonhlanhla; Padayatchi, Nesri; Barker, Pierre; Nunn, Andrew; Subrayen, Priashni; Abdool Karim, Salim S

    2017-11-13

    A large and compelling clinical evidence base has shown that integrated TB and HIV services leads to reduction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)- and tuberculosis (TB)-associated mortality and morbidity. Despite official policies and guidelines recommending TB and HIV care integration, its poor implementation has resulted in TB and HIV remaining the commonest causes of death in several countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including South Africa. This study aims to reduce mortality due to TB-HIV co-infection through a quality improvement strategy for scaling up of TB and HIV treatment integration in rural primary healthcare clinics in South Africa. The study is designed as an open-label cluster randomized controlled trial. Sixteen clinic supervisors who oversee 40 primary health care (PHC) clinics in two rural districts of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa will be randomized to either the control group (provision of standard government guidance for TB-HIV integration) or the intervention group (provision of standard government guidance with active enhancement of TB-HIV care integration through a quality improvement approach). The primary outcome is all-cause mortality among TB-HIV patients. Secondary outcomes include time to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation among TB-HIV co-infected patients, as well as TB and HIV treatment outcomes at 12 months. In addition, factors that may affect the intervention, such as conditions in the clinic and staff availability, will be closely monitored and documented. This study has the potential to address the gap between the establishment of TB-HIV care integration policies and guidelines and their implementation in the provision of integrated care in PHC clinics. If successful, an evidence-based intervention comprising change ideas, tools, and approaches for quality improvement could inform the future rapid scale up, implementation, and sustainability of improved TB-HIV integration across sub-Sahara Africa and other resource

  8. Provider-initiated HIV testing & counselling in incident tuberculosis cases under National TB Programme conditions at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Tirupati, south India

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    Alladi Mohan

    2017-01-01

    >Interpretation & conclusions: The findings of this study showed that a higher proportion of TB patients underwent HIV testing (75% compared to the national figure of 63 per cent in 2013-2014. HIV seropositivity (4.6% in TB patients who underwent HIV testing was similar to the five per cent figure observed at national level during 2013-2014. The HIV status of 25 per cent of patients with incident TB still remained unknown, suggesting a need for better integration and co-ordination for effective management of HIV-TB co-infection.

  9. TB in HIV Patients: Strengthening Control Measures | Saleh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is clear that there are several factors e.g. the increasing disparities in wealth, health inequality leading to poor access to health services, free movement of ... in recent times across the globe and more to the sub-Saharan Africa. this rise is not unrelated to the rise of the prevalence HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus).

  10. Pulmonary Immune-Compartment-Specific Interferon Gamma Responses in HIV-Infected Individuals with Active Tuberculosis (TB in an Area of High TB Prevalence

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    S. Buldeo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of data on the pulmonary immune-compartment interferon gamma (IFNγ response to M. tuberculosis, particularly in settings of high tuberculosis (TB prevalence and in HIV-coinfected individuals. This data is necessary to understand the diagnostic potential of commercially available interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs in both the pulmonary immune-compartment and peripheral blood. We used intracellular cytokine staining by flow cytometry to assess the IFNγ response to purified protein derivative (PPD and early secretory antigen 6 (ESAT6 in induced sputa (ISp and blood samples from HIV-infected, smear-negative, TB suspects. We found that individuals with active TB disease produced significantly less IFNγ in response to PPD in their induced sputa samples than individuals with non-active TB (control group. This difference was not reflected in the peripheral blood, even within the CD27− CD4+ memory T lymphocyte population. These findings suggest that progression to active TB disease may be associated with the loss of IFNγ secretion at the site of primary infection. Our findings highlight the importance of studying pulmonary immune-compartment M. tuberculosis specific responses to elucidate IFNγ secretion across the spectrum of TB disease.

  11. Evaluation of immune responses in HIV infected patients with pleural tuberculosis by the QuantiFERON® TB-Gold interferon-gamma assay

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    Lekabe Jacob M

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis of tuberculous (TB pleuritis is difficult and better diagnostic tools are needed. New blood based interferon-gamma (IFN-γ tests are promising, but sensitivity could be low in HIV positive patients. The IFN-γ tests have not yet been validated for use in pleural fluid, a compartment with higher level of immune activation than in blood. Methods The QuantiFERON TB®-Gold (QFT-TB test was analysed in blood and pleural fluid from 34 patients presenting with clinically suspected pleural TB. Clinical data, HIV status and CD4 cell counts were recorded. Adenosine deaminase activity (ADA analysis and TB culture were performed on pleural fluid. Results The patients were categorised as 'confirmed TB' (n = 12, 'probable TB' (n = 16 and 'non-TB' pleuritis (n = 6 based on TB culture results and clinical and biochemical criteria. The majority of the TB patients were HIV infected (82%. The QFT-TB in pleural fluid was positive in 27% and 56% of the 'confirmed TB' and 'probable TB' cases, respectively, whereas the corresponding sensitivities in blood were 58% and 83%. Indeterminate results in blood (25% were caused by low phytohemagglutinin (PHA = positive control IFN-γ responses, significantly lower in the TB patients as compared to the 'non-TB' cases (p = 0.02. Blood PHA responses correlated with CD4 cell count (r = 0.600, p = 0.028. In contrast, in pleural fluid indeterminate results (52% were caused by high Nil (negative control IFN-γ responses in both TB groups. Still, the Nil IFN-γ responses were lower than the TB antigen responses (p Conclusion The QFT-TB test in blood could contribute to the diagnosis of TB pleuritis in the HIV positive population. Still, the number of inconclusive results is too high to recommend the commercial QFT-TB test for routine use in pleural fluid in a TB/HIV endemic resource-limited setting.

  12. Predictive and prognostic properties of TB-LAM among HIV-positive patients initiating ART in Johannesburg, South Africa.

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    d'Elia, Alexander; Evans, Denise; McNamara, Lynne; Berhanu, Rebecca; Sanne, Ian; Lönnermark, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    While the diagnostic properties of the TB LAM urine assay (LAM) have been well-described, little is known about its predictive and prognostic properties at ART initiation in a routine clinic setting. We describe the predictive and prognostic properties of LAM in HIV-positive patients initiating ART at an urban hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. Retrospective study of HIV-positive adults (>18 years) who initiated standard first-line ART between February 2012 and April 2013 and had a LAM test at initiation. In HIV-positive patients with no known TB at ART initiation, we assessed the sensitivity, specificity and positive/negative likelihood ratios of LAM to predict incident TB within 6 months of ART initiation. In addition, in patients with a TB diagnosis and on TB treatment ART initiation, we measured the CD4 response at 6 months on ART. Of the 274 patients without TB at ART initiation, 65% were female with median CD4 count of 213 cells/mm(3). Among the 14 (5.1%) patients who developed active TB, none were urine LAM +ve at baseline. LAM had poor sensitivity (0.0% 95% CI 0.00-23.2) to predict incident TB within 6 months of initiation. We analyzed 22 patients with a confirmed TB diagnosis at initiation separately. Of these, LAM +ve patients (27%) showed lower CD4 gains compared to LAM negative patients (median increase 103 vs 199 cells/mm(3); p = 0.08). LAM has limited value for accurately predicting incident TB in patients with higher CD4 counts after ART initiation. LAM may help identify TB/HIV co-infected patients at ART initiation who respond more slowly to treatment and require targeted interventions to improve treatment outcomes. Larger studies with longer patient follow-up are needed.

  13. Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Actions of Vitamin D in Combating TB/HIV

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    Anna K. Coussens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB disease activation is now believed to arise due to a lack of inflammatory homeostatic control at either end of the spectrum of inflammation: either due to immunosuppression (decreased antimicrobial activity or due to immune activation (excess/aberrant inflammation. Vitamin D metabolites can increase antimicrobial activity in innate immune cells, which, in the context of HIV-1 coinfection, have insufficient T cell-mediated help to combat Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB infection. Moreover, maintaining vitamin D sufficiency prior to MTB infection enhances the innate antimicrobial response to T cell-mediated interferon-γ. Conversely, vitamin D can act to inhibit expression and secretion of a broad range of inflammatory mediators and matrix degrading enzymes driving immunopathology during active TB and antiretroviral- (ARV- mediated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS. Adjunct vitamin D therapy during treatment of active TB may therefore reduce lung pathology and TB morbidity, accelerate resolution of cavitation and thereby decrease the chance of transmission, improve lung function following therapy, prevent relapse, and prevent IRIS in those initiating ARVs. Future clinical trials of vitamin D for TB prevention and treatment must be designed to detect the most appropriate primary endpoint, which in some cases should be anti-inflammatory and not antimicrobial.

  14. Trèlat's beads as oral manifestations in patients with HIV/TB

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    Elcio Magdalena Giovani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a contagious infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Koch's bacillus. Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and TB has reached a significant importance as a public health problem and this association has been recognized as the most significant event that changed “the balance between man and Koch's bacillus” in the last century, and has a large contribution to the risk for disease spreading. Tuberculosis has two main standard categories of clinical manifestations: primary and secondary. Primary TB is responsible for the initial infection with lungs being the involved organ. Oral lesions are observed as a secondary TB clinical manifestation with most frequent sites being hard and soft palate, tongue, lips, gums, tonsils, and salivary glands. A case of classical TB lesions in the oral cavity is reported, and the importance of a correct diagnosis through careful history taking is emphasized. Treatment selection needs to be done assertively, with great determination and building a link between patient and treatment protocol, in order to promote patient's adherence.

  15. Clinical Presentation, Aetiology, and Outcomes of Meningitis in a Setting of High HIV and TB Prevalence

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    Keneuoe Hycianth Thinyane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningitis causes significant morbidity and mortality globally. The aim of this study was to study the clinical presentation, aetiology, and outcomes of meningitis among adult patients admitted to Queen Mamohato Memorial Hospital in Maseru, Lesotho, with a diagnosis of meningitis. A cross-sectional study was conducted between February and April 2014; data collected included presenting signs and symptoms, laboratory results, and clinical outcomes. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise data; association between variables was analysed using Fisher’s exact test. 56 patients were enrolled; the HIV coinfection rate was 79%. The most common presenting symptoms were altered mental status, neck stiffness, headache, and fever. TB meningitis was the most frequent diagnosis (39%, followed by bacterial (27%, viral (18%, and cryptococcal meningitis (16%. In-hospital mortality was 43% with case fatalities of 23%, 40%, 44%, and 90% for TB, bacterial, cryptococcal, and viral meningitis, respectively. Severe renal impairment was significantly associated with mortality. In conclusion, the causes of meningitis in this study reflect the high prevalence of HIV and TB in our setting. Strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality due to meningitis should include improving diagnostic services to facilitate early detection and treatment of meningitis and timely initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients.

  16. Mortality from HIV and TB coinfections is higher in Eastern Europe than in Western Europe and Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Mocroft, Amanda; Post, Frank A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of death in HIV-infected patients worldwide. We aimed to study clinical characteristics and outcome of 1075 consecutive patients diagnosed with HIV/TB from 2004 to 2006 in Europe and Argentina. METHODS: One-year mortality was assessed...... in patients stratified according to region of residence, and factors associated with death were evaluated in multivariable Cox models. RESULTS: At TB diagnosis, patients in Eastern Europe had less advanced immunodeficiency, whereas a greater proportion had a history of intravenous drug use, coinfection...... with 7, 9 and 11% in Central/Northern Europe, Southern Europe, and Argentina, respectively (P

  17. Cost-effectiveness of initiating antiretroviral therapy at different points in TB treatment in HIV-TB co-infected ambulatory patients in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Kogieleum; Grobler, Anneke C; Deghaye, Nicola; Reddy, Tarylee; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Gray, Andrew; Karim, Salim Abdool

    2015-01-01

    Objective Initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) during tuberculosis (TB) treatment improves survival in TB-HIV co-infected patients. In patients with CD4+ counts benefit of early ART initiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the costs and cost effectiveness of starting ART at various time points during TB treatment in patients with CD4+ counts ≥50cells/mm3. Methods In the SAPiT trial, 642 HIV-TB co-infected patients were randomized to three arms, either receiving ART within 4 weeks of starting TB treatment (early treatment arm; Arm-1), after the intensive phase of TB treatment (late treatment arm; Arm-2), or after completing TB treatment (sequential arm; Arm-3). Direct healthcare costs were measured from a provider perspective using a micro-costing approach. The incremental cost per death averted was calculated using the trial outcomes. Results For patients with CD4+ count≥50cells/mm3, median monthly variable costs per patient were $116, $113 and $102 in Arms-1, -2 and -3, respectively. There were 12 deaths in 177 patients in Arm-1, 8 deaths in 180 patients in the Arm-2 and 19 deaths in 172 patients in Arm-3. While the costs were lower in Arm-3, it had a substantially higher mortality rate. The incremental cost per death averted associated with moving from Arm-3 to Arm-2 was $4199. There was no difference in mortality between Arm-1 and Arm-2, but Arm-1 was slightly more expensive. Conclusions Initiation of ART after the completion of the intensive phase of TB treatment is cost effective for patients with CD4+ counts≥50cells/mm3. PMID:26167618

  18. Outcomes and Impact of HIV Prevention, ART and TB Programs in Swaziland – Early Evidence from Public Health Triangulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, Cari; Mndzebele, Sibongile; Hlophe, Thabo; Garcia Calleja, Jesus Maria; Korenromp, Eline L.; Stoneburner, Rand; Pervilhac, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Swaziland’s severe HIV epidemic inspired an early national response since the late 1980s, and regular reporting of program outcomes since the onset of a national antiretroviral treatment (ART) program in 2004. We assessed effectiveness outcomes and mortality trends in relation to ART, HIV testing and counseling (HTC), tuberculosis (TB) and prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT). Methods Data triangulated include intervention coverage and outcomes according to program registries (2001-2010), hospital admissions and deaths disaggregated by age and sex (2001-2010) and population mortality estimates from the 1997 and 2007 censuses and the 2007 demographic and health survey. Results By 2010, ART reached 70% of the estimated number of people living with HIV/AIDS with CD4<350/mm3, with progressively improving patient retention and survival. As of 2010, 88% of health facilities providing antenatal care offered comprehensive PMTCT services. The HTC program recorded a halving in the proportion of adults tested who were HIV-infected; similarly HIV infection rates among HIV-exposed babies halved from 2007 to 2010. Case fatality rates among hospital patients diagnosed with HIV/AIDS started to decrease from 2005–6 in adults and especially in children, contrasting with stable case fatality for other causes including TB. All-cause child in-patient case fatality rates started to decrease from 2005–6. TB case notifications as well as rates of HIV/TB co-infection among notified TB patients continued a steady increase through 2010, while coverage of HIV testing and CPT for co-infected patients increased to above 80%. Conclusion Against a background of high, but stable HIV prevalence and decreasing HIV incidence, we documented early evidence of a mortality decline associated with the expanded national HIV response since 2004. Attribution of impact to specific interventions (versus natural epidemic dynamics) will require additional data from future

  19. Consensus statement: Management of drug-induced liver injury in HIV-positive patients treated for TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Jong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced liver injury (DILI in HIV/tuberculosis (TB co-infected patients is a common problem in the South African setting, and re-introduction of anti-TB drugs can be challenging for the healthcare worker. Although international guidelines on the re-introduction of TB treatment are available, the definition of DILI is not uniform, management of antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV co-infection is not mentioned, and the guidance on management is not uniform and lacks a practical approach. In this consensus statement, we summarise important aspects of DILI and provide practical guidance for healthcare workers for different patient groups and healthcare settings on the re-introduction of anti-TB drugs and ART in HIV/TB co-infected individuals presenting with DILI.

  20. MDR-TB Outbreak among HIV-Negative Tunisian Patients followed during 11 Years.

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    Naira Dekhil

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB outbreaks that evolve, from the outset, in a context strictly negative for HIV infection deserve special consideration since they reflect the true intrinsic epidemic potential of the causative strain. To our knowledge, the long-term evolution of such exceptional outbreaks and the treatment outcomes for the involved patients has never been reported hitherto. Here we provide a thorough description, over an 11-year period, of an MDR-TB outbreak that emerged and expanded in an HIV-negative context, Northern Tunisia.From October 2001 to June 2011, the MDR-TB outbreak involved 48 HIV-negative individuals that are mainly young (mean age 31.09 yrs; 89.6% male and noninstitutionalized. Drug susceptibility testing coupled to mutational analysis revealed that initial transmission involved an isolate that was simultaneously resistant to isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and streptomycin. The causative Haarlem3-ST50 outbreak strain expanded mainly as an 11-banded IS6110 RFLP profile (77.1%, from which a 12-banded subclone evolved. After undergoing a 2-year treatment with second-line drugs, 22 (45.8% patients were cured and 3 (6.2% completed treatment, thus yielding an overall treatment success rate of 52.1%. Among the patients that experienced unfavorable treatment outcomes, 10 (20.8% failed treatment, 3 (6.2% were lost to follow-up, 5 (10.4% died, and 5 (10.4% could not be evaluated. Poor adherence to treatment was found to be the main independent predictor of unfavorable outcomes (HR: 9.15; 95% CI 1.72-48.73; P = 0.014. Intriguingly, the evolved 12-banded subclone proved significantly associated with unfavorable outcomes (HR: 4.90; 95% CI 1.04-23.04, P = 0.044. High rate of fatality and relapse was further demonstrated at the long-term, since 70% of those whose treatment failed have died, and 24% among those deemed successfully treated have relapsed.Taken together, the data obtained in this study indicate that MDR-TB

  1. TB/HIV Co-Infection Care in Conflict-Affected Settings: A Mapping of Health Facilities in the Goma Area, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboru, Berthollet Bwira; Ogwang, Brenda A; Namegabe, Edmond Ntabe; Mbasa, Ndemo; Kabunga, Deka Kambale; Karafuli, Kambale

    2013-09-01

    HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis (TB) are major contributors to the burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa. The two diseases have been described as a harmful synergy as they are biologically and epidemiologically linked. Control of TB/HIV co-infection is an integral and most challenging part of both national TB and national HIV control programmes, especially in contexts of instability where health systems are suffering from political and social strife. This study aimed at assessing the provision of HIV/TB co-infection services in health facilities in the conflict-ridden region of Goma in Democratic Republic of Congo. A cross-sectional survey of health facilities that provide either HIV or TB services or both was carried out. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the data which was analysed using descriptive statistics. Eighty facilities were identified, of which 64 facilities were publicly owned. TB care was more available than HIV care (in 61% vs. 9% of facilities). Twenty-three facilities (29%) offered services to co-infected patients. TB/HIV co-infection rates among patients were unknown in 82% of the facilities. Only 19 facilities (24%) reported some coordination with and support from concerned diseases' control programmes. HIV and TB services are largely fragmented, indicating imbalances and poor coordination by disease control programmes. HIV and TB control appear not to be the focus of health interventions in this crisis affected region, despite the high risks of TB and HIV infection in the setting. Comprehensive public health response to this setting calls for reforms that promote joint TB/HIV co-infection control, including improved leadership by the HIV programmes that accuse weaknesses in this conflict-ridden region.

  2. TB/HIV Co-Infection Care in Conflict-Affected Settings: A Mapping of Health Facilities in the Goma Area, Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthollet Bwira Kaboru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis (TB are major contributors to the burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa. The two diseases have been described as a harmful synergy as they are biologically and epidemiologically linked. Control of TB/HIV co-infection is an integral and most challenging part of both national TB and national HIV control programmes, especially in contexts of instability where health systems are suffering from political and social strife. This study aimed at assessing the provision of HIV/TB co-infection services in health facilities in the conflict-ridden region of Goma in Democratic Republic of Congo. Methods A cross-sectional survey of health facilities that provide either HIV or TB services or both was carried out. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the data which was analysed using descriptive statistics. Results Eighty facilities were identified, of which 64 facilities were publicly owned. TB care was more available than HIV care (in 61% vs. 9% of facilities. Twenty-three facilities (29% offered services to co-infected patients. TB/HIV co-infection rates among patients were unknown in 82% of the facilities. Only 19 facilities (24% reported some coordination with and support from concerned diseases’ control programmes. HIV and TB services are largely fragmented, indicating imbalances and poor coordination by disease control programmes. Conclusion HIV and TB control appear not to be the focus of health interventions in this crisis affected region, despite the high risks of TB and HIV infection in the setting. Comprehensive public health response to this setting calls for reforms that promote joint TB/HIV co-infection control, including improved leadership by the HIV programmes that accuse weaknesses in this conflict-ridden region.

  3. Patient reported delays in seeking treatment for Tuberculosis (TB among adult and pediatric TB patients and TB patients co-infected with HIV in Lima, Peru: a qualitative study

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    Valerie A Paz-Soldan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Tuberculosis (TB remains a significant public health challenge worldwide, and particularly in Peru with one of the highest incidence rates in Latin America. TB patient behavior has a direct influence on whether a patient will receive timely diagnosis and successful treatment of their illness. Objectives: The objective was to understand the complex factors that can impact TB patient health seeking behavior. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with adult and parents of pediatric patients receiving TB treatment (n=43, within that group a sub-group was also co-infected with HIV (n=11. Results: Almost all of the study participants recognized delays in seeking either their child’s or their own diagnosis of their TB symptoms. The principal reasons for treatment-seeking delays were lack of knowledge and confusion of tuberculosis symptoms, fear and embarrassment of receiving a TB diagnosis, and a patient tendency to self-medicate prior to seeking formal medical attention.Conclusions: Health promotion activities that target patient delays have the potential to improve individual patient outcomes and mitigate the spread of TB at a community level.

  4. Adult meningitis in a setting of high HIV and TB prevalence: findings from 4961 suspected cases

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    Meintjes Graeme

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presentation and causes of adult meningitis in South Africa have changed substantially as a result of HIV. Knowledge of aetiology and laboratory findings in patients presenting with meningitis are important in guiding management. We performed a retrospective study to determine these findings in a setting of high HIV and TB prevalence in Cape Town. Methods Patients undergoing lumbar punctures between 1st January 2006 and 31st December 2008 at a public sector referral hospital were studied. Cases were classified by microbiological diagnosis, or in the absence of definitive microbiology as 1 normal CSF (neutrophils ≤ 1 × 106/L, lymphocytes ≤ 5 × 106/L, protein ≤ 0.5 g/dL, glucose ≥1.5 mmol/L, 2 minor abnormalities (neutrophils 2-5, lymphocytes 6-20, protein 0.51-1.0, glucose 1.0-1.49 or 3 markedly abnormal (neutrophils>5, lymphocytes>20, protein>1.0, glucose Results 5578 LPs were performed on 4549 patients, representing 4961 clinical episodes. Of these, 2293 had normal CSF and 931 had minor abnormalities and no aetiology identified. Of the remaining 1737, microbiological diagnoses were obtained in 820 (47%. Cryptococcus accounted for 63% (514 of microbiological diagnoses, TB for 28% (227, bacterial meningitis for 8% (68. Of the remaining 917 who had marked abnormalities, the majority (59% had a sterile lymphocytic CSF. Of note 16% (81 patients with confirmed Cryptococcus, 5% (12 with TB and 4% (3 with bacterial meningitis had normal CSF cell-counts and biochemistry. Conclusions Cryptococcal and tuberculous meningitis are now the commonest causes of adult meningitis in this setting. TB meningitis is probably underdiagnosed by laboratory investigation, as evidence by the large numbers presenting with sterile lymphocytic markedly abnormal CSFs.

  5. Infrequent detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii by PCR in oral wash specimens from TB patients with or without HIV and healthy contacts in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte; Jensen, Andreas V.; Praygod, George

    2010-01-01

    In tuberculosis (TB) endemic parts of the world, patients with pulmonary symptoms are managed as "smear-negative TB patients" if they do not improve on a two-week presumptive, broad-spectrum course of antibiotic treatment even if they are TB microscopy smear negative. These patients are frequently...... HIV positive and have a higher mortality than smear-positive TB patients. Lack of access to diagnose Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia might be a contributing reason. We therefore assessed the prevalence of P. jirovecii by PCR in oral wash specimens among TB patients and healthy individuals in an HIV...

  6. Malnutrition associated with unfavorable outcome and death among South African MDR-TB and HIV co-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, R M; Padayatchi, N; Shah, N S; Wolf, A; Werner, L; Sunkari, V B; O'Donnell, M R

    2014-09-01

    Pediatric multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is complicated by difficult diagnosis, complex treatment, and high mortality. In South Africa, these challenges are amplified by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection; however, evidence on treatment outcomes among co-infected children is limited. Using conventional and new pediatric definitions, to describe treatment outcomes and identify risk factors for unfavorable outcome and mortality in children aged children (median age 8 years, IQR 4-12) with MDR-TB (n = 78) or XDR-TB (n = 6) initiated treatment. Sixty-four (77%) were HIV-positive and 62 (97%) received antiretroviral therapy. Sixty-six (79%) achieved favorable treatment outcomes. Overall mortality was 11% (n = 9) at 18 months after initiation of treatment. Malnutrition (aOR 27.4, 95%CI 2.7-278.7) and severe radiographic findings (aOR 4.68, 95%CI 1.01-21.9) were associated with unfavorable outcome. New pediatric outcome definitions increased the proportion classified as cured. It is possible to successfully treat pediatric MDR-TB-HIV even in resource-poor settings. Malnutrition is a marker for severe TB-HIV disease, and is a potential target for future interventions in these patients.

  7. The contribution of spatial analysis to understanding HIV/TB mortality in children: a structural equation modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eustasius Musenge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa accounts for more than a sixth of the global population of people infected with HIV and TB, ranking her highest in HIV/TB co-infection worldwide. Remote areas often bear the greatest burden of morbidity and mortality, yet there are spatial differences within rural settings. Objectives: The primary aim was to investigate HIV/TB mortality determinants and their spatial distribution in the rural Agincourt sub-district for children aged 1–5 years in 2004. Our secondary aim was to model how the associated factors were interrelated as either underlying or proximate factors of child mortality using pathway analysis based on a Mosley-Chen conceptual framework. Methods: We conducted a secondary data analysis based on cross-sectional data collected in 2004 from the Agincourt sub-district in rural northeast South Africa. Child HIV/TB death was the outcome measure derived from physician assessed verbal autopsy. Modelling used multiple logit regression models with and without spatial household random effects. Structural equation models were used in modelling the complex relationships between multiple exposures and the outcome (child HIV/TB mortality as relayed on a conceptual framework. Results: Fifty-four of 6,692 children aged 1–5 years died of HIV/TB, from a total of 5,084 households. Maternal death had the greatest effect on child HIV/TB mortality (adjusted odds ratio=4.00; 95% confidence interval=1.01–15.80. A protective effect was found in households with better socio-economic status and when the child was older. Spatial models disclosed that the areas which experienced the greatest child HIV/TB mortality were those without any health facility. Conclusion: Low socio-economic status and maternal deaths impacted indirectly and directly on child mortality, respectively. These factors are major concerns locally and should be used in formulating interventions to reduce child mortality. Spatial prediction maps can guide policy

  8. Implementation and outcomes of an active defaulter tracing system for HIV, prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT), and TB patients in Kibera, Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Kerry A; Cheti, Erastus O; Reid, Tony

    2011-06-01

    Retention of patients in long term care and adherence to treatment regimens are a constant challenge for HIV, prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT), and TB programmes in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the implementation and outcomes of an active defaulter tracing system used to reduce loss to follow-up (LTFU) among HIV, PMTCT, TB, and HIV/TB co-infected patients receiving treatment at three Médecins Sans Frontières clinics in the informal settlement of Kibera, Nairobi, Kenya. Patients are routinely contacted by a social worker via telephone, in-person visit, or both very soon after they miss an appointment. Patient outcomes identified through 1066 tracing activities conducted between 1 April 2008 and 31 March 2009 included: 59.4% returned to the clinic, 9.0% unable to return to clinic, 6.3% died, 4.7% refused to return to clinic, 4.5% went to a different clinic, and 0.8% were hospitalized. Fifteen percent of patients identified for tracing could not be contacted. LTFU among all HIV patients decreased from 21.2% in 2006 to 11.5% in 2009. An active defaulter tracing system is feasible in a resource poor setting, solicits feedback from patients, retains a mobile population of patients in care, and reduces LTFU among HIV, PMTCT, and TB patients. Copyright © 2011 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Whole genome sequencing reveals mycobacterial microevolution among concurrent isolates from sputum and blood in HIV infected TB patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ssengooba, Willy; de Jong, Bouke C.; Joloba, Moses L.; Cobelens, Frank G.; Meehan, Conor J.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of advanced immunosuppression, M. tuberculosis is known to cause detectable mycobacteremia. However, little is known about the intra-patient mycobacterial microevolution and the direction of seeding between the sputum and blood compartments. From a diagnostic study of HIV-infected TB

  10. Decline in overall, smear-negative and HIV-positive TB incidence while smear-positive incidence stays stable in Guinea-Bissau 2004-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemvik, G; Rudolf, F; Vieira, F

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To calculate Tuberculosis (TB) incidence rates in Guinea-Bissau over an 8-year period. METHODS: Since 2003, a surveillance system has registered all TB cases in six suburban districts of Bissau. In this population-based prospective follow-up study, 1205 cases of pulmonary TB were...... identified between January 2004 and December 2011. Incidence rates were calculated using census data from the Bandim Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS). RESULTS: The overall incidence of pulmonary TB was 279 per 100 000 person-years of observation; the male incidence being 385, and the female...... 191. TB incidence rates increased significantly with age in both sexes, regardless of smear or HIV status. Despite a peak with unknown cause of 352 per 100 000 in 2007, the overall incidence of pulmonary TB declined over the period. The incidence of HIV infected TB cases declined significantly from...

  11. Prejudice and misconceptions about tuberculosis and HIV in rural and urban communities in Ethiopia: a challenge for the TB/HIV control program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background In Ethiopia, where HIV and tuberculosis (TB) are very common, little is known about the prejudice and misconceptions of rural communities towards People living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) and TB. Methods We conducted a cross sectional study in Gilgel Gibe Field Research area (GGFRA) in southwest Ethiopia to assess the prejudice and misconceptions of rural and urban communities towards PLHA and TB. The study population consisted of 862 randomly selected adults in GGFRA. Data were collected by trained personnel using a pretested structured questionnaire. To triangulate the findings, 8 focus group discussions among women and men were done. Results Of the 862 selected study participants, 750(87%) accepted to be interviewed. The mean age of the respondents was 31.2 (SD ± 11.0). Of the total interviewed individuals, 58% of them were females. More than half of the respondents did not know the possibility of transmission of HIV from a mother to a child or by breast feeding. For fear of contagion of HIV, most people do not want to eat, drink, and share utensils or clothes with a person living with HIV/AIDS. A higher proportion of females [OR = 1.5, (95% CI: 1.0, 2.2)], non-literate individuals [OR = 2.3, (95%CI: 1.4, 3.6)], rural residents [OR = 3.8, (95%CI: 2.2, 6.6)], and individuals who had poor knowledge of HIV/AIDS [OR = 2.8, (95%CI: 1.8, 2.2)] were more likely to have high prejudice towards PLHA than respectively males, literates, urban residents and individuals with good knowledge. Exposure to cold air was implicated as a major cause of TB. Literates had a much better knowledge about the cause and methods of transmission and prevention of TB than non-literates. More than half of the individuals (56%) had high prejudice towards a patient with TB. A larger proportion of females [OR = 1.3, (95% CI: 1.0, 1.9)] and non-literate individuals [OR = 1.4, (95% CI: 1.1, 2.0)] had high prejudice towards patients with TB than males and literate individuals. Conclusion TB/HIV

  12. Paediatric TB/HIV co-infection – 'an uncompromising duet that ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-10-01

    Oct 1, 2011 ... tuberculosis (TB) in 2009, childhood TB accounted for 11% (884 000 cases).1 ... reduction in incident TB in ART-treated children compared with ..... Obesity is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage but its effect on.

  13. Pharmacogenetic & pharmacokinetic biomarker for efavirenz based ARV and rifampicin based anti-TB drug induced liver injury in TB-HIV infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getnet Yimer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Implication of pharmacogenetic variations and efavirenz pharmacokinetics in concomitant efavirenz based antiviral therapy and anti-tubercular drug induced liver injury (DILI has not been yet studied. We performed a prospective case-control association study to identify the incidence, pharmacogenetic, pharmacokinetic and biochemical predictors for anti-tubercular and antiretroviral drugs induced liver injury (DILI in HIV and tuberculosis (TB co-infected patients. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Newly diagnosed treatment naïve TB-HIV co-infected patients (n = 353 were enrolled to receive efavirenz based ART and rifampicin based anti-TB therapy, and assessed clinically and biochemically for DILI up to 56 weeks. Quantification of plasma efavirenz and 8-hydroxyefaviernz levels and genotyping for NAT2, CYP2B6, CYP3A5, ABCB1, UGT2B7 and SLCO1B1 genes were done. The incidence of DILI and identification of predictors was evaluated using survival analysis and the Cox Proportional Hazards Model. The incidence of DILI was 30.0%, or 14.5 per 1000 person-week, and that of severe was 18.4%, or 7.49 per 1000 person-week. A statistically significant association of DILI with being of the female sex (p = 0.001, higher plasma efavirenz level (p = 0.009, efavirenz/8-hydroxyefavirenz ratio (p = 0.036, baseline AST (p = 0.022, ALT (p = 0.014, lower hemoglobin (p = 0.008, and serum albumin (p = 0.007, NAT2 slow-acetylator genotype (p = 0.039 and ABCB1 3435TT genotype (p = 0.001. CONCLUSION: We report high incidence of anti-tubercular and antiretroviral DILI in Ethiopian patients. Between patient variability in systemic efavirenz exposure and pharmacogenetic variations in NAT2, CYP2B6 and ABCB1 genes determines susceptibility to DILI in TB-HIV co-infected patients. Close monitoring of plasma efavirenz level and liver enzymes during early therapy and/or genotyping practice in HIV clinics is recommended for early identification

  14. Major challenges in clinical management of TB/HIV co-infected patients in Eastern Europe compared with Western Europe and Latin America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efsen, Anne Marie; Schultze, Anna; Post, Frank

    2014-01-01

    identified in logistic regression models. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed between EE (n=844), WE (n=152), SE (n=164) and LA (n=253) for use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) at TB diagnosis (17%, 40%, 44% and 35%, pdefinite TB diagnosis (culture and/or PCR positive......, Isoniazid, Pyrazinamide, Ethambutol (RHZE)], the corresponding proportions would have been 64% vs. 86-97%, respectively (Figure 1b). CONCLUSIONS: In EE, TB/HIV patients had poorer exposure to cART, less often a definitive TB diagnosis and more often MDR-TB compared to other parts of Europe and LA. Initial...

  15. TB preventive therapy for people living with HIV: key considerations for scale-up in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathmanathan, I; Ahmedov, S; Pevzner, E; Anyalechi, G; Modi, S; Kirking, H; Cavanaugh, J S

    2018-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death for persons living with the human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV). TB preventive therapy (TPT) works synergistically with, and independently of, antiretroviral therapy to reduce TB morbidity, mortality and incidence among PLHIV. However, although TPT is a crucial and cost-effective component of HIV care for adults and children and has been recommended as an international standard of care for over a decade, it remains highly underutilized. If we are to end the global TB epidemic, we must address the significant reservoir of tuberculous infection, especially in those, such as PLHIV, who are most likely to progress to TB disease. To do so, we must confront the pervasive perception that barriers to TPT scale-up are insurmountable in resource-limited settings. Here we review available evidence to address several commonly stated obstacles to TPT scale-up, including the need for the tuberculin skin test, limited diagnostic capacity to reliably exclude TB disease, concerns about creating drug resistance, suboptimal patient adherence to therapy, inability to monitor for and prevent adverse events, a 'one size fits all' option for TPT regimen and duration, and uncertainty about TPT use in children, adolescents, and pregnant women. We also discuss TPT delivery in the era of differentiated care for PLHIV, how best to tackle advanced planning for drug procurement and supply chain management, and how to create an enabling environment for TPT scale-up success.

  16. #Globalhealth Twitter Conversations on #Malaria, #HIV, #TB, #NCDS, and #NTDS: a Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Isaac Chun-Hai; Jackson, Ashley M; Ahweyevu, Jennifer O; Grizzle, Jordan H; Yin, Jingjing; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Liang, Hai; Sekandi, Juliet N; Fu, King-Wa

    Advocates use the hashtag #GlobalHealth on Twitter to draw users' attention to prominent themes on global health, to harness their support, and to advocate for change. We aimed to describe #GlobalHealth tweets pertinent to given major health issues. Tweets containing the hashtag #GlobalHealth (N = 157,951) from January 1, 2014, to April 30, 2015, were purchased from GNIP Inc. We extracted 5 subcorpora of tweets, each with 1 of 5 co-occurring disease-specific hashtags (#Malaria, #HIV, #TB, #NCDS, and #NTDS) for further analysis. Unsupervised machine learning was applied to each subcorpus to categorize the tweets by their underlying topics and obtain the representative tweets of each topic. The topics were grouped into 1 of 4 themes (advocacy; epidemiological information; prevention, control, and treatment; societal impact) or miscellaneous. Manual categorization of most frequent users was performed. Time zones of users were analyzed. In the entire #GlobalHealth corpus (N = 157,951), there were 40,266 unique users, 85,168 retweets, and 13,107 unique co-occurring hashtags. Of the 13,087 tweets across the 5 subcorpora with co-occurring hashtag #malaria (n = 3640), #HIV (n = 3557), #NCDS (noncommunicable diseases; n = 2373), #TB (tuberculosis; n = 1781), and #NTDS (neglected tropical diseases; n = 1736), the most prevalent theme was prevention, control, and treatment (4339, 33.16%), followed by advocacy (3706, 28.32%), epidemiological information (1803, 13.78%), and societal impact (1617, 12.36%). Among the top 10 users who tweeted the highest number of tweets in the #GlobalHealth corpus, 5 were individual professionals, 3 were news media, and 2 were organizations advocating for global health. The most common users' time zone was Eastern Time (United States and Canada). This study highlighted the specific #GlobalHealth Twitter conversations pertinent to malaria, HIV, tuberculosis, noncommunicable diseases, and neglected tropical diseases. These

  17. An HIV1/2 point of care test on sputum for screening TB/HIV co-infection in central India - Will it work?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prabha Desikan; Sajal De; Nitika Pant Pai; Pradyumna K Mishra; Kaushal Kumar; Nikita Panwalkar; Mayanka Verma; Zia Ul Hasan; Kewal K Maudar

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To determine whether theOraQuick®HIV-1/2Assay(OraSureTechnologies, Inc.,Bethlehem,PA,USA) in sputum is a valid tool forHIV surveillance amongTB patients. Methods:A cross sectional study was carried out on sputa of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis.Sputa were tested for antibodies toHIV usingOraQuick®HIV-1/2Assay(OraSure Technologies,Inc.,Bethlehem,PA,USA).The results were compared with results of serum ELISA.Results:Compared to serumELISA, theOraQuick®HIV-1/2Assay in sputum specimens reported90% sensitivity(9/10) and100% specificity(307/307), with a positive predictive value of 100%(95%CI:66.37%-100.00%) and a negative predictive value of99.68%(95%CI:98.20%-99.99%). Conclusions:This testing method may provide a useful strategy for conductingHIV surveillance in possible co-infectedTB patients at peripheral centres.Since there is no investment on infrastructure, it may be possible for paramedical health professionals to carry out the test, particularly in areas with lowHIV endemicity.

  18. A controlled study of an HIV/AIDS/STI/TB intervention with faith healers in Vhembe District, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashamba, Tshilidzi; Peltzer, Karl; Maluleke, Thelma X; Sodi, Tholene

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop an HIV and AIDS training manual, and to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and management of faith healers of Apostolic churches regarding HIV and AIDS, before and after they attended an HIV and AIDS training programme. A quasi-experimental intervention design was used with faith healers affiliated with the United African Apostolic Church (UAAC) in the Thulamela and Musina municipalities of Vhembe District, Limpopo Province, South Africa. A total of 103 faith healers were included in this study, 58 were systematically assigned to an intervention and 45 to a control group. The intervention group received training for 2 days. At follow-up after 2 months, intervention effects were significant for HIV knowledge and to a lesser extent TB knowledge. No significant improvement was found in HIV/STI (sexually transmitted infection) management strategies such as HIV/STI risk behaviour counselling, referral of clients for HIV testing, keeping condoms at stock in church, and church community HIV/AIDS/STI education. It is important to note that faith healers address some of the major known behavioural risk and protective factors such as partner reduction and condom use. Therefore, faith healers could be more widely utilized in HIV prevention programmes as risk reduction counsellors, in particular on matters of community-level education.

  19. Patient satisfaction with HIV and TB treatment in a public programme in rural KwaZulu-Natal: evidence from patient-exit interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is a determinant of treatment uptake, adherence and retention, and an important health systems outcome. Queues, health worker-patient contact time, staff attitudes, and facility cleanliness may affect patient satisfaction. We quantified dimensions of patient satisfaction among HIV and TB patients in a rural sub-district of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and identified underlying satisfaction factors that explained the data. Methods We conducted patient-exit interviews with 300 HIV and 300 TB patients who were randomly selected using a two-stage cluster random sampling approach with primary sampling units (primary healthcare clinics) selected with probability-proportional-to-size sampling. We performed factor analysis to investigate underlying patient satisfaction factors. We compared the satisfaction with HIV and TB services and examined the relationships between patient satisfaction and patients’ socio-demographic characteristics in multivariable regression. Results Almost all patients (95% HIV, 97% TB) reported to be globally satisfied with the healthcare services received on the day of the interview. However, patient satisfaction with specific concrete aspects of the health services was substantially lower: 52% of HIV and 40% of TB patients agreed that some staff did not treat patients with sufficient respect (p = 0.02 for difference between the two patient groups); 65% of HIV and 40% of TB patients agreed that health worker queues were too long (p patient satisfaction variables could be reduced to a few underlying factors that align broadly with concepts previously identified in the literature as affecting access to healthcare. Increases in health systems resources for HIV and TB, but also improvements in facility maintenance, staff attitudes and communication, are likely to substantially improve HIV and TB patients’ satisfaction with the care they receive in public-sector treatment programmes in rural communities in South

  20. Integration and task shifting for TB/HIV care and treatment in highly resource-scarce settings: one size may not fit all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rie, Annelies; Patel, Monita R; Nana, Mbonze; Vanden Driessche, Koen; Tabala, Martine; Yotebieng, Marcel; Behets, Frieda

    2014-03-01

    A crucial question in managing HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis (TB) concerns when and how to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART). The effectiveness of CD4-stratified ART initiation in a nurse-centered, integrated TB/HIV program at primary care in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, was assessed. Prospective cohort study was conducted to assess the effect of CD4-stratified ART initiation by primary care nurses (513 TB patients, August 2007 to November 2009). ART was to be initiated at 1 month of TB treatment if CD4 count is 350 cells per cubic millimeter. ART uptake and mortality were compared with a historical prospective cohort of 373 HIV-infected TB patients referred for ART to a centralized facility and 3577 HIV-negative TB patients (January 2006 to May 2007). ART uptake increased (17%-69%, P vs 9.8%, P decentralized, nurse-initiated, CD4-stratified ART. Mortality among TB patients with CD4 count >100 cells per cubic millimeter was similar to that of HIV-negative TB patients (5.6% vs 6.3%, P = 0.65), but mortality among those with CD4 count <100 cells per cubic millimeter remained high (18.8%). Nurse-centered, CD4-stratified ART initiation at primary care level was effective in increasing timely ART uptake and reducing mortality among TB patients but may not be adequate to prevent mortality among those presenting with severe immunosuppression. Further research is needed to determine the optimal management at primary care level of TB patients with CD4 counts <100 cells per cubic millimeter.

  1. Depressive symptoms and hazardous/harmful alcohol use are prevalent and correlate with stigma among TB-HIV patients in Lesotho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes-Larson, E; Hirsch-Moverman, Y; Saito, S; Frederix, K; Pitt, B; Maama-Maime, L; Howard, A A

    2017-11-01

    Limited data exist on the prevalence and correlates, including stigma, of mental health conditions, including depressive symptoms and alcohol use, among patients co-infected with tuberculosis (TB) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa, despite their negative impact on health outcomes. To assess the prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms and hazardous/harmful alcohol use among TB-HIV patients in the Start TB patients on ART and Retain on Treatment (START) study. START, a mixed-methods cluster-randomized trial, evaluated a combination intervention package vs. standard of care (SOC) to improve treatment outcomes in TB-HIV co-infected patients in Lesotho. Moderate/severe depressive symptoms and hazardous/harmful alcohol use were measured using baseline questionnaire data collected from April 2013 to March 2015. Demographic, psychosocial, and TB- and HIV-related knowledge and attitudes, including stigma, were assessed for association with both conditions using generalized linear mixed models. Among 371 participants, 29.8% reported moderate/severe depressive symptoms, and 24.7% reported hazardous/harmful alcohol use; 7% reported both. Depressive symptoms were significantly associated with less education, more difficulty understanding written medical information, non-disclosure of TB, greater TB stigma, and the SOC study arm. Hazardous/harmful alcohol use was significantly associated with male sex, as well as greater TB and external HIV stigma. Prevalence of depressive symptoms and hazardous/harmful alcohol use were high, suggesting a need for routine screening for, and treatment of, mental health disorders in TB-HIV patients.

  2. Scaling up integration: development and results of a participatory assessment of HIV/TB services, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caldwell Judy

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In South Africa the need to integrate HIV, TB and STI programmes has been recognised at a policy and organisation level; the challenge is now one of translating policies into relevant actions and monitoring implementation to ensure that the anticipated benefits of integration are achieved. In this research, set in public primary care services in Cape Town, South Africa, we set out to determine how middle level managers could be empowered to monitor the implementation of an effective, integrated HIV/TB/STI service. Methods A team of managers and researchers designed an evaluation tool to measure implementation of key components of an integrated HIV/TB/STI package with a focus on integration. They used a comprehensive health systems framework based on conditions for programme effectiveness and then identified and collected tracer indicators. The tool was extensively piloted in two rounds involving 49 clinics in 2003 and 2004 to identify data necessary for effective facility-level management. A subsequent evaluation of 16 clinics (2 per health sub district, 12% of all public primary care facilities was done in February 2006. Results 16 clinics were reviewed and 635 records sampled. Client access to HIV/TB/STI programmes was limited in that 50% of facilities routinely deferred clients. Whilst the physical infrastructure and staff were available, there was problem with capacity in that there was insufficient staff training (for example, only 40% of clinical staff trained in HIV care. Weaknesses were identified in quality of care (for example, only 57% of HIV clients were staged in accordance with protocols and continuity of care (for example, only 24% of VCT clients diagnosed with HIV were followed up for medical assessment. Facility and programme managers felt that the evaluation tool generated information that was useful to manage the programmes at facility and district level. On the basis of the results facility managers drew

  3. The effect of complete integration of HIV and TB services on time to initiation of antiretroviral therapy: a before-after study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Kerschberger

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that early ART initiation in TB/HIV co-infected patients lowers mortality. One way to implement earlier ART commencement could be through integration of TB and HIV services, a more efficient model of care than separate, vertical programs. We present a model of full TB/HIV integration and estimate its effect on time to initiation of ART.We retrospectively reviewed TB registers and clinical notes of 209 TB/HIV co-infected adults with a CD4 count <250 cells/µl and registered for TB treatment at one primary care clinic in a South African township between June 2008 and May 2009. Using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard analysis, we compared time between initiation of TB treatment and ART for the periods before and after full, "one-stop shop" integration of TB and HIV services (in December 2009. Potential confounders were determined a priori through directed acyclic graphs. Robustness of assumptions was investigated by sensitivity analyses. The analysis included 188 patients (100 pre- and 88 post-integration, yielding 56 person-years of observation. Baseline characteristics of the two groups were similar. Median time to ART initiation decreased from 147 days (95% confidence interval [CI] 85-188 before integration of services to 75 days (95% CI 52-119 post-integration. In adjusted analyses, patients attending the clinic post-integration were 1.60 times (95% CI 1.11-2.29 more likely to have started ART relative to the pre-integration period. Sensitivity analyses supported these findings.Full TB/HIV care integration is feasible and led to a 60% increased chance of co-infected patients starting ART, while reducing time to ART initiation by an average of 72 days. Although these estimates should be confirmed through larger studies, they suggest that scale-up of full TB/HIV service integration in high TB/HIV prevalence settings may shorten time to ART initiation, which might reduce excess mortality and morbidity.

  4. Outcomes and impact of HIV prevention, ART and TB programs in Swaziland--early evidence from public health triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, Cari; Mndzebele, Sibongile; Hlophe, Thabo; Garcia Calleja, Jesus Maria; Korenromp, Eline L; Stoneburner, Rand; Pervilhac, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Swaziland's severe HIV epidemic inspired an early national response since the late 1980s, and regular reporting of program outcomes since the onset of a national antiretroviral treatment (ART) program in 2004. We assessed effectiveness outcomes and mortality trends in relation to ART, HIV testing and counseling (HTC), tuberculosis (TB) and prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT). Data triangulated include intervention coverage and outcomes according to program registries (2001-2010), hospital admissions and deaths disaggregated by age and sex (2001-2010) and population mortality estimates from the 1997 and 2007 censuses and the 2007 demographic and health survey. By 2010, ART reached 70% of the estimated number of people living with HIV/AIDS with CD4impact to specific interventions (versus natural epidemic dynamics) will require additional data from future household surveys, and improved routine (program, surveillance, and hospital) data at district level.

  5. Áreas de vulnerabilidade para co-infecção HIV-aids/TB em Ribeirão Preto, SP Áreas de vulnerabilidad para coinfección VIH-sida/TB en Ribeirao Preto, Sureste de Brasil Areas of vulnerability to HIV/TB co-infection in Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugênia Firmino Brunello

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar áreas de vulnerabilidade para os casos novos de co-infecção HIV/tuberculose (TB. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo ecológico realizado por meio do georreferenciamento dos casos novos de HIV/TB notificados em Ribeirão Preto, SP, em 2006. Os dados foram obtidos do sistema de informação estadual paulista de notificação de TB. Os casos novos de co-infecção HIV/TB foram analisados conforme características sociodemográficas e clínicas e, posteriormente, georreferenciados na base cartográfica do município segundo endereço residencial. Os setores do município foram categorizados em três níveis socioeconômicos: inferior, intermediário e superior, com base na análise de componentes principais das variáveis do censo demográfico de 2000 (renda, instrução e percentagem de domicílios com cinco ou mais moradores. Foi calculada a incidência da co-infecção HIV/TB para cada nível socioeconômico. RESULTADOS: A co-infecção HIV/TB acometeu mais adultos do sexo masculino em idade economicamente ativa e a forma pulmonar da TB foi a mais comum. A distribuição espacial mostrou que as incidências nas áreas com níveis socioeconômicos intermediários e inferiores (8,3 e 11,5 casos por 100 mil habitantes, respectivamente foram superiores àquela (4,8 casos por 100 mil habitantes de nível socioeconômico superior. CONCLUSÕES: A taxa de incidência de co-infecção HIV/TB analisada por níveis socioeconômicos mostrou padraÞo espacial de distribuiçaÞo não homogêneo e apresentou valores mais altos em áreas de maior vulnerabilidade social. O estudo diagnosticou aìreas geograìficas prioritaìrias para o controle da co-infecção e a tecnologia do sistema de informação geográfica pode ser empregada no planejamento das ações em saúde pelos gestores municipais.OBJETIVO: Identificar áreas de vulnerabilidad para los casos nuevos de coinfección VIH/tuberculosis (TB. MÉTODOS: Estudio descriptivo ecol

  6. Community-based directly observed treatment for TB patients to improve HIV services: a cross-sectional study in a South African province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Embry M; Kigozi, N Gladys; Heunis, J Christo

    2018-04-07

    There is uncertainty about how directly observed treatment (DOT) support for tuberculosis (TB) can be delivered most effectively and how DOT support can simultaneously be used to strengthen human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention and control among TB patients. This study describes how DOT support by community health workers (CHWs) was used in four municipalities in the Free State province - a high TB/HIV burden, poorly-resourced setting - to provide HIV outreach, referrals, and health education for TB patients. The study was part of a larger cross-sectional study of HIV counselling and testing (HCT) among 1101 randomly-selected TB patients registered at 40 primary health care (PHC) facilities (clinics and community health centres) across small town/rural and large town/urban settings. Univariate analysis of percentages, chi-square tests and t-tests for difference in means were used to describe differences between the types of TB treatment support and patient characteristics, as well as the types of - and patient satisfaction with - HIV information and referrals received from various types of treatment supporters including home-based DOT supporters, clinic-based DOT supporters or support from family/friends/employers. Multivariate logistic regression was used to predict the likelihood of not having receiving home-based DOT and of never having received HIV counselling. The independent variables include poverty-related health and socio-economic risk factors for poor outcomes. Statistical significance is shown using a 95% confidence interval and a 0.05 p-value. Despite the fact that DOT support for all TB patients was the goal of South African health policy at the time (2012), most TB patients were not receiving formal DOT support. Only 155 (14.1%) were receiving home-based DOT, while 114 (10.4%) received clinic-based DOT. TB patients receiving home-based DOT reported higher rates of HIV counselling than other patients. Public health providers should train DOT

  7. Find TB. Treat TB. Working together to eliminate TB.

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-26

    In this podcast, Dr. Sundari Mase, Medical Team Lead in the Field Services and Evaluation Branch in the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses World TB Day and the 2014 theme.  Created: 2/26/2014 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/26/2014.

  8. Improved HIV and TB Knowledge and Competence Among Mid-level Providers in a Cluster-Randomized Trial of One-on-One Mentorship for Task Shifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naikoba, Sarah; Senjovu, Kaggwa D; Mugabe, Pallen; McCarthy, Carey F; Riley, Patricia L; Kadengye, Damazo T; Dalal, Shona

    2017-08-15

    Health worker shortages pose a challenge to the scale up of HIV care and treatment in Uganda. Training mid-level providers (MLPs) in the provision of HIV and tuberculosis (TB) treatment can expand existing health workforce capacity and access to HIV services. We conducted a cluster-randomized trial of on-site clinical mentorship for HIV and TB care at 10 health facilities in rural Uganda. Twenty MLPs at 5 randomly assigned to an intervention facilities received 8 hours a week of one-on-one mentorship, every 6 weeks over a 9-month period; and another 20 at 5 control facilities received no clinical mentorship. Enrolled MLPs' clinical knowledge and competence in management of HIV and TB was assessed using case scenarios and clinical observation at baseline and immediately after the 9-month intervention. The performance of the study health facilities on 8 TB and HIV care indicators was tracked over the 9-month period using facility patient records. Thirty-nine out 40 enrolled MLPs had case scenario and clinical observation scores for both the baseline and end of intervention assessments. Mentorship was associated with a mean score increase of 16.7% (95% confidence interval: 9.8 to 23.6, P shifting.

  9. Impact of telemonitoring approaches on integrated HIV and TB diagnosis and treatment interventions in sub-Saharan Africa: a scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarence S Yah

    2017-03-01

    Results: We found telemonitoring approaches as a convenient and sustained proxy-method of HIV and TB risk reduction strategies including early diagnosis and prompt quality clinical outcomes. This has shown to significantly contribute in decreasing health systems/patients cost, long waiting time in clinics, hospital visits, travels and time off/on from work. Conclusion: Telemonitoring/mhealth (electronic phone text/video/materials messaging adoption, integration, acceptability, access and uptake are crucial in monitoring and improving HIV and TB uptake, retention, adherence and coverage in both local and national interventions programs. Improved integrated HIV and TB telemonitoring sustainability hold great promises in health systems strengthening including patient early centered diagnosis and care delivery, uptake and retention in medications/ services and improvement of patients’ quality of life.

  10. Radiology services for children in HIV- and TB-endemic regions: scope for greater collaboration between radiologists and clinicians caring for children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dramowski, Angela; Morsheimer, Megan M.; Schaaf, H.S.; Rabie, Helena; Sorour, Gillian; Cotton, Mark F.; Frigati, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    There is limited literature documenting the interaction between radiologists and clinicians caring for children, especially in regions where HIV and tuberculosis (TB) are endemic. The dual burden of these diseases in resource-limited settings creates unique challenges for radiographic interpretation and utilization. This review aims to heighten awareness of issues confronting radiologists and clinicians caring for children and to encourage greater collaboration between these two disciplines in HIV- and TB-endemic regions. The Child-Friendly Healthcare Initiative is discussed, emphasizing opportunities to promote child friendliness in radiology services. (orig.)

  11. Ethiopia's experience on scaling up latent TB infection management for people living with HIV and under-five child household contacts of index TB patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blen Ayele Kebede

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI is one of the globally recommended key strategies to end tuberculosis. However, there is limited experience with translation of global recommendations into action at country levels. We present Ethiopia's experience in implementing LTBI management. Our objective is to share promising practices, existing opportunities and to suggest specific steps required for further scale up of the services. Our report is based on synthesis of data from secondary sources including official routine reports of Ministry of Health, materials presented at review meetings, and findings from supervisory visits to districts and health facilities. Our results suggest that Ethiopia has made significant strides toward strengthening LTBI management in people living with HIV and among under-five-year-old household contacts of TB patients. The use of contact investigation as entry point for LTBI management could be taken as best practice. More effort is needed to further strengthen implementation of LTBI management, and it should be supported through context-specific implementation and operational research activities.

  12. HIV, Hepatitis C, TB, Harm Reduction, and Persons Deprived of Liberty: What Standards Does International Human Rights Law Establish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Gen; Lines, Rick

    2016-12-01

    HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), and TB in prisons and other places of detention are serious public health concerns, with prevalence and incidence considerably higher than in the general community because of the overrepresentation of risky behavior, substandard conditions, overcrowding, people who inject drugs, and the wholly inadequate prevention, care, and treatment of these conditions, including the denial of harm reduction services. This is not only a severe public health crisis but also a serious human rights concern. This article works to clarify the standards established by human rights law with regards to HIV, HCV, TB, and harm reduction in prisons by examining international and regional case law, minimum standards on the treatment of prisoners and public health, as well as the work of UN treaty bodies, Special Rapporteurs, and prison monitoring bodies. It is imperative that urgent steps are taken to close the gap between human rights and public health standards on the one hand, and effective implementation in prison settings on the other.

  13. Active Sputum Monitoring Detects Substantial Rate of Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in an HIV-Infected Population in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassim, Shaheen; Shaw, Pamela A.; Sangweni, Phumelele; Malan, Lizette; Ntshani, Ella; Mathibedi, Monkwe Jethro; Stubbs, Nomso; Metcalf, Julia A; Eckes, Risa; Masur, Henry; Komati, Stephanus

    2010-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) co-infection with HIV is a substantial problem in South Africa. There has been a presumption that drug resistant strains of TB are common in South Africa, but few studies have documented this impression. Methods In Phidisa, a joint observational and randomized HIV treatment study for South African National Defence Force members and dependents, an initiative obtained microbiologic TB testing in subjects who appeared to be at high risk. We report results for HIV-infected subjects. Results TB was identified by culture in 116/584 (19.9%) of patients selected for sputum examination on the basis of suggestive symptoms. Smear was an insensitive technique for confirming the diagnosis: only 33% of culture-positive patients were identified by smear, with a 0.2% false positive rate. Of the 107 culture-positive individuals with susceptibility testing, 22 (20.6%) were identified to be MDR and 4 (3.7%) became extremely drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR) while under observation. Culture-positive cases with a history of TB treatment had more than twice the rate of MDR than those without, 27.1% vs. 11.9% (p=0.05). Conclusions TB is common in this cohort of HIV-infected patients. Smear was not a sensitive technique for identifying culture-positive cases in this health system. Drug susceptibility testing is essential to proper patient management because MDR was present in 20.6% of culture-positive patients. Better management strategies are needed to reduce the development of MDR-TB since so many such patients had received prior antituberculous therapy that was presumably not curative. PMID:20196651

  14. A Controlled Study of an HIV/AIDS/STI/TB Intervention with Faith ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to develop an HIV and AIDS training manual, and to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and management of faith healers of Apostolic churches regarding HIV and AIDS, before and after they attended an HIV and AIDS training programme. A quasi-experimental intervention design was used with faith ...

  15. Alcohol and drug use disorders, HIV status and drug resistance in a sample of Russian TB patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, M. F.; Krupitsky, E.; Tsoy, M.; Zvartau, E.; Brazhenko, N.; Jakubowiak, W.; E. McCaul, M.

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING: Alcohol use, tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behavior are of increasing concern in Russian TB patients. DESIGN: A prevalence study of alcohol use and HIV risk behavior was conducted in a sample of 200 adult men and women admitted to TB hospitals in St Petersburg and Ivanovo, Russia. RESULTS: Of the subjects, 72% were men. The mean age was 41. Active TB was diagnosed using a combination of chest X-ray, sputum smears and sputum cultures. Sixty-two per cent met DSM-IV criteria for current alcohol abuse or dependence. Drug use was uncommon, with only two patients reporting recent intravenous heroin use. There was one case of HIV infection. The mean total risk assessment battery score was 3.4. Depression was present in 60% of the sample, with 17% severely depressed. Alcohol abuse/dependence was associated with an eight-fold increase in drug resistance (OR 8.58; 95% CI 2.09-35.32). Patients with relapsing or chronic TB were more likely to meet the criteria for alcohol abuse/dependence (OR 2.56; 95% CI 1.0-6.54). CONCLUSION: Alcohol use disorders are common in patients being treated for active TB, and are associated with significant morbidity. Additional surveys are needed to examine the relationship between alcohol use disorders and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance. CONTEXTE: Chezles patients tuberculeux russes, l’utilisation d’alcool, la résistance aux médicaments antituberculeux et un comportement à risque pour le virus de l’immunodéficience humaine (VIH) sont des sujets croissants d’inquiétude. SCHÉMA: Une étude: de prévalence de l’utilisation d’alcool et du comportement à risque pour le VIH a été menée sur un échantillon de 200 hommes et femmes adultes, admis dans des hôpitaux pour la tuberculose (TB) de Saint-Pétersbourg et d’Ivanovo en Russie. RÉSULTATS: Il y avait 72% d’hommes dans l’échantillon. L’âge moyen est de 41 ans. On a diagnostiqué la TB active par l

  16. TUBERCULOSIS AND HIV COINFECTION: A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The aim of the present study is to record the clinical, radiological profile of pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB in HIV positive patients. To win the battle against AIDS we have to fight against TB. Unlike HIV/AIDS, TB is completely curable in the vast majority of cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS This prospective study was conducted in the department of pulmonary medicine, Gadag institute of medical sciences, Gadag. All newly diagnosed HIV patients during the study period were included and screened for TB. HIV infection was confirmed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay using two different antigens and a rapid test as recommended by NACO. RESULTS Among 370 newly diagnosed HIV positive patients, 113(30.54% patients were diagnosed to have TB. Most common affected age group was 31-40years with a mean age of 38.08 years. Unprotected heterosexual contact was the most common mode of HIV transmission. Fever, weight loss and cough were the commonest symptoms at presentation. Pulmonary TB was diagnosed in 85(22.97% patients, EPTB in 21(5.67% and disseminated TB in 7(1.8% patients. Among the EPTB patients, 2(9.5% patients had extra thoracic lymphadenopathy. Cervical lymph node was the commonest lymph node involved. 14(66.66% patients had pleural effusion, 3(14.28% had abdominal TB, 1(4.76% had tubercular meningitis and 1(4.76% patient had TB testis. CONCLUSION The prevalence of HIV–TB co-infection was high. Moreover, HIV positive patients need early diagnosis and treatment of active TB. However large sample size prospective studies are needed to correlate the clinical and CD4 count with the occurrence of different types of tuberculosis.

  17. Áreas de vulnerabilidade para co-infecção HIV-aids/TB em Ribeirão Preto, SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugênia Firmino Brunello

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar áreas de vulnerabilidade para os casos novos de co-infecção HIV/tuberculose (TB. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo ecológico realizado por meio do georreferenciamento dos casos novos de HIV/TB notificados em Ribeirão Preto, SP, em 2006. Os dados foram obtidos do sistema de informação estadual paulista de notificação de TB. Os casos novos de co-infecção HIV/TB foram analisados conforme características sociodemográficas e clínicas e, posteriormente, georreferenciados na base cartográfica do município segundo endereço residencial. Os setores do município foram categorizados em três níveis socioeconômicos: inferior, intermediário e superior, com base na análise de componentes principais das variáveis do censo demográfico de 2000 (renda, instrução e percentagem de domicílios com cinco ou mais moradores. Foi calculada a incidência da co-infecção HIV/TB para cada nível socioeconômico. RESULTADOS: A co-infecção HIV/TB acometeu mais adultos do sexo masculino em idade economicamente ativa e a forma pulmonar da TB foi a mais comum. A distribuição espacial mostrou que as incidências nas áreas com níveis socioeconômicos intermediários e inferiores (8,3 e 11,5 casos por 100 mil habitantes, respectivamente foram superiores àquela (4,8 casos por 100 mil habitantes de nível socioeconômico superior. CONCLUSÕES: A taxa de incidência de co-infecção HIV/TB analisada por níveis socioeconômicos mostrou padraÞo espacial de distribuiçaÞo não homogêneo e apresentou valores mais altos em áreas de maior vulnerabilidade social. O estudo diagnosticou aìreas geograìficas prioritaìrias para o controle da co-infecção e a tecnologia do sistema de informação geográfica pode ser empregada no planejamento das ações em saúde pelos gestores municipais.

  18. Diagnosis of tuberculosis in a high TB-HIV environment using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is growing concern about the high transmission of tuberculosis (TB) in prisons posing a risk to the outside community. There are high levels of overcrowding in the Uganda Prisons Service (UPS) with some prisons accommodating 4 times above their designed capacities. Our objective was to determine the prevalence ...

  19. diagnosis of tuberculosis in a high tb-hiv environment using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBLICATIONS1

    ABSTRACT. There is growing concern about the high transmission of tuberculosis (TB) in prisons posing a risk to the outside community. There are high levels of overcrowding in the Uganda Prisons Ser- vice (UPS) with some prisons accommodating 4 times above their designed capacities. Our ob- jective was to determine ...

  20. South African plants as a source of drugs to treat infectious diseases - TB, malaria and HIV.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pillay, P

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available and the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) established a database of 566 plant taxa that are reportedly used for the treatment of TB and 623 taxa associated with malaria and/or fever. A process of prioritization using selection criteria led...

  1. Doing battle with "the monster:" how high-risk heterosexuals experience and successfully manage HIV stigma as a barrier to HIV testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwadz, Marya; Leonard, Noelle R; Honig, Sylvie; Freeman, Robert; Kutnick, Alexandra; Ritchie, Amanda S

    2018-04-20

    Annual HIV testing is recommended for populations at-risk for HIV in the United States, including heterosexuals geographically connected to urban high-risk areas (HRA) with elevated rates of HIV prevalence and poverty, who are primarily African American/Black or Hispanic. Yet this subpopulation of "individuals residing in HRA" (IR-HRA) evidence low rates of regular HIV testing. HIV stigma is a recognized primary barrier to testing, in part due to its interaction with other stigmatized social identities. Guided by social-cognitive and intersectionality theories, this qualitative descriptive study explored stigma as a barrier to HIV testing and identified ways IR-HRA manage stigma. In 2012-2014, we conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 31 adult IR-HRA (74% male, 84% African American/Black) with unknown or negative HIV status, purposively sampled from a larger study for maximum variation on HIV testing experiences. Interviews were audio-recorded and professionally transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed using a systematic content analysis approach that was both theory-driven and inductive. Stigma was a primary barrier to HIV testing among IR-HRA. In the context of an under-resourced community, HIV stigma was experienced as emerging from, and being perpetuated by, health care organizations and educational institutions, as well as community members. Participants noted it was "better not to know" one's HIV status, to avoid experiencing HIV-related stigma, which could interact with other stigmatized social identities and threaten vital social relationships, life chances, and resources. Yet most had tested for HIV previously. Factors facilitating testing included health education to boost knowledge of effective treatments for HIV; understanding HIV does not necessitate ending social relationships; and tapping into altruism. In the context of economic and social inequality, HIV stigma operates on multiple, intersecting layers. IR-HRA struggle with an aversion to

  2. Survival of HIV-TB co-infected adult patients under ART in Ambo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Objectives: To estimate the survival of HIV/AIDS co-infected patients and to identify predictors of survival based on data obtained from Ambo .... done using SPSS, SAS, and STATA software. ..... Control Program Manual, Fourth Edition. Addis.

  3. Analysis of host responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in a multi-site study of subjects with different TB and HIV infection states in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne S Sutherland

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains a global health threat with 9 million new cases and 1.4 million deaths per year. In order to develop a protective vaccine, we need to define the antigens expressed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, which are relevant to protective immunity in high-endemic areas.We analysed responses to 23 Mtb antigens in a total of 1247 subjects with different HIV and TB status across 5 geographically diverse sites in Africa (South Africa, The Gambia, Ethiopia, Malawi and Uganda. We used a 7-day whole blood assay followed by IFN-γ ELISA on the supernatants. Antigens included PPD, ESAT-6 and Ag85B (dominant antigens together with novel resuscitation-promoting factors (rpf, reactivation proteins, latency (Mtb DosR regulon-encoded antigens, starvation-induced antigens and secreted antigens.There was variation between sites in responses to the antigens, presumably due to underlying genetic and environmental differences. When results from all sites were combined, HIV- subjects with active TB showed significantly lower responses compared to both TST(- and TST(+ contacts to latency antigens (Rv0569, Rv1733, Rv1735, Rv1737 and the rpf Rv0867; whilst responses to ESAT-6/CFP-10 fusion protein (EC, PPD, Rv2029, TB10.3, and TB10.4 were significantly higher in TST(+ contacts (LTBI compared to TB and TST(- contacts fewer differences were seen in subjects with HIV co-infection, with responses to the mitogen PHA significantly lower in subjects with active TB compared to those with LTBI and no difference with any antigen.Our multi-site study design for testing novel Mtb antigens revealed promising antigens for future vaccine development. The IFN-γ ELISA is a cheap and useful tool for screening potential antigenicity in subjects with different ethnic backgrounds and across a spectrum of TB and HIV infection states. Analysis of cytokines other than IFN-γ is currently on-going to determine correlates of protection, which may be useful for vaccine

  4. Incremental Yield of Including Determine-TB LAM Assay in Diagnostic Algorithms for Hospitalized and Ambulatory HIV-Positive Patients in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerga, Helena; Ferlazzo, Gabriella; Bevilacqua, Paolo; Kirubi, Beatrice; Ardizzoni, Elisa; Wanjala, Stephen; Sitienei, Joseph; Bonnet, Maryline

    2017-01-01

    Determine-TB LAM assay is a urine point-of-care test useful for TB diagnosis in HIV-positive patients. We assessed the incremental diagnostic yield of adding LAM to algorithms based on clinical signs, sputum smear-microscopy, chest X-ray and Xpert MTB/RIF in HIV-positive patients with symptoms of pulmonary TB (PTB). Prospective observational cohort of ambulatory (either severely ill or CD4<200cells/μl or with Body Mass Index<17Kg/m2) and hospitalized symptomatic HIV-positive adults in Kenya. Incremental diagnostic yield of adding LAM was the difference in the proportion of confirmed TB patients (positive Xpert or MTB culture) diagnosed by the algorithm with LAM compared to the algorithm without LAM. The multivariable mortality model was adjusted for age, sex, clinical severity, BMI, CD4, ART initiation, LAM result and TB confirmation. Among 474 patients included, 44.1% were severely ill, 69.6% had CD4<200cells/μl, 59.9% had initiated ART, 23.2% could not produce sputum. LAM, smear-microscopy, Xpert and culture in sputum were positive in 39.0% (185/474), 21.6% (76/352), 29.1% (102/350) and 39.7% (92/232) of the patients tested, respectively. Of 156 patients with confirmed TB, 65.4% were LAM positive. Of those classified as non-TB, 84.0% were LAM negative. Adding LAM increased the diagnostic yield of the algorithms by 36.6%, from 47.4% (95%CI:39.4-55.6) to 84.0% (95%CI:77.3-89.4%), when using clinical signs and X-ray; by 19.9%, from 62.2% (95%CI:54.1-69.8) to 82.1% (95%CI:75.1-87.7), when using clinical signs and microscopy; and by 13.4%, from 74.4% (95%CI:66.8-81.0) to 87.8% (95%CI:81.6-92.5), when using clinical signs and Xpert. LAM positive patients had an increased risk of 2-months mortality (aOR:2.7; 95%CI:1.5-4.9). LAM should be included in TB diagnostic algorithms in parallel to microscopy or Xpert request for HIV-positive patients either ambulatory (severely ill or CD4<200cells/μl) or hospitalized. LAM allows same day treatment initiation in patients at

  5. HIV/TB: When is it safe to start HAART? | Wood | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 4 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected ...

  6. Association between health systems performance and treatment outcomes in patients co-infected with MDR-TB and HIV in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: implications for TB programmes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Loveday

    Full Text Available To improve the treatment of MDR-TB and HIV co-infected patients, we investigated the relationship between health system performance and patient treatment outcomes at 4 decentralised MDR-TB sites.In this mixed methods case study which included prospective comparative data, we measured health system performance using a framework of domains comprising key health service components. Using Pearson Product Moment Correlation coefficients we quantified the direction and magnitude of the association between health system performance and MDR-TB treatment outcomes. Qualitative data from participant observation and interviews analysed using systematic text condensation (STC complemented our quantitative findings.We found significant differences in treatment outcomes across the sites with successful outcomes varying from 72% at Site 1 to 52% at Site 4 (p<0.01. Health systems performance scores also varied considerably across the sites. Our findings suggest there is a correlation between treatment outcomes and overall health system performance which is significant (r = 0.99, p<0.01, with Site 1 having the highest number of successful treatment outcomes and the highest health system performance. Although the 'integration' domain, which measured integration of MDR-TB services into existing services appeared to have the strongest association with successful treatment outcomes (r = 0.99, p<0.01, qualitative data indicated that the 'context' domain influenced the other domains.We suggest that there is an association between treatment outcomes and health system performance. The chance of treatment success is greater if decentralised MDR-TB services are integrated into existing services. To optimise successful treatment outcomes, regular monitoring and support are needed at a district, facility and individual level to ensure the local context is supportive of new programmes and implementation is according to guidelines.

  7. Economic support to patients in HIV and TB grants in rounds 7 and 10 from the global fund to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda M Richter

    Full Text Available People with TB and/or HIV frequently experience severe economic barriers to health care, including out-of-pocket expenses related to diagnosis and treatment, as well as indirect costs due to loss of income. These barriers can both aggravate economic hardship and prevent or delay diagnosis, treatment and successful outcome, leading to increased transmission, morbidity and mortality. WHO, UNAIDS and the ILO argue that economic support of various kinds is essential to enable vulnerable people to protect themselves from infection, avoid delayed diagnosis and treatment, overcome barriers to adherence, and avert destitution. This paper analyses successful country proposals to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria that include economic support in Rounds 7 and 10; 36 and 20 HIV and TB grants in Round 7 and 32 and 26, respectively, in Round 10. Of these, up to 84 percent included direct or indirect economic support for beneficiaries, although the amount constituted a very small proportion of the total grant. In TB grants, the objectives of economic support were generally clearly stated, and focused on mechanisms to improve treatment uptake and adherence, and the case was most clearly made for MDR-TB patients. In HIV grants, the objectives were much broader in scope, including mitigation of adverse economic and social effects of HIV and its treatment on both patients and families. The analysis shows that economic support is on the radar for countries developing Global Fund proposals, and a wide range of economic support activities are in place. In order to move forward in this area, the wealth of country experience that exists needs to be collated, assessed and disseminated. In addition to trials, operational research and programme evaluations, more precise guidance to countries is needed to inform evidence-based decision about activities that are cost-effective, affordable and feasible.

  8. Community perceptions of the socio-economic structural context influencing HIV and TB risk, prevention and treatment in a high prevalence area in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwenya, Nothando; Gumede, Dumile; Shahmanesh, Maryam; McGrath, Nuala; Grant, Alison; Seeley, Janet

    2018-03-01

    Following calls for targeted HIV prevention interventions in so-called "hotspots", we explored subjective perceptions of community members in places considered to be high HIV and tuberculosis (TB) transmission areas and those with low prevalence. Although more people now have access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), some areas are still experiencing high HIV transmission rates, presenting a barrier to the elimination of HIV. A rapid qualitative assessment approach was used to access a sample of 230 people who contributed narratives of their experiences and perceptions of transmission, treatment and prevention of HIV and TB in their communities. Theoretical propositions case study strategy was used to inform and guide the thematic analysis of the data with Research Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University College London, London, UK. Our results support the concept of linking perceived control to health through the identification of structural factors that increase communities' sense of agency. People in these communities did not feel they had the efficacy to effect change in their milieu. The few socio-economic opportunities promote social mobility in search of better prospects which may have a negative impact on community cohesion and prevention strategies. Communities were more concerned with improving their immediate social and economic situations and prioritised this above the prevention messages. Therefore approaches that focus on changing the structural and environmental barriers to prevention may increase people's perceived control. Multifaceted strategies that address the identified constructs of perceived control may influence the social change necessary to make structural interventions successful.

  9. "It's an Uphill Battle Everyday": Intersectionality, Low-Income Black Heterosexual Men, and Implications for HIV Prevention Research and Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowleg, Lisa; Teti, Michelle; Malebranche, David J; Tschann, Jeanne M

    2013-01-01

    This interview study, the initial qualitative phase of a larger mixed methods HIV prevention study focused on Black heterosexual men, used intersectionality as a theoretical framework to explore: (1) How a sample of Black heterosexual men describe and experience the multiple intersections of race, gender, and SES; and (2) How these descriptions reflected interlocking systems of social inequality for Black men at the social-structural level. Participants were 30 predominantly low-income self-identified Black heterosexual men between the ages of 18 and 44. Analyses highlighted four themes that demonstrate how participants' individual-level experiences as Black men reflect macro social-structural inequality: (1) racial discrimination and microaggressions; (2) unemployment; (3) incarceration; and (4) police surveillance and harassment. We discuss the study's findings within the context of social-structural factors that disproportionately and adversely impact Black men. We also highlight the implications of the intersectionality perspective for HIV prevention research and interventions for Black heterosexual men.

  10. Visible Battle Rhythm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cort, Brian; Bouchard, Alain; Gouin, Denis; Proulx, Pascale; Wright, William

    2006-01-01

    .... Visual Battle Rhythm (VBR) is a software prototype which updates the battle rhythm process with modern technology and careful information design to improve the synchronization, situational awareness and decision making ability of commanders...

  11. The START Study to evaluate the effectiveness of a combination intervention package to enhance antiretroviral therapy uptake and retention during TB treatment among TB/HIV patients in Lesotho: rationale and design of a mixed-methods, cluster-randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea A. Howard

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART early during tuberculosis (TB treatment increases survival; however, implementation is suboptimal. Implementation science studies are needed to identify interventions to address this evidence-to-program gap. Objective: The Start TB Patients on ART and Retain on Treatment (START Study is a mixed-methods, cluster-randomized trial aimed at evaluating the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and acceptability of a combination intervention package (CIP to improve early ART initiation, retention, and TB treatment success among TB/HIV patients in Berea District, Lesotho. Design: Twelve health facilities were randomized to receive the CIP or standard of care after stratification by facility type (hospital or health center. The CIP includes nurse training and mentorship, using a clinical algorithm; transport reimbursement and health education by village health workers (VHW for patients and treatment supporters; and adherence support using text messaging and VHW. Routine data were abstracted for all newly registered TB/HIV patients; anticipated sample size was 1,200 individuals. A measurement cohort of TB/HIV patients initiating ART was recruited; the target enrollment was 384 individuals, each to be followed for the duration of TB treatment (6–9 months. Inclusion criteria were HIV-infected; on TB treatment; initiated ART within 2 months of TB treatment initiation; age ≥18; English- or Sesotho-speaking; and capable of informed consent. The exclusion criterion was multidrug-resistant TB. Three groups of key informants were recruited from intervention clinics: early ART initiators; non/late ART initiators; and health care workers. Primary outcomes include ART initiation, retention, and TB treatment success. Secondary outcomes include time to ART initiation, adherence, change in CD4+ count, sputum smear conversion, cost-effectiveness, and acceptability. Follow-up and data abstraction are complete

  12. The effect of HIV coinfection, HAART and TB treatment on cytokine/chemokine responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens in active TB patients and latently Mtb infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassa, Desta; de Jager, Wilco; Gebremichael, Gebremedhin; Alemayehu, Yodit; Ran, Leonie; Fransen, Justin; Wolday, Dawit; Messele, Tsehaynesh; Tegbaru, Belete; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; van Baarle, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    Identification of Mtb specific induced cytokine/chemokine host biomarkers could assist in developing novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic tools for TB. Levels of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17, IL-10, IP-10 and MIP-1α were measured in supernatants of whole blood stimulated with Mtb specific fusion

  13. Conceptualizing the cross-cultural gaps in managing international aid: HIV/AIDS and TB project delivery in Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Terence

    2011-01-01

    There appears to be a gap between the billions of dollars inputted into fighting HIV/AIDS and TB and outcomes. This in part can be attributed to the lack of attention in International Development to managing programmes and projects within complex levels of cross-cultural interactions. International Development often ignores management issues, yet Management Studies is left wanting through a lack of engagement with development issues including the fight against disease and poverty. This paper attempts to link these two disciplines towards mutual benefit, through a critical cross-cultural approach. It provides contextualization of international development policies/strategies; conceptualization of dominant paradigms; structural analysis of how a programme/project fits into the global governance structure; analysis of complexities and levels of cross-cultural interaction and their consequences and the process and implications of knowledge transfer across cultural distances. It concludes with implications for policy and practice, as well as what is needed from cross-disciplinary research. This includes how feedback loops can be strengthened from local to global, how indigenous knowledge may be better understood and integrated, how power relations within the global governance structure could be managed, how cross-cultural interaction could be better understood, and how knowledge transfer/sharing should be critically managed. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Project delivery in HIV/AIDS and TB in Southern Africa: the cross-cultural management imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeyé, Frederik; Jackson, Terence

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a broad-based study that initially investigated a possible gap in global inputs into the fight against HIV/AIDS and TB co-infection, and outputs in terms of results achieved. It is proposed that such a gap may be hypothesized to be due, at least in part, to inappropriate management regimes within the global health governance structure. The research does not simply question the effectiveness of the management of programs and projects, but rather the inappropriateness resulting from the lack of addressing cross-cultural issues. The factors facilitating or hampering project service delivery were examined, by looking at 12 case studies in Botswana and South Africa. These data were complemented with seven semi-structured interviews with donor organizations and NGOs, conducted in the North. Cultural interactions were investigated by using the concept of "interfaces". The results suggest that there is a disjuncture between the global and local level that affects project delivery. The main issues hampering project outcomes can be summarized as systemic, structural and cultural. The article's main contributions are both theoretical, looking at global project delivery from a cross-cultural management perspective, as well as to development praxis by highlighting the need to focus more critically on cross-cultural management issues within the global health governance structure, and indeed within international development as a whole.

  15. TB Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sputum can also be used to do a culture. TB blood test – a test that uses a blood sample to find out if you are infected with TB bacteria. The test measures the response to TB proteins when they are mixed with a small amount of blood. Examples of these TB blood tests include QuantiFERON ® -TB ...

  16. Role of MRP transporters in regulating antimicrobial drug inefficacy and oxidative stress-induced pathogenesis during HIV-1 and TB infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Upal; Barber, Paul; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Batrakova, Elena V; Mondal, Debasis; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Multi-Drug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) drug-efflux transporter superfamily. MRPs are known to regulate the efficacy of a broad range of anti-retroviral drugs (ARV) used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and antibacterial agents used in Tuberculus Bacilli (TB) therapy. Due to their role in efflux of glutathione (GSH) conjugated drugs, MRPs can also regulate cellular oxidative stress, which may contribute to both HIV and/or TB pathogenesis. This review focuses on the characteristics, functional expression, and modulation of known members of the MRP family in HIV infected cells exposed to ARV drugs and discusses their known role in drug-inefficacy in HIV/TB-induced dysfunctions. Currently, nine members of the MRP family (MRP1-MRP9) have been identified, with MRP1 and MRP2 being the most extensively studied. Details of the other members of this family have not been known until recently, but differential expression has been documented in inflammatory tissues. Researchers have found that the distribution, function, and reactivity of members of MRP family vary in different types of lymphocytes and macrophages, and are differentially expressed at the basal and apical surfaces of both endothelial and epithelial cells. Therefore, the prime objective of this review is to delineate the role of MRP transporters in HAART and TB therapy and their potential in precipitating cellular dysfunctions manifested in these chronic infectious diseases. We also provide an overview of different available options and novel experimental strategies that are being utilized to overcome the drug resistance and disease pathogenesis mediated by these membrane transporters.

  17. Role of MRP Transporters in Regulating Antimicrobial Drug Inefficacy and Oxidative Stress-induced Pathogenesis during HIV-1 and TB Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upal eRoy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-Drug Resistance Proteins (MRPs are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC drug-efflux transporter superfamily. MRPs are known to regulate the efficacy of a broad range of anti-retroviral drugs (ARV used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and antibacterial agents used in Tuberculus Bacilli (TB therapy. Due to their role in efflux of glutathione (GSH conjugated drugs, MRPs can also regulate cellular oxidative stress, which may contribute to both HIV and/or TB pathogenesis. This review focuses on the characteristics, functional expression, and modulation of known members of the MRP family in HIV infected cells exposed to ARV drugs and discusses their known role in drug-inefficacy in HIV/TB-induced dysfunctions. Currently, nine members of the MRP family (MRP1-MRP9 have been identified, with MRP1 and MRP2 being the most extensively studied. Details of the other members of this family have not been known until recently, but differential expression has been documented in inflammatory tissues. Researchers have found that the distribution, function and reactivity of members of MRP family vary in different types of lymphocytes and macrophages, and are differentially expressed at the basal and apical surfaces of both endothelial and epithelial cells. Therefore, the prime objective of this review is to delineate the role of MRP transporters in HAART and TB therapy and their potential in precipitating cellular dysfunctions manifested in these chronic infectious diseases. We also provide an overview of different available options and novel experimental strategies that are being utilized to overcome the drug resistance and disease pathogenesis mediated by these membrane transporters.

  18. Boosting Quality Registries with Clinical Decision Support Functionality*. User Acceptance of a Prototype Applied to HIV/TB Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannheden, Carolina; Hvitfeldt-Forsberg, Helena; Eftimovska, Elena; Westling, Katarina; Ellenius, Johan

    2017-08-11

    The care of HIV-related tuberculosis (HIV/TB) is complex and challenging. Clinical decision support (CDS) systems can contribute to improve quality of care, but more knowledge is needed on factors determining user acceptance of CDS. To analyze physicians' and nurses' acceptance of a CDS prototype for evidence-based drug therapy recommendations for HIV/TB treatment. Physicians and nurses were involved in designing a CDS prototype intended for future integration with the Swedish national HIV quality registry. Focus group evaluation was performed with ten nurses and four physicians, respectively. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) was used to analyze acceptance. We identified several potential benefits with the CDS prototype as well as some concerns that could be addressed by redesign. There was also concern about dependence on physician attitudes, as well as technical, organizational, and legal issues. Acceptance evaluation at a prototype stage provided rich data to improve the future design of a CDS prototype. Apart from design and development efforts, substantial organizational efforts are needed to enable the implementation and maintenance of a future CDS system.

  19. The Battle of Vukovar: The Battle That Saved Croatia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sebetovsky, Mario

    2002-01-01

    The key battle in the Croatian Homeland War that led to Croatia independence was the Battle of Vukovar Despite its importance very little has been written about this battle from a professional military perspective...

  20. Engagement of non-government organisations and community care workers in collaborative TB/HIV activities including prevention of mother to child transmission in South Africa: Opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwimana Jeannine

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The implementation of collaborative TB/HIV activities may help to mitigate the impact of the dual epidemic on patients and communities. Such implementation requires integrated interventions across facilities and levels of government, and with communities. Engaging Community Care Workers (CCWs in the delivery of integrated TB/HIV services may enhance universal coverage and treatment outcomes, and address human resource needs in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods Using pre-intervention research in Sisonke district, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa as a case study, we report on three study objectives: (1 to determine the extent of the engagement of NGOs and CCWs in the implementation of collaborative TB/HIV including PMTCT; (2 to identify constraints related to provision of TB/HIV/PMTCT integrated care at community level; and (3 to explore ways of enhancing the engagement of CCWs to provide integrated TB/HIV/PMTCT services. Our mixed method study included facility and NGO audits, a household survey (n = 3867, 33 key informant interviews with provincial, district, facility, and NGO managers, and six CCW and patient focus group discussions. Results Most contracted NGOs were providing TB or HIV support and care with little support for PMTCT. Only 11% of facilities’ TB and HIV patients needing care and support at the community level were receiving support from CCWs. Only 2% of pregnant women reported being counseled by CCWs on infant feeding options and HIV testing. Most facilities (83% did not have any structural linkage with NGOs. Major constraints identified were system-related: structural, organizational and managerial constraints; inadequate CCW training and supervision; limited scope of CCW practice; inadequate funding; and inconsistency in supplies and equipment. Individual and community factors, such as lack of disclosure, stigma related to HIV, and cultural beliefs were also identified as constraints. Conclusions NGO

  1. Risk Factors for DOTS Treatment Default Among New HIV-TB Coinfected Patients in Nalgonda (Dist.) Telangana (State): A Case Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy Satti, Siva Balaji; Kondagunta, Nagaraj

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic regimens as recommended by the Revised National TB Control Programme (RNTCP) have been shown to be highly effective for both preventing and treating tuberculosis, but poor adherence to medication is a major barrier to its global control. The study was conducted to assess the influence of patient related factors for DOTS Treatment Default among HIV-TB Co-infected cases. This was a case control study conducted in Nalgond, Telangana. All new HIV-TB coinfected and DOTS-defaulted patients registered under RNTCP for the period from January 2010 to December 2012 were selected. Of the 154 patients, 23 had died and 11 could not be traced, and these were excluded. Thus the total number of available cases were 120 for those age- and sex-matched controls (HIV-TB coinfected patients and those who had completed the DOTS regimen successfully) were selected. The mean age was 36.5 ± 9 years; the majority (23.3%) of patients defaulted during the second month of treatment. Significant risk factors associated with defaulting included unskilled occupation [adjusted odds ratio (AOR: 3.56; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1-11.56], lower middle class socioeconomic status (AOR: 17.16; 95% CI: 3.93-74.82), small family size (AOR: 21.3; 95% CI: 6.4-70.91), marital disharmony (AOR: 6.78; 95% CI: 1.93-23.76), not being satisfied with the conduct of health personnel (AOR: 7.38; 95% CI: 2.32-23.39), smoking (AOR: 8.5; 95% CI: 2.31-31.21), and side effects of drugs (AOR: 4.18; 95% CI: 1.35-12.9). Unskilled occupation, marital disharmony, small family size, lower middle class socioeconomic status, not being satisfied with the conduct of health personnel, smoking, and drug side effects were significantly associated with defaulting. Information on the pattern of tuberculosis (TB), the outcome of anti-tuberculosis treatment (ATT), and the factors associated with it will help in planning interventions to improve adherence to DOTS treatment.

  2. Impact of tuberculosis treatment on CD4 cell count, HIV RNA, and p24 antigen in patients with HIV and tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejse, Christian; Furtado, A.; Camara, C.

    2013-01-01

    To describe HIV RNA levels during tuberculosis (TB) infection in patients co-infected with TB and HIV. Moreover, to examine the p24 antigen profile during TB treatment.......To describe HIV RNA levels during tuberculosis (TB) infection in patients co-infected with TB and HIV. Moreover, to examine the p24 antigen profile during TB treatment....

  3. The antiretroviral efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy and plasma nevirapine concentrations in HIV-TB co-infected Indian patients receiving rifampicin based antituberculosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha Sanjeev

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rifampicin reduces the plasma concentrations of nevirapine in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and tuberculosis (TB co-infected patients, who are administered these drugs concomitantly. We conducted a prospective interventional study to assess the efficacy of nevirapine-containing highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART when co-administered with rifampicin-containing antituberculosis treatment (ATT and also measured plasma nevirapine concentrations in patients receiving such a nevirapine-containing HAART regimen. Methods 63 cases included antiretroviral treatment naïve HIV-TB co-infected patients with CD4 counts less than 200 cells/mm3 started on rifampicin-containing ATT followed by nevirapine-containing HAART. In control group we included 51 HIV patients without tuberculosis and on nevirapine-containing HAART. They were assessed for clinical and immunological response at the end of 24 and 48 weeks. Plasma nevirapine concentrations were measured at days 14, 28, 42 and 180 of starting HAART. Results 97 out of 114 (85.1% patients were alive at the end of 48 weeks. The CD4 cell count showed a mean increase of 108 vs.113 cells/mm3 (p=0.83 at 24 weeks of HAART in cases and controls respectively. Overall, 58.73% patients in cases had viral loads of less than 400 copies/ml at the end of 48 weeks. The mean (± SD Nevirapine concentrations of cases and control at 14, 28, 42 and 180 days were 2.19 ± 1.49 vs. 3.27 ± 4.95 (p = 0.10, 2.78 ± 1.60 vs. 3.67 ± 3.59 (p = 0.08, 3.06 ± 3.32 vs. 4.04 ± 2.55 (p = 0.10 respectively and 3.04 μg/ml (in cases. Conclusions Good immunological and clinical response can be obtained in HIV-TB co-infected patients receiving rifampicin and nevirapine concomitantly despite somewhat lower nevirapine trough concentrations. This suggests that rifampicin-containing ATT may be co administered in resource limited setting with nevirapine-containing HAART regimen without substantial reduction in

  4. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of HIV in the United States, please visit: https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids- ... HIV, STD, and TB Prevention. About HIV/AIDS. ( https://www.cdc.gov/actagainstaids/basics/whatishiv.html ). Atlanta, ...

  5. Clinic flow for STI, HIV, and TB patients in an urban infectious disease clinic offering point-of-care testing services in Durban, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stime, Katrina J; Garrett, Nigel; Sookrajh, Yukteshwar; Dorward, Jienchi; Dlamini, Ntuthu; Olowolagba, Ayo; Sharma, Monisha; Barnabas, Ruanne V; Drain, Paul K

    2018-05-11

    Many clinics in Southern Africa have long waiting times. The implementation of point-of-care (POC) tests to accelerate diagnosis and improve clinical management in resource-limited settings may improve or worsen clinic flow and waiting times. The objective of this study was to describe clinic flow with special emphasis on the impact of POC testing at a large urban public healthcare clinic in Durban, South Africa. We used time and motion methods to directly observe patients and practitioners. We created patient flow maps and recorded individual patient waiting and consultation times for patients seeking STI, TB, or HIV care. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 20 clinic staff to ascertain staff opinions on clinic flow and POC test implementation. Among 121 observed patients, the total number of queues ranged from 4 to 7 and total visit times ranged from 0:14 (hours:minutes) to 7:38. Patients waited a mean of 2:05 for standard-of-care STI management, and approximately 4:56 for STI POC diagnostic testing. Stable HIV patients who collected antiretroviral therapy refills waited a mean of 2:42 in the standard queue and 2:26 in the fast-track queue. A rapid TB test on a small sample of patients with the Xpert MTB/RIF assay and treatment initiation took a mean of 6:56, and 40% of patients presenting with TB-related symptoms were asked to return for an additional clinic visit to obtain test results. For all groups, the mean clinical assessment time with a nurse or physician was 7 to 9 min, which accounted for 2 to 6% of total visit time. Staff identified poor clinic flow and personnel shortages as areas of concern that may pose challenges to expanding POC tests in the current clinic environment. This busy urban clinic had multiple patient queues, long clinical visits, and short clinical encounters. Although POC testing ensured patients received a diagnosis sooner, it more than doubled the time STI patients spent at the clinic and did not result in same

  6. Winning the battle and losing the war? Where public health is getting it wrong in the current fight against HIV-AIDS and tuberculosis in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Luchuo Engelbert; Clovis, Nkeh Charles

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enormous victory that has been recorded in decreasing significantly HIV-TB related mortality and morbidity in Sub-Saharan Africa, enormous challenges continue to obstruct proper and enviable control of these conditions. These range from prioritization, ethics, funding, drug resistance and research gaps. Resistance to these diseases could constitute key treatment and prevention challenges to health care systems and the international community if not handled appropriately and promptly. This paper presents key shortcomings of the current funding, management and research policies and highlights possible action areas to remedy this situation.

  7. Effect of Pregnancy on Interferon Gamma Release Assay and Tuberculin Skin Test Detection of Latent TB Infection Among HIV-Infected Women in a High Burden Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCourse, Sylvia M; Cranmer, Lisa M; Matemo, Daniel; Kinuthia, John; Richardson, Barbra A; Horne, David J; John-Stewart, Grace

    2017-05-01

    Peripartum immunologic changes may affect latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) diagnostic performance among HIV-infected women. HIV-infected women were serially tested with tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma release assay [QuantiFERON TB Gold In-tube (QFT)] in pregnancy and 6 weeks postpartum in Kenya. Prevalence, sensitivity and agreement, and correlates of QFT/TST positivity were assessed. Quantitative QFT mitogen and Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen (Mtb-Ag) responses were compared by peripartum stage. Incidence of test conversion at 6 weeks postpartum was evaluated in baseline TST-/QFT- women. Among 100 HIV-infected women, median age was 26 years, median CD4 was 555 cells per cubic millimeter, and 88% were on antiretrovirals. More women were QFT+ than TST+ in both pregnancy (35.4% vs. 13.5%, P = 0.001) and postpartum (29.6% vs. 14.8%, P pregnancy vs. postpartum, and specifically among persistently QFT+ women (Mtb-Ag: 3.46 vs. 4.48 IU/mL, P = 0.007). QFT indeterminate rate was higher in pregnancy (16%) compared with postpartum (0%) because of lower mitogen response. QFT identified >2-fold more women with LTBI compared with TST in pregnancy and postpartum. Lower QFT Mtb-Ag and mitogen responses in pregnancy compared with postpartum suggest that pregnancy-associated immunologic changes may influence LTBI test performance.

  8. Coalition Battle Management Language

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tolk, Andreas; Galvin, Kevin; Hieb, Michael; Khimeche, Lionel

    2004-01-01

    Battle Management Language (BML) is being developed as an unambiguous language to command and control forces and equipment conducting military operations and to provide for situational awareness and a shared common operational picture...

  9. An assessment of the HIV/TB knowledge and skills of home-based carers working in the North West province in South Africa: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Justin G; Letsoalo, Mabjala R; Chirowodza, Admire C

    2017-04-19

    Home-based carers (HBCs) play a critical role in ensuring the success of the primary health care re-engineering strategy in South Africa. Their role includes ensuring improved access to and delivery of primary health care at the household level, and better co-ordination and improved linkages between community and health facilities for HIV/TB services. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge, skills, challenges and training needs of HBCs involved in HIV/TB care in one sub-district in the North-West province of South Africa. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study in which 157 HBCs were interviewed to assess their knowledge and skills regarding HIV and TB. Data were collected using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire. Quantitative and qualitative data were analysed using SPSS statistical software and thematic analysis respectively. One hundred and forty-four (92%) of the interviewees were female and 13 (8%) were male. The median age of the participants was 35 years (interquartile range (IQR): 22-27). The median score for knowledge of both HIV and TB questions was 66% (IQR: 57-75). In general, HIV knowledge scores were higher than TB knowledge scores (73% versus 66%). A significant association was found between knowledge scores and formal training (p worked. HBCs also reported facing various challenges in their jobs related to stigma and the social contexts in which they work. The study showed that the overall knowledge of HBCs was limited, given the skills required and the services they provide. Given the increasing role of HBCs in various health initiatives, targeted interventions are required to support and improve their competencies and service provision.

  10. Infrequent detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii by PCR in oral wash specimens from TB patients with or without HIV and healthy contacts in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lotte; Jensen, Andreas V; Praygod, George

    2010-01-01

    In tuberculosis (TB) endemic parts of the world, patients with pulmonary symptoms are managed as "smear-negative TB patients" if they do not improve on a two-week presumptive, broad-spectrum course of antibiotic treatment even if they are TB microscopy smear negative. These patients are frequentl......- and TB-endemic area of sub-Saharan Africa....

  11. Diagnostic accuracy, incremental yield and prognostic value of Determine TB-LAM for routine diagnostic testing for tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients requiring acute hospital admission in South Africa: a prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Stephen D; Kerkhoff, Andrew D; Burton, Rosie; Schutz, Charlotte; Boulle, Andrew; Vogt, Monica; Gupta-Wright, Ankur; Nicol, Mark P; Meintjes, Graeme

    2017-03-21

    We previously reported that one-third of HIV-positive adults requiring medical admission to a South African district hospital had laboratory-confirmed tuberculosis (TB) and that almost two-thirds of cases could be rapidly diagnosed using Xpert MTB/RIF-testing of concentrated urine samples obtained on the first day of admission. Implementation of urine-based, routine, point-of-care TB screening is an attractive intervention that might be facilitated by use of a simple, low-cost diagnostic tool, such as the Determine TB-LAM lateral-flow rapid test for HIV-associated TB. Sputum, urine and blood samples were systematically obtained from unselected HIV-positive adults within 24 hours of admission to a South African township hospital. Additional clinical samples were obtained during hospitalization as clinically indicated. TB was defined by the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in any sample using Xpert MTB/RIF or liquid culture. The diagnostic yield, accuracy and prognostic value of urine-lipoarabinomannan (LAM) testing were determined, but urine-LAM results did not inform treatment decisions. Consecutive HIV-positive adult acute medical admissions not already receiving TB treatment (n = 427) were enrolled regardless of clinical presentation or symptoms. TB was diagnosed in 139 patients (TB prevalence 32.6%; median CD4 count 80 cells/μL). In the first 24 hours of admission, sputum (spot and/or induced) samples were obtained from 37.0% of patients and urine samples from 99.5% of patients (P < 0.001). The diagnostic yields from these specimens were 19.4% (n = 27/139) for sputum-microscopy, 26.6% (n = 37/139) for sputum-Xpert, 38.1% (n = 53/139) for urine-LAM and 52.5% (n = 73/139) for sputum-Xpert/urine-LAM combined (P < 0.01). Corresponding yields among patients with CD4 counts <100 cells/μL were 18.9%, 24.3%, 55.4% and 63.5%, respectively (P < 0.01). The diagnostic yield of urine-LAM was unrelated to respiratory symptoms, and

  12. Detectemos la TB. Tratemos la TB. Trabajemos juntos para eliminar la TB. (Find TB. Treat TB. Working together to eliminate TB.)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-26

    Este podcast trata sobre el Día Mundial de la Tuberculosis y el tema de los CDC para el año 2014.  Created: 2/26/2014 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/26/2014.

  13. Using mHealth for HIV/TB Treatment Support in Lesotho: Enhancing Patient-Provider Communication in the START Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch-Moverman, Yael; Daftary, Amrita; Yuengling, Katharine A; Saito, Suzue; Ntoane, Moeketsi; Frederix, Koen; Maama, Llang B; Howard, Andrea A

    2017-01-01

    mHealth is a promising means of supporting adherence to treatment. The Start TB patients on ART and Retain on Treatment (START) study included real-time adherence support using short-text messaging service (SMS) text messaging and trained village health workers (VHWs). We describe the use and acceptability of mHealth by patients with HIV/tuberculosis and health care providers. Patients and treatment supporters received automated, coded medication and appointment reminders at their preferred time and frequency, using their own phones, and $3.70 in monthly airtime. Facility-based VHWs were trained to log patient information and text message preferences into a mobile application and were given a password-protected mobile phone and airtime to communicate with community-based VHWs. The use of mHealth tools was analyzed from process data over the study course. Acceptability was evaluated during monthly follow-up interviews with all participants and during qualitative interviews with a subset of 30 patients and 30 health care providers at intervention sites. Use and acceptability were contextualized by monthly adherence data. From April 2013 to August 2015, the automated SMS system successfully delivered 39,528 messages to 835 individuals, including 633 patients and 202 treatment supporters. Uptake of the SMS intervention was high, with 92.1% of 713 eligible patients choosing to receive SMS messages. Patient and provider interviews yielded insight into barriers and facilitators to mHealth utilization. The intervention improved the quality of health communication between patients, treatment supporters, and providers. HIV-related stigma and technical challenges were identified as potential barriers. The mHealth intervention for HIV/tuberculosis treatment support in Lesotho was found to be a low-tech, user-friendly intervention, which was acceptable to patients and health care providers.

  14. Battle of Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited BATTLE OF NARRATIVES...from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL June 2012 Author: Lars Ruth Approved by: Prof. Sean F. Everton Thesis Advisor Dr. Hy...are more important than are others. For example, for some, social security and taxes are very important while gun control and LGBT are not. For

  15. Stop TB in My Lifetime: A Call for a World Free of TB - World TB Day 2013

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-12

    In this podcast Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses World TB Day, the 2013 slogan and theme.  Created: 3/12/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/13/2012.

  16. Community Involvement in TB Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Werf (Marloes); S.G. Heumann (Silke); E.M.H. Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWhile communities at risk have been both drivers and partners in HIV research, their important role in TB research is yet to be fully realized. Involvement of communities in tuberculosis care and prevention is currently on the international agenda. This creates opportunities and

  17. HIV Prevention

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-01

    Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, talks about steps people can take to protect their health from HIV.  Created: 2/1/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/1/2012.

  18. Airland Battle Doctrine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Professional Paper 463 / September 1988 OTIC - EL cOPY V 0- 00 00 N Airland Battle Doctrine DTIC S ELECTE DEC 2 81988D Douglas W. Skinner Dcb A...missiles to ground targets. Initial deployment will be on the Army’s OV-i Bronco and the Air Force’s TR-l and C-18. This is another outgrowth of the

  19. Workplace interventions to reduce HIV and TB stigma among health care workers - Where do we go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jacob; Yassi, Annalee; Rau, Asta; Buxton, Jane A; Wouters, Edwin; Engelbrecht, Michelle C; Uebel, Kerry E; Nophale, Letshego E

    2015-01-01

    Fear of stigma and discrimination among health care workers (HCWs) in South African hospitals is thought to be a major factor in the high rates of HIV and tuberculosis infection experienced in the health care workforce. The aim of the current study is to inform the development of a stigma reduction intervention in the context of a large multicomponent trial. We analysed relevant results of four feasibility studies conducted in the lead up to the trial. Our findings suggest that a stigma reduction campaign must address community and structural level drivers of stigma, in addition to individual level concerns, through a participatory and iterative approach. Importantly, stigma reduction must not only be embedded in the institutional management of HCWs but also be attentive to the localised needs of HCWs themselves.

  20. tb diagnostics challenges of tb diagnosis and treatment in south africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-06-01

    Jun 1, 2007 ... 45 currently provides treatment to 3 000 patients. Eighty-nine per cent of those accessing ART have symptomatic HIV disease. (WHO clinical stage 3 and 4) with a median CD4 cell count of. 95 cells/µl. More than 50% have a history of prior completed. TB treatment, 15% are on current TB treatment, 11% are.

  1. Integration of TB and ART services fails to improve TB treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The median CD4+ count of HIV-positive patients was 152 cells/μl (interquartile range (IQR) 71 - 277) for integrated facilities and 148 cells/μl (IQR 67 - 260) for single-service facilities. There was no statistical difference in the TB treatment outcome profile between integrated and single-service facilities for all TB patients (p=0.

  2. “It’s an Uphill Battle Everyday”: Intersectionality, Low-Income Black Heterosexual Men, and Implications for HIV Prevention Research and Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowleg, Lisa; Teti, Michelle; Malebranche, David J.; Tschann, Jeanne M.

    2012-01-01

    This interview study, the initial qualitative phase of a larger mixed methods HIV prevention study focused on Black heterosexual men, used intersectionality as a theoretical framework to explore: (1) How a sample of Black heterosexual men describe and experience the multiple intersections of race, gender, and SES; and (2) How these descriptions reflected interlocking systems of social inequality for Black men at the social-structural level. Participants were 30 predominantly low-income self-identified Black heterosexual men between the ages of 18 and 44. Analyses highlighted four themes that demonstrate how participants’ individual-level experiences as Black men reflect macro social-structural inequality: (1) racial discrimination and microaggressions; (2) unemployment; (3) incarceration; and (4) police surveillance and harassment. We discuss the study’s findings within the context of social-structural factors that disproportionately and adversely impact Black men. We also highlight the implications of the intersectionality perspective for HIV prevention research and interventions for Black heterosexual men. PMID:23482810

  3. TB control programmes: the challenges for Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, T

    1996-11-01

    Governmental neglect of tuberculosis (TB), inadequately managed and inaccurately designed TB control programs, population growth, and the HIV epidemic account for the resurgence of TB in sub-Saharan Africa. The World Health Organization and the International Union against TB and Lung Disease have developed a TB control strategy that aims to reduce mortality, morbidity, and transmission of TB. It aims for an 85% cure rate among detected new cases of smear-positive TB and a 70% rate of detecting existing smear-positive TB cases. The strategy involves the provision of short-course chemotherapy (SCC) to all identified smear-positive TB cases through directly observed treatment (DOTS). SCC treatment regimens for smear-positive pulmonary TB recommended for sub-Saharan African countries are: initial phase = daily administration over 2 months of streptomycin, rifampicin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide; continuation phase = 3 doses over 4 months of isoniazid and rifampicin or daily administration of thiacetazone and isoniazid or of ethambutol and isoniazid. A TB control policy must be implemented to bring about effective TB control. The essential elements of this policy include political commitment, case detection through passive case-finding, SCC, a regular supply of essential drugs, and a monitoring and evaluation system. Political commitment involves establishing a National TB Control Program to be integrated into the existing health structure. Increased awareness of TB in the community and among health workers and a reference laboratory are needed to make case finding successful. A distribution and logistics system is needed to ensure uninterrupted intake of drugs throughout treatment. These regimens have been very successful and cost-effective but pose several disadvantages (e.g., heavy workload of recommended 3 sputum smear tests). A simplified approach involves 1 initial sputum smear for 6 months; 6-months, intermittent rifampicin-based therapy, 100% DOTS throughout

  4. National HIV Testing Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-09

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, discusses National HIV Testing Day, an annual observance which raises awareness of the importance of knowing one's HIV status and encourages at-risk individuals to get an HIV test.  Created: 6/9/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 6/9/2011.

  5. Antigen-Specific Interferon-Gamma Responses and Innate Cytokine Balance in TB-IRIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goovaerts, Odin; Jennes, Wim; Massinga-Loembé, Marguerite; Ceulemans, Ann; Worodria, William; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Colebunders, Robert; Kestens, Luc; Loembé, Marguerite Massinga; Mayanja, Harriet; Mascart, Francoise; van den Bergh, Rafael; Locht, Camille; Reiss, Peter; Cobelens, Frank; Ondoa, Pascale; Pakker, Nadine; Mugerwa, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) remains a poorly understood complication in HIV-TB patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). TB-IRIS could be associated with an exaggerated immune response to TB-antigens. We compared the recovery of

  6. Custody battle ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-02-09

    A four-year-old child will be allowed to remain with his foster parents, although the foster mother is HIV-positive. The State Court of Appeals of Nebraska ruled that living with an HIV-positive foster mother places [name removed]. at no increased health risk. This court ruling overturns the State Department of Social Services' decision to remove the boy from the custody of his foster parents.

  7. Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR- TB) Compared with Non-MDR-TB Infections in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmi, Omar Salad; Hasan, Habsah; Abdullah, Sarimah; Mat Jeab, Mat Zuki; Ba, Zilfalil; Naing, Nyi Nyi

    2016-07-01

    Treating patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) strains is more complicated, complex, toxic, expensive, than treating patients with susceptible TB strains. This study aims to compare the treatment outcomes and potential factors associated between patients with MDR-TB and non MDR TB infections in peninsular Malaysia. This study was a retrospective cohort study. Data were collected from the medical records of all registered MDR-TB patients and Non-MDR-TB patients at five TB hospitals in peninsular Malaysia from January 2010 to January 2014. A total of 314 subjects were studied, including 105 MDR-TB cases and 209 non-MDR-TB. After TB treatment, 24.8% of the MDR-TB patients and 17.7% of non MDR TB relapsed; 17.1% of the MDR-TB patients and 16.3% of non MDR TB defaulted from TB treatment. A significant difference seen in treatment success rate 17.1% for MDR-TB; 63.1% for non MDR TB (P history of TB treatment, and presence of HIV infection.

  8. The battle of Brokdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, R.

    1996-01-01

    Defining notoriety, or the level of public agitation, continues to be a difficult venture. It was like this ten years ago, when construction of the Brokdorf Nuclear Power Station was completed. The controversial decisions in energy policy preceding the start of power operation are almost forgotten, or have been dismissed, by now. In the early eighties, newspaper archives reserved many meters of shelf space to these topics. In late 1982, the press coverage exceeded everybody's imagination. The archive of the HEW utility at that time held some 11,000 press clippings in 30 files, and this collection was far from being complete. After all, Brokdorf was a hot topic not only in Germany. News about Brokdorf was published all over the globe, in Australia, the United States, Argentina, and Alaska. It is hard to unterstand today why Brokdorf had such a catalytic action at that time, causing either complete rejection or raising the question whether a measure of energy policy once approved was to be upheld by politics. Yet, the protests launched at that time still read like instructions to anybody wanting to exploit emotions for purposes of shaping policy. Rarely has there been a similar case in the history of industry of a company polarized, politicized and, in certain phases, even paralyzed like this. This makes the 'Battle of Brokdorf' a fascinating, little known piece of contemporary controversial energy policy. (orig.) [de

  9. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  10. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  11. National HIV Testing Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, discusses National HIV Testing Day, an annual observance which raises awareness of the importance of knowing one's HIV status and encourages at-risk individuals to get an HIV test.

  12. Antigen-Specific Interferon-Gamma Responses and Innate Cytokine Balance in TB-IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goovaerts, Odin; Jennes, Wim; Massinga-Loembé, Marguerite; Ceulemans, Ann; Worodria, William; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Colebunders, Robert; Kestens, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) remains a poorly understood complication in HIV-TB patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). TB-IRIS could be associated with an exaggerated immune response to TB-antigens. We compared the recovery of IFNγ responses to recall and TB-antigens and explored in vitro innate cytokine production in TB-IRIS patients. Methods In a prospective cohort study of HIV-TB co-infected patients treated for TB before ART initiation, we compared 18 patients who developed TB-IRIS with 18 non-IRIS controls matched for age, sex and CD4 count. We analyzed IFNγ ELISpot responses to CMV, influenza, TB and LPS before ART and during TB-IRIS. CMV and LPS stimulated ELISpot supernatants were subsequently evaluated for production of IL-12p70, IL-6, TNFα and IL-10 by Luminex. Results Before ART, all responses were similar between TB-IRIS patients and non-IRIS controls. During TB-IRIS, IFNγ responses to TB and influenza antigens were comparable between TB-IRIS patients and non-IRIS controls, but responses to CMV and LPS remained significantly lower in TB-IRIS patients. Production of innate cytokines was similar between TB-IRIS patients and non-IRIS controls. However, upon LPS stimulation, IL-6/IL-10 and TNFα/IL-10 ratios were increased in TB-IRIS patients compared to non-IRIS controls. Conclusion TB-IRIS patients did not display excessive IFNγ responses to TB-antigens. In contrast, the reconstitution of CMV and LPS responses was delayed in the TB-IRIS group. For LPS, this was linked with a pro-inflammatory shift in the innate cytokine balance. These data are in support of a prominent role of the innate immune system in TB-IRIS. PMID:25415590

  13. The social determinants of tuberculosis and their association with TB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Progress made in TB control through the implementation of the DOTS strategy, has been retarded by factors such as poverty, the HIV pandemic and the advent of multidrug resistant tuberculosis. There is currently an increasing shift in TB control ...

  14. T Cell Reactivity against Mycolyl Transferase Antigen 85 of M. tuberculosis in HIV-TB Coinfected Subjects and in AIDS Patients Suffering from Tuberculosis and Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Launois

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The mycolyl transferase antigen 85 complex is a major secreted protein family from mycobacterial culture filtrate, demonstrating powerful T cell stimulatory properties in most HIV-negative, tuberculin-positive volunteers with latent M.tuberculosis infection and only weak responses in HIV-negative tuberculosis patients. Here, we have analyzed T cell reactivity against PPD and Ag85 in HIV-infected individuals, without or with clinical symptoms of tuberculosis, and in AIDS patients with disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria. Whereas responses to PPD were not significantly different in HIV-negative and HIV-positive tuberculin-positive volunteers, responses to Ag85 were significantly decreased in the HIV-positive (CDC-A and CDC-B group. Tuberculosis patients demonstrated low T cell reactivity against Ag85, irrespective of HIV infection, and finally AIDS patients suffering from NTM infections were completely nonreactive to Ag85. A one-year follow-up of twelve HIV-positive tuberculin-positive individuals indicated a decreased reactivity against Ag85 in patients developing clinical tuberculosis, highlighting the protective potential of this antigen.

  15. Prioritizing Healthcare Delivery in a Conflict Zone Comment on "TB/HIV Co-Infection Care in Conflict-Affected Settings: A Mapping of Health Facilities in the Goma Area, Democratic Republic of Congo".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Robin; Richardson, Eugene T

    2013-09-01

    Nowhere are the barriers to a functional health infrastructure more clearly on display than in the Goma region of Democratic Republic of Congo. Kaboru et al. report poorly integrated services for HIV and TB in this war-torn region. Priorities in conflict zones include provision of security, shelter, food, clean water and prevention of sexual violence. In Goma, immediate health priorities include emergency treatment of cholera, malaria, respiratory illnesses, provision of maternal care, millions of measles vaccinations, and management of an ongoing rabies epidemic. It is a daunting task to determine an essential package of medical services in a setting where there are so many competing priorities, where opportunity costs are limited and epidemiologic information is scarce. Non-governmental agencies sometimes add to the challenge via an insidious reduction of state sovereignty and the creation of new levels of income inequality. Kaboru et al. have successfully highlighted many of the complexities of rebuilding and prioritizing healthcare in a conflict zone.

  16. HIV Testing among Canadian Tuberculosis Cases from 1997 to 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Harris

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggests a global rise in adult tuberculosis (TB cases associated with HIV/AIDS. The World Health Organization, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Public Health Agency of Canada advocate universal screening of all TB cases for HIV. The contribution of HIV to the TB burden in Canada remains unclear.

  17. RESEARCH Improving access and quality of care in a TB control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    or treatment. Improving access and quality of care in a. TB control programme. Vera Scott, Virginia Azevedo, Judy Caldwell. Objectives. To use a quality improvement approach to improve access to and quality of tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis and care in. Cape Town. Methods. Five HIV/AIDS/sexually transmitted infections/TB.

  18. TB truths : Patients’ experience with tuberculosis and healthcare in sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, A.L.

    2018-01-01

    TB remains one of the most alarming global health threats of this age. Despite the often available TB medication for free, rates are not being significantly reduced or in some areas even going up. TB epidemiology have become more complex, due to the HIV epidemic and development of drug-resistance.

  19. Mycobacteria and TB

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaufmann, S. H. E. (Stephan H. E.); Hahn, Helmut

    2003-01-01

    .... Scientists investigating the epidemiology, immunology and molecular biology of TB or engaged in vaccine and drug development as well as physicians and social workers treating TB patients will benefit...

  20. Supporting clinical management of the difficult-to-treat TB cases: the ERS-WHO TB Consilium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia D’Ambrosio

    2015-03-01

    The primary objective of the ERS/WHO TB Consilium is to provide clinical consultation for drug-resistant TB and other difficult-to-treat TB cases, including co-infection with HIV and paediatric cases. Through technical guidance to clinicians managing complex TB cases, the main contribution and outcome of the initiative will be a public health response aimed at achieving correct treatment of affected patients and preventing further development of drug resistance. The Consilum's secondary objective is to ensure monitoring and evaluation of clinical practices on the ground (diagnosis, treatment and prevention.

  1. HIV: Social and Environmental Factors

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, discusses how social and environmental factors may put African Americans at greater risk for HIV.

  2. Five years retrospective cohort analysis of treatment outcomes of TB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global public health challenge, with an estimated 1.4 million patients worldwide. Co-infection with HIV leads to challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess treatment ...

  3. Tuberculosis Case Finding With Combined Rapid Point-of-Care Assays (Xpert MTB/RIF and Determine TB LAM) in HIV-Positive Individuals Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floridia, Marco; Ciccacci, Fausto; Andreotti, Mauro; Hassane, Archa; Sidumo, Zita; Magid, Nurja A; Sotomane, Horacio; David, Muhlavasse; Mutemba, Elsa; Cebola, Junia; Mugunhe, Remigio Josè; Riccardi, Fabio; Marazzi, Maria Cristina; Giuliano, Marina; Palombi, Leonardo; Mancinelli, Sandro

    2017-11-13

    Tuberculosis is a major health concern in several countries, and effective diagnostic algorithms for use in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients are urgently needed. At prescription of antiretroviral therapy, all patients in 3 Mozambican health centers were screened for tuberculosis, with a combined approach: World Health Organization (WHO) 4-symptom screening (fever, cough, night sweats, and weight loss), a rapid test detecting mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan in urine (Determine TB LAM), and a molecular assay performed on a sputum sample (Xpert MTB/RIF; repeated if first result was negative). Patients with positive LAM or Xpert MTB/RIF results were referred for tuberculosis treatment. Among 972 patients with a complete diagnostic algorithm (58.5% female; median CD4 cell count, 278/μL; WHO HIV stage I, 66.8%), 98 (10.1%) tested positive with Xpert (90, 9.3%) or LAM (34, 3.5%) assays. Compared with a single-test Xpert strategy, dual Xpert tests improved case finding by 21.6%, LAM testing alone improved it by 13.5%, and dual Xpert tests plus LAM testing improved it by 32.4%. Rifampicin resistance in Xpert-positive patients was infrequent (2.5%). Among patients with positive results, 22 of 98 (22.4%) had no symptoms at WHO 4-symptom screening. Patients with tuberculosis diagnosed had significantly lower CD4 cell counts and hemoglobin levels, more advanced WHO stage, and higher HIV RNA levels. Fifteen (15.3%) did not start tuberculosis treatment, mostly owing to rapidly deteriorating clinical conditions or logistical constraints. The median interval between start of the diagnostic algorithm and start of tuberculosis treatment was 7 days. The prevalence of tuberculosis among Mozambican HIV-positive patients starting antiretroviral therapy was 10%, with limited rifampicin resistance. Use of combined point-of-care tests increased case finding, with a short time to treatment. Interventions are needed to remove logistical barriers and prevent presentation

  4. Get the Facts, Talk about HIV

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-01

    Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, urges members of the black community to talk about HIV.  Created: 2/1/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/1/2012.

  5. Are routine tuberculosis programme data suitable to report on antiretroviral therapy use of HIV-infected tuberculosis patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Miranda; Gudo, Paula Samo; Simbe, Chalice Mage; Perdigão, Paula; van Leth, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is lifesaving for HIV-infected tuberculosis (TB) patients. ART-use by these patients lag behind compared to HIV-testing and co-trimoxazole preventive therapy. TB programmes provide the data on ART-use by HIV-infected TB patients, however often the HIV services provide

  6. Collaborative activities and treatment outcomes in patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyen, T T T; Nhung, N V; Shewade, H D; Hoa, N B; Harries, A D

    2016-03-21

    The National Tuberculosis (TB) Programme in Viet Nam and Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC). To determine 1) at national level between 2011 and 2013, the relationship between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, uptake of TB-HIV interventions and adverse treatment outcomes among TB-HIV patients; and 2) in HCMC in 2013, patient characteristics associated with adverse outcomes. An ecological study reviewing aggregate nationwide data and a retrospective cohort review in HCMC. Nationwide, from 2011 to 2013, HIV testing increased in TB patients from 58% to 68% and antiretroviral therapy (ART) increased in TB-HIV patients from 54% to 63%. Adverse treatment outcomes in TB-HIV patients increased from 24% to 27%, largely due to transfer out (5-9% increase) and death. The Northern and Highland regions showed poor uptake of TB-HIV interventions. In HCMC, 303 (27%) of 1110 TB-HIV patients had adverse outcomes, with higher risks observed in those with previously treated TB, those diagnosed as HIV-positive before TB onset and those never placed on cotrimoxazole or ART. Despite improving HIV testing rates and TB-HIV interventions, adverse outcomes in TB-HIV patients remain at about 26%. Characteristics predicting higher risk of adverse outcomes must be addressed if Viet Nam wishes to end the TB epidemic by 2030.

  7. Validation of brief screening tools for depressive and alcohol use disorders among TB and HIV patients in primary care in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Vikram

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and determine the optimum cut-off scores for clinical use of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT against a reference psychiatric diagnostic interview, in TB and anti-retroviral therapy (ART patients in primary care in Zambia. Methods This was a cross-sectional study in 16 primary level care clinics. Consecutive sampling was used to select 649 participants who started TB treatment or ART in the preceding month. Participants were first interviewed using the CES-D and AUDIT, and subsequently with a psychiatric diagnostic interview for current major depressive disorder (MDD and alcohol use disorders (AUDs using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI. The diagnostic accuracy was calculated using the Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (AUROC. The optimum cut-off scores for clinical use were calculated using sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV. Results The CES-D and AUDIT had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.84; 0.98 respectively. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the four-factor CES-D model was not a good fit for the data (Tucker-Lewis Fit Index (TLI = 0.86; standardized root-mean square residual (SRMR = 0.06 while the two-factor AUDIT model fitted the data well (TFI = 0.99; SRMR = 0.04. Both the CES-D and AUDIT demonstrated good discriminatory ability in detecting MINI-defined current MDDs and AUDs (AUROC for CES-D = 0.78; AUDIT = 0.98 for women and 0.75 for men. The optimum CES-D cut-off score in screening for current MDD was 22 (sensitivity 73%, PPV 76% while that of the AUDIT in screening for AUD was 24 for women (sensitivity 60%, PPV 60%, and 20 for men (sensitivity 55%, PPV 50%. Conclusions The CES-D and AUDIT showed high discriminatory ability in measuring MINI-defined current MDD and AUD respectively. They are

  8. Health care index score and risk of death following tuberculosis diagnosis in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, D N; Grint, D; Post, F A

    2013-01-01

    To assess health care utilisation for patients co-infected with TB and HIV (TB-HIV), and to develop a weighted health care index (HCI) score based on commonly used interventions and compare it with patient outcome.......To assess health care utilisation for patients co-infected with TB and HIV (TB-HIV), and to develop a weighted health care index (HCI) score based on commonly used interventions and compare it with patient outcome....

  9. Dilemma and quantum battle of sexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, Ahmad; Toor, A H

    2004-01-01

    We analysed quantum version of the game battle of sexes using a general initial quantum state. For a particular choice of initial entangled quantum state it is shown that the classical dilemma of the battle of sexes can be resolved and a unique solution of the game can be obtained

  10. Waging a Battle to Promote Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Suzanne Liacos

    2010-01-01

    As advocates for reading, librarians cannot help but love a reading program. In this article, the author talks about the Battle of the Books, a reading enrichment program that had been in place since 1996. Battle of the Books promotes reading among middle school students by offering interesting books and a trivia-type competition. The author…

  11. Epidemiology of tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Ulrik Bak; Bauer, J; Poulsen, S

    1999-01-01

    increased in the younger age groups, indicating more newly infected persons. This study was performed in order to assess the impact of the HIV epidemic and immigration on TB incidence among native Danes. The study was also designed to reveal transmission patterns of TB among HIV-positive patients. Data from......Denmark is an area of low incidence of HIV and tuberculosis (TB). The number of newly reported cases of HIV has been stable during the 1990s, whereas the number of TB cases has doubled in Denmark in the past decade, mainly due to immigration. However, among native Danes the incidence of TB has...... HIV-TB co-infected patients identified in the national registers of TB and AIDS from 1992-95 were collected retrospectively from medical records. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses of TB isolates from co-infected patients were compared with all patterns registered...

  12. Temporal trends in TB notification rates during ART scale-up in Cape Town: an ecological analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Sabine; Boulle, Andrew; Caldwell, Judy; Pienaar, David; Wood, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces individual tuberculosis (TB) risk by two-thirds, the population-level impact remains uncertain. Cape Town reports high TB notification rates associated with endemic HIV. We examined population trends in TB notification rates during a 10-year period of

  13. Sharing the spotlight in Durban: A report from IAS TB2016 at AIDS2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Whitaker

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is now recognized as the number one cause of death worldwide due to a single infectious pathogen and is the cause of death in one-third of people living with HIV worldwide. An inaugural pre-conference focused on TB (TB2016 was held at the International AIDS Society Conference AIDS2016. This report focuses on key messages from the TB2016 conference that are important for the medical, public health, activist, and scientific communities. Keywords: Tuberculosis, HIV, Epidemiology, Public health, Treatment, Prevention

  14. Prioritizing Healthcare Delivery in a Conflict Zone; Comment on “TB/HIV Co-Infection Care in Conflict-Affected Settings: A Mapping of Health Facilities in the Goma Area, Democratic Republic of Congo”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Wood

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowhere are the barriers to a functional health infrastructure more clearly on display than in the Goma region of Democratic Republic of Congo. Kaboru et al. report poorly integrated services for HIV and TB in this war-torn region. Priorities in conflict zones include provision of security, shelter, food, clean water and prevention of sexual violence. In Goma, immediate health priorities include emergency treatment of cholera, malaria, respiratory illnesses, provision of maternal care, millions of measles vaccinations, and management of an ongoing rabies epidemic. It is a daunting task to determine an essential package of medical services in a setting where there are so many competing priorities, where opportunity costs are limited and epidemiologic information is scarce. Non-governmental agencies sometimes add to the challenge via an insidious reduction of state sovereignty and the creation of new levels of income inequality. Kaboru et al. have successfully highlighted many of the complexities of rebuilding and prioritizing healthcare in a conflict zone.

  15. Using IGRA in the diagnosis of tuberculosis or latent tuberculosis infection in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P.

    2010-01-01

    Persons with HIV and LTBI are at very high risk of developing active TB. The CD4 count drops in persons during the natural course of HIV/AIDS and at the same time the risk of TB increases. It is clear that there is a TB protective effect when HIV patients are placed on highly active antiretrovira...

  16. Questions and Answers about TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease. Introduction Testing and Treatment TB Disease Glossary Introduction Introduction What is TB? Why is TB still ... chest x-ray is made by exposing a film to x-rays that pass through the chest. ...

  17. TB in Captive Elephants

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-27

    Dr. Barry Kreiswirth, founding director of the Public Health Research Institute, TB Center, at Rutgers University, discusses TB in three captive elephants.  Created: 4/27/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/27/2017.

  18. Influence of HIV and other risk factors on tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TB has a negative impact on HIV, increasing the risk of HIV-related morbidity ... Objectives. To describe the sociodemographic and outcome characteristics of TB patients, and to identify risk factors associated with TB ..... Cunningham J, Perkins M. Diagnostics for tuberculosis: Global demand and market potential. 2006.

  19. Epidemiology of tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Ulrik Bak; Bauer, J; Poulsen, S

    1999-01-01

    Denmark is an area of low incidence of HIV and tuberculosis (TB). The number of newly reported cases of HIV has been stable during the 1990s, whereas the number of TB cases has doubled in Denmark in the past decade, mainly due to immigration. However, among native Danes the incidence of TB has...

  20. Prevalence of pulmonary TB and spoligotype pattern of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among TB suspects in a rural community in Southwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deribew Amare

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Ethiopia where there is no strong surveillance system and state of the art diagnostic facilities are limited, the real burden of tuberculosis (TB is not well known. We conducted a community based survey to estimate the prevalence of pulmonary TB and spoligotype pattern of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Southwest Ethiopia. Methods A total of 30040 adults in 10882 households were screened for pulmonary TB in Gilgel Gibe field research centre in Southwest Ethiopia. A total of 482 TB suspects were identified and smear microscopy and culture was done for 428 TB suspects. Counseling and testing for HIV/AIDS was done for all TB suspects. Spoligotyping was done to characterize the Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates. Results Majority of the TB suspects were females (60.7% and non-literates (83.6%. Using smear microscopy, a total of 5 new and 4 old cases of pulmonary TB cases were identified making the prevalence of TB 30 per 100,000. However, using the culture method, we identified 17 new cases with a prevalence of 76.1 per 100,000. There were 4.3 undiagnosed pulmonary TB cases for every TB case who was diagnosed through the passive case detection mechanism in the health facility. Eleven isolates (64.7% belonged to the six previously known spoligotypes: T, Haarlem and Central-Asian (CAS. Six new spoligotype patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, not present in the international database (SpolDB4 were identified. None of the rural residents was HIV infected and only 5 (5.5% of the urban TB suspects were positive for HIV. Conclusion The prevalence of TB in the rural community of Southwest Ethiopia is low. There are large numbers of undiagnosed TB cases in the community. However, the number of sputum smear-positive cases was very low and therefore the risk of transmitting the infection to others may be limited. Active case finding through health extension workers in the community can improve the low case detection rate

  1. National HIV/AIDS Strategy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-01

    Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, talks about the importance of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy and the work of CDC.  Created: 2/1/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/1/2012.

  2. HIV: Social and Environmental Factors

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-01

    Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, discusses how social and environmental factors may put African Americans at greater risk for HIV.  Created: 2/1/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/1/2012.

  3. A review of co-morbidity between infectious and chronic disease in Sub Saharan Africa: TB and diabetes mellitus, HIV and metabolic syndrome, and the impact of globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Fiona; Critchley, Julia A; Johnstone, Lucy K; Unwin, Nigel C

    2009-09-14

    Africa is facing a rapidly growing chronic non-communicable disease burden whilst at the same time experiencing continual high rates of infectious disease. It is well known that some infections increase the risk of certain chronic diseases and the converse. With an increasing dual burden of disease in Sub Saharan Africa the associations between diseases and our understanding of them will become of increased public health importance. In this review we explore the relationships reported between tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus, human immunodeficiency virus, its treatment and metabolic risk. We aimed to address the important issues surrounding these associations within a Sub Saharan African setting and to describe the impact of globalization upon them. Diabetes has been associated with a 3-fold incident risk of tuberculosis and it is hypothesised that tuberculosis may also increase the risk of developing diabetes. During co-morbid presentation of tuberculosis and diabetes both tuberculosis and diabetes outcomes are reported to worsen. Antiretroviral therapy for HIV has been associated with an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome and HIV has been linked with an increased risk of developing both diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Globalization is clearly related to an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It may be exerting other negative and positive impacts upon infectious and chronic non-communicable disease associations but at present reporting upon these is sparse. The impact of these co-morbidities in Sub Saharan Africa is likely to be large. An increasing prevalence of diabetes may hinder efforts at tuberculosis control, increasing the number of susceptible individuals in populations where tuberculosis is endemic, and making successful treatment harder. Roll out of anti-retroviral treatment coverage within Sub Saharan Africa is an essential response to the HIV epidemic however it is likely to lead to a growing number of individuals

  4. Annual risk of tuberculous infection using different methods in communities with a high prevalence of TB and HIV in Zambia and South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwame Shanaube

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The annual risk of tuberculous infection (ARTI is a key epidemiological indicator of the extent of transmission in a community. Several methods have been suggested to estimate the prevalence of tuberculous infection using tuberculin skin test data. This paper explores the implications of using different methods to estimate prevalence of infection and ARTI. The effect of BCG vaccination on these estimates is also investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tuberculin surveys among school children in 16 communities in Zambia and 8 in South Africa (SA were performed in 2005, as part of baseline data collection and for randomisation purposes of the ZAMSTAR study. Infection prevalence and ARTI estimates were calculated using five methods: different cut-offs with or without adjustments for sensitivity, the mirror method, and mixture analysis. A total of 49,835 children were registered for the surveys, of which 25,048 (50% had skin tests done and 22,563 (90% of those tested were read. Infection prevalence was higher in the combined SA than Zambian communities. The mirror method resulted in the least difference of 7.8%, whereas that estimated by the cut-off methods varied from 12.2% to 17.3%. The ARTI in the Zambian and SA communities was between 0.8% and 2.8% and 2.5% and 4.2% respectively, depending on the method used. In the SA communities, the ARTI was higher among the younger children. BCG vaccination had little effect on these estimates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ARTI estimates are dependent on the calculation method used. All methods agreed that there were substantial differences in infection prevalence across the communities, with higher rates in SA. Although TB notification rates have increased over the past decades, the difference in cumulative exposure between younger and older children is less dramatic and a rise in risk of infection in parallel with the estimated incidence of active tuberculosis cannot be excluded.

  5. Factors Associated with Mortality among Patients on TB Treatment in the Southern Region of Zimbabwe, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandy, Charles; Masuka, Nyasha; Hazangwe, Patrick; Choto, Regis C.; Mutasa-Apollo, Tsitsi; Nkomo, Brilliant; Sibanda, Edwin; Mugurungi, Owen; Siziba, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Background. In 2013, the tuberculosis (TB) mortality rate was highest in southern Zimbabwe at 16%. We therefore sought to determine factors associated with mortality among registered TB patients in this region. Methodology. This was a retrospective record review of registered patients receiving anti-TB treatment in 2013. Results. Of 1,971 registered TB patients, 1,653 (84%) were new cases compared with 314 (16%) retreatment cases. There were 1,538 (78%) TB/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfected patients, of whom 1,399 (91%) were on antiretroviral therapy (ART) with median pre-ART CD4 count of 133 cells/uL (IQR, 46–282). Overall, 428 (22%) TB patients died. Factors associated with increased mortality included being ≥65 years old [adjusted relative risk (ARR) = 2.48 (95% CI 1.35–4.55)], a retreatment TB case [ARR = 1.34 (95% CI, 1.10–1.63)], and being HIV-positive [ARR = 1.87 (95% CI, 1.44–2.42)] whilst ART initiation was protective [ARR = 0.25 (95% CI, 0.22–0.29)]. Cumulative mortality rates were 10%, 14%, and 21% at one, two, and six months, respectively, after starting TB treatment. Conclusion. There was high mortality especially in the first two months of anti-TB treatment, with risk factors being recurrent TB and being HIV-infected, despite a high uptake of ART. PMID:28352474

  6. Factors Associated with Mortality among Patients on TB Treatment in the Southern Region of Zimbabwe, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudakwashe C. Takarinda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 2013, the tuberculosis (TB mortality rate was highest in southern Zimbabwe at 16%. We therefore sought to determine factors associated with mortality among registered TB patients in this region. Methodology. This was a retrospective record review of registered patients receiving anti-TB treatment in 2013. Results. Of 1,971 registered TB patients, 1,653 (84% were new cases compared with 314 (16% retreatment cases. There were 1,538 (78% TB/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV coinfected patients, of whom 1,399 (91% were on antiretroviral therapy (ART with median pre-ART CD4 count of 133 cells/uL (IQR, 46–282. Overall, 428 (22% TB patients died. Factors associated with increased mortality included being ≥65 years old [adjusted relative risk (ARR = 2.48 (95% CI 1.35–4.55], a retreatment TB case [ARR = 1.34 (95% CI, 1.10–1.63], and being HIV-positive [ARR = 1.87 (95% CI, 1.44–2.42] whilst ART initiation was protective [ARR = 0.25 (95% CI, 0.22–0.29]. Cumulative mortality rates were 10%, 14%, and 21% at one, two, and six months, respectively, after starting TB treatment. Conclusion. There was high mortality especially in the first two months of anti-TB treatment, with risk factors being recurrent TB and being HIV-infected, despite a high uptake of ART.

  7. TIME Impact - a new user-friendly tuberculosis (TB) model to inform TB policy decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, R M G J; Lalli, M; Sumner, T; Hamilton, M; Pedrazzoli, D; Bonsu, F; Hippner, P; Pillay, Y; Kimerling, M; Ahmedov, S; Pretorius, C; White, R G

    2016-03-24

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death from infectious disease worldwide, predominantly affecting low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where resources are limited. As such, countries need to be able to choose the most efficient interventions for their respective setting. Mathematical models can be valuable tools to inform rational policy decisions and improve resource allocation, but are often unavailable or inaccessible for LMICs, particularly in TB. We developed TIME Impact, a user-friendly TB model that enables local capacity building and strengthens country-specific policy discussions to inform support funding applications at the (sub-)national level (e.g. Ministry of Finance) or to international donors (e.g. the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria).TIME Impact is an epidemiological transmission model nested in TIME, a set of TB modelling tools available for free download within the widely-used Spectrum software. The TIME Impact model reflects key aspects of the natural history of TB, with additional structure for HIV/ART, drug resistance, treatment history and age. TIME Impact enables national TB programmes (NTPs) and other TB policymakers to better understand their own TB epidemic, plan their response, apply for funding and evaluate the implementation of the response.The explicit aim of TIME Impact's user-friendly interface is to enable training of local and international TB experts towards independent use. During application of TIME Impact, close involvement of the NTPs and other local partners also builds critical understanding of the modelling methods, assumptions and limitations inherent to modelling. This is essential to generate broad country-level ownership of the modelling data inputs and results. In turn, it stimulates discussions and a review of the current evidence and assumptions, strengthening the decision-making process in general.TIME Impact has been effectively applied in a variety of settings. In South Africa, it

  8. Usefulness of the mycobacterium tuberculosis direct assay in early diagnosis of extrapulmonary TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hui-Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ detection of living mycobacterium TB rRNA by the mycobacterium TB direct assay (MTD and its clinical significance in the early diagnosis of extrapulmonary TB. Eighty-six patients were recruited from the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center from June to November in 2010, having been diagnosed with extrapulmonary TB, including tuberculous peritonitis (n=22, lymphatic TB (n=21, tuberculous meningitis (n=15, HIV-associated TB (n=13, nephroTB (n=9, spinal TB (n=2, cutaneous TB (n=13, parotid TB (n=1, chest wall TB (n=1, intestinal TB (n=1. One hundred and five extrapulmonary specimens, including CSF, puncture fluid, drainage, pleural fluid, urine, secretion, ascites, lymphatic tissue and marrow were collected from the patients. The samples were examined using acid-fast stain, solid culture, liquid culture and MTD in parallel. In MTD, the target segments of MTB rRNA in either cultures or clinical specimens were amplified prior to being qualitatively detected with the hybridization protection assay (HPA. The sensitivities of MTD and acid-fast staining in liquid and solid cultures were 48.6%, 41.9%, 20.0% and 14.3%, respectively. MTD sensitivity was higher than that of the others and its specificity was 100%. We concluded that MTD rRNA detection is an effective, rapid, convenient, sensitive and reliable method for the early diagnosis of extrapulmonary TB.

  9. Predicting Battle Outcomes with Classification Trees

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coban, Muzaffer

    2001-01-01

    ... from the actual battlefield, The models built by using classification trees reveal that the objective variables alone cannot explain the outcome of battles, Relative factors, such as leadership, have deep...

  10. Intensified tuberculosis case finding among hiv-infected individuals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-10-02

    burden ... active TB (and in need of treatment) or being free of TB disease (and warranting ... following symptoms – current cough, fever, weight loss or night sweats (CFWS) .... and stand-alone HIV testing services. The WHO ...

  11. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Training Home Conditions Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculosis: Treatment Tuberculosis: Treatment Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... or bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Tuberculosis: Diagnosis Tuberculosis: History Clinical Trials For more than ...

  12. Converging risk factors but no association between HIV infection and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hof, S; Tursynbayeva, A; Abildaev, T; Adenov, M; Pak, S; Bekembayeva, G; Ismailov, S

    2013-04-01

    Kazakhstan is a country with a low HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome) burden, but a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). We describe the epidemiology of multidrug resistance and HIV among TB patients, using the 2007-2011 national electronic TB register. HIV test results were available for 97.2% of TB patients. HIV prevalence among TB patients increased from 0.6% in 2007 to 1.5% in 2011. Overall, 41.6% of patients had a positive smear at diagnosis, 38.6% a positive culture and 51.7% either a positive smear or culture. Drug susceptibility testing (DST) results were available for 92.7% of culture-positive cases. Socio-economic factors independently associated with both HIV and MDR-TB were urban residency, drug use, homelessness and a history of incarceration. In adjusted analysis, HIV positivity was not associated with MDR-TB (OR 1.0, 95%CI 0.86-1.2). Overall, among TB patients with DST and HIV test results available, 65.0% were positive for neither HIV nor MDR-TB, 33.5% only for MDR-TB, 0.9% only for HIV and 0.6% for both HIV and MDR-TB. Among injection drug users, 12.5% were positive for HIV and MDR-TB. We showed increasing HIV prevalence among TB patients in Kazakhstan. HIV was not an independent risk factor for MDR-TB, but risk factors were largely overlapping and we did identify subgroups at particular risk of HIV-MDR-TB co-infection, notably drug users. Enhanced efforts are necessary to provide care to these socially vulnerable populations.

  13. HIV infection among tuberculosis patients in Vietnam: prevalence and impact on tuberculosis notification rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, D H; Sy, D N; Linh, N D; Hoan, T M; Dien, H T; Thuy, T B; Hoa, N P; Tung, L B; Cobelens, F

    2010-08-01

    Vietnam has an emerging human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic (estimated population prevalence 0.5%), but valid data on HIV prevalence among tuberculosis (TB) patients are limited. Recent increases in TB notification rates among young adults may be related to HIV. To assess the prevalence of HIV infection among smear-positive TB patients in six provinces with relatively high HIV population prevalence in Vietnam. All patients who registered for treatment of smear-positive TB during the fourth quarter of 2005 were offered HIV testing. Of the 1217 TB patients included in the study, 100 (8.2%) tested HIV-positive. HIV prevalence varied between 2% and 17% in the provinces, and was strongly associated with age Vietnam, HIV infection is concentrated in drug users, as well as in specific geographic areas where it has considerable impact on TB notification rates among men aged 15-34 years.

  14. XDR TB in South Africa - What lies ahead? | Thaver | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The emergence of XDR TB coupled with the high prevalence of HIV/AIDS has intensified the need to identify new treatment strategies and accelerate research into antibiotics against XDR TB before the world is faced with a global public health crisis. This article gives a short overview on the important health implications of ...

  15. Diagnosing Xpert MTB/RIF-negative TB: Impact and cost of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Use of Xpert MTB/RIF is being scaled up throughout South Africa for improved diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). A large proportion of HIV-infected patients with possible TB are Xpert-negative on their initial test, and the existing diagnostic algorithm calls for these patients to have sputum culture (Xpert followed by ...

  16. Impact of Tuberculosis Co-Infection on the Level of PCV in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: It has been documented that HIV causes anemia in HIV infected patients. One of the commonest opportunistic infection in HIV patients is TB, and this has also been documented to cause anemia. In Nigeria, several cases of HIV and TB co-infections have been diagnosed. This study was carried out to determine ...

  17. Ludacris Talks About HIV

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-24

    Ludacris, award winning singer and actor, urges everyone to talk about HIV/AIDS and its prevention.  Created: 7/24/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 7/24/2012.

  18. Let's Stop HIV Together

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-16

    This podcast features 22 individuals who encourage others in the fight against HIV.  Created: 7/16/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 7/16/2012.

  19. Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts You Can Prevent TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination TB Facts: You Can Prevent TB What ...

  20. Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB Can Be Treated What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Page 1 of 2 TB Facts: TB ...

  1. The battle over workers' compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberger, J N

    2000-01-01

    Faced with lower profits and rapidly increasing premium costs in the 1980s, insurers and employer organizations cleverly parlayed the public perception of worker fraud and abuse in the workers' compensation system (that they helped to create) into massive legislative changes. Over the last decade, state legislators and governors, Republican and Democrat alike, have jumped on this bandwagon, one that workers and their allies have dubbed the workers' compensation "deform" movement. Alleging a "game plan" and a calculated campaign on the part of insurers and employers, the author looks at the major components of changes that were made, examines the elements of workers' compensation over which employers and insurers have gained control, and discusses Newt Gingrich's efforts to capitalize on employer and insurer fervor over the system. This campaign whistled through the country until it goaded the labor movement, injured workers, the trial bar, and others in Ohio in 1997 to organize themselves to stand up to employers by defeating the deform law through a ballot initiative. The article details that battle and suggests that similar voices can be achieved through a return to grassroots organizing and mobilization.

  2. The battle of "nano" paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofias, Alexandros Marios; Dunne, Michael; Storm, Gert; Allen, Christine

    2017-12-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the three most widely used chemotherapeutic agents, together with doxorubicin and cisplatin, and is first or second line treatment for several types of cancers. In 2000, Taxol, the conventional formulation of PTX, became the best-selling cancer drug of all time with annual sales of 1.6 billion. In 2005, the introduction of the albumin-based formulation of PTX, known as Abraxane, ended Taxol's monopoly of the PTX market. Abraxane's ability to push the Taxol innovator and generic formulations aside attracted fierce competition amongst competitors worldwide to develop their own unique, new and improved formulation of PTX. At this time there are at least 18 companies focused on pre-clinical and/or clinical development of nano-formulations of PTX. These pharmaceutical companies are investing substantial capital to capture a share of the lucrative global PTX market. It is hoped that any formulation that dominates the market will result in tangible benefits to patients in terms of both survival and quality of life. Given all of this activity, here we address the question: Who is going to win the battle of "nano" paclitaxel? Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The battle against nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Anne W.M.; Ng, W.T.; Chan, Y.H.; Sze, Henry; Chan, Connie; Lam, T.H.

    2012-01-01

    This is a review of the evolving efforts to understand and combat nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), a most peculiar cancer with a distinctly skewed geographic and ethnic distribution. Multifactorial etiology with dynamic interplay of genetic predisposition, Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection and environmental carcinogens is suggested. With changing lifestyle in Hong Kong, the age-standardized incidence rate has decreased by more than 50% during the past 30 years. The advent of megavoltage radiotherapy has transformed this once lethal cancer into one that is readily curable. Advances in technology and addition of chemotherapy have led to gratifying improvements. Overall survival exceeding 75% at 5 years could now be achieved; series using advanced technique with intensity-modulation consistently achieved excellent locoregional control. Studies are on-going to develop more potent systemic therapy for distant control. Serious late toxicities remain a serious concern demanding further improvement in radiotherapy technique and optimization of dose fractionation. Translational researches are increasingly important for the ideal goals of prevention, early detection and more accurate prognostication/prediction to work toward personalized medicine. The battle against NPC is one of the most fascinating successes in oncology, it is highly hopeful that with international collaborations and concerted efforts, we can totally conquer this cancer.

  4. Five years retrospective cohort analysis of treatment outcomes of TB ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global public health chal- lenge, with an estimated 1.4 .... completed treatment and who is smear negative at the end of 6th or 7th month of treat- ..... the course of management of the dual disease entity. Conclusion. This study ...

  5. SOA approach to battle command: simulation interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayott, Gregory; Self, Mid; Miller, Gordon J.; McDonnell, Joseph S.

    2010-04-01

    NVESD is developing a Sensor Data and Management Services (SDMS) Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) that provides an innovative approach to achieve seamless application functionality across simulation and battle command systems. In 2010, CERDEC will conduct a SDMS Battle Command demonstration that will highlight the SDMS SOA capability to couple simulation applications to existing Battle Command systems. The demonstration will leverage RDECOM MATREX simulation tools and TRADOC Maneuver Support Battle Laboratory Virtual Base Defense Operations Center facilities. The battle command systems are those specific to the operation of a base defense operations center in support of force protection missions. The SDMS SOA consists of four components that will be discussed. An Asset Management Service (AMS) will automatically discover the existence, state, and interface definition required to interact with a named asset (sensor or a sensor platform, a process such as level-1 fusion, or an interface to a sensor or other network endpoint). A Streaming Video Service (SVS) will automatically discover the existence, state, and interfaces required to interact with a named video stream, and abstract the consumers of the video stream from the originating device. A Task Manager Service (TMS) will be used to automatically discover the existence of a named mission task, and will interpret, translate and transmit a mission command for the blue force unit(s) described in a mission order. JC3IEDM data objects, and software development kit (SDK), will be utilized as the basic data object definition for implemented web services.

  6. Battle of Kasserine Pass: Defeat is a Matter of Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    a ga inst Germany in World War II ; some historians even go so far as to anticipate defeat in the first battles of all major Ameri can wars. Martin ...the battle of Kasserine Pass prove the conventional wisdom that America is doomed to defeat in its first battles? Martin Blumenson, a prominent...Much study of the battle of Kasserine Pass has been done since Martin Blumenson wrote the original history in 1966. The ULTRA and MAGIC intercepts

  7. Health systems in the Republic of Congo: challenges and opportunities for implementing tuberculosis and HIV collaborative service, research, and training activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linguissi, Laure Stella Ghoma; Gwom, Luc Christian; Nkenfou, Celine Nguefeu; Bates, Matthew; Petersen, Eskild; Zumla, Alimuddin; Ntoumi, Francine

    2017-03-01

    The Republic of Congo is on the World Health Organization (WHO) list of 'high burden' countries for tuberculosis (TB) and HIV. TB is the leading cause of death among HIV-infected patients in the Republic of Congo. In this viewpoint, the available data on TB and HIV in the Republic of Congo are reviewed, and the gaps and bottlenecks that the National TB Control Program (NTCP) faces are discussed. Furthermore, priority requirements for developing and implementing TB and HIV collaborative service activities are identified. HIV and TB control programs operate as distinct entities with separate case management plans. The implementation of collaborative TB/HIV activities to evaluate and monitor the management of TB/HIV co-infected individuals remains inefficient in most regions, and these activities are sometimes non-existent. This reveals major challenges that require definition in order to improve the delivery of healthcare. The NTCP lacks adequate resources for optimal implementation of control measures of TB and HIV compliance and outcomes. The importance of aligning and integrating TB and HIV treatment services (including follow-up) and adherence support services through coordinated and collaborative efforts between individual TB and HIV programs is discussed. Aligning and integrating TB and HIV treatment services through coordinated and collaborative efforts between individual TB and HIV programs is required. However, the WHO recommendations are generic, and health services in the Republic of Congo need to tailor their TB and HIV programs according to the availability of resources and operational feasibility. This will also open opportunities for synergizing collaborative TB/HIV research and training activities, which should be prioritized by the donors supporting the TB/HIV programs. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Health systems in the Republic of Congo: challenges and opportunities for implementing tuberculosis and HIV collaborative service, research, and training activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Stella Ghoma Linguissi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Republic of Congo is on the World Health Organization (WHO list of ‘high burden’ countries for tuberculosis (TB and HIV. TB is the leading cause of death among HIV-infected patients in the Republic of Congo. In this viewpoint, the available data on TB and HIV in the Republic of Congo are reviewed, and the gaps and bottlenecks that the National TB Control Program (NTCP faces are discussed. Furthermore, priority requirements for developing and implementing TB and HIV collaborative service activities are identified. HIV and TB control programs operate as distinct entities with separate case management plans. The implementation of collaborative TB/HIV activities to evaluate and monitor the management of TB/HIV co-infected individuals remains inefficient in most regions, and these activities are sometimes non-existent. This reveals major challenges that require definition in order to improve the delivery of healthcare. The NTCP lacks adequate resources for optimal implementation of control measures of TB and HIV compliance and outcomes. The importance of aligning and integrating TB and HIV treatment services (including follow-up and adherence support services through coordinated and collaborative efforts between individual TB and HIV programs is discussed. Aligning and integrating TB and HIV treatment services through coordinated and collaborative efforts between individual TB and HIV programs is required. However, the WHO recommendations are generic, and health services in the Republic of Congo need to tailor their TB and HIV programs according to the availability of resources and operational feasibility. This will also open opportunities for synergizing collaborative TB/HIV research and training activities, which should be prioritized by the donors supporting the TB/HIV programs.

  9. Dynamics of adrenal steroids are related to variations in Th1 and Treg populations during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV positive persons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Florencia Quiroga

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains the most frequent cause of illness and death from an infectious agent, and its interaction with HIV has devastating effects. We determined plasma levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, its circulating form DHEA-suphate (DHEA-s and cortisol in different stages of M. tuberculosis infection, and explored their role on the Th1 and Treg populations during different scenarios of HIV-TB coinfection, including the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS, a condition related to antiretroviral treatment. DHEA levels were diminished in HIV-TB and HIV-TB IRIS patients compared to healthy donors (HD, HIV+ individuals and HIV+ individuals with latent TB (HIV-LTB, whereas dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-s levels were markedly diminished in HIV-TB IRIS individuals. HIV-TB and IRIS patients presented a cortisol/DHEA ratio significantly higher than HIV+, HIV-LTB and HD individuals. A positive correlation was observed between DHEA-s and CD4 count among HIV-TB individuals. Conversely, cortisol plasma level inversely correlated with CD4 count within HIV-TB individuals. M. tuberculosis-specific Th1 lymphocyte count was increased after culturing PBMC from HIV-TB individuals in presence of DHEA. We observed an inverse correlation between DHEA-s plasma level and Treg frequency in co-infected individuals, and CD4+FoxP3+ Treg frequency was increased in HIV-TB and IRIS patients compared to other groups. Strikingly, we observed a prominent CD4+CD25-FoxP3+ population across HIV-TB and HIV-TB IRIS patients, which frequency correlated with DHEA plasma level. Finally, DHEA treatment negatively regulated FoxP3 expression without altering Treg frequency in co-infected patients. These data suggest an enhancing role for DHEA in the immune response against M. tuberculosis during HIV-TB coinfection and IRIS.

  10. The Ukraine Crisis: The Battle of Superpowers

    OpenAIRE

    Elmquist-Clausen, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    This project concerns the Ukraine crisis, and how the crisis can be explained as a battle between Russia and the West. The project takes it departure in neoclassical realism, and uses this theory to understand how the actors in the crisis balance each other. This project concerns the Ukraine crisis, and how the crisis can be explained as a battle between Russia and the West. The project takes it departure in neoclassical realism, and uses this theory to understand how the actors in the cri...

  11. Independent predictors of tuberculosis mortality in a high HIV prevalence setting: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Dominique J; Schomaker, Michael; Wilkinson, Robert J; de Azevedo, Virginia; Maartens, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Identifying those at increased risk of death during TB treatment is a priority in resource-constrained settings. We performed this study to determine predictors of mortality during TB treatment. We performed a retrospective analysis of a TB surveillance population in a high HIV prevalence area that was recorded in ETR.net (Electronic Tuberculosis Register). Adult TB cases initiated TB treatment from 2007 through 2009 in Khayelitsha, South Africa. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify risk factors for death (after multiple imputations for missing data). Model selection was performed using Akaike's Information Criterion to obtain the most relevant predictors of death. Of 16,209 adult TB cases, 851 (5.3 %) died during TB treatment. In all TB cases, advancing age, co-infection with HIV, a prior history of TB and the presence of both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB were independently associated with an increasing hazard of death. In HIV-infected TB cases, advancing age and female gender were independently associated with an increasing hazard of death. Increasing CD4 counts and antiretroviral treatment during TB treatment were protective against death. In HIV-uninfected TB cases, advancing age was independently associated with death, whereas smear-positive disease was protective. We identified several independent predictors of death during TB treatment in resource-constrained settings. Our findings inform resource-constrained settings about certain subgroups of TB patients that should be targeted to improve mortality during TB treatment.

  12. TB or not TB?: a case of isolated testicular TB with scrotal involvement.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bhargava, A

    2009-06-01

    Despite the genitourinary tract being the most common site affected by extrapulmonary TB, isolated testicular TB remains a rare clinical entity. In patients with co-morbidities such as hepatic impairment, treatment proves a challenge, as first-line hepatotoxic pharmaceuticals are contraindicated. Here, we report a case of isolated testicular TB with scrotal involvement, on a background of hepatic dysfunction.

  13. Low-level Battle Management Language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alstad, A.; Mevassvik, O.M.; Nielsen, M.N.; Løvlid, R.A.; Henderson, H.C.; Jansen, R.E.J.; Reus, N.M. de

    2013-01-01

    TNO (The Netherlands) and FFI (Norway) are cooperating in extending a COTS Computer Generated Forces (CGF) tool with a Coalition Battle Management Language (C-BML) interface for executing C-BML orders and issuing reports. Due to the lack of satisfactory models for command and control (C2)/combat

  14. Battle Management Language capable Computer Generated Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkers, R.; Henderson, H.; Reus, N.M. de; Alstad, A.; Mevassvik, O.M.; Skogsrud, G.

    2011-01-01

    The development of Coalition Battle Management Language (C-BML) by SISO and its evaluation by the NATO MSG-085 task group and predecessor NATO MSG-048 has led Norway and the Netherlands to develop C-BML interfaces for their Command and Control Information Systems (C2ISs) NORTaC-C2IS and ISIS. FFI

  15. The battle of the dumps continues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Although East Rand Gold and Uranium Company is about to start exploitation of the old slimes dams to produce gold, uranium and sulphuric acid, the battle to suppress dust and establish vegetation on the old dumps continues. The physical problems, planning, co-ordination and legal aspects of mine dump reclamation are outlined

  16. Clinical presentation and opportunistic infections in HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Allan; Jespersen, Sanne; Katzenstein, Terese L

    2016-01-01

    HIV-2 is prevalent. In this study, we aimed to characterize the clinical presentations among HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, newly diagnosed HIV patients attending the HIV outpatient clinic at Hospital Nacional Sim~ao Mendes in Guinea......-Bissau were enrolled. Demographical and clinical data were collected and compared between HIV-1, HIV-2 and HIV-1/2 dual seropositive patients. Results: A total of 169 patients (76% HIV-1, 17% HIV-2 and 6% HIV 1/2) were included in the study between 21 March 2012 and 14 December 2012. HIV-1 seropositive...... antigen. Conclusion: HIV-1 and HIV-1/2 seropositive patients have lower CD4 cell counts than HIV-2 seropositive patients when diagnosed with HIV with only minor clinical and demographic differences among groups. Few patients were diagnosed with TB and cryptococcal disease was not found to be a major...

  17. Using 15 DHS surveys to study epidemiological correlates of TB courtesy stigma and health-seeking behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, E J J; Mergenthaler, C; Bakker, M I; Redwood, L; Mitchell, E M H

    2017-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) stigma is thought to delay or prevent the decision to seek health care, but the strength of this association and the prevalence of anticipated TB stigma in the general population in most countries is unknown. To examine epidemiological, cultural and sociodemographic factors associated with TB courtesy stigma in 15 surveys across 13 countries, and its link to health seeking for cough in children under five. A multilevel survey weighted logistic regression model was used to analyse how individual characteristics and social contexts affect the occurrence of TB courtesy stigma. The same modelling approach was used to analyse associations between TB courtesy stigma and individual-level predictors of health-seeking behaviour of mothers for children with cough. TB courtesy stigma varies greatly among countries. TB courtesy stigma was negatively correlated with knowledge of TB's curability (adjusted OR [aOR] 0.82; 95%CI 0.78-0.86) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) accepting attitudes (proxy for HIV stigma) (aOR 0.15, 95%CI 0.15-0.16). Mothers' health-seeking behaviour for children under five with cough was found to be positively correlated with HIV accepting attitudes (OR 1.16, 95%CI 1.08-1.25), but was marginally affected by TB courtesy stigma (OR 0.99, 95%CI 0.98-1.00). Improving the general awareness of the effectiveness of anti-tuberculosis treatment will help to diminish TB courtesy stigma, and should be prioritised over expanding knowledge of mode of transmission. Efforts to reduce HIV and TB stigma may increase care seeking for childhood TB symptoms.

  18. Diagnosing HIV-associated tuberculosis | Wilson | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The world has made defeating AIDS a top priority. This is a blessing. But TB remains ignored. Today we are calling on the world to recognise that we can't fight AIDS unless we do much more to fight TB as well.' Nelson Mandela: Media briefing on 'Confronting the Joint HIV-TB Epidemics', co-convened by the Bill & Melinda ...

  19. BCG protects against tuberculosis irrespective of HIV status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Range, Nyagosya; PrayGod, George

    2013-01-01

    While BCG vaccine protects against severe tuberculosis (TB) in children, its effect against adult TB is questionable. Furthermore, it is not known if HIV co-infection modifies the effect of BCG. Among 352 pairs of Tanzanian TB cases and matched controls, the BCG scar was associated with a reduced...

  20. Longitudinal analysis of HIV risk behaviour patterns and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of this study was to identify various HIV risk behaviours among tuberculosis (TB) patients in a longitudinal study design in South Africa. In 42 public primary healthcare facilities in three districts in three provinces, adult new TB and TB retreatment patients with hazardous or harmful alcohol use were interviewed ...

  1. Punto J : a Portal for Youth-to-Youth Education on Health and HIV ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    . Punto J, funded under project 103077-Phase I, enables young people to use information and communication technologies (ICTs) to create awareness of, and promote leadership and participation in, the battle against HIV/AIDS. Young ...

  2. HIV infection among tuberculosis patients in Vietnam: prevalence and impact on tuberculosis notification rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thanh, D. H.; Sy, D. N.; Linh, N. D.; Hoan, T. M.; Dien, H. T.; Thuy, T. B.; Hoa, N. P.; Tung, L. B.; Cobelens, F.

    2010-01-01

    Vietnam has an emerging human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic (estimated population prevalence 0.5%), but valid data on HIV prevalence among tuberculosis (TB) patients are limited. Recent increases in TB notification rates among young adults may be related to HIV. To assess the prevalence of

  3. A deadly combination – HIV and diabetes mellitus: Where are we ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Approximately 1% of the population develops active TB annually.[9]. Globally DM ... [13] Both. DM and HIV infection increase the risk of developing TB. Optimal control of DM .... The mean HbA1c achieved in the HIV-infected diabetic cohort v. ..... HIV-infected diabetic patients stratified according to glycaemic control. Optimal ...

  4. Cost of Tuberculosis Diagnosis and Treatment in Patients with HIV: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Siqueira-Filha, Noemia Teixeira; Legood, Rosa; Cavalcanti, Aracele; Santos, Andreia Costa

    2018-04-01

    To summarize the costs of tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis and treatment in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and to assess the methodological quality of these studies. We included cost, cost-effectiveness, and cost-utility studies that reported primary costing data, conducted worldwide and published between 1990 and August 2016. We retrieved articles in PubMed, Embase, EconLit, CINAHL plus, and LILACS databases. The quality assessment was performed using two guidelines-the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards and the Tool to Estimate Patient's Costs. TB diagnosis was reported as cost per positive result or per suspect case. TB treatment was reported as cost of TB drugs, TB/HIV hospitalization, and treatment. We analyzed the data per level of TB/HIV endemicity and perspective of analysis. We included 34 articles, with 24 addressing TB/HIV treatment and 10 addressing TB diagnosis. Most of the studies were carried out in high TB/HIV burden countries (82%). The cost of TB diagnosis per suspect case varied from $0.5 for sputum smear microscopy to $175 for intensified case finding. The cost of TB/HIV hospitalization was higher in low/medium TB/HIV burden countries than in high TB/HIV burden countries ($75,406 vs. $2,474). TB/HIV co-infection presented higher costs than TB from the provider perspective ($814 vs. $604 vs. $454). Items such as "choice of discount rate," "patient interview procedures," and "methods used for valuing indirect costs" did not achieve a good score in the quality assessment. Our findings point to the need of generation of more standardized methods for cost data collection to generate more robust estimates and thus, support decision-making process. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Changes in US HIV Treatment Guidelines

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-03

    Following the 2012 HIV Treatment Guidelines, which include early diagnosis and treatment with ART, can increase longevity and improve the quality of life for patients living with HIV.  Created: 10/3/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 10/3/2012.

  6. National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In observance of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, talks about the HIV/AIDS among African Americans and what steps can be taken on the national, state, local, and individual levels to address this epidemic.

  7. Protecting Yourself and Your Partners from HIV

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, provides individuals with steps they can take to protect their health from HIV. This podcast was created for National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, which takes place on February 7.

  8. Perceptions of HIV, AIDS and tuberculosis among patients on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of the research were to explore perceptions of HIV, AIDS and tuberculosis (TB) among individuals enrolled in antiretroviral therapy (ART) at two municipal clinics in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, and to assess the implications of these perceptions on the provision of HIV and TB care services. Data were collected ...

  9. Timing of antiretroviral therapy initiation in adults with HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timing of antiretroviral therapy initiation in adults with HIV-associated tuberculosis: Outcomes of therapy in an urban hospital in KwaZulu-Natal. ... We aimed to compare clinical outcomes of patients with HIV-associated TB who commenced ART at different stages of TB therapy. Methods. A retrospective chart review was ...

  10. Predictive markers of survival in HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative Tanzanian patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, C.; Koelemay, M. J.; Swai, A. B.; Perenboom, R.; Mwakyusa, D. H.; Oosting, J.

    1995-01-01

    Prediction of survival in Tanzanian patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB). To evaluate the prognostic value of clinical and laboratory parameters on survival in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive and HIV seronegative patients with extrapulmonary TB. Over an 8-month period 192

  11. TB infection prevention and control experiences of South African nurses - a phenomenological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The tuberculosis (TB) epidemic in South Africa is characterised by one of the highest levels of TB/HIV co-infection and growing multidrug-resistant TB worldwide. Hospitals play a central role in the management of TB. We investigated nurses' experiences of factors influencing TB infection prevention and control (IPC) practices to identify risks associated with potential nosocomial transmission. Methods The qualitative study employed a phenomenological approach, using semi-structured interviews with a quota sample of 20 nurses in a large tertiary academic hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. The data was subjected to thematic analysis. Results Nurses expressed concerns about the possible risk of TB transmission to both patients and staff. Factors influencing TB-IPC, and increasing the potential risk of nosocomial transmission, emerged in interconnected overarching themes. Influences related to the healthcare system included suboptimal IPC provision such as the lack of isolation facilities and personal protective equipment, and the lack of a TB-IPC policy. Further influences included inadequate TB training for staff and patients, communication barriers owing to cultural and linguistic differences between staff and patients, the excessive workload of nurses, and a sense of duty of care. Influences related to wider contextual conditions included TB concerns and stigma, and the role of traditional healers. Influences related to patient behaviour included late uptake of hospital care owing to poverty and the use of traditional medicine, and poor adherence to IPC measures by patients, family members and carers. Conclusions Several interconnected influences related to the healthcare system, wider contextual conditions and patient behavior could increase the potential risk of nosocomial TB transmission at hospital level. There is an urgent need for the implementation and evaluation of a comprehensive contextually appropriate TB IPC policy with the setting and

  12. Jamie Foxx Talks About HIV

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-24

    Jamie Foxx, Academy Award winning actor and singer, urges everyone to talk about HIV/AIDS and its prevention.  Created: 7/24/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 7/24/2012.

  13. Risk factors for inadequate TB case finding in Rural Western Kenya: a comparison of actively and passively identified TB patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna H Van't Hoog

    Full Text Available The findings of a prevalence survey conducted in western Kenya, in a population with 14.9% HIV prevalence suggested inadequate case finding. We found a high burden of infectious and largely undiagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB, that a quarter of the prevalent cases had not yet sought care, and a low case detection rate.We aimed to identify factors associated with inadequate case finding among adults with PTB in this population by comparing characteristics of 194 PTB patients diagnosed in a health facility after self-report, i.e., through passive case detection, with 88 patients identified through active case detection during the prevalence survey. We examined associations between method of case detection and patient characteristics, including HIV-status, socio-demographic variables and disease severity in univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses.HIV-infection was associated with faster passive case detection in univariable analysis (crude OR 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI 2.0-5.9, but in multivariable logistic regression this was largely explained by the presence of cough, illness and clinically diagnosed smear-negative TB (adjusted OR (aOR HIV 1.8, 95% CI 0.85-3.7. Among the HIV-uninfected passive case detection was less successful in older patients aOR 0.76, 95%CI 0.60-0.97 per 10 years increase, and women (aOR 0.27, 95%CI 0.10-0.73. Reported current or past alcohol use reduced passive case detection in both groups (0.42, 95% CI 0.23-0.79. Among smear-positive patients median durations of cough were 4.0 and 6.9 months in HIV-infected and uninfected patients, respectively.HIV-uninfected patients with infectious TB who were older, female, relatively less ill, or had a cough of a shorter duration were less likely found through passive case detection. In addition to intensified case finding in HIV-infected persons, increasing the suspicion of TB among HIV-uninfected women and the elderly are needed to improve TB case

  14. Vukovar 1991 Battle and Cultural Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Cvikić

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper it is argued that Vukovar 1991 Battle traumatic memory wearing away process is a social issue and cannot be simply amputated by modernist narratives from accumulated traces of the past. Instead, those traumatic memories are constantly reconstructed, repressed, or transformed in some way or another under the pressure of manipulative power politics and competing ideologies in contemporary Croatian society.  Therefore, the question this paper asks is whether war crimes and atrocities committed in Vukovar 1991 have its meaningful place in the Croatian cultural memory and whether  social research techniques into contemporary cultural memory in Croatia can afford to avoid testimonial narrations of the Vukovar 1991 Battle and war experiences since they are an integral part of the collective memory?

  15. The Gaugamela Battle Eclipse: An Archaeoastronomical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcaro, V. F.; Valsecchi, G. B.; Verderame, L.

    A total lunar eclipse occurred during the night preceding the decisive Battle of Gaugamela (20th September 331 BCE), when the Macedonian army, led by Alexander the Great, finally defeated the Persian king Darius and his army. This astronomical event, well known to historians, had a relevant role on the battle outcome. The eclipse was described in detail by Babylonian astronomers, though, unfortunately, the text of their report has only partially been preserved. We have reconstructed the evolution of the phenomenon as it appeared to the observer in Babylonia, by using the positional astronomy code "Planetario V2.0". On the base of this reconstruction we suggest a number of integrations to the lost part of the text, allowing a finer astrological interpretation of the eclipse and of its influence on the mood of the armies that set against each other on the following morning.

  16. CD4 lymphocyte dynamics in Tanzanian pulmonary tuberculosis patients with and without HIV co-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Aase B.; Range, Nyagosya; Changalucha, John

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The interaction of HIV and tuberculosis (TB) on CD4 levels over time has previously been divergently reported and only in small study populations with short or no follow-up. METHODS: CD4 counts were assessed from time of diagnosis till the end of TB treatment in a cohort...... of pulmonary TB patients with and without HIV co-infection and compared with cross-sectional data on age- and sex-matched non-TB controls from the same area. RESULTS: Of 1605 study participants, 1250 were PTB patients and 355 were non-TB controls. At baseline, HIV was associated with 246 (95% CI: 203; 279...

  17. Tuberculosis Epidemiology at the Country Scale: Self-Limiting Process and the HIV Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Augusto Maurin Krsulovic

    Full Text Available The global spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is the main hypothesis behind tuberculosis (TB positive trends in the last decades, according to modeling studies and World Health Organization Reports (WHO. On one hand, TB (WHO reports do not explicitly consider a modeling approach, but cover country and global TB trends. On the other hand, modeling studies usually do not cover the scale of WHO reports, because of the amount of parameters estimated to describe TB natural history. Here we combined these two principal sources of TB studies covering TB High Burden Countries (HBCs dynamics. Our main goals were: (i to detect the endogenous component of TB dynamics since 1974 for TB HBCs; and (ii to explore the HIV exogenous effects on TB models`parameters.We explored the relationship between the TB per capita population rate of change (RI and the infectious class size following an endogenous/exogenous framework. RI can be affected by intra-population processes (i.e. competition, predation and exogenous variables like HIV. We found that TB dynamics had always a strong endogenous component, represented by a negative correlation between TB population size and RI, which was captured by the discrete logistic model. Moreover, we explored the HIV exogenous effects on TB models`parameters. We found that overall the TB+HIV logistic model was more parsimonious than TB model alone, principally in the African region. Our results showed that HIV affected principally TB carrying capacity, as expected by the known HIV effects on TB natural-history. We also tested if DOTS (Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course Strategy, poverty levels and BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin coverage explained the models´ residuals variances, but they did not.Since 1974, TB dynamics were categorized in distinct chronological domains, with different dynamics but nearly the same underlying mechanism: a negative relationship between RI and infected class size (i.e. self

  18. Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Q M; Nguyen, H L; Do, T N; Nguyen, V N; Nguyen, B H; Nguyen, T V A; Sintchenko, V; Marais, B J

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are leading causes of disease and death in Vietnam, but TB/HIV disease trends and the profile of co-infected patients are poorly described. We examined national TB and HIV notification data to provide a geographic overview and describe relevant disease trends within Vietnam. We also compared the demographic and clinical profiles of TB patients with and without HIV infection. During the past 10 years (2005-2014) cumulative HIV case numbers and deaths increased to 298,151 and 71,332 respectively, but access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) improved and new infections and deaths declined. From 2011-2014 routine HIV testing of TB patients increased from 58.9% to 72.5% and of all TB patients diagnosed with HIV in 2014, 2,803 (72.4%) received ART. The number of multidrug resistant (MDR)-TB cases enrolled for treatment increased almost 3-fold (578 to 1,532) from 2011-2014. The rate of HIV co-infection in MDR and non-MDR TB cases (51/1,532; 3.3% vs 3,774/100,555; 3.8%; OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.7-1.2) was similar in 2014. The care of TB/HIV co-infected patients have shown sustained improvement in Vietnam. Rising numbers of MDR-TB cases is a concern, but this is not "driven" by HIV co-infection. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS dual infection: A Case study for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 479 (99%) cases had their HIV test results recorded. The HIV positive cases were 244 (51%). Dual infection: The proportion of TB cases also having HIV/AIDS infection was 51%. The cure rate of smear positive, HIV positive cases was 71%; the cure rate of smear positive, HIV negative case was 85%.The mortality ...

  20. Incidence, risk factors and mortality of tuberculosis in Danish HIV patients 1995-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taarnhøj, Gry A.; Engsig, Frederik N; Ravn, Pernille

    2011-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection predisposes to tuberculosis (TB). We described incidence, risk factors and prognosis of TB in HIV-1 infected patients during pre (1995-1996), early (1997-1999), and late Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) (2000-2007) periods.......Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection predisposes to tuberculosis (TB). We described incidence, risk factors and prognosis of TB in HIV-1 infected patients during pre (1995-1996), early (1997-1999), and late Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) (2000-2007) periods....

  1. HIV testing, antiretroviral therapy, and treatment outcomes in new cases of tuberculosis in Brazil, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Torrens

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To assess the implementation of HIV-related interventions for patients with tuberculosis (TB, as well as TB treatment outcomes in patients coinfected with HIV in Brazil in 2011. Methods This was a cross-sectional, operational research study of HIV-related interventions among TB cases and the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of TB-HIV coinfected patients. It also used a retrospective cohort design to determine the association between antiretroviral therapy (ART and favorable TB treatment outcomes. The source of data was a linkage of 2011 administrative health databases used by the National TB and HIV/AIDS Programs. Results Of 73 741 new cases of TB reported, 63.6% (46 865 patients were tested for HIV; 10.3% were positive. Of patients with HIV, 45.9% or 3 502 were on ART. TB favorable outcome was achieved in 63.1% or 2 205 coinfected patients on ART and in only 35.4% or 1 459 of those not on ART. On multivariate analysis, the relative risk for the association between ART and TB treatment success was 1.72 (95% Confidence Interval = 1.64–1.81. Conclusions The linkage between national TB and HIV datasets has created a convenient baseline for ongoing monitoring of HIV testing, ART use, and TB treatment outcomes among coinfected patients. The low rates of HIV screening and ART use in 2011 need to be improved. The association between ART and treatment success adds to the evidence supporting timely initiation of ART for all patients with TB-HIV coinfection.

  2. Natural ventilation reduces high TB transmission risk in traditional homes in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygizos, Melissa; Shenoi, Sheela V; Brooks, Ralph P; Bhushan, Ambika; Brust, James C M; Zelterman, Daniel; Deng, Yanhong; Northrup, Veronika; Moll, Anthony P; Friedland, Gerald H

    2013-07-01

    Transmission of drug susceptible and drug resistant TB occurs in health care facilities, and community and households settings, particularly in highly prevalent TB and HIV areas. There is a paucity of data regarding factors that may affect TB transmission risk in household settings. We evaluated air exchange and the impact of natural ventilation on estimated TB transmission risk in traditional Zulu homes in rural South Africa. We utilized a carbon dioxide decay technique to measure ventilation in air changes per hour (ACH). We evaluated predominant home types to determine factors affecting ACH and used the Wells-Riley equation to estimate TB transmission risk. Two hundred eighteen ventilation measurements were taken in 24 traditional homes. All had low ventilation at baseline when windows were closed (mean ACH = 3, SD = 3.0), with estimated TB transmission risk of 55.4% over a ten hour period of exposure to an infectious TB patient. There was significant improvement with opening windows and door, reaching a mean ACH of 20 (SD = 13.1, p ventilation conditions (windows/doors open) and window to volume ratio. Expanding ventilation increased the odds of achieving ≥12 ACH by 60-fold. There is high estimated risk of TB transmission in traditional homes of infectious TB patients in rural South Africa. Improving natural ventilation may decrease household TB transmission risk and, combined with other strategies, may enhance TB control efforts.

  3. Patient characteristics and perceived health status of individuals with HIV and tuberculosis coinfection in Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yujia; Wu, Jizhou; Feng, Xue; Chen, Huanhuan; Lu, Huaxiang; Chen, Li; Luo, Liuhong; Rui, Chao

    2017-04-01

    To explore demographics, clinical and medication profiles, patients' social support, and perceived health status in HIV/TB coinfected patients in Guangxi, China.We performed a cross-sectional study in the HIV clinic of the Guigang City People's Hospital (N = 150). Health professionals conducted face-to-face interviews and collected data from patients' electronic medical records regarding patients' demographic, clinical, and medication information, as well as their social support and perceived health status. We classified all HIV/AIDS patients into HIV monoinfected and TB coinfected, at a ratio of 2:1.Compared with the HIV monoinfected, patients with HIV/TB coinfection were more likely to be older, male, less educated, unemployed, carrying health insurance, having advanced stage of HIV infection, longer history with HIV, and other opportunistic infections. Patients coinfected with TB were also more likely to hold a negative belief that their HIV treatment could prevent exacerbations, and reported significantly worse emotional/informational support, social interaction, and perceived health status. Better social support and better self-efficacy to the HIV treatment adherence was significantly associated with better perceived health status among patients with HIV and TB coinfection.Having HIV/TB coinfection was associated with poorer perceived general well-being and mental health, particularly in those undergoing TB therapy. Our findings suggest the need for mental health referrals and medication management for coinfected individuals, as well as further efforts and policies to improve coordinated care.

  4. HIV-infected presumptive tuberculosis patients without tuberculosis: How many are eligible for antiretroviral therapy in Karnataka, India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay M.V. Kumar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For certain subgroups within people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV [active tuberculosis (TB, pregnant women, children <5 years old, and serodiscordant couples], the World Health Organization recommends antiretroviral therapy (ART irrespective of CD4 count. Another subgroup which has received increased attention is “HIV-infected presumptive TB patients without TB”. In this study, we assess the proportion of HIV-infected presumptive TB patients eligible for ART in Karnataka State (population 60 million, India. This was a cross-sectional analysis of data of HIV-infected presumptive TB patients diagnosed in May 2015 abstracted from national TB and HIV program records. Of 42,585 presumptive TB patients, 28,964 (68% were tested for HIV and 2262 (8% were HIV positive. Of the latter, 377 (17% had active TB. Of 1885 “presumptive TB patients without active TB”, 1100 (58% were already receiving ART. Of the remaining 785 who were not receiving ART, 617 (79% were assessed for ART eligibility and of those, 548 (89% were eligible for ART. About 90% of “HIV-infected presumptive TB patients without TB” were eligible for ART. This evidence supports a public health approach of starting all “HIV-infected presumptive TB patients without TB” on ART irrespective of CD4 count in line with global thinking about ‘test and treat’.

  5. Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis: implications for the HIV epidemic and antiretroviral therapy rollout in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jason R; Shah, N Sarita; Gandhi, Neel; Moll, Tony; Friedland, Gerald

    2007-12-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is emerging as a major clinical and public health challenge in areas of sub-Saharan Africa where there is a high prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. TB drug-resistance surveillance in this region has been limited by laboratory capacity and the public health infrastructure; however, with the maturation of the HIV epidemic, the burden of drug-resistant TB is increasing rapidly. The recent discovery of large numbers of cases of multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB in South Africa likely represents an unrecognized and evolving epidemic rather than sporadic, localized outbreaks. The combination of a large population of HIV-infected susceptible hosts with poor TB treatment success rates, a lack of airborne infection control, limited drug-resistance testing, and an overburdened MDR-TB treatment program provides ideal conditions for an MDR-TB and XDR-TB epidemic of unparalleled magnitude. In the present article, we review the history of drug-resistant TB in South Africa, describe its interaction with the HIV epidemic and the resultant consequences, and suggest measures necessary for controlling MDR-TB and XDR-TB in this context. A successful response to the emergence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB will necessitate increased resources for and collaboration between TB and HIV programs.

  6. Substantially Higher and Earlier Occurrence of Anti-Tuberculosis Drug-Related Adverse Reactions in HIV Coinfected Tuberculosis Patients: A Matched-Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matono, Takashi; Nishijima, Takeshi; Teruya, Katsuji; Morino, Eriko; Takasaki, Jin; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Oka, Shinichi

    2017-11-01

    Little information exists on the frequency, severity, and timing of first-line anti-tuberculosis drug-related adverse events (TB-AEs) in HIV-tuberculosis coinfected (HIV-TB) patients in the antiretroviral therapy (ART) era. This matched-cohort study included HIV-TB patients as cases and HIV-uninfected tuberculosis (non-HIV-TB) patients as controls. Tuberculosis was culture-confirmed in both groups. Cases were matched to controls in a 1:4 ratio on age, sex, and year of diagnosis. TB-AEs were defined as Grade 2 or higher requiring drug discontinuation/regimen change. From 2003 to 2015, 94 cases and 376 controls were analyzed (95% men, 98% Asians). Standard four-drug combination therapy was initiated in 91% of cases and 89% of controls (p = 0.45). Cases had a higher frequency of TB-AE [51% (48/94) vs. 10% (39/376), p tuberculosis treatment. HIV infection was an independent risk factor for TB-AEs in the multivariate Cox analysis [adjusted HR (aHR): 6.96; 95% confidence interval: 3.93-12.3]. TB-AEs occurred more frequently in HIV-TB than in non-HIV-TB patients, and were more severe. The majority of TB-AEs occurred within 4 weeks of initiating anti-tuberculosis treatment. Because TB-AEs may delay ART initiation, careful monitoring during this period is warranted in coinfected patients.

  7. Monitoring linked epidemics: the case of tuberculosis and HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María S Sánchez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The tight epidemiological coupling between HIV and its associated opportunistic infections leads to challenges and opportunities for disease surveillance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We review efforts of WHO and collaborating agencies to track and fight the TB/HIV co-epidemic, and discuss modeling--via mathematical, statistical, and computational approaches--as a means to identify disease indicators designed to integrate data from linked diseases in order to characterize how co-epidemics change in time and space. We present R(TB/HIV, an index comparing changes in TB incidence relative to HIV prevalence, and use it to identify those sub-Saharan African countries with outlier TB/HIV dynamics. R(TB/HIV can also be used to predict epidemiological trends, investigate the coherency of reported trends, and cross-check the anticipated impact of public health interventions. Identifying the cause(s responsible for anomalous R(TB/HIV values can reveal information crucial to the management of public health. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We frame our suggestions for integrating and analyzing co-epidemic data within the context of global disease monitoring. Used routinely, joint disease indicators such as R(TB/HIV could greatly enhance the monitoring and evaluation of public health programs.

  8. National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-01

    In observance of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, talks about the HIV/AIDS among African Americans and what steps can be taken on the national, state, local, and individual levels to address this epidemic.  Created: 2/1/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/1/2012.

  9. Protecting Yourself and Your Partners from HIV

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-01

    Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, provides individuals with steps they can take to protect their health from HIV. This podcast was created for National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, which takes place on February 7.  Created: 2/1/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/1/2012.

  10. book and video reviews battles in britain and their political

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Illustrated, maps. ISBN I 85326 672 8. R61-00 ... battles fought on British soil from the Norse invasion under King Harold. Hardrada (September ... but also sets each battle against the political and historical background of the time. Seymour ...

  11. Muscle Activity during Unilateral Vs. Bilateral Battle Rope Exercises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calatayud, J.; Martin, F.; Colado, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Calatayud, J, Martin, F, Colado, JC, Benitez, JC, Jakobsen, MD, and Andersen, LL. Muscle activity during unilateral vs. bilateral battle rope exercises. J Strength Cond Res 29(10): 2854-2859, 2015High training intensity is important for efficient strength gains. Although battle rope training is m...

  12. Lope and the Battle-Speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Iglesias-Zoido

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the way in which Lope de Vega conceives in his theater the pre-battle harangue, the most characteristic speech in ancient and renaissance historiography. Having this aim in mind, I have analyzed the role played by this type of speech in a group of plays dealing with historical and military subjects. These plays were written in a period when Lope was particularly interested in historical issues: La Santa Liga (1598-1603, Arauco domado (1599, El asalto de Mastrique (1595-1606 and Los Guanches de Tenerife (1604-1606.

  13. Musculoskeletal disorders in main battle tank personnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Guldager, Bernadette; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders of personnel in the main battle tank (MBT) units in the Danish army with those of personnel in other types of army units, and to investigate associations between job function in the tank, military rank, and musculoskeletal problems......, and ankle. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There were only 4 women in the MBT group; as a consequence, female personnel were excluded from the study. The participation rate was 58.0% (n = 184) in the MBT group and 56.3% (n = 333) in the reference group. The pattern of musculoskeletal disorders among personnel...

  14. Philostorgius’ Account of the Battle at Mursa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Cedilnik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available On September 28, 351 AD, Emperor Constantius II defeated the usurper Magnentius in the battle at Mursa. While the battle is described in several ancient sources, the present study focuses on the account given by Philostorgius. Philostorgius is the first known author to have included in his description of the battle the appearance of a cross in the sky, drawing on the writings of an unknown Arian historian. But for all its seemingly miraculous connotations, Philostorgius’ story is no mere figment of the imagination. It is based on a perfectly natural meteorological phenomenon, the parhelia or phantom suns, which had been observed on May 7, 351, in the sky above Jerusalem. They were interpreted at the time as the sign of Christ’s cross, and the contemporary Jerusalem bishop, Cyril, provided a detailed description in a letter to Emperor Constantius. But while the Bishop already saw this phenomenon as a sign of God’s favour to Constantius, the appearance of the cross above Jerusalem was not immediately associated with the slightly later conflict at Mursa. This connection was only established by Arian historians, who used the story of the vision before the Mursa battle to glorify Emperor Constantius, a supporter of Arianism. The earliest source known today is an anonymous Arian historian writing in the late 4th century: his work provided the basis for Philostorgius’ account of the Mursa battle. Still, the association of the visions above Jerusalem and Mursa is perhaps not to be attributed merely to the Arian authors’ partiality to Emperor Constantius. It may have been prompted by two natural but hardly everyday celestial phenomena as well: on May 28, 355, the Balkans, including Mursa, witnessed a total solar eclipse, while August 8, 351, brought a partial eclipse to an area of the Balkans (but not to Mursa. The two eclipses may have influenced Philostorgius’ account of the Mursa battle. While neither the eclipse nor the parhelia visible

  15. Predictors of tuberculosis (TB) and antiretroviral (ARV) medication non-adherence in public primary care patients in South Africa: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Pamela; Peltzer, Karl; Louw, Julia; Matseke, Gladys; McHunu, Gugu; Tutshana, Bomkazi

    2013-04-26

    Despite the downward trend in the absolute number of tuberculosis (TB) cases since 2006 and the fall in the incidence rates since 2001, the burden of disease caused by TB remains a global health challenge. The co-infection between TB and HIV adds to this disease burden. TB is completely curable through the intake of a strict anti-TB drug treatment regimen which requires an extremely high and consistent level of adherence.The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with adherence to anti-TB and HIV treatment drugs. A cross-sectional survey method was used. Three study districts (14 primary health care facilities in each) were selected on the basis of the highest TB caseload per clinic. All new TB and new TB retreatment patients were consecutively screened within one month of anti-tuberculosis treatment. The sample comprised of 3107 TB patients who had been on treatment for at least three weeks and a sub-sample of the total sample were on both anti-TB treatment and anti-retro-viral therapy(ART) (N = 757). Data collection tools included: a Socio-Demographic Questionnaire; a Post-Traumatic-Stress-Disorder (PTSD) Screen; a Psychological Distress Scale; the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT); and self-report measures of tobacco use, perceived health status and adherence to anti-TB drugs and ART. The majority of the participants (N = 3107) were new TB cases with a 55.9% HIV co-infection rate in this adult male and female sample 18 years and older. Significant predictors of non-adherence common to both anti-TB drugs and to dual therapy (ART and anti-TB drugs) included poverty, having one or more co-morbid health condition, being a high risk for alcohol mis-use and a partner who is HIV positive. An additional predictor for non-adherence to anti-TB drugs was tobacco use. A comprehensive treatment programme addressing poverty, alcohol mis-use, tobacco use and psycho-social counseling is indicated for TB patients (with and without HIV

  16. Mortality among MDR-TB cases: comparison with drug-susceptible tuberculosis and associated factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocfa Chung-Delgado

    Full Text Available An increase in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB cases is evident worldwide. Its management implies a complex treatment, high costs, more toxic anti-tuberculosis drug use, longer treatment time and increased treatment failure and mortality. The aims of this study were to compare mortality between MDR and drug-susceptible cases of tuberculosis, and to determine risk factors associated with mortality among MDR-TB cases.A retrospective cohort study was performed using data from clinical records of the National Strategy for Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis in Lima, Peru. In the first objective, MDR-TB, compared to drug-susceptible cases, was the main exposure variable and time to death, censored at 180 days, the outcome of interest. For the second objective, different variables obtained from clinical records were assessed as potential risk factors for death among MDR-TB cases. Cox regression analysis was used to determine hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI. A total of 1,232 patients were analyzed: mean age 30.9 ±14.0 years, 60.0% were males. 61 patients (5.0% died during treatment, whereas the MDR-TB prevalence was 19.2%. MDR-TB increased the risk of death during treatment (HR = 7.5; IC95%: 4.1-13.4 when compared to presumed drug-susceptible cases after controlling for potential confounders. Education level (p = 0.01, previous TB episodes (p<0.001, diabetes history (p<0.001 and HIV infection (p = 0.04 were factors associated with mortality among MDR-TB cases.MDR-TB is associated with an increased risk of death during treatment. Lower education, greater number of previous TB episodes, diabetes history, and HIV infection were independently associated with mortality among MDR-TB cases. New strategies for appropriate MDR-TB detection and management should be implemented, including drug sensitivity tests, diabetes and HIV screening, as well as guarantee for a complete adherence to therapy.

  17. Tuberculosis among HIV-positive patients across Europe: changes over time and risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruk, Alexey; Bannister, Wendy; Podlekareva, Daria N

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To describe temporal changes in the incidence rate of tuberculosis (TB) (pulmonary or extrapulmonary) among HIV-positive patients in western Europe and risk factors of TB across Europe. METHODS:: Poisson regression models were used to determine temporal changes in incidence rate of TB...

  18. Latent tuberculosis in HIV positive, diagnosed by the M. tuberculosis specific interferon-gamma test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, Inger; Ruhwald, Morten; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    Although tuberculosis (TB) is a minor problem in Denmark, severe and complicated cases occur in HIV positive. Since the new M. tuberculosis specific test for latent TB, the QuantiFERON-TB In-Tube test (QFT-IT) became available the patients in our clinic have been screened for the presence of latent...

  19. Latent tuberculosis in HIV positive, diagnosed by the M. tuberculosis specific interferon-gamma test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, Inger; Ruhwald, Morten; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although tuberculosis (TB) is a minor problem in Denmark, severe and complicated cases occur in HIV positive. Since the new M. tuberculosis specific test for latent TB, the QuantiFERON-TB In-Tube test (QFT-IT) became available the patients in our clinic have been screened...

  20. Tuberculosis among HIV-positive patients across Europe: changes over time and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruk, Alexey; Bannister, Wendy; Podlekareva, Daria N.; Chentsova, Nelly P.; Rakhmanova, Aza G.; Horban, Andrzej; Domingo, Perre; Mocroft, Amanda; Lundgren, Jens D.; Kirk, Ole; Losso, M.; Elias, C.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; Clumeck, N.; de Wit, S.; Delforge, M.; Colebunders, R.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Sedlacek, D.; Nielsen, J.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, A.-B. E.; Skinhøj, P.; Pedersen, C.; Ostergaard, L.; Zilmer, K.; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Viard, J.-P.; Girard, P.-M.; Livrozet, J. M.; Vanhems, P.; Pradier, C.; Dabis, F.; Neau, D.; Rockstroh, J.; Reiss, P.

    2011-01-01

    To describe temporal changes in the incidence rate of tuberculosis (TB) (pulmonary or extrapulmonary) among HIV-positive patients in western Europe and risk factors of TB across Europe. Poisson regression models were used to determine temporal changes in incidence rate of TB among 11,952 patients

  1. TB epidemiology: where are the young women? Know your tuberculosis epidemic, know your response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, Rubeshan; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Padayatchi, Nesri

    2018-03-27

    The global predominance of tuberculosis in men has received significant attention. However, epidemiological studies now demonstrate that there is an increased representation of young women with tuberculosis, especially in high HIV burden settings where young women bear a disproportionate burden of HIV. The role of the HIV epidemic, as well as changes in behavioural, biological, and structural risk factors are explored as potential explanations for the increasing burden of tuberculosis in young women. As young women are particularly vulnerable to HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa, it is unsurprising that the TB epidemic in this setting has become increasingly feminised. This age-sex trend of TB in South Africa is similar to WHO estimates for other countries with a high HIV prevalence where there are more female than male cases notified up to the age of 25 years. The high prevalence of anaemia of chronic disease in young women with HIV is an additional potential reason for their increased TB risk. The widespread use of injectable medroxyprogesterone acetate contraception, which has been shown to possess selective glucocorticoid effect and oestrogen suppression, in young women may be an important emerging biological risk factor for tuberculosis in young women. Behavioural factors such as alcohol use and tobacco smoking patterns are further factors which may be responsible for the narrowing of the sex gap in TB epidemiology. In comparison to the significantly higher alcohol consumption rates in men globally, there is a narrowing gap in alcohol consumption between the sexes in South Africa with alarming rates of alcohol abuse in young women. There is a similar narrowing of the tobacco smoking gap between the sexes in South Africa, with increasing smoking prevalence in young women. With nearly 70% of all TB patients being co-infected with HIV in our setting, it is not surprising that the age and sex distribution of TB is increasingly resembling the distribution of HIV

  2. Community-based MDR-TB care project improves treatment initiation in patients diagnosed with MDR-TB in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Pyae Phyo; Shewade, Hemant Deepak; Kyaw, Nang Thu Thu; Thein, Saw; Si Thu, Aung; Kyaw, Khine Wut Yee; Aye, Nyein Nyein; Phyo, Aye Mon; Maung, Htet Myet Win; Soe, Kyaw Thu; Aung, Si Thu

    2018-01-01

    The Union in collaboration with national TB programme (NTP) started the community-based MDR-TB care (CBMDR-TBC) project in 33 townships of upper Myanmar to improve treatment initiation and treatment adherence. Patients with MDR-TB diagnosed/registered under NTP received support through the project staff, in addition to the routine domiciliary care provided by NTP staff. Each township had a project nurse exclusively for MDR-TB and 30 USD per month (max. for 4 months) were provided to the patient as a pre-treatment support. To assess whether CBMDR-TBC project's support improved treatment initiation. In this cohort study (involving record review) of all diagnosed MDR-TB between January 2015 and June 2016 in project townships, CBMDR-TBC status was categorized as "receiving support" if date of project initiation in patient's township was before the date of diagnosis and "not receiving support", if otherwise. Cox proportional hazards regression (censored on 31 Dec 2016) was done to identify predictors of treatment initiation. Of 456 patients, 57% initiated treatment: 64% and 56% among patients "receiving support (n = 208)" and "not receiving support (n = 228)" respectively (CBMDR-TBC status was not known in 20 (4%) patients due to missing diagnosis dates). Among those initiated on treatment (n = 261), median (IQR) time to initiate treatment was 38 (20, 76) days: 31 (18, 50) among patients "receiving support" and 50 (26,101) among patients "not receiving support". After adjusting other potential confounders (age, sex, region, HIV, past history of TB treatment), patients "receiving support" had 80% higher chance of initiating treatment [aHR (0.95 CI): 1.8 (1.3, 2.3)] when compared to patients "not receiving support". In addition, age 15-54 years, previous history of TB and being HIV negative were independent predictors of treatment initiation. Receiving support under CBMDR-TBC project improved treatment initiation: it not only improved the proportion initiated but also

  3. Alarming Levels of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Patients in Metropolitan Mumbai, India

    OpenAIRE

    Isaakidis, Petros; Das, Mrinalini; Kumar, Ajay M V; Peskett, Christopher; Khetarpal, Minni; Bamne, Arun; Adsul, Balkrishna; Manglani, Mamta; Sachdeva, Kuldeep Singh; Parmar, Malik; Kanchar, Avinash; Rewari, B B; Deshpande, Alaka; Rodrigues, Camilla; Shetty, Anjali

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a looming threat to tuberculosis control in India. However, no countrywide prevalence data are available. The burden of DR-TB in HIV-co-infected patients is likewise unknown. Undiagnosed and untreated DR-TB among HIV-infected patients is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We aimed to assess the prevalence of DR-TB (defined as resistance to any anti-TB drug) in patients attending public antiretroviral treatment (ART) centers in greater ...

  4. A meta-analysis of drug resistant tuberculosis in Sub-Saharan Africa: how strongly associated with previous treatment and HIV co-infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhan, Asres; Berhan, Yifru; Yizengaw, Desalegn

    2013-11-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, the fight against tuberculosis (TB) has encountered a great challenge because of the emergence of drug resistant TB strains and the high prevalence of HIV infection. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the association of drug-resistant TB with anti-TB drug treatment history and HIV co-infection. After electronic based literature search in the databases of Medline, HINARI, EMBASE and the Cochrane library, article selection and data extraction were carried out. HIV co-infection and previous history of TB treatment were used as predictors for the occurrence of any anti-TB drug resistant or multiple drug resistant TB (MDR-TB). The risk ratios for each included study and for the pooled sample were computed using the random-effects model. Heterogeneity test, sensitivity analyses and funnel plots were also done. The pooled analysis showed that the risk of developing drug-resistant TB to at least one anti-TB drug was about 3 times higher in individuals who had a previous history of anti-TB treatment than new TB cases. The risk of having MDR-TB in previously anti-TB treated TB cases was more than 5-fold higher than that of new TB cases. Resistance to Ethambutol and Rifampicin was more than fivefold higher among the previously treated with anti-TB drugs. However, HIV infection was not associated with drug-resistant TB. There was a strong association of previous anti-TB treatment with MDR-TB. Primary treatment warrants special emphasis, and screening for anti-TB drugs sensitivity has to be strengthened.

  5. National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-03-05

    This podcast provides information on the impact of HIV and AIDS on women and girls and the importance of getting tested for HIV.  Created: 3/5/2009 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/5/2009.

  6. Treatment outcome of tuberculosis-HIV co-infection in North-central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B M Musa

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: TB/HIV co-infection is common in our population with substantial number of persons sfrf declining HIV screening. The cure rate for TB in this cohort is poor. Further studies are suggested to trul. address the poor treatment outcome.

  7. Tuberculosis Screening and Active Tuberculosis among HIV-Infected Persons in a Canadian Tertiary Care Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Brassard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: HIV infection increases the risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis (TB. The present study evaluates how latent TB is detected and treated to determine the effectiveness of screening in HIV-infected patients with diverse risk profiles.

  8. Improving access and quality of care in a TB control programme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five HIV/AIDS/sexually transmitted infections/TB (HAST) evaluations were conducted from 2008 to 2010, with interviews with 99 facility managers and a folder review of over 850 client records per evaluation cycle. The data were used in a local quality improvement process: sub-district workshops identified key weaknesses ...

  9. Litigation as TB Rights Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract One thousand people die every day in India as a result of TB, a preventable and treatable disease, even though the Constitution of India, government schemes, and international law guarantee available, accessible, acceptable, quality health care. Failure to address the spread of TB and to provide quality treatment to all affected populations constitutes a public health and human rights emergency that demands action and accountability. As part of a broader strategy, health activists in India employ Public Interest Litigation (PIL) to hold the state accountable for rights violations and to demand new legislation, standards for patient care, accountability for under-spending, improvements in services at individual facilities, and access to government entitlements in marginalized communities. Taking inspiration from right to health PIL cases (PILs), lawyers in a New Delhi-based rights organization used desk research, fact-findings, and the Right To Information Act to build a TB PIL for the Delhi High Court, Sanjai Sharma v. NCT of Delhi and Others (2015). The case argues that inadequate implementation of government TB schemes violates the Constitutional rights to life, health, food, and equality. Although PILs face substantial challenges, this paper concludes that litigation can be a crucial advocacy and accountability tool for people living with TB and their allies. PMID:27781000

  10. Nitric oxide production in the exhaled air of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in relation to HIV co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melese Endalkachew

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO is essential for host defense in rodents, but the role of NO during tuberculosis (TB in man remains controversial. However, earlier observations that arginine supplementation facilitates anti-TB treatment, supports the hypothesis that NO is important in the host defense against TB. Local production of NO measured in fractional exhaled air (FeNO in TB patients with and without HIV co-infection has not been reported previously. Thus, our aim was to investigate levels of FeNO in relation to clinical symptoms and urinary NO metabolites (uNO. Methods In a cross sectional study, FeNO and uNO were measured and clinical symptoms, chest x-ray, together with serum levels of arginine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha and interleukin 12 (IL-12 were evaluated in sputum smear positive TB patients (HIV+/TB, n = 36, HIV-/TB, n = 59, their household contacts (n = 17 and blood donors (n = 46 from Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia. Results The proportion of HIV-/TB patients with an increased FeNO level (> 25 ppb was significantly higher as compared to HIV+/TB patients, but HIV+/TB patients had significantly higher uNO than HIV-/TB patients. HIV+ and HIV-/TB patients both had lower levels of FeNO compared to blood donors and household contacts. The highest levels of both uNO and FeNO were found in household contacts. Less advanced findings on chest x-ray, as well as higher sedimentation rate were observed in HIV+/TB patients as compared to HIV-/TB patients. However, no significant correlation was found between FeNO and uNO, chest x-ray grading, clinical symptoms, TNF-alpha, IL-12, arginine levels or sedimentation rate. Conclusion In both HIV negative and HIV co infected TB patients, low levels of exhaled NO compared to blood donors and household were observed. Future studies are needed to confirm whether low levels of exhaled NO could be a risk factor in acquiring TB and the relative importance of NO in human TB.

  11. 30 Years of HIV/AIDS

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, discusses the 30 year anniversary of the first reported cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS. Dr. Fenton also reflects on the HIV/AIDS epidemic – past, present, and future.

  12. Let's Stop HIV Together PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-16

    This public service announcement features 22 individuals who encourage others in the fight against HIV.  Created: 7/16/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 7/16/2012.

  13. Revisiting the Battle of the Little Big Horn

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burns, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    The Battle of the Little Big Horn has captured the interest of historians, scholars, and military enthusiasts since the day that over 200 United States soldiers under General George Armstrong Custer's...

  14. The Battle of Algiers: A War of Liberation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Margaret

    1971-01-01

    The author describes the film, The Battle of Algiers," and suggests discussion ideas for a classroom analysis: emotional response; labels, e.g., enemy; responsibility; alternatives; justice; warfare and crime. Learning activities and resources are also suggested. (Author/JB)

  15. A Bayesian Decision Model for Battle Damage Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Franzen, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Battle damage assessment (BDA) is critical to success in any air campaign. However, Desert Storm highlighted numerous deficiencies in the BDA process, and operations since Desert Storm continue to point out weaknesses...

  16. John Pope - Failure at Second Battle of Bull Run

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morio, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Was the failure of the Army of Virginia at the Second Battle of Bull Run a result of General John Pope being a failure as a leader or were there other circumstances that helped him in his loss? Conclusion...

  17. The Battle for Okinawa: A Direct Approach for Direct Defeat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robling, Terry

    1995-01-01

    Throughout the fall of 1944 and early spring of 1945, the Japanese defenders of Okinawa prepared a defensive battle strategy that resulted in Japanese defeat and the most casualties for both forces...

  18. Battle Management as a Basic Air Force Doctrine Operational Function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rhone, Jon M

    2008-01-01

    According to JP 1-02, Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms, battle management is "The management of activities within the operational environment, based on the commands...

  19. The Effects of Automation on Battle Manager Workload and Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soller, Amy; Morrison, John

    2008-01-01

    ...) can moderate this degradation. The sources for this survey range from studies that describe the basic limits of human memory capacity to those that assess the number of battle managers needed to operate a partially automated missile defense system...

  20. Biomarkers of latent TB infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhwald, Morten; Ravn, Pernille

    2009-01-01

    For the last 100 years, the tuberculin skin test (TST) has been the only diagnostic tool available for latent TB infection (LTBI) and no biomarker per se is available to diagnose the presence of LTBI. With the introduction of M. tuberculosis-specific IFN-gamma release assays (IGRAs), a new area...... of in vitro immunodiagnostic tests for LTBI based on biomarker readout has become a reality. In this review, we discuss existing evidence on the clinical usefulness of IGRAs and the indefinite number of potential new biomarkers that can be used to improve diagnosis of latent TB infection. We also present...... early data suggesting that the monocyte-derived chemokine inducible protein-10 may be useful as a novel biomarker for the immunodiagnosis of latent TB infection....

  1. Expanded polyfunctional T cell response to mycobacterial antigens in TB disease and contraction post-treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Young

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available T cells producing multiple factors have been shown to be required for protection from disease progression in HIV but we have recently shown this not to be the case in TB. Subjects with active disease had a greater proportion of polyfunctional cells responding to ESAT-6/CFP-10 stimulation than their infected but non-diseased household contacts (HHC. We therefore wanted to assess this profile in subjects who had successfully completed standard TB chemotherapy.We performed a cross-sectional study using PBMC from TB cases (pre- and post-treatment and HHC. Samples were stimulated overnight with TB antigens (ESAT-6/CFP-10 and PPD and their CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were assessed for production of CD107a, IFN-gamma, IL-2 and TNF-alpha and the complexity of the responses was determined using SPICE and PESTLE software.We found that an increase in complexity (i.e., production of more than 1 factor simultaneously of the T cell profile was associated with TB disease and that this was significantly reduced following TB treatment. This implies that T cells are able to respond adequately to TB antigens with active disease (at least initially but the ability of this response to protect the host from disease progression is hampered, presumably due to immune evasion strategies by the bacteria. These findings have implications for the development of new diagnostics and vaccine strategies.

  2. Double Standards in Global Health: Medicine, Human Rights Law and Multidrug-Resistant TB Treatment Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Thomas; Admay, Catherine; Shakow, Aaron; Keshavjee, Salmaan

    2016-06-01

    The human rights arguments that underpinned the fight against HIV over the last three decades were poised, but ultimately failed, to provide a similar foundation for success against multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) and other diseases of the poor. With more than 1.5 million deaths since 2000 attributed to strains of MDR-TB, and with half a million new, and mostly untreated, MDR-TB cases in the world each year, the stakes could not be higher. The World Health Organization (WHO), whose mandate is to champion the attainment by all peoples of the highest possible level of health, recommended unsound medical treatment for MDR-TB patients in resource-poor settings from 1993-2002. Citing cost considerations, WHO did not recommend the available standard of care that had been successfully used to contain and defeat MDR-TB in rich countries. By acting as a strategic gatekeeper in its technical advisory role to donor agencies and countries, it also facilitated the global implementation of a double standard for TB care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), upending important legal and scientific priorities. This raises serious questions about whether the organization violated international human rights standards and those established in its own constitution. While calling for additional analysis and discussion on this topic, the authors propose that policymakers should reject double standards of this kind and instead embrace the challenge of implementing the highest standard of care on a global level.

  3. 30 Years of HIV/AIDS

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-02

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, discusses the 30 year anniversary of the first reported cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS. Dr. Fenton also reflects on the HIV/AIDS epidemic – past, present, and future.  Created: 6/2/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 6/2/2011.

  4. Use of anti-retroviral therapy in tuberculosis patients on second-line anti-TB regimens: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Arentz

    Full Text Available Use of antiretroviral therapy (ART during treatment of drug susceptible tuberculosis (TB improves survival. However, data from HIV infected individuals with drug resistant TB are lacking. Second line TB drugs when combined with ART may increase drug interactions and lead to higher rates of toxicity and greater noncompliance. This systematic review sought to determine the benefit of ART in the setting of second line drug therapy for drug resistant TB.We included individual patient data from studies that evaluated treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-1 infected individuals published between January 1980 and December of 2009. We evaluated the effect of ART on treatment outcomes, time to smear and culture conversion, and adverse events.Ten observational studies, including data from 217 subjects, were analyzed. Patients using ART during TB treatment had increased likelihood of cure (hazard ratio (HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.6-7.4 and decreased likelihood of death (HR 0.4, 95% CI 0.3-0.6 during treatment for drug resistant TB. These associations remained significant in patients with a CD4 less than 200 cells/mm(3 and less than 50 cells/mm(3, and when correcting for drug resistance pattern.We identified only observational studies from which individual patient data could be drawn. Limitations in study design, and heterogeneity in a number of the outcomes of interest had the potential to introduce bias.While there are insufficient data to determine if ART use increases adverse drug interactions when used with second line TB drugs, ART use during treatment of drug resistant TB appears to improve cure rates and decrease risk of death. All individuals with HIV appear to benefit from ART use during treatment for TB.

  5. TB in Children in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Regimen for Latent TB Infection-Patient Education Brochure Posters Mantoux Tuberculin Skin Test Wall Chart World TB ... site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple ...

  6. Time series cross-correlation analysis of HIV seropositivity and pulmonary tuberculosis among migrants entering Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Akhtar

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: HIV infection seemed to have played a significant role in the re-activation of latent M. tuberculosis infection in this migrant population. While currently less evident, in near future, however, TB and HIV/AIDS control programmes in the countries of origin of migrants may face a crucial challenge. Knowledge of serious consequences of association between HIV infection and pulmonary TB allows the promotion of public heath education to reduce the exposure to these infections. Future studies may focus on evaluating the impact of public health education programs on this dual burden of HIV infection and pulmonary TB in migrants.

  7. Extensively Drug-Resistant TB

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-12-16

    Dr. Charlotte Kvasnovsky, a surgery resident and Ph.D. candidate in biostatistics, discusses various types of drug resistance in TB patients in South Africa.  Created: 12/16/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/16/2016.

  8. TB in Wild Asian Elephants

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-05-10

    Dr. Susan Mikota, co-founder of Elephant Care International, discusses TB in wild Asian elephants.  Created: 5/10/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/10/2017.

  9. Alarming levels of drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in metropolitan Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaakidis, Petros; Das, Mrinalini; Kumar, Ajay M V; Peskett, Christopher; Khetarpal, Minni; Bamne, Arun; Adsul, Balkrishna; Manglani, Mamta; Sachdeva, Kuldeep Singh; Parmar, Malik; Kanchar, Avinash; Rewari, B B; Deshpande, Alaka; Rodrigues, Camilla; Shetty, Anjali; Rebello, Lorraine; Saranchuk, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a looming threat to tuberculosis control in India. However, no countrywide prevalence data are available. The burden of DR-TB in HIV-co-infected patients is likewise unknown. Undiagnosed and untreated DR-TB among HIV-infected patients is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We aimed to assess the prevalence of DR-TB (defined as resistance to any anti-TB drug) in patients attending public antiretroviral treatment (ART) centers in greater metropolitan Mumbai, India. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among adults and children ART-center attendees. Smear microscopy, culture and drug-susceptibility-testing (DST) against all first and second-line TB-drugs using phenotypic liquid culture (MGIT) were conducted on all presumptive tuberculosis patients. Analyses were performed to determine DR-TB prevalence and resistance patterns separately for new and previously treated, culture-positive TB-cases. Between March 2013 and January 2014, ART-center attendees were screened during 14135 visits, of whom 1724 had presumptive TB. Of 1724 attendees, 72 (4%) were smear-positive and 202 (12%) had a positive culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Overall DR-TB was diagnosed in 68 (34%, 95% CI: 27%-40%) TB-patients. The proportions of DR-TB were 25% (29/114) and 44% (39/88) among new and previously treated cases respectively. The patterns of DR-TB were: 21% mono-resistant, 12% poly-resistant, 38% multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB), 21% pre-extensively-drug-resistant (MDR-TB plus resistance to either a fluoroquinolone or second-line injectable), 6% extensively drug-resistant (XDR-TB) and 2% extremely drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB plus resistance to any group-IV/V drug). Only previous history of TB was significantly associated with the diagnosis of DR-TB in multivariate models. The burden of DR-TB among HIV-infected patients attending public ART-centers in Mumbai was alarmingly high, likely representing ongoing transmission in the community and

  10. Alarming levels of drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in metropolitan Mumbai, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Isaakidis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB is a looming threat to tuberculosis control in India. However, no countrywide prevalence data are available. The burden of DR-TB in HIV-co-infected patients is likewise unknown. Undiagnosed and untreated DR-TB among HIV-infected patients is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We aimed to assess the prevalence of DR-TB (defined as resistance to any anti-TB drug in patients attending public antiretroviral treatment (ART centers in greater metropolitan Mumbai, India. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among adults and children ART-center attendees. Smear microscopy, culture and drug-susceptibility-testing (DST against all first and second-line TB-drugs using phenotypic liquid culture (MGIT were conducted on all presumptive tuberculosis patients. Analyses were performed to determine DR-TB prevalence and resistance patterns separately for new and previously treated, culture-positive TB-cases. RESULTS: Between March 2013 and January 2014, ART-center attendees were screened during 14135 visits, of whom 1724 had presumptive TB. Of 1724 attendees, 72 (4% were smear-positive and 202 (12% had a positive culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Overall DR-TB was diagnosed in 68 (34%, 95% CI: 27%-40% TB-patients. The proportions of DR-TB were 25% (29/114 and 44% (39/88 among new and previously treated cases respectively. The patterns of DR-TB were: 21% mono-resistant, 12% poly-resistant, 38% multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB, 21% pre-extensively-drug-resistant (MDR-TB plus resistance to either a fluoroquinolone or second-line injectable, 6% extensively drug-resistant (XDR-TB and 2% extremely drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB plus resistance to any group-IV/V drug. Only previous history of TB was significantly associated with the diagnosis of DR-TB in multivariate models. CONCLUSION: The burden of DR-TB among HIV-infected patients attending public ART-centers in Mumbai was alarmingly high, likely representing

  11. 17 Smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis among HIV patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conducted in February 2009 to assess the effect of the level of CD4 lymphocyte ... development of smear positive pulmonary TB (PTB) among HIV patients before ..... (2000) Impact of combination antiretroviral therapy on the risk of tuberculosis.

  12. Measurement of 160Tb and 161Tb in nuclear forensics samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, J.; Davies, A.V.; Britton, R.E.

    2017-01-01

    160 Tb and 161 Tb are important radionuclides to measure when analysing a Nuclear Forensics sample. An analytical method for the measurement of both 160 Tb and 161 Tb was developed in this study. Terbium was separated and purified using exchange resin and TrisKem LN Resin. The purified fraction containing 160 Tb and 161 Tb was measured by gamma spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting. The counting efficiencies of 160 Tb and 161 Tb were determined using the CIEMAT/NIST efficiency tracing method. The LSC count rate ratio, R160 Tb /R161 Tb , on the reference date was determined by sequential counting and calculated using a custom script based on their half-lives. (author)

  13. Incidence and determinants of tuberculosis infection among adult patients with HIV attending HIV care in north-east Ethiopia: a retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ausman; Mekonnen, Desalew; Shiferaw, Atsede M; Belayneh, Fanuel

    2018-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) and its predictors among adults living with HIV/AIDS in government health facilities in north-east Ethiopia. Setting A 5-year retrospective cohort study was conducted from May to June 2015 on 451 adult HIV/AIDS-infected individuals who enrolled in the HIV care clinics of government health facilities in north-east Ethiopia. Participants A total of 451 HIV-infected adults who newly enrolled in the adult HIV care clinic from 1 July 2010 with complete information were followed until May 2015. Primary outcome measure The primary outcome was the proportion of patients diagnosed with TB or the TB incidence rate. Secondary outcome measure The incidence of TB was investigated in relation to years of follow-up. Results A total of 451 charts with complete information were followed for 1377.41 person-years (PY) of observation. The overall incidence density of TB was 8.6 per 100 PYof observation. Previous TB disease (adjusted HR (AHR) 3.65, 95% CI 1.97 to 6.73), being bedridden (AHR 5.45, 95% CI 1.16 to 25.49), being underweight (body mass index (BMI) bedridden condition were the determinants of the incidence of TB. Therefore, addressing the significant predictors and improving TB/HIV collaborative activities should be strengthened in the study setting. PMID:29437750

  14. Cellular Architecture of Spinal Granulomas and the Immunological Response in Tuberculosis Patients Coinfected with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debapriya; Danaviah, Siva; Muema, Daniel M; Akilimali, Ngomu Akeem; Moodley, Prashini; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Das, Gobardhan

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( M.tb ) and HIV are individually responsible for the most deaths worldwide among all infectious agents, and coinfection with M.tb and HIV is a significant public health challenge in the developing world. Although the lung is the primary target organ for tuberculosis (TB), M.tb can also cause extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) such as in the bones and joints. Treatment of EPTB is much more challenging than treatment of pulmonary TB. The hallmark of the host immune response against TB is the formation of organized structures called granulomas that are infiltrated with immune cells and are rich in cytokines and chemokines. Inside granulomas, the host confines the M.tb bacteria to a particular region of the organ and avoids dispersion. In this study, we analyzed immune cells in bone granulomas of patients with EPTB that are also coinfected with HIV. We found that HIV-infected TB patients have dispersed bone granulomas, with reduced T cell numbers and a concomitant increase in plasma cells. Additionally, HIV-infected patients exhibited dramatically increased serum levels of IgM and IgG1 antibodies, which is indicative of T-cell-independent B-cell activation and mucosal T-cell activation, respectively. Interestingly, we also observed that CD29 + stem cells are increased in HIV-TB coinfection, suggesting a link with HIV infection. Therefore, our work provides new insights into the architecture of spinal TB granulomas and the role of B-cells and humoral immunity against a highly infectious intracellular pathogen. We propose that our findings will inform biomarker identification for EPTB and possibly the development of related therapeutics and/or vaccines to protect HIV-infected patients against disseminated TB.

  15. Heightened vulnerability to MDR-TB epidemics after controlling drug-susceptible TB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D Bishai

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Prior infection with one strain TB has been linked with diminished likelihood of re-infection by a new strain. This paper attempts to determine the role of declining prevalence of drug-susceptible TB in enabling future epidemics of MDR-TB.A computer simulation of MDR-TB epidemics was developed using an agent-based model platform programmed in NetLogo (See http://mdr.tbtools.org/. Eighty-one scenarios were created, varying levels of treatment quality, diagnostic accuracy, microbial fitness cost, and the degree of immunogenicity elicited by drug-susceptible TB. Outcome measures were the number of independent MDR-TB cases per trial and the proportion of trials resulting in MDR-TB epidemics for a 500 year period after drug therapy for TB is introduced.MDR-TB epidemics propagated more extensively after TB prevalence had fallen. At a case detection rate of 75%, improving therapeutic compliance from 50% to 75% can reduce the probability of an epidemic from 45% to 15%. Paradoxically, improving the case-detection rate from 50% to 75% when compliance with DOT is constant at 75% increases the probability of MDR-TB epidemics from 3% to 45%.The ability of MDR-TB to spread depends on the prevalence of drug-susceptible TB. Immunologic protection conferred by exposure to drug-susceptible TB can be a crucial factor that prevents MDR-TB epidemics when TB treatment is poor. Any single population that successfully reduces its burden of drug-susceptible TB will have reduced herd immunity to externally or internally introduced strains of MDR-TB and can experience heightened vulnerability to an epidemic. Since countries with good TB control may be more vulnerable, their self interest dictates greater promotion of case detection and DOTS implementation in countries with poor control to control their risk of MDR-TB.

  16. Drug-resistant tuberculosis among HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy in Durban, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey K Hom

    Full Text Available To estimate the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB and describe the resistance patterns in patients commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART in an HIV clinic in Durban, South Africa.Cross-sectional cohort study.Consecutive HIV-infected adults (≥ 18y/o initiating HIV care were enrolled from May 2007-May 2008, regardless of signs or symptoms of active TB. Prior TB history and current TB treatment status were self-reported. Subjects expectorated sputum for culture (MGIT liquid and 7H11 solid medium. Positive cultures were tested for susceptibility to first- and second-line anti-tuberculous drugs. The prevalence of drug-resistant TB, stratified by prior TB history and current TB treatment status, was assessed.1,035 subjects had complete culture results. Median CD4 count was 92/µl (IQR 42-150/µl. 267 subjects (26% reported a prior history of TB and 210 (20% were receiving TB treatment at enrollment; 191 (18% subjects had positive sputum cultures, among whom the estimated prevalence of resistance to any antituberculous drug was 7.4% (95% CI 4.0-12.4. Among those with prior TB, the prevalence of resistance was 15.4% (95% CI 5.9-30.5 compared to 5.2% (95% CI 2.1-8.9 among those with no prior TB. 5.1% (95% CI 2.4-9.5 had rifampin or rifampin plus INH resistance.The prevalence of TB resistance to at least one drug was 7.4% among adults with positive TB cultures initiating ART in Durban, South Africa, with 5.1% having rifampin or rifampin plus INH resistance. Improved tools for diagnosing TB and drug resistance are urgently needed in areas of high HIV/TB prevalence.

  17. Tuberculosis-HIV co-infection: policy and epidemiology in 25 countries in the WHO European region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeff; Olsen, M; Ditiu, L

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to collect and review tuberculosis (TB)-HIV data for Europe and to provide an overview of current health policies addressing co-infection.......The aims of this study were to collect and review tuberculosis (TB)-HIV data for Europe and to provide an overview of current health policies addressing co-infection....

  18. Opening the Door to Zero New HIV Infections in Closed Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Torriente, Anna; Tadion, Alexander; Hsu, Lee-Nah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prisons and other closed settings are high-risk environments for HIV and tuberculosis (TB) transmission. Prisoners often experience overcrowded living conditions and violence?including sexual assault?increasing their vulnerability to HIV and TB. However, high infection rates in prisons affect both prisoners and prison employees. Both groups, in interacting with their families and their communities, represent a potential risk of HIV transmission outside the prison setting. National HI...

  19. Multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV positive patients in Eastern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Post, Frank A; Grint, Daniel; Efsen, Anne Marie Werlinrud

    2014-01-01

    Observational data from Eastern Europe on the management and outcome of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) in HIV positive populations remain sparse in the English-language literature.We compared clinical characteristics and outcomes of 55 patients who were diagnosed with HIV and MDR TB...... in Eastern Europe between 2004 and 2006 to 89 patients whose Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were susceptible to isoniazid and rifampicin.Patients with HIV and MDR TB were young and predominantly male with high rates of intravenous drug use, imprisonment and hepatitis C co-infection. Eighty-four per cent...... of patients with MDR TB had no history of previous TB drug exposure suggesting that the majority of MDR TB resulted from transmission of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis. The use of non-standardized tuberculosis treatment was common, and the use of antiretroviral therapy infrequent. Compared to those...

  20. Kinetics of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test during treatment of patients with sputum smear-positive tuberculosis in relation to initial TST result and severity of disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idh, Jonna; Abate, Ebba; Westman, Anna

    2010-01-01

    . Smear-positive TB patients (n = 71) were recruited at Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia. The TST, QFN, CD4+ cell count and clinical symptoms (TB score) were assessed and followed up during treatment. From baseline to 7 months after treatment, there was a significant decrease in QFN reactivity (93.......8% to 62.5% in HIV-negative/TB; 70.3% to 33.3% in HIV-positive/TB patients) down to a level comparable to a control group of blood donors (51.2%). The agreement between TST and QFN was poor in TB patients compared to healthy controls. A negative TST correlated to more advanced TB in contrast to a negative...

  1. Outrunning Asthma: Football Player Rashad Jennings Battled Childhood Asthma with Exercise and Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... us Outrunning Asthma Football player Rashad Jennings battled childhood asthma with exercise and determination Photo: ABC National Football ... Dancing with the Stars” champion Rashad Jennings battled childhood asthma with grit and determination. He has partnered with ...

  2. Multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV positive patients in Eastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Frank A; Grint, Daniel; Werlinrud, Anne Marie; Panteleev, Alexander; Riekstina, Vieja; Malashenkov, Evgeniy A; Skrahina, Alena; Duiculescu, Dan; Podlekareva, Daria; Karpov, Igor; Bondarenko, Vasiliy; Chentsova, Nelly; Lundgren, Jens; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole; Miro, Jose M

    2014-03-01

    Observational data from Eastern Europe on the management and outcome of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) in HIV positive populations remain sparse in the English-language literature. We compared clinical characteristics and outcomes of 55 patients who were diagnosed with HIV and MDR TB in Eastern Europe between 2004 and 2006 to 89 patients whose Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were susceptible to isoniazid and rifampicin. Patients with HIV and MDR TB were young and predominantly male with high rates of intravenous drug use, imprisonment and hepatitis C co-infection. Eighty-four per cent of patients with MDR TB had no history of previous TB drug exposure suggesting that the majority of MDR TB resulted from transmission of drug-resistant M. tuberculosis. The use of non-standardized tuberculosis treatment was common, and the use of antiretroviral therapy infrequent. Compared to those with susceptible tuberculosis, patients with MDR TB were less likely to achieve cure or complete tuberculosis treatment (21.8% vs. 62.9%, p < 0.0001), and they were more likely to die (65.5% vs. 27.0%, p < 0.0001). Our study documents suboptimal management and poor outcomes in HIV positive patients with MDR TB. Implementation of WHO guidelines, rapid TB diagnostics and TB drug susceptibility testing for all patients remain a priority in this region. Copyright © 2013 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investing to end epidemics: the role of the Global Fund to control TB by 2030.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunii, Osamu; Yassin, Mohammed A; Wandwalo, Eliud

    2016-03-01

    The Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria provides over three-quarters of all international financing towards TB programs with US$4.7 billion disbursed, supporting provision of treatment for 13.2 million patients with smear-positive TB and 210 000 patients with multidrug-resistant TB in over 100 countries since 2002. In 2013, the Global Fund launched a new funding model that, among others, is advancing strategic investments to maximize impact, addressing 'missing' TB cases, enhancing a synergistic response to TB/HIV dual epidemics, and building resilient and sustainable systems for health. A new Global Fund Strategy is under development through consultation with various stakeholders, with which the Global Fund will work to play a more catalytic role and foster innovations to end the TB epidemic. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Socio-demographic and AIDS-related factors associated with tuberculosis stigma in southern Thailand: a quantitative, cross-sectional study of stigma among patients with TB and healthy community members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strauss Ronald P

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB remains one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. A comprehensive approach towards disease control that addresses social factors including stigma is now advocated. Patients with TB report fears of isolation and rejection that may lead to delays in seeking care and could affect treatment adherence. Qualitative studies have identified socio-demographic, TB knowledge, and clinical determinants of TB stigma, but only one prior study has quantified these associations using formally developed and validated stigma scales. The purpose of this study was to measure TB stigma and identify factors associated with TB stigma among patients and healthy community members. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in southern Thailand among two different groups of participants: 480 patients with TB and 300 healthy community members. Data were collected on socio-demographic characteristics, TB knowledge, and clinical factors. Scales measuring perceived TB stigma, experienced/felt TB stigma, and perceived AIDS stigma were administered to patients with TB. Community members responded to a community TB stigma and community AIDS stigma scale, which contained the same items as the perceived stigma scales given to patients. Stigma scores could range from zero to 30, 33, or 36 depending on the scale. Three separate multivariable linear regressions were performed among patients with TB (perceived and experience/felt stigma and community members (community stigma to determine which factors were associated with higher mean TB stigma scores. Results Only low level of education, belief that TB increases the chance of getting AIDS, and AIDS stigma were associated with higher TB stigma scores in all three analyses. Co-infection with HIV was associated with higher TB stigma among patients. All differences in mean stigma scores between index and referent levels of each factor were less than two points, except for

  5. Opening the Door to Zero New HIV Infections in Closed Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriente, Anna; Tadion, Alexander; Hsu, Lee-Nah

    2016-06-01

    Prisons and other closed settings are high-risk environments for HIV and tuberculosis (TB) transmission. Prisoners often experience overcrowded living conditions and violence-including sexual assault-increasing their vulnerability to HIV and TB. However, high infection rates in prisons affect both prisoners and prison employees. Both groups, in interacting with their families and their communities, represent a potential risk of HIV transmission outside the prison setting. National HIV and TB strategies should therefore include measures to prevent transmission and increase access to HIV-related services in prisons. Courts have progressively recognized the human rights of prisoners, including the right to health and access to HIV-related services. A number of national and regional court decisions have affirmed that prison authorities have a duty of care to prisoners and an obligation to ensure that prisoners have access to HIV prevention measures and treatment. Policies and programs on HIV, AIDS, and TB for prison workplaces that are aligned with the ILO's international labor standards can benefit both prisoners and prison employees. In particular, the ILO's HIV and AIDS Recommendation, 2010 (No. 200) affirms the principle of universal access to HIV services and provides guidance for the HIV/TB response in prison settings.

  6. Delay in seeking care for tuberculosis symptoms among adults newly diagnosed with HIV in rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwira, L G; Dowdy, D W; Khundi, M; Barnes, G L; Nkhoma, A; Choko, A T; Murowa, M; Chaisson, R E; Corbett, E L; Fielding, K

    2018-03-01

    Ten primary health clinics in rural Thyolo District, Malawi. Tuberculosis (TB) is a common initial presentation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We investigated the time from TB symptom onset to HIV diagnosis to describe TB health-seeking behaviour in adults newly diagnosed with HIV. We asked adults (18 years) about the presence and duration of TB symptoms at the time of receiving a new HIV diagnosis. Associations with delayed health seeking (defined as >30 and >90 days from the onset of TB symptoms) were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. TB symptoms were reported by 416 of 1265 participants (33%), of whom 36% (150/416) had been symptomatic for >30 days before HIV testing. Most participants (260/416, 63%) were below the poverty line (US$0.41 per household member per day). Patients who first sought care from informal providers had an increased odds of delay of >30 days (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.6, 95%CI 0.9-2.8) or 90 days (aOR 2.0, 95%CI 1.1-3.8). Delayed health seeking for TB-related symptoms was common. Poverty was ubiquitous, but had no clear relationship to diagnostic delay. HIV-positive individuals who first sought care from informal providers were more likely to experience diagnostic delays for TB symptoms.

  7. The Battle of Moscow - Turning Point of World War II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V M Falin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the Battle of Moscow in October- December, 1941. Author analyzes the causes of the failure of German army, who tries to encircle and capture Moscow, the events taking place on the outskirts of Moscow, German troops attempts to encircle Moscow. The author presents data on the speech by Adolf Hitler in Berlin on October 5, 1941, in which he acknowledged the failure of the Blitzkrieg and the Battle for Moscow and its suburbs. The researcher uses the documents of the Wehrmacht High Command, which stated that after the Battle of Moscow, German troops could not on any further stage of the war to restore the quality and morale of the armed forces, with whom Reich rushed to a campaign for world domination. The author, a prominent public and political figure of the USSR, also relies on personal recollections, interviews with prominent generals of World War II, including I. Konev.

  8. Index-TB Guidelines: Guidelines on extrapulmonary tuberculosis for India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Ryan, H.; Khaparde, Sunil; Sachdeva, K. S.; Singh, Achintya D.; Mohan, Alladi; Sarin, Rohit; Paramasivan, C N; Kumar, Prahlad; Nischal, Neeraj; Khatiwada, Saurav; Garner, Paul; Tharyan, Prathap

    2017-01-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) is frequently a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is a common opportunistic infection in people living with HIV/AIDS and other immunocompromised states such as diabetes mellitus and malnutrition. There is a paucity of data from clinical trials in EPTB and most of the information regarding diagnosis and management is extrapolated from pulmonary TB. Further, there are no formal national or international guidelines on EPTB. To address these concerns, Indian EPTB guidelines were developed under the auspices of Central TB Division and Directorate of Health Services, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. The objective was to provide guidance on uniform, evidence-informed practices for suspecting, diagnosing and managing EPTB at all levels of healthcare delivery. The guidelines describe agreed principles relevant to 10 key areas of EPTB which are complementary to the existing country standards of TB care and technical operational guidelines for pulmonary TB. These guidelines provide recommendations on three priority areas for EPTB: (i) use of Xpert MTB/RIF in diagnosis, (ii) use of adjunct corticosteroids in treatment, and (iii) duration of treatment. The guidelines were developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria, which were evidence based, and due consideration was given to various healthcare settings across India. Further, for those forms of EPTB in which evidence regarding best practice was lacking, clinical practice points were developed by consensus on accumulated knowledge and experience of specialists who participated in the working groups. This would also reflect the needs of healthcare providers and develop a platform for future research. PMID:28862176

  9. Index-TB guidelines: Guidelines on extrapulmonary tuberculosis for India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra K Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB is frequently a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is a common opportunistic infection in people living with HIV/AIDS and other immunocompromised states such as diabetes mellitus and malnutrition. There is a paucity of data from clinical trials in EPTB and most of the information regarding diagnosis and management is extrapolated from pulmonary TB. Further, there are no formal national or international guidelines on EPTB. To address these concerns, Indian EPTB guidelines were developed under the auspices of Central TB Division and Directorate of Health Services, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. The objective was to provide guidance on uniform, evidence-informed practices for suspecting, diagnosing and managing EPTB at all levels of healthcare delivery. The guidelines describe agreed principles relevant to 10 key areas of EPTB which are complementary to the existing country standards of TB care and technical operational guidelines for pulmonary TB. These guidelines provide recommendations on three priority areas for EPTB: (i use of Xpert MTB/RIF in diagnosis, (ii use of adjunct corticosteroids in treatment, and (iii duration of treatment. The guidelines were developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE criteria, which were evidence based, and due consideration was given to various healthcare settings across India. Further, for those forms of EPTB in which evidence regarding best practice was lacking, clinical practice points were developed by consensus on accumulated knowledge and experience of specialists who participated in the working groups. This would also reflect the needs of healthcare providers and develop a platform for future research.

  10. M. tuberculosis genotypic diversity and drug susceptibility pattern in HIV- infected and non-HIV-infected patients in northern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Soolingen Dick

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB is a major health problem and HIV is the major cause of the increase in TB. Sub-Saharan Africa is endemic for both TB and HIV infection. Determination of the prevalence of M. tuberculosis strains and their drug susceptibility is important for TB control. TB positive culture, BAL fluid or sputum samples from 130 patients were collected and genotyped. The spoligotypes were correlated with anti-tuberculous drug susceptibility in HIV-infected and non-HIV patients from Tanzania. Results One-third of patients were TB/HIV co-infected. Forty-seven spoligotypes were identified. Fourteen isolates (10.8% had new and unique spoligotypes while 116 isolates (89.2% belonged to 33 known spoligotypes. The major spoligotypes contained nine clusters: CAS1-Kili 30.0%, LAM11- ZWE 14.6%, ND 9.2%, EAI 6.2%, Beijing 5.4%, T-undefined 4.6%, CAS1-Delhi 3.8%, T1 3.8% and LAM9 3.8%. Twelve (10.8% of the 111 phenotypically tested strains were resistant to anti-TB drugs. Eight (7.2% were monoresistant strains: 7 to isoniazid (INH and one to streptomycin. Four strains (3.5% were resistant to multiple drugs: one (0.9% was resistant to INH and streptomycin and the other three (2.7% were MDR strains: one was resistant to INH, rifampicin and ethambutol and two were resistant to all four anti-TB drugs. Mutation in the katG gene codon 315 and the rpoB hotspot region showed a low and high sensitivity, respectively, as predictor of phenotypic drug resistance. Conclusion CAS1-Kili and LAM11-ZWE were the most common families. Strains of the Beijing family and CAS1-Kili were not or least often associated with resistance, respectively. HIV status was not associated with spoligotypes, resistance or previous TB treatment.

  11. Douglas Haig and the Battle of the Somme

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    4J "insights into tomorrow" AA A A tDSTRIBUTON STATEMENT A Approved fta public rlow800 Diasibution Unlimited 84 0 , 0 DISCLAIMER The views and...Israeli Wars, p. 348. 16 John Keegan, The Face of Battle (New York: Penguin Books, 1976), p. 303. 5 17. has said this is characteristically the American way...Random House, 1982. Keegan, John. The Face of Battle. New York: Penguin Books, 1976. Mao Tse-tung. On the Protracted War. Peking: Foreign Languages

  12. Fitting Lanchester Equations to the Battles of Kursk and Ardennes

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Thomas W.; Turkes, Turker

    2004-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nav.10101 Lanchester equations and their extensions are widely used to calculate attrition in models of warfare. This paper examines how Lanchester models fit detailed daily data on the battles of Kursk and Ardennes. The data on Kursk, often called the greatest tank battle in history, was only recently made available. A new approach is used to find the optimal parameter values and gain an understanding...

  13. New HIV Testing Algorithm: Promising Tool in the Fight Against HIV

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-09-21

    In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Phil Peters discusses the new HIV testing algorithm and how this latest technology can improve the diagnosis of acute HIV infection. Early detection of HIV is critical to saving lives, getting patients into treatment, and preventing transmission.  Created: 9/21/2016 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP), • Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP).   Date Released: 9/21/2016.

  14. The rise and fall of tuberculosis in Malawi: associations with HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyerere, Henry; Harries, Anthony D; Tayler-Smith, Katie; Jahn, Andreas; Zachariah, Rony; Chimbwandira, Frank M; Mpunga, James

    2016-01-01

    Since 1985, Malawi has experienced a dual epidemic of HIV and tuberculosis (TB) which has been moderated recently by the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART). The aim of this study was to describe the association over several decades between HIV/AIDS, the scale-up of ART and TB case notifications. Aggregate data were extracted from annual reports of the National TB Control Programme, the Ministry of Health HIV Department and the National Statistics Office. ART coverage was calculated using the total HIV population as denominator (derived from UNAIDS Spectrum software). In 1970, there were no HIV-infected persons but numbers had increased to a maximum of 1.18 million by 2014. HIV prevalence reached a maximum of 10.8% in 2000, thereafter decreasing to 7.5% by 2014. Numbers alive on ART increased from 2586 in 2003 to 536 527 (coverage 45.3%) by 2014. In 1985, there were 5286 TB cases which reached a maximum of 28 234 in 2003 and then decreased to 17 723 by 2014 (37% decline from 2003). There were increases in all types of new TB between 1998-2003 which then declined by 30% for extrapulmonary TB, by 37% for new smear-positive PTB and by 50% for smear-negative PTB. Previously treated TB cases reached a maximum of 3443 in 2003 and then declined by 42% by 2014. The rise and fall of TB in Malawi between 1985 and 2014 was strongly associated with HIV infection and ART scale-up; this has implications for ending the TB epidemic in high HIV-TB burden countries. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Risk factors associated with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in a tertiary armed force referral and teaching hospital, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demile, Biresaw; Zenebu, Amare; Shewaye, Haile; Xia, Siqing; Guadie, Awoke

    2018-05-31

    Ethiopia is one of the world health organization defined higher tuberculosis (TB) burden countries where the disease remains a massive public health threat. This study aimed to identify the prevalence and associated factors of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) using all armed force and civilian TB attendants in a tertiary level armed force hospital, where data for MDR-TB are previously unpublished. Cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2014 to August 2015 in a tertiary level Armed Force Referral and Teaching Hospital (AFRTH), Ethiopia. Armed force members (n = 251) and civilians (n = 130) which has been undergone TB diagnosis at AFRTH were included. All the specimens collected were subjected to microscopic smear observation, culture growth and drug susceptibility testing. Data were analyzed using statistical package for social sciences following binary logistic regression and Chi-square. P-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Among 381 TB patients, 355 (93.2%) new and 26 (6.8%) retreatment cases were identified. Culture and smear positive TB cases were identified in 297 (77.9%) and 252 (66.1%) patients, respectively. The overall prevalence of MDR-TB in AFRTH was found 1.8% (1.3% for armed force members and 0.5% for civilian patients) all of which were previously TB treated cases. The entire treatment success rates were 92.6% achieved highest in the armed force (active and pension) than the civilian patients. The failure and dead cases were also found 2.5 and 4.6%, respectively. Using bivariate analysis, category of attendants and TB contact history were strong predictors of MDR-TB in armed force and civilian patients. Moreover, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection also identified a significant (OR = 14.6; 95% CI = 2.3-92.1; p = 0.004) predicting factor for MDR-TB in armed force members. However, sex, age and body mass index were not associated factor for MDR-TB. In AFRTH, lower prevalence of

  16. CD4 cell levels during treatment for tuberculosis (TB in Ethiopian adults and clinical markers associated with CD4 lymphocytopenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sten Skogmar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The clinical correlations and significance of subnormal CD4 levels in HIV-negative patients with TB are unclear. We have determined CD4 cell levels longitudinally during anti-tuberculosis treatment (ATT in patients, with and without HIV co-infection, and their associations with clinical variables. METHOD: Adults diagnosed with TB (maximum duration of ATT for 2 weeks, and with no history of antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV-positive subjects were included consecutively in eight out-patient clinics in Ethiopia. Healthy individuals were recruited for comparison at one of the study health centers. Data on patient characteristics and physical findings were collected by trained nurses following a structured questionnaire at inclusion and on follow-up visits at 2 and 6 months. In parallel, peripheral blood CD4 cell levels were determined. The evolution of CD4 cell levels during ATT was assessed, and the association between clinical characteristics and low CD4 cell levels at baseline was investigated using regression analysis. RESULTS: In total, 1116 TB patients were included (307 HIV-infected. Among 809 HIV-negative patients, 200 (25% had subnormal CD4 cell counts (<500 cells/mm(3, with <350 cells/mm(3 in 82 (10% individuals. CD4 cell levels increased significantly during the course of ATT in both HIV+ and HIV- TB-patients, but did not reach the levels in healthy subjects (median 896 cells/mm(3. Sputum smear status, signs of wasting (low mid upper arm circumference (MUAC, and bedridden state were significantly associated with low CD4 cell counts. CONCLUSION: A high proportion of Ethiopian TB patients have subnormal CD4 cell counts before starting treatment. Low CD4 cell levels are associated with smear positive disease and signs of wasting. The continuous increase of CD4 cell counts during the course of ATT suggest a reversible impact of active TB on CD4 cell homeostasis, which may be considered in interpretation of CD4 cell counts in HIV/TB

  17. Tuberculosis, hepatitis C and hepatitis B co-infections in patients with HIV in the Great Tehran Prison, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Farhoudi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a study to evaluate tuberculosis (TB, hepatitis C and hepatitis B co-infections in male patients with HIV in the Great Tehran Prison from October 2013 to May 2014. Among 85 HIV positive patients, five persons (5.9% had TB. Also, 56 new HIV-infected patients were checked for hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis C virus antibody. There were three hepatitis B surface antigen (5.4% and 50 hepatitis C virus antibody (89.3% results. This study suggests that it is necessary to investigate TB, hepatitis C and hepatitis B in HIV positive prisoners in Iran.

  18. Linking private, for-profit providers to public sector services for HIV and tuberculosis co-infected patients: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Mollie; Rutherford, George W.; Weiser, Sheri; Fair, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of infectious disease deaths worldwide and is the leading cause of death among people with HIV. The World Health Organization (WHO) has called for collaboration between public and private healthcare providers to maximize integration of TB/HIV services and minimize costs. We systematically reviewed published models of public-private sector diagnostic and referral services for TB/HIV co-infected patients. Methods We searched PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Google Scholar, Science Direct, CINAHL and Web of Science. We included studies that discussed programs that linked private and public providers for TB/HIV concurrent diagnostic and referral services and used Review Manager (Version 5.3, 2015) for meta-analysis. Results We found 1,218 unduplicated potentially relevant articles and abstracts; three met our eligibility criteria. All three described public-private TB/HIV diagnostic/referral services with varying degrees of integration. In Kenya private practitioners were able to test for both TB and HIV and offer state-subsidized TB medication, but they could not provide state-subsidized antiretroviral therapy (ART) to co-infected patients. In India private practitioners not contractually engaged with the public sector offered TB/HIV services inconsistently and on a subjective basis. Those partnered with the state, however, could test for both TB and HIV and offer state-subsidized medications. In Nigeria some private providers had access to both state-subsidized medications and diagnostic tests; others required patients to pay out-of-pocket for testing and/or treatment. In a meta-analysis of the two quantitative reports, TB patients who sought care in the public sector were almost twice as likely to have been tested for HIV than TB patients who sought care in the private sector (risk ratio [RR] 1.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.88–2.08). However, HIV-infected TB patients who sought care

  19. Linking private, for-profit providers to public sector services for HIV and tuberculosis co-infected patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Mollie; Rutherford, George W; Weiser, Sheri; Fair, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of infectious disease deaths worldwide and is the leading cause of death among people with HIV. The World Health Organization (WHO) has called for collaboration between public and private healthcare providers to maximize integration of TB/HIV services and minimize costs. We systematically reviewed published models of public-private sector diagnostic and referral services for TB/HIV co-infected patients. We searched PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Google Scholar, Science Direct, CINAHL and Web of Science. We included studies that discussed programs that linked private and public providers for TB/HIV concurrent diagnostic and referral services and used Review Manager (Version 5.3, 2015) for meta-analysis. We found 1,218 unduplicated potentially relevant articles and abstracts; three met our eligibility criteria. All three described public-private TB/HIV diagnostic/referral services with varying degrees of integration. In Kenya private practitioners were able to test for both TB and HIV and offer state-subsidized TB medication, but they could not provide state-subsidized antiretroviral therapy (ART) to co-infected patients. In India private practitioners not contractually engaged with the public sector offered TB/HIV services inconsistently and on a subjective basis. Those partnered with the state, however, could test for both TB and HIV and offer state-subsidized medications. In Nigeria some private providers had access to both state-subsidized medications and diagnostic tests; others required patients to pay out-of-pocket for testing and/or treatment. In a meta-analysis of the two quantitative reports, TB patients who sought care in the public sector were almost twice as likely to have been tested for HIV than TB patients who sought care in the private sector (risk ratio [RR] 1.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.88-2.08). However, HIV-infected TB patients who sought care in the public sector were

  20. Clinical Characteristics of Tuberculosis-Associated Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in North Indian Population of HIV/AIDS Patients Receiving HAART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Karmakar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective. IRIS is an important complication that occurs during management of HIV-TB coinfection and it poses difficulty in diagnosis. Previous studies have reported variable incidence of IRIS. The present study was undertaken to describe the pattern of TB-associated IRIS using recently proposed consensus case-definitions for TB-IRIS for its use in resource-limited settings. Methods. A prospective analysis of ART-naïve adults started on HAART from November, 2008 to May, 2010 was done in a tertiary care hospital in north India. A total 224 patients divided into two groups, one with HIV-TB and the other with HIV alone, were followedup for a minimum period of 3 months. The diagnosis of TB was categorised as ‘‘definitive’’ and ‘‘probable’’. Results. Out of a total of 224 patients, 203 completed followup. Paradoxical TB-IRIS occurred in 5 of 123 (4% HIV-TB patients while 6 of 80 (7.5% HIV patients developed ART-associated TB. A reduction in plasma viral load was significantly (P=.016 associated with paradoxical TB-IRIS. No identifiable risk factors were associated with the development of ART-associated TB. Conclusion. The consensus case-definitions are useful tools in the diagnosis of TB-associated IRIS. High index of clinical suspicion is required for an early diagnosis.

  1. Incident Tuberculosis during Antiretroviral Therapy Contributes to Suboptimal Immune Reconstitution in a Large Urban HIV Clinic in Sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Sabine M.; Kiragga, Agnes N.; Schaefer, Petra; Kambugu, Andrew; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) effectively decreases tuberculosis (TB) incidence long-term, but is associated with high TB incidence rates in the first 6 months. We sought to determine the incidence and the long-term effects of TB during ART on HIV treatment outcome, and the risk factors

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of HIV Testing Referral Strategies among Tuberculosis Patients in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhler, Lauren M.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Saxena, Anjali; Losina, Elena; Muniyandi, Malaisamy; Stoler, Adam W.; Lu, Zhigang; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Flanigan, Timothy P.; Bender, Melissa A.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2010-01-01

    Background Indian guidelines recommend routine referral for HIV testing of all tuberculosis (TB) patients in the nine states with the highest HIV prevalence, and selective referral for testing elsewhere. We assessed the clinical impact and cost-effectiveness of alternative HIV testing referral strategies among TB patients in India. Methods and Findings We utilized a computer model of HIV and TB disease to project outcomes for patients with active TB in India. We compared life expectancy, cost, and cost-effectiveness for three HIV testing referral strategies: 1) selective referral for HIV testing of those with increased HIV risk, 2) routine referral of patients in the nine highest HIV prevalence states with selective referral elsewhere (current standard), and 3) routine referral of all patients for HIV testing. TB-related data were from the World Health Organization. HIV prevalence among TB patients was 9.0% in the highest prevalence states, 2.9% in the other states, and 4.9% overall. The selective referral strategy, beginning from age 33.50 years, had a projected discounted life expectancy of 16.88 years and a mean lifetime HIV/TB treatment cost of US$100. The current standard increased mean life expectancy to 16.90 years with additional per-person cost of US$10; the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was US$650/year of life saved (YLS) compared to selective referral. Routine referral of all patients for HIV testing increased life expectancy to 16.91 years, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of US$730/YLS compared to the current standard. For HIV-infected patients cured of TB, receiving antiretroviral therapy increased survival from 4.71 to 13.87 years. Results were most sensitive to the HIV prevalence and the cost of second-line antiretroviral therapy. Conclusions Referral of all patients with active TB in India for HIV testing will be both effective and cost-effective. While effective implementation of this strategy would require investment, routine

  3. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a national referral hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Walls

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: There are no recent data on the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR TB in Cambodia. We aim to describe TB drug resistance amongst adults with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV co-infection in a national referral hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Design: Between 22 November 2007 and 30 November 2009, clinical specimens from HIV-infected patients suspected of having TB underwent routine microscopy, Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, and drug susceptibility testing. Laboratory and clinical data were collected for patients with positive M. tuberculosis cultures. Results: M. tuberculosis was cultured from 236 HIV-infected patients. Resistance to any first-line TB drug occurred in 34.7% of patients; 8.1% had multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB. The proportion of MDR TB amongst new patients and previously treated patients was 3.7 and 28.9%, respectively (p<0.001. The diagnosis of MDR TB was made after death in 15.8% of patients; in total 26.3% of patients with MDR TB died. The diagnosis of TB was established by culture of extra-pulmonary specimens in 23.6% of cases. Conclusions: There is significant resistance to first-line TB drugs amongst new and previously treated TB–HIV co-infected patients in Phnom Penh. These data suggest that the prevalence of DR TB in Cambodia may be higher than previously recognised, particularly amongst HIV-infected patients. Additional prevalence studies are needed. This study also illustrates the feasibility and utility of analysis of non-respiratory specimens in the diagnosis of TB, even in low-resource settings, and suggests that extra-pulmonary specimens should be included in TB diagnostic algorithms.

  4. HIV and tuberculosis: Partners in crime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maniar Janak

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis is the commonest infection detected in HIV-infected individuals worldwide. Aim: The aim of this study is to describe the clinical, bacteriologic and radiological spectrum of tuberculosis (TB in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in a tertiary care centre in Mumbai. Methods: A total of 8640 HIV-infected individuals were screened for tuberculosis routinely from January 1998 to December 2003, using clinical examination, chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasonography, sputum smears for acid-fast bacilli (AFB and culture on Lowenstein-Jensen medium. Results: TB was detected in 8078 (93.5% patients of whom 3393 (42% had pulmonary, 3514 (43.5% had extrapulmonary TB and 1171 (14.5% had disseminated disease. One thousand two hundred thirty eight patients (36.5% showed AFB in sputum, while 1154 (34% showed growth on culture medium and 4174 had radiographic involvement. In 781 (67% individuals disseminated disease coexisted with pulmonary involvement. All 8078 coinfected patients were treated with anti-TB therapy (ATT, of whom 6422 patients (79.5% showed one or more adverse events. Gastritis was the commonest complaint followed by hepatitis and skin rashes. ATT resistance was detected in 482 individuals. Conclusion: Tuberculosis is the commonest opportunistic infection (OI in HIV positive patients in India, showing a higher prevalence of extrapulmonary and disseminated TB and adverse events due to ATT. Early recognition of concurrent OIs and their adequate treatment and prophylaxis is essential.

  5. Why healthcare workers are sick of TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne von Delft

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dr Thato Mosidi never expected to be diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB, despite widely prevalent exposure and very limited infection control measures. The life-threatening diagnosis of primary extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB came as an even greater shock. The inconvenient truth is that, rather than being protected, Dr Mosidi and thousands of her healthcare colleagues are at an increased risk of TB and especially drug-resistant TB. In this viewpoint paper we debunk the widely held false belief that healthcare workers are somehow immune to TB disease (TB-proof and explore some of the key factors contributing to the pervasive stigmatization and subsequent non-disclosure of occupational TB. Our front-line workers are some of the first to suffer the consequences of a progressively more resistant and fatal TB epidemic, and urgent interventions are needed to ensure the safety and continued availability of these precious healthcare resources. These include the rapid development and scale-up of improved diagnostic and treatment options, strengthened infection control measures, and focused interventions to tackle stigma and discrimination in all its forms. We call our colleagues to action to protect themselves and those they care for.

  6. Limitations of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test in detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in immunocompromised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, M.; Mortensen, K.L.; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2008-01-01

    Four cases are presented, immunosuppressed by at least three different mechanisms: one HIV-positive patient with a CD4 count of 0.29 x 10(6)/ml, one malnourished patient, and two kidney-transplanted patients. All patients had a negative interferon (IFN)-gamma test for suspected tuberculosis (TB),...

  7. Limitations of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test in detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in immunocompromised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mads; Mortensen, Klaus Leth; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2008-01-01

    Four cases are presented, immunosuppressed by at least three different mechanisms: one HIV-positive patient with a CD4 count of 0.29 x 10(6)/ml, one malnourished patient, and two kidney-transplanted patients. All patients had a negative interferon (IFN)-gamma test for suspected tuberculosis (TB...

  8. Promising therapy of XDR-TB/MDR-TB with thioridazine an inhibitor of bacterial efflux pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amaral, L; Martins, M; Viveiros, M

    2008-01-01

    -TB) - a M. tuberculosis organism that is resistant to the most effective second line drugs available for the treatment of TB. This review provides detailed, significant evidence that supports the use of an old neuroleptic compound, thioridazine (TZ), for the management of MDR-TB and XDR-TB infections...... therapy predictably ineffective and death is inevitable, compassionate therapy with TZ should be contemplated. The risks are small and the rewards great....

  9. Battle Management Language: Proof of Principle and Future Developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus, N. M.de; Krom, P.P.J. de; Schade, U.; Pullen, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The NATO Modeling and Simulation Group Technical Activity 048 (MSG-048) was chartered in 2006 to investigate the potential of a Coalition Battle Management Language (C-BML) for Multinational and NATO interoperation of command and control systems with Modeling and Simulation. At its May, 2007

  10. Enacting Informal Science Learning: Exploring the Battle for Informal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Informal Science Learning (ISL) is a policy narrative of interest in the United Kingdom and abroad. This paper explores how a group of English secondary school science teachers, enacted ISL science clubs through employing the Periodic Table of Videos. It examines how these teachers "battled" to enact ISL policy in performative conditions…

  11. The Gunboat ‘Delgado Pareho’: Creation and Battle Path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Anca Alamillo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available On the base of official data and archives, the battle path of the Spanish 3 class gunboat ‘Delgado Pareho’, previously ‘Dart’ yacht purchased in the USA in 1895, was restored. The shows the influence of the gunboat during the Spanish-American War.

  12. True Stories of Censorship Battles in America's Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Valerie, Ed.; Barco, Kathy, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual freedom is a core value of librarianship, but fighting to keep controversial materials on the shelves can sometimes feel like a lonely battle. And not all censorship controversies involve the public objecting to a book in the collection--libraries are venues for displays and meetings, and sometimes library staff themselves are tempted…

  13. Dictatorship of Virtue: Multiculturalism and the Battle for America's Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Richard

    This book addresses the issue of multicultural education and the political battles waged over it in U.S. schools. The volume examines the perspectives of both advocates and critics and applauds the true meaning of multiculturalism equality of opportunity and social justice. The fear is there is pulling away from certain cultural norms…

  14. CASE STUDY: China — Young researchers battle poverty and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-14

    Dec 14, 2010 ... CASE STUDY: China — Young researchers battle poverty and bureaucracy in rural China ... And the “three pig rule” is just one example of the problems the local people ... Revenues were applied to system maintenance and all financial ... The researchers, of course, were trained in science, fieldwork, and ...

  15. Virtual Close Quarter Battle (CQB) Graphical Decision Trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    leave a gap in what would traditionally be thought of as an ideal locomotion device. Research has shown that the introduction of vestibular cues in...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS VIRTUAL CLOSE QUARTER BATTLE (CQB) GRAPHICAL DECISION TRAINER by Jordan Reece...including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson

  16. Automotive IC reliability: Elements of the battle towards zero defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuper, F.G.

    2008-01-01

    The battle towards zero defects consists of fast response to PPM signals, prevention of incidents and continuous improvement. In this paper elements of all three branches are treated. A PPM analysis tool called quality crawl charts is introduced that enables prediction of customer complaint levels

  17. The Battle Command Sustainment Support System: Initial Analysis Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    products including jet fuels, distillate fuels, residual fuels, automotive gasoline , specified bulk lubricating oils, aircraft engine oils, fuel...contained within this report. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Mission command Software Tactical applications (TacApps) Command post ...computing environment (CPCE) Command post client Battle command sustainment support System (BCS3) Logistics

  18. One-year mortality of HIV-positive patients treated for rifampicin- and isoniazid-susceptible tuberculosis in Eastern Europe, Western Europe, and Latin America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, DN; Schultze, A; Panteleev, A

    2017-01-01

    in Western Europe or Latin America. METHODS: One-year mortality of HIV-positive patients with rifampicin/isoniazid-susceptible TB in Eastern Europe, Western Europe, and Latin America was analysed and compared in a prospective observational cohort study. Factors associated with death were analysed using Cox......OBJECTIVES: The high mortality among HIV/tuberculosis (TB) coinfected patients in Eastern Europe is partly explained by the high prevalence of drug-resistant TB. It remains unclear whether outcomes of HIV/TB patients with rifampicin/isoniazid-susceptible TB in Eastern Europe differ from those...... cell count. These results call for improvement of care for TB/HIV patients in Eastern Europe....

  19. Is systematic screening and treatment for latent tuberculosis infection in HIV patients useful in a low endemic setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniewski, Ula; Payen, Marie-Christine; Delforge, Marc; De Wit, Stephane

    2017-08-01

    A decreasing incidence of tuberculosis (TB) among HIV patients has been documented in high-income settings and screening for tuberculosis is not systematically performed in many clinics (such as ours). Our objectives are to evaluate whether a same decline of incidence was seen in our Belgian tertiary center and to evaluate whether systematic screening and prophylaxis of tuberculosis should remain part of routine practice. Between 2005 and 2012, the annual incidence of tuberculosis among adult HIV patients was measured. The impact of demographic characteristics and CD 4 nadir on the incidence of active TB was evaluated. Among the 1167 patients who entered the cohort, 42 developed active TB with a significant decrease of annual incidence from 28/1000 patient-years in 2005 to 3/1000 patient-years in 2012. Among the 42 cases, 83% were of sub-Saharan origin. Median CD4 cell count upon HIV diagnosis was significantly lower in TB cases and 60% had a nadir CD4 below 200/μl. Thirty-six percent of incident TB occurred within 14 days after HIV diagnosis. A significant decline of TB incidence in HIV patients was observed. Incident TB occurred mainly in African patients, with low CD4 upon HIV diagnosis. A significant proportion of TB cases were discovered early in follow-up which probably reflects TB already present upon HIV diagnosis. In a low endemic setting, exclusion of active TB upon HIV diagnosis remains a priority and screening for LTBI should focus on HIV patients from high risk groups such as migrants from endemic regions, especially in patients with low CD4 nadir.

  20. Lymphocyte proliferation to mycobacterial antigens is detectable across a spectrum of HIV-associated tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakari Muhammad

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying novel TB diagnostics is a major public health priority. We explored the diagnostic characteristics of antimycobacterial lymphocyte proliferation assays (LPA in HIV-infected subjects with latent or active TB. Methods HIV-infected subjects with bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG scars and CD4 counts ≥ 200 cells/mm3 entering a TB booster vaccine trial in Tanzania had baseline in vivo and in vitro immune tests performed: tuberculin skin tests (TST, LPA and five day assays of interferon gamma (IFN-γ release. Assay antigens were early secreted antigenic target 6 (ESAT-6, antigen 85 (Ag85, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole cell lysate (WCL. Subjects were screened for active TB at enrollment by history, exam, sputum smear and culture. We compared antimycobacterial immune responses between subjects with and without latent or active TB at enrollment. Results Among 1885 subjects screened, 635 had latent TB and 13 had active TB. Subjects with latent TB were more likely than subjects without TB to have LPA responses to ESAT-6 (13.2% vs. 5.5%, P Conclusion Lymphoproliferative responses to mycobacteria are detectable during HIV-associated active TB, and are less sensitive but more specific than TST. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00052195.

  1. Markers to differentiate between Kaposi's sarcoma and tuberculous pleural effusions in HIV-positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M; Finney, L J; Komrower, D; Chitani, A; Bates, J; Chipungu, G A; Corbett, E; Allain, T J

    2015-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and tuberculosis (TB) commonly cause pleural effusions in high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) burden resource-limited countries. Differentiating between them is challenging, as pleural biopsy and TB culture are rarely available. To identify markers to differentiate between TB effusions and KS effusions in HIV-positive patients, and to compare liquid culture and Xpert MTB/RIF in pleural fluid. Fifty HIV-positive patients with pleural effusions recruited in Malawi underwent pleural ultrasound and aspiration. Fluid visual inspection, cell count, bacterial culture, glucose/protein, solid and liquid TB culture and Xpert were performed. The mean age of the patients was 32 years; 30/50 (60%) were male and 29 (58%) had cutaneous/oral KS. Thirteen (26%) pleural fluid samples were liquid culture-positive for TB, while 9/13 (69%) were Xpert-positive. Three (10.3%) KS patients had culture-positive TB effusions; 17 (58.6%) had KS effusions. The relative risk of TB in KS patients increased with limited KS, loculated fluid and low glucose. Eleven (52.3%) non-KS patients had culture-positive TB effusions associated with male sex, straw-coloured fluid and fibrin stranding on ultrasound. KS patients were most likely to have KS effusion, but TB should be considered. Most non-KS patients had TB, supporting the use of World Health Organization guidelines. Xpert identified two thirds of liquid culture-positive results.

  2. [Active tuberculosis in a cohort of HIV-infected inmates in a prison in Mexico City: clinical and epidemiological characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-León, Christian; Badial-Hernández, Florentino; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Sierra-Madero, Juan G; Martínez-Gamboa, Areli; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio; González-Aguirre, Adrián; Guerrero-Almeida, María de Lourdes; del Valle, J Miriam Bobadilla; González-Rodríguez, Andrea; Sifuentes-Osornio, José

    2012-01-01

    To determine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of prison inmates with active tuberculosis in HIV-positive prison populations. We conducted a cohort study in HIV-infected subjects in a prison in Mexico City, with the aim of determining clinical and epidemiological characteristics of cases with active TB. We detected 172 HIV infected inmates and TB in 28 of them (16.3%) - 21 (12.2) with pulmonary TB--with an incidence rate of 7.7/100 persons/year for active TB and 4.7/100 persons/year for pulmonary TB. No drug resistance was found. Two clusters (4 and 2 subjects) were observed after RFLP-typing of 18 isolates, with a transmission rate of 11% by molecular and clinical analysis. The prevalence of active TB was found to be a thousand times greater than in the general population. Evidence of transmission inside the prison was also found.

  3. Changes in Serum Proteins and Creatinine levels in HIV Infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the level of total serum proteins and globulins in HIV infected Nigerians. 64 patients with HIV infection and 10 apparently healthy subjects were recruited from 3 hospitals in Lagos Metropolis. They were examined for the presence of TB and malaria. Serum total protein, albumin and creatinine levels ...

  4. HIV-seroprevalence among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intensification of the screening of HIV infection in the general population and early management of HIV disease, especially in young women, could reduce the incidence of TB. Keywords: co-infection, epidemiology, health management, quantitative research, screening, sub-Saharan Africa African Journal of AIDS Research ...

  5. Building the Capacity of the HIV Prevention Workforce

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-07-29

    This podcast provides an overview of CDC's HIV prevention capacity building efforts with community-based organizations and health departments.  Created: 7/29/2010 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.   Date Released: 7/29/2010.

  6. Advances in the Diagnosis, Treatment and Control of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) research findings in recent times. The potential impact of these findings on routine care has informed this review which aims at discussing current concepts and practices underpinning TB/HIV care and control. Any HIV infected person with a ...

  7. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR TB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TB Reference Laboratory Network, the National TB Surveillance System in the United States, the national reference laboratory of South Korea, and ... capacity in the U.S. and abroad; and Developing education, risk, and media communications ... – United States, 1993–2006 CDC. CDC’s Role in Preventing XDR ...

  8. Understanding social context on TB cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyanto, Y.; Wati, D. M.

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) nowadays still becomes one of the world’s deadliest communicable disease. More than half were in South-East Asia and Western Pacific Regions, including Indonesia. As developing country, Indonesia remains classic problems in overcoming TB, that is discontinuation on treatment. Most of discontinuation on treatment among TB patients are affected by diagnostic delay that caused by patient delay. These phenomena occur in many areas, rural to suburb, coastal to plantation, and so on, and they are related with social context among community that could be social capital for each community to deal with TB. Jember as one of county in East Java is known as plantation area. It also has a high prevalence of TB. This study focused on understanding about social context among community, especially on plantation area. This cross-sectional study involved in three districts of Jember, those are Tanggul, Pakusari, and Kalisat. The data were obtained directly from the TB patients, local community, and Primary Health Care (PHC) where the patients recorded. Spatial analysis and social network analysis (SNA) were applied to obtain health seeking behavior pattern among the TB patients coincide the community. Most of TB patients had already chosen health professionals to lead the treatment, although some of them remained to choose self-medication. Meanwhile, SNA showed that religious leader was considered as main part of countermeasures of TB. But they didn’t ever become central figures. So it can be concluded that there are other parts among community who can contribute due to combatting on TB.

  9. Detection of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific DNA by droplet digital PCR for vaccine evaluation in challenged monkeys and TB diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Neng; Tan, Yang; Zhang, Lingyun; Luo, Wei; Guan, Qing; Yan, Ming-Zhe; Zuo, Ruiqi; Liu, Weixiang; Luo, Feng-Ling; Zhang, Xiao-Lian

    2018-04-24

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) is emerging as a more serious pathogen due to the increased multidrug-resistant TB and co-infection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The development of an effective and sensitive detection method is urgently needed for bacterial load evaluation in vaccine development, early TB diagnosis, and TB treatment. Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a newly developed sensitive PCR method for the absolute quantification of nucleic acid concentrations. Here, we used ddPCR to quantify the circulating virulent M. tb-specific CFP10 (10-kDa culture filtrate protein, Rv3874) and Rv1768 DNA copy numbers in the blood samples from Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-vaccinated and/or virulent M. tb H37Rv-challenged rhesus monkeys. We found that ddPCR was more sensitive compared to real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (qPCR), as the detection limits of CFP10 were 1.2 copies/μl for ddPCR, but 15.8 copies/μl for qPCR. We demonstrated that ddPCR could detect CFP10 and Rv1768 DNA after 3 weeks of infection and at least two weeks earlier than qPCR in M.tb H37Rv-challenged rhesus monkey models. DdPCR could also successfully quantify CFP10 and Rv1768 DNA copy numbers in clinical TB patients' blood samples (active pulmonary TB, extrapulmonary TB (EPTB), and infant TB). To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that ddPCR is an effective and sensitive method of measuring the circulating CFP10 and Rv1768 DNA for vaccine development, bacterial load evaluation in vivo, and early TB (including EPTB and infant TB) diagnosis as well.

  10. Copy number variation of Fc gamma receptor genes in HIV-infected and HIV-tuberculosis co-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee R Machado

    Full Text Available AIDS, caused by the retrovirus HIV, remains the largest cause of morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa yet almost all genetic studies have focused on cohorts from Western countries. HIV shows high co-morbidity with tuberculosis (TB, as HIV stimulates the reactivation of latent tuberculosis (TB. Recent clinical trials suggest that an effective anti-HIV response correlates with non-neutralising antibodies. Given that Fcγ receptors are critical in mediating the non-neutralising effects of antibodies, analysis of the extensive variation at Fcγ receptor genes is important. Single nucleotide variation and copy number variation (CNV of Fcγ receptor genes affects the expression profile, activatory/inhibitory balance, and IgG affinity of the Fcγ receptor repertoire of each individual. In this study we investigated whether CNV of FCGR2C, FCGR3A and FCGR3B as well as the HNA1 allotype of FCGR3B is associated with HIV load, response to highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and co-infection with TB. We confirmed an effect of TB-co-infection status on HIV load and response to HAART, but no conclusive effect of the genetic variants we tested. We observed a small effect, in Ethiopians, of FCGR3B copy number, where deletion was more frequent in HIV-TB co-infected patients than those infected with HIV alone.

  11. Relevance and acceptability of using the Quantiferon gold test (QGIT) to screen CD4 blood draws for latent TB infection among PLHIV in South Africa: formative qualitative research findings from the TEKO trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, Deanna; Tudor, Carrie; Motlhaoleng, Katlego; Lebina, Limakatso; Qomfu, Cokiswa; Variava, Ebrahim; Chon, Sandy; Martinson, Neil; Golub, Jonathan E

    2018-04-16

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among people living with HIV (PLHIV), despite the availability of effective preventive therapy. The TEKO trial is assessing the impact of using a blood test, Quantiferon-TB Gold In-Tube Test (QGIT), to screen for latent TB compared to the Tuberculin Screening Test (TST) among PLHIV in South Africa. Fifty-six qualitative interviews were conducted with PLHIV and clinical providers participating in the TEKO trial. We explored TB screening, diagnosis, and treatment guidelines and processes and the use of the QGIT to screen for latent TB infection at the time of CD4 blood draw. Thematic content analysis was conducted. Considerable variability in TB screening procedures was documented due to lack of personnel and clarity regarding current national TB guidelines for PLHIV. Few clinics had started using the TST per national guidelines and many patients had never heard of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT). Nearly all participants supported the idea of latent TB screening using routine blood drawn for CD4 counts. Findings indicate that screening for latent TB infection using QGIT from blood drawn for CD4 counts among PLHIV is an acceptable approach to increase latent TB detection given the challenges associated with ensuring systematic latent TB screening in overburdened public clinics. The results presented here were from formative research related to the TEKO trial (Identifier NCT02119130 , registered 10 April 2014).

  12. Epidemiological, clinical, microbiological and therapeutic differences in tuberculosis disease in patients with and without HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sanz, Javier; Lago-Gómez, María Rosa; Rodríguez-Zurita, María Elena; Martín-Echevarría, Esteban; Torralba, Miguel

    2018-04-23

    Our objective is to analyze the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in our population and to compare the characteristics of patients with and without HIV infection. Clinical-epidemiological retrospective cohort study that included patients diagnosed with TB with and without HIV infection between 2005-2016 in the province of Guadalajara (Spain). Epidemiological, clinical, microbiological and therapeutic variables were assessed, including microbiological resistances. TB was diagnosed in 261 patients. There were 25 patients (9.6%) who had HIV infection. Patients with HIV infection were predominantly males, had higher incidence of hepatitis C virus, a higher percentage of extrapulmonary TB, a higher prevalence of resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin, a greater paradoxical response and a longer average hospital stay. On the other hand, they had a lower percentage of positive tuberculin skin test and positive sputum smear (microscopy). A significant percentage of TB patients had no serology for HIV. Patients with HIV infection show remarkable differences in epidemiological, clinical and resistance variables to antituberculosis drugs. A high percentage of patients with TB were not tested for HIV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti-tuberculosis therapy-induced hepatotoxicity among Ethiopian HIV-positive and negative patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getnet Yimer

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available To assess and compare the prevalence, severity and prognosis of anti-TB drug induced hepatotoxicity (DIH in HIV positive and HIV negative tuberculosis (TB patients in Ethiopia.In this study, 103 HIV positive and 94 HIV negative TB patients were enrolled. All patients were evaluated for different risk factors and monitored biochemically and clinically for development of DIH. Sub-clinical hepatotoxicity was observed in 17.3% of the patients and 8 out of the 197 (4.1% developed clinical hepatotoxicity. Seven of the 8 were HIV positive and 2 were positive for HBsAg.Sub-clinical hepatotoxicity was significantly associated with HIV co-infection (p = 0.002, concomitant drug intake (p = 0.008, and decrease in CD4 count (p = 0.001. Stepwise restarting of anti TB treatment was also successful in almost all the patients who developed clinical DIH. We therefore conclude that anti-TB DIH is a major problem in HIV-associated TB with a decline in immune status and that there is a need for a regular biochemical and clinical follow up for those patients who are at risk.

  14. Identification of a 251 gene expression signature that can accurately detect M. tuberculosis in patients with and without HIV co-infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Dawany

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Co-infection with tuberculosis (TB is the leading cause of death in HIV-infected individuals. However, diagnosis of TB, especially in the presence of an HIV co-infection, can be limiting due to the high inaccuracy associated with the use of conventional diagnostic methods. Here we report a gene signature that can identify a tuberculosis infection in patients co-infected with HIV as well as in the absence of HIV. METHODS: We analyzed global gene expression data from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC samples of patients that were either mono-infected with HIV or co-infected with HIV/TB and used support vector machines to identify a gene signature that can distinguish between the two classes. We then validated our results using publically available gene expression data from patients mono-infected with TB. RESULTS: Our analysis successfully identified a 251-gene signature that accurately distinguishes patients co-infected with HIV/TB from those infected with HIV only, with an overall accuracy of 81.4% (sensitivity = 76.2%, specificity = 86.4%. Furthermore, we show that our 251-gene signature can also accurately distinguish patients with active TB in the absence of an HIV infection from both patients with a latent TB infection and healthy controls (88.9-94.7% accuracy; 69.2-90% sensitivity and 90.3-100% specificity. We also demonstrate that the expression levels of the 251-gene signature diminish as a correlate of the length of TB treatment. CONCLUSIONS: A 251-gene signature is described to (a detect TB in the presence or absence of an HIV co-infection, and (b assess response to treatment following anti-TB therapy.

  15. Rational development of radiopharmaceuticals for HIV-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Maldarelli, Frank; Eckelman, William C.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    The global battle against HIV-1 would benefit from a sensitive and specific radiopharmaceutical to localize HIV-infected cells. Ideally, this probe would be able to identify latently infected host cells containing replication competent HIV sequences. Clinical and research applications would include assessment of reservoirs, informing clinical management by facilitating assessment of burden of infection in different compartments, monitoring disease progression and monitoring response to therapy. A “rational” development approach could facilitate efficient identification of an appropriate targeted radiopharmaceutical. Rational development starts with understanding characteristics of the disease that can be effectively targeted and then engineering radiopharmaceuticals to hone in on an appropriate target, which in the case of HIV-1 (HIV) might be an HIV-specific product on or in the host cell, a differentially expressed gene product, an integrated DNA sequence specific enzymatic activity, part of the inflammatory response, or a combination of these. This is different from the current approach that starts with a radiopharmaceutical for a target associated with a disease, mostly from autopsy studies, without a strong rationale for the potential to impact patient care. At present, no targeted therapies are available for HIV latency, although a number of approaches are under study. Here we discuss requirements for a radiopharmaceutical useful in strategies targeting persistently infected cells. The radiopharmaceutical for HIV should be developed based on HIV biology, studied in an animal model and then in humans, and ultimately used in clinical and research settings

  16. Prevalência da infecção pelo HIV em pacientes internados por tuberculose Prevalence of HIV infection in patients hospitalized due to tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUILHERME FREIRE GARCIA

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Verificar a prevalência da co-infecção tuberculose (TBC/HIV e a capacidade da anamnese em detectar a infecção pelo HIV em pacientes internados por TBC. Local: Hospital Eduardo de Menezes, Belo Horizonte, MG, referência para TBC e SIDA. Material e métodos: Todos os pacientes internados com TBC na enfermaria de pneumologia foram avaliados prospectivamente no período de 1/1/1997 até 31/1/1998, com anamnese dirigida para fatores de risco para SIDA, TBC, tratamentos anteriores e abandonos de tratamento para TBC, e verificadas as formas clínicas de TBC. Foram excluídos pacientes com doenças marcadoras de SIDA com exceção da TBC, ou com sorologia anti-HIV realizada anteriormente. Foram realizadas sorologias anti-HIV (ELISA e, quando positivas, confirmadas pelo teste Western-Blot. Os testes do qui-quadrado e de Fisher foram usados para análise estatística. Resultados: Sessenta e cinco pacientes avaliados foram divididos em grupo I (sorologia positiva para HIV, n = 6 e grupo II (sorologia negativa para HIV, n = 59. Não houve diferença significativa entre os dois grupos quanto a fatores de risco para SIDA, TBC, abandonos de tratamento ou tratamentos anteriores para TBC ou formas clínicas de TBC. Conclusões: Devido à alta prevalência da infecção pelo HIV (9,2% no grupo estudado, estes achados reforçam as orientações do Consenso Brasileiro de Tuberculose no sentido de: 1 a anamnese não consegue detectar uma parcela significativa dos pacientes com co-infecção TBC/HIV; e: 2 a solicitação de sorologia anti-HIV deve ser feita de forma rotineira em todos os pacientes com TBC ativa.Objectives: To verify the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB/HIV co-infection and the ability of the clinical history to detect the HIV infection in TB inpatients. Setting: Eduardo de Menezes Hospital, reference for both TB and AIDS. Patients and methods: All patients admitted with TB in a pneumology ward were evaluated prospectively from 1

  17. The burden and treatment of HIV in tuberculosis patients in Papua Province, Indonesia: a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price Ric N

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New diagnoses of tuberculosis (TB present important opportunities to detect and treat HIV. Rates of HIV and TB in Indonesia's easternmost Papua Province exceed national figures, but data on co-infection rates and outcomes are lacking. We aimed to measure TB-HIV co-infection rates, examine longitudinal trends, compare management with World Health Organisation (WHO recommendations, and document progress and outcome. Methods Adults with newly-diagnosed smear-positive pulmonary TB managed at the Timika TB clinic, Papua Province, were offered voluntary counselling and testing for HIV in accordance with Indonesian National Guidelines, using a point-of-care antibody test. Positive tests were confirmed with 2 further rapid tests. Study participants were assessed using clinical, bacteriological, functional and radiological measures and followed up for 6 months. Results Of 162 participants, HIV status was determined in 138 (85.2%, of whom 18 (13.0% were HIV+. Indigenous Papuans were significantly more likely to be HIV+ than Non-Papuans (Odds Ratio [OR] 4.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.38-14.23. HIV prevalence among people with TB was significantly higher than during a 2003-4 survey at the same TB clinic, and substantially higher than the Indonesian national estimate of 3%. Compared with HIV- study participants, those with TB-HIV co-infection had significantly lower exercise tolerance (median difference in 6-minute walk test: 25 m, p = 0.04, haemoglobin (mean difference: 1.3 g/dL, p = 0.002, and likelihood of cavitary disease (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.12-1.01, and increased occurrence of pleural effusion (OR 3.60, 95% CI 1.70-7.58, higher rates of hospitalisation or death (OR 11.80, 95% CI 1.82-76.43, but no difference in the likelihood of successful 6-month treatment outcome. Adherence to WHO guidelines was limited by the absence of integration of TB and HIV services, specifically, with no on-site ART prescriber available. Only six people

  18. Bilateral pleural effusion in a HIV negative patient - TB or not TB?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huson, Michaëla A. M.; Hermanides, Hillegonda S.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Kross, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Pleural tuberculosis is an infrequent cause of respiratory illness in Europe and usually presents unilaterally. We present the case of a young, immunocompetent sailor from the Phillippines, who presented with bilateral pleural fluid caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in the Netherlands.

  19. We Can Stop HIV One Conversation at a Time

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-08-28

    As part of the We Can Stop HIV One Conversation at a Time campaign, this 30 second PSA encourages Hispanics/Latinos to talk openly about HIV and AIDS with their families, friends, partners, and communities.  Created: 8/28/2014 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 8/28/2014.

  20. Prevalence of HIV Infection Among Tuberculosis Patients in Bali, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Muliawan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: During 1998-2007, TB and HIV cases in Bali had shown a significant increase respectively. In general, both of these diseases are chronic diseases that need long term treatment, and together they could worsen the patients’ condition. To prevent the double burden of those patients, we need to know HIV infection prevalence among TB cases in Bali. Method: One thousands of TB cases diagnosed at TB health services unit (UPK at primary health centers (puskesmas and public hospitals in Bali, in September-November 2008, were given information and their blood samples were taken for HIV tests. Samples were chosen proportionally according to the number of TB cases registered in each UPK. Five milliliters of blood sample were taken from each eligible patient by laboratory staff or nurse at the UPK for HIV tests which were conducted at Bali Health Laboratory. HIV test used in this study were the two types of rapid test in accordance with WHO standard. Discussion: Thirty-nine out of 1,000 blood samples were found HIV positive. The highest HIV prevalence among TB cases was in the Buleleng District (11.5% and followed by Denpasar City (5.1%. This prevalence showed a different figure from the HIV/AIDS cases in VCT clinics registered at Bali Provincial Health Agency, where the highest prevalence found in Denpasar, followed by Buleleng and Badung. If we compare, the difference in figure between Badung and Buleleng, might be due to the difference in routes of HIV transmission. In Buleleng, most of the cases (90% were sexually transmitted, while in Badung 48% transmission were through injecting drug users. The IDUs seek health services at private health centers and rarely utilize public/government services such as puskesmas and hospitals. Conclusion: The HIV prevalence among TB patients in Bali was 3.9%. The characteristics of the patients showed that they are mostly male, aged between 31-40 years old, have junior high school-university education

  1. Local knowledge of the link between tuberculosis and HIV-1/AIDS among the Turkana of Lodwar township: implications for tuberculosis and HIV-1/AIDS prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owiti, John Arianda

    2008-01-01

    This article is extracted from a doctoral thesis that was supported by a research grant from the International Development Research Centre of Canada (IDRC)'s Ecosystem Approaches to Human Health Training Award, the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Northern Ireland's Emslie Horniman Scholarship Fund and McGill University, Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research's Humanities and Social Sciences Research Award. This study used a broad theoretical framework encompassing an ecosystem approach to HIV-1/AIDS that partly investigated the nexus between local knowledge of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV-1/AIDS. According to the Turkana of Lodwar township, Kenya, HIV-1/AIDS and TB are largely contagious and are attributed to impersonal and natural causes. In addition, in line with biomedical knowledge, the Turkana's local knowledge emphasises a conceptual link between TB and HIV-1/AIDS. The study also demonstrates that factors of the ecosystem such as kaada, poverty, widow inheritance, migration and other socio-cultural practices play an influential role in the vulnerability of the Turkana to the contraction and transmission of both TB and HIV-1/AIDS. The article posits an integrated approach to the prevention of TB and HIV-1 and to the management of AIDS and TB.

  2. risk factors of active tuberculosis in people living with hiv/aids

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abrham

    2011-07-02

    Jul 2, 2011 ... The objective of this study was to assess distal ... KEYWORDS: Active TB, HIV, risk factors, case control study, Southwest Ethiopia ... and Khat (stimulant plant from Chata Edulis), .... to live in a house made of a cement floor.

  3. PREDNISONE THERAPY SAFETY FOR TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH MIX OF TUBERCULOSIS AND HIV-INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Maksimov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The study of prednisone safety for treatment of TB mixed with HIV-infection has been conducted. Two groups of patients were compared. The first group was consisted of 88 patients who were treated by prednisone and standard tuberculosis therapy, the second group of patients presented by 45 patients received only tuberculosis medicines. It was demonstrated that in case of prednisone using (1st group the number of CD4 limphocytes increased, intoxication symptoms disappeared fast and recovery process accelerated. Increasing of cases with unfavorable course of TB and HIV-infection in patients of first group was not registered in compare with the second group. Thus, using of prednisone therapy to treat TB mixed with HIV-infection was safe, not lead to unfavorable course of TB or HIV-infection. Such kind of treatment especially important for patients with exudative reactions.

  4. Player Skill Decomposition in Multiplayer Online Battle Arenas

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhengxing; Sun, Yizhou; El-nasr, Magy Seif; Nguyen, Truong-Huy D.

    2017-01-01

    Successful analysis of player skills in video games has important impacts on the process of enhancing player experience without undermining their continuous skill development. Moreover, player skill analysis becomes more intriguing in team-based video games because such form of study can help discover useful factors in effective team formation. In this paper, we consider the problem of skill decomposition in MOBA (MultiPlayer Online Battle Arena) games, with the goal to understand what player...

  5. Battle Experience; Solomon Islands Actions Information. Bulletin Number 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    1942-11-01

    IS SECONDARY TO TOR- PEDOES . THE FOUR DESTROYERS IN THE REAR COULD HAVE BEEN MORE EFFECTIVELY EMPLOYED IN THE VAN CONCENTRATED WITH THE OTHER...PROPERLY. THEY SHOULD BE USED OFFENSIVELY. THEIR TOR­ PEDOES ARE THEIR PRIMARY WEAPONS AND SHOULD BE USED PROPERLY AT EVERY OPPORTUNITY. Shortly after...is out in guns #4 and #5 but they still have power and battle lighting. All safety links on the torpedoes failed. Three torpedoes slid out of #1

  6. Operationalizing Air-Sea Battle in the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Joumall 25 \\/ FEATURE Ballard, Harysch, Cole, & Hall Operationalizing Ait’-Sea Battle in the Pacific tribes and nomadic marauders such as the...communications in general, the former focuses on the digital data links between different platforms. The original CSBA operational con- cept touches on this...very capable fourth-generation fighters; and it has fielded layers of upgraded and double- digit surface-to-air missile systems and antiaircraft

  7. The battle for centre stage: Women's football in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engh, Mari Haugaa

    2010-01-01

    From when the first official South African Women's National Football team was established in 1993, Banyana Banyana have been 'making it happen' for women's football in South Africa. National team players have become inspirational icons and role models for thousands of South African women and girl....... Highlighting examples of battles for power and leadership, homophobic attitudes and attempts to feminise the bodies of women footballers, this Focus illustrates the hard fought victories and disappointing losses in the history of South African women's football....

  8. Training health care workers to promote HIV services for patients with tuberculosis in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behets Frieda

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV counseling and testing, HIV prevention and provision of HIV care and support are essential activities to reduce the burden of HIV among patients with TB, and should be integrated into routine TB care. Methods The development of training materials to promote HIV services for TB patients involved the definition of target health care workers (HCWs; identification of required tasks, skills and knowledge; review of international guidelines; and adaptation of existing training materials for voluntary counseling and testing, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and management of opportunistic infections (OIs. Training effectiveness was assessed by means of questionnaires administered pre- and post-training, by correlating post-training results of HCWs with the centre's HIV testing acceptance rates, and through participatory observations at the time of on-site supervisory visits and monthly meetings. Results Pre-training assessment identified gaps in basic knowledge of HIV epidemiology, the link between TB and HIV, interpretation of CD4 counts, prevention and management of OIs, and occupational post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP. Opinions on patients' rights and confidentiality varied. Mean test results increased from 72% pre-training to 87% post-training (p Conclusion Many HCWs did not possess the knowledge or skills necessary to integrate HIV activities into routine care for patients with TB. A participatory approach resulted in training materials that fulfilled local needs.

  9. risk factors of active tuberculosis in people living with hiv/aids in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abrham

    2011-07-02

    Jul 2, 2011 ... R, Lisse I, Samb B et al: Tuberculosis in. Bissau: incidence and risk factors in an urban community in sub-Saharan Africa. Int J. Epidemiol 2004;33(1):163-172. 10. MOH: TB, leprosy and TB/HIV prevention and control program manual. Addis Ababa,. Ethiopia. 2008. 11. Fugnudo Mbeki AG, Kuwala Lube: ...

  10. Deep-vein thrombosis in the era of high HIV and tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participants were predominantly black (79.8%) and female (64.6%), with a median age of 46 (interquartile range (IQR) 38 - 57) years. The prevalences of HIV and TB were 53.0% and 21.2%, respectively. The most common risk factors for thrombosis were TB (17.2%) and malignancies (14.1%). Thrombophilia screening had ...

  11. Antiretroviral Treatment-Associated Tuberculosis in a Prospective Cohort of HIV-Infected Patients Starting ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Worodria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Commencement of antiretroviral treatment (ART in severely immunosuppressed HIV-infected persons is associated with unmasking of subclinical disease. The subset of patients that are diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB disease while on ART have been classified as ART-associated TB. Few studies have reported the incidence of ART-associated TB and unmasking TB-IRIS according to the International Network for the Study of HIV-Associated IRIS (INSHI consensus definition. To determine the incidence and predictors of ART-associated TB, we screened 219 patients commencing ART at the Infectious Diseases Clinic in Kampala, Uganda for TB by symptoms, sputum microscopy, and chest X-rays and followed them for one year. Fourteen (6.4% patients were diagnosed with TB during followup. Eight (3.8% patients had ART-associated TB (incidence rate of 4.3 per 100 person years; of these, three patients fulfilled INSHI criteria for unmasking TB-associated IRIS (incidence rate of 1.6 per 100 person years. A body mass index of less than 18.5 kg/m2 BMI (HR 5.85 95% CI 1.24–27.46, P=.025 and a C-reactive protein greater than 5 mg/L (HR 8.23 95% CI 1.36–38.33, P=.020 were risk factors for ART-associated TB at multivariate analysis. In conclusion, with systematic TB screening (including culture and chest X-ray, the incidence of ART-associated TB is relatively low in settings with high HIV and TB prevalence.

  12. AWARENESS AND SOCIAL STIGMA ASSOCIATED WITH HIV/AIDS AND TUBERCULOSIS AMONG STUDENTS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyanna Susan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and Tuberculosis (TB are two major public health problems that are often seen as co-infections, but are spread via different routes having different treatment strategies and outcomes with one being curable and the other not. However, both these diseases have stigma in common. OBJECTIVES (i To assess the knowledge and social stigma regarding HIV/AIDS. (ii To assess the knowledge and social stigma regarding TB. (iii To study the association between knowledge & social stigma in HIV/AIDS and TB. (ivTo compare the social stigma associated with HIV/AIDS and TB. METHODOLOGY A cross-sectional study was carried out in an urban Arts & Science college situated in Kochi among students aged between 17-24 years. Those students who were not willing to participate and who have/had TB or HIV/AIDS were excluded from the study. A total of 171 students were included in the study by random sampling and a pretested self-administered questionnaire was used.INTRODUCTION Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and Tuberculosis (TB are two major public health problems that are often seen as co-infections, but are spread via different routes having different treatment strategies and outcomes with one being curable and the other not. However, both these diseases have stigma in common. OBJECTIVES (i To assess the knowledge and social stigma regarding HIV/AIDS. (ii To assess the knowledge and social stigma regarding TB. (iii To study the association between knowledge & social stigma in HIV/AIDS and TB. (ivTo compare the social stigma associated with HIV/AIDS and TB. METHODOLOGY A cross-sectional study was carried out in an urban Arts & Science college situated in Kochi among students aged between 17-24 years. Those students who were not willing to participate and who have/had TB or HIV/AIDS were excluded from the study. A total of 171 students were included in the study by random sampling and a pretested self

  13. Digital clubbing in tuberculosis – relationship to HIV infection, extent of disease and hypoalbuminemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smieja Marek

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digital clubbing is a sign of chest disease known since the time of Hippocrates. Its association with tuberculosis (TB has not been well studied, particularly in Africa where TB is common. The prevalence of clubbing in patients with pulmonary TB and its association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, severity of disease, and nutritional status was assessed. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among patients with smear-positive TB recruited consecutively from the medical and TB wards and outpatient clinics at a public hospital in Uganda. The presence of clubbing was assessed by clinical signs and measurement of the ratio of the distal and inter-phalangeal diameters (DPD/IPD of both index fingers. Clubbing was defined as a ratio > 1.0. Chest radiograph, serum albumin and HIV testing were done. Results Two hundred patients (82% HIV-infected participated; 34% had clubbing by clinical criteria whilst 30% had clubbing based on DPD/IPD ratio. Smear grade, extensive or cavitary disease, early versus late HIV disease, and hypoalbuminemia were not associated with clubbing. Clubbing was more common among patients with a lower Karnofsky performance scale score or with prior TB. Conclusion Clubbing occurs in up to one-third of Ugandan patients with pulmonary TB. Clubbing was not associated with stage of HIV infection, extensive disease or hypoalbuminemia.

  14. TUBERCULOSIS/HIV CO-INFECTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    setting of AIDS, accounting for about 26% of AIDS- related deaths ... TB and HIV. HISTORICaL BaCkgROUND .... microscopy, when culture is used as the reference standard. ... cost; field level evaluation showed promising results and this ...

  15. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a national referral hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Genevieve; Bulifon, Sophie; Breysse, Serge; Daneth, Thol; Bonnet, Maryline; Hurtado, Northan; Molfino, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    There are no recent data on the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR TB) in Cambodia. We aim to describe TB drug resistance amongst adults with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection in a national referral hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Between 22 November 2007 and 30 November 2009, clinical specimens from HIV-infected patients suspected of having TB underwent routine microscopy, Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, and drug susceptibility testing. Laboratory and clinical data were collected for patients with positive M. tuberculosis cultures. M. tuberculosis was cultured from 236 HIV-infected patients. Resistance to any first-line TB drug occurred in 34.7% of patients; 8.1% had multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB). The proportion of MDR TB amongst new patients and previously treated patients was 3.7 and 28.9%, respectively (pCambodia may be higher than previously recognised, particularly amongst HIV-infected patients. Additional prevalence studies are needed. This study also illustrates the feasibility and utility of analysis of non-respiratory specimens in the diagnosis of TB, even in low-resource settings, and suggests that extra-pulmonary specimens should be included in TB diagnostic algorithms.

  16. Islam’s First Arrow: The Battle of Badr as a Decisive Battle in Islamic History and Its Significance Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    of the Bible “eye-for-an-eye” mentality may have contributed to the political instability and rampant tribal infighting so common during this period...Khaybar (Betrayal), Battle of Karbala (Noble Sacrifice), Shaytan’s ( Satan ) Handiwork, (Ruse), Seventy-two Virgins (Noble Sacrifice), Mahdi (Deliverance...Publishing: 2004. http://www.intelcenter.com/Badr-al-Riyadh- v1-1. pdf Armstrong, Karen. Muhammad: A Prophet For Our Time. New York: Harper Collins, 2006

  17. Assessing the accessibility of HIV care packages among tuberculosis patients in the Northwest Region, Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel San

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV co-infection is a major source of morbidity and mortality globally. The World Health Organization (WHO has recommended that HIV counselling and testing be offered routinely to TB patients in order to increase access to HIV care packages. We assessed the uptake of provider-initiated testing and counselling (PITC, antiretroviral (ART and co-trimoxazole preventive therapies (CPT among TB patients in the Northwest Region, Cameroon. Methods A retrospective cohort study using TB registers in 4 TB/HIV treatment centres (1 public and 3 faith-based for patients diagnosed with TB between January 2006 and December 2007 to identify predictors of the outcomes; HIV testing/serostatus, ART and CPT enrolment and factors that influenced their enrolment between public and faith-based hospitals. Results A total of 2270 TB patients were registered and offered pre-HIV test counselling; 2150 (94.7% accepted the offer of a test. The rate of acceptance was significantly higher among patients in the public hospital compared to those in the faith-based hospitals (crude OR 1.97; 95% CI 1.33 - 2.92 and (adjusted OR 1.92; 95% CI 1.24 - 2.97. HIV prevalence was 68.5% (1473/2150. Independent predictors of HIV-seropositivity emerged as: females, age groups 15-29, 30-44 and 45-59 years, rural residence, previously treated TB and smear-negative pulmonary TB. ART uptake was 50.3% (614/1220 with 17.2% (253/1473 of missing records. Independent predictors of ART uptake were: previously treated TB and extra pulmonary TB. Finally, CPT uptake was 47.0% (524/1114 with 24% (590/1114 of missing records. Independent predictors of CPT uptake were: faith-based hospitals and female sex. Conclusion PITC services are apparently well integrated into the TB programme as demonstrated by the high testing rate. The main challenges include improving access to ART and CPT among TB patients and proper reporting and monitoring of

  18. A cluster-randomized trial of provider-initiated (opt-out) HIV counseling and testing of tuberculosis patients in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Diana S; Deluca, Andrea N; Kali, Paula; Hausler, Harry; Sheard, Carol; Hoosain, Ebrahim; Chaudhary, Mohammad A; Celentano, David D; Chaisson, Richard E

    2008-06-01

    To determine whether implementation of provider-initiated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) counseling would increase the proportion of tuberculosis (TB) patients who received HIV counseling and testing. Cluster-randomized trial with clinic as the unit of randomization. Twenty, medium-sized primary care TB clinics in the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality, Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. A total of 754 adults (18 years and older) newly registered as TB patients in the 20 study clinics. Implementation of provider-initiated HIV counseling and testing. Percentage of TB patients HIV counseled and tested. SECONDARY: Percentage of patients with HIV test positive, and percentage of those who received cotrimoxazole and who were referred for HIV care. : A total of 754 adults newly registered as TB patients were enrolled. In clinics randomly assigned to implement provider-initiated HIV counseling and testing, 20.7% (73/352) patients were counseled versus 7.7% (31/402) in the control clinics (P = 0.011), and 20.2% (n = 71) versus 6.5% (n = 26) underwent HIV testing (P = 0.009). Of those patients counseled, 97% in the intervention clinics accepted testing versus 79% in control clinics (P = 0.12). The proportion of patients identified as HIV infected in intervention clinics was 8.5% versus 2.5% in control clinics (P = 0.044). Fewer than 40% of patients with a positive HIV test were prescribed cotrimoxazole or referred for HIV care in either study arm. Provider-initiated HIV counseling significantly increased the proportion of adult TB patients who received HIV counseling and testing, but the magnitude of the effect was small. Additional interventions to optimize HIV testing for TB patients urgently need to be evaluated.

  19. The association of TB with HIV infection in Oromia Regional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACIPH_Admin

    Regional National State Health Bureau, Shashemene, P.O.Box 138, Ethiopia, Email address, Abera_bekele@ yahoo.com ... service coverage across the region, using all available ..... burden by chest radiography,M.tuberculosis load and.

  20. Macronutrient supplementation to HIV and TB patients during treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Henrik; Olsen, Mette Frahm; Filteau, Suzanne

    2018-01-01

    In low-income countries, undernutrition and infectious diseases are major health problems. Their coexistence is partly due to poverty being an important determinant of both problems, but also due to the two-way causal interactions between nutritional deciencies and infections, whereby infections ...

  1. Deteriorating liver function in TB and HIV co-treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectively, the patient had gained 4 kg and was slightly jaundiced. He had no hepatomegaly and there were no other clinical findings. The clinician phoned the patient after receiving his 4-week blood test results, and asked him to return for follow- up. His blood test results before and after ART initiation are summarised in.

  2. "The Impact of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Immune Evasion on Protective Immunity: Implications for TB Vaccine Design" - Meeting report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggiano, Cesar; Eichelberg, Katrin; Ramachandra, Lakshmi; Shea, Jaqueline; Ramakrishnan, Lalita; Behar, Samuel; Ernst, Joel D; Porcelli, Steven A; Maeurer, Markus; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2017-06-14

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the major cause of death from infectious diseases around the world, particularly in HIV infected individuals. TB vaccine design and development have been focused on improving Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and evaluating recombinant and viral vector expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins, for boosting BCG-primed immunity, but these approaches have not yet yielded significant improvements over the modest effects of BCG in protecting against infection or disease. On March 7-8, 2016, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) convened a workshop on "The Impact of Mtb Immune Evasion on Protective Immunity: Implications for TB Vaccine Design" with the goal of defining immune mechanisms that could be targeted through novel research approaches, to inform vaccine design and immune therapeutic interventions for prevention of TB. The workshop addressed early infection events, the impact of Mtb evolution on the development and maintenance of an adaptive immune response, and the factors that influence protection against and progression to active disease. Scientific gaps and areas of study to revitalize and accelerate TB vaccine design were discussed and prioritized. These included a comprehensive evaluation of innate and Mtb-specific adaptive immune responses in the lung at different stages of disease; determining the role of B cells and antibodies (Abs) during Mtb infection; development of better assays to measure Mtb burden following exposure, infection, during latency and after treatment, and approaches to improving current animal models to study Mtb immunogenicity, TB disease and transmission. Copyright © 2017.

  3. Surveillance, Evaluation of Programmatic Management of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (PMDT at DR-TB Centre, NITRD, New Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Padda

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: PMDT was launched in 2007 in our country but drug resistant TB remains to be a public health problem. Effective surveillance is the backbone for success of any programme and true stands for PMDT. Aim & Objectives: To identify the strengths and constraints of the surveillance evaluation system. Material & Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in January 2015 at DR-TB Centre of NITRD, New Delhi which caters to a population of 29 lacs. PMDT surveillance system was evaluated using attributes like simplicity, data quality, acceptability, positive predictive value, representativeness and timeliness defined by CDC, USA guidelines. Relevant information was collected using data abstraction form and interview with stakeholders. Data was analysed using EpiInfo 07 version. Results: Nodal officer and District TB officer are responsible for surveillance system activities of PMDT at DR-TB centre and district level, respectively. All the reports (100% were submitted on time and all the districts were reporting to DR-TB centre. 75% of TB-HIV coordinators found reporting formats to be simple but all the quarterly reports were found to be complete. Data quality was not found to be optimal. Conclusion: Private sector needs to be taken on board as they have no to minimal involvement in PMDT. For data quality improvement time to time training of medical officers and health workers should be organized.

  4. Colworth prize lecture 2016: exploiting new biological targets from a whole-cell phenotypic screening campaign for TB drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Patrick Joseph; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2017-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the aetiological agent of tuberculosis (TB) and is the leading bacterial cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. One third of the world's population is infected with TB, and in conjunction with HIV represents a serious problem that urgently needs addressing. TB is a disease of poverty and mostly affects young adults in their productive years, primarily in the developing world. The most recent report from the World Health Organisation states that 8 million new cases of TB were reported and that ~1.5 million people died from TB. The efficacy of treatment is threatened by the emergence of multi-drug and extensively drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. It can be argued that, globally, M. tuberculosis is the single most important infectious agent affecting mankind. Our research aims to establish an academic-industrial partnership with the goal of discovering new drug targets and hit-to-lead new chemical entities for TB drug discovery.

  5. Magnetic properties of ball-milled TbFe2 and TbFe2B

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    1. Introduction. The RFe2 (R = rare earth) Laves phase compounds are known to possess large cubic anisotropy (Clark et al 1972) and highest Curie temperature (TC) of all RT2 compounds. (T = transition metal). RFe2 ... TbFe2 and TbFe2B were prepared by arc melting the high pure elements (Tb and B, 99⋅9% purity; Fe, ...

  6. Host markers in Quantiferon supernatants differentiate active TB from latent TB infection: preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walzl Gerhard

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon gamma release assays, including the QuantiFERON® TB Gold In Tube (QFT have been shown to be accurate in diagnosing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. These assays however, do not discriminate between latent TB infection (LTBI and active TB disease. Methods We recruited twenty-three pulmonary TB patients and 34 household contacts from Cape Town, South Africa and performed the QFT test. To investigate the ability of new host markers to differentiate between LTBI and active TB, levels of 29 biomarkers in QFT supernatants were evaluated using a Luminex multiplex cytokine assay. Results Eight out of 29 biomarkers distinguished active TB from LTBI in a pilot study. Baseline levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L, antigen stimulated levels of EGF, and the background corrected antigen stimulated levels of EGF and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1β were the most informative single markers for differentiation between TB disease and LTBI, with AUCs of 0.88, 0.84, 0.87, 0.90 and 0.79 respectively. The combination of EGF and MIP-1β predicted 96% of active TB cases and 92% of LTBIs. Combinations between EGF, sCD40L, VEGF, TGF-α and IL-1α also showed potential to differentiate between TB infection states. EGF, VEGF, TGF-α and sCD40L levels were higher in TB patients. Conclusion These preliminary data suggest that active TB may be accurately differentiated from LTBI utilizing adaptations of the commercial QFT test that includes measurement of EGF, sCD40L, MIP-1β, VEGF, TGF-α or IL-1α in supernatants from QFT assays. This approach holds promise for development as a rapid diagnostic test for active TB.

  7. Tuberculosis in HIV-infected Tanzanian children below 14 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njau, J C; Aboud, S

    2010-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB)-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection is an important public health problem. Diagnosis of TB in children usually follows discovery of an adult case, and relies on clinical presentation, sputum examination and chest radiograph. However, clinical features are non-specific, chest radiographs are difficult to interpret, and routine laboratory tests are not helpful. The aim of the current study was to determine the prevalence of TB in HIV-infected children below 14 years attending a tertiary hospital. A cross-sectional study was conducted in HIV-infected children below 14 years of age at Muhimbili National Hospital, in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, between July 2008 and January 2009. Information on socio-demographic and anthropometric characteristics was collected using a structured questionnaire. Following assessment of clinical presentation, physical examination, tuberculin skin test, and chest radiograph were performed for each child. Two consecutive sputum specimens and blopd sample were collected for microscopy and culture, and CD4 T-lymphocyte percentage test, respectively. Chi-square test was used to compare differences in proportions. Odds ratio (OR) and their 95% confidence interval (CI) are presented as the risk estimator. Of 182 HIV-infected children enrolled in the study, 104 (57.1%) were males. Overall, thirty-seven (20.3%) children had TB. The prevalence of TB was highest in males (78.4%) compared to females (p = 0.003). There was a higher proportion of TB (45.9%) in the age group below 24 months compared to other age groups (p = 0.001). Male gender, history of positive TB contact and severe immunosuppression were found to be significant risk factors for TB while use of antiretroviral therapy was found to be associated with decreased risk for TB. One-fifth of children had TB/HIV co-infection. Presence of four or more clinical manifestations and a low CD4+ T-lymphocyte percentage can be used to predict active TB in HIV

  8. Incidence and predictors of tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults after initiation of antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria, 2004-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishani Pathmanathan

    Full Text Available Nigeria had the most AIDS-related deaths worldwide in 2014 (170,000, and 46% were associated with tuberculosis (TB. Although treatment of people living with HIV (PLHIV with antiretroviral therapy (ART reduces TB-associated morbidity and mortality, incident TB can occur while on ART. We estimated incidence and characterized factors associated with TB after ART initiation in Nigeria.We analyzed retrospective cohort data from a nationally representative sample of adult patients on ART. Data were abstracted from 3,496 patient records, and analyses were weighted and controlled for a complex survey design. We performed domain analyses on patients without documented TB disease and used a Cox proportional hazard model to assess factors associated with TB incidence after ART.At ART initiation, 3,350 patients (95.8% were not receiving TB treatment. TB incidence after ART initiation was 0.57 per 100 person-years, and significantly higher for patients with CD4<50/μL (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 4.2, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-12.7 compared with CD4≥200/μL. Patients with suspected but untreated TB at ART initiation and those with a history of prior TB were more likely to develop incident TB (AHR: 12.2, 95% CI: 4.5-33.5 and AHR: 17.6, 95% CI: 3.5-87.9, respectively.Incidence of TB among PLHIV after ART initiation was low, and predicted by advanced HIV, prior TB, and suspected but untreated TB. Study results suggest a need for improved TB screening and diagnosis, particularly among high-risk PLHIV initiating ART, and reinforce the benefit of early ART and other TB prevention efforts.

  9. Providing an address for delivery of nanoencapsulated TB drugs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lemmer, Yolandy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available compliance and drug resistance pose a great challenge to TB treatment programs worldwide. To improve the current inadequate therapeutic management of TB, a polymeric anti-TB nanodrug delivery system, for anti-TB drugs, was developed that could enable entry...

  10. Urine-Based Nested PCR for the Diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Comparative Study Between HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi Makiani, Mahin; Davoodian, Parivash; Baghershiroodi, Mahnaz; Nejatizadeh, Abdol Azim; Fakkhar, Farideh; Zangeneh, Mehrangiz; Jahangiri, Nadia

    2016-08-01

    While tuberculosis (TB) can be diagnosed by microscopy and culture, the sensitivity of Ziehl-Neelsen staining is variable and culture results require 4 - 8 weeks to be determined. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its modifications, including nested PCR, might be promising methods for the rapid diagnosis of TB. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of nested PCR on urine samples of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and -negative patients with different manifestations of clinical TB. In a prospective study, three early-morning urine samples from 100 patients with pulmonary TB (PTB) or extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) were evaluated using a molecular target with insertion element IS6110, specific to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, and nested PCR was performed. The results were analyzed with SPSS version 22. A total of 100 patients, including 74 (74%) with PTB and 26 (26%) with EPTB, were enrolled. Positive smears were seen in 38 patients (38%). Lymph nodes were the most commonly involved organ in 14 of the 26 (53.8%) EPTB patients (13.5%). Seven (23.1%) of the EPTB patients were HIV-positive. Urine PCR was positive in only 28 patients (28%). Seven HIV-positive patients with PTB showed positive urine PCR results. Moreover, PCR results were positive in only one of the seven HIV-positive subjects with EPTB. Positive PCR results were found in 20 of the 73 HIV-negative patients (27.4%) and in 8 of the 27 HIV-positive patients (29.6%). Therefore, there was no significant difference between the HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients for urine PCR (sensitivity 29.6%, specificity 72.6%; positive and negative predictive values 28% and 72%, respectively; P = 0.138). Nested PCR showed the same sensitivity in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. It can be applied as a rapid technique for the diagnosis of TB.

  11. Thermally stimulated properties in ZnSe:Tb and ZnSe:(Mn, Tb) phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A. K.; Mishra, S. K.; Pandey, S. P.; Lakshmi Mishra, Kshama

    2018-02-01

    Thermoluminescence studies were performed of ZnSe:Tb and ZnSe:(Mn, Tb) phosphors. A method of preparation for ZnSe phosphors doped with Tb and (Mn, Tb) has been discussed. The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of these phosphors have been studied from 100 to 370 K temperature after exciting by UV radiation (365 nm) at three uniform heating rates 0.4, 0.6 and 0.9 K/s. The trapping parameters like trap depth, lifetime of electrons and capture cross-section have also been determined using various methods.

  12. Risk factors for MDR and XDR-TB in a tertiary referral hospital in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Balaji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: India has a high burden of drug resistant TB, although there are few data on XDR-TB. Although XDR-TB has existed previously in India, the definition has not been widely applied, and surveillance using second line drug susceptibility testing has not been performed. Our objective was to analyze clinical and demographic risk factors associated with isolation of MDR and XDR TB as compared to susceptible controls, at a tertiary center. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Retrospective chart review based on positive cultures isolated in a high volume mycobacteriology laboratory between 2002 and 2007. 47 XDR, 30 MDR and 117 susceptible controls were examined. Drug resistant cases were less likely to be extrapulmonary, and had received more previous treatment regimens. Significant risk factors for XDR-TB included residence outside the local state (OR 7.43, 3.07-18.0 and care costs subsidized (OR 0.23, 0.097-0.54 in bivariate analysis and previous use of a fluoroquinolone and injectable agent (other than streptomycin (OR 7.00, 95% C.I. 1.14-43.03 and an initial treatment regimen which did not follow national guidelines (OR 5.68, 1.24-25.96 in multivariate analysis. Cavitation and HIV did not influence drug resistance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There is significant selection bias in the sample available. Selection pressure from previous treatment and an inadequate initial regimen increases risk of drug resistance. Local patients and those requiring financial subsidies may be at lower risk of XDR-TB.

  13. Immunomodulation by vitamin D: implications for TB

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Rene F; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2011-01-01

    TB remains a major cause of mortality throughout the world. Low vitamin D status has been linked to increased risk of TB and other immune disorders. These observations suggest a role for vitamin D as a modulator of normal human immune function. This article will detail the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which vitamin D regulates the immune system and how vitamin D insufficiency may lead to immune dysregulation. The importance of vitamin D bioavailability as a mechanism for defining the ...

  14. The candidate TB vaccine, MVA85A, induces highly durable Th1 responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Tameris

    Full Text Available Vaccination against tuberculosis (TB should provide long-term protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb. The current TB vaccine, Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG, protects against disseminated childhood TB, but protection against lung TB in adolescents and adults is variable and mostly poor. One potential reason for the limited durability of protection may be waning of immunity through gradual attrition of BCG-induced T cells. We determined if a MVA85A viral-vector boost could enhance the durability of mycobacteria-specific T cell responses above those induced by BCG alone.We describe a long-term follow-up study of persons previously vaccinated with MVA85A. We performed a medical history and clinical examination, a tuberculin skin test and measured vaccine-specific T cell responses in persons previously enrolled as adults, adolescents, children or infants into three different Phase II trials, between 2005 and 2011.Of 252 potential participants, 183 (72.6% consented and completed the study visit. Vaccine-induced Ag85A-specific CD4+ T cell responses were remarkably persistent in healthy, HIV-uninfected adults, adolescents, children and infants, up to 6 years after MVA85A vaccination. Specific CD4+ T cells expressed surface markers consistent with either CD45RA-CCR7+ central memory or CD45RA-CCR7- effector memory T cells. Similarly durable Ag85A-specific CD4+ T cell responses were detected in HIV-infected persons who were on successful antiretroviral therapy when MVA85A was administered. By contrast, Ag85A-specific CD4+ T cell frequencies in untreated MVA85A-vaccinated HIV-infected persons were mostly undetectable 3-5 years after vaccination.MVA85A induces remarkably durable T cell responses in immunocompetent persons. However, results from a recent phase IIb trial of MVA85A, conducted in infants from the same geographic area and study population, showed no vaccine efficacy, suggesting that these durable T cell responses do not

  15. Missed Opportunities for TB Investigation in Primary Care Clinics in South Africa: Experience from the XTEND Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violet N Chihota

    Full Text Available 40 primary health clinics (PHCs in four provinces in South Africa, June 2012 -February 2013.To determine whether health care worker (HCW practice in investigating people with TB symptoms was altered when the initial test for TB was changed from smear microscopy to Xpert MTB/RIF.Cross-sectional substudy at clinics participating in a pragmatic cluster randomised trial, Xpert for TB: Evaluating a New Diagnostic "XTEND", which evaluated the effect of Xpert MTB/RIF implementation in South Africa.Consecutive adults exiting PHCs reporting at least one TB symptom (defined as any of cough, weight loss, night sweats and fever were enrolled. The main outcome was the proportion who self-reported having sputum requested by HCW during the clinic encounter just completed.3604 adults exiting PHCs (1676 in Xpert arm, 1928 in microscopy arm were enrolled (median age 38 years, 71.4% female, 38.8% reported being HIV-positive, 70% reported cough. For 1267 participants (35.2% the main reason for attending the clinic was TB symptom(s. Overall 2130/3604 (59.1% said they reported their symptom(s to HCW. 22.7% (818/3604 reported having been asked to give sputum for TB investigation. Though participants in the Xpert vs. microscopy arm were more likely to have sputum requested by HCW, this was not significantly different: overall (26.0% [436/1676] vs 19.8% [382/1928]; adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 1.31, [95% CI 0.78-2.20] and when restricted to those presenting at clinics due to symptoms (49.1% [260/530] vs 29.9% [220/737]; aPR 1.38 [0.89-2.13] and those reporting being HIV-positive (29.4% [190/647] vs 20.8% [156/749]; aPR 1.38[0.88-2.16]. Those attending clinic due to TB symptoms, were more likely to have sputum requested if they had increasing number of symptoms; longer duration of cough, unintentional weight loss and night sweats and if they reported symptoms to HCW.A large proportion of people exiting PHCs reporting TB symptoms did not get tested. Implementation of

  16. QuantiFERON®-TB gold in-tube performance for diagnosing active tuberculosis in children and adults in a high burden setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michala V Rose

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine whether QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT can contribute to the diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB in children in a high-burden setting and to assess the performance of QFT and tuberculin skin test (TST in a prospective cohort of TB suspect children compared to adults with confirmed TB in Tanzania. METHODS: Sensitivity and specificity of QFT and TST for diagnosing active TB as well as indeterminate QFT rates and IFN-γ levels were assessed in 211 TB suspect children in a Tanzanian district hospital and contrasted in 90 adults with confirmed pulmonary TB. RESULTS: Sensitivity of QFT and TST in children with confirmed TB was 19% (5/27 and 6% (2/31 respectively. In adults sensitivity of QFT and TST was 84% (73/87 and 85% (63/74. The QFT indeterminate rate in children and adults was 27% and 3%. Median levels of IFN-γ were lower in children than adults, particularly children <2 years and HIV infected. An indeterminate result was associated with age <2 years but not malnutrition or HIV status. Overall childhood mortality was 19% and associated with an indeterminate QFT result at baseline. CONCLUSION: QFT and TST showed poor performance and a surprisingly low sensitivity in children. In contrast the performance in Tanzanian adults was good and comparable to performance in high-income countries. Indeterminate results in children were associated with young age and increased mortality. Neither test can be recommended for diagnosing active TB in children with immature or impaired immunity in a high-burden setting.

  17. Analysis of the Phenotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4+ T Cells to Discriminate Latent from Active Tuberculosis in HIV-Uninfected and HIV-Infected Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Riou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Several immune-based assays have been suggested to differentiate latent from active tuberculosis (TB. However, their relative performance as well as their efficacy in HIV-infected persons, a highly at-risk population, remains unclear. In a study of 81 individuals, divided into four groups based on their HIV-1 status and TB disease activity, we compared the differentiation (CD27 and KLRG1, activation (HLA-DR, homing potential (CCR4, CCR6, CXCR3, and CD161 and functional profiles (IFNγ, IL-2, and TNFα of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells using flow cytometry. Active TB disease induced major changes within the Mtb-responding CD4+ T cell population, promoting memory maturation, elevated activation and increased inflammatory potential when compared to individuals with latent TB infection. Moreover, the functional profile of Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells appeared to be inherently related to their degree of differentiation. While these specific cell features were all capable of discriminating latent from active TB, irrespective of HIV status, HLA-DR expression showed the best performance for TB diagnosis [area-under-the-curve (AUC = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.82–1.01, specificity: 82%, sensitivity: 84% for HIV− and AUC = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.98–1.01, specificity: 94%, sensitivity: 93% for HIV+]. In conclusion, these data support the idea that analysis of T cell phenotype can be diagnostically useful in TB.

  18. Incidence, risk factors and mortality of tuberculosis in Danish HIV patients 1995-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Aase B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection predisposes to tuberculosis (TB. We described incidence, risk factors and prognosis of TB in HIV-1 infected patients during pre (1995-1996, early (1997-1999, and late Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART (2000-2007 periods. Methods We included patients from a population-based, multicenter, nationwide cohort. We calculated incidence rates (IRs and mortality rates (MRs. Cox's regression analysis was used to estimate risk factors for TB infection with HAART initiation included as time updated variable. Kaplan-Meier was used to estimate mortality after TB. Results Among 2,668 patients identified, 120 patients developed TB during the follow-up period. The overall IR was 8.2 cases of TB/1,000 person-years of follow-up (PYR. IRs decreased during the pre-, early and late-HAART periods (37.1/1000 PYR, 12.9/1000 PYR and 6.5/1000 PYR respectively. African and Asian origin, low CD4 cell count and heterosexual and injection drug user route of HIV transmission were risk factors for TB and start of HAART reduced the risk substantially. The overall MR in TB patients was 34.4 deaths per 1,000 PYR (95% Confidence Interval: 22.0-54.0 and was highest in the first two years after the diagnosis of TB. Conclusions Incidence of TB still associated with conventional risk factors as country of birth, low CD4 count and route of HIV infection while HAART reduces the risk substantially. The mortality in this patient population is high in the first two years after TB diagnosis.

  19. Tuberculosis and hepatic steatosis are prevalent liver pathology findings among HIV-infected patients in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Liver disease epidemiology in sub-Saharan Africa has shifted as a result of HIV and the increased use of antiretroviral therapy leading to a need for updated data on common causes of liver disease. We retrospectively reviewed records from all hospitalized patients who had liver biopsy at a single hospital in South Africa from 2001 to 2009 and compared diagnosis by HIV status. During the period of study 262 patients had liver biopsy, 108 (41% were HIV-infected, 25 (10% were HIV-sero-negative, and 129 (49% had unknown or unrecorded HIV status. Overall 81% of biopsies provided additional diagnostic data. Malignancy was the most common finding reported on 56 (21% biopsies followed by granuloma or TB, hepatic steatosis, and fibrosis or cirrhosis. HIV-infected patients were more likely to have granulomas and steatosis. Half of patients with granulomas were already on TB treatment, suggesting paradoxical reactions or drug induced liver injury may have been important causes of liver inflammation among these patients. We note that TB, paradoxical reactions during TB treatment, possible drug induced liver injury, and hepatic steatosis are important causes of liver pathology among HIV-infected hospitalized patients with unclear etiology of liver disease after initial assessment. Among HIV sero-negative patients, malignancy was the major cause of liver disease. Our findings re-enforce the importance of TB as a diagnosis among HIV-infected individuals.

  20. [The Spanish AIDS Study Group and Spanish National AIDS Plan (GESIDA/Secretaría del Plan Nacional sobre el Sida) recommendations for the treatment of tuberculosis in HIV-infected individuals (Updated January 2013)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Antonio; Pulido, Federico; Caylá, Joan; Iribarren, José A; Miró, José M; Moreno, Santiago; Pérez-Camacho, Inés

    2013-12-01

    This consensus document was prepared by an expert panel of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida (GESIDA [Spanish AIDS Study Group]) and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida (PNS [Spanish National AIDS Plan]). The document updates current guidelines on the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-infected individuals contained in the guidelines on the treatment of opportunistic infections published by GESIDA and PNS in 2008. The document aims to facilitate the management and treatment of HIV-infected patients with TB in Spain, and includes specific sections and recommendations on the treatment of drug-sensitive TB, multidrug-resistant TB, and extensively drug-resistant TB, in this population. The consensus guidelines also make recommendations on the treatment of HIV-infected patients with TB in special situations, such as chronic liver disease, pregnancy, kidney failure, and transplantation. Recommendations are made on the timing and initial regimens of antiretroviral therapy in patients with TB, and on immune reconstitution syndrome in HIV-infected patients with TB who are receiving antiretroviral therapy. The document does not cover the diagnosis of TB, diagnosis/treatment of latent TB, or treatment of TB in children. The quality of the evidence was evaluated and the recommendations graded using the approach of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the 2007 WHO guideline to improve the diagnosis of tuberculosis in ambulatory HIV-positive adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, Olivier; Thai, Sopheak; Khun, Kim Eam; Pe, Reaksmey; van Griensven, Johan; Apers, Ludwig; Van den Ende, Jef; Mao, Tan Eang; Lynen, Lutgarde

    2011-04-06

    In 2007 WHO issued a guideline to improve the diagnosis of smear-negative and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) in HIV-positive patients. This guideline relies heavily on the acceptance of HIV-testing and availability of chest X-rays. Cohort study of TB suspects in four tuberculosis (TB) clinics in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. We assessed the operational performance of the guideline, the incremental yield of investigations, and the diagnostic accuracy for smear-negative tuberculosis in HIV-positive patients using culture positivity as reference standard. 1,147 (68.9%) of 1,665 TB suspects presented with unknown HIV status, 1,124 (98.0%) agreed to be tested, 79 (7.0%) were HIV-positive. Compliance with the guideline for chest X-rays and sputum culture requests was 97.1% and 98.3% respectively. Only 35 of 79 HIV-positive patients (44.3%) with a chest X-ray suggestive of TB started TB treatment within 10 days. 105 of 442 HIV-positive TB suspects started TB treatment (56.2% smear-negative pulmonary TB (PTB), 28.6% smear-positive PTB, 15.2% EPTB). The median time to TB treatment initiation was 5 days (IQR: 2-13 days), ranging from 2 days (IQR: 1-11.5 days) for EPTB, over 2.5 days (IQR: 1-4 days) for smear-positive PTB to 9 days (IQR: 3-17 days) for smear-negative PTB. Among the 34 smear-negative TB patients with a confirmed diagnosis, the incremental yield of chest X-ray, clinical suspicion or abdominal ultrasound, and culture was 41.2%, 17.6% and 41.2% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the algorithm to diagnose smear-negative TB in HIV-positive TB suspects was 58.8% (95%CI: 42.2%-73.6%) and 79.4% (95%CI: 74.8%-82.4%) respectively. Pending point-of-care rapid diagnostic tests for TB disease, diagnostic algorithms are needed. The diagnostic accuracy of the 2007 WHO guideline to diagnose smear-negative TB is acceptable. There is, however, reluctance to comply with the guideline in terms of immediate treatment initiation.

  2. Evaluation of the 2007 WHO guideline to improve the diagnosis of tuberculosis in ambulatory HIV-positive adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Koole

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2007 WHO issued a guideline to improve the diagnosis of smear-negative and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB in HIV-positive patients. This guideline relies heavily on the acceptance of HIV-testing and availability of chest X-rays. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Cohort study of TB suspects in four tuberculosis (TB clinics in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. We assessed the operational performance of the guideline, the incremental yield of investigations, and the diagnostic accuracy for smear-negative tuberculosis in HIV-positive patients using culture positivity as reference standard. 1,147 (68.9% of 1,665 TB suspects presented with unknown HIV status, 1,124 (98.0% agreed to be tested, 79 (7.0% were HIV-positive. Compliance with the guideline for chest X-rays and sputum culture requests was 97.1% and 98.3% respectively. Only 35 of 79 HIV-positive patients (44.3% with a chest X-ray suggestive of TB started TB treatment within 10 days. 105 of 442 HIV-positive TB suspects started TB treatment (56.2% smear-negative pulmonary TB (PTB, 28.6% smear-positive PTB, 15.2% EPTB. The median time to TB treatment initiation was 5 days (IQR: 2-13 days, ranging from 2 days (IQR: 1-11.5 days for EPTB, over 2.5 days (IQR: 1-4 days for smear-positive PTB to 9 days (IQR: 3-17 days for smear-negative PTB. Among the 34 smear-negative TB patients with a confirmed diagnosis, the incremental yield of chest X-ray, clinical suspicion or abdominal ultrasound, and culture was 41.2%, 17.6% and 41.2% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the algorithm to diagnose smear-negative TB in HIV-positive TB suspects was 58.8% (95%CI: 42.2%-73.6% and 79.4% (95%CI: 74.8%-82.4% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Pending point-of-care rapid diagnostic tests for TB disease, diagnostic algorithms are needed. The diagnostic accuracy of the 2007 WHO guideline to diagnose smear-negative TB is acceptable. There is, however, reluctance to comply with the guideline in terms of immediate treatment

  3. Latent and subclinical tuberculosis in HIV infected patients: a cross-sectional study

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    Kall Meaghan M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV and tuberculosis (TB are commonly associated. Identifying latent and asymptomatic tuberculosis infection in HIV-positive patients is important in preventing death and morbidity associated with active TB. Methods Cross-sectional study of one time use of an interferon-gamma release assay (T-SPOT.TB - immunospot to detect tuberculosis infection in patients in a UK inner city HIV clinic with a large sub-Saharan population. Results 542 patient samples from 520 patients who disclosed their symptoms of TB were tested. Median follow-up was 35 months (range 27-69. More than half (55% originated from countries with medium or high tuberculosis burden and 57% were women. Antiretroviral therapy was used by 67%; median CD4 count at test was 458 cells/μl. A negative test was found in 452 samples and an indeterminate results in 40 (7.4% but neither were associated with a low CD4 count. A positive test was found in 10% (50/502 individuals. All patients with positive tests were referred to the TB specialist, 47 (94% had a chest radiograph and 46 (92% attended the TB clinic. Two had culture-positive TB and a third individual with features of active TB was treated. 40 started and 38 completed preventive treatment. One patient who completed preventive treatment with isoniazid monotherapy subsequently developed isoniazid-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. No patient with a negative test has developed TB. Conclusions We found an overall prevalence of latent TB infection of 10% through screening for TB in those with HIV infection and without symptoms, and a further 1% with active disease, a yield greater than typically found in contact tracing. Acceptability of preventive treatment was high with 85% of those with latent TB infection eventually completing their TB chemotherapy regimens. IGRA-based TB screening among HIV-infected individuals was feasible in the clinical setting and assisted with appropriate management (including preventive

  4. Pokémon Battles as a Context for Mathematical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffey, William

    2017-01-01

    In this article I explore some of the underlying mathematics of Poke´mon battles and describe ways that teachers at the secondary level could explore concepts of mathematical game theory in this context. I discuss various ways of representing and analyzing a Poke´mon battle using game theory and conclude with an example of applying concepts of…

  5. 77 FR 29918 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Battle Creek, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... airspace is necessary to accommodate new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAP) at W. K. Kellogg.... Kellogg Airport, Battle Creek, MI. Controlled airspace is needed for the safety and management of IFR... controlled airspace at W.K. Kellogg Airport, Battle Creek, MI. Environmental Review This proposal will be...

  6. 76 FR 72025 - Noise Compatibility Program Notice for W.M. Kellogg Airport, Battle Creek, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... for W.M. Kellogg Airport, Battle Creek, MI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... exposure maps submitted by the City of Battle Creek, Michigan for W.K. Kellogg Airport under the provisions... noise compatibility program that was submitted for W.K. Kellogg Airport under part 150 in conjunction...

  7. Hecamede: Homeric nurse of the battle-wounded in the Trojan War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanika, Alexia P; Baltas, Christos S

    2014-02-01

    The Homeric epics present the 10-year lasting Trojan War, offering the description of battle wounds and medical care of injuries. Hecamede is referred by the Homer as a battlefield nurse who had knowledge of the treatment of bleeding battle wounds.

  8. Battling Obesity in K-12 Learners from an Exercise Physiology Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattigan, Peter; Biren, Greg

    2007-01-01

    Physical education practitioners and programs have the opportunity and obligation to help children become physically educated, healthy, and active adults. This article discusses the battle against obesity in K-12 learners from an exercise physiology perspective and focuses on the fact that practitioners have all the tools they need to battle this…

  9. Nosocomial infections in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty-five nosocomial infections (23%) among the HIV-infected children, but only ... candidiasis in seven and zero, urinary tract infection in four and one and .... tant or multidrug-resistant TB received ... bacterial infections, 96 hours in the case.

  10. Defeating Mechanisms of Armours for Main Battle Tanks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manfred Held

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental protection principles of the new armours for main battle tanks against kinetic energy projectiles (KE) and chemical energy weapons (CE)--shaped charges are shortly described and their efficiency against both threats discussed. The armour topics can be split into: "perpendicular or zero-degree armours", such as rolled homogeneous armour (RHA), also with extremely high strength, ceramics, glass, liquid filled columns and explosive filled cells,"inclined armours", as spaced RHA plates with their corner effects, bulging armour, additive and integrated explosive reactive armours (ERA) and "hard kill active defence possibilities" in different defeating distances.

  11. Light Infantry: A Tactical Deep Battle Asset for Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-02

    that overview siptgficant lessons will be extracted with a view toward modern day applicability. A brief review of current capabilities for U. S. o...Genral Boldin wrote about a forty-five day operation in the enemy’s rear in which he establisad caummications with friendly forces and was able to...between the lessons extracted above n the hb fits of deep battle operations identified by LT Holder. lie contends that the principal benefLts of d v-p

  12. A clinical scoring system to prioritise investigation for tuberculosis among adults attending HIV clinics in South Africa.

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    Yasmeen Hanifa

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO recommendation for regular tuberculosis (TB screening of HIV-positive individuals with Xpert MTB/RIF as the first diagnostic test has major resource implications.To develop a diagnostic prediction model for TB, for symptomatic adults attending for routine HIV care, to prioritise TB investigation.Cohort study exploring a TB testing algorithm.HIV clinics, South Africa.Representative sample of adult HIV clinic attendees; data from participants reporting ≥1 symptom on the WHO screening tool were split 50:50 to derive, then internally validate, a prediction model.TB, defined as "confirmed" if Xpert MTB/RIF, line probe assay or M. tuberculosis culture were positive; and "clinical" if TB treatment started without microbiological confirmation, within six months of enrolment.Overall, 79/2602 (3.0% participants on ART fulfilled TB case definitions, compared to 65/906 (7.2% pre-ART. Among 1133/3508 (32.3% participants screening positive on the WHO tool, 1048 met inclusion criteria for this analysis: 52/515 (10.1% in the derivation and 58/533 (10.9% in the validation dataset had TB. Our final model comprised ART status (on ART > 3 months vs. pre-ART or ART 1 symptom. We converted this to a clinical score, using clinically-relevant CD4 and BMI categories. A cut-off score of ≥3 identified those with TB with sensitivity and specificity of 91.8% and 34.3% respectively. If investigation was prioritised for individuals with score of ≥3, 68% (717/1048 symptomatic individuals would be tested, among whom the prevalence of TB would be 14.1% (101/717; 32% (331/1048 of tests would be avoided, but 3% (9/331 with TB would be missed amongst those not tested.Our clinical score may help prioritise TB investigation among symptomatic individuals.

  13. TO EVALUATE PREVALENCE OF DIABETES AND HIV IN NEWLY-DIAGNOSED MULTIDRUGRESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS ADMITTED FOR PRETREATMENT EVALUATION IN DOTS PLUS CENTRE, THANJAVUR

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    Namasivayam Kuppusamy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND More than 9 million people fall sick with tuberculosis every year in the world. People with weak immune system as a result of disease like diabetes and HIV are at high risk of developing MDR-TB infection. Proper monitoring and evaluation are needed to control MDR-TB in HIV and diabetes patients. The aim of the study is to find the prevalence of diabetes and HIV among MDR-TB patients admitted for pretreatment evaluation in Dots Plus Centre, Thanjavur Medical College, Tamilnadu. MATERIALS AND METHODS The medical records with datas of 96 patients with MDR-TB who are having diabetes and HIV infection were examined. These cases were diagnosed and registered during January 2015 to December 2015. These patients had drug resistant to first line antituberculosis drugs (isoniazid and rifampicin. Duration of diabetes and HIV infection were noted. Age were categorised in to four groups- 20-29 years, 30-39 years, 40-49 years and above 50 years. The potential risk of association of diabetes, HIV or both with MDR-TB was evaluated by univariate conditional logistic regression model. RESULTS Out of 96 newly-diagnosed MDR-TB patients, prevalence of diabetes is about 34.37%, out of which (84.84% were males and (15.15% were females. Out of 34.37%, 38.54% of patients had controlled diabetes, 61.45% patients had uncontrolled diabetes. Nearly, more than half of diabetes patient falls under uncontrolled diabetes. More number of male patients had diabetes with MDR-TB when compared to females. 10.4% of these persons got oral hypoglycaemic agent and 6.3% got insulin as treatment for diabetes. 1% had irregular treatment with poor compliance. Prevalence of HIV is about 4.16% out of which 75% were males and 25% were females. One patient had both diabetes and HIV with MDR tuberculosis. CONCLUSION In our retrospective study, prevalence of diabetes in MDR-TB patients were more common in males than in females, most of them were in the age groups of 40 years and above

  14. Implementing the global plan to stop TB, 2011-2015--optimizing allocations and the Global Fund's contribution: a scenario projections study.

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    Eline L Korenromp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Global Plan to Stop TB estimates funding required in low- and middle-income countries to achieve TB control targets set by the Stop TB Partnership within the context of the Millennium Development Goals. We estimate the contribution and impact of Global Fund investments under various scenarios of allocations across interventions and regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Global Plan assumptions on expected cases and mortality, we estimate treatment costs and mortality impact for diagnosis and treatment for drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB, including antiretroviral treatment (ART during DOTS for HIV-co-infected patients, for four country groups, overall and for the Global Fund investments. In 2015, China and India account for 24% of funding need, Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA for 33%, sub-Saharan Africa (SSA for 20%, and other low- and middle-income countries for 24%. Scale-up of MDR-TB treatment, especially in EECA, drives an increasing global TB funding need--an essential investment to contain the mortality burden associated with MDR-TB and future disease costs. Funding needs rise fastest in SSA, reflecting increasing coverage need of improved TB/HIV management, which saves most lives per dollar spent in the short term. The Global Fund is expected to finance 8-12% of Global Plan implementation costs annually. Lives saved through Global Fund TB support within the available funding envelope could increase 37% if allocations shifted from current regional demand patterns to a prioritized scale-up of improved TB/HIV treatment and secondly DOTS, both mainly in Africa--with EECA region, which has disproportionately high per-patient costs, funded from alternative resources. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings, alongside country funding gaps, domestic funding and implementation capacity and equity considerations, should inform strategies and policies for international donors, national governments and

  15. The tuberculosis challenge in a rural South African HIV programme

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    Cooke Graham S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa remains the country with the greatest burden of HIV-infected individuals and the second highest estimated TB incidence per capita worldwide. Within South Africa, KwaZulu-Natal has one of the highest rates of TB incidence and an emerging epidemic of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Methods Review of records of consecutive HIV-infected people initiated onto ART between 1st January 2005 and 31st March 2006. Patients were screened for TB at initiation and incident episodes recorded. CD4 counts, viral loads and follow-up status were recorded; data was censored on 5th August 2008. Geographic cluster analysis was performed using spatial scanning. Results 801 patients were initiated. TB prevalence was 25.3%, associated with lower CD4 (AHR 2.61 p = 0.01 for CD4 25 copies/ml (OR 1.75 p = 0.11. A low-risk cluster for incident TB was identified for patients living near the local hospital in the geospatial analysis. Conclusion There is a large burden of TB in this population. Rate of incident TB stabilises at a rate higher than that of the overall population. These data highlight the need for greater research on strategies for active case finding in rural settings and the need to focus on strengthening primary health care.

  16. The politics of tuberculosis and HIV service integration in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amo-Adjei, Joshua; Kumi-Kyereme, Akwasi; Fosuah Amo, Hannah; Awusabo-Asare, Kofi

    2014-09-01

    The need to integrate TB/HIV control programmes has become critical due to the comorbidity regarding these diseases and the need to optimise the use of resources. In developing countries such as Ghana, where public health interventions depend on donor funds, the integration of the two programmes has become more urgent. This paper explores stakeholders' views on the integration of TB/HIV control programmes in Ghana within the remits of contingency theory. With 31 purposively selected informants from four regions, semi-structured interviews and observations were conducted between March and May 2012, and the data collected were analysed using the inductive approach. The results showed both support for and opposition to integration, as well as some of the avoidable challenges inherent in combining TB/HIV control. While those who supported integration based their arguments on clinical synergies and the need to promote the efficient use of resources, those who opposed integration cited the potential increase in workload, the clinical complications associated with joint management, the potential for a leadership crisis, and the "smaller the better" propositions to support their stance. Although a policy on TB/HIV integration exists, inadequate 'political will' from the top management of both programmes has trickled down to lower levels, which has stifled progress towards the comprehensive management of TB/HIV and particularly leading to weak data collection and management structures and unsatisfactory administration of co-trimoxazole for co-infected patients. It is our view that the leadership of both programmes show an increased commitment to protocols involving the integration of TB/HIV, followed by a commitment to addressing the 'fears' of frontline service providers to encourage confidence in the process of service integration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of isoniazid preventive therapy on tuberculosis or death in persons with HIV : a retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayele, Henok Tadesse; van Mourik, Maaike S M; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) is a recommended strategy for prevention of tuberculosis (TB) in persons with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) although the benefits have not been unequivocally demonstrated in routine clinical practice with widespread ART adoption. Therefore, we

  18. Vitamin D deficiency in medical patients at a central hospital in Malawi: a comparison with TB patients from a previous study.

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    Yamikani Mastala

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (VDD in adult medical, non-tuberculous (non-TB patients. To investigate associations with VDD. To compare the results with a similar study in TB patients at the same hospital. DESIGN: Cross-sectional sample. SETTING: Central hospital in Malawi. PARTICIPANTS: Adult non-TB patients (n = 157, inpatients and outpatients. OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was the prevalence of VDD. Potentially causal associations sought included nutritional status, in/outpatient status, HIV status, anti-retroviral therapy (ART and, by comparison with a previous study, a diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB. RESULTS: Hypovitaminosis D (≤75 nmol/L occurred in 47.8% (75/157 of patients, 16.6% (26/157 of whom had VDD (≤50 nmol/L. None had severe VDD (≤25 nmol/L. VDD was found in 22.8% (23/101 of in-patients and 5.4% (3/56 of out-patients. In univariable analysis in-patient status, ART use and low dietary vitamin D were significant predictors of VDD. VDD was less prevalent than in previously studied TB patients in the same hospital (68/161 = 42%. In multivariate analysis of the combined data set from both studies, having TB (OR 3.61, 95%CI 2.02-6.43 and being an in-patient (OR 2.70, 95%CI 1.46-5.01 were significant independent predictors of VDD. CONCLUSIONS: About half of adult medical patients without TB have suboptimal vitamin D status, which is more common in in-patients. VDD is much more common in TB patients than non-TB patients, even when other variables are controlled for, suggesting that vitamin D deficiency is associated with TB.

  19. 'Remote FASH' tele-sonography - a novel tool to assist diagnosing HIV-associated extrapulmonary tuberculosis in remote areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.; Grobusch, M. P.; Heller, T.

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is complex, especially in HIV positive patients. Ultrasound can aid diagnosis of extrapulmonary TB (EPTB), but experienced sonographers are often not available in endemic settings. We describe a novel tool to aid diagnosis of EPTB using telemedicine and a previously

  20. Effect of isoniazid preventive therapy on tuberculosis incidence in people living with HIV-AIDS at Hasan Sadikin hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satiavan, I.; Hartantri, Y.; Werry, B.; Nababan, Y.; Wisaksana, R.; Alisjahban, B.

    2018-03-01

    Indonesia is the second largest number of tuberculosis (TB) in the world. Isoniazid Preventive Therapy (IPT) as one of the three I’s TB-HIV collaboration to manage TB in people living with HIV / AIDS (PLHIV) has not been fully performed. It is related to doubt to get rid of TB in PLHIV. This study aims to see the effect of IPT on the incidence of TB in PLHIV. This issue is a retrospective cohort study based on medical record data in HIV clinic. Inclusion criteria are PLHIV ≥ 15 years of age who were registered to visit the CST service and obtain IPT with good adherence if they were receiving ART. Of 462 patients, HIV- infected patients receiving IPT were 154 (33.3%). IPT administration has a protective effect on PLHIV where the rate of TB incidence in PLHIV who received IPT were 0.21 times lower than those who did not receive IPT (IRR = 0.21, 95% CI 0.023-0.881, p 0.008). In this population, IPT administration reduces 79% risk of PLHIV to suffer TB.IPT administration reduces the incidence of TB.

  1. A Systematic Review of the Prevalence and Pattern of Imaging Defined Post-TB Lung Disease.

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    Jamilah Meghji

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is an important risk factor for chronic respiratory disease in resource poor settings. The persistence of abnormal spirometry and symptoms after treatment are well described, but the structural abnormalities underlying these changes remain poorly defined, limiting our ability to phenotype post-TB lung disease in to meaningful categories for clinical management, prognostication, and ongoing research. The relationship between post-TB lung damage and patient-centred outcomes including functional impairment, respiratory symptoms, and health related quality of life also remains unclear.We performed a systematic literature review to determine the prevalence and pattern of imaging-defined lung pathology in adults after medical treatment for pleural, miliary, or pulmonary TB disease. Data were collected on study characteristics, and the modality, timing, and findings of thoracic imaging. The proportion of studies relating imaging findings to spirometry results and patient morbidity was recorded. Study quality was assessed using a modified Newcastle-Ottowa score. (Prospero Registration number CRD42015027958.We identified 37 eligible studies. The principle features seen on CXR were cavitation (8.3-83.7%, bronchiectasis (4.3-11.2%, and fibrosis (25.0-70.4%, but prevalence was highly variable. CT imaging identified a wider range of residual abnormalities than CXR, including nodules (25.0-55.8%, consolidation (3.7-19.2%, and emphysema (15.0-45.0%. The prevalence of cavitation was generally lower (7.4-34.6% and bronchiectasis higher (35.0-86.0% on CT vs. CXR imaging. A paucity of prospective data, and data from HIV-infected adults and sub-Saharan Africa (sSA was noted. Few studies related structural damage to physiological impairment, respiratory symptoms, or patient morbidity.Post-TB structural lung pathology is common. Prospective data are required to determine the evolution of this lung damage and its associated morbidity over time. Further

  2. Magnetic properties of TbTiGe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokes, K.; Tegus, O.; Brueck, E.; Gortenmulder, T.J.; Boer, F.R. de; Buschow, K.H.J.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the magnetic properties of the compound TbTiGe by means of neutron diffraction in the temperature range 1.7-310 K. We also report on magnetization measurements made at different temperatures and fields. The compound TbTiGe adopts the tetragonal CeFeSi-structure type and orders antiferromagnetically at T N =286 K. The structure is collinear antiferromagnetic in the whole temperature range below T N , with the magnetic moments aligned along the tetragonal c-axis. The uncommon shape of the temperature dependence of the magnetization observed in our sample is attributed to small amounts of the ferromagnetic low-temperature modification of TbTiGe

  3. Multi-quasiparticle excitations in 145Tb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yong; Zhou Xiaohong; Zhang Yuhu; Liu Minliang; Guo Yingxiang; Lei Xiangguo; Kusakari, H.; Sugawara, M.

    2004-01-01

    High-spin states in 145 Tb have been populated using the 118 Sn( 32 S, 1p4n) reaction at a beam energy of 165 MeV. The level scheme of 145 Tb has been established for the first time. The level scheme shows characteristics of spherical or slightly oblate nucleus. Based on the systematic trends of the level structure in the neighboring N=80 isotones, the level structure in 145 Tb below 2 MeV excitation is well explained by coupling an h 11/2 valence proton to the even-even 144 Gd core. Above 2 MeV excitation, most of the yrast levels are interpreted with multi-quasiparticle shell-model configurations. (authors)

  4. The Battle over Pastures: The Hidden War in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Alden Wily

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rangelands (‘pastures’ constitute a large and valuable natural resource in Afghanistan. Millions of rural people shape their agro-pastoral or pastoral livelihoods around this asset. In many ways, the territorial history of Afghanistan may be written through the lens of ancient and continuing battles between ethnic groups for possession of alpine pastures. In more recent times, this battle has centred on control of the Hindu Kush, the rich highland pastures of central Afghanistan. This paper focuses on the worsening conflict over this resource and the diminishing opportunities for its resolution, as new pressures mount. Despite numerous government initiatives, the Karzai Administration has failed to get to grips with the ownership issues underpinning this contestation and the associated seasonal armed conflict. As rangelands are made more available for purchase in the marketplace and as a surge in mining developments eats into pastures, more conflict may be expected, deepening divisions not only between ethnicities, but also between rich and poor, and between the people and the state.

  5. E-health systems for management of MDR-TB in resource-poor environments: a decade of experience and recommendations for future work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Hamish S F; Habib, Ali; Goodrich, Mark; Thomas, David; Blaya, Joaquin A; Fils-Aime, Joseph Reginald; Jazayeri, Darius; Seaton, Michael; Khan, Aamir J; Choi, Sharon S; Kerrison, Foster; Falzon, Dennis; Becerra, Mercedes C

    2013-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) is a complex infectious disease that is a growing threat to global health. It requires lengthy treatment with multiple drugs and specialized laboratory testing. To effectively scale up treatment to thousands of patients requires good information systems to support clinical care, reporting, drug forecasting, supply chain management and monitoring. Over the last decade we have developed the PIH-EMR electronic medical record system, and subsequently OpenMRS-TB, to support the treatment of MDR-TB in Peru, Haiti, Pakistan, and other resource-poor environments. We describe here the experience with implementing these systems and evaluating many aspects of their performance, and review other systems for MDR-TB management. We recommend a new approach to information systems to address the barriers to scale up MDR-TB treatment, particularly access to the appropriate drugs and lab data. We propose moving away from fragmented, vertical systems to focus on common platforms, addressing all stages of TB care, support for open data standards and interoperability, care for a wide range of diseases including HIV, integration with mHealth applications, and ability to function in resource-poor environments.

  6. Spatial overlap links seemingly unconnected genotype-matched TB cases in rural Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Maeda, Midori; Emperador, Devy M.; Wandera, Bonnie; Mugagga, Olive; Crandall, John; Janes, Michael; Marquez, Carina; Kamya, Moses R.; Charlebois, Edwin D.; Havlir, Diane V.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Incomplete understanding of TB transmission dynamics in high HIV prevalence settings remains an obstacle for prevention. Understanding where transmission occurs could provide a platform for case finding and interrupting transmission. Methods From 2012–2015, we sought to recruit all adults starting TB treatment in a Ugandan community. Participants underwent household (HH) contact investigation, and provided names of social contacts, sites of work, healthcare and socializing, and two sputum samples. Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture-positive specimens underwent 24-loci MIRU-VNTR and spoligotyping. We sought to identify epidemiologic links between genotype-matched cases by analyzing social networks and mapping locations where cases reported spending ≥12 hours over the one-month pre-treatment. Sites of spatial overlap (≤100m) between genotype-matched cases were considered potential transmission sites. We analyzed social networks stratified by genotype clustering status, with cases linked by shared locations, and compared network density by location type between clustered vs. non-clustered cases. Results Of 173 adults with TB, 131 (76%) were enrolled, 108 provided sputum, and 84/131 (78%) were MTB culture-positive: 52% (66/131) tested HIV-positive. Of 118 adult HH contacts, 105 (89%) were screened and 3 (2.5%) diagnosed with active TB. Overall, 33 TB cases (39%) belonged to 15 distinct MTB genotype-matched clusters. Within each cluster, no cases shared a HH or reported shared non-HH contacts. In 6/15 (40%) clusters, potential epidemiologic links were identified by spatial overlap at specific locations: 5/6 involved health care settings. Genotype-clustered TB social networks had significantly greater network density based on shared clinics (p<0.001) and decreased density based on shared marketplaces (p<0.001), compared to non-clustered networks. Conclusions In this molecular epidemiologic study, links between MTB genotype-matched cases were only

  7. HIV Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... All Collapse All Should I get tested for HIV? CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of ...

  8. TB case detection in Tajikistan – analysis of existing obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Korobitsyn

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tajikistan National TB Control ProgramObjective: (1 To identify the main obstacles to increasing TB Detection in Tajikistan. (2 To identify interventions that improve TB detection.Methods: Review of the available original research data, health normative base, health systems performance and national economic data, following WHO framework for detection of TB cases, which is based on three scenarios of why incident cases of TB may not be notified.Results: Data analysis revealed that some aspects of TB case detection are more problematic than others and that there are gaps in the knowledge of specific obstacles to TB case detection. The phenomenon of “initial default” in Tajikistan has been documented; however, it needs to be studied further. The laboratory services detect infectious TB cases effectively; however, referrals of appropriate suspects for TB diagnosis may lag behind. The knowledge about TB in the general population has improved. Yet, the problem of TB related stigma persists, thus being an obstacle for effective TB detection. High economic cost of health services driven by under-the-table payments was identified as another barrier for access to health services.Conclusion: Health system strengthening should become a primary intervention to improve case detection in Tajikistan. More research on reasons contributing to the failure to register TB cases, as well as factors underlying stigma is needed.

  9. Alto a la tuberculosis en mi generación: Un llamado a un mundo libre de tuberculosis. Podcast del Día Mundial de la Tuberculosis del 2013 (Stop TB in My Lifetime: A Call for a World Free of TB World TB Day 2013)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-12

    En este podcast el doctor Kenneth Castro, Director de la División de Eliminación de la Tuberculosis, habla sobre el Día Mundial de la Tuberculosis, así como del tema y eslogan de este año.  Created: 3/12/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/13/2012.

  10. Let’s Stop HIV Together: Jamar Rogers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-16

    In this podcast, singer Jamar Rogers shares his personal story in the Let's Stop HIV Together Campaign.  Created: 7/16/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 7/16/2012.

  11. 'When I get better I will do the test': Facilitators and barriers to HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'When I get better I will do the test': Facilitators and barriers to HIV testing in Northwest Region of Cameroon with implications for TB and HIV/AIDS control ... However, as a result of conflicting emotional experiences regarding to test or not to test, the decision-making process was not straightforward and this complex process ...

  12. Treatment outcome of Tuberculosis and HIV Co-infection at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . TB is a reemerging disease linked with HIV infections. It is necessary to compare the treatment outcome of patients with only Tuberculosis with those with HIV/AIDs co-infection. This study will also provide baseline information on treatment ...

  13. Combination of TB lymphadenitis and metastatic LAP in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhassan Talaiezadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB may present as pulmonary and extra-pulmonary. TB lymphadenitis is the most common presentation of extra-pulmonary TB. TB lymphadenitis should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of different disorders such as metastatic lymphadenopathy. The reported patient was a 65-year-old lady with breast cancer and conglomerated and matted axillary lymphadenopathy who received chemotherapy. She presented with more extensive axillary LAP contrary to our expectation. Modified radical mastectomy was done and pathology analysis reported TB lymphadenitis associated with metastatic LAP. Under cover of anti-TB therapy adjuvant chemoradiation therapy was started. Accordingly, we recommend TB be ruled out in every patient who needs chemotherapy in the endemic region because chemotherapy may cause the extension of TB in the body.

  14. Patient satisfaction with TB care clinical consultations in Kampala: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... on treatment outcome. Keywords: Patient satisfaction, TB care clinical consultations, cross sectional study. ... Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global ... Measurement of outcome: Variables considered were; how long the ... Key: ART= Antiretroviral Therapy. Characteristic. Parameter n (%). Sex. Female.

  15. Tuberculosis: Learn the Signs and Symptoms of TB Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Tuberculosis (TB) Disease: Symptoms and Risk Factors Language: English ( ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria that ...

  16. A 10-year population based study of 'opt-out' HIV testing of tuberculosis patients in Alberta, Canada: national implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Long

    Full Text Available Compliance with the recommendation that all tuberculosis (TB patients be tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV has not yet been achieved in Canada or globally.The experience of "opt-out" HIV testing of TB patients in the Province of Alberta, Canada is described over a 10-year period, 2003-2012. Testing rates are reported before and after the introduction of the "opt-out" approach. Risk factors for HIV seropositivity are described and demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of TB patients who were newly diagnosed versus previously diagnosed with HIV are compared. Genotypic clusters, defined as groups of two or more cases whose isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis had identical DNA fingerprints over the 10-year period or within 2 years of one another, were analyzed for their ability to predict HIV co-infection.HIV testing rates were 26% before and 90% after the introduction of "opt-out" testing. During the "opt-out" testing years those 64 years of age at diagnosis were less likely to have been tested. In those tested the prevalence of HIV was 5.6%. In the age group 15-64 years, risk factors for HIV were: age (35-64 years, Canadian-born Aboriginal or foreign-born sub-Saharan African origin, and combined respiratory and non-respiratory disease. Compared to TB patients previously known to be HIV positive, TB patients newly discovered to be HIV positive had more advanced HIV disease (lower CD4 counts; higher viral loads at diagnosis. Large cluster size was associated with Aboriginal ancestry. Cluster size predicted HIV co-infection in Aboriginal peoples when clusters included all cases reported over 10 years but not when clusters included cases reported within 2 years of one another."Opt-out" HIV testing of TB patients is effective and well received. Universal HIV testing of TB patients (>80% of patients tested has immediate (patients and longer-term (TB/HIV program planning benefits.

  17. High-sensitive and rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by IFN-γ release assay among HIV-infected individuals in BCG-vaccinated area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Weimin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An accurate test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is urgently needed in immunosuppressed populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic power of enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT-based IFN-γ release assay in detecting active and latent tuberculosis in HIV-infected population in bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG-vaccinated area. A total of 100 HIV-infected individuals including 32 active tuberculosis patients were recruited. An ELISPOT-based IFN-γ release assay, T-SPOT.TB, was used to evaluate the M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 and CFP-10 specific IFN-γ response. Tuberculin skin test (TST was performed for all recruited subjects. Results The subjects were divided into group HIV+ATB (HIV-infected individuals with active tuberculosis, n = 32, group HIV+LTB (HIV-infected individuals with positive results of T-SPOT.TB assay, n = 46 and group HIV only (HIV-infected individuals with negative results of T-SPOT.TB assay and without evidence of tuberculosis infection, n = 22. In group HIV+ATB and HIV+LTB, T-SPOT.TB positive rate in subjects with TST P 85% in patients with TB treatment for less than 1 month and CD4+ T cells ≥200/μl, while for patients treated for more than 3 months and CD4+ T cells Conclusion ELISPOT-based IFN-γ release assay is more sensitive and rapid for the diagnosis of TB infection in Chinese HIV-infected individuals with history of BCG vaccination, and could be an effective tool for guiding preventive treatment with isoniazid in latently infected people and for TB control in China.

  18. Comparison of PPD test in household contacts of smear-positive and -negative tuberculosis (TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Azarkar

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The most important way to prevent TB is omission of the disease transmission sources (TB patients by anti-TB treatment. Extensive studies are needed to ensure that contacts of patients with pulmonary TB are identified and appropriately screened.

  19. Exploring workplace TB interventions with foreign-born Latino workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggerth, Donald E; Keller, Brenna M; Flynn, Michael A

    2018-05-15

    Persons born outside the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with tuberculosis disease (TB) than native-born individuals. Foreign-born Latinos at risk of TB may be difficult to reach with public health interventions due to cultural and institutional barriers. Workplaces employing large concentrations of foreign-born Latinos may be useful locations for TB interventions targeting this high-risk population. This study used a two-phase approach to investigate the feasibility of workplace TB interventions. The first phase investigated employer knowledge of TB and receptiveness to allowing TB interventions in their businesses through 5 structured interviews. The second phase investigated foreign-born workers' knowledge of TB and their receptiveness to receiving TB interventions in their places of employment through 12 focus groups stratified by gender and education. Phase 1: Only 1 of the 5 employers interviewed had a high level of knowledge about TB, and three had no knowledge other than that TB was a disease that involved coughing. They were receptive to workplace TB interventions, but were concerned about lost productivity and customers finding out if an employee had TB. Phase 2: There was no observed differences in responses between gender and between the bottom two education groups, so the final analysis took place between a gender-combined lower education group and higher education group. The higher education group tended to have knowledge that was more accurate and to view TB as a disease associated with poverty. The lower education group tended to have more misconceptions about TB and more often expressed concern that their employers would not support worksite interventions. The results from both phases indicate that more TB education is needed among both foreign-born Latino workers and their employers. Obstacles to implementing workplace TB interventions include knowledge, potential productivity loss, employer liability, and perceived customer response

  20. Diagnosis of active TB using aptamers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khati, M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available of the disease. We have shown in a proof-of-concept case-controlled study that the aptamer-based diagnostic tool was able to accurately detect all cases of active TB from sputum samples of patients, including smear-negative culture positive and samples from...

  1. Assessment of the Diagnostic Potential of Clinotech TB Screen Test ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Clinotech TB Screen test, a 3rd generation multi-antigen rapid chromatographic immunoassay for detection of IgG antibodies in serum against recombinant protein antigens 38kDa, 16kDa and 6kDa, was assessed for its diagnostic potential for diagnosis of active pulmonary TB in routine TB control programme in Abia ...

  2. New water guidelines developed to battle nuclear corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses methods of preventing degradation of nuclear steam generators due to a combination of impurities and corrosion products in the secondary system. Explains that tube and support-plate corrosion has been the main concern, manifesting itself primarily in the recirculating units used in PWR systems. Points out that the battle against corrosion is closely linked to control of ionic impurities, alkalinity, oxidants, and sludge-copper and iron corrosion products, primarily-in condensate and feedwater systems. Examines a set of secondary-water-chemistry guidelines developed by the Steam Generator Owners Group (SGOG). Presents diagram showing changes at Salem 1 to arrest corrosion, including condenser retubing, addition of condensate polisher and recirculation loop. Table indicates how preventive measures at Salem 1, affected secondary-water chemistry

  3. The copyright wars three centuries of trans-atlantic battle

    CERN Document Server

    Baldwin, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Today’s copyright wars can seem unprecedented. Sparked by the digital revolution that has made copyright—and its violation—a part of everyday life, fights over intellectual property have pitted creators, Hollywood, and governments against consumers, pirates, Silicon Valley, and open-access advocates. But while the digital generation can be forgiven for thinking the dispute between, for example, the publishing industry and Google is completely new, the copyright wars in fact stretch back three centuries—and their history is essential to understanding today’s battles. The Copyright Wars—the first major trans-Atlantic history of copyright from its origins to today—tells this important story. Peter Baldwin explains why the copyright wars have always been driven by a fundamental tension. Should copyright assure authors and rights holders lasting claims, much like conventional property rights, as in Continental Europe? Or should copyright be primarily concerned with giving consumers cheap and easy ac...

  4. Capital versus talent. The battle that's reshaping business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roger L; Moldoveanu, Mihnea C

    2003-07-01

    For much of the twentieth century, labor and capital fought bitterly for control of the industrialized economy. The titans of industry ultimately won a resounding victory over the unions, but the story doesn't end there. In today's economy, value is largely the product of knowledge and information. Companies cannot generate profits without the ideas, skills, and leadership capabilities of knowledge workers. It's these factors--not technologies, not factories, and certainly not capital--that give the most successful companies their unique advantages. As knowledge workers come to realize this, and see that the demand for their talent outstrips the supply, they are steadily wresting more and more of the profits from shareholders. This time the battle is between the sources of capital and the producers of value, and how it will end is far from clear. The roots of the current conflict lie in the twentieth-century shift from industrial to managerial capitalism and the creation of a new class of professional talent, the authors explain. Since the arrival of the information-based economy in the past decade, tensions have escalated. The dramatic rise of CEO pay--and the public fire it has drawn--is a telling symptom. With this new battle, we're also witnessing a fundamental change in the political alignment of capital. The Left is now siding with "the common shareholder" against the well-compensated top tier of the labor pool. Shareholders seeing an unprecedented proportion of the return on their investments siphoned off to employees may well ask, is there no end to it? Increasingly, it's human capital that is the basis of value, and financial capital has become far more generic than shareholders would like to believe. The growing tensions between shareholders and managers cannot be ignored, and capitalism is at a crossroads--again.

  5. Prevalence and predictors of HIV among Chinese tuberculosis patients by provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling (PITC: a multisite study in South Central of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB and HIV are two worldwide public health concerns. Co-infection of these two diseases has been considered to be a major obstacle for the global efforts in reaching the goals for the prevention of HIV and TB. METHOD: A comprehensive cross-sectional study was conducted to recruit TB patients in three provinces (Guangxi, Henan and Sichuan of China between April 1 and September 30, 2010. RESULTS: A total of 1,032 consenting TB patients attended this survey during the study period. Among the participants, 3.30% were HIV positive; about one quarter had opportunistic infections. Nearly half of the participants were 50 years or older, the majority were male and about one third were from minority ethnic groups. After adjusting for site, gender and areas of residence (using the partial/selective Model 1, former commercial plasma donors (adjusted OR [aOR] = 33.71 and injecting drug users(aOR = 15.86 were found to have significantly higher risk of being HIV-positivity. In addition, having extramarital sexual relationship (aOR = 307.16, being engaged in commercial sex (aOR = 252.37, suffering from opportunistic infections in the past six months (aOR = 2.79, losing 10% or more of the body weight in the past six months (aOR = 5.90 and having abnormal chest X-ray findings (aOR = 20.40 were all significantly associated with HIV seropositivity (each p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: HIV prevalence among TB patients was high in the study areas of China. To control the dual epidemic, intervention strategies targeting socio-demographic and behavioral factors associated with higher risk of TB-HIV co-infection are urgently called for.

  6. We Can Stop HIV One Conversation at a Time Radio PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-08-27

    As part of the We Can Stop HIV One Conversation at a Time campaign, this 30 second PSA encourages Hispanics/Latinos to talk openly about HIV and AIDS with their families, friends, partners, and communities.  Created: 8/27/2014 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 8/27/2014.

  7. Possible misdiagnosis of HIV associated lymphoma as tuberculosis among patients attending Uganda Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyego, Paul; Nakiyingi, Lydia; Ddungu, Henry; Walimbwa, Stephen; Nalwanga, Damalie; Reynolds, Steven J; Parkes-Ratanshi, Rosalind

    2017-03-14

    Early diagnosis of HIV associated lymphoma is challenging because the definitive diagnostic procedure of biopsy, requires skills and equipment that are not readily available. As a consequence, diagnosis may be delayed increasing the risk of mortality. We set out to determine the frequency and risk factors associated with the misdiagnosis of HIV associated lymphoma as tuberculosis (TB) among patients attending the Uganda Cancer Institute (UCI). A retrospective cohort study design was used among HIV patients with associated lymphoma patients attending the UCI, Kampala, Uganda between February and March 2015. Eligible patient charts were reviewed for information on TB treatment, socio-demographics, laboratory parameters (Hemoglobin, CD4cells count and lactate dehydrogenase) and clinical presentation using a semi structured data extraction form. A total of 183 charts were reviewed; 106/183 were males (57.9%), the median age was 35 (IQR, 28-45). Fifty six (30.6%) patients had a possible misdiagnosis as TB and their median time on TB treatment was 3.5 (1-5.3) months. In multivariate analysis the presence of chest pain had an odd ratio (OR) of 4.4 (95% CI 1.89-10.58, p HIV associated lymphoma attending UCI are misdiagnosed and treated as TB. Chest pain and stage III and IV of lymphoma were associated with an increased risk of a possible misdiagnosis of lymphoma as TB.

  8. Obstructive lung disease as a complication in post pulmonary TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarigan, A. P.; Pandia, P.; Eyanoer, P.; Tina, D.; Pratama, R.; Fresia, A.; Tamara; Silvanna

    2018-03-01

    The case of post TB is a problem that arises in the community. Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) can affect lung function. Therefore, we evaluated impaired pulmonary function in subjects with diagnosed prior pulmonary TB. A Case Series study, pulmonary function test was performed in subjects with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis; aged ≥18 years were included. Exclusion criteria was a subject who had asthma, obesity, abnormal thorax and smoking history. We measured FEV1 and FVC to evaluate pulmonary function. Airflow obstruction was FEV1/FVC%pulmonary TB, 5 subjects (23%) had airflow obstruction with FEV1/FVC% value pulmonary TB.

  9. Interface Heuristics and Style Guide Design: An Air Battle Management Case Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, W. T; Bolia, Robert S

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a human-machine interface style guide designed to promote a common look and feel among operator interfaces employed by air battle managers in the United States...

  10. Physical Training Program Guidelines for U.S. Navy Recruits: Preparing Recruits for Battle Stations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trone, D

    1999-01-01

    ...) a directive instructing RDCs to ensure that the physical conditioning program for women is sufficient to prepare them for successful completion of the final physical readiness test and Battle Stations...

  11. The Airpower Tenet of Centralized Control From Organizational and Battle Management Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Depalmer, Steven

    1997-01-01

    .... The tenet is examined from both an organizational and a battle management aspect. The organizational aspect refers to the command and procedural arrangements that permit a Joint Forces Air Component Commander (JFACC...

  12. A Belief Network Decision Support Method Applied to Aerospace Surveillance and Battle Management Projects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Staker, R

    2003-01-01

    This report demonstrates the application of a Bayesian Belief Network decision support method for Force Level Systems Engineering to a collection of projects related to Aerospace Surveillance and Battle Management...

  13. Battle Staff Training System II: Computer-Based Instruction Supporting the Force XXI Training Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wampler, Richard

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the methodology and lessons learned in the development of the Innovative Tools and Techniques for Brigade and Below Staff Training II - Battle Staff Training System II (ITTBBST-BSTS II...

  14. Outcomes of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment with early initiation of antiretroviral therapy for HIV co-infected patients in Lesotho.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Satti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the importance of concurrent treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB and HIV co-infection has been increasingly recognized, there have been few studies reporting outcomes of MDR-TB and HIV co-treatment. We report final outcomes of comprehensive, integrated MDR-TB and HIV treatment in Lesotho and examine factors associated with death or treatment failure. METHODS: We reviewed clinical charts of all adult patients who initiated MDR-TB treatment in Lesotho between January 2008 and September 2009. We calculated hazard ratios (HR and used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression to identify predictors of poor outcomes. RESULTS: Of 134 confirmed MDR-TB patients, 83 (62% were cured or completed treatment, 46 (34% died, 3 (2% transferred, 1 (1% defaulted, and 1 (1% failed treatment. Treatment outcomes did not differ significantly by HIV status. Among the 94 (70% patients with HIV co-infection, 53% were already on antiretroviral therapy (ART before MDR-TB treatment initiation, and 43% started ART a median of 16 days after the start of the MDR-TB regimen. Among HIV co-infected patients who died, those who had not started ART before MDR-TB treatment had a shorter median time to death (80 days vs. 138 days, p=0.065. In multivariable analysis, predictors of increased hazard of failure or death were low and severely low body mass index (HR 2.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-5.93; HR 5.50, 95% CI 2.38-12.69, and a history of working in South Africa (HR 2.37, 95% CI 1.24-4.52. CONCLUSIONS: Favorable outcomes can be achieved in co-infected patients using a community-based treatment model when both MDR-TB and HIV disease are treated concurrently and treatment is initiated promptly.

  15. Technology and tuberculosis control: the OUT-TB Web experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Jennifer L; Alexander, David C; Marchand-Austin, Alex; Lam, Karen; Whelan, Michael; Lee, Brenda; Furness, Colin; Rea, Elizabeth; Stuart, Rebecca; Lechner, Julia; Varia, Monali; McLean, Jennifer; Jamieson, Frances B

    2017-04-01

    Develop a tool to disseminate integrated laboratory, clinical, and demographic case data necessary for improved contact tracing and outbreak detection of tuberculosis (TB). In 2007, the Public Health Ontario Laboratories implemented a universal genotyping program to monitor the spread of TB strains within Ontario. Ontario Universal Typing of TB (OUT-TB) Web utilizes geographic information system (GIS) technology with a relational database platform, allowing TB control staff to visualize genotyping matches and microbiological data within the context of relevant epidemiological and demographic data. OUT-TB Web is currently available to the 8 health units responsible for >85% of Ontario's TB cases and is a valuable tool for TB case investigation. Users identified key features to implement for application enhancements, including an e-mail alert function, customizable heat maps for visualizing TB and drug-resistant cases, socioeconomic map layers, a dashboard providing TB surveillance metrics, and a feature for animating the geographic spread of strains over time. OUT-TB Web has proven to be an award-winning application and a useful tool. Developed and enhanced using regular user feedback, future versions will include additional data sources, enhanced map and line-list filter capabilities, and development of a mobile app. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Efavirenz, tenofovir and emtricitabine combined with first-line tuberculosis treatment in tuberculosis-HIV-coinfected Tanzanian patients: a pharmacokinetic and safety study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semvua, H.H.; Mtabho, C.M.; Fillekes, Q.; Boogaard, J. van den; Kisonga, R.M.; Mleoh, L.; Ndaro, A.; Kisanga, E.R.; Ven, A. van der; Aarnoutse, R.E.; Kibiki, G.S.; Boeree, M.J.; Burger, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the effect of rifampicin-based tuberculosis (TB) treatment on the pharmacokinetics of efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine in a fixed-dose combination tablet, and vice versa, in Tanzanian TB-HIV-coinfected patients. METHODS: This was a Phase II open-label multiple dose

  17. Risk factors for default from tuberculosis treatment in HIV-infected individuals in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruza, Magda; Albuquerque, Maria F P Militão; Coimbra, Isabella; Moura, Líbia V; Montarroyos, Ulisses R; Miranda Filho, Demócrito B; Lacerda, Heloísa R; Rodrigues, Laura C; Ximenes, Ricardo A A

    2011-12-16

    Concomitant treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and tuberculosis (TB) presents a series of challenges for treatment compliance for both providers and patients. We carried out this study to identify risk factors for default from TB treatment in people living with HIV. We conducted a cohort study to monitor HIV/TB co-infected subjects in Pernambuco, Brazil, on a monthly basis, until completion or default of treatment for TB. Logistic regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals and P-values. From a cohort of 2310 HIV subjects, 390 individuals (16.9%) who had started treatment after a diagnosis of TB were selected, and data on 273 individuals who completed or defaulted on treatment for TB were analyzed. The default rate was 21.7% and the following risk factors were identified: male gender, smoking and CD4 T-cell count less than 200 cells/mm3. Age over 29 years, complete or incomplete secondary or university education and the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were identified as protective factors for the outcome. The results point to the need for more specific actions, aiming to reduce the default from TB treatment in males, younger adults with low education, smokers and people with CD4 T-cell counts Default was less likely to occur in patients under HAART, reinforcing the strategy of early initiation of HAART in individuals with TB.

  18. Operating Characteristics of a Tuberculosis Screening Tool for People Living with HIV in Out-Patient HIV Care and Treatment Services, Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Turinawe

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO 2010 guidelines for intensified tuberculosis (TB case finding (ICF among people living with HIV (PLHIV includes a recommendation that PLHIV receive routine TB screening. Since 2005, the Rwandan Ministry of Health has been using a five-question screening tool. Our study objective was to assess the operating characteristics of the tool designed to identify PLHIV with presumptive TB as measured against a composite reference standard, including bacteriologically confirmed TB.In a cross-sectional study, the TB screening tool was routinely administered at enrolment in outpatient HIV care and treatment services at seven public health facilities. From March to September 2011, study enrollees were examined for TB disease irrespective of TB screening outcome. The examination consisted of a chest radiograph (CXR, three sputum smears (SS, sputum culture (SC and polymerase chain reaction line-probe assay (Hain test. PLHIV were classified as having "laboratory-confirmed TB" with positive results on SS for acid-fast bacilli, SC on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, or a Hain test.Overall, 1,767 patients were enrolled and screened of which; 1,017 (57.6% were female, median age was 33 (IQR, 27-41, and median CD4+ cell count was 385 (IQR, 229-563 cells/mm3. Of the patients screened, 138 (7.8% were diagnosed with TB of which; 125 (90.5% were laboratory-confirmed pulmonary TB. Of 404 (22.9% patients who screened positive and 1,363 (77.1% who screened negative, 79 (19.5% and 59 (4.3%, respectively, were diagnosed with TB. For laboratory-confirmed TB, the tool had a sensitivity of 54.4% (95% CI 45.3-63.3, specificity of 79.5% (95% CI 77.5-81.5, PPV of 16.8% and NPV of 95.8%.TB prevalence among PLHIV newly enrolling into HIV care and treatment was 65 times greater than the overall population prevalence. However, the performance of the tool was poorer than the predicted performance of the WHO recommended TB screening questions.

  19. The impact of HIV and ART on recurrent tuberculosis in a sub-Saharan setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, Rein M G J; Glynn, Judith R; Mboma, Sebastian; Mzemba, Themba; Mwaungulu, Nimrod J; Mwaungulu, Lorren; Mwenibabu, Michael; Mpunga, James; French, Neil; Crampin, Amelia C

    2012-11-13

    To estimate the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the incidence of recurrent tuberculosis (TB) in an African population. A long-term population cohort in Karonga District, northern Malawi. Patients who had completed treatment for laboratory-confirmed TB diagnosed since 1996 were visited annually to record vital status, ART use and screen for TB. Survival analysis estimated the effect of HIV/ART status at completion of treatment on mortality and recurrence. Analyses were stratified by time since treatment completion to estimate the effects on relapse (predominates during first year) and reinfection disease (predominates later). Among 1133 index TB cases contributing 4353 person-years of follow-up, there were 307 deaths and 103 laboratory-confirmed recurrences (recurrence rate 4.6 per 100 person-years). Half the recurrences occurred in the first year since completing treatment. HIV infection increased the recurrence rate [rate ratio adjusted for age, sex, period and TB type 2.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.69-4.26], but with less effect in the first year (adjusted rate ratio 1.71, 95% CI 0.87-3.35) than subsequently (adjusted rate ratio 4.2, 95% CI 2.16-8.15). Recurrence rates on ART were intermediate between those of HIV-negative individuals and HIV-positive individuals without ART. Compared with HIV-positive individuals without ART, the adjusted rate ratio was 0.74 (95% CI 0.27-2.06) in the first year, and 0.43 (95% CI 0.11-1.73) later. The increased incidence of TB recurrence observed in HIV-positive patients appeared to be reduced by ART. The effects are mostly on later (likely reinfection) disease so the impact of ART on reducing recurrence will be highest in high TB incidence settings.

  20. The impact of HIV infection and CD4 cell count on the performance of an interferon gamma release assay in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabye, Martine G.; Ravn, Pernille; PrayGod, George

    2009-01-01

    pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in a TB- and HIV-endemic population and the effect of HIV-infection and CD4 cell count on test performance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 161 patients with sputum culture confirmed PTB were subjected to HIV- and QFT-IT testing and measurement of CD4 cell count. The QFT......BACKGROUND: The performance of the tuberculosis specific Interferon Gamma Release Assays (IGRAs) has not been sufficiently documented in tuberculosis- and HIV-endemic settings. This study evaluated the sensitivity of the QuantiFERON TB-Gold In-Tube (QFT-IT) in patients with culture confirmed...