WorldWideScience

Sample records for battery project progress

  1. FY2016 Advanced Batteries R&D Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-08-31

    The Advanced Batteries research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for projects focusing on batteries for plug-in electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush. This report describes the progress made on the research and development projects funded by the Battery subprogram in 2016. This section covers the Vehicle Technologies Office overview; the Battery subprogram R&D overview; Advanced Battery Development project summaries; and Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design project summaries. It also includes the cover and table of contents.

  2. Progress of the BT-EdF-CEA project. The lithium polymer battery; Avancees du projet BT-EdF-CEA. Batterie lithium polymere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marginedes, D.; Majastre, H. [Bollore Technologies, 29 - Quimper (France); Baudry, P.; Lascaud, S. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Bloch, D.; Lebrun, N. [CEA Grenoble, CEREM, 38 (France)

    1996-12-31

    The lithium-polymer energy storage technology requires the production of thin films of huge surface. The BT-EdF-CEA consortium has studied the various manufacturing techniques of these films and their assembly. The process was chosen according to its productivity, low expensiveness, ecological impact and energy performances with capacities reaching 40 Ah. This paper explains: the objectives and specifications of the project, the advantage of the consortium and the role of the different partners, the results (coating, dry extrusion and battery element manufacturing techniques), and the electrochemical performances of the elements. (J.S.)

  3. Progress of the BT-EdF-CEA project. The lithium polymer battery; Avancees du projet BT-EdF-CEA. Batterie lithium polymere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marginedes, D; Majastre, H [Bollore Technologies, 29 - Quimper (France); Baudry, P; Lascaud, S [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Bloch, D; Lebrun, N [CEA Grenoble, CEREM, 38 (France)

    1997-12-31

    The lithium-polymer energy storage technology requires the production of thin films of huge surface. The BT-EdF-CEA consortium has studied the various manufacturing techniques of these films and their assembly. The process was chosen according to its productivity, low expensiveness, ecological impact and energy performances with capacities reaching 40 Ah. This paper explains: the objectives and specifications of the project, the advantage of the consortium and the role of the different partners, the results (coating, dry extrusion and battery element manufacturing techniques), and the electrochemical performances of the elements. (J.S.)

  4. FY2016 Advanced Batteries R&D Annual Progress Report - Part 5 of 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-08-31

    The Advanced Batteries research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for projects focusing on batteries for plug-in electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush. This report describes the progress made on the research and development projects funded by the Battery subprogram in 2016. This section cover Advanced Battery Materials Research (BMR) part 2, Battery500 Innovation Centers project summaries, and appendices.

  5. Progress in aqueous rechargeable batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Jilei Liu; Chaohe Xu; Zhen Chen; Shibing Ni; Ze Xiang Shen

    2018-01-01

    Over the past decades, a series of aqueous rechargeable batteries (ARBs) were explored, investigated and demonstrated. Among them, aqueous rechargeable alkali-metal ion (Li+, Na+, K+) batteries, aqueous rechargeable-metal ion (Zn2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Al3+) batteries and aqueous rechargeable hybrid batteries are standing out due to peculiar properties. In this review, we focus on the fundamental basics of these batteries, and discuss the scientific and/or technological achievements and challenges. B...

  6. FY2016 Advanced Batteries R&D Annual Progress Report - Part 2 of 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-08-31

    The Advanced Batteries research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for projects focusing on batteries for plug-in electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush. This report describes the progress made on the research and development projects funded by the Battery subprogram in 2016. This section covers the summaries of the Applied Batteries Research for Transportation Projects part 1.

  7. FY2016 Advanced Batteries R&D Annual Progress Report - Part 3 of 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-08-31

    The Advanced Batteries research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for projects focusing on batteries for plug-in electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush. This report describes the progress made on the research and development projects funded by the Battery subprogram in 2016. This section covers the summaries of the Applied Batteries Research for Transportation Projects part 2.

  8. FY2016 Advanced Batteries R&D Annual Progress Report - Part 4 of 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-08-31

    The Advanced Batteries research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for projects focusing on batteries for plug-in electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush. This report describes the progress made on the research and development projects funded by the Battery subprogram in 2016. This section covers Advanced Battery Materials Research (BMR) part 1.

  9. Progress in aqueous rechargeable batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilei Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, a series of aqueous rechargeable batteries (ARBs were explored, investigated and demonstrated. Among them, aqueous rechargeable alkali-metal ion (Li+, Na+, K+ batteries, aqueous rechargeable-metal ion (Zn2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Al3+ batteries and aqueous rechargeable hybrid batteries are standing out due to peculiar properties. In this review, we focus on the fundamental basics of these batteries, and discuss the scientific and/or technological achievements and challenges. By critically reviewing state-of-the-art technologies and the most promising results so far, we aim to analyze the benefits of ARBs and the critical issues to be addressed, and to promote better development of ARBs.

  10. Battery Electric Vehicles: characteristics and research projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, I.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation discusses briefly the history of the electric car and its main characteristics. Two projects introduced: the battery electric VW Lupo EL and URE05e electric Formula Student racecar. Presentation slides.

  11. Progress of the Computer-Aided Engineering of Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries (CAEBAT) (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, A. A.; Han, T.; Hartridge, S.; Shaffer, C.; Kim, G. H.; Pannala, S.

    2013-06-01

    This presentation, Progress of Computer-Aided Engineering of Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries (CAEBAT) is about simulation and computer-aided engineering (CAE) tools that are widely used to speed up the research and development cycle and reduce the number of build-and-break steps, particularly in the automotive industry. Realizing this, DOE?s Vehicle Technologies Program initiated the CAEBAT project in April 2010 to develop a suite of software tools for designing batteries.

  12. Overview of ENEA's Projects on lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandrini, F.; Conte, M.; Passerini, S.; Prosini, P. P.

    The increasing need of high performance batteries in various small-scale and large-scale applications (portable electronics, notebooks, palmtops, cellular phones, electric vehicles, UPS, load levelling) in Italy is motivating the R&D efforts of various public and private organizations. Research of lithium batteries in Italy goes back to the beginning of the technological development of primary and secondary lithium systems with national know-how spread in various academic and public institutions with a few private stakeholders. In the field of lithium polymer batteries, ENEA has been dedicating significant efforts in almost two decades to promote and carry out basic R&D and pre-industrial development projects. In recent years, three major national projects have been performed and coordinated by ENEA in co-operation with some universities, governmental research organizations and industry. In these projects novel polymer electrolytes with ceramic additives, low cost manganese oxide-based composite cathodes, environmentally friendly process for polymer electrolyte, fabrication processes of components and cells have been investigated and developed in order to fulfill long-term needs of cost-effective and highly performant lithium polymer batteries.

  13. Shippingport: Overall project progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crimi, F.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Shippingport atomic power station (SAPS) consisted of the nuclear steam supply system and associated radioactive waste processing systems, which were owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the balance of plant, owned by the Duquesne Light Company. The station is located at Shippingport, Pennsylvania, on 7 acres of land leased by DOE from Duquesne Light Company. The Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) is being performed under contract to the DOE by the General Electric Company (GE) and its preselected subcontractor, MK-Ferguson Company, as the decommissioning operations contractor (DOC). This paper describes the decommissioning work that has been accomplished since July 1988, and the project's cost and schedule status. As the first decommissioning of a commercial, full-scale nuclear power plant, the SSDP is expected to set the standards for the demolition of future nuclear power plants

  14. Progressive Finland sees progress with nuclear projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, David [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    The Finnish Hanhikivi-1 reactor project is firmly on track and a licence has been granted for construction of a final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel - the first final repository in the world to enter the construction phase. Significant progress has been made with plans for Finland to build its sixth nuclear reactor unit at Hanhikivi. Fennovoima's licensing manager Janne Liuko said the company expects to receive the construction licence for the Generation III+ Hanhikivi-1 plant in late 2017. The application was submitted to the Finnish Ministry of Employment and the Economy in June 2015.

  15. Research Progress toward the Practical Applications of Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochala, Joshua; Liu, Dianying; Wu, Bingbin; Robinson, Cynthia; Xiao, Jie

    2017-07-26

    The renaissance of Li-S battery technology is evidenced by the intensive R&D efforts in recent years. Although the theoretical capacity and energy of a Li-S battery is theoretically very high, the projected usable energy is expected to be no more than twice that of state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries, or 500 Wh/kg. The recent "sulfur fever" has certainly gathered new knowledge on sulfur chemistry and electrochemistry, electrolytes, lithium metal, and their interactions in this "new" system; however, a real advance toward a practical Li-S battery is still missing. One of the main reasons behind this is the sensitivity of Li-S batteries to the experimental testing parameters. Sophisticated nanostructures are usually employed, while the practicality of these nanomaterials for batteries is rarely discussed. The sulfur electrode, usually engineered in a thin-film configuration, further poses uncertainties in the knowledge transfer from the lab to industry. This review article briefly overviews the recent research progress on Li-S batteries, followed by a discussion of the Li-S battery system from the authors' own understandings collected from their past few years of research. The critical findings, the unresolved issues, and the scientific gap between lab research and industrial application are discussed. The future work in Li-S battery research is also explored to propel relevant research efforts toward industrial applications.

  16. Skyhook project: progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, E.J.; Prioleau, J.C.; Mahlmann, L.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have initiated two types of animal experiments to complement and extend the existing data base comparing low- and high-LET radiations, and the studies utilize the Harderian gland model and range-finding or pilot studies on life-span shortening after exposure to heavy charged particles characterized by different LETs. Results from the animal studies have yielded new information concerning relationships between LET and carcinogenic effects and the animal studies are of themselves complementary. The Harderian gland model yields information on in-vivo transformation under conditions of tumor promotion that result from excess pituitary hormones, while the life-span studies, involving no extraneous promotion, indicate interactions between tumor induction and expression. Comparison of tumorigenic results on the Harderian gland and life shortening responses are expected to be highly informative. The purpose of the Skyhook Project was to test the hypothesis that LET was an adequate predictor for life shortening and that low-energy charged particles characterized by a LET approximately the same as that for fission neutrons would produce quantitatively similar life-shortening results after single or multifractionated doses. Another purpose was to evaluate life shortening, using comparatively high doses, over a LET range from less than 1 to approximately 200 keV/μm

  17. Progress in Application of CNTs in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lithium-ion battery is widely used in the fields of portable devices and electric cars with its superior performance and promising energy storage applications. The unique one-dimensional structure formed by the graphene layer makes carbon nanotubes possess excellent mechanical, electrical, and electrochemical properties and becomes a hot material in the research of lithium-ion battery. In this paper, the applicable research progress of carbon nanotubes in lithium-ion battery is described, and its future development is put forward from its two aspects of being not only the anodic conductive reinforcing material and the cathodic energy storage material but also the electrically conductive framework material.

  18. Progress of JPDR decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyota, M.; Yanagihara, S.

    1995-01-01

    The Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR) decommissioning project is progressively achieving its final goal; the project will be finished by March 1996 to release the JPDR's site into unrestricted use in a green field condition. The new techniques which developed or improved in R and D, the first phase of this program, have been successfully applied to the actual dismantling activities. Some decommissioning wastes have been managed as the first case of onsite shallow land burial based on the new regulatory frame of radioactive waste management. The experiences and the data obtained from the JPDR dismantling activities are expected to contribute to future decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. (author)

  19. Recent Progress in Advanced Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajun Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development and commercialization of lithium ion batteries is rooted in material discovery. Promising new materials with high energy density are required for achieving the goal toward alternative forms of transportation. Over the past decade, significant progress and effort has been made in developing the new generation of Li-ion battery materials. In the review, I will focus on the recent advance of tin- and silicon-based anode materials. Additionally, new polyoxyanion cathodes, such as phosphates and silicates as cathode materials, will also be discussed.

  20. Progress in batteries and solar cells. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimotake, H.

    1984-01-01

    The 89 articles in this book are on research in batteries, solar cells and fuel cells. Topics include uses of batteries in electric powered vehicles, load management in power plants, batteries for miniature electronic devices, electrochemical processes, and various electrode and electrolyte materials, including organic compounds. Types of batteries discussed are lithium, lead-acid, manganese dioxide, Silver cells, Air cells, Nickel cells and solar cells. Problems of recharging and life cycle are also discussed

  1. Extreme project. Progress report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyrolle, F.; Masson, O.; Charmasson, S.

    2007-01-01

    The E.X.T.R.E.M.E. project introduced in 2005 to the S.E.S.U.R.E. / L.E.R.C.M. has for objectives to acquire data on the consequences of the extreme climatic meteorological episodes on the distribution of the artificial radioisotopes within the various compartments of the geosphere. This report presents the synthesis of the actions developed in 2006 in positioning and in co financing of the project by means of regional or national research programs (C.A.R.M.A., E.X.T.R.E.M.A., E.C.C.O.R.E.V.I.), of data acquisition, valuation and scientific collaboration. (N.C.)

  2. A revolution in electrodes: recent progress in rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xin; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-04-01

    As a promising candidate for future batteries, the lithium-sulfur battery is gaining increasing interest due to its high capacity and energy density. However, over the years, lithium-sulfur batteries have been plagued by fading capacities and the low Coulombic efficiency derived from its unique electrochemical behavior, which involves solid-liquid transition reactions. Moreover, lithium-sulfur batteries employ metallic lithium as the anode, which engenders safety vulnerability of the battery. The electrodes play a pivotal role in the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries. A leap forward in progress of lithium-sulfur batteries is always accompanied by a revolution in the electrode technology. In this review, recent progress in rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries is summarized in accordance with the evolution of the electrodes, including the diversified cathode design and burgeoning metallic-lithium-free anodes. Although the way toward application has still many challenges associated, recent progress in lithium-sulfur battery technology still paints an encouraging picture of a revolution in rechargeable batteries. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Progress and recent developments in sodium, metal chloride batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratnakumar, B.V.; Attia, A.I.; Halpert, G.

    1991-01-01

    A new class of rechargeable sodium batteries emerged in the last decade mainly due to the efforts in South Africa and the United Kingdom. These systems include solid transition metal chlorides in sodium tetrachloroaluminates as cathodes. Significant developments have been made on two systems, i.e., Na/NiCl 2 and Na/FeCl 2 ; high energy densities of the order of 130 Wh/Kg have been demonstrated at the cell level both with FeCl 2 and NiCl 2 cathodes. Long cycle life of over 2000 cycles was demonstrated with NiCl 2 , especially with a sulfur additive to the electrolyte to retain the sintered structure of the NiCl 2 electrode. Various environmental and safety tests have been successfully performed on the cells. Scale up efforts resulted in cells of 40 - 100 Ah, which were evaluated in an electric vehicle application. Additionally, it appears from a recent evaluation study carried out by European Space Agency on Na/NiCl 2 for GEO and LEO applications that energy densities of the order of 120 Wh/Kg and 100 Wh/Kg respectively at the cell level are feasible and long cycle lives (beyond 2800 cycles are possible). Several fundamental and developmental studies have been carried out at other laboratories aimed at understanding the reaction mechanisms, determining the kinetics and identifying various rate governing processes, and screening various other metal chlorides. Finally, the specific energies and especially the power densities projected for Na/FeCl 2 and Na/NiCl 2 systems based on alternate designs for beta alumina solid electrolyte, i.e., multiple tubes and flat plates are very attractive for electric vehicle and space applications. In this paper, the authors propose to present a detailed account of the developments made hither to as well as the key research issues being addressed in the sodium - metal chloride battery technology

  4. Decomposable Mandrel Project. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letts, S.A.; Fearon, E.; Allison, L.; Buckley, S.; Saculla, M.; Cook, R.

    1995-01-01

    We report on our progress in developing a new technology to produce both Nova and NIF scale capsules using a depolymerizable mandrel. In this technique we use poly(α-methylstyrene) (PAMS) beads or shells as mandrels which are overcoated with plasma polymer. The poly(α-methylstyrene) mandrel is then thermally depolymerized to gas phase monomer which diffuses away through the more thermally stable plasma polymer coating, leaving a hollow shell. Since our last report we have concentrated on characterization of the final shell. Starting with PAMS bead mandrels leads to distorted pyrolyzed shells because of thermally induced creep of the CH coating. We found that plasma polymer coatings on hollow shell mandrels shrink isotropically during pyrolysis and maintain sphericity. We are now concentrating our efforts on the use of microencapsulated shells to prepare targets with buried diagnostic layers or inner wall surface texture

  5. Technological progress in sealed lead/acid batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, J.; Nakashima, H.; Kasai, Y.

    A brief review is given of the history of the research and development of sealed lead/acid batteries during the 30 years since, in 1959, the Yuasa Battery Co. introduced a small-sized sealed battery as the power supply for portable television sets. In 1965, Yuasa began the full-scale mass production and sale of a small-sized sealed lead/acid battery under the NOYPER brand. In 1970, the use of a PbCa alloy grid was adopted, and there followed the successful development of a sealed battery with an oxygen-recombination facility. In 1976, Yuasa more or less established the basic technology for the valve-regulated sealed lead/acid battery — the NP battery — which is now the type in general use. Throughout the 1980s, Yuasa, has continued development in order to expand the sphere of application for the production technology of valve-regulated batteries for motorcycles, as well as for stationary duties with large capacities of 100 to 3000 A h. Recently, in order to improve the reliability and boost the output of sealed lead/acid batteries for employment in UPS power sources, Yuasa has been working intently on the design of a valve-regulated lead/acid battery with outstanding characteristics for high-rate discharge and resistance to high temperatures.

  6. Learning by Doing: the Progressive Novella Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Michael G.

    1996-01-01

    States that the Progressive Novella Project for high school students involves the collaborative writing of a 35-50 page novella. Explains that prior to the actual writing process, students are educated in the basic elements of fiction writing. Describes the division of labor into groups. Comments that the results of the project are invariably…

  7. Recent progress in rechargeable alkali metalâair batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Zhang; Xin-Gai Wang; Zhaojun Xie; Zhen Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable alkali metalâair batteries are considered as the most promising candidate for the power source of electric vehicles (EVs) due to their high energy density. However, the practical application of metalâair batteries is still challenging. In the past decade, many strategies have been purposed and explored, which promoted the development of metalâair batteries. The reaction mechanisms have been gradually clarified and catalysts have been rationally designed for air cathodes. In this ...

  8. Progress in electrolytes for rechargeable Li-based batteries and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Qi Li; Juner Chen; Lei Fan; Xueqian Kong; Yingying Lu

    2016-01-01

    Owing to almost unmatched volumetric energy density, Li-based batteries have dominated the portable electronic industry for the past 20 years. Not only will that continue, but they are also now powering plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and zero-emission vehicles. There is impressive progress in the exploration of electrode materials for lithium-based batteries because the electrodes (mainly the cathode) are the limiting factors in terms of overall capacity inside a battery. However, more and ...

  9. Tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmire, W.H.; Munzer, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The current status of tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is presented in this paper. The Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a key part of the YMP, has been long in development and construction is ongoing. This is a progress report on the tunneling aspects of the ESF as of January 1, 1996. For purposes of discussion in this summary, the tunneling has progressed in four general phases. The paper describes: tunneling in jointed rock under low stress; tunneling through the Bow Ridge Fault and soft rock; tunneling through the Imbricate Fault Zone; and Tunneling into the candidate repository formation

  10. Transit bus applications of lithium ion batteries : progress and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    This report provides an overview of diverse transit bus applications of advanced Lithium Ion Batteries (LIBs). The report highlights and illustrates several FTA programs that fostered the successful development, demonstration, and deployment of fuel-...

  11. Recent Progress in Graphite Intercalation Compounds for Rechargeable Metal (Li, Na, K, Al)-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiantie; Dou, Yuhai; Wei, Zengxi; Ma, Jianmin; Deng, Yonghong; Li, Yutao; Liu, Huakun; Dou, Shixue

    2017-10-01

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) with higher energy density are very necessary to meet the increasing demand for devices with better performance. With the commercial success of lithiated graphite, other graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) have also been intensively reported, not only for LIBs, but also for other metal (Na, K, Al) ion batteries. In this Progress Report, we briefly review the application of GICs as anodes and cathodes in metal (Li, Na, K, Al) ion batteries. After a brief introduction on the development history of GICs, the electrochemistry of cationic GICs and anionic GICs is summarized. We further briefly summarize the use of cationic GICs and anionic GICs in alkali ion batteries and the use of anionic GICs in aluminium-ion batteries. Finally, we reach some conclusions on the drawbacks, major progress, emerging challenges, and some perspectives on the development of GICs for metal (Li, Na, K, Al) ion batteries. Further development of GICs for metal (Li, Na, K, Al) ion batteries is not only a strong supplement to the commercialized success of lithiated-graphite for LIBs, but also an effective strategy to develop diverse high-energy batteries for stationary energy storage in the future.

  12. Cost reductions in nickel-hydrogen battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Richard L.; Sindorf, Jack F.

    1987-01-01

    Significant progress was made toward the development of a commercially marketable hydrogen nickel oxide battery. The costs projected for this battery are remarkably low when one considers where the learning curve is for commercialization of this system. Further developmental efforts on this project are warranted as the H2/NiO battery is already cost competitive with other battery systems.

  13. Progress and challenges in bipolar lead-acid battery development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Kathryn R.

    1995-05-01

    Bipolar lead-acid batteries have higher power densities than any other aqueous battery system. Predicted specific powers based on models and prototypes range from 800 kW/kg for 100 ms discharge times to 1.6 kW/kg for 10 s. A 48 V automotive bipolar battery could have 2 1/2 times the cold cranking rate of a monopolar 12 V design in the same size. Problems which have precluded the development of commercial bipolar designs include the instability of substrate materials and enhanced side reactions. Design approaches include pseudo-bipolar configurations, as well as true bipolar designs in planar and tubular configurations. Substrate materials used include lead and lead alloys, carbons, conductive ceramics, and tin-oxide-coated glass fibers. These approaches are reviewed and evaluated.

  14. Project Progress Assessment Report (PPAR) 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sall, Baba

    2015-01-01

    This evaluation reports reviews basic information, output achievement, equipment and human resources, comment and recommendations. It highlights outputs Fully achieved, those which are partially achieved or in progress and also non achieved outputs. Regarding comments and lessons learned, counterpart stated that the overall timeline of the project is respected, even if activities are delayed to adapt to technical, financial and human resources constraints. The results obtained are in line with expectations thanks to a rigorously respected scientific approach. The Collegial Coordination of the project (DSV-LNERV-CIRAD) and the TO are in phase on the conduct of the Project the collection of baseline data is a crucial phase in the implementation of tsetse control programs. It makes it possible to implement a good strategy. The scientific and technical rigor and the good atmosphere within the Project team are also to be retained.

  15. Project Progress Assessment Report (PPAR) 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sall, Baba

    2012-01-01

    This evaluation reports reviews basic information, output achievement, equipment and human resources, comment and recommendations. It highlights outputs Fully achieved, those which are partially achieved or in progress and also non achieved outputs. Regarding comments and lessons learned, counterpart stated that the overall timeline of the project is respected, even if activities are delayed to adapt to technical, financial and human resources constraints. The results obtained are in line with expectations thanks to a rigorously respected scientific approach. The Collegial Coordination of the project (DSV-LNERV-CIRAD) and the TO are in phase on the conduct of the Project the collection of baseline data is a crucial phase in the implementation of tsetse control programs. It makes it possible to implement a good strategy. The scientific and technical rigor and the good atmosphere within the Project team are also to be retained.

  16. The ALPHA project: A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.

    1995-01-01

    A review of the ALPHA project is presented, including a summary of progress and current status. The project comprises the experimental and analytical investigation of the long-term decay heat removal phenomena from the containment of the next generation of passive Advanced Light Water Reactors. In its present phase, the project is directed to the investigation of the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) Passive Containment Cooling system. The project includes separate-effects tests of containment phenomena (the LINX program). The effects of aerosols that may result from hypothetical severe accidents are also considered (the AIDA program). The construction and commissioning of the major ALPHA experimental facilities, PANDA, LINX-2 and AIDA is complete and the first series of tests are underway. Scaling studies have guided their design. Several small-scale experiments and studies have already produced valuable results

  17. Progress in electrolytes for rechargeable Li-based batteries and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Owing to almost unmatched volumetric energy density, Li-based batteries have dominated the portable electronic industry for the past 20 years. Not only will that continue, but they are also now powering plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and zero-emission vehicles. There is impressive progress in the exploration of electrode materials for lithium-based batteries because the electrodes (mainly the cathode are the limiting factors in terms of overall capacity inside a battery. However, more and more interests have been focused on the electrolytes, which determines the current (power density, the time stability, the reliability of a battery and the formation of solid electrolyte interface. This review will introduce five types of electrolytes for room temperature Li-based batteries including 1 non-aqueous electrolytes, 2 aqueous solutions, 3 ionic liquids, 4 polymer electrolytes, and 5 hybrid electrolytes. Besides, electrolytes beyond lithium-based systems such as sodium-, magnesium-, calcium-, zinc- and aluminum-based batteries will also be briefly discussed. Keywords: Electrolyte, Ionic liquid, Polymer, Hybrid, Battery

  18. The progress of the electrode materials development for lithium ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Kai; Dai Shouhui; Wan Yuhua

    2001-01-01

    The structure and the charge-discharge principle of Li-ion battery are briefly discussed; the progress of electrode materials for Li-ion battery is reviewed in detail. Graphite has found wide applications in commercial Li-ion batteries, however, the hard carbon, especially the carbon with hydrogen is the most promising anode material for Li-ion battery owing to its high capacity, which has now become hot spot of investigation. Following the LiCoO 2 , LiMn 2 O 4 spinel compound becomes the most powerful contestant. On the basis of the authors' results, the synthesis methods of LiMn 2 O 4 and its characterizations are compared. Moreover, the structural properties of intercalation electrode materials that are related to the rechargeable capacity and stability during cycling of lithium ions are also discussed

  19. Progress of the EAST project in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Y.X.; Wu, S.T.; Weng, P.D.; Li, J.G.; Gao, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) project is one of the National Mega-Projects of Science Research of China, which was approved by Chinese government in 1998. EAST is a full superconducting tokamak with an elongated plasma cross-section. The mission of the project is to widely investigate both of the physics and the technologies of advanced tokamak operations, especially the mechanism of power and particle handling for steady-state operations. The basic requirements for the EAST tokamak are full superconducting coils, suitable inductive current system, continuous working non-inductive current driven and heating systems, flexible operation scenarios, flexible J(r) and P(r) control, reliable and fast plasma positioning and shaping control, changeable plasma facing components, advanced divertor and diagnostics. Significant progress of the EAST project has been achieved during last two years. The R and D programs, mainly focused on the superconducting magnets, have processed successfully. The prototypes of main parts have been fabricated and qualified. Most of the key parts of the machine have been delivered to the assembly site. The assembly of the device has begun. It is planned to obtain the first plasma in 2005. The detail information of the testing results of superconducting magnets will be given in this paper. The assembly plan and the experimental plan will be introduced, too. (author)

  20. Recent Progress in Organic Electrodes for Li and Na Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sechan; Kwon, Giyun; Ku, Kyojin; Yoon, Kyungho; Jung, Sung-Kyun; Lim, Hee-Dae; Kang, Kisuk

    2018-03-27

    Organic rechargeable batteries, which use organics as electrodes, are excellent candidates for next-generation energy storage systems because they offer design flexibility due to the rich chemistry of organics while being eco-friendly and potentially cost efficient. However, their widespread usage is limited by intrinsic problems such as poor electronic conductivity, easy dissolution into liquid electrolytes, and low volumetric energy density. New types of organic electrode materials with various redox centers or molecular structures have been developed over the past few decades. Moreover, research aimed at enhancing electrochemical properties via chemical tuning has been at the forefront of organic rechargeable batteries research in recent years, leading to significant progress in their performance. Here, an overview of the current developments of organic rechargeable batteries is presented, with a brief history of research in this field. Various strategies for improving organic electrode materials are discussed with respect to tuning intrinsic properties of organics using molecular modification and optimizing their properties at the electrode level. A comprehensive understanding of the progress in organic electrode materials is provided along with the fundamental science governing their performance in rechargeable batteries thus a guide is presented to the optimal design strategies to improve the electrochemical performance for next-generation battery systems. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The Astronomy Genealogy Project: A Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is not yet visible, much progress has been made on the Astronomy Genealogy Project (AstroGen) since it was accepted as a project of the Historical Astronomy Division (HAD) three years ago. AstroGen will list the world's astronomers with information about their highest degrees and advisors. (In academic genealogy, your thesis advisor is your parent.) A small group (the AstroGen Team) has compiled a database of approximately 12,000 individuals who have earned doctorates with theses (dissertations) on topics in astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, or planetary science. These include nearly all those submitted in Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, and New Zealand, and most of those in the United States (all through 2014 for most universities and all through 1990 for all). We are compiling more information than is maintained by the Mathematics Genealogy Project (MGP). In addition to name, degree, university, year of degree, and thesis advisor(s), all provided by MGP as well, we are including years of birth and death when available, mentors in addition to advisors, and links to the thesis when it is online and to the person's web page or obituary, when we can find it. We are still struggling with some questions, such as the boundaries of inclusion and whether or not to include subfields of astronomy. We believe that AstroGen will be a valuable resource for historians of science as well as a source of entertainment for those who like to look up their academic family trees. A dedicated researcher following links from AstroGen will be able to learn quite a lot about the careers of astronomy graduates of a particular university, country, or era. We are still seeking volunteers to enter the graduates of one or more universities.

  2. King County Metro Battery Electric Bus Demonstration: Preliminary Project Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-05-22

    The U.S. Federal Transit Administration (FTA) funds a variety of research projects that support the commercialization of zero-emission bus technology. To evaluate projects funded through these programs, FTA has enlisted the help of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct third-party evaluations of the technologies deployed under the FTA programs. NREL works with the selected agencies to evaluate the performance of the zero-emission buses compared to baseline conventional buses in similar service. The evaluation effort will advance the knowledge base of zero-emission technologies in transit bus applications and provide 'lessons learned' to aid other fleets in incrementally introducing next generation zero-emission buses into their operations. This report provides preliminary performance evaluation results from a demonstration of three zero-emission battery electric buses at King County Metro in King County, Washington. NREL developed this preliminary results report to quickly disseminate evaluation results to stakeholders. Detailed evaluation results will be published in future reports.

  3. The PLX- α Project: Progress and Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Cassibry, J.; Gilmore, M.; Samulyak, R.; Stoltz, P.; PLX-α Team

    2016-10-01

    The Plasma Liner Experiment-ALPHA (PLX- α) project aims to demonstrate the viability of spherically imploding plasma liners as a standoff driver for plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF). In the past year, progress has been made in designing and testing new contoured-gap coaxial guns, 3D model development and simulations (via Eulerian and Lagrangian hydrocodes) of PLX- α-relevant plasma-liner formation/implosion via up to 60 plasma jets ( 100 kJ of liner kinetic energy), 1D semi-analytic and numerical modeling of reactor-scale PJMIF (10s of MJ of liner kinetic energy), and preparation/upgrade of the PLX facility/diagnostics. The design goal for the coaxial guns is to form plasma jets of up to initial n 2 ×1016 cm-3, mass 5 mg, Vjet 50 km/s, rjet = 4 cm, and length 10 cm. The modeling research is assessing ram-pressure amplification and Mach-number degradation during liner convergence, evolution of liner non-uniformity amplitude and mode number, and exploration of PJMIF configurations with promising 1D and 2D fusion gains. Conical multi-jet-merging and full-4 π experiments will commence in Fall, 2016 and late 2017, respectively. Supported by the ARPA-E ALPHA Program.

  4. Fluor Hanford Project Focused Progress at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HANSON, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    Fluor Hanford is making significant progress in accelerating cleanup at the Hanford site. This progress consistently aligns with a new strategic vision established by the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (RL)

  5. Key challenges and recent progress in batteries, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage for clean energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalk, Steven G.; Miller, James F.

    Reducing or eliminating the dependency on petroleum of transportation systems is a major element of US energy research activities. Batteries are a key enabling technology for the development of clean, fuel-efficient vehicles and are key to making today's hybrid electric vehicles a success. Fuel cells are the key enabling technology for a future hydrogen economy and have the potential to revolutionize the way we power our nations, offering cleaner, more efficient alternatives to today's technology. Additionally fuel cells are significantly more energy efficient than combustion-based power generation technologies. Fuel cells are projected to have energy efficiency twice that of internal combustion engines. However before fuel cells can realize their potential, significant challenges remain. The two most important are cost and durability for both automotive and stationary applications. Recent electrocatalyst developments have shown that Pt alloy catalysts have increased activity and greater durability than Pt catalysts. The durability of conventional fluorocarbon membranes is improving, and hydrocarbon-based membranes have also shown promise of equaling the performance of fluorocarbon membranes at lower cost. Recent announcements have also provided indications that fuel cells can start from freezing conditions without significant deterioration. Hydrogen storage systems for vehicles are inadequate to meet customer driving range expectations (>300 miles or 500 km) without intrusion into vehicle cargo or passenger space. The United States Department of Energy has established three centers of Excellence for hydrogen storage materials development. The centers are focused on complex metal hydrides that can be regenerated onboard a vehicle, chemical hydrides that require off-board reprocessing, and carbon-based storage materials. Recent developments have shown progress toward the 2010 DOE targets. In addition DOE has established an independent storage material testing center

  6. Battery Energy Storage Market: Commercial Scale, Lithium-ion Projects in the U.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaren, Joyce; Gagnon, Pieter; Anderson, Kate; Elgqvist, Emma; Fu, Ran; Remo, Tim

    2016-10-01

    This slide deck presents current market data on the commercial scale li-ion battery storage projects in the U.S. It includes existing project locations, cost data and project cost breakdown, a map of demand charges across the U.S. and information about how the ITC and MACRS apply to energy storage projects that are paired with solar PV technology.

  7. INTEGRATION OF PROGRESS STRATEGY IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Дмитрий Георгиевич БЕЗУГЛЫЙ

    2015-01-01

    The methods and tools of the developed project promotion, the planning system of promotion strategy are suggested; the main approaches used in the project promotion have been identified. The conclusions about the importance, necessity and role in the promotion of a holistic project management system have been made.

  8. USEPAM Project: The State of Progress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Søren

    The paper represents the introductory speech at the 2nd regional workshop of the USEPAM project in Phnom Penh March 2005. It gives a review of the project's activities and achievements, and an introduction to the objectives, structure and programme of the workshop...

  9. Recent Progress in Graphite Intercalation Compounds for Rechargeable Metal (Li, Na, K, Al)‐Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiantie; Dou, Yuhai; Wei, Zengxi; Li, Yutao; Liu, Huakun; Dou, Shixue

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lithium‐ion batteries (LIBs) with higher energy density are very necessary to meet the increasing demand for devices with better performance. With the commercial success of lithiated graphite, other graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) have also been intensively reported, not only for LIBs, but also for other metal (Na, K, Al) ion batteries. In this Progress Report, we briefly review the application of GICs as anodes and cathodes in metal (Li, Na, K, Al) ion batteries. After a brief introduction on the development history of GICs, the electrochemistry of cationic GICs and anionic GICs is summarized. We further briefly summarize the use of cationic GICs and anionic GICs in alkali ion batteries and the use of anionic GICs in aluminium‐ion batteries. Finally, we reach some conclusions on the drawbacks, major progress, emerging challenges, and some perspectives on the development of GICs for metal (Li, Na, K, Al) ion batteries. Further development of GICs for metal (Li, Na, K, Al) ion batteries is not only a strong supplement to the commercialized success of lithiated‐graphite for LIBs, but also an effective strategy to develop diverse high‐energy batteries for stationary energy storage in the future. PMID:29051856

  10. Progress of the HTR-10 project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, D.; Xu, Y.

    1996-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the main technical features and the design specifications of the HTR-10. Present status and main progress of the license applications, the design and manufacture of the main components and the engineering experiments as well as the construction of the HTR-10 are summarized. (author). 3 tabs

  11. Recent Progress in Design of Biomass-Derived Hard Carbons for Sodium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Górka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sodium ion batteries (SIBs have attracted lots of attention over last few years due to the abundance and wide availability of sodium resources, making SIBs the most cost-effective alternative to the currently used lithium ion batteries (LIBs. Many efforts are underway to find effective anodes for SIBs since the commercial anode for LIBs, graphite, has shown very limited capacity for SIBs. Among many different types of carbons, hard carbons—especially these derived from biomass—hold a great deal of promise for SIB technology thanks to their constantly improving performance and low cost. The main scope of this mini-review is to present current progress in preparation of negative electrodes from biomass including aspects related to precursor types used and their impact on the final carbon characteristics (structure, texture and composition. Another aspect discussed is how certain macro- and microstructure characteristics of the materials translate to their performance as anode for Na-ion batteries. In the last part, current understanding of factors governing sodium insertion into hard carbons is summarized, specifically those that could help solve existing performance bottlenecks such as irreversible capacity, initial low Coulombic efficiency and poor rate performance.

  12. Geodynamics Project. US progress report, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The recommendations of the US Geodynamics Committee relative to program activities are presented. US Program progress is reviewed in the following areas: fine structure of the crust and upper mantle; continuous seismic reflection profiling of the deep basement: Hardeman County, Texas; Mid-Atlantic Ridge - evolution of oceanic lithosphere; internal processes and properties; crystal growing; chemical differentiation of magmas; geodynamic modelling; magnetic problems; plate boundaries; plate interiors; geodynamic syntheses; and eustatic cycles of sea level changes. (MHR)

  13. [The human variome project and its progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Lei; Duan, Guang-You; Zhang, Tao

    2010-11-01

    The main goal of post genomics is to explain how the genome, the map of which has been constructed in the Human Genome Project, affacts activities of life. This leads to generate multiple "omics": structural genomics, functional genomics, proteomics, metabonomics, et al. In Jun. 2006, Melbourne, Australia, Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) initiated the Human Variome Project (HVP) to collect all the sequence variation and polymorphism data worldwidely. HVP is to search and determine those mutations related with human diseases by association study between genetype and phenotype on the scale of genome level and other methods. Those results will be translated into clinical application. Considering the potential effects of this project on human health, this paper introduced its origin and main content in detail and discussed its meaning and prospect.

  14. JET Project: progress in construction and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolini, E.

    1978-01-01

    The JET Project of the European Community aims to construct and operate one of the largest Tokamak Devices foreseen at present in the field of Fusion Research. The aim of the experiment is to produce and study plasma conditions approaching those needed in a thermonuclear reactor and therefore will involve operation with deuterium--tritium gas

  15. Progress of JAERI neutron science project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Yukio

    1999-01-01

    Neutron Science Project was started at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute since 1996 for promoting futuristic basic science and nuclear technology utilizing neutrons. For this purpose, research and developments of intense proton accelerator and spallation neutron target were initiated. The present paper describes the current status of such research and developments. (author)

  16. DOE Robotics Project. Summary of progress for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This document provide the bimonthly progress reports on the Department of Energy (DOE) Robotics Project by the University of Michigan. Reports are provided for the time periods of December 90/January 91 through June 91/July 91. (FI)

  17. Constitutive behavior and progressive mechanical failure of electrodes in lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Xu, Jun; Cao, Lei; Wu, Zenan; Santhanagopalan, Shriram

    2017-07-01

    The electrodes of lithium-ion batteries (LIB) are known to be brittle and to fail earlier than the separators during an external crush event. Thus, the understanding of mechanical failure mechanism for LIB electrodes (anode and cathode) is critical for the safety design of LIB cells. In this paper, we present experimental and numerical studies on the constitutive behavior and progression of failure in LIB electrodes. Mechanical tests were designed and conducted to evaluate the constitutive properties of porous electrodes. Constitutive models were developed to describe the stress-strain response of electrodes under uniaxial tensile and compressive loads. The failure criterion and a damage model were introduced to model their unique tensile and compressive failure behavior. The failure mechanism of LIB electrodes was studied using the blunt rod test on dry electrodes, and numerical models were built to simulate progressive failure. The different failure processes were examined and analyzed in detail numerically, and correlated with experimentally observed failure phenomena. The test results and models improve our understanding of failure behavior in LIB electrodes, and provide constructive insights on future development of physics-based safety design tools for battery structures under mechanical abuse.

  18. Recent progress in sulfide-based solid electrolytes for Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D., E-mail: liu.dongqiang@ireq.ca; Zhu, W.; Feng, Z.; Guerfi, A.; Vijh, A.; Zaghib, K.

    2016-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Li{sub 2}S-GeS{sub 2}-P{sub 2}S{sub 5} ternary diagram showing various sulphide compounds as solid electrolytes for Li-ion batteries. - Highlights: • Recent progress of sulfide-based solid electrolytes is described from point of view of structure. • Thio-LISICON type electrolytes exhibited high ionic conductivity due to their bcc sublattice and unique Li{sup +} diffusion pathway. • “Mixed-anion effect” is also an effective way to modify the energy landscape as well as the ionic conductivity. - Abstract: Sulfide-based ionic conductors are one of most attractive solid electrolyte candidates for all-solid-state batteries. In this review, recent progress of sulfide-based solid electrolytes is described from point of view of structure. In particular, lithium thio-phosphates such as Li{sub 7}P{sub 3}S{sub 11}, Li{sub 10}GeP{sub 2}S{sub 12} and Li{sub 11}Si{sub 2}PS{sub 12} etc. exhibit extremely high ionic conductivity of over 10{sup −2} S cm{sup −1} at room temperature, even higher than those of commercial organic carbonate electrolytes. The relationship between structure and unprecedented high ionic conductivity is delineated; some potential drawbacks of these electrolytes are also outlined.

  19. Conjoint utility analysis of technical maturity and project progress of construction project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, taking construction project as the research object, the relationship between the project maturity index calculated by the construction project technical risks with different fine degree and the project progress index is studied, and the equilibrium relationship between the Party A’s utility curve and the Party B’s cost curve of using project maturity index and project progress index as the research variables is analyzed. The results show that, when the construction project technical risk division is more precise, the conjoint utility of the project's technical maturity index and the project progress is higher, and the project’s Party A and Party B two sides are closer to the optimal equilibrium. This shows that the construction project technical risk must be finely divided, and managed and controlled respectively, which will help to improve the conjoint utility of the project Party A and Party B two sides.

  20. Biorefinery Demonstration Project Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, David [University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc., Athens, GA (United States)

    2015-10-20

    In this project we focused on various aspects of biorefinery technology development including algal-biorefinery technology, thermochemical conversion of biomass to bio-oils and biochar; we tested characteristics and applications of biochars and evaluated nutrient cycling with wastewater treatment by the coupling of algal culture systems and anaerobic digestion. Key results include a method for reducing water content of bio-oil through atomized alcohol addition. The effect included increasing the pH and reducing the viscosity and cloud point of the bio-oil. Low input biochar production systems were evaluated via literature reviews and direct experimental work. Additionally, emissions were evaluated and three biochar systems were compared via a life cycle analysis. Attached growth systems for both algal cultivation and algal harvesting were found to be superior to suspended growth cultures. Nutrient requirements for algal cultivation could be obtained by the recycling of anaerobic digester effluents, thus experimentally showing that these two systems could be directly coupled. Twenty-two journal articles and six intellectual property applications resulted from the cumulative work that this project contributed to programmatically.

  1. PHEV/EV Li-Ion Battery Second-Use Project (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2010-04-01

    Accelerated development and market penetration of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and electric vehicles (Evs) are restricted at present by the high cost of lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries. One way to address this problem is to recover a fraction of the battery cost via reuse in other applications after the battery is retired from service in the vehicle, if the battery can still meet the performance requirements of other energy storage applications. In several current and emerging applications, the secondary use of PHEV and EV batteries may be beneficial; these applications range from utility peak load reduction to home energy storage appliances. However, neither the full scope of possible opportunities nor the feasibility or profitability of secondary use battery opportunities have been quantified. Therefore, with support from the Energy Storage activity of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is addressing this issue. NREL will bring to bear its expertise and capabilities in energy storage for transportation and in distributed grids, advanced vehicles, utilities, solar energy, wind energy, and grid interfaces as well as its understanding of stakeholder dynamics. This presentation introduces NREL's PHEV/EV Li-ion Battery Secondary-Use project.

  2. High Efficiency Space Power Systems Project Advanced Space-Rated Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2011-01-01

    Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) has an agreement with China National Offshore Oil Corporation New Energy Investment Company, Ltd. (CNOOC), under the United States-China EcoPartnerships Framework, to create a bi-national entity seeking to develop technically feasible and economically viable solutions to energy and environmental issues. Advanced batteries have been identified as one of the initial areas targeted for collaborations. CWRU invited NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) personnel from the Electrochemistry Branch to CWRU to discuss various aspects of advanced battery development as they might apply to this partnership. Topics discussed included: the process for the selection of a battery chemistry; the establishment of an integrated development program; project management/technical interactions; new technology developments; and synergies between batteries for automotive and space operations. Additional collaborations between CWRU and NASA GRC's Electrochemistry Branch were also discussed.

  3. Imperial Valley Environmental Project: progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, P.L.; Anspaugh, L.R. (eds.)

    1977-10-19

    Progress is reported in six areas of research: air quality, water quality, ecosystem quality, subsidence and seismicity, socioeconomic effects, and integrated assessment. A major goal of the air quality element is to evaluate the rate of emission of H/sub 2/S, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, and C/sub 2/H/sub 6/ from the operation of the geothermal loop experimental facility at Niland. Concentrations of H/sub 2/S were found to vary between 1500 to 4900 ppM by volume at the Niland facility. To distinguish between geothermal fluids and other waters, extensive sampling networks were established. A major accomplishment was the installation of a high-resolution subsidence-detection network in the Salton Sea geothermal field area, centered on the test facility at Niland. A major effort went into establishing a background of data needed for subsequent impact assessments related to socioeconomic issues raised by geothermal developments. Underway are a set of geothermal energy scenarios that include power development schedules, technology characterizations, and considerations of power-plant-siting criteria. A Gaussian air-pollution model was modified for use in preliminary air-quality assessments. A crop-growth model was developed to evaluate impacts of gases released from geothermal operations on various agricultural crops. Work is also reported on the legal analysis of geothermal legislation and the legal aspects of water-supply utilization. Remote sensing was directed primarily at the Salton Sea, Heber, Brawley, and East Mesa KGRAs. However, large-format photography of the entire Salton Trough was completed. Thermal and multispectral imaging was done for several selected sites in the Salton Sea KGRA. (JGB)

  4. The OPTHER Project: Progress toward the THz Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paoloni, C; Brunetti, F; Di Carlo, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the OPTHER (OPtically driven TeraHertz AmplifiERs) project and progress toward the THz amplifier realization. This project represents a considerable advancement in the field of high frequency amplification. The design and realization of a THz amplifier within...... this project is a consolidation of efforts at the international level from the leading scientific and industrial European organizations working with vacuum electronics....

  5. US company's new nuclear project progresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archie, Jeffrey B.

    2011-01-01

    Operated by South Carolina Electric and Gas Company in the southeastern United States, V.C. Summer Nuclear Station has maintained a reputation of excellence for more than 25 years. The key to its success: placing safety as its first priority, keeping a keen focus on operations, establishing a culture of continuous learning, and embracing collaboration with industry peers. This philosophy guides its new nuclear project, which SCE and G has undertaken to meet the need for baseload generation in its service area in a manner that is clean, safe, reliable, and efficient. In the process, SCE and G is generating jobs and boosting the economy. Site preparation has been under way since 2009. SCE and G anticipates receiving its combined construction and operating license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the independent, federal agency that oversees commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S., in late 2011 or early 2012, which will allow major construction to commence. The 2 new reactors are scheduled to begin commercial operation in 2016 and 2019, respectively, placing V.C. Summer at the forefront of a U.S. nuclear renaissance and carrying its legacy of excellence into the future. (orig.)

  6. Review on recent progress of nanostructured anode materials for Li-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Goriparti, Subrahmanyam

    2014-07-01

    This review highlights the recent research advances in active nanostructured anode materials for the next generation of Li-ion batteries (LIBs). In fact, in order to address both energy and power demands of secondary LIBs for future energy storage applications, it is required the development of innovative kinds of electrodes. Nanostructured materials based on carbon, metal/semiconductor, metal oxides and metal phosphides/nitrides/sulfides show a variety of admirable properties for LIBs applications such as high surface area, low diffusion distance, high electrical and ionic conductivity. Therefore, nanosized active materials are extremely promising for bridging the gap towards the realization of the next generation of LIBs with high reversible capacities, increased power capability, long cycling stability and free from safety concerns. In this review, anode materials are classified, depending on their electrochemical reaction with lithium, into three groups: intercalation/de-intercalation, alloy/de-alloy and conversion materials. Furthermore, the effect of nanoscale size and morphology on the electrochemical performance is presented. Synthesis of the nanostructures, lithium battery performance and electrode reaction mechanisms are also discussed. To conclude, the main aim of this review is to provide an organic outline of the wide range of recent research progresses and perspectives on nanosized active anode materials for future LIBs.

  7. Review on recent progress of nanostructured anode materials for Li-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Goriparti, Subrahmanyam; Miele, Ermanno; De Angelis, Francesco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Capiglia, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    This review highlights the recent research advances in active nanostructured anode materials for the next generation of Li-ion batteries (LIBs). In fact, in order to address both energy and power demands of secondary LIBs for future energy storage applications, it is required the development of innovative kinds of electrodes. Nanostructured materials based on carbon, metal/semiconductor, metal oxides and metal phosphides/nitrides/sulfides show a variety of admirable properties for LIBs applications such as high surface area, low diffusion distance, high electrical and ionic conductivity. Therefore, nanosized active materials are extremely promising for bridging the gap towards the realization of the next generation of LIBs with high reversible capacities, increased power capability, long cycling stability and free from safety concerns. In this review, anode materials are classified, depending on their electrochemical reaction with lithium, into three groups: intercalation/de-intercalation, alloy/de-alloy and conversion materials. Furthermore, the effect of nanoscale size and morphology on the electrochemical performance is presented. Synthesis of the nanostructures, lithium battery performance and electrode reaction mechanisms are also discussed. To conclude, the main aim of this review is to provide an organic outline of the wide range of recent research progresses and perspectives on nanosized active anode materials for future LIBs.

  8. Systems Maturity Assessment of the Lithium Ion Battery for Extravehicular Mobility Unit Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Samuel P.

    2011-01-01

    The Long Life (Lithium Ion) Battery (LLB/LIB) is designed to replace the current Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Silver/Zinc (Ag/Zn) Increased Capacity Battery (ICB), which is used to provide power to the Primary Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) during Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). The LLB (a battery based on commercial lithium ion cell technology) is designed to have the same electrical and mechanical interfaces as the current ICB. The EMU LIB Charger is designed to charge, discharge, and condition the LLB either in a charger-strapped configuration or in an EMU-mounted configuration. This paper will retroactively apply the principles of Systems Maturity Assessment to the LLB project through use of the Integration Readiness Level and Earned Readiness Management. The viability of this methodology will be considered for application to new and existing technology development projects.

  9. Progress of scientific researches and project of CSR in IMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Genming

    2004-01-01

    The article reviews the recent progress of the scientific researches including synthesis of new nuclides, investigations of the isospin effects in heavy ion collisions, studies of the nuclear structure in high spin states and the applications of heavy ion beams to other scientific researches, such as biology and material science. It also gives a brief introduction of the development of the design and progress of the new project of heavy ion cooling storage ring (CSR) of Lanzhou. (author)

  10. Forecasting of Radiation Belts: Results From the PROGRESS Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balikhin, M. A.; Arber, T. D.; Ganushkina, N. Y.; Walker, S. N.

    2017-12-01

    Forecasting of Radiation Belts: Results from the PROGRESS Project. The overall goal of the PROGRESS project, funded in frame of EU Horizon2020 programme, is to combine first principles based models with the systems science methodologies to achieve reliable forecasts of the geo-space particle radiation environment.The PROGRESS incorporates three themes : The propagation of the solar wind to L1, Forecast of geomagnetic indices, and forecast of fluxes of energetic electrons within the magnetosphere. One of the important aspects of the PROGRESS project is the development of statistical wave models for magnetospheric waves that affect the dynamics of energetic electrons such as lower band chorus, hiss and equatorial noise. The error reduction ratio (ERR) concept has been used to optimise the set of solar wind and geomagnetic parameters for organisation of statistical wave models for these emissions. The resulting sets of parameters and statistical wave models will be presented and discussed. However the ERR analysis also indicates that the combination of solar wind and geomagnetic parameters accounts for only part of the variance of the emissions under investigation (lower band chorus, hiss and equatorial noise). In addition, advances in the forecast of fluxes of energetic electrons, exploiting empirical models and the first principles IMPTAM model achieved by the PROGRESS project is presented.

  11. SOCIAL PROGRESS AND ECONOMIC PROJECTS FOR DISADVANTAGED GROUPS IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelian Virgil BALUTA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to analyse the social progress, social politics, social law and successful projects applicable to the some disadvantaged groups: Roma people and woman. Inclusion of Roma people is analysed from economic point of view. The economic problems of equality by gender is presented in terms of labour rate and other relevant ratio. For Roma people the focus of analyse is also on labour involvement. The chapters of the communication are: introduction, literature review ( state of art in the field of social progress, theoretical background, tools for social progress in EU, economic inclusion of Roma population, economic equality by gender, conclusions.

  12. The Cordoba and Wolsung projects: a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, G.L.

    1977-06-01

    The Cordoba and Wolsung projects mark the entry into the international sales arena of the standardized Canadian 600 MWe CANDU-PHW reactor design. The Cordoba station experienced a setback in the early stages when severe inflation in Argentina led to a renegotiation of the contract. However, following this, good progress has been made and the current forecast completion date in 1980 is expected to be achieved. The Wolsung project experienced difficulties early in the project due to site conditions, so that site work commenced some 9-10 months later than originally planned. These difficulties had predictable effects upon the progress of site-related engineering and it is expected that the project completion date will be somewhat delayed

  13. Recent Progress in the Design of Advanced Cathode Materials and Battery Models for High-Performance Lithium-X (X = O2 , S, Se, Te, I2 , Br2 ) Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiantie; Ma, Jianmin; Fan, Qinghua; Guo, Shaojun; Dou, Shixue

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances and achievements in emerging Li-X (X = O 2 , S, Se, Te, I 2 , Br 2 ) batteries with promising cathode materials open up new opportunities for the development of high-performance lithium-ion battery alternatives. In this review, we focus on an overview of recent important progress in the design of advanced cathode materials and battery models for developing high-performance Li-X (X = O 2 , S, Se, Te, I 2 , Br 2 ) batteries. We start with a brief introduction to explain why Li-X batteries are important for future renewable energy devices. Then, we summarize the existing drawbacks, major progress and emerging challenges in the development of cathode materials for Li-O 2 (S) batteries. In terms of the emerging Li-X (Se, Te, I 2 , Br 2 ) batteries, we systematically summarize their advantages/disadvantages and recent progress. Specifically, we review the electrochemical performance of Li-Se (Te) batteries using carbonate-/ether-based electrolytes, made with different electrode fabrication techniques, and of Li-I 2 (Br 2 ) batteries with various cell designs (e.g., dual electrolyte, all-organic electrolyte, with/without cathode-flow mode, and fuel cell/solar cell integration). Finally, the perspective on and challenges for the development of cathode materials for the promising Li-X (X = O 2 , S, Se, Te, I 2 , Br 2 ) batteries is presented. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe3O4/carbon microspheres (Fe3O4/C were prepared by a facile hydrothermal reaction using cellulose and ferric trichloride as precursors. The resultant composite spheres have been investigated as anode materials for the lithium-ion batteries, and they show high capacity and good cycle stability (830mAhg−1 at a current density of 0.1C up to 70 cycles, as well as enhanced rate capability. The excellent electrochemical performance is attributed to the high structural stability and high rate of ionic/electronic conduction arising from the porous character and the synergetic effect of the carbon coated Fe3O4 structure and conductive carbon coating.

  15. The international arctic seas assessment project: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeblom, K.L.; Linsley, G.S.

    1995-01-01

    The article provides some background information on wastes dumped into the Arctic Seas and describes the progress made within the framework of International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP) lunched to assess the health and environmental implications of the dumping. 1 tab

  16. Interactive reliability analysis project. FY 80 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmuson, D.M.; Shepherd, J.C.

    1981-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress to date in the interactive reliability analysis project. Purpose is to develop and demonstrate a reliability and safety technique that can be incorporated early in the design process. Details are illustrated in a simple example of a reactor safety system

  17. Progress in Aging Epidemiology in Japan: The JAGES Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori Kondo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a prominent topic in global health. The purpose of this report is to document progress in two of our research projects in Japan, which currently is the most aged society in the world. The Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES is one of the largest nation-wide research projects on aging, with more than 100 000 participants in 2010 and 2013. One of the notable findings is that community participation is a significant determinant of older people’s health. We have also made progress in the development of the JAGES Health Equity Assessment and Response Tools (HEART, which is a management tool for developing age-friendly cities. This progress suggests that community perspective and management of health promotion in the communities are valuable and require further research.

  18. Making Progress: The Use of Multiple Progress Reports to Enhance Advertising Students' Media Plan Term Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritz, Gary H.; Lozada, Hector R.; Long, Mary M.

    2007-01-01

    Since the AACSB mandates that students demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills, it is imperative that business professors do what is necessary to improve such skills. The authors investigate whether the use of using multiple progress reports in an Advertising class project improves the final product. The data results show that…

  19. Current Progress of Si/Graphene Nanocomposites for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinjie Cen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The demand for high performance lithium-ion batteries (LIBs is increasing due to widespread use of portable devices and electric vehicles. Silicon (Si is one of the most attractive candidate anode materials for next generation LIBs. However, the high-volume change (>300% during lithium ion alloying/de-alloying leads to poor cycle life. When Si is used as the anode, conductive carbon is needed to provide the necessary conductivity. However, the traditional carbon coating method could not overcome the challenges of pulverization and unstable Solid Electrolyte Interphase (SEI layer during long-term cycling. Since 2010, Si/Graphene composites have been vigorously studied in hopes of providing a material with better cycling performance. This paper reviews current progress of Si/Graphene nanocomposites in LIBs. Different fabrication methods have been studied to synthesize Si/Graphene nanocomposites with promising electrochemical performances. Graphene plays a key enabling role in Si/Graphene anodes. However, the desired properties of graphene for this application have not been systematically studied and understood. Further systematic investigation of the desired graphene properties is suggested to better control the Si/Graphene anode performance.

  20. Recent Progress in Self-Supported Metal Oxide Nanoarray Electrodes for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Qi, Limin

    2016-09-01

    The rational design and fabrication of electrode materials with desirable architectures and optimized properties has been demonstrated to be an effective approach towards high-performance lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Although nanostructured metal oxide electrodes with high specific capacity have been regarded as the most promising alternatives for replacing commercial electrodes in LIBs, their further developments are still faced with several challenges such as poor cycling stability and unsatisfying rate performance. As a new class of binder-free electrodes for LIBs, self-supported metal oxide nanoarray electrodes have many advantageous features in terms of high specific surface area, fast electron transport, improved charge transfer efficiency, and free space for alleviating volume expansion and preventing severe aggregation, holding great potential to solve the mentioned problems. This review highlights the recent progress in the utilization of self-supported metal oxide nanoarrays grown on 2D planar and 3D porous substrates, such as 1D and 2D nanostructure arrays, hierarchical nanostructure arrays, and heterostructured nanoarrays, as anodes and cathodes for advanced LIBs. Furthermore, the potential applications of these binder-free nanoarray electrodes for practical LIBs in full-cell configuration are outlined. Finally, the future prospects of these self-supported nanoarray electrodes are discussed.

  1. The STABALID project: Risk analysis of stationary Li-ion batteries for power system applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, F.J.; Carvalho, L.; Costa, I.C.; Iria, J.P.; Bodet, J.-M.; Jacinto, G.; Lecocq, A.; Roessner, J.; Caillard, B.; Salvi, O.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a risk analysis performed to stationary Li-ion batteries within the framework of the STABALID project. The risk analysis had as main objective analysing the variety of hazards and dangerous situations that might be experienced by the battery during its life cycle and providing useful information on how to prevent or manage those undesired events. The first task of the risk analysis was the identification of all the hazards (or risks) that may arise during the battery life cycle. Afterwards, the hazards identified were mapped in the different stages of the battery life cycle and two analyses were performed for each stage: an internal problem analysis and an external peril analysis. For both, the dangerous phenomena and the undesirable events resulting from each hazard was evaluated in terms of probability of occurrence and severity. Then, a risk assessment was carried out according to a predefined risk matrix and a preliminary set of risk mitigation measures were proposed to reduce their probability of occurrence and/or their severity level. The results obtained show that it is possible to reduce the probability of occurrence/severity of all the risks associated to the battery life cycle to acceptable or tolerable levels. - Highlights: • Methodology for a detailed risk analysis of stationary Li-ion batteries. • Various hazards and dangerous situations are analysed with high detail. • Useful information on how to prevent or manage the undesired events is provided. • Measures to reduce probability of occurrence/severity of the risks are presented

  2. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, October 1992--March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-09-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Although progress has been made in developing reliable structural ceramics, further work is needed to reduce cost. The work described in this report is organized according to the following work breakdown structure project elements: Materials and processing (monolithics [Si nitride, carbide], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining, cost effective ceramic machining), materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts), data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, nondestructive evaluation development), and technology transfer.

  3. Crystalline Repository Project. Technical progress report, October 1982-March 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This document reports the progress being made periodically on the development of a geologic repository in crystalline rock for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The reporting elements are arranged by the work breakdown structure so that related studies are presented together. The studies are reported by the Office of Crystalline Respository Development (OCRD), a prime contractor of the US Department of Energy Repository Project Office. The studies include work by other prime contractors and by subcontractors to OCRD

  4. Report on Lithium Ion Battery Trade Studies to Support the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) Energy Storage Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert D.; Kissock, Barbara I.; Bennett, William R.

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the results of two system related analyses to support the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) Energy Storage Project. The first study documents a trade study to determine the optimum Li-ion battery cell capacity for the ascent stage battery for the Altair lunar lander being developed under the Constellation Systems program. The battery cell capacity for the Ultra High Energy (UHE) Li-ion battery initially chosen as the target for development was 35 A-hr; this study concludes that a 19.4 A-hr cell capacity would be more optimum from a minimum battery mass perspective. The second study in this report is an assessment of available low temperature Li-ion battery cell performance data to determine whether lowering the operating temperature range of the Li-ion battery, in a rover application, could save overall system mass by eliminating thermal control system mass normally needed to maintain battery temperature within a tighter temperature limit than electronics or other less temperature sensitive components. The preliminary assessment for this second study indicates that the reduction in the thermal control system mass is negated by an increase in battery mass to compensate for the loss in battery capacity due to lower temperature operating conditions.

  5. A comprehensive review on recent progress in aluminum–air batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yisi Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aluminum–air battery is considered to be an attractive candidate as a power source for electric vehicles (EVs because of its high theoretical energy density (8100 Wh kg−1, which is significantly greater than that of the state-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries (LIBs. However, some technical and scientific problems preventing the large-scale development of Al–air batteries have not yet to be resolved. In this review, we present the fundamentals, challenges and the recent advances in Al–air battery technology from aluminum anode, air cathode and electrocatalysts to electrolytes and inhibitors. Firstly, the alloying of aluminum with transition metal elements is reviewed and shown to reduce the self-corrosion of Al and improve battery performance. Additionally for the cathode, extensive studies of electrocatalytic materials for oxygen reduction/evolution including Pt and Pt alloys, nonprecious metal catalysts, and carbonaceous materials at the air cathode are highlighted. Moreover, for the electrolyte, the application of aqueous and nonaqueous electrolytes in Al–air batteries are discussed. Meanwhile, the addition of inhibitors to the electrolyte to enhance electrochemical performance is also explored. Finally, the challenges and future research directions are proposed for the further development of Al–air batteries. Keywords: Aluminum–air battery, Aluminum anode, Air cathode, Oxygen reduction reaction, Electrolytes

  6. Development and progress of the South African uranium enrichment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, A.J.A.; Grant, W.L.; Barbour, R.A.; Loubser, R.S.; Wannenburg, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    The earlier development of the project is briefly reviewed, and some of the salient features of the South African process are touched upon. Development of the separation element in the last 18 months is discussed, as well as further work on the helikon cascade process. A brief description of the helikon cascade operation is given by means of diagrams. Because of time limitations, the complete helikon theory is not presented, but only some examples shown. Experimental work done to verify the helikon concept, as well as theoretical treatment, is presented. A brief report of the progress made on the experimental module of 6 t/a separative work capacity is given. This module, known as Mini-Z, is well advanced and details of its features and construction are shown. A short discussion of progress on the full-scale prototype module, known as Proto-Z, is next presented. The flexibility of such a design to fit a wide range of cascade sizes is considered, as well as cost implications of various approaches to design. Apart from progress on the development of the commercial plant, a brief review is given of the present state of the pilot plant at Valindaba. Some of the information obtained is mentioned. In conclusion, some information is given in regard to further planning and other work on the commercial plant at present being undertaken. Projected operation of the plant and some nuclear fuel service aspects are touched on

  7. Surface and interface sciences of Li-ion batteries. -Research progress in electrode-electrolyte interface-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Taketoshi; Abe, Takeshi

    2017-12-01

    The application potential of Li-ion batteries is growing as demand increases in different fields at various stages in energy systems, in addition to their conventional role as power sources for portable devices. In particular, applications in electric vehicles and renewable energy storage are increasing for Li-ion batteries. For these applications, improvements in battery performance are necessary. The Li-ion battery produces and stores electric power from the electrochemical redox reactions between the electrode materials. The interface between the electrodes and electrolyte strongly affects the battery performance because the charge transfer causing the electrode redox reaction begins at this interface. Understanding of the surface structure, electronic structure, and chemical reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface is necessary to improve battery performance. However, the interface is located between the electrode and electrolyte materials, hindering the experimental analysis of the interface; thus, the physical properties and chemical processes have remained poorly understood until recently. Investigations of the physical properties and chemical processes at the interface have been performed using advanced surface science techniques. In this review, current knowledge and future research prospects regarding the electrode-electrolyte interface are described for the further development of Li-ion batteries.

  8. High-performance batteries for electric-vehicle propulsion and stationary energy storage. Progress report, October 1977--September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, P.A.; Barney, D.L.; Steunenberg, R.K.

    1978-11-01

    The research, development, and management activities of the programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and at industrial subcontractors' laboratories on high-temperature batteries during the period October 1977--September 1978 are reported. These batteries are being developed for electric-vehicle propulsion and for stationary-energy-storage applications. The present cells, which operate at 400 to 500/sup 0/C, are of a vertically oriented, prismatic design with one or more inner positive electrodes of FeS or FeS/sub 2/, facing electrodes of lithium--aluminum alloy, and molten LiCl--KCl electrolyte. During this fiscal year, cell and battery development work continued at ANL, Eagle--Picher Industries, Inc., the Energy Systems Group of Rockwell International, and Gould Inc. Related work was also in progress at the Carborundum Co., General Motors Research Laboratories, and various other organizations. A major event was the initiation of a subcontract with Eagle--Picher Industries to develop, design, and fabricate a 40-kWh battery (Mark IA) for testing in an electric van. Conceptual design studies on a 100-MWh stationary-energy-storage module were conducted as a joint effort between ANL and Rockwell International. A significant technical advance was the development of multiplate cells, which are capable of higher performance than bicells. 89 figures, 57 tables.

  9. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-07-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  10. Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP). A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullee, G.R.; Usher, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Shippingport Atomic Power Station was shutdown in October, 1982 by the Plant Operator, Duquesne Light Company, for decommissioning by the US Department of Energy. The planning for decommissioning was completed in September, 1983. In September, 1984 operational responsibility for the station was transferred to the DOE's Decommissioning Operations Contractor - the General Electric Company (assisted by an integrated subcontractor, MK Ferguson Company). Significant accomplishments to date include the completion of all prerequisites for decommissioning, the removal of asbestos from plant systems, loading of irradiated reactor components into the reactor vessel for shipment, the commencement of electrical deactivations and the commencement of piping/component removal. Decontamination and waste processing are progressing in support of the project schedule. The reactor vessel will be shipped as one piece on a barge for burial at Hanford, Washington. The final release of the site is scheduled for April, 1990. A technology transfer program is being utilized to disseminate information about the project

  11. Status of the Space-Rated Lithium-Ion Battery Advanced Development Project in Support of the Exploration Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), along with the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Johnson Space Center (JSC), Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and industry partners, is leading a space-rated lithium-ion advanced development battery effort to support the vision for Exploration. This effort addresses the lithium-ion battery portion of the Energy Storage Project under the Exploration Technology Development Program. Key discussions focus on the lithium-ion cell component development activities, a common lithium-ion battery module, test and demonstration of charge/discharge cycle life performance and safety characterization. A review of the space-rated lithium-ion battery project will be presented highlighting the technical accomplishments during the past year.

  12. Progress on the Hanford K basins spent nuclear fuel project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culley, G.E.; Fulton, J.C.; Gerber, E.W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper highlights progress made during the last year toward removing the Department of Energy's (DOE) approximately, 2,100 metric tons of metallic spent nuclear fuel from the two outdated K Basins at the Hanford Site and placing it in safe, economical interim dry storage. In the past year, the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project has engaged in an evolutionary process involving the customer, regulatory bodies, and the public that has resulted in a quicker, cheaper, and safer strategy for accomplishing that goal. Development and implementation of the Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Fuel is as much a case study of modern project and business management within the regulatory system as it is a technical achievement. A year ago, the SNF Project developed the K Basins Path Forward that, beginning in December 1998, would move the spent nuclear fuel currently stored in the K Basins to a new Staging and Storage Facility by December 2000. The second stage of this $960 million two-stage plan would complete the project by conditioning the metallic fuel and placing it in interim dry storage by 2006. In accepting this plan, the DOE established goals that the fuel removal schedule be accelerated by a year, that fuel conditioning be closely coupled with fuel removal, and that the cost be reduced by at least $300 million. The SNF Project conducted coordinated engineering and technology studies over a three-month period that established the technical framework needed to design and construct facilities, and implement processes compatible with these goals. The result was the Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Fuel. This strategy accomplishes the goals set forth by the DOE by beginning fuel removal a year earlier in December 1997, completing it by December 1999, beginning conditioning within six months of starting fuel removal, and accomplishes it for $340 million less than the previous Path Forward plan

  13. First progress report on the Japan Endoscopy Database project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodashima, Shinya; Tanaka, Kiyohito; Matsuda, Koji; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Yutaka; Ohtsuka, Kazuo; Oda, Ichiro; Katada, Chikatoshi; Kato, Masayuki; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Kiyonori; Hoteya, Shu; Horimatsu, Takahiro; Matsuda, Takahisa; Muto, Manabu; Yamamoto, Hironori; Ryozawa, Shomei; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Miyata, Hiroaki; Kato, Mototsugu; Haruma, Ken; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Uemura, Naomi; Kaminishi, Michio; Tajiri, Hisao

    2018-01-01

    The Japan Endoscopy Database (JED) Project was started to develop the world's largest endoscopic database, capture the actual performance of endoscopic practice, and standardize the terminology and fundamental items needed for a clinical and research registry. This paper presents a progress report on the first phase of this project undertaken at eight endoscopic centers in Japan. The list of data items to be collected was drafted by the MSED-J (Minimal Standard Endoscopic Database) subcommittee. These items were aggregated offline by integrating data from two endoscopic filing systems between July 2015 and December 2015. The study population included all patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy at all eight centers, patients who underwent enteroscopy at five of the eight centers, and patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) at four of the eight centers. Data collected in this phase included 61 070 endoscopic procedures, of which 40 475 were esophagogastroduodenoscopies, 215 were enteroscopies, 19 204 were colonoscopies, and 1176 were ERCPs. Frequencies of complications were 0.68% for esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 0% for enteroscopy, 0.43% for colonoscopy, and 13.34% for ERCP. In addition, we obtained various data including Helicobacter pylori infection status, past history of endoscopy in patients who underwent enteroscopy or colonoscopy, and degree of difficulty of ERCP, although the frequencies of reporting were sometimes low, with some items <20%. Results of the first phase suggest that the JED project can provide vast quantities of useful data about endoscopic procedures. © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  14. Electrolyte additives for lithium metal anodes and rechargeable lithium metal batteries: progresses and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Eshetu, Gebrekidan Gebresilassie; Judez, Xabier; Li, Chunmei; Rodriguez-Martínez, Lide M; Armand, Michel

    2018-02-14

    Lithium metal (Li°) - based rechargeable batteries (LMBs), such as Li° anode vs. intercalation and/or conversion type cathode batteries, lithium-sulphur (Li-S), and lithium-oxygen (O2)/air (Li-O2/air) are becoming increasingly important for electrifying the modern transportation system, enabling sustainable mobility in the near future. Though some rechargeable LMBs batteries (e.g., Li°/LiFePO4 batteries from Bolloré Bluecar®, Li-S batteries from OXIS Energy and Sion Power) are already commercially viable in niche applications, their large-scale deployment is still hampered due to the existence of a number of formidable challenges, including lithium dendrite growth, electrolyte instability towards high voltage intercalation type cathode, poor electronic and ionic conductivities of sulphur (S8) and O2, as well as their corresponding reduction products (e.g., Li2S and Li2O), dissolution and shuttling of polysulphide (PS) intermediates etc. This ultimately results in short cycle life, low coulombic/energy efficiency, poor safety, and a high self-discharge rate. Among other mitigating strategies, the use of electrolyte additives is considered as one of the most economical, and effective approach for circumventing these dilemmas. Set out to offer an in-depth insight into the rapidly growing research on the account of electrolyte additives for rechargeable LMBs, this review presents an overview of the various functional additives, that are being applied in Li-anode/intercalation cathode-based, Li-S and Li-O2 batteries. This review is believed to assess the status quo of the research and thereby arouse new thoughts and opportunities, opening new avenues for the practical realization of these appealing devices. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A simulation of 'schedule-cost' progress monitoring system in nuclear power project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Haitao; Huang Zhongping; Zhang Zemin; Wang Zikai

    2010-01-01

    The objective of project management is to find the optimal balance between progress and cost according to the project requirements. Traditional method always manages progress and cost separately. However, domestic and international experience indicated that the interactions between these two factors are crucial in the project implementation. Modern project managers have to manage and maintain a 'Progress - Cost' joint control framework. Such a model is applied into a sub-project of a nuclear power project using Simulink in this paper. It helps to identify and correct the deviations of the project. Earned Value Management is used by the project manager to quantify the cost of the project and progress of implementation. The budget plan value, actual value, earned value are three important parameters to measure cost and progress of the project. The experimental results illustrated that the method gives a more comprehensive performance evaluation of the project. (authors)

  16. Progress report on recommendations of the Flaring Project Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macken, C.

    1999-01-01

    Part of the mandate of the Clean Air Strategic Alliance (CASA) is to share decision-making responsibility for air quality management with the government of Alberta, through the ministries of Environmental Protection, Energy, and Health, and the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB). CASA's vision for air quality in Alberta is that 'the air will be odourless, tasteless, look clear, and have no measurable short- or long-term adverse effects on people, animals, or the environment'. In 1997, CASA approved the establishment of the Flaring Project Team in response to public concern about potential and observed impacts associated with flaring of solution gas. Members of that team established a framework for the management of solution gas flaring. Their long-term goal is to eliminate routine flaring of solution gas. The Project Team assessed existing information on solution gas flaring, including technologies, efficiencies, emissions and impacts. Alternative technologies were also reviewed along with biological and health effects of solution gas flaring. A list of data gaps and research needs was compiled in order to help with the development of the Team's recommendations. The Team's final report was delivered in June 1998. It was recommended that the following policy objective hierarchy be used to guide decisions related to routine solution gas flaring: (1) eliminate routine solution gas flaring, (2) reduce volumes of gas flared, and (3) improve the efficiency of flares. By way of progress the Project Team was able to report that in March, 1999, the EUB issued a draft interim directive to address upstream petroleum industry flaring. The draft Directive incorporates the recommendations from the CASA Flaring Project Team with respect to management of solution gas flaring. In December 1998, changes to the royalty structure to encourage the productive use of flare gas have been announced by the Alberta Department of Energy and Alberta Environmental protection, thus

  17. Planning and progress of the WAGR decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boorman, T.

    1988-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, the earliest production reactors, which will be decommissioned first, are of the Magnox type. The Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor, is however, sufficiently similar to make it a suitable prototype decommissioning project. The planning and progress so far is described. Special decommissioning equipment, including a remote dismantling machine, has been developed and a waste packaging building built on site. Its function is to enable all intermediate-level and low-level radioactive waste removed from the reactor vault by remote equipment to be packaged remotely into suitable containers. The work done on the WAGR decommissioning has shown that the dismantling of a power-producing reactor is feasible and can be accomplished using existing engineering techniques. (U.K.)

  18. Progress with the NESC spinning cylinder project and other NESC projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintle, J.B.; Hurst, R.C.; Hemsworth, B.

    1995-01-01

    The first international project (NESC I) of the Network of Evaluating Steel Components is a spinning cylinder, pressurized thermal shock (PTS) experiment. The main objective of the project is to validate the non-destructive evaluation and structural mechanics procedures for PWR reactor pressure vessels under PTS conditions. Contributing organizations world-wide will participate in this blind trial which embraces all aspects of structural integrity assessment. This paper describes the progress of the project to date, covering cylinder manufacture and inspection, materials evaluation, structural analysis and test instrumentation. It emphasizes the importance of networking global expertise in a managed framework and of the partnership, co-operation and teamwork developed by the contributing organizations through the five Task Groups constituting the NESC I. Finally, five new initiatives for projects managed by the Network are currently under review and described in this paper

  19. Progress with the NESC spinning cylinder project and other NESC projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintle, J.B.; Hurst, R.C.; Hemsworth, B.

    1995-01-01

    The first international project (NESC I) of the Network for Evaluating Steel Components is a spinning cylinder, pressurized thermal shock (PTS) experiment. The main objective of the project is to validate the non-destructive evaluation and structural mechanics procedures for PWR reactor pressure vessels under PTS conditions. Contributing organizations world-wide will participate in this blind trial which embraces all aspects of structural integrity assessment. This paper describes the progress of the project to date, covering cylinder manufacture and inspection, materials evaluation, structural analysis and test instrumentation. It emphasises the importance of networking global expertise in a managed framework and of the partnership, co-operation and teamwork developed by the contributing organizations through the five Task Groups constituting NESC I. Finally, five new initiatives for projects managed by the Network are currently under review and described in this paper. (author). 2 refs, 6 figs

  20. The Midwifery Legacies Project: history, progress, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Davis, Tonia L; McGee, Karen B; Moore, Elaine M; Paine, Lisa L

    2015-01-01

    The Midwifery Legacies Project, formerly known as the OnGoing Group, was founded as an annual greeting card outreach aimed at maintaining contact with midwives as they approached retirement and beyond. In 2009, the importance of documenting personal and professional stories of midwives arose out of a bequest by a midwife who was relatively unknown outside of the community she served. The result has been the evolution of a robust collection of stories, which are known as the 20th Century Midwife Story Collection. Between 2009 and 2014, more than 120 US midwives aged 65 years or older were interviewed by a midwife, a student midwife, or a professional filmmaker. Collectively, these midwives' stories offer an intimate snapshot of the social, political, and cultural influences that have shaped US midwifery during the past half century. Individually, the stories honor and recognize midwives' contributions to the profession and the women they have served. This article details the development, progress, and future directions of the Midwifery Legacies Project. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  1. Progress of the Hanford Bulk Vitrification Project ICVTM Testing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witwer, K.S.; Woolery, D.W.; Dysland, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    In June 2004, the Bulk Vitrification Project was initiated with the intent to engineer, construct and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat low-activity tank waste from Hanford tank 241-S-109. The project, managed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., and performed by AMEC Earth and Environmental, Inc. (AMEC), will develop and operate a full-scale demonstration facility to exhibit the effectiveness of the bulk vitrification process under actual operating conditions. Since project initiation, testing has been undertaken using crucible-scale, 1/6 linear (engineering) scale, and full-scale vitrification equipment. Crucible-scale testing, coupled with engineering-scale testing, helps establish process limitations of selected glass formulations. Full-scale testing provides critical design verification of the In Container Vitrification (ICV) TM process both prior to and during operation of the demonstration facility. Beginning in late 2004, several full-scale tests have been performed at AMEC's test site, located adjacent to the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in Richland, WA. Early testing involved verification of melt startup methodology, followed by subsequent full-melt testing to validate critical design parameters and demonstrate the 'Bottom-Up, Feed While Melt' process. As testing has progressed, design improvements have been identified and incorporated into each successive test. Full scale testing at AMEC's test site is currently scheduled to complete in 2006, with continued full-scale operational testing at the demonstration facility on the Hanford Site starting in 2007. Additional engineering scale testing will validate recommended glass formulations that have been provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This testing is expected to continue through 2006. This paper discusses the progress of the full-scale and engineering scale testing performed to date. Crucible-scale testing, a critical step in developing

  2. Progress report: Bangladesh [CSC Project on Management of Water Hyacinth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haider, S.Z.

    1981-01-01

    The CSC Project on Management of Water Hyacinth in Bangladesh was started in only April 1981. The present report from Bangladesh is based on the interim progress reports, submitted by the project coordinators of the organizations concerned, for the work during the short intervening period to 4th June 1981. It is obvious that the report deals mainly with the preliminary preparations and observations on the various aspects of the investigations. The research components assigned to various organisations in Bangladesh are: Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology; - Growth rate and biogas production; Housing and Building Research Institute; - Paper and board, and biogas; Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research - Protein, enzymes and ammoacids; Dacca University - Pollution removal and studies of biomass production. Bangladesh is a flat deltaic plain formed from old and new alluvium. The areas of old alluvium are located above the general level, while the vast areas of new alluvium are situated m the flood plain of the modern rivers. The whole country is intersected by a network of rivers; the areas comprising the alluvial plains are very large. The river bank levees are high and the land gradually slopes inland away from the levees. The tract of land between two rivers are shaped like a furrow and in most cases form elongated 'beels' or swamps which are ideal place for the growth and propagation of aquatic plants particularly water hyacinth along with other aquatic organisms, both of plant and animal origin due to eutrophication. It is in the shallow swamps and derelict ponds that luxuriant growth and proliferation of water hyacinth is generally observed in Bangladesh. However, there is a feeling that much of the water hyacinth population in the open countryside was depleted during the severe drought which prevailed during the summer of 1979. But Bangladesh has the ideal water and climatic environment for conditions of rapid growth and spread

  3. The 150 ns detector project: progress with small detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warburton, W.K.; Russell, S.R.; Kleinfelder, Stuart A.; Segal, Julie

    1994-01-01

    This project's long term goal is to develop a pixel area detector capable of 6 MHz frame rates (150 ns/frame). Our milestones toward this goal are: a single pixel, 1x256 1D and 8x8 2D detectors, 256x256 2D detectors and, finally, 1024x1024 2D detectors. The design strategy is to supply a complete electronics chain (resetting preamp, selectable gain amplifier, analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and memory) for each pixel. In the final detectors these will all be custom integrated circuits. The front end preamplifiers are being integrated first, since their design and performance are both the most unusual and also critical to the project's success. Similarly, our early work is also concentrating on devising and perfecting detector structures which are thick enough (1 mm) to absorb over 99% of the incident X-rays in the energy range of interest. In this paper we discuss our progress toward the 1x256 1D and 8x8 2D detectors. We have fabricated sample detectors at Stanford's Center for Integrated Systems and are preparing both to test them individually and to wirebond them to the preamplifier samples to produce our first working small 1D and 2D detectors. We will describe our solutions to the design problems associated with collecting charge in less than 30 ns from 1 mm thick pixels in high resistivity silicon. We have constructed and tested the front end of our preamplifier design using a commercial 1.2 μm CMOS technology and are moving on to produce a few channels of the complete preamplifier, including a switchable gain stage and output stage. We will discuss both the preamplifier design and our initial test results. ((orig.))

  4. The 150 ns detector project: progress with small detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, W.K. (X-ray Instrumentation Associates, 2513 Charleston Rd, Ste 207, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)); Russell, S.R. (X-ray Instrumentation Associates, 2513 Charleston Rd, Ste 207, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)); Kleinfelder, Stuart A. (VLSI Physics, 19 Drury Lane, Berkeley, CA 94705 (United States)); Segal, Julie (Integrated Ckts Lab., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States))

    1994-09-01

    This project's long term goal is to develop a pixel area detector capable of 6 MHz frame rates (150 ns/frame). Our milestones toward this goal are: a single pixel, 1x256 1D and 8x8 2D detectors, 256x256 2D detectors and, finally, 1024x1024 2D detectors. The design strategy is to supply a complete electronics chain (resetting preamp, selectable gain amplifier, analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and memory) for each pixel. In the final detectors these will all be custom integrated circuits. The front end preamplifiers are being integrated first, since their design and performance are both the most unusual and also critical to the project's success. Similarly, our early work is also concentrating on devising and perfecting detector structures which are thick enough (1 mm) to absorb over 99% of the incident X-rays in the energy range of interest. In this paper we discuss our progress toward the 1x256 1D and 8x8 2D detectors. We have fabricated sample detectors at Stanford's Center for Integrated Systems and are preparing both to test them individually and to wirebond them to the preamplifier samples to produce our first working small 1D and 2D detectors. We will describe our solutions to the design problems associated with collecting charge in less than 30 ns from 1 mm thick pixels in high resistivity silicon. We have constructed and tested the front end of our preamplifier design using a commercial 1.2 [mu]m CMOS technology and are moving on to produce a few channels of the complete preamplifier, including a switchable gain stage and output stage. We will discuss both the preamplifier design and our initial test results. ((orig.))

  5. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    Approximately 30 research projects are summarized in this report. Title of the project, contract number, company or university, award amount, principal investigators, objectives, and summary of technical progress are given for each project. Enhanced oil recovery projects include chemical flooding, gas displacement, and thermal recovery. Most of the research projects though are related to geoscience technology and reservoir characterization.

  6. NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program Energy Storage Project Battery Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.; Miller, Thomas B.; Mercer, Carolyn R.; Jankovsky, Amy L.

    2010-01-01

    Technical Interchange Meeting was held at Saft America s Research and Development facility in Cockeysville, Maryland on Sept 28th-29th, 2010. The meeting was attended by Saft, contractors who are developing battery component materials under contracts awarded through a NASA Research Announcement (NRA), and NASA. This briefing presents an overview of the components being developed by the contractor attendees for the NASA s High Energy (HE) and Ultra High Energy (UHE) cells. The transition of the advanced lithium-ion cell development project at NASA from the Exploration Technology Development Program Energy Storage Project to the Enabling Technology Development and Demonstration High Efficiency Space Power Systems Project, changes to deliverable hardware and schedule due to a reduced budget, and our roadmap to develop cells and provide periodic off-ramps for cell technology for demonstrations are discussed. This meeting gave the materials and cell developers the opportunity to discuss the intricacies of their materials and determine strategies to address any particulars of the technology.

  7. Recent Progresses and Development of Advanced Atomic Layer Deposition towards High-Performance Li-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Liang, Longwei; Sun, Xuan; Sun, Xiaofei; Wu, Chen; Hou, Linrui; Sun, Jinfeng

    2017-01-01

    Electrode materials and electrolytes play a vital role in device-level performance of rechargeable Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, electrode structure/component degeneration and electrode-electrolyte sur-/interface evolution are identified as the most crucial obstacles in practical applications. Thanks to its congenital advantages, atomic layer deposition (ALD) methodology has attracted enormous attention in advanced LIBs. This review mainly focuses upon the up-to-date progress and development of the ALD in high-performance LIBs. The significant roles of the ALD in rational design and fabrication of multi-dimensional nanostructured electrode materials, and finely tailoring electrode-electrolyte sur-/interfaces are comprehensively highlighted. Furthermore, we clearly envision that this contribution will motivate more extensive and insightful studies in the ALD to considerably improve Li-storage behaviors. Future trends and prospects to further develop advanced ALD nanotechnology in next-generation LIBs were also presented. PMID:29036916

  8. Massachusetts Crystalline Repository Project. Progress report, December 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Project activities which have been undertaken include the following: review and comment on OCRD projects reports; review of pertinent DOE, NRC, EPA, and DOT quidelines and regulations; review of reports and maps released by the federal project group and contractors; attendance at DOE workshops and conferences; implementation of state-specific research activities; interaction with representatives of federal agencies and other participating states; and interface with media, state officials and legislators, and interested citizens

  9. Projects at the component development and integration facility. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the third quarter of FY94. The CDIF is a major Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: Biomass Remediation Project; Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil Project; MHD Shutdown; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; and Spray Casting Project

  10. [Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project]: FY 1987 annual progress report, October 1, 1986-September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents progress on the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project for FY 1987. There are two main topics: Project Management and Decommissioning Project Activities. Changes from technical and managerial concepts developed in the original Decommissioning Plan are presented with the related technical, economic, or schedule considerations. 3 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  11. UK Safeguards R and D Project progress report for the period July 1983 - April 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    Progress reports are presented on the following projects: centrifuge enrichment plant safeguards; stores safeguards and general accounting techniques; generic programmes (projects underlying many instrument systems (e.g. tamper proofing and indication; neutron interrogation systems); system studies); FBR fuel cycle safeguards; service programmes (services to the IAEA); exploratory and short projects. (U.K.)

  12. Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project: FY 1986 annual progress report, October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report presents progress on the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project for FY 1986. There are two main topics: Project Management and Decommissioning Project Activities. Changes from technical and managerial concepts developed in the original Decommissioning Plan are presented with the related technical, economic, or schedule considerations. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project: FY 1988 annual progress report, October 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents progress on the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project for FY 1988. There are two main topics: Project Management and Decommissioning Project Activities. Changes from technical and managerial concepts developed in the original Decommissioning Plan are presented with the related technical, economic, or schedular considerations. 4 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs

  14. SEAFOODplus: objectives, outputs, progress since the completion of the project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børresen, Torger

    the human nutrition area one project pointed toward new information indicating that fish protein has been overlooked as a key factor for human nutrition. When male individuals received a hypocaloric diet for weight reduction, the weight loss was significantly higher when the diet contained fish...... for delivering high amounts of essential nutrients, e.g. selenium, through optimal feed formulations, thus using fish as a carrier of important nutrients in the human diet. Traceability was a project area cutting across all the other areas within the SEAFOODplus project. New methods for implementing full...

  15. Progress Report of the Schools Television Research Project--III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemelfield, Graeme

    1969-01-01

    "This concluding article provides the first published account of a series of psychological experiments which are presently being undertaken by the Schools Television Research Project, examining presentation factors in instructional television. (Editor)

  16. JPL's electric and hybrid vehicles project: Project activities and preliminary test results. [power conditioning and battery charge efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    Efforts to achieve a 100 mile urban range, to reduce petroleum usage 40% to 70%, and to commercialize battery technology are discussed with emphasis on an all plastic body, four passenger car that is flywheel assisted and battery powered, and on an all metal body, four passenger car with front wheel drive and front motor. For the near term case, a parallel hybrid in which the electric motor and the internal combustion engine may directly power the drive wheels, is preferred to a series design. A five passenger car in which the electric motor and the gasoline engine both feed into the same transmission is discussed. Upgraded demonstration vehicles were tested using advanced lead acid, nickel zinc, nickel iron, and zinc chloride batteries to determine maximum acceleration, constant speed, and battery behavior. The near term batteries demonstrated significant improvement relative to current lead acid batteries. The increase in range was due to improved energy density, and ampere hour capacity, with relatively 1 small weight and volume differences.

  17. Construction progress of the cooling & ventilation in the LHC project

    CERN Document Server

    Body, Y; Josa, F; Monsted, A; Pirollet, B; CERN. Geneva. ST Division

    2002-01-01

    After the LEP dismantling Phase the Cooling and Ventilation Group has started the LHC construction work. Year 2001 through to 2004 will certainly be the most important period of activity for the CV group in the erection phase The author will report on the current works that are in progress on the different LHC Points distinguishing between the Ventilation and the Water Cooling installations. The Ventilation work completed in the new surface buildings in Points 1, 4,5,6 and 8. The work for the Cooling plants comprehend to the pumping stations, the cooling towers and the chilled water production stations in Points 1 and 5, For all of these activities, an updated report of the progress the work, the planning and of the expenses are given. Finally, a brief overview of the future activities is presented.

  18. Progress, status, and plans for the HRIBF project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auble, R.L.; Alton, G.D.; Bailey, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Over the last three years, the Holifield accelerator system has been reconfigured into a first-generation radioactive ion beam facility, the HRIBF, a national user facility for RIB research. The construction and reconfiguration have been completed and the equipment commissioning and beam development phases have started. The progress to date, the present status, and future plans will be given. The special problems connected with the production and acceleration of RIBs will be discussed

  19. Recent Progress in Synthesis and Application of Low-Dimensional Silicon Based Anode Material for Lithium Ion Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuandong Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon is regarded as the next generation anode material for LIBs with its ultra-high theoretical capacity and abundance. Nevertheless, the severe capacity degradation resulting from the huge volume change and accumulative solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI formation hinders the silicon based anode material for further practical applications. Hence, a variety of methods have been applied to enhance electrochemical performances in terms of the electrochemical stability and rate performance of the silicon anodes such as designing nanostructured Si, combining with carbonaceous material, exploring multifunctional polymer binders, and developing artificial SEI layers. Silicon anodes with low-dimensional structures (0D, 1D, and 2D, compared with bulky silicon anodes, are strongly believed to have several advanced characteristics including larger surface area, fast electron transfer, and shortened lithium diffusion pathway as well as better accommodation with volume changes, which leads to improved electrochemical behaviors. In this review, recent progress of silicon anode synthesis methodologies generating low-dimensional structures for lithium ion batteries (LIBs applications is listed and discussed.

  20. Jules Horowitz reactor - presentation of the project and progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballagny, A.; Frachet, S.; Rommens, M.; Guigon, B.; Minguet, J.L.; Dupuy, J.P.; Leydier, C.

    2001-01-01

    The RJH project was launched by CEA some years ago, with the objective to replace, after 2010, the material testing reactors of the previous generation. The objectives are also: to realise a significant step in term of performances, to ensure a high flexibility of the design, in order to host in the future new experiments, which are not completely defined at the project stage, to reach a high level of safety, according to the best current practice. After a summary of the main experimental objectives of the facility, the present paper deals with a detailed technical presentation of the project, resulting from preliminary design studies. The following topics are covered successively: the main functionalities, the resulting design options and technical solutions, the layout of the nuclear facility. (orig.)

  1. Progress and achievements of the ITER L-4 blanket project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daenner, W.; Toschi, R.; Cardella, A.

    1999-01-01

    The L-4 Blanket Project embraces the R and D of the ITER Shielding Blanket, and its main objective is the fabrication of prototype components. This paper summarises the main conclusions from the materials R and D and the development of technologies which were required for the prototype specifications and manufacturing. The main results of the ongoing testing activities, and of the component manufacture are outlined.The main objectives of the project have been achieved including improvements of the material properties and of joining technologies, which resulted in good component quality and high performance in qualification tests. (author)

  2. Progress and achievements of the ITER L-4 blanket project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daenner, W.; Toschi, R.; Cardella, A.

    2001-01-01

    The L-4 Blanket Project embraces the R and D of the ITER Shielding Blanket, and its main objective is the fabrication of prototype components. This paper summarises the main conclusions from the materials R and D and the development of technologies which were required for the prototype specifications and manufacturing. The main results of the ongoing testing activities, and of the component manufacture are outlined. The main objectives of the project have been achieved including improvements of the material properties and of joining technologies, which resulted in good component quality and high performance in qualification tests. (author)

  3. Project Milestone. Analysis of Range Extension Techniques for Battery Electric Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, Jeremy [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wood, Eric [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pesaran, Ahmad [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This report documents completion of the July 2013 milestone as part of NREL’s Vehicle Technologies Annual Operating Plan with the U.S. Department of Energy. The objective was to perform analysis on range extension techniques for battery electric vehicles (BEVs). This work represents a significant advancement over previous thru-life BEV analyses using NREL’s Battery Ownership Model, FastSim,* and DRIVE.* Herein, the ability of different charging infrastructure to increase achievable travel of BEVs in response to real-world, year-long travel histories is assessed. Effects of battery and cabin thermal response to local climate, battery degradation, and vehicle auxiliary loads are captured. The results reveal the conditions under which different public infrastructure options are most effective, and encourage continued study of fast charging and electric roadway scenarios.

  4. 7 CFR 3405.19 - Monitoring progress of funded projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HIGHER EDUCATION CHALLENGE GRANTS... reform, and opportunities to enhance dissemination of exemplary end products/results. (b) An Annual..., including: A review of project objectives and accomplishments; a description of any products and outcomes...

  5. Savanna ecosystem project: phase I summary and phase II progress

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Huntely, BJ

    1978-07-01

    Full Text Available A summary of the results of the first phase (mid 1974 to mid 1976) of the South African Savanna Ecosystem Project being undertaken at Nylsvley in the northern Transvaal is presented. Phase I of this ten year study of the structure and functioning...

  6. Peanut (Arachis hypogaea Expressed Sequence Tag Project: Progress and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suping Feng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many plant ESTs have been sequenced as an alternative to whole genome sequences, including peanut because of the genome size and complexity. The US peanut research community had the historic 2004 Atlanta Genomics Workshop and named the EST project as a main priority. As of August 2011, the peanut research community had deposited 252,832 ESTs in the public NCBI EST database, and this resource has been providing the community valuable tools and core foundations for various genome-scale experiments before the whole genome sequencing project. These EST resources have been used for marker development, gene cloning, microarray gene expression and genetic map construction. Certainly, the peanut EST sequence resources have been shown to have a wide range of applications and accomplished its essential role at the time of need. Then the EST project contributes to the second historic event, the Peanut Genome Project 2010 Inaugural Meeting also held in Atlanta where it was decided to sequence the entire peanut genome. After the completion of peanut whole genome sequencing, ESTs or transcriptome will continue to play an important role to fill in knowledge gaps, to identify particular genes and to explore gene function.

  7. 7 CFR 3402.23 - Documentation of progress on funded projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES... of Fellows supported by any special international study or thesis/dissertation research allowance and... Research Information System (CRIS). The CRIS database contains narrative project information, progress...

  8. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report, April 1991--September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  9. Progress in resolving construction issues on nuclear projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    The cost of nuclear plant construction in the United States can be drastically reduced. Progress is being made in the reduction of construction costs and with continuing effort much more can be done. The easiest way to attack high costs is to eliminate the unnecessary repairs and rework in construction, along with the time consuming evaluations and dispositions, and to use common sense in design practices. By doing this, millions of dollars could easily be cut from the cost of construction of nuclear powerplants

  10. The Recon Pilot Project: A Progress Report, October 1970-May 1971

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriette D. Avram

    1971-09-01

    Full Text Available Synopsis of three progress reports on the RECON Pilot Project submitted by the Library of Congress to the Council on Library Resources covering the period October 1970-May 1971. Progress is reported in the following areas: RECON production, foreign language editing test, format recognition, microfilming, input devices, and tasks assigned to the RECON Working Task Force.

  11. Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Project Quarterly Progress Report for Period Ending December 31, 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA, NA [ORNL

    1957-03-12

    This quarterly progress report of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Project at ORNL records the technical progress of research on circulating-fuel reactors and other ANP research at the Laboratory. The report is divided into five major parts: 1) Aircraft Reactor Engineering, 2) Chemistry, and 3) Metallurgy, 4) Heat Transfer and Physical Properties, Radiation Damage, and Fuel Recovery and Reprocessing, and 5) Reactor Shielding.

  12. Staunton 1 Reclamation Demonstration Project. Progress report for 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-12-01

    The Staunton 1 Reclamation Demonstration Project involves an evaluation of the reclamation process for a deep coal mine refuse system. A typical abandoned midwestern deep coal mine refuse site was selected, final land use was determined, baseline data were collected, engineering plans were developed and implemented, and a post-construction evaluation was begun. The project is a cooperative effort by two state agencies--the Abandoned Mined Land Reclamation Council of Illinois the Illinois Institute for Environmental Quality--and the U.S. Department of Energy through the Land Reclamation Program at Argonne National Laboratory. Current investigations are monitoring groundwater, surface water quality, aquatic ecosystems, revegetation, soil characteristics, erosion and runoff, soil microbial and soil fauna populations, wildlife, and economic effects of the reclamation effort. The research is a multidisciplinary approach to the concept of ecosystem response to reclamation.

  13. Milliwatt Generator Project. Progress report, April-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maraman, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    This formal biannual report covers the effort related to the Milliwatt Generator Project (MWG) carried out for the Department of Energy, Office of Military Applications, by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work

  14. Oman- Decisive progress for the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    The soon signature of a firm contract with the Korea Gas Corporation and the perspective of an agreement with Thailand will allow the attribution of a construction contract in September 1996. The hypothesis of a third liquefaction train seems to be more and more probable. The project of Oman-India gas pipeline is not given up but only put it back to several years. (N.C.)

  15. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project Progress report, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Thompson, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following about the Advanced Neutron Source: Project Management; Research and Development; Fuel Development; Corrosion Loop Tests and Analyses; Thermal-Hydraulic Loop Tests; Reactor Control and Shutdown Concepts; Critical and Subcritical Experiments; Material Data, Structural Tests, and Analysis; Cold-Source Development; Beam Tube, Guide, and Instrument Development; Hot-Source Development; Neutron Transport and Shielding; I ampersand C Research and Development; Design; and Safety

  16. Plutonium Reclamation Facility incident response project progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides status of Hanford activities in response to process deficiencies highlighted during and in response to the May 14, 1997, explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility. This report provides specific response to the August 4, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary which requested a progress report, in 120 days, on activities associated with reassessing the known and evaluating new vulnerabilities (chemical and radiological) at facilities that have been shut down, are in standby, are being deactivated or have otherwise changed their conventional mode of operation in the last several years. In addition, this report is intended to provide status on emergency response corrective activities as requested in the memorandum from the Secretary on August 28, 1997. Status is also included for actions requested in the second August 28, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary, regarding timely notification of emergencies

  17. Plutonium Reclamation Facility incident response project progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, B.A.

    1997-11-25

    This report provides status of Hanford activities in response to process deficiencies highlighted during and in response to the May 14, 1997, explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility. This report provides specific response to the August 4, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary which requested a progress report, in 120 days, on activities associated with reassessing the known and evaluating new vulnerabilities (chemical and radiological) at facilities that have been shut down, are in standby, are being deactivated or have otherwise changed their conventional mode of operation in the last several years. In addition, this report is intended to provide status on emergency response corrective activities as requested in the memorandum from the Secretary on August 28, 1997. Status is also included for actions requested in the second August 28, 1997, memorandum from the Secretary, regarding timely notification of emergencies.

  18. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report, FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.H.; King-Jones, K.H. [eds.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thompson, P.B. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Central Engineering Services

    1995-01-01

    The President`s budget request for FY 1994 included a construction project for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). However, the budget that emerged from the Congress did not, and so activities during this reporting period were limited to continued research and development and to advanced conceptual design. A significant effort was devoted to a study, requested by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and led by Brookhaven National Laboratory, of the performance and cost impacts of reducing the uranium fuel enrichment below the baseline design value of 93%. The study also considered alternative core designs that might mitigate those impacts. The ANS Project proposed a modified core design, with three fuel elements instead of two, that would allow operation with only 50% enriched uranium and use existing fuel technology. The performance penalty would be 15--20% loss of thermal neutron flux; the flux would still just meet the minimum design requirement set by the user community. At the time of this writing, DOE has not established an enrichment level for ANS, but two advisory committees have recommended adopting the new core design, provided the minimum flux requirements are still met.

  19. Tunneling on the Yucca Mountain Project: Progress and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmire, W.H.; Rogers, D.J.; Wightman, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is the US's effort to confirm the technical acceptability of Yucca Mountain as a repository for high-level nuclear waste. A key part of the site characterization project is the construction of a 7.8-km-long, 7.6-m-diameter tunnel for in-depth geologic and other scientific investigations. The work is governed in varying degrees by the special requirements for nuclear quality assurance, which imposes uncommon and often stringent limitations on the materials which can be used in construction, the tunneling methods and procedures used, and record-keeping for many activities. This paper presents the current status of what has been learned, how construction has adapted to meet the requirements, and how the requirements were interpreted in a mitigating way to meet the legal obligations, yet build the tunnel as rapidly as possible. With regard to design methodologies and the realities of tunnel construction, ground support with a shielded Tunnel Boring Machine is discussed. Notable lessons learned include the need for broad design analyses for a wide variety of conditions and how construction procedures affect ground support

  20. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report, FY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.H.; King-Jones, K.H.; Thompson, P.B.

    1995-01-01

    The President's budget request for FY 1994 included a construction project for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). However, the budget that emerged from the Congress did not, and so activities during this reporting period were limited to continued research and development and to advanced conceptual design. A significant effort was devoted to a study, requested by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and led by Brookhaven National Laboratory, of the performance and cost impacts of reducing the uranium fuel enrichment below the baseline design value of 93%. The study also considered alternative core designs that might mitigate those impacts. The ANS Project proposed a modified core design, with three fuel elements instead of two, that would allow operation with only 50% enriched uranium and use existing fuel technology. The performance penalty would be 15--20% loss of thermal neutron flux; the flux would still just meet the minimum design requirement set by the user community. At the time of this writing, DOE has not established an enrichment level for ANS, but two advisory committees have recommended adopting the new core design, provided the minimum flux requirements are still met

  1. Progress of the LASL dry hot rock geothermal energy project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. C.

    1974-01-01

    The possibilities and problems of extracting energy from geothermal reservoirs which do not spontaneously yield useful amounts of steam or hot water are discussed. The system for accomplishing this which is being developed first is a pressurized-water circulation loop intended for use in relatively impermeable hot rock. It will consist of two holes connected through the hot rock by a very large hydraulic fracture and connected at the surface through the primary heat exchanger of an energy utilization system. Preliminary experiments in a hole 2576 ft (0.7852 km) deep, extending about 470 ft (143 m) into the Precambrian basement rock underlying the Jemez Plateau of north-central New Mexico, revealed no unexpected difficulties in drilling or hydraulically fracturing such rock at a temperature of approximately 100 C, and demonstrated a permeability low enough so that it appeared probable that pressurized water could be contained by the basement rock. Similar experiments are in progress in a second hole, now 6701 ft (2.043 km) deep, about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) south of the first one.

  2. Progress of the intense positron beam project EPOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause-Rehberg, R.; Brauer, G.; Jungmann, M.; Krille, A.; Rogov, A.; Noack, K.

    2008-01-01

    EPOS (the ELBE POsitron Source) is a running project to build an intense, bunched positron beam for materials research. It makes use of the bunched electron beam of the ELBE radiation source (Electron Linac with high Brilliance and low Emittance) at the Research Centre Dresden-Rossendorf (40 MeV, 1 mA). ELBE has unique timing properties, the bunch length is <5 ps and the repetition time is 77 ns. In contrast to other Linacs made for Free Electron Lasers (e.g., TTF at DESY, Hamburg), ELBE can be operated in full cw-mode, i.e., with an uninterrupted sequence of bunches. The article continues an earlier publication. It concentrates on details of the timing system and describes issues of radiation protection

  3. NEPA Project quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1950

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1950-12-31

    Exploration of various types of power plant cycles for nuclear propelled aircraft has been continued during this quarter. The principal current objective of the project is the development of information which will make an intelligent choice of the basic power plant cycle possible. It is still hoped that this choice can be made late in 1950. The survey studies which have been under way for several months continued during the quarter. These consist of analyses and rough preliminary layouts for various types of aircraft, using each of the several basic cycles which have been seriously considered for each of the three phases of development. Although it is still extremely premature to discuss the relative merits of the various cycles, the information so for developed discloses some cycle differences which may, if confirmed by additional work, be significant. In this respect, there have been no recent major changes in the comparative standings of the cycles.

  4. Lithium Battery Safety/Cell-to-Cell Failure Project FY14 Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-06

    as the cell remained a closed system. In an actual application, cells lose heat to the ambient 31 environment and to expelled materials during...that specific heat was unchanged from that of the virgin cell. We fit three polynomial functions to the data shown in Figure 19, and these

  5. Progress Report 15, December 1979-April 1980, and proceedings of the fifteenth Project Integration Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period December 1979 to April 1980 is reported. Reports on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area silicon sheet and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering; and operations are included. Also, a report on, and copies of visual presentations made at, the Project Integration Meeting held April 2 and 3, 1980, are included.

  6. Staunton 1 Reclamation Demonstration Project. Progress report II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-07-01

    The Staunton 1 Reclamation Demonstration Project involves an evaluation of the reclamation process on a 13.8-ha abandoned deep coal mine refuse site in southwestern Illinois. The procedure included collection of preconstruction environmental data, determination of the site's final land use, and development and implementation of a detailed site development plan. Approximately 9.3 ha of refuse material was recontoured, covered with a minimum of 30 cm of soil obtained on site, and seeded with a mixture of grasses and legumes. Hydrologic investigation indicates some improvement in groundwater quality. Surface water quality also has shown improvement, but development of the aquatic ecosystem in the newly-constructed pond is slow. Revegetation has been successful, and a protective plant cover has been established on most areas of the site. Soil tests indicate that acceptable plant growth media have been constructed; however, continued application of fertilizer and limestone will probably be necessary to maintain the vegetation. The soil microbial community has achieved total numbers equal to those of old fields, but species' diversity is low. Small mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians have invaded and are utilizing the site. The economic value of the site and adjacent property has increased substantially, and the area's aesthetic value has been enhanced significantly. The two-year period of intensive monitoring and evaluation has been utilized to develop recommendations for improving the designs of future reclamation efforts.

  7. Progress of IFERC project in the Broader Approach Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Hayashi, K.; Ohuchi, R.; Nishitani, T.

    2010-01-01

    For contributing to the ITER project and promoting a possible early realization of DEMO, since 2007 the International Fusion Energy Research Centre (IFERC) shall perform the activities on (1) DEMO Design and R and D Coordination, (2) Computational Simulation Centre, and (3) ITER Remote Experimentation Centre in the framework under the agreement between the Government of Japan and the European Atomic Energy Community for the joint implementation of the Broader Approach Activities in the field of fusion energy. The DEMO Design activity aims at establishing a common basis for DEMO Design, including design features of DEMO, possible common concepts of DEMO, a roadmap for DEMO, and so on. Based on the common interest of EU and Japan toward DEMO, the DEMO R and D activities have been planned and carried out for the areas which are related to DEMO blanket development: SiC/SiC composites, tritium technology, materials engineering, advanced neutron multiplier, and advanced tritium breeders for DEMO blanket. In the activity of the Computational Simulation Centre, the objective is to provide and exploit a supercomputer for large scale simulation activities to analyse experimental data on fusion plasmas, prepare scenarios for ITER operation, predict the performance of the ITER facilities and contribute to the DEMO Design.

  8. The New Progress of the Starry Sky Project of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohua

    2015-08-01

    Since the 28th General Assembly of IAU, the SSPC team made new progress:1. Enhanced the function of the SSPC team-- Established the contact with IAU C50, IUCN Dark Skies Advisory Group, AWB and IDA,and undertakes the work of the IDA Beijing Chapter.-- Got supports from China’s National Astronomical Observatories, Beijing Planetarium, and Shanghai Science and Technology Museum.-- Signed cooperation agreements with Lighting Research Center, English Education Group and law Firm; formed the team force.2. Put forward a proposal to national top institutionThe SSPC submitted the first proposal about dark sky protection to the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference.3. Introduced the Criteria and Guideline of dark sky protectionThe SSPC team translated 8 documents of IDA, and provided a reference basis for Chinese dark sky protection.4. Actively establish dark sky places-- Plan a Dark Sky Reserve around Ali astronomical observatory (5,100m elevation) in Tibet. China’s Xinhua News Agency released the news.-- Combining with Hangcuo Lake, a National Natural Reserve and Scenic in Tibet, to plan and establish the Dark Sky Park.-- Cooperated with Shandong Longgang Tourism Group to construct the Dream Sky Theme Park in the suburbs of Jinan city.In the IYL 2015, the SSPC is getting further development:First, make dark sky protection enter National Ecological Strategy of “Beautiful China”. We call on: “Beautiful China” needs “Beautiful Night Sky” China should care the shared starry sky, and left this resource and heritage for children.Second, hold “Cosmic Light” exhibition in Shanghai Science and Technology Museum on August.Third, continue to establish Dark Sky Reserve, Park and Theme Park. We want to make these places become the bases of dark sky protection, astronomical education and ecological tourism, and develop into new cultural industry.Fourth, actively join international cooperation.Now, “Blue Sky, White Cloud and Starry Sky “have become

  9. Tritium effluent control project progress report, July--September 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kershner, C.J.; Bixel, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    In the Tritiated Liquid Waste Decontamination (Molecular Excitation) program, it was found that a 1/4'' Nd:YAG amplifier and a Faraday rotator isolator must be added to the oscillator to obtain the required power for the laser excitation experiments. The isotopic selectivity of the two-photon dissociation process was examined in more detail. The selectivity or ratio of HTO to H 2 O molecules that are photodissociated was found to be on the order of 25, which is inadequate for application to large-scale detritiation projects, e.g., nuclear fuel reprocessing plant waste. The selectivity is such that most of the laser energy is wasted in photodissociation of H 2 O. This obstacle may be overcome by pumping more vibrational energy into the HTO molecules. Various schemes towards this end are being considered. Extensive ab initio calculations on the potential surface for the hydrogen atom-water exchange reaction have been carried out. The energy barrier is calculated to be 38 1/2 kcal/mole, which implies that the exchange reaction T + H 2 O → HTO + H is at least 10 9 times slower than the exchange reaction T + H 2 → HT + H. Calculations were also performed on the analogous hydrogen atom-hydrogen fluoride exchange reaction. In lieu of other disposal methods a system using a General Electric UCT-1 regenerative cell has been assembled and tested. This system should be capable of decomposing pure water into hydrogen and oxygen gases. The tritium from this process can be purified and reused instead of buried. A preliminary economic evaluation was made of the HT/H 2 O catalytic exchange detritiation stripping process as it might apply to a 5 metric ton/day nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. A tritiated water shipping container has been designed and developed for use with the ERDA--DOT approved AL--MI secondary container

  10. A Project Assessment of Stabilizing System of WT Generation using Rechargeable Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yasuhiro; Takano, Tomihiro; Tanikawa, Ryoichi; Takagi, Tetsuro; Hirooka, Koutaro; Kumagai, Sadatoshi

    The expansion of the renewable energy introduction is examined as measures for controlling global warming. Wind power generation is expected as effective power resource, but the negative impact from the difficulty of an unstable output is concerned. In recent years, WT generation with contract of cut-of with shorting adjusting power and with rechargeable battery for stabilizing control are examined, but the introduction has not been accelerated yet because there is an influence in WT generation entrepreneur's business. In this paper, we make a brief summary of relation between the fluctuation of wind power generation and stability of electric power operation, and two types of approach; cut-off contract and stabilization using rechargeable battery. For the stabilization using battery, there are two methods, one is reduction control and the other is constant control. We propose a new control method for constant control based on profit optimization considering WT generation forecast and its risk of deviation. We also propose the estimation method for the .limitation of battery installation. Simulation results show the efficiency of our proposed methods.

  11. S.E.N.S.I.B. project. Progress report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the state of progress of all the studies which establish at present the S.E.N.S.I.B. project. For year 2006, the progress of the project is globally in compliance with the general schedule of realization of the S.E.N.S.I.B. project and with the perspectives announced in 2005. Factors of sensitivity were identified in diverse circles ( thematic studies) and methods and specific tools of the project are developed. 14 publications (reviews and congress) and 9 I.R.S.N. reports were produced. An international work group was launched to the I.R.S.N. initiative. The web site of S.E.N.S.I.B. on the I.R.S.N. scientific site was built. The S.E.N.S.I.B. project receives a financial participation of the Ademe. (N.C.)

  12. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, April--June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.

    1993-06-01

    Technical assistance was provided to 60 requests from 19 states. R&D progress is reported on: evaluation of lineshaft turbine pump problems, geothermal district heating marketing strategy, and greenhouse peaking analysis. Two presentations and one tour were conducted, and three technical papers were prepared. The Geothermal Progress Monitor reported: USGS Forum on Mineral Resources, Renewable Energy Tax Credits Not Working as Congress Intended, Geothermal Industry Tells House Panel, Newberry Pilot Project, and Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources in Nevada.

  13. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report for April 1993 through September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. However, further work is needed to reduce the cost of ceramics to facilitate their commercial introduction, especially in the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. The work described in this report is organized according to the following WBS project elements: Project Management and Coordination; Materials and Processing; Materials Design Methodology; Data Base and Life Prediction; and Technology Transfer. This report includes contributions from all currently active project participants. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 47 projects reported here.

  14. Demand-side management project for Tenaga Nasional Berhad. Progress report No. 4. Export trade information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This study, conducted by the California Energy Commission, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. Progress Report No. 4 is divided into the following contents: April 6, 1994 Training Mission Delegation Itinerary; April 6, 1994 Training Mission Workshop Information Package; Letter to Chairman of Tenaga Nasional Berhad Requesting Demonstration Project Funding; Design/Build Construction Bid Proposal for Energy Efficient Electric Technology Demontration Project; Final Draft of Demand-Side Management Plan for Tenaga Nasional Berhad; Attachments.

  15. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 89

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    Summaries are presented for the DOE contracts related to supported research for thermal recovery of petroleum, geoscience technology, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Data included for each project are: title, contract number, principal investigator, research organization, beginning date, expected completion date, amount of award, objectives of the research, and summary of technical progress.

  16. Preparation of MoS2/TiO2 based nanocomposites for photocatalysis and rechargeable batteries: progress, challenges, and perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biao; Meng, Yuhuan; Sha, Junwei; Zhong, Cheng; Hu, Wenbin; Zhao, Naiqin

    2017-12-21

    The rapidly increasing severity of the energy crisis and environmental degradation are stimulating the rapid development of photocatalysts and rechargeable lithium/sodium ion batteries. In particular, MoS 2 /TiO 2 based nanocomposites show great potential and have been widely studied in the areas of both photocatalysis and rechargeable lithium/sodium ion batteries due to their superior combination properties. In addition to the low-cost, abundance, and high chemical stability of both MoS 2 and TiO 2 , MoS 2 /TiO 2 composites also show complementary advantages. These include the strong optical absorption of TiO 2 vs. the high catalytic activity of MoS 2 , which is promising for photocatalysis; and excellent safety and superior structural stability of TiO 2 vs. the high theoretic specific capacity and unique layered structure of MoS 2 , thus, these composites are exciting as anode materials. In this review, we first summarize the recent progress in MoS 2 /TiO 2 -based nanomaterials for applications in photocatalysis and rechargeable batteries. We highlight the synthesis, structure and mechanism of MoS 2 /TiO 2 -based nanomaterials. Then, advancements and strategies for improving the performance of these composites in photocatalytic degradation, hydrogen evolution, CO 2 reduction, LIBs and SIBs are critically discussed. Finally, perspectives on existing challenges and probable opportunities for future exploration of MoS 2 /TiO 2 -based composites towards photocatalysis and rechargeable batteries are presented. We believe the present review would provide enriched information for a deeper understanding of MoS 2 /TiO 2 composites and open avenues for the rational design of MoS 2 /TiO 2 based composites for energy and environment-related applications.

  17. Annual report on reactor safety research projects. Reporting period 2013. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Within its competence for energy research the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) sponsors research projects on the safety of nuclear power plants currently in operation. The objective of these projects is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS)mbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such research projects by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRSF- Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work. The progress reports are published by the Project Management Agency/Authority Support Division of GRS. The reports as of the year 2000 are available in the Internet-based information system on results and data of reactor safety research (http://www.grs-fbw.de). The compilation of the reports is classified according to the classification system ''Joint Safety Research Index (JSRI)''. The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. It has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties. (orig.)

  18. Annual report on reactor safety research projects. Reporting period 2011. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Within its competence for energy research the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) sponsors research projects on the safety of nuclear power plants currently in operation. The objective of these projects is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS)mbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such research projects by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRSF- Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work. The progress reports are published by the Project Management Agency/Authority Support Division of GRS. The reports as of the year 2000 are available in the Internet-based information system on results and data of reactor safety research (http://www.grs-fbw.de). The compilation of the reports is classified according to the classification system ''Joint Safety Research Index (JSRI)''. The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. It has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties. (orig.)

  19. Annual report on reactor safety research projects. Reporting period 2014. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    Within its competence for energy research the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) sponsors research projects on the safety of nuclear power plants currently in operation. The objective of these projects is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such research projects by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work. The progress reports are published by the Project Management Agency/Authority Support Division of GRS. The reports as of the year 2000 are available in the lnternet-based information system on results and data of reactor safety research (http://www.grs-fbw.de). The compilation of the reports is classified according to the classification system ''Joint Safety Research Index (JSRI)''. The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. lt has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties.

  20. Annual report on reactor safety research projects. Reporting period 2015. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Within its competence for energy research the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) sponsors research projects on the safety of nuclear power plants currently in operation. The objective of these projects is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft tor Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such research projects by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are ·' prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work. The progress reports are published by the Project Management Agency/Authority Support Division of GRS. The reports as of the year 2000 are available in the lnternet-based information system on results and data of reactor safety research (http://www.grs-fbw.de). The compilation of the reports is classified according to the classification system ''Joint Safety Research Index (JSRI)''. The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. it has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties.

  1. Environment, safety and health progress assessment of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the results of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Progress Assessment of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), Fernald, Ohio, conducted from October 15 through October 25, 1991. The Secretary of Energy directed that small, focused, ES ampersand H Progress Assessments be performed as part of the continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process in the areas of ES ampersand H. The FEMP assessment is the pilot assessment for this new program. The objectives for the FEMP ES ampersand H Progress Assessment were to assess: (1) how the FEMP has progressed since the 1989 Tiger Assessment; (2) how effectively the FEMP has corrected specific deficiencies and associated root causes identified by that team; and (3) whether the current organization, resources, and systems are sufficient to proactively manage ES ampersand H issues

  2. Environment, safety and health progress assessment of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the results of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), Fernald, Ohio, conducted from October 15 through October 25, 1991. The Secretary of Energy directed that small, focused, ES&H Progress Assessments be performed as part of the continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process in the areas of ES&H. The FEMP assessment is the pilot assessment for this new program. The objectives for the FEMP ES&H Progress Assessment were to assess: (1) how the FEMP has progressed since the 1989 Tiger Assessment; (2) how effectively the FEMP has corrected specific deficiencies and associated root causes identified by that team; and (3) whether the current organization, resources, and systems are sufficient to proactively manage ES&H issues.

  3. Progress reports on SCWR-related development projects from Chinese universities for FY2008-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, L.K.H.

    2010-02-01

    Canada is participating in the international cooperative forum on system research for two designs (supercritical water-cooled reactor, SCWR, and Very High Temperature Reactor, VHTR) of the Gen-IV nuclear reactor. The forum is referred to as the Generation-IV International Forum (or GIF). The Canadian effort focuses mainly on the SCWR. Among various GIF participants, Canada is the leader of this design and has interest mainly on the pressure-tube type reactor, which is a natural extension of the existing CANDU reactor. Several critical research areas (such as material, chemistry, thermalhydraulics, instability, critical flow, etc.) have been identified in the system-research plan for supporting the SCWR design. Collaborative projects have been established between AECL and universities in China to expedite the CANDU SCWR design. These projects focus on research areas beyond the current scope of the AECL and the NSERC/NRCan/AECL collaborative research and development (CRD) project. AECL supports these projects directly and is contributing (in-kind) the results and findings to the Canadian national program. The collaboration between AECL and Chinese universities began in 2007 July. Most projects cover the duration of three years. The Chinese universities submit their annual progress reports each year prior to the project renewal. The objective of this report is to summarize the progress on collaborative projects between AECL and Chinese universities (namely the Tsinghua University, Shanghai Jiaotong University, and Xi'an Jiaotong University) over the duration of 2008 July to 2009 June. (author)

  4. Progress and status of the international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO) - 5182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev, A.; Fesenko, G.; Grigoriev, F.G.; Korinny, A.; Phillips, J.R.; Rho, K.

    2015-01-01

    The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was established in 2000 through IAEA General Conference resolution. INPRO cooperates with Member States to ensure that sustainable nuclear energy is available to help meet the energy needs of the 21. century. INPRO membership has grown to 41 members and 16 observers. The paper presents the current prospectus of the INPRO programme and details the most recent achievements in the following 7 projects: 1) the GAINS project (Global Architecture of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems with thermal and fast reactors and a closed nuclear fuel cycle); 2) the SYNERGIES project applies and amends the analytical framework developed in GAINS project to examine more specifically the various forms of regional collaboration among nuclear energy suppliers and users; 3) the KIND project (Key Indicators for Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems) has the objective of developing guidance on the evaluation on innovative nuclear technologies; 4) the ROADMAPS project addresses several possible stages toward nuclear energy sustainability; 5) the RISC project aims at demonstrating that the evolution of safety requirements and technical innovations provide continual progress towards the avoidance of evacuation measures outside NPP sites in case of severe accidents; 6) the FANES project has the objective of carrying out feasibility analyses of advanced and innovative fuels for different reactor systems; and 7) the WIRAF project aims at identifying problematic waste from innovative reactor designs and corresponding nuclear fuel cycles

  5. International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). 2008 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the work is to review the progress of the IAEA international project for innovative reactors and fuel cycle technologies (INPRO). The publication reports about the recognition of INPRO and on general Information on INPRO, its strengths, memberships, collaboration with other international initiatives, the INPRO organization and management and the history of INPRO. The section on the progress of INPRO in 2008 contains task 1: INPRO Methodology, task 2: Assessment Studies, task 3: Nuclear Energy Visions for the 21st Century, task 4: Infrastructure and Institutional Innovation, task 5: Common User Considerations and task 6: Collaborative Projects. Conclusions and New Trends are followed by a bibliography. Annex I deals with the INPRO project management in 2008 and Annex II provides a selection of photographs from 2008. Finally a list of acronyms is provided

  6. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Annual progress report for 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, S.H.

    1988-09-01

    This report describes progress during 1987 of five Hanford Site ground water monitoring projects. Four of these projects are being conducted according to regulations based on the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the state Hazardous Waste Management Act. The fifth project is being conducted according to regulations based on the state Solid Waste Management Act. The five projects discussed herein are: 300 Area Process Trenches; 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins; 200 Areas Low-Level Burial Grounds; Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill; Solid Waste Landfill. For each of the projects, there are included, as applicable, discussions of monitoring well installations, water-table measurements, background and/or downgradient water quality and results of chemical analysis, and extent and rate of movement of contaminant plumes. 14 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs

  7. ARCHER Project: Progress on Material and component activities for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckthorpe, D.E.

    2014-01-01

    The ARCHER (Advanced High-Temperature Reactors for Cogeneration of Heat and Electricity R&D) integrated project is a four year project which was started in 2011 as part of the European Commission 7th Framework Programme (FP7) to perform High Temperature Reactor technology R&D in support of reactor demonstration. The project consortium encompasses conventional and Nuclear Industry, Utilities, Technical Support Organizations, Research & Development Organizations and Academia. The activities involved contribute to the Generation IV (GIF) International Forum and collaborate with related projects in the US, China, Japan, and the Republic of Korea in cooperation with IAEA and ISTC. This paper addresses the progress of the work on ARCHER materials and component activities since the start of the project and underlines some of the main conclusions reached. (author)

  8. ICDE project report: collection and analysis of common-cause failures of batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-12-01

    This report documents a study performed on the set of Common Cause Failure (CCF) events of batteries (BT). the events studied here were derived from the International CCF Data Exchange (ICDE) database, with contributions from organizations from several countries. 50 events in the ICDE database were studied by tabulating the data and observing the trends. The data span a period from 1980 through 2000. The database contains general information about event attributes such as root cause, coupling factor, common cause component group (CCCG) size, and corrective action. The objective of the report was also to develop the failure mechanisms and phenomena involved in the events, their relationship to the root causes, and possibilities for improvement

  9. Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project: FYs 1984-1985 annual progress report, October 1, 1983 through September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report presents progress on the Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project for FYs 1984-85. There are three main topics: project management, decommissioning project activities, and issues of concern. The project purpose is demonstration of nuclear plant decommissioning and dismantlement operations in an environment of current industry practices. 8 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Progress report for project modeling Arctic barrier island-lagoon system response to projected Arctic warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, Li H.; Gibbs, Ann E.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Storlazzi, Curt; B.M. Jones,

    2012-01-01

    Changes in Arctic coastal ecosystems in response to global warming may be some of the most severe on the planet. A better understanding and analysis of the rates at which these changes are expected to occur over the coming decades is crucial in order to delineate high-priority areas that are likely to be affected by climate changes. In this study we investigate the likelihood of changes to habitat-supporting barrier island – lagoon systems in response to projected changes in atmospheric and oceanographic forcing associated with Arctic warming. To better understand the relative importance of processes responsible for the current and future coastal landscape, key parameters related to increasing arctic temperatures are investigated and used to establish boundary conditions for models that simulate barrier island migration and inundation of deltaic deposits and low-lying tundra. The modeling effort investigates the dominance and relative importance of physical processes shaping the modern Arctic coastline as well as decadal responses due to projected conditions out to the year 2100.

  11. Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) was formally established by Executive Policy in 1983 following passage of the federal Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Act). That Act provides for the systematic siting, construction, operation, and closure of high-level radioactive defense and research by-products and other forms of high-level radioactive waste from around the country which will be stored at such repositories. In 1985 the Nevada legislature formally established the NWPO as a distinct and statutorily authorized agency to provide support to the Governor and State Legislature on matters concerning the high-level nuclear waste programs. The NWPO utilized a small, central staff supplemented by contractual services for needed technical and specialized expertise in order to provide high quality oversight and monitoring of federal activities, to conduct necessary independent studies, and to avoid unnecessary duplication of efforts. This report summarizes the results of this ongoing program to ensure that risks to the environment and to human safety are minimized. It includes findings in the areas of hydrogeology, geology, quality assurance activities, repository engineering, legislature participation, socioeconomic affects, risk assessments, monitoring programs, public information dissemination, and transportation activities. The bulk of the reporting deals with the Yucca Mountain facility

  12. Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Progress report 14, August 1979-December 1979 and proceedings of the 14th Project Integration Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period August through November 1979, is described. Progress on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area sheet silicon, and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering, and operations, and the steps taken to integrate these efforts are detailed. A report on the Project Integration Meeting held December 5-6, 1979, including copies of the visual materials used, is presented.

  13. High-performance batteries for stationary energy storage and electric-vehicle propulsion. Progress report, April--June 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-10-01

    Research, development, and management activities of the program on lithium--aluminum/metal sulfide batteries during April--June 1977 are described. These batteries are being developed for electric-vehicle propulsion and stationary energy storage. The present cells, which operate at 400--450/sup 0/C, are of a vertically oriented, prismatic design with a central positive electrode of FeS or FeS/sub 2/, two facing negative electrodes of lithium--aluminum alloy, and an electrolyte of molten LiCl--KCl. Testing and evaluation of industrially fabricated cells is continuing. Li--Al/FeS and Li--Al/FeS/sub 2/ cells from Eagle--Picher Industries and from Gould Inc. were tested. These tests provided information on the effects of design modifications and alternative materials for cells. Improved electrode and cell designs are being developed and tested, and the more promising designs are incorporated into the industrially fabricated cells. Among the concepts receiving major attention are carbon-bonded positive electrodes, scaled-up designs of stationary energy storage cells, additives to extend electrode lifetime, alternative electrode separators, and pellet-grid electrodes. Materials development efforts included the development of a lightweight electrical feedthrough; studies of various current-collector designs; investigation of powder separators; wettability and corrosion tests of materials for cell components; and postoperative examinations of cells. Cell chemistry studies were concerned with discharge mechanisms of FeS electrodes and with other transition-metal sulfides as positive electrode materials. Voltammetric studies were conducted to investigate the reversibility of the FeS/sub 2/ electrode. The use of calcium and magnesium alloys for the negative electrode in advanced battery systems were investigated. 8 figures, 12 tables.

  14. Management of water hyacinth. A CSC/UNEP project. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    The water hyacinth project was initially proposed at the Regional Workshop on Rural Technology held at Dacca in January 1978. In November 1978, national coordinators met at New Delhi and outlined the project in detail as reported in CSC(79)RT-4. The meeting was attended by delegates from Bangladesh, Egypt, Guyana, India, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Sri Lanka, Commonwealth Science Council and the United Nations Environment Programme. Following this a proposal was submitted to UNEP seeking funding support to meet the external cost component of the project. This support was subsequently granted. The project aims to achieve an integrated approach towards managing water hyacinth. The underlying intention was that management would cover both eradication of the plant as well as making productive use of it when possible. Productive uses envisaged include biogas synthesis, production of papers and boards and as a source of proteins. Another interesting possibility is the use of the plant to control industrial as well as domestic water pollution . All these were detailed in a three and a half year time plan. The project had its first review meeting in June 1979 in Papua New Guinea. The major intention of this meeting was to examine status reports from each country in an attempt to quantify the problem caused by water hyacinth and assess the work plan in relation to this. The report of this meeting has been published as CSC(79)RT-5. At this meeting Papua New Guinea decided to withdraw from this project as water hyacinth was not regarded as a severe problem. The use of dugong as a control agent was not recommended by Papua New Guinea. In April 1980 an interim review meeting attended by the Regional Coordinator and representatives of UNEP and CSC was held in London where, based on the progress made in the participating countries, activities and time schedules were refined and sharpened (CSC (80)RT-16). It look some time to resolve the external funding question . It was

  15. Button batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swallowing batteries ... These devices use button batteries: Calculators Cameras Hearing aids Penlights Watches ... If a person puts the battery up their nose and breathes it further in, ... problems Cough Pneumonia (if the battery goes unnoticed) ...

  16. Progress Report 16 for the period April-September 1980, and the proceedings of the 16th Project Integration Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period April to September 1980, is reported in detail. Progress on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area silicon sheet and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering, and operations is described. A report on, and copies of visual presentations made at, the Project Integration Meeting held September 24 and 25, 1980 are included.

  17. FY2012 Progress Report for Energy Storage Research & Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    FY 2012 annual report of the energy storage research and development effort within the VT Office. An important step for the electrification of the nation’s light duty transportation sector is the development of more cost-effective, long lasting, and abuse-tolerant PEV batteries. In fiscal year 2012, battery R&D work continued to focus on the development of high-energy batteries for PEVs and very high power devices for hybrid vehicles. This document provides a summary and progress update of the VTP battery R&D projects that were supported in 2012.

  18. One System Integrated Project Team Progress in Coordinating Hanford Tank Farms and the Waste Treatment Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skwarek, Raymond J.; Harp, Ben J.; Duncan, Garth M.

    2013-01-01

    The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed at the Hanford Site in late 2011 as a way to improve coordination and itegration between the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) on interfaces between the two projects, and to eliminate duplication and exploit opportunities for synergy. The IPT is composed of jointly staffed groups that work on technical issues of mutal interest, front-end design and project definition, nuclear safety, plant engineering system integration, commissioning, planning and scheduling, and environmental, safety, health and quality (ESH&Q) areas. In the past year important progress has been made in a number of areas as the organization has matured and additional opportunities have been identified. Areas covered in this paper include: Support for development of the Office of Envirnmental Management (EM) framework document to progress the Office of River Protection's (ORP) River Protection Project (RPP) mission; Stewardship of the RPP flowsheet; Collaboration with Savannah River Site (SRS), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Operations programs integration; and, Further development of the waste acceptance criteria

  19. Latest position in battery techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staeger, H J

    1960-03-17

    A short survey of the development of electrochemical properties as batteries is followed by an account of the construction, properties, and fields of application of lead, iron--nickel, and silver--zinc batteries, and their more recent developments, such as the hollow-rod plates in lead batteries, sintered plates, and sealed batteries. The work in progress on fuel cells is discussed and different practical cells are compared. There is no battery which is the best for all applications, each system has its own advantages or disadvantages. The lead battery in its different forms still remains the most universally applied.

  20. Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Resource for Project Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-07-31

    as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. .

  1. Electrochemical accumulators batteries; Accumulateurs electrochimiques batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansart, F; Castillo, S; Laberty- Robert, C; Pellizon-Birelli, M [Universite Paul Sabatier, Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux Inorganiques et Energetiques, CIRIMAT, UMR CNRS 5085, 31 - Toulouse (France); and others

    2000-07-01

    It is necessary to storage the electric power in batteries to join the production and the utilization. In this domain progresses are done every days in the technics and also in the available materials. These technical days present the state of the art in this domain. Many papers were presented during these two days giving the research programs and recent results on the following subjects: the lithium batteries, the electrolytes performances and behaviour, lead accumulators, economic analysis of the electrochemical storage market, the batteries applied to the transportation sector and the telephones. (A.L.B.)

  2. New secondary batteries utilizing electronically conductive polymer cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Charles R.; White, Ralph E.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to characterize the transport properties in electronically conductive polymers and to assess the utility of these films as cathodes in lithium/polymer secondary batteries. During this research period, progress has been made in a literature survey of the historical background, methods of preparation, the physical and chemical properties, and potential technological applications of polythiophene. Progress has also been made in the characterization of polypyrrole flat films and fibrillar films. Cyclic voltammetry and potential step chronocoulometry were used to gain information on peak currents and potentials switching reaction rates, charge capacity, and charge retention. Battery charge/discharge studies were also performed.

  3. Salt repository project: Technical progress report for the quarter 1 April--30 June 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This document reports the progress being made each quarter on the development of a geologic repository in salt for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The reporting elements are arranged by the work breakdown structure so that related studies are presented together. The studies are reported by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, a prime contractor of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Salt Repository Project Office. The studies include work by other DOE prime contractors and by contractors to the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation

  4. Salt Repository Project technical progress report for the quarter 1 January--31 March 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This document reports the progress being made each quarter on the development of a geologic repository in salt for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The reporting elements are arranged by the work breakdown structure so that related studies are presented together. The studies are reported by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, a prime contractor of the US Department of energy (DOE) Salt Repository Project Office. The studies include work by other DOE prime contractors and by contractors to the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation. 23 refs., 1 fig

  5. Analyzing compound and project progress through multi-objective-based compound quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissink, J Willem M; Degorce, Sébastien

    2013-05-01

    Compound-quality scoring methods designed to evaluate multiple drug properties concurrently are useful to analyze and prioritize output from drug-design efforts. However, formalized multiparameter optimization approaches are not widely used in drug design. We rank molecules synthesized in drug-discovery projects using simple and aggregated desirability functions reflecting medicinal chemistry 'rules'. Our quality score deals transparently with missing data, a key requirement in drug-hunting projects where data availability is often limited. We further estimate confidence in the interpretation of such a compound-quality measure. Scores and associated confidences provide systematic insight in the quality of emerging chemical equity. Tracking quality of synthetic output over time yields valuable insight into the progress of drug-design teams, with potential applications in risk and resource management of a drug portfolio.

  6. Mapping Project on Energy and the Social Sciences. Progress report, October 1, 1978-June 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.A.; Doob, L.W.; Gould, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    This is a progress report of activities in the fourth year of the Yale Institution for Social and Policy Studies Mapping Project on Energy and the Social Sciences. The Mapping Project evaluates past and present social and behavioral science energy studies, assesses the potential for social and behavioral science contributions to a resolution of the energy problems in the future, and diffuses social and behavioral science information and perspectives to policymakers and others concerned with US or world energy developments. Activities in FY 1979 included meetings, workshops, collecting bibliographic material, publications, evaluating DOE programs in buildings and transportation, performing a special study of potential social impacts of 4 coal technologies, and developing plans for 10 specific research studies on energy.

  7. [Progress report on a World Bank loan to China for a tuberculosis control project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, F; Chi, Y; Wang, K

    1995-02-01

    The progress of the World Bank loaned TB control project implemented from the second quarter of 1991 to the fourth quarter of 1993 was described in this paper. In the past three years, 737 counties of the 12 provinces with the population of 360 million has been covered by the project. Among 95176 new smear positive cases discovered, 93909 patients received free treatment of TB. The treatment coverage is 98.7%, of which 95% were treated under full course supervision. The smear conversion rate at two, three months of new smear positive TB patients are 83.4% and 90.6% respectively. The cohort analysis showed that the cure rate is 89.8%, which has reached the advanced level of the modern national tuberculosis control programme in the world.

  8. Crystalline Repository Project: Technical progress report for the period October 1, 1982--May 28, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    This document reports the progress made on the development of a second geologic repository in crystalline rocks during the duration of the Crystalline Repository Project from its inception in October 1982 to its termination in May 1986. The reporting elements are arranged by the work breakdown structure so that related studies are presented together. The studies are reported by the Office of Waste Technology Development (OWTD), successor to the Office of Crystalline Repository Development. OWTD is a prime contractor of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Repository Technology Program Office, itself the successor to the Crystalline Repository Project Office. The studies include work by other DOE prime contractors and by contractors to the Office of Crystalline Repository Development. 151 refs

  9. The Role Of The Integrated, Thematic Project To Learning Progress Of The Child In The Early Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Cornelia Stoian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have proposed to present you the results of an empirical research in order to identify the positive aspects of the integrated, thematic project in learning progress of children in preschool. Using the observation method, we analyzed children's results regarding the objectives in the respect to the objectives in the grid. Children's progress in learning represents the confirmation and affirmation of the role of this integrated, thematic project in supporting the early learning child.

  10. Progress in R and D of coated conductor in M-PACC project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T.; Koizumi, T.; Kimura, K. [SWCC Showa Cable Systems Co., Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan); Kato, T. [Japan Fine Ceramics Center, Aichi (Japan); Kiss, T. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Izumi, T.; Ibi, A.; Nakaoka, K. [Superconductivity Research Laboratory, International Superconductivity Technology, Kanagawa (Japan); and others

    2014-06-15

    The five-year national project in Japan for R and D of coated conductors and applications, named as the Materials and Power Applications of Coated Conductors (M-PACC) project, was finished at the end of FY2013. The project consists of four sub-themes as cable, transformer, SMES and coated conductors. In the theme of coated conductors, the fabrication process had been developed to satisfy the requirements from the applications such as in-field I{sub c} performance, low AC loss in the long tapes etc. Through the project, the remarkable progress was achieved as follows; a high in-field minimum I-c value over 54A/cm-width under 3T at 77K was realized in a 200m long EuBCO tape with artificial pinning centers of BaHfO{sub 3} by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique on the IBAD template. On the other hand, the AC loss reduction was confirmed in the tapes fabricated by both PLD and the metal organic deposition (MOD) techniques by scribing 100 m tapes into 10-filaments. Additionally, the mechanism of the delamination phenomenon was systematically investigated and the strength was improved by eliminating the origins of the weak points in the films. Through the development, all targeted goals were accomplished and the several results were appreciated as a world champion data.

  11. Progress update of NASA's free-piston Stirling space power converter technology project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudenhoefer, James E.; Winter, Jerry M.; Alger, Donald

    1992-01-01

    A progress update is presented of the NASA LeRC Free-Piston Stirling Space Power Converter Technology Project. This work is being conducted under NASA's Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The goal of the CSTI High Capacity Power Element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA space initiatives. Efforts are focused upon increasing system power output and system thermal and electric energy conversion efficiency at least five fold over current SP-100 technology, and on achieving systems that are compatible with space nuclear reactors. This paper will discuss progress toward 1050 K Stirling Space Power Converters. Fabrication is nearly completed for the 1050 K Component Test Power Converter (CTPC); results of motoring tests of the cold end (525 K), are presented. The success of these and future designs is dependent upon supporting research and technology efforts including heat pipes, bearings, superalloy joining technologies, high efficiency alternators, life and reliability testing, and predictive methodologies. This paper will compare progress in significant areas of component development from the start of the program with the Space Power Development Engine (SPDE) to the present work on CTPC.

  12. Yucca Mountain Project - Argonne National Laboratory annual progress report, FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, J.K.; Fortner, J.A.; Finn, P.A.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Buck, E.C.; Wolf, S.F.

    1995-02-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Management Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1993-September 1994. Studies have been performed to evaluate the performance of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel samples under unsaturated conditions (low volume water contact) that are likely to exist in the Yucca Mountain environment being considered as a potential site for a high-level waste repository. Tests with simulated waste glasses have been in progress for over eight years and demonstrate that actinides from initially fresh glass surfaces will be released as a result of the spallation of reacted glass layers from the surface, as the small volume of water passes over the waste form. Studies are also underway to evaluate the performance of spent fuel samples and unirradiated UO{sub 2} in projected repository conditions. Tests with UO{sub 2} have been ongoing for nine years and show that the oxidation of UO{sub 2} occurs rapidly, and the resulting paragenetic sequence of secondary phases that form on the sample surface is similar to that observed in natural analogues. The reaction of spent fuel samples under conditions similar to those used with UO{sub 2} have been in progress for nearly two years, and the results suggest that spent fuel follows the same reaction progress as UO{sub 2}. The release of individual fission products and transuranic elements was not congruent, with the release being controlled by the formation of small particles or colloids that are suspended in solution and transported away from the waste form. The reaction progress depends on the composition of the spent fuel samples used and, likely, on the composition of the groundwater that contacts the waste form.

  13. Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Progress report 12, January-April 1979 and proceedings of the 12th Project Integration Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    This report describes progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period January through April 1979. It includes reports on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area sheet silicon, and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering and operations, and a discussion of the steps taken to integrate these efforts. It includes a report on, and copies of viewgraphs presented at the Project Integration Meeting held April 4-5, 1979.

  14. STYLE - A European project on structural integrity: Progress of the work after 2 Years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heussner, Stefan; Nicak, Tomas; Keim, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the progress of the work on the EURATOM project STYLE (Structural integrity for lifetime management - non-RPV components). The project focuses on the structural integrity assessment of reactor coolant pressure boundary components (RCPB) relevant to ageing and life time management. The 4-years project started in January 2010 and is now in its third year. Within STYLE realistic failure models for some of the key components will be identified. The range of assessment tools considered will include those for assessment of component failure by advanced fracture mechanics analyses validated on small and large scale experiments, quantification of weld residual stresses by numerical analysis and by measurements, stress corrosion crack initiation and growth effects and assessment of RCPB components (excluding the reactor pressure vessel) under dynamic and seismic loading. Based on theoretical and experimental results, performance assessment and further development of simplified engineering assessment methods (EAM) will be carried out considering both deterministic and probabilistic approaches. Integrity assessment case studies and large scale demonstration experiments will be performed on Mock-ups of safety relevant components. These will include a repair weld in an aged butt-welded austenitic pipe, a dissimilar narrow gap TIG weld (following the EPR design) and a cladded ferritic pipe. Moreover, experiments on specimens and feature test pieces will be carried out to support the large scale Mock-up analyses. The end product of the project ('STYLE TOOLS') will comprise best practice guidelines on the use of advanced tools, on improvement and qualification of EAM as a part of European Leak-before-break (LBB) procedures and on life time management of the integrity of RCPB components in European nuclear power plants. The project is interacting with the European Network of Excellence NUGENIA (former NULIFE). (author)

  15. Ceramic Technology Project, semiannual progress report for October 1993 through March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1994-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990, the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The original objective of the project was to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. The direction of the Ceramic Technology Project is now shifting toward reducing the cost of ceramics to facilitate commercial introduction of ceramic components for near-term engine applications. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned.

  16. Crashworthiness Models for Automotive Batteries - Report on Project 2088-A031-15 for DOT/NHTSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalnaus, Sergiy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kumar, Abhishek [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lebrun-Grandie, Damien T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Simunovic, Srdjan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Slattery, Stuart R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Turner, John A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hsin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Allu, Srikanth [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gorti, Sarma B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Turcksin, Bruno R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Safety is a key element of any device designed to store energy, in particular electrochemical batteries, which convert energy of chemical reactions to electrical energy. Safety considerations are especially important when applied to large automotive batteries designed for propulsion of electric vehicles (EV). The high amount of energy stored in EV battery packs translates to higher probability of fire in case of severe deformation of battery compartment due to automotive crash or impact caused by road debris. While such demand for safety has resulted in heavier protection of battery enclosure, the mechanisms leading to internal short circuit due to deformation of the battery are not well understood even on the level of a single electrochemical cell. Moreover, not all internal shorts result in thermal runaway, and thus a criterion for catastrophic failure needs to be developed. This report summarizes the effort to pinpoint the critical deformation necessary to trigger a short via experimental study on large format automotive Li-ion cells in a rigid spherical indentation configuration. Cases of single cells and cell stacks undergoing indentation were investigated. Mechanical properties of cell components were determined via experimental testing and served as input for constitutive models of Finite Element (FE) analysis. The ability of the model to predict the behavior of cell(s) under spherical indentation and to predict failure leading to internal short circuit was validated against experiments. The necessity of resolving pairs of negative and positive electrodes in the FE formulation is clearly demonstrated by comparing layer-resolved simulations with simulations involving batteries with homogenized material properties. Finally, a coupled solution of electrochemical-electrical-thermal (EET) problem on a Nissan Leaf battery module was demonstrated towards the goal of extending the simulations to module level.

  17. FY2014 Energy Storage R&D Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-03-01

    The Energy Storage research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for projects focusing on batteries for plug-in electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush. This report describes the progress made on the research and development projects funded by the Energy Storage subprogram in 2014. You can download individual sections at the following website, http://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/downloads/vehicle-technologies-office-2014-energy-storage-rd-annual-report.

  18. The development of KMRR schedule and progress control system (KSPCS) for the master schedule of KMRR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woong; Lee, Tae Joon; Kim, Joon Yun; Cho, Yun Ho; Hah, Jong Hyun

    1993-07-01

    This report was to development the computerized schedule and progress control system for the master schedule of KMRR project with ARTEMIS 7000/386 CM (Ver. 7.4.2.) based on project management theory (PERT/CPM, PDM, and S-curve). This system has been efficiently used for KMRR master schedule and will be utilized for the detail scheduling of KMRR project. (Author) 23 refs., 26 figs., 52 tabs

  19. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 83, quarter ending June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Summaries of 41 research projects on enhanced recovery are presented under the following sections: (1) chemical flooding; (2) gas displacement; (3) thermal recovery; (4) geoscience technology; (5) resource assessment technology; and (6) reservoir classes. Each presentation gives the title of the project, contract number, research facility, contract date, expected completion data, amount of the award, principal investigator, and DOE program manager, and describes the objectives of the project and a summary of the technical progress.

  20. The development of KMRR schedule and progress control system (KSPCS) for the master schedule of KMRR project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Woong; Lee, Tae Joon; Kim, Joon Yun; Cho, Yun Ho; Hah, Jong Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-01

    This report was to development the computerized schedule and progress control system for the master schedule of KMRR project with ARTEMIS 7000/386 CM (Ver. 7.4.2.) based on project management theory (PERT/CPM, PDM, and S-curve). This system has been efficiently used for KMRR master schedule and will be utilized for the detail scheduling of KMRR project. (Author) 23 refs., 26 figs., 52 tabs.

  1. Progress of and future plans for the L-4 Blanket Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daenner, W.; Ioki, K.; Cardella, A.

    2001-01-01

    The ITER L-4 Blanket Project has achieved substantial progress over the last two years. The qualification of materials so far considered as reference for the shield module fabrication has been completed, as well as the developments for joining the triplex First Wall structure. Several Primary Wall, baffle, and limiter mock-ups have been manufactured and tested showing comfortable margins against the loads expected in ITER. Shield prototypes have been manufactured by conventional and advanced technology, which have finally demonstrated the manufacturing feasibility. More recently, activities for the qualification of the module attachment system have been started, and first results from materials and mock-up tests have become available. Several test campaigns are still to be finished to complete the data base for the design. In the meantime, further activities have been initiated to adapt the R and D programme to the ITER-FEAT design features, with the aim to further reduce the cost. (author)

  2. 制备多孔锂离子电池电极的研究进展%Preparation Research Progress in Porous Lithium-ion Battery Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党在清; 刘刚

    2013-01-01

      着重介绍近年来多孔锂离子电池电极材料合成的研究进展。软模板剂法合成温度较低,生成的多孔材料孔型可控性好。纳米铸造、凝胶结晶及生物材料作底物等硬模板剂方法可在温度较高的条件下合成电极材料,该材料多为介孔和大孔材料。电极沉积法、超声波降解法、水热合成法等非模板剂法合成条件较为简单,合成材料孔径分布较广。%  The research progress in porous electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries was focused on. The reaction temperature of soft-templating was relatively low, and could produce well-controlled porous materials. Hard-templating method contained nanocast-ing method, colloidal crystal templating method and biotemplating method. Porous materials which pore sizes distributed in meso-pore or macropore was synthesized under relatively high temperature by these methods. Non-templating method, included electrode-position method, ultrasonication method and hydrothermal synthesis, could be applied to synthesize porous materials with broad pore size distribution with simple synthesis conditions.

  3. General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety and fuels program. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maraman, W.J.

    1980-02-01

    Studies related to the use of 238 PuO 2 in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of LASL are presented. The three programs involved are: general-purpose heat source development; space nuclear safety; and fuels program. Three impact tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of a high temperature reentry pulse and the use of CBCF on impact performance. Additionally, two 238 PuO 2 pellets were encapsulated in Ir-0.3% W for impact testing. Results of the clad development test and vent testing are noted. Results of the environmental tests are summarized. Progress on the Stirling isotope power systems test and the status of the improved MHW tests are indicated. The examination of the impact failure of the iridium shell of MHFT-65 at a fuel pass-through continued. A test plan was written for vibration testing of the assembled light-weight radioisotopic heater unit. Progress on fuel processing is reported

  4. Lithium batteries for electric road vehicle applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Bo; Hallgren, B; Johansson, Arne; Selaanger, P [Catella Generics, Kista (Sweden)

    1996-12-31

    Lithium is one of the most promising negative electrode materials to be used for the manufacturing of batteries. It is the most electronegative material in the table of standard potentials and its low weight will facilitate a high gravimetric coulombic density. Theoretically, as high values as 6 kWh/kg could be reached for lithium based batteries. The aim of this study has been to make an inventory of what is internationally known about lithium batteries suitable for electric vehicle applications. It is representative for the development status by the summer of 1995. Both high and ambient temperature lithium batteries are described in the study even if the analysis is concentrated on the latter. Ambient temperature systems has gathered the major interest, especially from manufacturers in the `3Cs` market segment (Consumer electronics, Communications and Computers). There is no doubt, a bright future for lithium rechargeable batteries. Depending on the ambition of a national research programme, one can await the ongoing development of batteries for the 3Cs market segment or take the lead in a near-term or advanced system R and D for EV batteries. In the zero ambition EV battery programme, we recommend allocation of funds to follow the development within the 3Cs sector. The corresponding funding level is 1-2 MSEK/year granted to a stable receiver. In a low ambition EV programme, we recommend to keep a few groups active in the front-line of specific research areas. The purpose is to keep a link for communication open to the surrounding battery world. The cost level is 4-6 MSEK per year continually. In a high ambition programme we recommend the merging of Swedish resources with international EV battery R and D programmes, e.g. the EUCAR project. The research team engaged should be able to contribute to the progress of the overall project. The cost for the high ambition programme is estimated at the level 15-20 MSEK per year continually. 47 refs, 17 figs, 16 tabs

  5. Lithium batteries for electric road vehicle applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Bo; Hallgren, B.; Johansson, Arne; Selaanger, P. [Catella Generics, Kista (Sweden)

    1995-12-31

    Lithium is one of the most promising negative electrode materials to be used for the manufacturing of batteries. It is the most electronegative material in the table of standard potentials and its low weight will facilitate a high gravimetric coulombic density. Theoretically, as high values as 6 kWh/kg could be reached for lithium based batteries. The aim of this study has been to make an inventory of what is internationally known about lithium batteries suitable for electric vehicle applications. It is representative for the development status by the summer of 1995. Both high and ambient temperature lithium batteries are described in the study even if the analysis is concentrated on the latter. Ambient temperature systems has gathered the major interest, especially from manufacturers in the `3Cs` market segment (Consumer electronics, Communications and Computers). There is no doubt, a bright future for lithium rechargeable batteries. Depending on the ambition of a national research programme, one can await the ongoing development of batteries for the 3Cs market segment or take the lead in a near-term or advanced system R and D for EV batteries. In the zero ambition EV battery programme, we recommend allocation of funds to follow the development within the 3Cs sector. The corresponding funding level is 1-2 MSEK/year granted to a stable receiver. In a low ambition EV programme, we recommend to keep a few groups active in the front-line of specific research areas. The purpose is to keep a link for communication open to the surrounding battery world. The cost level is 4-6 MSEK per year continually. In a high ambition programme we recommend the merging of Swedish resources with international EV battery R and D programmes, e.g. the EUCAR project. The research team engaged should be able to contribute to the progress of the overall project. The cost for the high ambition programme is estimated at the level 15-20 MSEK per year continually. 47 refs, 17 figs, 16 tabs

  6. Modelling gas migration in fractured rock. A contribution to the EU's PROGRESS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.; Robinson, P.; Clark, K.

    2001-01-01

    To assess the performance of a waste repository, it is necessary to be able to predict the rates of gas generation and to understand and evaluate both the way the gas may disperse from the repository and any effects that might be associated with this dispersal. This document describes the modelling work carried out by QuantiSci on behalf of the UK Environment Agency, in conjunction with the CEC PROGRESS Project (Research into Gas Generation and Migration in Radioactive Waste Repository Systems) which has been carried out as part of the European Commission's IV th framework R and D programme. The project was under the PEGASUS (Projects on the Effects of GAS in Underground Storage facilities) umbrella. A review is provided of alternative conceptual models for the migration of gas through an initially water saturated fracture. A range of front or interface tracking methods for computing gas migration through a fracture is described: direct discretisation, marker particle, volume of fluids and level set methods. Volume of fluids methods are identified as the most appropriate approach for models of this sort. Subsequently, a description is given of the development of a model of gas injection into a single fracture in a portion of Borrowdale Volcanic Granite. The theoretical approach for the model is described in detail and the model compared to experimental results obtained for the real fracture. The experimental results of the CEC PROGRESS Project (obtained using Positron Emission Tomography) do not show particularly good agreement with the model results. However, there are strong indications that this is largely the result of uncertainties in the interpretation of the PET results. The experimental results are acknowledged to be extremely hard to interpret and the apparent negative gas thicknesses observed experimentally confirm this fact. Given the clearly critical dependence of the gas migration pathways on the aperture distribution, any discrepancies of this sort

  7. Energy Storage Annual Progress Report for FY15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ban, Chunmei [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cao, Lei [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Graf, Peter [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Keyser, Matt [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kim, Gi-Heon [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Santhanagopalan, Shriram [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saxon, Aron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Shi, Ying [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Kandler [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tenent, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yang, Chuanbo [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Chao [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The Energy Storage research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for projects focusing on batteries for plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in support of the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge. PEVs could have a significant impact on the nation's goal of reducing dependence on imported oil and gaseous pollutant emissions. The Energy Storage program targets overcoming technical barriers to enable market success, including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost; (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability); (3) reducing battery weight and volume; and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) supports the VTO's Energy Storage program by evaluating the thermal performance of cells and packs, developing electrochemical-thermal models to accelerate the design cycle for developing batteries, investigating the behavior of lithium-ion batteries under abuse conditions such as crush, enhancing the durability of electrodes by coatings such as atomic layer deposition, synthesis of materials for higher energy density batteries, and conducting techno-economic analysis of batteries in various electric-drive vehicles. This report describes the progress made by NREL on the research and development projects funded by the DOE VTO Energy Storage subprogram in FY15.

  8. A Rechargeable Hydrogen Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christudas Dargily, Neethu; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Devendrachari, Mruthunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Gautam, Manu; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-04-27

    We utilize proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen storage molecules to unlock a rechargeable battery chemistry based on the cleanest chemical energy carrier molecule, hydrogen. Electrochemical, spectroscopic, and spectroelectrochemical analyses evidence the participation of protons during charge-discharge chemistry and extended cycling. In an era of anthropogenic global climate change and paramount pollution, a battery concept based on a virtually nonpolluting energy carrier molecule demonstrates distinct progress in the sustainable energy landscape.

  9. School-Camp Project: progress and prospects; Projeto Campo-Escola: avancos e perspectivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Junior, Jose Baptista de; Pacheco, Almi Cabral; Souza, Thiago Teixeira; Medeiros Junior, Luiz; Santanna, Vanessa Cristina [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Projeto Campo-Escola

    2008-07-01

    The Field-School Project (PCE) was created through an agreement signed in 2003 between the Brazilian Regulatory Petroleum Agency (ANP) and the Federal University of Bahia. The main objectives of the Project were: implementation of a programme of technology transfer to institutions of federal education, and training of specialist for the sector of E and P of oil and gas, from the use of oil fields. Besides that, to demonstrate to small entrepreneurs that it is possible to exploit oil fields at low cost. Nowadays, the PCE has 02 fully equipped camps. The field of Quiambina, with a single well, was the first revitalized field. Equipped with mechanical elevation, it achieved a production of 19,000 bbl of oil until April 2008. The second revitalized field (Fazenda Mamoeiro), also with a single well, is already equipped for the production of gas and oil. Gas will be its primary product. The start of production of this field is planned for July 2008. Apart from these fields, the PCE also has three more: Bela Vista, Caracatu and Riacho Sesmaria. They were also designated by the ANP to integrate the PCE in Bahia. This article shows the progress and prospects for PCE, with emphasis to the field of Fazenda Mamoeiro in its imminent start of production. (author)

  10. Beneficial uses of nuclear waste/sewage sludge irradiation project. Progress report, April 1981-September 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    The objective is the further development and transfer of sludge irradiation technology to the municipal sector. At the conclusion of this project, a number of sludge irradiation demonstration plants will have been constructed and placed in operation by municipalities across the country. The following program elements have been established to ensure successful accomplishment of the program objectives: technology transfer by means of municipal demonstration plants; research support and data base development through operation of the SIDSS (Sandia Irradiator for Dried Sewage Solids) pilot plant; engineering support for the demonstration plants by SNL and LANL to include required support for NEPA/licensing activities, risk assessment, safety, and basic design engineering support to A and E firms; life sciences and agricultural R and D support by NMSU for base program activities and for demonstration plants; quality assurance activities to support licensing and other requirements; and program management. During the period covered by this report, the objectives of the BU/SSIP project have been expanded to include determination of an appropriate role for DOE and SNL in food irradiation. Progress on the program elements for the period April 1, 1981 through September 30, 1981, is discussed in detail

  11. S.E.N.S.I.B. project. Progress report 2006; Projet SENSIB. Rapport d'avancement 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This report presents the state of progress of all the studies which establish at present the S.E.N.S.I.B. project. For year 2006, the progress of the project is globally in compliance with the general schedule of realization of the S.E.N.S.I.B. project and with the perspectives announced in 2005. Factors of sensitivity were identified in diverse circles ( thematic studies) and methods and specific tools of the project are developed. 14 publications (reviews and congress) and 9 I.R.S.N. reports were produced. An international work group was launched to the I.R.S.N. initiative. The web site of S.E.N.S.I.B. on the I.R.S.N. scientific site was built. The S.E.N.S.I.B. project receives a financial participation of the Ademe. (N.C.)

  12. Battery Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the capacity of the employed batteries. The battery lifetime determines how long one can use a device. Battery modeling can help to predict, and possibly extend this lifetime. Many different battery models have been developed over the years. However,

  13. Lithium Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division Lithium Batteries Resources with Additional thin-film lithium batteries for a variety of technological applications. These batteries have high essentially any size and shape. Recently, Teledyne licensed this technology from ORNL to make batteries for

  14. Waste Tank Organic Safety Project organic concentration mechanisms task. FY 1994 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, M.A.

    1994-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Waste Tank Organic Safety Project is conducting research to support Westinghouse Hanford Company's (WHC) Waste Tank Safety Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Tank Farm Project Office. The goal of PNL's program is to provide a scientific basis for analyzing organics in Hanford's underground storage tanks (USTs) and for determining whether they are at concentrations that pose a potentially unsafe condition. Part of this research is directed toward determining what organic concentrations are safe by conducting research on organic aging mechanisms and waste energetics to assess the conditions necessary to produce an uncontrolled energy release in tanks due to reactions between the organics and the nitrate and nitrate salts in the tank wastes. The objective of the Organic Concentration Mechanisms Task is to assess the degree of localized enrichment of organics to be expected in the USTs due to concentration mechanisms. This report describes the progress of research conducted in FY 1994 on two concentration mechanisms of interest to the tank safety project: (1) permeation of a separate organic liquid phase into the interstitial spaces of the tank solids during the draining of free liquid from the tanks; and (2) concentration of organics on the surfaces of the solids due to adsorption. Three experiments were conducted to investigate permeation of air and solvent into a sludge simulant that is representative of single-shell tank sludge. The permeation behavior of air and solvent into the sludge simulant can be explained by the properties of the fluid pairs (air/supernate and solvent supernate) and the sludge. One important fluid property is the interfacial tension between the supernate and either the solvent or air. In general, the greater the interfacial tension between two fluids, the more difficult it will be for the air or solvent to displace the supernate during dewatering of the sludge

  15. Air and metal hydride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampinen, M.; Noponen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Applied Thermodynamics

    1998-12-31

    The main goal of the air and metal hydride battery project was to enhance the performance and manufacturing technology of both electrodes to such a degree that an air-metal hydride battery could become a commercially and technically competitive power source for electric vehicles. By the end of the project it was possible to demonstrate the very first prototype of the air-metal hydride battery at EV scale, achieving all the required design parameters. (orig.)

  16. [Research progresses of the completed pediatrics projects funded by National Natural Science Foundation of China from 2002 to 2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling; Hao, Jie; Deng, Min; Xu, Yan-ying

    2009-05-01

    To understand the projects completion and research progresses in pediatrics which were funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), and evaluate the accomplishment objectively and justly. The completion status of projects in pediatrics funded by department of clinical medicine II from 2002 to 2006 was analysed retrospectively, and important research achievement and outstanding development in some projects were reported. During the period between 2002 and 2006, 420 articles were published, and the average was 8.1 papers per project, which included 56 papers that were published in journals indexed by SCI (the average was 1.1 papers per project). The completion of general project was better than that of "the Young Researchers Fund" and small grant project. Ten post-doctors, 102 doctors and 109 masters were trained. Two projects were awarded with the first grade prize and another 2 with the second grade prize at the provincial and ministerial level, 4 items applied for patent and 1 was granted. These completed projects, which were mainly related to 7 of 12 subspecialties in the field of pediatrics, such as the respiratory disease, nephrology, neurology, cardiology, endocrinology, hematology, neonatology, are the major portion of the application projects and subsidized projects funded by NSFC, and achieved great research progresses. During the period between 2002 and 2006, the 52 completed projects in pediatrics showed difference in the distribution and quality of accomplishment among subspecialties and among types of supported projects; there are some gaps between pediatrics and some other clinical basic subspecialties II, this situation released the research status and problems in development of pediatrics in China. The general projects completion was good, and many projects obtained research achievements, which reflect the leading function of NSFC in pediatric research.

  17. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 86, quarter ending March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    Summaries are presented for 37 enhanced oil recovery contracts being supported by the Department of Energy. The projects are grouped into gas displacement methods, thermal recovery methods, geoscience technology, reservoir characterization, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Each summary includes the objectives of the project and a summary of the technical progress, as well as information on contract dates, size of award, principal investigator, and company or facility doing the research.

  18. RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Annual progress report for 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruland, R.M.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes the progress during 1988 of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects covering 16 hazardous waste facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility (the Solid Waste Landfill). Each of the projects is being conducted according to federal regulations based on the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the State of Washington Administrative Code. 21 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs

  19. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, October--December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R and D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of FY-98 (October--December 1997). It describes 216 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include requests for general information including maps and material for high school debates, and material on geothermal heat pumps, resource and well data, space heating and cooling, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, district heating, resorts and spas, industrial applications, electric power and snow melting. Research activities include work on model construction specifications of lineshaft submersible pumps and plate heat exchangers, a comprehensive aquaculture developer package and revisions to the Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook. Outreach activities include the publication of the Quarterly Bulletin (Vol. 18, No. 4) which was devoted entirely to geothermal activities in South Dakota, dissemination of information mainly through mailings of publications, tours of local geothermal uses, geothermal library acquisition and use, participation in workshops, short courses and technical meetings by the staff, and progress monitor reports on geothermal activities.

  20. Federal assistance program. Quarterly project progress report, January 1998--March 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the second quarter of FY-98-98 (January-March, 1998). It describes 268 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include requests for general information including maps and material for high school debates, and material on geothermal heat pumps, resource and well data, spacing heating and cooling, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, district heating, resorts and spas, industrial applications, electric power and snow melting. Research activities include work on model construction specifications for line shaft submersible pumps and plate heat exchangers and a comprehensive aquaculture developer package. The revised Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebooks was completed, published and is available for distribution. Outreach activities include the publication of the Quarterly Bulletin (Vol. 19, No. 1) which was devoted entirely to geothermal equipment, dissemination of information mainly through mailings of publications, tours of local geothermal uses, geothermal library acquisitions and use, participation in workshops, short courses and technical meetings by the staff, and progress monitor reports on geothermal activities.

  1. 94-1 Research and Development Project lead laboratory support: Fiscal year 1997. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, S.D.

    1996-12-01

    On May 26, 1994, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 94-1, which expressed the board's concern about nuclear materials left in the manufacturing pipeline after the US halted its nuclear weapons production activities. The DNFSB emphasized the need for remediation of these materials. As part of Recommendation 94-1, the DNFSB defined research objectives as follows: that a research program be established to fill any gaps in the information base needed for choosing among the alternate processes to be used in safe conversion of various types of fissile materials to optimal forms for safe interim storage and the longer-term disposition. To achieve this objective a research and technology development program with two elements is needed: a technology-specific program that is focused on treating and storing materials safety, with concomitant development of storage criteria and surveillance requirements, centered around 3- and 8-year targets; and a core technology program to augment the knowledge base about general chemical and physical processing and storage behavior and to assure safe interim material storage until disposition policies are formulated. The paper reports the progress on the following: materials identification and surveillance; stabilization process development; surveillance and monitoring; core technologies; and project management

  2. Progress on the HUPO Draft Human Proteome: 2017 Metrics of the Human Proteome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omenn, Gilbert S; Lane, Lydie; Lundberg, Emma K; Overall, Christopher M; Deutsch, Eric W

    2017-12-01

    The Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) Human Proteome Project (HPP) continues to make progress on its two overall goals: (1) completing the protein parts list, with an annual update of the HUPO draft human proteome, and (2) making proteomics an integrated complement to genomics and transcriptomics throughout biomedical and life sciences research. neXtProt version 2017-01-23 has 17 008 confident protein identifications (Protein Existence [PE] level 1) that are compliant with the HPP Guidelines v2.1 ( https://hupo.org/Guidelines ), up from 13 664 in 2012-12 and 16 518 in 2016-04. Remaining to be found by mass spectrometry and other methods are 2579 "missing proteins" (PE2+3+4), down from 2949 in 2016. PeptideAtlas 2017-01 has 15 173 canonical proteins, accounting for nearly all of the 15 290 PE1 proteins based on MS data. These resources have extensive data on PTMs, single amino acid variants, and splice isoforms. The Human Protein Atlas v16 has 10 492 highly curated protein entries with tissue and subcellular spatial localization of proteins and transcript expression. Organ-specific popular protein lists have been generated for broad use in quantitative targeted proteomics using SRM-MS or DIA-SWATH-MS studies of biology and disease.

  3. St. Louis Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project - A Progress Report-November 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadeniz, D.; Rogers, J.D.; Williams, R.A.; Cramer, C.H.; Bauer, R.A.; Hoffman, D.; Chung, J.; Hempen, G.L.; Steckel, P.H.; Boyd, O.L.; Watkins, C.M.; McCallister, N.S.; Schweig, E.

    2009-01-01

    St. Louis has experienced minor earthquake damage at least 12 times in the past 200 years. Because of this history and its proximity to known active earthquake zones, the St. Louis Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project (SLAEHMP) is producing digital maps that show variability of earthquake hazards, including liquefaction and ground shaking, in the St. Louis area. The maps will be available free via the internet. Although not site specific enough to indicate the hazard at a house-by-house resolution, they can be customized by the user to show specific areas of interest, such as neighborhoods or transportation routes. Earthquakes currently cannot be predicted, but scientists can estimate how strongly the ground is likely to shake as the result of an earthquake. Earthquake hazard maps provide one way of conveying such estimates. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which produces earthquake hazard maps for the Nation, is working with local partners to develop detailed maps for urban areas vulnerable to strong ground shaking. These partners, which along with the USGS comprise the SLAEHMP, include the Missouri University of Science and Technology-Rolla (Missouri S&T), Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), Saint Louis University, Missouri State Emergency Management Agency, and URS Corporation. Preliminary hazard maps covering a test portion of the 29-quadrangle St. Louis study area have been produced and are currently being evaluated by the SLAEHMP. A USGS Fact Sheet summarizing this project was produced and almost 1000 copies have been distributed at several public outreach meetings and field trips that have featured the SLAEHMP (Williams and others, 2007). In addition, a USGS website focusing on the SLAEHMP, which provides links to project results and relevant earthquake hazard information, can be found at: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/ceus/urban_map/st_louis/index.php. This progress report summarizes the

  4. Aspergillus oryzae in solid-state and submerged fermentations: Progress report on a multi-disciplinary project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesebeke, R. te; Ruijter, G.; Rahardjo, Y.S.P.; Hoogschagen, M.J.; Heerikhuisen, M.; Levin, A.; Driel, K.G.A. van; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Dijksterhuis, J.; Zhu, Y.; Weber, F.J.; Vos, W.M. de; Hondel, K.A.M.J.J. van den; Rinzema, A.; Punt, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    We report the progress of a multi-disciplinary research project on solid-state fermentation (SSF) of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae. The molecular and physiological aspects of the fungus in submerged fermentation (SmF) and SSF are compared and we observe a number of differences correlated

  5. Aspergillus oryzae in solid-state and submerged fermentations. Progress report on a multi-disciplinary project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Biesebeke, Rob; Ruijter, George; Rahardjo, Yovita S P; Hoogschagen, Marisca J; Heerikhuisen, Margreet; Levin, Ana; van Driel, Kenneth G A; Schutyser, Maarten A I; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Zhu, Yang; Weber, Frans J; de Vos, Willem M; van den Hondel, Kees A M J J; Rinzema, Arjen; Punt, Peter J

    We report the progress of a multi-disciplinary research project on solid-state fermentation (SSF) of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae. The molecular and physiological aspects of the fungus in submerged fermentation (SmF) and SSF are compared and we observe a number of differences correlated

  6. Aspergillus oryzae in solid-state and submerged fermentations. Progress report on a multi-disciplinary project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesebeke, te R.; Ruijter, G.; Rahardjo, Y.S.P.; Hoogschagen, M.J.; Heerikhuisen, M.; Levin, A.; Driel, van K.G.A.; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Dijksterhuis, J.; Yang Zhu, Yang; Weber, F.J.; Vos, de W.M.; Hondel, van den K.A.; Rinzema, A.; Punt, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    We report the progress of a multi-disciplinary research project on solid-state fermentation (SSF) of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae. The molecular and physiological aspects of the fungus in submerged fermentation (SmF) and SSF are compared and we observe a number of differences correlated

  7. Nuclear battery materials and application of nuclear batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Shaochang; Lu Zhenming; Fu Xiaoming; Liang Tongxiang

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear battery has lots of advantages such as small volume, longevity, environal stability and so on, therefore, it was widely used in aerospace, deep-sea, polar region, heart pacemaker, micro-electromotor and other fields etc. The application of nuclear battery and the development of its materials promote each other. In this paper the development and the latest research progress of nuclear battery materials has been introduced from the view of radioisotope, electric energy conversion and encapsulation. And the current and potential applications of the nuclear battery are also summarized. (authors)

  8. Research projects into the safety of nuclear power plants. Period cover 01. January - 30. June 2017. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Within its competence for energy research the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) sponsors research projects on the safety of nuclear power plants currently in operation. The objective of these projects is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such research projects by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work. The progress reports are published by the Project Management Agency/ Authority Support Division of GRS. The reports as of the year 2000 are available in the internet-based information system on results and data of reactor safety research (https://www.grs-fbw.de). The compilation of the reports is classified according to the topic areas of reactor safety research. The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. Ilt has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties.

  9. Project Management Plan/Progress Report UT/GTKS Training Program Development for Commercial Building Operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-03-31

    Universidad del Turabo (UT), in a collaborative effort with Global Turn Key Services, Inc. (GTKS), proposed to develop a training program and a commercialization plan for the development of Commercial Building Operators (CBOs). The CBOs will operate energy efficient buildings to help maintain existing buildings up to their optimal energy performance level, and ensure that net-zero-energy buildings continuously operate at design specifications, thus helping achieve progress towards meeting BTP Strategic Goals of creating technologies and design approaches that enable net-zero-energy buildings at low incremental costs by 2025. The proposed objectives were then: (1) Develop a Commercial Building Operator (CBO) training program and accreditation that will in turn provide a certification to participants recognized by Accreditation Boards such as the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP) and Leadership in Energy & Environmental Designs (LEED). (2) Develop and implement a commercialization and sustainability plan that details marketing, deployment, financial characterization, job placement, and other goals required for long-term sustainability of the project after the funding period. (3) After program development and deployment, provide potential candidates with the knowledge and skill sets to obtain employment in the commercial building green energy (net-zero-energy building) job market. The developed CBO training program will focus on providing skills for participants, such as displaced and unemployed workers, to enter the commercial building green energy (net-zeroenergy building) job market. This course was designed to allow a participant with minimal to no experience in commercial building green technology to obtain the required skill sets to enter the job market in as little as 12 weeks of intensive multi-faceted learning. After completion of the course, the CBO staff concluded the participant will meet minimum established accreditation

  10. A nationwide quality improvement project to accelerate Ghana's progress toward Millennium Development Goal Four: design and implementation progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twum-Danso, Nana A Y; Akanlu, George B; Osafo, Enoch; Sodzi-Tettey, Sodzi; Boadu, Richard O; Atinbire, Solomon; Adondiwo, Ane; Amenga-Etego, Isaac; Ashagbley, Francis; Boadu, Eric A; Dasoberi, Ireneous; Kanyoke, Ernest; Yabang, Elma; Essegbey, Ivan T; Adjei, George A; Buckle, Gilbert B; Awoonor-Williams, J Koku; Nang-Beifubah, Alexis; Twumasi, Akwasi; McCannon, C Joseph; Barker, Pierre M

    2012-12-01

    The gap between evidence-based guidelines and practice of care is reflected, in low- and middle-income countries, by high rates of maternal and child mortality and limited effectiveness of large-scale programing to decrease those rates. We designed a phased, rapid, national scale-up quality improvement (QI) intervention to accelerate the achievement of Millennium Development Goal Four in Ghana. Our intervention promoted systems thinking, active participation of managers and frontline providers, generation and testing of local change ideas using iterative learning from transparent district and local data, local ownership and sustainability. After 50 months of implementation, we have completed two prototype learning phases and have begun regional spread phases to all health facilities in all 38 districts of the three northernmost regions and all 29 Catholic hospitals in the remaining regions of the country. To accelerate the spread of improvement, we developed 'change packages' of rigorously tested process changes along the continuum of care from pregnancy to age 5 in both inpatient and outpatient settings. The primary successes for the project so far include broad and deep adoption of QI by local stakeholders for improving system performance, widespread capacitation of leaders, managers and frontline providers in QI methods, incorporation of local ideas into change packages and successful scale-up to approximately 25% of the country's districts in 3 years. Implementation challenges include variable leadership uptake and commitment at the district level, delays due to recruiting and scheduling barriers, weak data systems and repeated QI training due to high staff turnover.

  11. The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP): Progress and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) is a distributed climate-scenario simulation exercise for historical model intercomparison and future climate change conditions with participation of multiple crop and agricultural trade modeling groups around the world. The goals of AgMIP are to improve substantially the characterization of risk of hunger and world food security due to climate change and to enhance adaptation capacity in both developing and developed countries. Recent progress and the current status of AgMIP will be presented, highlighting three areas of activity: preliminary results from crop pilot studies, outcomes from regional workshops, and emerging scientific challenges. AgMIP crop modeling efforts are being led by pilot studies, which have been established for wheat, maize, rice, and sugarcane. These crop-specific initiatives have proven instrumental in testing and contributing to AgMIP protocols, as well as creating preliminary results for aggregation and input to agricultural trade models. Regional workshops are being held to encourage collaborations and set research activities in motion for key agricultural areas. The first of these workshops was hosted by Embrapa and UNICAMP and held in Campinas, Brazil. Outcomes from this meeting have informed crop modeling research activities within South America, AgMIP protocols, and future regional workshops. Several scientific challenges have emerged and are currently being addressed by AgMIP researchers. Areas of particular interest include geospatial weather generation, ensemble methods for climate scenarios and crop models, spatial aggregation of field-scale yields to regional and global production, and characterization of future changes in climate variability.

  12. Greenhouse gas emission trends and projections in Europe 2011. Tracking progress towards Kyoto and 2020 targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busche, J.; Scheffler, M.; Graichen, V. (Umweltbundesamt, Vienna (Austria)) (and others)

    2011-10-15

    At the end of 2010, the EU-15 was on track to achieve its Kyoto target but three EU-15 Member States (Austria, Italy and Luxembourg) were not on track to meet their burden-sharing targets. These countries must therefore seriously consider further action to ensure compliance, in particular revising their plans on using flexible mechanisms. Among the EEA member countries outside the EU, Liechtenstein and Switzerland were not on track to achieve their Kyoto target at the end of 2009. All other European countries are on track to meet their targets, either based on domestic emissions only or with the assistance of Kyoto mechanisms. The economic recession had a significant impact on the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends but a more limited effect on progress towards Kyoto targets. This is because emissions in the sectors covered by the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS), which were most affected by the crisis, do not affect Kyoto compliance once ETS caps have been set. With existing national measures, Member States do not project enough emission reductions for the EU to meet its unilateral 20 % reduction commitment in 2020. Additional measures currently planned by Member States will help further reduce emissions but will be insufficient to achieve the important emission cuts needed in the longer term. By 2020 Member States must enhance their efforts to reduce emissions in non-EU ETS sectors, such as the residential, transport or agriculture sectors, where legally binding national targets have been set under the EU's 2009 climate and energy package. (Author)

  13. A change in strategy for a CERCLA Removal Action Demolition Project in progress results in overall project enhancements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertin, M.; Nichols, R.M.; Edwards, D.T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses changes made in a demolition project at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), a site on the National Priorities list (NPL), owned by the Department of Energy. The project, to demolish fourteen uranium ore silos and their structure, was based on a Removal Action Work Plan, submitted and approved by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), that integrated Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements to remove the source of contamination and threat to public health and the environment. After the demolition contractor defaulted at 30% complete, completion of the project by the USEPA deadline was threatened. The recovery plan included re-evaluation of project documents in addition to the schedule. It was determined that re-interpretation of the removal action criteria, including design and Removal Action Work Plan, would eliminate road-blocks, and optimize resources, resulting in project completion by the original deadline even after lost-time in mobilizing another contractor. This presentation will discuss the open-quotes lessons learnedclose quotes by the project team and illustrate how simplification of construction methods resulted in enhancements to the environmental controls, improved material handing, and created a safer work environment

  14. Progress report projects in the field of nuclear safety sponsered by the Federal Minister for Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Investigations on the safety of Light Water Reactors (LWR) being performed in the framework of the Research Program Reactor Safety (RS-Projects) are sponsored by the BMFT (Federal Minister for Research and Technology), Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie. Objective of this program is to investigate in greater detail the safety margins of nuclear energy plants and their systems and the further development of safety technology. Besides the investigations of LWR tasks first projects on the safety of FBR type reactors are sponsored by the BMFT. The GRS (Reactor Safety Association), Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH, by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of such investigations by means of quarterly and annually publication of progress reports within the series GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work at the GRS, within the framework of general information of the progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are arranged according to the amended LWR Safety Research Program of the BMFT. Another table contents uses the same classification system as applied in the Nuclear Safety Index of the CEC and the OECD. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Progress report of the CEC project Rodos system development. Period: 1 september 92-31 august 93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, O.

    1994-01-01

    Within the context of the Radioprotection program of the CEC, the RODOS project (Real-time On-line DecisiOn Support system) aims at the development of a decision support system for nuclear emergencies. RODOS involves 22 research teams, divided in 4 sub-projects: 'Meteorology and Atmospheric Dispersion, 'System Development', 'Decision Aiding Techniques'. The fourth sub-project is a Joint Study Project of the Agreement between CEC ad the CIS republics. EDF is working in the 'System Development' sub-project and namely in the 'training' group. This group aims at the creation of a specific training course for health physics managers, based on RODOS. This note reproduces the progress report of the 'Development System' project. The reporting period is: September 92 - August 93. Progress bas been made within the reporting period in the: - development of data assimilation methods incorporating both monitoring data and model predictions for obtaining consistent pictures of the environmental contamination and the source term ; - improvement and extension of the modules ATSTEP-CORA (atmospheric dispersion and deposition), EMERSIM (simulation of emergency actions), ECOAMOR (exposure pathways and dose calculation) and FRODO (simulation of relocation and agricultural countermeasures) ; - preparation of training courses using RODOS as illustrative tool ; - extension of the functions of the RODOS operating system OSY, in particular of RoGIS, its geographical information system. (author). 2 figs

  16. Leaching Behavior of Coal Combustion Products and the Environmental Implication in Road Construction : Project Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-26

    This is the third annual report for Project #043352. Project #043352 is designed to establish the leaching characteristics for several different types of ash using a relatively rigorous leaching procedure developed by Kosson et al (2002) for a wide r...

  17. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains brief outlines of the multiple projects under the responsibility of the Western Environmental Technology Office in Butte Montana. These projects include biomass remediation, remediation of contaminated soils, mine waste technology, and several other types of remediation

  18. Transportation Infrastructure: Progress on and Challenges to Central Artery/Tunnel Project's Cost and Financing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The Central Artery/Tunnel project in Boston, Massachusetts--one of the largest, most complex, and most expensive highway construction projects ever undertaken--is well under way, with contracts worth nearly $8 billion either completed or awarded. Con...

  19. Dry cell battery poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  20. A systematic review to determine reliability and usefulness of the field-based test batteries for the assessment of physical fitness in adolescents – The ASSO Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Bianco

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present review is to investigate the main field-based tests, used alone or included in sport or fitness batteries, for the assessment of health- and skill-related physical fitness components in adolescents. Different scientific databases were searched through using the selected key words related to physical fitness and its components for adolescence. The search focused on original articles and reviews/meta-analyses using valid, reproducible and feasible tests that fit within the school environment. A total of 100 scientific manuscripts were included in the qualitative synthesis. The present systematic review pointed out 5 fitness tests that well adapt to the evaluation of the components of physical fitness of adolescents within a school environment: the 20 m shuttle run test for cardio-respiratory endurance; the handgrip strength test for upper body maximal strength; the standing broad jump test for lower body maximal strength; the sit-up test to exhaustion for muscular endurance and the 4×10 m shuttle run test for speed, agility and coordination. These fitness tests have been finally selected and incorporated into the Adolescents and Surveillance System for the Obesity prevention – Fitness Test Battery (ASSO-FTB, and will be adopted within the ASSO Project for evaluation purposes. This instrument could be also provided to teachers and people working in schools in order to assess physical fitness of adolescents over time and prevent obesity and related diseases.

  1. Progress and results of the project ENETRAP II: European network of education and training in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco, M.; Llorente Herranz, C.; Coeck, M.; Livosi, P.; Massiot, P.; Moebius, S.

    2013-01-01

    The CIEMAT has participated in a number of working groups and has led the WP 6 for the creation of a database of events of specific training the RPE and the RPO taking into account aspects developed in schemes of defined training. The database includes providers and job training opportunities. Is a tool that will serve as a mechanism for comparison with established standards of training in the project.The project has made great progress in the implementation of the new directive at European level. (Author)

  2. Yucca Mountain site characteriztion project bibliography. Progress Report, 1994--1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Following a reorganization of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management in 1990, the Yucca Mountain Project was renamed Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The title of this bibliography was also changed to Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Bibliography. Prior to August 5, 1988, this project was called the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. This bibliography contains information on this ongoing project which was added to the Department of Energy's Energy Science and Technology Database from January 1, 1994, through December 31, 1995. The bibliography is categorized by principal project participating organization. Participant-sponsored subcontractor reports, papers, and articles are included in the sponsoring organization's list. Another section contains information about publications on the Energy Science and Technology database which were not sponsored by the project but have some relevance to it

  3. Research Progress in Mathematical Analysis of Map Projection by Computer Algebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIAN Shaofeng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Map projection is an important component of modern cartography, and involves many fussy mathematical analysis processes, such as the power series expansions of elliptical functions, differential of complex and implicit functions, elliptical integral and the operation of complex numbers. The derivation of these problems by hand not only consumes much time and energy but also makes mistake easily, and sometimes can not be realized at all because of the impossible complexity. The research achievements in mathematical analysis of map projection by computer algebra are systematically reviewed in five aspects, i.e., the symbolic expressions of forward and inverse solution of ellipsoidal latitudes, the direct transformations between map projections with different distortion properties, expressions of Gauss projection by complex function, mathematical analysis of oblique Mercator projection, polar chart projection with its transformation. Main problems that need to be further solved in this research field are analyzed. It will be helpful to promote the development of map projection.

  4. Yucca Mountain site characteriztion project bibliography. Progress Report, 1994--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Following a reorganization of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management in 1990, the Yucca Mountain Project was renamed Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The title of this bibliography was also changed to Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Bibliography. Prior to August 5, 1988, this project was called the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. This bibliography contains information on this ongoing project which was added to the Department of Energy`s Energy Science and Technology Database from January 1, 1994, through December 31, 1995. The bibliography is categorized by principal project participating organization. Participant-sponsored subcontractor reports, papers, and articles are included in the sponsoring organization`s list. Another section contains information about publications on the Energy Science and Technology database which were not sponsored by the project but have some relevance to it.

  5. Progress report of the ECN contribution to the experiments in the HAW project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duijves, K.A.; Vonka, V.

    1990-12-01

    This progress report documents the progress of the ECN contribution in the High Active Waste experiment, a large-scale in situ test being performed underground at the Asse salt mine in Remlingen FRG, during the period April 1st through June 30th, 1990. In ch. 2 a general overview is given of the experiment development. Problems and solutions are discussed in ch. 3. (author). 4 refs.; 10 figs

  6. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronson, James P.; Duke, Bill; Loffink, Ken

    2008-12-30

    In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. Migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage and trapping facility design, operation, and criteria. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. Beginning in March of 2007, two work elements from the Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations Project were transferred to other projects. The work element Enumeration of Adult Migration at Nursery Bridge Dam is now conducted under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project and the work element Provide Transportation Assistance is conducted under the Umatilla Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance Project. Details of these activities can be found in those project's respective annual reports.

  7. Characterization of vanadium flow battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindner, H.; Ekman, C.; Gehrke, O.; Isleifsson, F.

    2010-10-15

    This report summarizes the work done at Risoe DTU testing a vanadium flow battery as part of the project 'Characterisation of Vanadium Batteries' (ForskEl project 6555) with the partners PA Energy A/S and OI Electric A/S under the Danish PSO energy research program. A 15kW/120kWh vanadium battery has been installed as part of the distributed energy systems experimental facility, SYSLAB, at Risoe DTU. A test programme has been carried out to get hands-on experience with the technology, to characterize the battery from a power system point of view and to assess it with respect to integration of wind energy in the Danish power system. The battery has been in operation for 18 months. During time of operation the battery has not shown signs of degradation of performance. It has a round-trip efficiency at full load of approximately 60% (depending on temperature and SOC). The sources of the losses are power conversion in cell stacks/electrolyte, power converter, and auxiliary power consumption from pumps and controller. The response time for the battery is limited at 20kW/s by the ramp rate of the power converter. The battery can thus provide power and frequency support for the power system. Vanadium battery is a potential technology for storage based services to the power system provided investment and O and M cost are low enough and long term operation is documented. (Author)

  8. Lake Roosevelt White Sturgeon Recovery Project : Annual Progress Report, January 2003 – March 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, Matthew D.; McLellan, Jason G. [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-07-15

    This report summarizes catch data collected from white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus in Lake Roosevelt during limited setlining and gill netting activities in the fall of 2003, and documents progress toward development of a U.S. white sturgeon conservation aquaculture program for Lake Roosevelt. From 27-30 October, 42 overnight small mesh gill net sets were made between Marcus and Northport, WA for a total catch of 15 juvenile white sturgeon (275-488 mm FL). All sturgeon captured were of Canadian hatchery origin. These fish had been previously released as sub-yearlings into the Canadian portion (Keenleyside Reach) of the Transboundary Reach of the Columbia River during 2002 and 2003. Most sturgeon (n=14) were caught in the most upstream area sampled (Northport) in low velocity eddy areas. Five fish exhibited pectoral fin deformities (curled or stunted). Growth rates were less than for juvenile sturgeon captured in the Keenleyside Reach but condition factor was similar. Condition factor was also similar to that observed in juvenile sturgeon (ages 1-8) captured in the unimpounded Columbia River below Bonneville Dam between 1987-92. From 10-14 November, 28 overnight setline sets were made in the Roosevelt Reach between the confluence of the Spokane River and Marcus Island for a total catch of 17 white sturgeon (94-213 cm FL). Catch was greatest in the most upstream areas sampled, a distribution similar to that observed during a WDFW setline survey in Lake Roosevelt in 1998. The mean W{sub r} index of 110% for fish captured this year was higher than the mean W{sub r} of 91% for fish captured in 1998. Excellent fish condition hindered surgical examination of gonads as lipid deposits made the ventral body wall very thick and difficult to penetrate with available otoscope specula. Acoustic tags (Vemco model V16 coded pingers, 69 kHz, 48-month life expectancy) were internally applied to 15 fish for subsequent telemetry investigations of seasonal and reproductively

  9. Mirage project. Second summary progress report (Work period January to December 1984)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Come, B.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the second year of work (1984) in the CEC project MIRAGE on migration of radionuclides in the geosphere. It complements CEC reports EUR 9304 (Description of the project) and EUR 9543 (Works carried out in 1983) on the same topic

  10. High Performance Parallel Processing Project: Industrial computing initiative. Progress reports for fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koniges, A.

    1996-02-09

    This project is a package of 11 individual CRADA`s plus hardware. This innovative project established a three-year multi-party collaboration that is significantly accelerating the availability of commercial massively parallel processing computing software technology to U.S. government, academic, and industrial end-users. This report contains individual presentations from nine principal investigators along with overall program information.

  11. Projected progress in the engineering state-of-the-art. [for aerospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicks, O. W.

    1978-01-01

    Projected advances in discipline areas associated with aerospace engineering are discussed. The areas examined are propulsion and power, materials and structures, aerothermodynamics, and electronics. Attention is directed to interdisciplinary relationships; one example would be the application of communications technology to the solution of propulsion problems. Examples involving projected technology changes are presented, and technology integration and societal effects are considered.

  12. Chernobyl Studies Project - working group 7.0 environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, October 1993--January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.

    1994-03-01

    The DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project was begun as part of a cooperative agreement between the US and the former USSR, (quote) To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future reactor accident (quote). Most of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus has now turned primarily to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are extensively engaged in case-control and cohort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children and in the Ukraine. A major part of the effort is providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and providing support and equipment for the medical teams. This document contains reports on progress in the following task areas: Management; External Dose; Hydrological Transport; Chromosome Painting Dosimetry; Stochastic Effects; Thyroid Studies; and Leukemia Studies.

  13. Technical progress in planning organization of the Ostravo-Karwina coal basin, ''Mining Projects of Ostravo''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpeta, B; Kolar, J

    1979-01-01

    Based on the main task of further improvement in labor productivity and improvement in the quality of products, the leading planning organization of the Ostravo-Karwina basin is planning and realizing progressive technological plans based on new equipment. Long-term plans for basin development up to 1990 stipulate a rise in capital investments by 180%, increase in the volume of productivity by 164% with a rise in the number of workers by 142%. Corresponding technical progress in planning is based on an improvement in the system of scientific-technical information, automation and technical equipping of the planning process, improvements in the forms and organizational structure. Organization of specialized research-planning groups to substantiate and to technically-economically evaluate technical progress, and also to develop comprehensive technical assignments is stipulated.

  14. Overview of progress on the improvement projects for the LANSCE accelerator and target facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R.J.; Browne, J.; Brun, T.; Donahue, J.B.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Hoffman, E.; Pynn, R.; Schriber, S.; Weinacht, D.

    1997-01-01

    Three projects have been initiated since 1994 to improve the performance of the accelerator and target facilities for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The LANSCE Reliability Improvement Project (LRIP) was separated into two phases. Phase 1, completed in 1995, targeted near-term improvements to beam reliability and availability that could be completed in one-year's time. Phase 2, now underway and scheduled for completion in May 1998, consists of two projects: (a) implementation of direct H-injection for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) and (b) an upgrade of the target/moderator system for the short pulse spallation neutron (SPSS) source. The latter will reduce the target change-out time from about 10 months to about three weeks. The third project, the SPSS Enhancement Project, is aimed at increasing the PSR output beam current to 200 microA at 30 Hz and providing up to seven new neutron scattering instruments

  15. Air Force standards for nickel hydrogen battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Warren; Milden, Martin

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed are presented in viewgraph form and include Air Force nickel hydrogen standardization goals, philosophy, project outline, cell level standardization, battery level standardization, and schedule.

  16. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project: Semiannual progress report for April through September 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. Objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  17. Experimental Physics Division of the Los Alamos Project. Progress report No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-09-01

    Included in this semi-monthly report written in 1943 are progress with neutron beams, neutron absorption in enriched materials, equipment operation and maintenance reports of the cyclotron neutron source facility, and instrumentation maintenance activities of individuals in the cyclotron group. (GHT)

  18. Progress report of the ECN contribution to the experiments in the HAW project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duijves, K.A.; Vonka, V.

    1991-08-01

    This report documents the progress of the ECN contribution in the High Active Waste Experiment, a large-scale in-situ test being performed underground in the Asse salt mine, Remlingen, FRG, during the period January 1st through March 31st, 1991. (A.S.). 3 refs.; 10 figs

  19. Coast Guard: Progress Being Made on Deepwater Project, but Risks Remain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    The Coast Guard is in the final stages of planning the largest procurement project in its history the modernization and/or replacement of over 90 cutters and 200 aircraft used for missions beyond 50 miles from shore...

  20. Li-ion batteries: Phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Peiyu; Zhang Yantao; Zhang Lianqi; Chu Geng; Gao Jian

    2016-01-01

    Progress in the research on phase transitions during Li + extraction/insertion processes in typical battery materials is summarized as examples to illustrate the significance of understanding phase transition phenomena in Li-ion batteries. Physical phenomena such as phase transitions (and resultant phase diagrams) are often observed in Li-ion battery research and already play an important role in promoting Li-ion battery technology. For example, the phase transitions during Li + insertion/extraction are highly relevant to the thermodynamics and kinetics of Li-ion batteries, and even physical characteristics such as specific energy, power density, volume variation, and safety-related properties. (topical review)

  1. Low cost solar array project. Quarterly progress report, January-March, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The engineering design, fabrication, assembly, operation, economic analysis, and process support R and D for an Experimental Process System Development Unit (EPSDU) are presented. The civil construction work was completed and the mechanical bid package is in preparation. The electrical design effort is in progress. Parallel efforts which complement the mechanical design are the process flow diagrams and control instrumentation logic for startup operation and shutdown. These are in progress and will identify all process and utility streams, control systems, and flow logic. The data collection system takes the signals from the instrumentation, translates them into engineering units and finally develops a data report which summarizes all key performance parameters. Cleaning procedures have been established to assure a contamination-free product and inspection visits have been made to the fabricators of specialty equipment.

  2. Geostatistics project of the National Uranium Resources Evaluation Program. Progress report, October 1978--March 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, R.J.; Bement, T.R.; Campbell, K.; Howell, J.S.; Wecksung, G.W.; Whitemann, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    During the period covered by this report, research was concentrated on multivariate approaches to the analysis of aerial radiometric data. Two aspects of principal components analysis were the subjects of two publications. The procedures recommended for linear discriminant analysis were revised. Progress was made in overlaying LANDSAT data with aerial radiometric data from the Lubbock quadrangle. Some preliminary results from principal components analysis of the Wind River data were obtained

  3. The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

    2009-06-10

    The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research projects that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This project deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW projects evaluate hatchery operations (project No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (project No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three projects monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin Annual Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho

  4. SERI Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project: Fiscal Year 1990 Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riordan, C; Maxwell, E; Stoffel, T; Rymes, M; Wilcox, S

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of the Solar Radiation Resource Project is to help meet the needs of the public, government, industry, and utilities for solar radiation data, models, and assessments as required to develop, design, deploy, and operate solar energy conversion systems. The project scientists produce information on the spatial (geographic), temporal (hourly, daily, and seasonal), and spectral (wavelength distribution) variability of solar radiation at different locations in the United States. Resources committed to the project in FY 1990 supported about four staff members, including part-time administrative support. With these resources, the staff must concentrate on solar radiation resource assessment in the United States; funds do not allow for significant efforts to respond to a common need for improved worldwide data. 34 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. The SHARPn project on secondary use of Electronic Medical Record data: progress, plans, and possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chute, Christopher G; Pathak, Jyotishman; Savova, Guergana K; Bailey, Kent R; Schor, Marshall I; Hart, Lacey A; Beebe, Calvin E; Huff, Stanley M

    2011-01-01

    SHARPn is a collaboration among 16 academic and industry partners committed to the production and distribution of high-quality software artifacts that support the secondary use of EMR data. Areas of emphasis are data normalization, natural language processing, high-throughput phenotyping, and data quality metrics. Our work avails the industrial scalability afforded by the Unstructured Information Management Architecture (UIMA) from IBM Watson Research labs, the same framework which underpins the Watson Jeopardy demonstration. This descriptive paper outlines our present work and achievements, and presages our trajectory for the remainder of the funding period. The project is one of the four Strategic Health IT Advanced Research Projects (SHARP) projects funded by the Office of the National Coordinator in 2010.

  6. Passive ALWR safety: the ALPHA project at Switzerland's PSI - a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.; Varadi, G.; Dreier, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) initiated the ALPHA project in 1991 for the experimental and analytical investigation of the long-term decay heat removal from the containment of the next generation of 'passive' advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). The dynamic containment response to such systems, as well as containment phenomena, are investigated. The ALPHA project includes integral system tests in the large-scale (1:25 in volume) PANDA facility; the smaller-scale separate effects LINX series of tests related to various passive containment mixing, stratification, and condensation phenomena in the presence of non-condensable gases; the AIDA tests on the behavior of aerosols in passive containment cooling systems (PCCS); and supporting analytical work. The project has been, so far, directed mainly to the investigation of the General Electric simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) PCCS and related phenomena. (author) 2 figs., 4 refs

  7. Development of a wind farm noise propagation prediction model - project progress to date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.; Bullmore, A.; Bass, J.; Sloth, E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a twelve month measurement campaign which is part of a European project (CEC Project JOR3-CT95-0051) with the aim to substantially reduce the uncertainties involved in predicting environmentally radiated noise levels from wind farms (1). This will be achieved by comparing noise levels measure at varying distances from single and multiple sources over differing complexities of terrain with those predicted using a number of currently adopted sound propagation models. Specific objectives within the project are to: establish the important parameters controlling the propagation of wind farm noise to the far field; develop a planning tool for predicting wind farm noise emission levels under practically encountered conditions; place confidence limits on the upper and lower bounds of the noise levels predicted, thus enabling developers to quantify the risk whether noise emission from wind farms will cause nuisance to nearby residents. (Author)

  8. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project. Semiannual progress report, April-September 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with input from private industry. Objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. Focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. The work described in this report is organized according to the following WBS project elements: management and coordination; materials and processing (monolithics, ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining); materials design methodology (contact interfaces, new concepts); data base and life prediction (time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, NDE development); and technology transfer. This report includes contributions from all currently active project participants.

  9. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, July 1996--September 1996. Federal Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the fourth quarter of FY-96. It describes 152 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics and resources. Research activities are summarized on greenhouse peaking. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

  10. Trends and projections in Europe 2013. Tracking progress towards Europe's climate and energy targets until 2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-10-01

    This report provide an assessment of the progress of the EU and European countries towards achieving their climate mitigation and energy policy objectives. These targets include international commitments pursuant the KP and the EU 2020 commitment to reduce by 20 % greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to 1990, to create 20 % of energy consumption from renewables and to increase energy efficiency by 20 %. The assessment is based on GHG data for the period 2008-2012, including recent estimates of proxy 2012 GHG emissions, GHG projections until 2020 submitted by Member States in 2013, as well as energy statistics until 2011. (Author)

  11. Progress on the Design of the Storage Ring Vacuum System for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillwell, B.; Billett, B.; Brajuskovic, B.; Carter, J.; Kirkus, E.; Lale, M.; Lerch, J.; Noonan, J.; O' Neill, M.; Rocke, B.; Suthar, K.; Walters, D.; Wiemerslage, G.; Zientek, J.

    2017-06-20

    Recent work on the design of the storage ring vacuum system for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project (APS-U) includes: revising the vacuum system design to accommodate a new lattice with reverse bend magnets, modifying the designs of vacuum chambers in the FODO sections for more intense incident synchrotron radiation power, modifying the design of rf-shielding bellows liners for better performance and reliability, modifying photon absorber designs to make better use of available space, and integrated planning of components needed in the injection, extraction and rf cavity straight sections. An overview of progress in these areas is presented.

  12. The Human Genome Project and Mental Retardation: An Educational Program. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Sharon

    1999-05-03

    The Arc, a national organization on mental retardation, conducted an educational program for members, many of whom have a family member with a genetic condition causing mental retardation. The project informed members about the Human Genome scientific efforts, conducted training regarding ethical, legal and social implications and involved members in issue discussions. Short reports and fact sheets on genetic and ELSI topics were disseminated to 2,200 of the Arc's leaders across the country and to other interested individuals. Materials produced by the project can e found on the Arc's web site, TheArc.org.

  13. HIFS VNL Monthly Progress Report Preparation for NDCX-II Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, Grant; Kwan, Joe; Barnard, John; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik; Leitner, Matthaeus; Waldron, Will; Bieniosek, Frank

    2009-01-01

    In preparation for the project and for anticipated review in August, the HIFS-VNL hosted an NDCX-II Advisory Meeting at LBNL on May 27, 2009. A number of experts in accelerator physics, engineering, and construction were asked to visit for a full day, listen to presentations on the project, its goals, and its status, and to offer their advice on how best to proceed, what topics needed attention, and what technical options seemed most attractive to them. This was a productive meeting, and the Committee's comments will provide useful guidance.

  14. Research projects into the safety of nuclear power plants. Period covered: 01. July - 31. December 2004. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Within its competence for energy research, the Bundesministerium fuer Wirtschaft und Technology (BMWi) (Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology) sponsors investigations into the safety of nuclear power plants. The objective of these investigations is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such investigations by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work and are published by the Research Management Division of GRS within the framework of general information on the progress in reactor safety research. The compilation of the reports is classified according to general topics related to reactor safety research. Further, use is made of the classification system 'Joint Safety Research Index' of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities). The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. It has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties. (orig.)

  15. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report, July 1--September 30, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-12-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality

  16. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance: Federal assistance program. Quarterly project progress report, October--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the first quarter of FY-96. It describes 90 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment and resources. Research activities are summarized on low-temperature resource assessment, geothermal district heating system cost evaluation and silica waste utilization project. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, technical papers and seminars, development of a webpage, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

  17. STYLE - A European Project on Structural Integrity: Progress of the work after 2 Years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heussner, Stefan; Nicak, Tomas; Keim, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    The overall objective of STYLE is to assess, optimise and develop the use of advanced tools for the structural integrity assessment of components relevant to ageing and life time management and to support the integration of the knowledge created in the project into main-stream nuclear industry assessment codes.

  18. Nuclear chemistry project. Progress report, January 1, 1978--December 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumann, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Research on the nuclear chemistry project is summarized including Coulomb capture of negative muons by atoms and molecules, nuclear structure and spectroscopy, and the preparation and use of radioactive targets both to study the internal electric fields acting on the nuclei of foreign atoms introduced in metallic solids by radioactive decay and determination of nuclear moments by optical hyperfine spectroscopy

  19. A visual progression of the Fort Valley Restoration Project treatments using remotely sensed imagery (P-53)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph E. Crouse; Peter Z. Fule

    2008-01-01

    The landscape surrounding the Fort Valley Experimental Forest in northern Arizona has changed dramatically in the past decade due to the Fort Valley Restoration Project, a collaboration between the Greater Flagstaff Forest Partnership, Coconino National Forest, and Rocky Mountain Research Station. Severe wildfires in 1996 sparked community concern to start restoration...

  20. General guidelines for the assessment of internal dose from monitoring data: Progress of the IDEAS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerfel, H.; Andrasi, A.; Bailey, M.; Blanchardon, E.; Cruz-Suarez, R.; Berkovski, V.; Castellani, C. M.; Hurtgenv, C.; Leguen, B.; Malatova, I.; Marsh, J.; Stather, J.; Zeger, J.

    2007-01-01

    In recent major international intercomparison exercises on intake and internal dose assessments from monitoring data, the results calculated by different participants varied significantly. Based on this experience the need for harmonisation of the procedures has been formulated within an EU 5. Framework Programme research project. The aim of the project, IDEAS, is to develop general guidelines for standardising assessments of intakes and internal doses. The IDEAS project started in October 2001 and ended in June 2005. The project is closely related to some goals of the work of Committee 2 of the ICRP and since 2003 there has been close cooperation between the two groups. To ensure that the guidelines are applicable to a wide range of practical situations, the first step was to compile a database of well-documented cases of internal contamination. In parallel, an improved version of an existing software package was developed and distributed to the partners for further use. A large number of cases from the database was evaluated independently by the partners and the results reviewed. Based on these evaluations, guidelines were drafted and discussed with dosimetry professionals from around the world by means of a virtual workshop on the Internet early in 2004. The guidelines have been revised and refined on the basis of the experiences and discussions in this virtual workshop. The general philosophy of the Guidelines is presented here, focusing on the principles of harmonisation, optimisation and proportionality. Finally, the proposed Levels of Task to structure the approach of internal dose evaluation are reported. (authors)

  1. Review projects for the US Fusion Program: Progress report, December 1, 1984-February 28, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribe, F.L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews projects at the University of Washington on the following topics: Magnetic Fusion Energy Program Plan (Feb. 1985); High Density Power Systems; Fusion Systems Studies; Burning Plasmas and Compact Ignition Tokamak; US Magnetic Mirror Program; and Technical Planning Activity (Jan. 1987)

  2. Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak projectprogress and future activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H.S.; Nadiah, I.; Eryani, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Tropical forests in Borneo (Brunei Darussalam, Kalimantan, Sabah and Sarawak) are considered as one of the twelve mega biodiversity centres in the world. However, until now, there is no up-to-date or complete documentation on the flora of the island. The Tree Flora of Sabah and Sarawak Project,

  3. Steam Generator Group Project. Progress report on data acquisition/statistical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, P.G.; Buchanan, J.A.; McIntyre, J.M.; Hof, P.J.; Ercanbrack, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    A major task of the Steam Generator Group Project (SGGP) is to establish the reliability of the eddy current inservice inspections of PWR steam generator tubing, by comparing the eddy current data to the actual physical condition of the tubes via destructive analyses. This report describes the plans for the computer systems needed to acquire, store and analyze the diverse data to be collected during the project. The real-time acquisition of the baseline eddy current inspection data will be handled using a specially designed data acquisition computer system based on a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) PDP-11/44. The data will be archived in digital form for use after the project is completed. Data base management and statistical analyses will be done on a DEC VAX-11/780. Color graphics will be heavily used to summarize the data and the results of the analyses. The report describes the data that will be taken during the project and the statistical methods that will be used to analyze the data. 7 figures, 2 tables

  4. Standard Terminology for Phenotypic Variations: The Elements of Morphology Project, Its Current Progress, and Future Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carey, John C.; Allanson, Judith E.; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the authors of this article formed an international working group to develop standardized definitions and terms to describe the physical variations used in human phenotypic analyses. This project, which came to be known as the Elements of Morphology, resulted in six articles proposing

  5. The Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project: inception, objectives, and progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jared Verner; Mark T. Smith

    2002-01-01

    The Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project, a formal administrative study involving extensive and intensive collaboration between Forest Service managers and researchers, is a response to changes in the agency’s orientation in favor of ecosystem approaches and to recent concern over issues associated with maintenance of late successional forest attributes...

  6. Projecting future air pollution-related mortality under a changing climate: progress, uncertainties and research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaniyazi, Lina; Guo, Yuming; Yu, Weiwei; Tong, Shilu

    2015-02-01

    Climate change may affect mortality associated with air pollutants, especially for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3). Projection studies of such kind involve complicated modelling approaches with uncertainties. We conducted a systematic review of researches and methods for projecting future PM2.5-/O3-related mortality to identify the uncertainties and optimal approaches for handling uncertainty. A literature search was conducted in October 2013, using the electronic databases: PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, ProQuest, and Web of Science. The search was limited to peer-reviewed journal articles published in English from January 1980 to September 2013. Fifteen studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Most studies reported that an increase of climate change-induced PM2.5 and O3 may result in an increase in mortality. However, little research has been conducted in developing countries with high emissions and dense populations. Additionally, health effects induced by PM2.5 may dominate compared to those caused by O3, but projection studies of PM2.5-related mortality are fewer than those of O3-related mortality. There is a considerable variation in approaches of scenario-based projection researches, which makes it difficult to compare results. Multiple scenarios, models and downscaling methods have been used to reduce uncertainties. However, few studies have discussed what the main source of uncertainties is and which uncertainty could be most effectively reduced. Projecting air pollution-related mortality requires a systematic consideration of assumptions and uncertainties, which will significantly aid policymakers in efforts to manage potential impacts of PM2.5 and O3 on mortality in the context of climate change. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. BATTERIES 2020 – A Joint European Effort towards European Competitive Automotive Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermans, J.-M.; Rodriguez-Martinez, L.M.; Omar, N.

    The Integrated ProjectBatteries 2020” unites 9 European partners jointly working on the research and development of European competitive automotive batteries. The project aims at increasing lifetime and energy density of large format high-energy lithium-ion batteries towards the goals targeted...... for automotive batteries. Three parallel strategies will be followed in order to achieve those targets: (i) Highly focused materials development; two improved generations of NMC materials will allow the performance, stability and cyclability of state of the art cells to be improved. (ii) Understanding ageing...... of degradation processes. (iii) Reduction of battery cost; a way to reduce costs, increase battery residual value and improve sustainability is to consider second life uses of batteries used in EV. These batteries are still operational and suitable to less restrictive conditions, such as those for stationary...

  8. Extreme project. Progress report 2006; Projet EXTREME. Rapport d'avancement 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyrolle, F.; Masson, O.; Charmasson, S

    2007-07-01

    The E.X.T.R.E.M.E. project introduced in 2005 to the S.E.S.U.R.E. / L.E.R.C.M. has for objectives to acquire data on the consequences of the extreme climatic meteorological episodes on the distribution of the artificial radioisotopes within the various compartments of the geosphere. This report presents the synthesis of the actions developed in 2006 in positioning and in co financing of the project by means of regional or national research programs (C.A.R.M.A., E.X.T.R.E.M.A., E.C.C.O.R.E.V.I.), of data acquisition, valuation and scientific collaboration. (N.C.)

  9. Explosives disposal demonstration projects. Progress report, April 12, 1995--June 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbeneau, R.

    1995-01-01

    This report contains quarterly reports on two projects. The first is undertaking the environmental restoration at the Pantex Plant. Research objectives are organized under four general tasks: field testing and produced water treatment, bioremediation of contaminated groundwater and soils, vadose zone remediation, and chromium remediation. The other project goal is to demonstrate generation of diamond by explosive compression of Carbon 60 and Carbon 70 and mixtures of these fullerenes. The intent is to exploit expertise developed by Pantex and other DOE Laboratories in the area of understanding and modeling of explosive compression for initiation of nuclear fission reactions to explosively compress carbon in the form of fullerenes with the goal of transforming the material into the diamond phase

  10. Progress of the Enhanced Hanford Single Shell Tank (SST) Integrity Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venetz, Theodore J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Washenfelder, Dennis J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Boomer, Kayle D. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Jeremy M. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Castleberry, Jim L. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-07

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project (SSTIP) in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration. In late 2010, seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement.

  11. Recent progress in flow control for practical flows results of the STADYWICO and IMESCON projects

    CERN Document Server

    Barakos, George; Luczak, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    This book explores the outcomes on flow control research activities carried out within the framework of two EU-funded projects focused on training-through-research of Marie Sklodowska-Curie doctoral students. The main goal of the projects described in this monograph is to assess the potential of the passive- and active-flow control methods for reduction of fuel consumption by a helicopter. The research scope encompasses the fields of structural dynamics, fluid flow dynamics, and actuators with control. Research featured in this volume demonstrates an experimental and numerical approach with a strong emphasis on the verification and validation of numerical models. The book is ideal for engineers, students, and researchers interested in the multidisciplinary field of flow control. Provides highly relevant and up-to-date information on the topic of flow control; Includes assessments of a wide range of flow-control technologies and application examples for fixed and rotary-wing configurations; Reinforces reader u...

  12. Statement on current progress of the EPR project. Basic Design phase concluded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamprecht, F.

    1997-01-01

    Against the background of expected increasing demand for electric power worldwide it is obvious that any existing technology for electricity generation will be required in the future to meet the demand, just as well as technology improvements. Nuclear industry's answer to this challenge are activities for further evolution of the PWR concept as a joint venture of France and Germany for development of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR). The project participants are reactor manufacturers and operators of both countries as well as organisations responsible for reactor safety. The Basic Design phase which started in 1995, after prior definition of the common safety philosophy, has recently been concluded. The results have been presented at a meeting in October 1997 in Cologne, organised by KTG and SFEN, the countries' respective nuclear societies. The broad statement is that project work was successful in achieving two major objectives: A well-balanced safety concept, and a competitive design. (orig./CB) [de

  13. Progress Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999.......Progress report describing the work carried out by the Danish participant in the ALTSET project in the period January 1999 to July 1999....

  14. Final Progress Report for Project Entitled: Quantum Dot Tracers for Use in Engineered Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Peter [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Bartl, Michael [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Reimus, Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Williams, Mark [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mella, Mike [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-09-12

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a new class of tracers that offer great promise for use in characterizing fracture networks in EGS reservoirs. From laboratory synthesis and testing through numerical modeling and field demonstrations, we have demonstrated the amazing versatility and applicability of quantum dot tracers. This report summarizes the results of four years of research into the design, synthesis, and characterization of semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) for use as geothermal tracers.

  15. General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety and fuels program. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maraman, W.J.

    1979-12-01

    This formal monthly report covers the studies related to the use of 238 PuO 2 in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The two programs involved are general-purpose heat source development and space nuclear safety and fuels. Most of the studies discussed hear are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues

  16. Observational studies in South African mines to mitigate seismic risks: a mid-project progress report

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Durrheim, RJ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available such as Japan. A 5-year collaborative project entitled "Observational studies in South African mines to mitigate seismic risks" was launched in 2010 to address these risks, drawing on over a century of South African and Japanese research experience... network in the mining districts. Figure 1. Schematic illustration of the research design. Jpn - Japanese researchers; CSIR - Council for Scientific and Industrial Research; CGS - Council for Geoscience The knowledge gained during the course...

  17. The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP): Overview and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.; Hatfield, J.; Jones, J. W.; Ruane, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) is an international effort to assess the state of global agricultural modeling and to understand climate impacts on the agricultural sector. AgMIP connects the climate science, crop modeling, and agricultural economic modeling communities to generate probabilistic projections of current and future climate impacts. The goals of AgMIP are to improve substantially the characterization of risk of hunger and world food security due to climate change and to enhance adaptation capacity in both developing and developed countries. This presentation will describe the general approach of AgMIP and highlight its findings and activities. AgMIP crop model intercomparisons have been established for wheat (27 models participating), maize (25 models), and rice (15+ models), and are being established for sugarcane, soybean, sorghum/millet, and peanut. In coordination with these pilots, methodologies to utilize weather generators and downscaled climate simulations for agricultural applications are under development. An AgMIP global agricultural economics model intercomparison with participation of 11 international groups is ongoing, and a number of global biophysical models are currently being evaluated for future climate impacts on agricultural lands both as part of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP) and for contribution to the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). AgMIP is also organizing regional research efforts, and has already held workshops in South America, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, Europe, and North America. Outcomes from these meetings have informed AgMIP activities, and 10 research teams from Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia have been selected for project funding. Additional activities are planned for Australia and East Asia. As the AgMIP research community continues to work towards its goals, three key cross-cutting scientific challenges have emerged and are being

  18. Evaluation and monitoring of wild/natural steelhead trout production: project progress report, 1996; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leth, Brian D.; Holubetz, Terry; Nemeth, Doug

    2000-01-01

    This project was initiated to provide additional, and more definitive, information regarding wild steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations in Idaho. Important streams for wild steelhead production were identified and selected for monitoring. Monitoring activities employed among streams varied, but generally included: aerial redd counts, placement of adult weirs, enumeration of juveniles through mask and snorkel counts, and emigrant trapping. This report details activities during the 1996 field season

  19. Monitoring the progress of NFFO-3 projects: short rotation willow coppice - agronomy and economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twemlow, R.K.M.

    1997-01-01

    The involvement of Sidney C. Banks p.l.c., and the subsidiary company Banks Agriculture, in fuel supply for biofuelled power stations started some 4 years ago. When identifying possible opportunities and crops it was apparent that, with the third tranche of Non-Fossil Fuel Obligations (NFFO3) coming up, there were companies looking at developing biofuelled power stations, using Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) and for this they needed to link with potential fuel suppliers. Sidney C. Banks p.l.c. linked with South Western Power (SWP) (a subsidiary of South Western Electricity p.l.c. (SWEB)) to act as their sole fuel supplier on projected biofuel wood power stations. Subsequently two wood fuelled power stations were awarded to SWP and Sidney C. Banks p.l.c. in the 3rd Tranche from NFFO, in December 1994. The objectives of this project were to: establish a network of SRC growers to produce fuel for a NFFO project; monitor the success of the enterprise; implement a programme of constant improvement to optimise the fuel supply strategy; and provide valuable information as to the performance of the SRC crop in large scale commercial production. (author)

  20. Progress on the Femto-Slicing Project at the Synchrotron SOLEIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prigent, P; Hollander, Ph; Labat, M; Couprie, M E; Marlats, J L; Laulhé, C; Luning, J; Moreno, T; Morin, P; Nadji, A; Polack, F; Ravy, S; Silly, M; Sirotti, F

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the Femto-Slicing project at SOLEIL is to generate 100 fs X-rays pulses on two beamlines, CRISTAL and TEMPO, for pump-probe experiments in the hard and soft X-rays regions. Two fs lasers are currently in operation on TEMPO and CRISTAL for pump-probe experiments on the ps time scale enabling time resolved photoemission and photodiffraction studies. The Femto-Slicing project is based on the fs laser of the CRISTAL beamline, which can be adjusted to deliver 3 mJ pulses of 30 fs duration at 2.5 kHz. The laser beam will be separated in three branches: one delivering about 2 mJ to the modulator Wiggler and the other ones delivering the remaining energy to the TEMPO and CRISTAL experiments. This layout will yield natural synchronization between IR laser pump and X-ray probe pulses, only affected by jitter associated with beam transport. In this paper, we present the current status of the Femto-Slicing project at SOLEIL, with particular emphasis on the expected performance, and the design and construction of the laser beam transport and the diagnostics implementation.

  1. Progress report on decommissioning activities at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), is located about 18 miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. Between 1953 and 1989, the facility, then called the Feed Material Production Center or FMPC, produced uranium metal products used in the eventual production of weapons grade material for use by other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. In 1989, FMPC's production was suspended by the federal government in order to focus resources on environmental restoration versus defense production. In 1992, Fluor Daniel Fernald assumed responsibility for managing all cleanup activities at the FEMP under contract to the DOE. In 1990, as part of the remediation effort, the site was divided into five operable units based on physical proximity of contaminated areas, similar amounts of types of contamination, or the potential for a similar technology to be used in cleanup activities. This report continues the outline of the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities at the FEMP site Operable Unit 3 (OU3) and provides an update on the status of the decommissioning activities. OU3, the Facilities Closure and Demolition Project, involves the remediation of more than 200 uranium processing facilities. The mission of the project is to remove nuclear materials stored in these buildings, then perform the clean out of the buildings and equipment, and decontaminate and dismantle the facilities

  2. UK Safeguards R and D Project progress report for the period May 1987 -April 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, T.W.

    1988-09-01

    The main categories of task included in the United Kingdom safeguards research and development programme are summarised in the first section. These are: tasks concerned with the development of instruments and techniques for reprocessing and centrifuge enrichment plant safeguards; tasks concerned with the development of instruments and techniques for general application in the field of safeguards; tasks which are services to the International Atomic Energy Authority and exploratory and short term tasks which occur from time to time. The next three sections contain progress reports on the individual tasks and section 6 lists reports and papers relevant to work on UK safeguards research and development published between May 1987 and April 1988. (U.K.)

  3. Lessons Learned from the Puerto Rico Battery Energy Storage System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOYES, JOHN D.; DE ANA, MINDI FARBER; TORRES, WENCESLANO

    1999-09-01

    The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) installed a distributed battery energy storage system in 1994 at a substation near San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was patterned after two other large energy storage systems operated by electric utilities in California and Germany. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Systems Program at Sandia National Laboratories has followed the progress of all stages of the project since its inception. It directly supported the critical battery room cooling system design by conducting laboratory thermal testing of a scale model of the battery under simulated operating conditions. The Puerto Rico facility is at present the largest operating battery storage system in the world and is successfully providing frequency control, voltage regulation, and spinning reserve to the Caribbean island. The system further proved its usefulness to the PREPA network in the fall of 1998 in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges. The owner-operator, PREPA, and the architect/engineer, vendors, and contractors learned many valuable lessons during all phases of project development and operation. In documenting these lessons, this report will help PREPA and other utilities in planning to build large energy storage systems.

  4. The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project : Progress Report, 1999-2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contor, Craig R.; Sexton, Amy D.

    2003-06-02

    The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME) was funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P. L. 96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME). Chapter One provides an overview of the entire report and how the objectives of each statement of work from 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 contract years are organized and reported. Chapter One also provides background information relevant to the aquatic resources of the Walla Walla River Basin. Objectives are outlined below for the statements of work for the 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 contract years. The same objectives were sometimes given different numbers in different years. Because this document is a synthesis of four years of reporting, we gave objectives letter designations and listed the objective number associated with the statement of work for each year. Some objectives were in all four work statements, while other objectives were in only one or two work statements. Each objective is discussed in a chapter. The chapter that reports activities and findings of each objective are listed with the objective below. Because data is often interrelated, aspects of some findings may be reported or discussed in more than one chapter. Specifics related to tasks, approaches, methods, results and discussion are addressed in the individual chapters.

  5. The Progress of the HIRFL-CSR Project and the Commissioning of the Cluster Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Xiaohong; Lu Rongchun; Shao Caojie; Ruan, Fangfang; Yu, Deyang; Li Mingsheng; Torpokov, D K; Shestakov, Yu V; Sadykov, Rs; Zevakov, S A; Xia Jiawen; Zhan Wenlong

    2007-01-01

    HIRFL-CSR, a new cooler-storage-ring project, is the post-acceleration system of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) consisting of a main ring (CSRm) and an experimental ring (CSRe). The construction of the HIRFL-CSR complex is nearing completion. The stored beam in the CSRm has been observed. Recently, the stored beam was accelerated from 7 MeV/u to 30 MeV/u. The cluster target is located in one straight section of the CSRe providing cluster jet targets of inert gases and small molecular gases. The cluster target has been finished and the results of the test running are presented

  6. Bill project introducing a progressive price fixing of energy - Nr 150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brottes, Francois; Le Roux, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    This bill project aims at speeding up energy transition by inciting households to reduce their consumption, and at accompanying the unavoidable increase of energy prices. It introduces a rather complex process to establish the energy tariff, and notably a bonus-malus principle. The objective is to incite households to better insulate their main housing. It also takes social tariffs into account, defines institutions and representative for energy regulation, proposes the implementation of a public service for housing energy performance, and addresses the issue of energy supply in winter to households in precarious situation

  7. Blind test results - measure of incessant progress in personnel monitoring services at Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jashi, K.B.; Ashok Kumar, A.; Pandaram, P.

    2018-01-01

    Personnel Monitoring Services (PMS) at Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) laboratory, Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KKNPP) involve monitoring of about 1500 radiation workers of KKNPP for external radiation exposure on monthly basis. Quality assurance in PMS provides an overall estimate of accuracy which depends not only upon the dosimeter quality and reader performance but also on data interpretation, applicable software and the system. Therefore it measures the effectiveness of quality control mechanism. Blind test is an effective tool to check the performance of the processor without their knowledge during routine processing of the service cards

  8. General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety fuels program. Progress report, February 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maraman, W.J.

    1980-05-01

    This formal monthly report covers the studies related to the use of 238 PuO 2 in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The two programs involved are: General-Purpose Heat Source Development and Space Nuclear Safety and Fuels. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work

  9. Retrieval process development and enhancements project Fiscal year 1995: Simulant development technology task progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golcar, G.R.; Bontha, J.R.; Darab, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    The mission of the Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD ampersand E) project is to develop an understanding of retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, gather data on these technologies, and relate the data to specific tank problems such that end-users have the requisite technical bases to make retrieval and closure decisions. The development of waste simulants is an integral part of this effort. The work of the RPD ampersand E simulant-development task is described in this document. The key FY95 accomplishments of the RPD ampersand E simulant-development task are summarized below

  10. University of Alberta Flare Research Project : characterization of gases and liquids flared at battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Flare Research Project at the University of Alberta is an ongoing multi year study into the emissions, combustion process and fluid mechanics related to flaring, which is commonly used in the energy and petrochemical industries to dispose of unwanted combustible gases by burning them in an open flame. This report presents the results of one phase of the study which characterizes the nature and relative quantities of gases and liquids being flared at seven battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A sampling system was specially developed to collect and analyze both the gas and liquid component of the flare stream. The analysis was performed by an independent chemical analysis company. Results indicate that no liquids were collected or observed at any of the sites, dispelling the assumption that liquids are commonly found in flare streams. Analysis of the gas phase showed a wide variation in the volume fraction of fuel and inert components. No correlation was made to link the appearance of smoke at a flare site to the composition of the flare gases. The preliminary tests provide the foundation for recommendations for future work regarding sampling programs and issues of combustion efficiency tab., 4 figs., 1 appendix

  11. University of Alberta Flare Research Project : characterization of gases and liquids flared at battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostiuk, L.W.; Thomas, G. P.

    2004-01-01

    Flaring is commonly used in the energy and petrochemical industries to dispose of unwanted combustible gases by burning them in an open flame. The Flare Research Project at the University of Alberta is an ongoing multiyear study into the emissions, combustion process and fluid mechanics related to flaring. This report presents the results of one phase of the study which characterizes the nature and relative quantities of gases and liquids being flared at seven battery sites in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. A sampling system was specially developed to collect and analyze both the gas and liquid component of the flare stream. The analysis was performed by an independent chemical analysis company. Results indicate that no liquids were collected or observed at any of the sites, dispelling the assumption that liquids are commonly found in flare streams. Analysis of the gas phase showed a wide variation in the volume fraction of fuel and inert components. No correlation was made to link the appearance of smoke at a flare site to the composition of the flare gases. The preliminary tests provide the foundation for recommendations for future work regarding sampling programs and issues of combustion efficiency. 1 tab., 4 figs., 1 appendix

  12. History and progress of the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project, 2001-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David B.; Cannon, William F.; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Rivera, Francisco Moreira; Rencz, Andrew N.; Garrett, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geological Survey of Canada, and the Mexican Geological Survey initiated a low-density (1 site per 1600 km2, 13323 sites) geochemical and mineralogical survey of North American soils (North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project). Sampling and analytical protocols were developed at a series of workshops in 20032004 and pilot studies were conducted from 20042007. The ideal sampling protocol at each site includes a sample from 05 cm depth, a composite of the soil A horizon, and a sample from the soil C horizon. The 3, HClO4, and HF. Separate methods are used for As, Hg, Se, and total C on this same size fraction. The major mineralogical components are determined by a quantitative X-ray diffraction method. Sampling in the conterminous U.S. was completed in 2010 (c. 4800 sites) with chemical and mineralogical analysis currently underway. In Mexico, approximately 66% of the sampling (871 sites) had been done by the end of 2010 with completion expected in 2012. After completing sampling in the Maritime provinces and portions of other provinces (472 sites, 7.6% of the total), Canada withdrew from the project in 2010. Preliminary results for a swath from the central U.S. to Florida clearly show the effects of soil parent material and climate on the chemical and mineralogical composition of soils. A sample archive will be established and made available for future investigations.

  13. Synchrotron topography project. Progress report, January 20, 1982-October 20, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilello, J.C.; Chen, H.; Hmelo, A.B.; Liu, J.M.; Birnbaum, H.K.; Herley, P.J.; Green, R.E. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The collaborators have participated in the Synchrotron Topography Project (STP) which has designed and developed instrumentation for an x-ray topography station at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The two principle instruments constructed consist of a White Beam Camera (WBC) and a Multiple Crystal Camera (MCC) with high planar collimation and wide area image coverage. It is possible to perform in-situ studies in a versatile environmental chamber equipped with a miniature mechanical testing stage for both the WBC and MCC systems. Real-time video imaging plus a rapid feed cassette holder for high resolution photographic plates are available for recording topographs. Provisions are made for other types of photon detection as well as spectroscopy. The facilities for the entire station have been designed for remote operation using a LSI-11/23 plus suitable interfacing. These instruments will be described briefly and the current status of the program will be reviewed. The Appendix of this report presents titles, authors and abstracts of other technical work associated with this project during the current period

  14. Mexico City air quality: Progress of an international collaborative project to define air quality management options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    Mexico City, faces a severe air pollution problem due to a combination of circumstances. The city is in a high mountain basin at a subtropical latitude. The basin setting inhibits dispersion of pollution and contributes to frequent wintertime thermal inversions which further trap pollutants near the surface. The elevation and latitude combine to provide plentiful sunshine which, in comparison to more northern latitudes, is enhanced in the UV radiation which drives atmospheric photochemistry to produce secondary pollutants such as ozone. The Area Metropolitana de la Ciudad de Mexico AMCW is defined to include the 16 delegations of the Federal District (D.F.) and 17 highly urbanized municipalities in the State of Mexico which border the D.F. The 1990 census (XI Censo General de Poblacion y Vivienda de 1990) records that slightly over 15 million people live in the AMCM. There are numerous other nearby communities which are in the airshed region of Mexico City, but which are not included in the definition and population of the AMCM. The Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative is one project that is examining the complex relationship between air pollution, economic growth, societal values, and air quality management policies. The project utilizes a systems approach including computer modeling, comprehensive measurement studies of Mexico City's air pollutants, environmental chemical reaction studies and socioeconomic analysis. Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA) and the Mexican Petroleum Institute are the designated lead institutions

  15. UP2 400 High Activity Oxide Legacy Waste Retrieval Project Scope and Progress-13048

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabeuf, Jean-Michel; Varet, Thierry [AREVA Site Value Development Business Unit, La Hague Site (France)

    2013-07-01

    The High Activity Oxide facility (HAO) reprocessed sheared and dissolved 4500 metric tons of light water reactor fuel the fuel of the emerging light water reactor spent fuel between 1976 and 1998. Over the period, approximately 2200 tons of process waste, composed primarily of sheared hulls, was produced and stored in a vast silo in the first place, and in canisters stored in pools in subsequent years. Upon shutdown of the facility, AREVA D and D Division in La Hague launched a thorough investigation and characterization of the silos and pools content, which then served as input data for the definition of a legacy waste retrieval and reconditioning program. Basic design was conducted between 2005 and 2007, and was followed by an optimization phase which lead to the definition of a final scenario and budget, 12% under the initial estimates. The scenario planned for the construction of a retrieval and reconditioning cell to be built on top of the storage silo. The retrieved waste would then be rinsed and sorted, so that hulls could subsequently be sent to La Hague high activity compacting facility, while resins and sludge would be cemented within the retrieval cell. Detailed design was conducted successfully from 2008 until 2011, while a thorough research and development program was conducted in order to qualify each stage of the retrieval and reconditioning process, and assist in the elaboration of the final waste package specification. This R and D program was defined and conducted as a response and mitigation of the major project risks identified during the basic design process. Procurement and site preparatory works were then launched in 2011. By the end of 2012, R and D is nearly completed, the retrieval and reconditioning process have been secured, the final waste package specification is being completed, the first equipment for the retrieval cell is being delivered on site, while preparation works are allowing to free up space above and around the silo, to

  16. Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon : Project Progress Report, 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venditti, David A.

    2003-10-01

    distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Five of the 18 redds spawned by captive-reared parents were hydraulically sampled to assess survival to the eyed stage of development. Eyed-eggs were collected from four of these, and survival to this stage ranged from 0%-89%. Expanding these results to the remaining redds produced an estimate of 15,000 eyed-eggs being produced by captive-reared fish.

  17. Overview of the Last Progresses for the European Test Blanket Modules Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salavy, J.-F.; Rampal, G.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Meyder, R.; Neuberger, H.; Laesser, R.; Poitevin, Y.; Zmitko, M.; Rigal, E.

    2006-01-01

    The long-term objective of the EU Breeding Blankets programme is the development of DEMO breeding blankets, which shall assure tritium self-sufficiency, an economically attractive use of the heat produced inside the blankets for electricity generation and a sufficiently high shielding of the superconducting magnets for long time operation. In the short-term so-called DEMO relevant Test Blanket Modules (TBMs) of these breeder blanket concepts shall be designed, manufactured, tested, installed, commissioned and operated in ITER for first tests in a fusion environment. The Helium Cooled Lithium-Lead (HCLL) breeder blanket and the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) concepts are the two breeder blanket lines presently developed by the EU. The main objective of the EU test strategy related to TBMs in ITER is to provide the necessary information for the design and fabrication of breeding blankets for a future DEMO reactor. EU TBMs shall therefore use the same structural and functional materials, apply similar fabrication technologies, and test adequate processes and components. This paper gives an overview of the last progresses in terms of system design, calculations, test program, safety and R-and-D done these last two years in order to cope with the ambitious objective to introduce two EU TBM systems for day-1 of ITER operation. The engineering design of the two systems is mostly concluded and the priority is now on the development and qualification of the fabrication technologies. From calculations point of view, the last modelling efforts related to the thermal-hydraulic of the first wall, the tritium behaviour, and the box thermal and mechanical resistance in accidental conditions are presented. Last features of the TBM and cooling system designs and integration in ITER reactor are highlighted. In particular, this paper also describes the safety and licensing analyses performed for each concept to be able to include the TBM systems in the ITER preliminary safety report

  18. Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 2000 Project Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venditti, David A.

    2002-04-01

    During 2000, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued to develop techniques to rear chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to sexual maturity in captivity and to monitor their reproductive performance under natural conditions. Eyed-eggs were collected to establish captive cohorts from three study streams and included 503 eyed-eggs from East Fork Salmon River (EFSR), 250 from the Yankee Fork Salmon River, and 304 from the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (WFYF). After collection, the eyed-eggs were immediately transferred to the Eagle Fish Hatchery, where they were incubated and reared by family group. Juveniles collected the previous summer were PIT and elastomer tagged and vaccinated against vibrio Vibrio spp. and bacterial kidney disease before the majority (approximately 75%) were transferred to the National Marine Fisheries Service, Manchester Marine Experimental Station for saltwater rearing through sexual maturity. Smolt transfers included 158 individuals from the Lemhi River (LEM), 193 from the WFYF, and 372 from the EFSR. Maturing fish transfers from the Manchester facility to the Eagle Fish Hatchery included 77 individuals from the LEM, 45 from the WFYF, and 11 from the EFSR. Two mature females from the WFYF were spawned in captivity with four males in 2000. Only one of the females produced viable eggs (N = 1,266), which were placed in in-stream incubators by personnel from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe. Mature adults (N = 70) from the Lemhi River were released into Big Springs Creek to evaluate their reproductive performance. After release, fish distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Fifteen of the 17 suspected redds spawned by captive-reared parents in Big Springs Creek were hydraulically sampled to assess survival to the eyed stage of development. Eyed-eggs were collected from 13 of these, and

  19. Progress report of the S.E.N.S.I.B. project 2005-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumont, G.; Bourcier, L.; Briand, B.; Chojnacki, E.; Dufeu, A.; Duffa, C.; Durand, V.; Eyrolle, F.; Larue, C.; Levain, A.; Masson, O.; Mercat, C.; Metivier, J.M.; Pey, B.; Pourcelot, L.; Renaud, Ph.; Roussel-Debet, S.; Thebault, H.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the project is to define a method for classifying territories by their sensitivity to a radioactive pollution, on the basis of their environmental and social characteristics, i.e. those characteristics associated with the human use of the environment. For example, the sensitivity of an urban environment will depend on the population density, the area covered, the urban services and their response to the contamination. The sensitivity of an agricultural area will be determined by the food chain and the way in which it is affected by contamination of the soil, crops or livestock. The end result of the S.E.N.S.I.B. project will be a standardised tool capable of representing and comparing the sensitivity of an area to radioactive pollution using a single measurement scale. This standardized measurement of the environmental and population characteristics will be useful in risk assessment and management, and in all the operational stages of a nuclear installation including commissioning, normal operation, accident and post-accident situations, and during decommissioning. The project will provide mappings of the sensitivity to a range of concrete scenarios, and of the vulnerability of each area once the probability of pollution occurring has been taken into account. The concept of sensitivity is shared by other fields besides radioecology and can be used to assess vulnerability to chemical pollution, climate change, or population pressures. The results obtained from the S.E.N.S.I.B. project will be applicable to other fields, especially that of chemical pollution, though a range of collaborations and partnerships. The S.E.N.S.I.B. project is divided into five stages. These are: Identification of sensitivity factors, i.e. all the characteristics of a territory likely to make the environment sensitive to a given type of pollution. Characterization of their ranges of values. Conversion of each range of values into a range of scores. Allocation of a weighting to be

  20. Recent progress in volcanism studies: Site characterization activities for the Yucca Mountain site characterization project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.M.; Valentine, G.; Morley, R.; Perry, F.V.

    1992-01-01

    Significant progress has been made on volcanism studies over the past calendar year. There are a number of major highlights from this work. Geochronology data have been obtained for the Lathrop Wells center using a range of isotopic, radiogenic, and age-calibrated methods. Initial work is encouraging but still insufficient to resolve the age of the center with confidence. Geologic mapping of the Sleeping Butte volcanic centers was completed and a report issued on the geology and chronology data. Twenty shallow trenches have been constructed in volcanic units of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Results of detailed studies of the trenches support a polycyclic eruptive history. New soil data from the trenches continue to support a late Pleistocene or Holocene age for many of the volcanic units at the center. Geochemical data (trace element and isotopic analysis) show that the volcanic units of the Lathrop Wells center cannot be related to one another by fractional crystallization of a single magma batch, supporting a polycyclic model of volcanism. Structural models using existing data are used to evaluate the probability of magmatic disruption of a potential repository. Several permissive models have been developed but none lead to significant differences in calculating the disruption ratio. Work was initiated on the eruptive and subsurface effects of magmatic activity on a repository. (author)

  1. Progress on the superconducting magnet for the time projection chamber experiment (TPC) at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Eberhard, P.H.; Burns, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    The TPC (Time Projection Chamber) experiment at PEP will have a two meter inside diameter superconducting magnet which creatests a 1.5 T uniform solenoidal field for the TPC. The superconducting magnet coil, cryostat, cooling system, and the TPC gas pressure vessel (which operatests at 11 atm) were designed to be about two thirds of a radiation length thick. As a result, a high current density coil design was chosen. The magnet is cooled by forced flow two phase helium. The TPC magnet is the largest adiabatically stable superconducting magnet built to date. The paper presents the parameters of the TPC thin solenoid and its subsystems. Tests results from the Spring 1980 cryogenic tes are presented. The topics to be dealt with in the paper are cryogenic services and the tests of magnet subsystems such as the folded current leads. Large thin superconducting magnet technology will be important to large detectors to be used on LEP

  2. Rhode Island crystalline repository siting project: Technical progress report, Calendar year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vild, B.

    1987-01-01

    A Nuclear Waste Fund established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 provides financial support to affected states to participate in the high-level radioactive waste repository siting program of the US Department of Energy. In Rhode Island, that function was performed by a multidisciplinary Project Review Team consisting of staff from three State agencies. Members of the Review Team attended several meetings in 1986 to discuss mutual concerns with Federal, State and Tribal officials. Comments were developed on DOE's Draft Area Recommendation Report. Members of the Review Team also testified at a public hearing in Providence on the Draft ARR, and developed and distributed a public information booklet. In May, Secretary of Energy John Herrington announced the suspension of the crystalline repository siting program. The remainder of the year was spent monitoring litigation challenging that decision and pending legislation. Administrative phase-down of the program was essentially complete by the close of the calendar year

  3. Technical progress report: Rhode Island crystalline repository project, calendar year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vild, B.F.

    1985-01-01

    A Nuclear Waste Fund established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 provides financial support to affected states to participate in the high-level radioactive waste repository siting program of the US Department of Energy. In Rhode Island, that function is performed by a multidisciplinary Project Review Team consisting of staff from three State agencies. Members of the Review Team attended several meetings in 1985 to voice their concerns directly to DOE. Written comments were also submitted on draft plans and reports. Among the issues raised were inconsistencies in the geologic and environmental data used to screen potential repository sites, the role of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) in the repository program, and regulations regarding the transportation and storage of nuclear waste. The Review Team also began work on a public information booklet describing the repository program in nontechnical terms. That booklet will be distributed widely upon completion

  4. Rhode Island crystalline repository project: Technical progress report, 1984-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    A Nuclear Waste Fund established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 provided financial support to the State of Rhode Island for its participation in the high-level radioactive waste repository siting program. In 1984, the Office of the Governor set up a multidisciplinary Project Review Team consisting of staff from three State agencies and the University of Rhode Island. Members of the Review Team attended several meetings throughout the reporting period to voice their concerns about siting directly to the US Department of Energy (DOE). Written comments were also submitted on draft plans and reports. Many of Rhode Island's recommendations in these comments were later adopted. In May, 1986, Secretary of Energy John Herrington announced the suspension of the crystalline repository siting program. The remainder of the year was spent monitoring litigation challenging that decision and pending legislation. Administrative phase-down of the program was essentially complete by the close of the calendar year

  5. Progress report on research and development work 1983 of the nuclear fusion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finken, D.

    1984-02-01

    The studies of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe on fusion using magnetic confinement are included in the nuclear fusion project and embedded into the European Fusion Technology Programme. The studies are promoted via an association contract between KfK and Euratom by the European Commission. Some of the studies exceed the volume defined in the technology programme. These contributions, most of them studies, help to connect the various sectors and prepare new tasks, with regard to the extension of the technology programme to be expected in the coming years and the planning activities for NET. The reports summarized here are contributions of the institutes and thus arranged according to organization units. The tasks which the KfK has taken over from the Fusion Technology Programme of the EC are compiled in the appendix. (orig./GG) [de

  6. Progress Report on the GROWTH (GNSS Reflectometry for Ocean Waves, Tides, and Height) Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Y.; Ichikawa, K.; Akiyama, H.; Ebinuma, T.; Isoguchi, O.; Kimura, N.; Konda, M.; Kouguchi, N.; Tamura, H.; Tomita, H.; Yoshikawa, Y.; Waseda, T.

    2016-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), such as GPS is a system of satellites that provide autonomous geo-spatial positioning with global coverage. It allows small electronic receivers to determine their location to high precision using radio signals transmitted from satellites, GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R) involves making measurements from the reflections from the Earth of navigation signals from GNSS satellites. Reflected signals from sea surface are considered that those are useful to observe sea state and sea surface height. We have started a research program for GNSS-R applications on oceanographic observations under the contract with MEXT (Ministry of Education Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, JAPAN) and launched a Japanese research consortium, GROWTH (GNSS Reflectometry for Ocean Waves, Tides, and Height). It is aiming to evaluate the capabilities of GNSS-R observations for oceanographic phenomena with different time scales, such as ocean waves (1/10 to tens of seconds), tides (one or half days), and sea surface dynamic height (a few days to years). In situ observations of ocean wave spectrum, wind speed vertical profile, and sea surface height will be quantitatively compared with equivalent estimates from simultaneous GNSS-R measurements. The GROWTH project will utilize different types of observation platforms; marine observation towers (about 20 m height), multi-copters (about 100 to 150 m height), and much higher-altitude CYGNSS data. Cross-platform data, together with in situ oceanographic observations, will be compared after adequate temporal averaging that accounts differences of the footprint sizes and temporal and spatial scales of oceanographic phenomena. This paper will provide overview of the GROWTH project, preliminary test results, obtained by the multi-sensor platform at observation towers, suggest actual footprint sizes and identification of swell. Preparation status of a ground station which will be supplied to receive CYGNSS data

  7. Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronson, James P.; Loffink, Ken; Duke, Bill

    2008-12-31

    adult Pacific lamprey was trapped and released above the Westland ladder this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened on March 11, 2008 in conjunction with water deliveries and continued through the summer. West Extension Irrigation District (WEID) discontinued diverting live flow on June 24, 2008 but the bypass remained open throughout the project year. The juvenile trap was not operated this project year.

  8. Chernobyl Studies Project: Working group 7.0, Environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, March--September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M. [eds.

    1994-12-01

    In April 1988, the US and the former-USSR signed a Memorandum of Cooperation (MOC) for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety; this MOC was a direct result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4 and the following efforts by the two countries to implement a joint program to improve the safety of nuclear power plants and to understand the implications of environmental releases. A Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS) was formed to implement the MOC. The JCCCNRS established many working groups; most of these were the responsibility of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as far as the US participation was concerned. The lone exception was Working Group 7 on Environmental Transport and Health Effects, for which the US participation was the responsibility of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of Working Group 7 was succintly stated to be, ``To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future nuclear reactor accident.`` To implement the work DOE then formed two subworking groups: 7.1 to address Environmental Transport and 7.2 to address Health Effects. Thus, the DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project began. The majority of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus is now turned to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are involved in and making progress on the case-control and co-hort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children. Dosimetric aspects are a fundamental part of these studies. We are currently working to implement similar studies in Ukraine. A major part of the effort of these projects is supporting these studies, both by providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and by providing support and equipment for the medical teams.

  9. REBL: design progress toward 16 nm half-pitch maskless projection electron beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Mark A.; Petric, Paul; Ummethala, Upendra; Carroll, Allen; Kojima, Shinichi; Grella, Luca; Shriyan, Sameet; Rettner, Charles T.; Bevis, Chris F.

    2012-03-01

    REBL (Reflective Electron Beam Lithography) is a novel concept for high speed maskless projection electron beam lithography. Originally targeting 45 nm HP (half pitch) under a DARPA funded contract, we are now working on optimizing the optics and architecture for the commercial silicon integrated circuit fabrication market at the equivalent of 16 nm HP. The shift to smaller features requires innovation in most major subsystems of the tool, including optics, stage, and metrology. We also require better simulation and understanding of the exposure process. In order to meet blur requirements for 16 nm lithography, we are both shrinking the pixel size and reducing the beam current. Throughput will be maintained by increasing the number of columns as well as other design optimizations. In consequence, the maximum stage speed required to meet wafer throughput targets at 16 nm will be much less than originally planned for at 45 nm. As a result, we are changing the stage architecture from a rotary design to a linear design that can still meet the throughput requirements but with more conventional technology that entails less technical risk. The linear concept also allows for simplifications in the datapath, primarily from being able to reuse pattern data across dies and columns. Finally, we are now able to demonstrate working dynamic pattern generator (DPG) chips, CMOS chips with microfabricated lenslets on top to prevent crosstalk between pixels.

  10. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY2005 Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Hudson, G B; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Nimz, G J; Ramon, E C; Rose, T P; Shuller, L; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2007-01-01

    This report describes FY 2005 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains five chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E and E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and Bechtel Nevada (BN)

  11. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project. Thirteenth quarterly technical progress report, August 1, 1990--October 31, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the project is to design and construct prototypical hardware for an integrated MHD topping cycle, and conduct long duration proof-of-concept tests of integrated system at the US DOE Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The results of the long duration tests will augment the existing engineering design data base on MHD power train reliability, availability, maintainability, and performance, and will serve as a basis for scaling up the topping cycle design to the next level of development, an early commercial scale power plant retrofit. The components of the MHD power train to be designed, fabricated, and tested include: A slagging coal combustor with a rated capacity of 50 MW thermal input, capable of operation with an Eastern (Illinois {number_sign}6) or Western (Montana Rosebud) coal, a segmented supersonic nozzle, a supersonic MHD channel capable of generating at least 1.5 MW of electrical power, a segmented supersonic diffuser section to interface the channel with existing facility quench and exhaust systems, a complete set of current control circuits for local diagonal current control along the channel, and a set of current consolidation circuits to interface the channel with the existing facility inverter.

  12. Synchrotron topographic project. Progress report, February 20, 1981-January 20, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilello, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    The Synchrotron Topography Project (STP) has under design and construction various phases of a dedicated beam line for x-ray diffraction topography users in conjunction with the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. During the past year final design and procurement phase has been completed for the following: (1) Experimental Hutch, (2) White Beam Camera, (3) Detector Arm for White Beam Camera, (4) Film Cassette System, (5) Medium Resolution Real-time TV System, (6) Lift Table Assembly, (7) Asymmetric Camera Base Mount, (8) Motor Control System, and (9) Computer system. Experimental work has been initiated on using reflection topography to study fracture surfaces. Preliminary results, both with Berg-Barrett, as well as with Synchrotron Topography done in collaboration with the Daresbury, U.K. facility show that defects generated in the near surface layers can be detected. Research work on the effects of stress concentration and geometric effects due to grain boundaries on the fracture of tungsten has been completed

  13. Greenhouse gas emission trends and projections in Europe 2012. Tracking progress towards Kyoto and 2020 targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gores, S.; Scheffler, M.; Graichen, V. [Oeko-Institut (Oeko), Freiburg (Germany)] [and others

    2012-10-15

    At the end of 2011, almost all European countries were on track towards their Kyoto targets for 2008-2012. The EU-15 also remained on track to achieve its Kyoto target. Italy, however, was not on track. Spain plans to acquire a large quantity of Kyoto units through the KP's flexible mechanisms to achieve its target. With emission caps already set for the economic sectors under the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS), emissions reductions during 2012 in the sectors outside the EU ETS together with reductions by carbon sinks will set the frame for how many Kyoto units Member States need to acquire to reach their individual targets. Hence, both the development and delivery of adequate plans to acquire enough Kyoto credits is becoming increasingly important. ETS emissions from 2008 to 2011 were on average 5 % below these caps, which results in an oversupply of allowances. The EU ETS is undergoing important changes in view of the third trading phase from 2013 to 2020. Most EU Member States project that in 2020, their emissions outside the EU ETS will be lower than their national targets set under the Climate and Energy Package. However, further efforts will be necessary to achieve longer term reductions. (Author)

  14. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project: Semiannual progress report, October 1986-March 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    This report contains four subelements: (1) Monolithics, (2) Ceramic Composites, (3) Thermal and Wear Coatings, and (4) Joining. Ceramic research conducted within the Monolithics subelement currently includes work activities on green state ceramic fabrication, characterization, and densification and on structural, mechanical, and physical properties of these ceramics. Research conducted within the Ceramic Composites subelement currently includes silicon carbide and oxide-based composites, which, in addition to the work activities cited for Monolithics, include fiber synthesis and characterization. Research conducted in the Thermal and Wear Coatings subelement is currently limited to oxide-base coatings and involves coating synthesis, characterization, and determination of the mechanical and physical properties of the coatings. Research conducted in the Joining subelement currently includes studies of processes to produce strong stable joints between zirconia ceramics and iron-base alloys. A major objective of the research in the Materials and Processing project element is to systematically advance the understanding of the relationships between ceramic raw materials such as powders and reactant gases, the processing variables involved in producing the ceramic materials, and the resultant microstructures and physical and mechanical properties of the ceramic materials. Success in meeting this objective will provide US companies with new or improved ways for producing economical highly reliable ceramic components for advanced heat engines.

  15. 1986 progress report on R and D work of the Nuclear Fusion Project (PKF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kast, G.

    1987-03-01

    The Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) and the Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching, have joined to form the Entwicklungsgemeinschaft Kernfusion, and under this roof perform research work on the physical and technical conditions and requirements of using the energy from nuclear fusion, and to plan the design and the construction of the necessary equipment for future large-scale experiments. The activities of the KfK for the development of fusion devices with magnetic confinement have been concentrated in the Nuclear Fusion Project, which cooperates in the European Fusion Technology Programme, on the basis of an association agreement between KfK and Euratom, supported by the European Commission. Supplementary KfK contributions, studies in most cases, create a connection between various fields of work, and prepare the road for new tasks, which in the years to come will be found in the extension of the Fusion Technology Programme and the planning work for NET. The reports collected in this annual survey are contributions from KfK Institutes of the year 1986. An annex presents the Easks taken over by KfK within the Fusion Technology Programme of the EC, and notes on the KfK Institutes taking part in the particular activities facilitate reference to the individual, full-text reports. (orig.) [de

  16. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Hatchery Element : Project Progress Report 2007 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Green, Daniel G.; Kline, Paul A.

    2008-12-17

    Numbers of Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka have declined dramatically in recent years. In Idaho, only the lakes of the upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Valley) remain as potential sources of production (Figure 1). Historically, five Sawtooth Valley lakes (Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, Stanley, and Yellowbelly) supported sockeye salmon (Bjornn et al. 1968; Chapman et al. 1990). Currently, only Redfish Lake receives a remnant anadromous run. On April 2, 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service (NOAA - formerly National Marine Fisheries Service) received a petition from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) to list Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. On November 20, 1991, NOAA declared Snake River sockeye salmon endangered. In 1991, the SBT, along with the Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG), initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project (Sawtooth Valley Project) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The goal of this program is to conserve genetic resources and to rebuild Snake River sockeye salmon populations in Idaho. Coordination of this effort is carried out under the guidance of the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC), a team of biologists representing the agencies involved in the recovery and management of Snake River sockeye salmon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service ESA Permit Nos. 1120, 1124, and 1481 authorize IDFG to conduct scientific research on listed Snake River sockeye salmon. Initial steps to recover the species involved the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho and at NOAA facilities in Washington State (for a review, see Flagg 1993; Johnson 1993; Flagg and McAuley 1994; Kline 1994; Johnson and Pravecek 1995; Kline and Younk 1995; Flagg et al. 1996; Johnson and Pravecek 1996; Kline and Lamansky 1997; Pravecek and

  17. Batteries for energy storage. Examples, strategies, solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahlbusch, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the variety of battery technologies and describes their mobile and stationary applications and uses. The major social project of the energy transition requires a holistic approach that takes into account especially the issues of energy saving and efficiency in addition to the power generation and distribution from renewable resources. In addition, the book provides an outlook on the further development possibilities of battery technology and battery applications. Improved battery technology is an important factor to help electromobility and stationary applications of batteries as distributed energy storage breakthrough. Not least, the importance and the need for the recycling of batteries and the variety of battery technologies are presented that have the greatest importance in terms of resource conservation and resource security. [de

  18. Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Battery: Hydrogen Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid Scale Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: LBNL is designing a flow battery for grid storage that relies on a hydrogen-bromine chemistry which could be more efficient, last longer and cost less than today’s lead-acid batteries. Flow batteries are fundamentally different from traditional lead-acid batteries because the chemical reactants that provide their energy are stored in external tanks instead of inside the battery. A flow battery can provide more energy because all that is required to increase its storage capacity is to increase the size of the external tanks. The hydrogen-bromine reactants used by LBNL in its flow battery are inexpensive, long lasting, and provide power quickly. The cost of the design could be well below $100 per kilowatt hour, which would rival conventional grid-scale battery technologies.

  19. The nuclear battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozier, K.S.; Rosinger, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the evolution and present status of an Atomic Energy of Canada Limited program to develop a small, solid-state, passively cooled reactor power supply known as the Nuclear Battery. Key technical features of the Nuclear Battery reactor core include a heat-pipe primary heat transport system, graphite neutron moderator, low-enriched uranium TRISO coated-particle fuel and the use of burnable poisons for long-term reactivity control. An external secondary heat transport system extracts useful heat energy, which may be converted into electricity in an organic Rankine cycle engine or used to produce high-pressure steam. The present reference design is capable of producing about 2400 kW(t) (about 600 kW(e) net) for 15 full-power years. Technical and safety features are described along with recent progress in component hardware development programs and market assessment work. 19 refs

  20. Lithium batteries advanced technologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Scrosati, Bruno; Schalkwijk, Walter A van; Hassoun, Jusef

    2013-01-01

    Explains the current state of the science and points the way to technological advances First developed in the late 1980s, lithium-ion batteries now power everything from tablet computers to power tools to electric cars. Despite tremendous progress in the last two decades in the engineering and manufacturing of lithium-ion batteries, they are currently unable to meet the energy and power demands of many new and emerging devices. This book sets the stage for the development of a new generation of higher-energy density, rechargeable lithium-ion batteries by advancing battery chemistry and ident

  1. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Federal Assistance Program quarterly project progress report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R and D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the third quarter of FY98 (April--June, 1998). It describes 231 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with included requests for general information including material for high school and university students, and material on geothermal heat pumps, resource and well data, spacing heating and cooling, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, district heating, resorts and spas, industrial applications, snow melting and electric power. Research activities include work on model construction specifications for line shaft submersible pumps and plate heat exchangers, and a comprehensive aquaculture developers package. A brochure on Geothermal Energy in Klamath County was developed for state and local tourism use. Outreach activities include the publication of the Quarterly Bulletin (Vol. 19, No. 2) with articles on research at the Geo-Heat Center, sustainability of geothermal resources, injection well drilling in Boise, ID and a greenhouse project in the Azores. Other outreach activities include dissemination of information mainly through mailings of publications, tours of local geothermal uses, geothermal library acquisitions and use, participation in workshops, short courses and technical meetings by the staff, and progress monitor reports on geothermal activities.

  2. Development of a Methodology for Hydrogeological Characterization of Faults: Progress of the Project in Berkeley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, J.; Moriya, T.; Yoshimura, K.; Tsuchi, H.; Karasaki, K.; Onishi, T.; Ueta, K.; Tanaka, S.; Kiho, K.

    2010-12-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO), in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), has carried out a project to develop an efficient and practical methodology to characterize hydrologic property of faults since 2007, exclusively for the early stage of siting a deep underground repository. A preliminary flowchart of the characterization program and a classification scheme of fault hydrology based on the geological feature have been proposed. These have been tested through the field characterization program on the Wildcat Fault in Berkeley, California. The Wildcat Fault is a relatively large non-active strike-slip fault which is believed to be a subsidiary of the active Hayward Fault. Our classification scheme assumes the contrasting hydrologic features between the linear northern part and the split/spread southern part of the Wildcat Fault. The field characterization program to date has been concentrated in and around the LBNL site on the southern part of the fault. Several lines of electrical and reflection seismic surveys, and subsequent trench investigations, have revealed the approximate distribution and near-surface features of the Wildcat Fault (see also Onishi, et al. and Ueta, et al.). Three 150m deep boreholes, WF-1 to WF-3, have been drilled on a line normal to the trace of the fault in the LBNL site. Two vertical holes were placed to characterize the undisturbed Miocene sedimentary formations at the eastern and western sides of the fault (WF-1 and WF-2 respectively). WF-2 on the western side intersected the rock formation, which was expected only in WF-1, and several of various intensities. Therefore, WF-3, originally planned as inclined to penetrate the fault, was replaced by the vertical hole further to the west. It again encountered unexpected rocks and faults. Preliminary results of in-situ hydraulic tests suggested that the transmissivity of WF-1 is ten to one hundred times higher than WF-2. The monitoring

  3. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2001-2002 Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, T.P.; Kersting, A.B.; Harris, L.J.; Hudson, G.B.; Smith, D.K.; Williams, R.W.; Loewen, D.R.; Nelson, E.J.; Allen, P.G.; Ryerson, F.J.; Pawloski, G.A.; Laue, C.A.; Moran, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    This report contains highlights of FY 2001 and 2002 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work emphasizes the Defense Programs goal of responsible management of natural resources at the NTS, while UGTA-funded work focuses on defining the extent of radionuclide contamination in NTS groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing. The report is organized on a topical basis, and contains eight chapters that reflect the range of technical work performed by LLNL-ANCD in support of HRMP and UGTA. Chapter 1 describes recent hot well sampling efforts at the NTS, and presents the results of chemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples from six near-field wells. These include the Cambric (UE-5n), Bilby (U-3cn PS No.2), Bourbon (UE-7nS), Nash (UE-2ce), Tybo/Benham (ER-20-5 No.3), and Almendro (U-19v PS No.1ds) sites. The data generated by the hot well program is vital to the development and validation of contaminant transport models at the NTS. Chapter 2 discusses the results of xenon isotope measurements of groundwater samples from the six near-field wells described in Chapter 1. This work demonstrates that fission xenon is present in the water at levels that are readily measurable and highlights the significant differences in xenon concentrations and isotopic abundances at different sites. These differences provide insight into the early cooling history of nuclear test cavities, and may assist in predicting the distribution of the source term in the near-field environment. Chapter 3 is an investigation of the distribution

  4. International Space Station Lithium-Ion Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Penni J.; Schwanbeck, Eugene; North, Tim; Balcer, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) primary Electric Power System (EPS) currently uses Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni-H2) batteries to store electrical energy. The electricity for the space station is generated by its solar arrays, which charge batteries during insolation for subsequent discharge during eclipse. The Ni-H2 batteries are designed to operate at a 35 depth of discharge (DOD) maximum during normal operation in a Low Earth Orbit. Since the oldest of the 48 Ni-H2 battery Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs) has been cycling since September 2006, these batteries are now approaching their end of useful life. In 2010, the ISS Program began the development of Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion) batteries to replace the Ni-H2 batteries and concurrently funded a Li-Ion ORU and cell life testing project. When deployed, they will be the largest Li-Ion batteries ever utilized for a human-rated spacecraft. This paper will include an overview of the ISS Li-Ion battery system architecture, the Li-Ion battery design and development, controls to limit potential hazards from the batteries, and the status of the Li-Ion cell and ORU life cycle testing.

  5. Materials for lithium-ion battery safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Liu, Yayuan; Lin, Dingchang; Pei, Allen; Cui, Yi

    2018-06-01

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are considered to be one of the most important energy storage technologies. As the energy density of batteries increases, battery safety becomes even more critical if the energy is released unintentionally. Accidents related to fires and explosions of LIBs occur frequently worldwide. Some have caused serious threats to human life and health and have led to numerous product recalls by manufacturers. These incidents are reminders that safety is a prerequisite for batteries, and serious issues need to be resolved before the future application of high-energy battery systems. This Review aims to summarize the fundamentals of the origins of LIB safety issues and highlight recent key progress in materials design to improve LIB safety. We anticipate that this Review will inspire further improvement in battery safety, especially for emerging LIBs with high-energy density.

  6. Stand Alone Battery Thermal Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Brad [Denso International America, Incorporated, Southfield, MI (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The objective of this project is research, development and demonstration of innovative thermal management concepts that reduce the cell or battery weight, complexity (component count) and/or cost by at least 20%. The project addresses two issues that are common problems with current state of the art lithium ion battery packs used in vehicles; low power at cold temperatures and reduced battery life when exposed to high temperatures. Typically, battery packs are “oversized” to satisfy the two issues mentioned above. The first phase of the project was spent making a battery pack simulation model using AMEsim software. The battery pack used as a benchmark was from the Fiat 500EV. FCA and NREL provided vehicle data and cell data that allowed an accurate model to be created that matched the electrical and thermal characteristics of the actual battery pack. The second phase involved using the battery model from the first phase and evaluate different thermal management concepts. In the end, a gas injection heat pump system was chosen as the dedicated thermal system to both heat and cool the battery pack. Based on the simulation model. The heat pump system could use 50% less energy to heat the battery pack in -20°C ambient conditions, and by keeping the battery cooler at hot climates, the battery pack size could be reduced by 5% and still meet the warranty requirements. During the final phase, the actual battery pack and heat pump system were installed in a test bench at DENSO to validate the simulation results. Also during this phase, the system was moved to NREL where testing was also done to validate the results. In conclusion, the heat pump system can improve “fuel economy” (for electric vehicle) by 12% average in cold climates. Also, the battery pack size, or capacity, could be reduced 5%, or if pack size is kept constant, the pack life could be increased by two years. Finally, the total battery pack and thermal system cost could be reduced 5% only if the

  7. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as

  8. Annual report on reactor safety research projects sponsored by the Ministry for Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany. Reporting period 1993. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, by order of the BMFT, informs continuously of the status of such investigations by means of semi-annual and annual publication of progress reports within the series GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about objectives, the work performed, the results, the next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the contractors themselves as a documentation of their progress in work and published by the Forschungsbetreuung at the GRS, (FB) (Research Coordination Department), within the framework of general information of progress in reactor safety research. The individual reports are classified according to the same classification system as applied in the nuclear index of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities) and the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. (orig./HP)

  9. Novel Energy Sources -Material Architecture and Charge Transport in Solid State Ionic Materials for Rechargeable Li ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katiyar, Ram S; Gómez, M; Majumder, S B; Morell, G; Tomar, M S; Smotkin, E; Bhattacharya, P; Ishikawa, Y

    2009-01-19

    Since its introduction in the consumer market at the beginning of 1990s by Sony Corporation ‘Li-ion rechargeable battery’ and ‘LiCoO2 cathode’ is an inseparable couple for highly reliable practical applications. However, a separation is inevitable as Li-ion rechargeable battery industry demand more and more from this well serving cathode. Spinel-type lithium manganate (e.g., LiMn2O4), lithium-based layered oxide materials (e.g., LiNiO2) and lithium-based olivine-type compounds (e.g., LiFePO4) are nowadays being extensively studied for application as alternate cathode materials in Li-ion rechargeable batteries. Primary goal of this project was the advancement of Li-ion rechargeable battery to meet the future demands of the energy sector. Major part of the research emphasized on the investigation of electrodes and solid electrolyte materials for improving the charge transport properties in Li-ion rechargeable batteries. Theoretical computational methods were used to select electrodes and electrolyte material with enhanced structural and physical properties. The effect of nano-particles on enhancing the battery performance was also examined. Satisfactory progress has been made in the bulk form and our efforts on realizing micro-battery based on thin films is close to give dividend and work is progressing well in this direction.

  10. BX in situ oil shale project. Annual technical progress report, March 1, 1979-February 29, 1980 and quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1979-February 29, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougan, P.M.

    1980-03-20

    During the year, design, construction and installation of all project equipment was completed, and continuous steam injection began on September 18, 1979 and continued until February 29, 1980. In the five-month period of steam injection, 235,060 barrels of water as steam at an average wellhead pressure of 1199 psig and an average wellhead temperature of 456/sup 0/F were injected into the eight project injection wells. Operation of the project at design temperature and pressure (1000/sup 0/F and 1500 psig) was not possible due to continuing problems with surface equipment. Environmental monitoring at the project site continued during startup and operation.

  11. Project progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isakov, A. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences (Russia)

    1997-12-31

    Works of two variety have been fulfilled: first, research of polystyrene shells formation conditions in drop tower furnace and ballistic furnace; second, creation of computer codes for simulation of shells formation processes, including numerous nucleation. Besides that polystyrene shells with diameter up to 2 mm transmitted to LLNL in parcel.

  12. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site Facilities: Progress report for the period April 1--June 30, 1988: Volume 1, Text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume set of documents that describes the progress of 10 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period April 1 to June 30, 1988. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled during this period in the 100-N Area and near the 216-A-36B Crib

  13. 锂离子电池电解液负极成膜添加剂的研究进展%Research progress of negative film-forming additives in electrolyte for Li-ion batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周丹; 梁风; 姚耀春

    2016-01-01

    Forming a stable solid electrolyte interface film (SEI film) is the key to solve the compatibility between lithium ion battery electrode material and electrolyte. Therefore,the research of high quality anode film-forming additive in electrolyte for lithium ion battery attracts much attention. The principle of film-forming additives for organic electrolyte in Li-ion batteries was reviewed. The research status of a variety of additives was particularly introduced. The recent progress on negative film-forming additives was reviewed in detail,from the perspectives of film formation mechanisms and quantum calculation. The main problem was how to select more suitable and efficient film-forming additives. In addition,the possible trends in this area were proposed:①Understanding the mechanism of additive reacting with the electrolyte,especially for the negative film forming additive which has minimum side effects for lithium ion battery;②Combining two or more additives together to compensate the deficiencies of one additive;③Increasing the solubility of inorganic film-forming additives in the electrolyte.%解决锂离子电池电极材料和电解液相容性的关键是形成稳定且Li+可导的固态电解质界面膜(SEI膜),因此,对优质负极成膜添加剂的研究成为锂离子电池研发中的一个热点。本文综述了锂离子电池电解液成膜添加剂的作用原理,具体介绍了各类负极成膜添加剂的研究现状,从成膜反应机理和理论计算方面详述了近几年来负极成膜添加剂的研究进展。分析了所存在的问题主要是如何快速地挑选出更适宜、更高效的成膜添加剂,并指出了成膜添加剂未来的发展趋势为:①研究各添加剂与电解液的反应机理,着重开发对锂离子电池副反应小的负极成膜添加剂;②通过选择两种或两种以上的添加剂的协同作用,以弥补一种添加剂的不足;③提高无机成膜添加剂在电解液中的溶解度。

  14. Foothill Transit Battery Electric Bus Demonstration Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, Leslie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Prohaska, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kelly, Kenneth [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Post, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-27

    Foothill Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate its fleet of Proterra battery electric buses (BEBs) in revenue service. The focus of this evaluation is to compare performance of the BEBs to that of conventional technology and to track progress over time toward meeting performance targets. This project has also provided an opportunity for DOE to conduct a detailed evaluation of the BEBs and charging infrastructure. This report provides data on the buses from April 2014 through July 2015. Data are provided on a selection of compressed natural gas buses as a baseline comparison.

  15. Lithium/polymer batteries. Safety approach of the BT-EDF-CEA project; Accumulateurs lithium/polymere. Demarche securite du projet BT-EDF-CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascaud, S.; Baudry, P. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Majastre, H. [Bollore Technologies, 29 - Quimper (France); Bloch, D. [CEAGrenoble, CEREM, 38 (France)

    1996-12-31

    The BT-EdF-CEA consortium for the development and the performance improvement of lithium/polymer batteries has carried out a safety analysis of the industrial risk and the risk for users linked with this new technology. The process chosen for the manufacturing of lithium/polymer batteries does not generate any particular risk of personnel or environmental contamination. Security tests have permitted to observe and analyze the behaviour of 4 Ah elements during thermal shocks, perforation and crushing, and during external short-circuit on 20 Ah elements. These tests demonstrate the great thermal stability and the excellent behaviour of batteries in the case of partial destruction. (J.S.) 2 refs.

  16. Lithium/polymer batteries. Safety approach of the BT-EDF-CEA project; Accumulateurs lithium/polymere. Demarche securite du projet BT-EDF-CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascaud, S; Baudry, P [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Majastre, H [Bollore Technologies, 29 - Quimper (France); Bloch, D [CEAGrenoble, CEREM, 38 (France)

    1997-12-31

    The BT-EdF-CEA consortium for the development and the performance improvement of lithium/polymer batteries has carried out a safety analysis of the industrial risk and the risk for users linked with this new technology. The process chosen for the manufacturing of lithium/polymer batteries does not generate any particular risk of personnel or environmental contamination. Security tests have permitted to observe and analyze the behaviour of 4 Ah elements during thermal shocks, perforation and crushing, and during external short-circuit on 20 Ah elements. These tests demonstrate the great thermal stability and the excellent behaviour of batteries in the case of partial destruction. (J.S.) 2 refs.

  17. Laboratory and field studies related to the Radionuclide Migration Project: Progress report, October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    In this report we describe the work done at Los Alamos in support of the Radionuclide Migration project during fiscal year 1986. We have continued to monitor the transport of tritium and 85 Kr from the Cambric explosion zone to the satellite well, which is pumped at 600 gal/min. Corresponding movement of cationic radionuclides such as 137 Cs and 90 Sr has not yet been observed after 12 yr of pumping, nor have we seen evidence that these strongly sorbing ions move in conjunction with colloids. We have analyzed more data from the Cheshire study site but have not resolved the uncertainties regarding the distribution and movement of radioactive materials at this location. Our attempts to improve our analytical capability for 36 Cl and 99 Tc have resulted in some progress. Similarly, we have increased our understanding of radionuclide transport phenomena such as channeling in fracture flow and anion exclusion in zeolites and clays. A sample exchange with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has helped us identify critical steps in our procedures for collecting and analyzing large-volume water samples. We have surveyed potential sites on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site for future radionuclide migration studies and conclude that there are none other than Cheshire presently available, and none are likely to be created in the near future. The Laboratory has engaged recently in radionuclide migration studies sponsored by our weapons program; we reviewed this work in an appendix to the annual report

  18. Childhood Obesity Declines Project: An Effort of the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research to Explore Progress in Four Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauh, Tina J; Dawkins-Lyn, Nicola; Dooyema, Carrie; Harris, Carole; Jernigan, Jan; Kettel Khan, Laura; Ottley, Phyllis; Young-Hyman, Deborah

    2018-03-01

    Recent findings show that national childhood obesity prevalence overall is improving among some age groups, but that disparities continue to persist, particularly among populations that have historically been at higher risk of obesity and overweight. Over the past several years, many jurisdictions at the city or county level across the nation have also reported declines. Little evaluation has focused on understanding the factors that influence the implementation of efforts to reduce childhood obesity rates. This article summarizes the rationale, aims, and overall design of the Childhood Obesity Declines Project (COBD), which was the first of its kind to systematically study and document the what, how, when, and where of community-based obesity strategies in four distinct communities across the nation. COBD was initiated by the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR), was led by a subset of NCCOR advisors and a research team at ICF, and was guided by external advisors made up of researchers, decision makers, and other key stakeholders. The research team used an adapted version of the Systematic Screening and Assessment method to review and collect retrospective implementation data in four communities. COBD found that sites implemented strategies across the many levels and environments that impact children's well being (akin to the social-ecological framework), building a Culture of Health in their communities. COBD demonstrates how collaboratives of major funders with the support of other experts and key stakeholders, can help to accelerate progress in identifying and disseminating strategies that promote healthy eating and physical activity.

  19. Guidance for growth factors, projections, and control strategies for the 15 percent rate-of-progress plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    Section 182(b)(1) of the Clean Air Act (Act) requires all ozone nonattainment areas classified as moderate and above to submit a State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision by November 15, 1993, which describes, in part, how the areas will achieve an actual volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions reduction of at least 15 percent during the first 6 years after enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). In addition, the SIP revision must describe how any growth in emissions from 1990 through 1996 will be fully offset. It is important to note that section 182(b)(1) also requires the SIP for moderate areas to provide for reductions in VOC and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as necessary to attain the national primary ambient air quality standard for ozone by November 15, 1996. The guidance document focuses on the procedures for developing 1996 projected emissions inventories and control measures which moderate and above ozone nonattainment areas must include in their rate-of-progress plans. The document provides technical guidance to support the policy presented in the 'General Preamble: Implementation of Title I of the CAAA of 1990' (57 FR 13498)

  20. Lithium batteries and other electrochemical storage systems

    CERN Document Server

    Glaize, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Lithium batteries were introduced relatively recently in comparison to lead- or nickel-based batteries, which have been around for over 100 years. Nevertheless, in the space of 20 years, they have acquired a considerable market share - particularly for the supply of mobile devices. We are still a long way from exhausting the possibilities that they offer. Numerous projects will undoubtedly further improve their performances in the years to come. For large-scale storage systems, other types of batteries are also worthy of consideration: hot batteries and redox flow systems, for example.

  1. Thermal battery automated assembly station conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, D

    1988-08-01

    Thermal battery assembly involves many operations which are labor- intense. In August 1986, a project team was formed at GE Neutron Devices to investigate and evaluate more efficient and productive battery assembly techniques through the use of automation. The result of this study was the acceptance of a plan to automate the piece part pellet fabrication and battery stacking operations by using computerized pellet presses and robots which would be integrated by a main computer. This report details the conceptual design and development plan to be followed in the fabrication, development, and implementation of a thermal battery automated assembly station. 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  2. Battery Safety Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Batteries commonly used in flashlights and other household devices produce hydrogen gas as a product of zinc electrode corrosion. The amount of gas produced is affected by the batteries' design and charge rate. Dangerous levels of hydrogen gas can be released if battery types are mixed, batteries are damaged, batteries are of different ages, or…

  3. Batteries for Electric Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Report summarizes results of test on "near-term" electrochemical batteries - (batteries approaching commercial production). Nickel/iron, nickel/zinc, and advanced lead/acid batteries included in tests and compared with conventional lead/acid batteries. Batteries operated in electric vehicles at constant speed and repetitive schedule of accerlerating, coasting, and braking.

  4. Modeling for Battery Prognostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Goebel, Kai; Khasin, Michael; Hogge, Edward; Quach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    , and is of suitable accuracy for reliable EOD prediction in a variety of operational profiles. The model can be considered an electrochemical engineering model, but unlike most such models found in the literature, certain approximations are done that allow to retain computational efficiency for online implementation of the model. Although the focus here is on Li-ion batteries, the model is quite general and can be applied to different chemistries through a change of model parameter values. Progress on model development, providing model validation results and EOD prediction results is being presented.

  5. Advanced Battery Manufacturing (VA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratton, Jeremy

    2012-09-30

    LiFeBATT has concentrated its recent testing and evaluation on the safety of its batteries. There appears to be a good margin of safety with respect to overheating of the cells and the cases being utilized for the batteries are specifically designed to dissipate any heat built up during charging. This aspect of LiFeBATT’s products will be even more fully investigated, and assuming ongoing positive results, it will become a major component of marketing efforts for the batteries. LiFeBATT has continued to receive prismatic 20 Amp hour cells from Taiwan. Further testing continues to indicate significant advantages over the previously available 15 Ah cells. Battery packs are being assembled with battery management systems in the Danville facility. Comprehensive tests are underway at Sandia National Laboratory to provide further documentation of the advantages of these 20 Ah cells. The company is pursuing its work with Hybrid Vehicles of Danville to critically evaluate the 20 Ah cells in a hybrid, armored vehicle being developed for military and security applications. Results have been even more encouraging than they were initially. LiFeBATT is expanding its work with several OEM customers to build a worldwide distribution network. These customers include a major automotive consulting group in the U.K., an Australian maker of luxury off-road campers, and a number of makers of E-bikes and scooters. LiFeBATT continues to explore the possibility of working with nations that are woefully short of infrastructure. Negotiations are underway with Siemens to jointly develop a system for using photovoltaic generation and battery storage to supply electricity to communities that are not currently served adequately. The IDA has continued to monitor the progress of LiFeBATT’s work to ensure that all funds are being expended wisely and that matching funds will be generated as promised. The company has also remained current on all obligations for repayment of an IDA loan and lease

  6. Software Tools for Battery Design | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Software Tools for Battery Design Software Tools for Battery Design Under the Computer-Aided Engineering for Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries (CAEBAT) project, NREL has developed software tools to help using CAEBAT software tools. Knowledge of the interplay of multi-physics at varied scales is imperative

  7. The Rise and Fall of the Social Science Curriculum Project in Iceland, 1974-1984: Reflections on Reason and Power in Educational Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Wolfgang

    1987-01-01

    Examines the demise of the Icelandic Social Science Curriculum Project (SSCP) as an example of progressive educational reform thwarted by neofundamentalist ideologies. States that the paper goes beyond Jerome Bruner's 1984 account of the rise and fall of "Man: A Course of Study" to provide a deeper analysis of the politics of…

  8. Nickel - iron battery. Nikkel - jern batteri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, H. A.

    1989-03-15

    A newer type of nickel-iron battery, (SAFT 6v 230 Ah monobloc), which could possibly be used in relation to electrically driven light road vehicles, was tested. The same test methods used for lead batteries were utilized and results compared favourably with those reached during other testings carried out, abroad, on a SAFT nickle-iron battery and a SAB-NIFE nickel-iron battery. Description (in English) of the latter-named tests are included in the publication as is also a presentation of the SAFT battery. Testing showed that this type of battery did not last as long as had been expected, but the density of energy and effect was superior to lead batteries. However energy efficiency was rather poor in comparison to lead batteries and it was concluded that nickel-iron batteries are not suitable for stationary systems where recharging under a constant voltage is necessary. (AB).

  9. Research, development and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report for 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    This is the first annual report describing progress in the 33-month cooperative program between Argonne National Laboratory and Gould Inc.'s Nickel-Zinc/Electric Vehicle Project. The purpose of the program is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the nickel-zinc battery for electric vehicle propulsion. The successful completion of the program will qualify the nickel-zinc battery for use in the Department of Energy's demonstration program under the auspices of Public Law 94-413.

  10. Household batteries: Evaluation of collection methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeberger, D.A.

    1992-12-31

    While it is difficult to prove that a specific material is causing contamination in a landfill, tests have been conducted at waste-to-energy facilities that indicate that household batteries contribute significant amounts of heavy metals to both air emissions and ash residue. Hennepin County, MN, used a dual approach for developing and implementing a special household battery collection. Alternative collection methods were examined; test collections were conducted. The second phase examined operating and disposal policy issues. This report describes the results of the grant project, moving from a broad examination of the construction and content of batteries, to a description of the pilot collection programs, and ending with a discussion of variables affecting the cost and operation of a comprehensive battery collection program. Three out-of-state companies (PA, NY) were found that accept spent batteries; difficulties in reclaiming household batteries are discussed.

  11. Household batteries: Evaluation of collection methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeberger, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    While it is difficult to prove that a specific material is causing contamination in a landfill, tests have been conducted at waste-to-energy facilities that indicate that household batteries contribute significant amounts of heavy metals to both air emissions and ash residue. Hennepin County, MN, used a dual approach for developing and implementing a special household battery collection. Alternative collection methods were examined; test collections were conducted. The second phase examined operating and disposal policy issues. This report describes the results of the grant project, moving from a broad examination of the construction and content of batteries, to a description of the pilot collection programs, and ending with a discussion of variables affecting the cost and operation of a comprehensive battery collection program. Three out-of-state companies (PA, NY) were found that accept spent batteries; difficulties in reclaiming household batteries are discussed.

  12. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 78, quarter ending March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This report presents descriptions of various research projects and field projects concerned with the enhanced recovery of petroleum. Contract numbers, principal investigators, company names, and project management information is included.

  13. Computer Aided Battery Engineering Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-07

    A multi-national lab collaborative team was assembled that includes experts from academia and industry to enhance recently developed Computer-Aided Battery Engineering for Electric Drive Vehicles (CAEBAT)-II battery crush modeling tools and to develop microstructure models for electrode design - both computationally efficient. Task 1. The new Multi-Scale Multi-Domain model framework (GH-MSMD) provides 100x to 1,000x computation speed-up in battery electrochemical/thermal simulation while retaining modularity of particles and electrode-, cell-, and pack-level domains. The increased speed enables direct use of the full model in parameter identification. Task 2. Mechanical-electrochemical-thermal (MECT) models for mechanical abuse simulation were simultaneously coupled, enabling simultaneous modeling of electrochemical reactions during the short circuit, when necessary. The interactions between mechanical failure and battery cell performance were studied, and the flexibility of the model for various batteries structures and loading conditions was improved. Model validation is ongoing to compare with test data from Sandia National Laboratories. The ABDT tool was established in ANSYS. Task 3. Microstructural modeling was conducted to enhance next-generation electrode designs. This 3- year project will validate models for a variety of electrodes, complementing Advanced Battery Research programs. Prototype tools have been developed for electrochemical simulation and geometric reconstruction.

  14. Characterization of vanadium flow battery. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindner, H.; Ekman, C.; Gehrke, O.; Isleifsson, F.

    2011-02-15

    This report summarizes the work done at Risoe-DTU testing a vanadium flow battery as part of the project ''Characterisation of Vanadium Batteries'' (ForskEl project 6555) with the partners PA Energy A/S and OI Electric A/S under the Danish PSO energy research program. A 15kW/120kWh vanadium battery has been installed as part of the distributed energy systems experimental facility, SYSLAB, at Risoe DTU. A test programme has been carried out to get hands-on experience with the technology, to characterize the battery from a power system point of view and to assess it with respect to integration of wind energy in the Danish power system. The battery has been in operation for 18 months. During time of operation the battery has not shown signs of degradation of performance. It has a round-trip efficiency at full load of approximately 60% (depending on temperature and SOC). The sources of the losses are power conversion in cell stacks/electrolyte, power converter, and auxiliary power consumption from pumps and controller. The efficiency was not influenced by the cycling of the battery. The response time for the battery is limited at 20kW/s by the ramp rate of the power converter. The battery can thus provide power and frequency support for the power system. The battery was operated together with a 11kW stall-regulated Gaia wind turbine to smooth the output of the wind turbine and during the tests the battery proved capable of firming the output of the wind turbine. Vanadium battery is a potential technology for storage based services to the power system provided investment and O and M cost are low enough and long term operation is documented. (Author)

  15. Requirements for future automotive batteries - a snapshot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karden, Eckhard; Shinn, Paul; Bostock, Paul; Cunningham, James; Schoultz, Evan; Kok, Daniel

    Introduction of new fuel economy, performance, safety, and comfort features in future automobiles will bring up many new, power-hungry electrical systems. As a consequence, demands on automotive batteries will grow substantially, e.g. regarding reliability, energy throughput (shallow-cycle life), charge acceptance, and high-rate partial state-of-charge (HRPSOC) operation. As higher voltage levels are mostly not an economically feasible alternative for the short term, the existing 14 V electrical system will have to fulfil these new demands, utilizing advanced 12 V energy storage devices. The well-established lead-acid battery technology is expected to keep playing a key role in this application. Compared to traditional starting-lighting-ignition (SLI) batteries, significant technological progress has been achieved or can be expected, which improve both performance and service life. System integration of the storage device into the vehicle will become increasingly important. Battery monitoring systems (BMS) are expected to become a commodity, penetrating the automotive volume market from both highly equipped premium cars and dedicated fuel-economy vehicles (e.g. stop/start). Battery monitoring systems will allow for more aggressive battery operating strategies, at the same time improving the reliability of the power supply system. Where a single lead-acid battery cannot fulfil the increasing demands, dual-storage systems may form a cost-efficient extension. They consist either of two lead-acid batteries or of a lead-acid battery plus another storage device.

  16. Advances and Future Challenges in Printed Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ricardo E; Costa, Carlos M; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu

    2015-11-01

    There is an increasing interest in thin and flexible energy storage devices to meet modern society's needs for applications such as radio frequency sensing, interactive packaging, and other consumer products. Printed batteries comply with these requirements and are an excellent alternative to conventional batteries for many applications. Flexible and microbatteries are also included in the area of printed batteries when fabricated using printing technologies. The main characteristics, advantages, disadvantages, developments, and printing techniques of printed batteries are presented and discussed in this Review. The state-of-the-art takes into account both the research and industrial levels. On the academic level, the research progress of printed batteries is divided into lithium-ion and Zn-manganese dioxide batteries and other battery types, with emphasis on the different materials for anode, cathode, and separator as well as in the battery design. With respect to the industrial state-of-the-art, materials, device formulations, and manufacturing techniques are presented. Finally, the prospects and challenges of printed batteries are discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). 2011 Progress Report. Enhancing Global Nuclear Energy Sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-05-15

    When INPRO was established in 2000, some key characteristics and main objectives for the project were determined and remain basically unchanged to this day: to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute to satisfying energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner and to bring together technology holders, technology users and other stakeholders to consider jointly the national and international actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles. I wish to use the occasion of this INPRO Progress Report to review some of the key highlights of the past year and share with you my views and vision of INPRO's future. The ''Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami'' and the resulting accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant occurred on 11 March 2011. In response to this accident and at the request of its Member States, the IAEA drafted an Action Plan which defines a programme of work o strengthen the global nuclear safety framework. The activities proposed in the Action Plan are meant to be implemented in the near term, to assess the safety of operating nuclear power plants n the light of lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident. The assessment covers both technical elements, specifically the design of nuclear power plants with regard to site specific extreme natural hazards, and institutional elements, such as the effectiveness of regulatory bodies, operating organizations and the international legal framework in regard to the implementation of IAEA Safety tandards and Conventions. The lessons learned in the medium and long terms will also be reflected n a periodic update of the design requirements for nuclear power plants, international safety tandards, regulations issued by national supervisory authorities, operational procedures, emergency planning and safety assessment methodologies. INPRO has a long term perspective and provides an assessment of the whole nuclear system. Ensuring

  18. International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). 2011 Progress Report. Enhancing Global Nuclear Energy Sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    When INPRO was established in 2000, some key characteristics and main objectives for the project were determined and remain basically unchanged to this day: to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute to satisfying energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner and to bring together technology holders, technology users and other stakeholders to consider jointly the national and international actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles. I wish to use the occasion of this INPRO Progress Report to review some of the key highlights of the past year and share with you my views and vision of INPRO's future. The ''Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami'' and the resulting accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant occurred on 11 March 2011. In response to this accident and at the request of its Member States, the IAEA drafted an Action Plan which defines a programme of work o strengthen the global nuclear safety framework. The activities proposed in the Action Plan are meant to be implemented in the near term, to assess the safety of operating nuclear power plants n the light of lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident. The assessment covers both technical elements, specifically the design of nuclear power plants with regard to site specific extreme natural hazards, and institutional elements, such as the effectiveness of regulatory bodies, operating organizations and the international legal framework in regard to the implementation of IAEA Safety tandards and Conventions. The lessons learned in the medium and long terms will also be reflected n a periodic update of the design requirements for nuclear power plants, international safety tandards, regulations issued by national supervisory authorities, operational procedures, emergency planning and safety assessment methodologies. INPRO has a long term perspective and provides an assessment of the whole nuclear system. Ensuring

  19. Develop improved battery charger (Turbo-Z Battery Charging System). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The output of this project was a flexible control board. The control board can be used to control a variety of rapid battery chargers. The control module will reduce development cost of rapid battery charging hardware. In addition, PEPCO's proprietary battery charging software have been pre-programmed into the control microprocessor. This product is being applied to the proprietary capacitive charging system now under development.

  20. Progress report of the 600 m borehole project of the CEC programme on management and storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.F.M.

    1991-07-01

    In the framework of the CEC Programme on Radioactive Waste Disposal (1990-1994), in situ experiments in salt deposits are conducted. The experimental results will be used to validate analytical techniques and computer models for prediction of salt behaviour. The experiments take place in the Asse II salt mine in Germany. Progress of the work during the first half of 1990 is reported. Convergence data measured during the first phase of the project will be reported in the final report of phase I, issued mid 1991. Convergence measurement devices have been removed from the borehole and are temporarily stored to be used in a new 600 m deep borehole to be drilled begin 1992. The experiment with the Variable Pressure Device (VPD) started March 1991. During first 2 months it has been shown that low pressure build-up due to convergence could not be registrated. The system, which is basically designed for higher depths and thus higher convergence rates, showed more hysteresis than expected on the applied pressure levels. The measuring programme defined earlier is therefore modified. It will be concentrated first on high pressure changes which are started July 1991. A preliminary conclusion of the first pressure step is that the in-situ measured elasticity of salt is significantly lower than elasticity measured in the laboratory on small samples. More detailed analysis of the measurement results and repeated pressure steps are necessary to verify this conclusion. The predictive analyses planned for the first half of 1991 could not be made since the measuring programme was modified. FE-analyses have been concentrated on interpretation of the measurement result during the first months. Influence of the heat production of the exothermally hardening salt concrete in the behaviour of the borehole is analysed in detail. Predictions of the modified measuring programme (topical report) will be reported later. (author). 4 refs.; 3 figs

  1. Radioactive battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deaton, R.L.; Silver, G.L.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive battery is described that is comprised of a container housing an electrolyte, two electrodes immersed in the electrolyte and insoluble radioactive material disposed adjacent one electrode. Insoluble radioactive material of different intensity of radioactivity may be disposed adjacent the second electrode. If hydrobromic acid is used as the electrolyte, Br 2 will be generated by the radioactivity and is reduced at the cathode: Br 2 + 2e = 2 Br - . At the anode Br - is oxidized: 2Br - = Br 2 + 2e. (U.S.)

  2. The impact of the new 36 V lead-acid battery systems on lead consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prengaman, R. David

    The production of vehicles utilizing 36 V battery systems has begun with the introduction of the Toyota Crown. Other vehicles with 36 V batteries are in the near horizon. These vehicles may contain single or dual battery systems. These vehicles will most likely contain valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries. The battery systems developed to date utilize significantly more lead than conventional 12 V batteries. This paper will evaluate the different proposed 36 V battery systems and estimate the lead requirements for each of the competing systems. It will also project the penetration of and resultant increased lead usage of these new batteries into the future.

  3. Batteries 2020 – Lithium - ion battery first and second life ageing, validated battery models, lifetime modelling and ageing assessment of thermal parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermans, Jean-Marc; Nikolian, Alexandros; De Hoog, Joris

    2016-01-01

    The European ProjectBatteries 2020” unites nine partners jointly working on research and the development of competitive European automotive batteries. The project aims at increasing both the energy density and lifetime of large format pouch lithium-ion batteries towards the goals targeted...... vehicle application. These batteries are still operational and suitable to less restrictive conditions, such as those for stationary and renewable energy application. Therefore, possible second life opportunities have been identified and further assessed. In this paper, the main ageing effects of lithium...... ion batteries are explained. Next, an overview of different validated battery models will be discussed. Finally, a methodology for assessing the performance of the battery cells in a second life application is presented....

  4. Annual report on reactor safety research projects sponsored by the Ministry of Economics and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany. Reporting period 2007. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Within its competence for energy research the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) sponsors research projects on the safety of nuclear power plants currently in operation. The objective of these projects is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such research projects by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work. The progress reports are published by the Research Management Division of GRS. The reports as of the year 2000 are available in the Internet-based information system on results and data of reactor safety research (http://www.grs-fbw.de). The compilation of the reports is classified according to the classification system 'Joint Safety Research Index (JSRI)'. The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. It has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties. (orig.)

  5. FY2013 Energy Storage R&D Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-02-01

    The FY 2013 Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D focuses on advancing the development of batteries to enable a large market penetration of hybrid and electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush.

  6. FY2011 Progress Report for Energy Storage Research & Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-01-31

    The FY 2011 Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D focuses on advancing the development of batteries to enable a large market penetration of hybrid and electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush.

  7. From battery modeling to battery management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, P.H.L.; Danilov, D.

    2011-01-01

    The principles of rechargeable battery operation form the basis of the electronic network models developed for Nickel-based aqueous battery systems, including Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH), and non-aqueous battery systems, such as the well-known Li-ion. These electronic network models are based on

  8. Asotin Creek instream habitat alteration projects : habitat evaluation, adult and juvenile habitat utilization and water temperature monitoring : 2001 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumgarner, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    projects to improve fish habitat. In 1998, the ACCD identified the need for a more detailed analysis of these instream projects to fully evaluate their effectiveness at improving fish habitat. Therefore, ACCD contracted with WDFW's Snake River Lab (SRL) to take pre- and post-construction measurements of the habitat (i.e., pools, LOD, width, depth) at each site, and to evaluate fish use within some of the altered sites. These results have been published annually as progress reports to the ACCD (Bumgarner et al. 1999, Wargo et al. 2000, and Bumgarner and Schuck 2001). The ACCD also contracted with the WDFW SRL to conduct other evaluation and monitoring in the stream such as: (1) conduct snorkel surveys at habitat alteration sites to document fish usage following construction, (2) deploy temperature monitors throughout the basin to document summer water temperatures, and (3) attempt to document adult fish utilization by documenting the number of steelhead redds associated with habitat altered areas. This report provides a summary of pre-construction measurements taken on three proposed Charley Creek habitat sites during 2001, two sites in main Asotin Creek, and one site in George Creek, a tributary that enters in the lower Asotin Creek basin. Further, it provides a comparison of measurements taken pre- and post-construction on three 1999 habitat sites taken two years later, but at similar river flows. It also presents data collected from snorkel surveys, redd counts, and temperature monitoring

  9. Lifetime modelling of lead acid batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindner, H.; Cronin, T.; Lundsager, P.

    2005-04-01

    The performance and lifetime of energy storage in batteries are an important part of many renewable based energy systems. Not only do batteries impact on the system performance but they are also a significant expenditure when considering the whole life cycle costs. Poor prediction of lifetime can, therefore, lead to uncertainty in the viability of the system in the long term. This report details the work undertaken to investigate and develop two different battery life prediction methodologies with specific reference to their use in hybrid renewable energy systems. Alongside this, results from battery tests designed to exercise batteries in similar modes to those that they experience in hybrid systems have also been analysed. These have yielded battery specific parameters for use in the prediction software and the first results in the validation process of the software are also given. This work has been part of the European Union Benchmarking research project (ENK6-CT-2001-80576), funded by the European Union, the United States and Australian governments together with other European states and other public and private financing bodies. The project has concentrated on lead acid batteries as this technology is the most commonly used. Through this work the project partner institutions have intended to provide useful tools to improve the design capabilities of organizations, private and public, in remote power systems. (au)

  10. Battery waste management status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, B.M.; Sabatini, J.C.; Wolsky, S.

    1993-01-01

    The paper consists of a series of slides used in the conference presentation. The topics outlined in the slides are: an overview of battery waste management; waste management of lead acid batteries; lead acid recycling; typical legislation for battery waste; regulatory status in European countries; mercury use in cells; recent trends in Hg and Cd use; impact of batteries to air quality at MSW incinerators; impact of electric vehicles; new battery technologies; and unresolved issues

  11. Progress of JT-60SA Project: EU-JA joint efforts for assembly and fabrication of superconducting tokamak facilities and its research planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirai, Hiroshi, E-mail: shirai.hiroshi@jaea.go.jp [JT-60SA Project Team, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Barabaschi, Pietro [JT-60SA EU-Home Team, Fusion for Energy, Boltsmannstr 2, Garching 85748 (Germany); Kamada, Yutaka [JT-60SA JA-Home Team, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • JT-60SA Project is promoted under the BA Agreement and JA national programme. • JT-60SA is designed to operate in break-even equivalent condition for a long period. • JT-60SA Project supports and complements the ITER project, and promotes DEMO design. • Fabrication of JT-60SA components and assembly in Naka are steadily going on. • JT-60SA Research Plan has been developed jointly by EU and JA fusion communities. - Abstract: Aiming at supporting the early realization of fusion energy, the JT-60SA Project has shown steady progress for several years toward the first plasma in 2019 under the dual frameworks: the Satellite Tokamak Programme of the Broader Approach Agreement between EU and Japan, and the Japanese national programme. JT-60SA is a superconducting tokamak designed to operate in break-even equivalent conditions for a long pulse duration (typically 100 s) with a maximum plasma current of 5.5 MA. A variety of plasma control capabilities enable JT-60SA to contribute directly to the ITER project and also to DEMO by addressing key engineering and physics issues for advanced plasma operation. Design and fabrication of JT-60SA components, shared by the EU and Japan, started in 2007. Assembly in the torus hall started in January 2013, and welding work of the vacuum vessel sectors (seven 40° sectors and two 30° sectors) is currently ongoing on the cryostat base. Other components such as TF coils, PF coils, power supplies, cryogenic system, cryostat vessel, thermal shields and so on were or are being delivered to the Naka site for installation, assembly and commissioning. This paper gives technical progress on fabrication, installation and assembly of tokamak components and ancillary systems, as well as progress of the JT-60SA Research Plan being developed jointly by European and Japanese fusion communities.

  12. Annual report on Reactor Safety Research Projects sponsored by the Ministry of Economics and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany. Reporting period 1999. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Within its competence for energy research, the Bundesministerium fuer Wirtschaft und Technologie (BMWi) (Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology) sponsors investigations into the safety of nuclear power plants. The objective of these investigations is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such investigations by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work and are published by the Research Management Division of GRS within the framework of general information on the progress in reactor safety research. The compilation of the reports is classified according to the classification system ''Joint Safety Research Index'' of the CEC (commission of the European communities). The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. (orig.)

  13. Annual report on reactor safety research projects sponsored by the Ministry of Economics and Labour of the Federal Republic of Germany. Reporting period 2003. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of the investigations into the safety of nuclear power plants by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work and are published by the Research Management Division of GRS within the framework of general information on the progress in reactor safety research. The compilation of the reports is classified according to general topics related to reactor safety research. Further, use is made of the classification system ''Joint Safety Research Index'' of the CEC (commission of the european communities). The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers

  14. The battery market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    The worldwide battery market is estimated to be $21 billion annually at present. The geographical distribution of this market is shown in this paper. The American (North and South), Western Europe and Africa, and Asian and Australia represent equal markets of $6 billion each. The communist block countries (including Russia and China) are estimated to represent a $3 billion market. Automotive and consumer batteries constitute more than 80% of the world battery market. Industrial batteries make up the rest. Secondary (rechargeable) batteries (automotive, for example) have only 60% share of the world battery consumption. Primary batteries (most toy batteries that are the throw away type) exceed rechargeables by far in units. However, the larger size of rechargeable batteries makes their total value larger despite the small number of units

  15. FY2015 Energy Storage R&D Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-04-30

    The Energy Storage research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for projects focusing on batteries for plug-in electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush.

  16. Development and Testing of an UltraBattery-Equipped Honda Civic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald Karner

    2012-04-01

    The UltraBattery retrofit project DP1.8 and Carbon Enriched project C3, performed by ECOtality North America (ECOtality) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC), are to demonstrate the suitability of advanced lead battery technology in Hybrid Electrical Vehicles (HEVs).

  17. Quick charge battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    Electric and hybrid electric vehicles (EVs and HEVs) will become a significant reality in the near future of the automotive industry. Both types of vehicles will need a means to store energy on board. For the present, the method of choice would be lead-acid batteries, with the HEV having auxiliary power supplied by a small internal combustion engine. One of the main drawbacks to lead-acid batteries is internal heat generation as a natural consequence of the charging process as well as resistance losses. This limits the re-charging rate to the battery pack for an EV which has a range of about 80 miles. A quick turnaround on recharge is needed but not yet possible. One of the limiting factors is the heat buildup. For the HEV the auxiliary power unit provides a continuous charge to the battery pack. Therefore heat generation in the lead-acid battery is a constant problem that must be addressed. Presented here is a battery that is capable of quick charging, the Quick Charge Battery with Thermal Management. This is an electrochemical battery, typically a lead-acid battery, without the inherent thermal management problems that have been present in the past. The battery can be used in an all-electric vehicle, a hybrid-electric vehicle or an internal combustion engine vehicle, as well as in other applications that utilize secondary batteries. This is not restricted to only lead-acid batteries. The concept and technology are flexible enough to use in any secondary battery application where thermal management of the battery must be addressed, especially during charging. Any battery with temperature constraints can benefit from this advancement in the state of the art of battery manufacturing. This can also include nickel-cadmium, metal-air, nickel hydroxide, zinc-chloride or any other type of battery whose performance is affected by the temperature control of the interior as well as the exterior of the battery.

  18. Gelled-electrolyte batteries for electric vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuphorn, H. (Accumulatorenfabrik Sonnenschein GmbH, Buedingen (Germany))

    1992-09-15

    Increasing problems of air pollution have pushed activities of electric vehicle projects world-wide and in spite of projects for developing new battery systems for high energy densities, today lead/acid batteries are almost the single system, ready for technical usage in this application. Valve-regulated lead/acid batteries with gelled electrolyte have the advantage that no maintenance is required and because the gel system does not cause problems with electrolyte stratification, no additional appliances for central filling or acid addition are required, which makes the system simple. Those batteries with high density active masses indicate high endurance results and field tests with 40 VW-CityStromers, equipped with 96 V/160 A h gel batteries with thermal management show good results during four years. In addition, gelled lead acid batteries possess superior high rate performance compared with conventional lead/acid batteries, which guarantees good acceleration results of the car and which makes the system recommendable for application in electric vehicles. (orig.).

  19. Gelled-electrolyte batteries for electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuphorn, Hans

    Increasing problems of air pollution have pushed activities of electric vehicle projects worldwide and in spite of projects for developing new battery systems for high energy densities, today lead/acid batteries are almost the single system, ready for technical usage in this application. Valve-regulated lead/acid batteries with gelled electrolyte have the advantage that no maintenance is required and because the gel system does not cause problems with electrolyte stratification, no additional appliances for central filling or acid addition are required, which makes the system simple. Those batteries with high density active masses indicate high endurance results and field tests with 40 VW-CityStromers, equipped with 96 V/160 A h gel batteries with thermal management show good results during four years. In addition, gelled lead/acid batteries possess superior high rate performance compared with conventional lead/acid batteries, which guarantees good acceleration results of the car and which makes the system recommendable for application in electric vehicles.

  20. The Failure of Progressive Classroom Reform: Lessons from the Curriculum Reform Implementation Project in Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Progressive education has been an article of educational faith in Papua New Guinea during the last 50 years but the best available evidence indicates that major reforms to formalistic curriculum and teaching in primary and secondary classrooms have failed during this period despite large-scale professional, administrative and financial support. In…

  1. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 71, quarter ending June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; microbial technology; and novel technology. A list of available publication is also provided.

  2. Biomedical applications of batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, Roger [Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom); Linford, Roger [The Research Office, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom); Schlindwein, Walkiria [School of Pharmacy, De Montfort University, The Gateway, Leicester, LE1 9BH (United Kingdom)

    2004-08-31

    An overview is presented of the many ways in which batteries and battery materials are used in medicine and in biomedical studies. These include the use of batteries as power sources for motorised wheelchairs, surgical tools, cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators, dynamic prostheses, sensors and monitors for physiological parameters, neurostimulators, devices for pain relief, and iontophoretic, electroporative and related devices for drug administration. The various types of battery and fuel cell used for this wide range of applications will be considered, together with the potential harmful side effects, including accidental ingestion of batteries and the explosive nature of some of the early cardiac pacemaker battery systems.

  3. The human genome project: Information management, access, and regulation. Technical progress report, 1 April--31 August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInerney, J.D.; Micikas, L.B.

    1993-09-10

    Efforts are described to prepare educational materials including computer based as well as conventional type teaching materials for training interested high school and elementary students in aspects of Human Genome Project.

  4. Recent progress of the waste processing and disposal projects within the Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, R.D.; McGinnis, C.P.; Cruse, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Remediation has created the Office of Technology Development (OTD) to provide new and improved remediation technologies for the 1 x 10 8 gal of radioactive waste in the underground storage tanks (USTs) at five DOE sites. The OTD established and the Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) to perform demonstrations, tests, and evaluations on these new technologies before these processes are transferred to the tank sites for use in full-scale remediation of the USTs. The UST-ID projects are performed by the Characterization and Waste Retrieval Program or the Waste Processing and Disposal Program (WPDP). During FY 1994, the WPDP is funding 12 projects in the areas of supernate processing, sludge processing, nitrate destruction, and final waste forms. The supernate projects are primarily concerned with cesium removal. A mobile evaporator and concentrator for cesium-free supernate is also being demonstrated. The sludge projects are emphasizing sludge dissolution and the evaluation of the TRUEX and diamide solvent extraction processes for transuranic waste streams. One WPDP project is examining both supernate and sludge processes in an effort to develop a system-level plan for handling all UST waste. The other WPDP studies are concerned with nitrate and organic destruction as well as subsequent waste forms. The current status of these WPDP projects is presented

  5. Mapping the Challenges of Magnesium Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jaehee; Sahadeo, Emily; Noked, Malachi; Lee, Sang Bok

    2016-05-05

    Rechargeable Mg battery has been considered a major candidate as a beyond lithium ion battery technology, which is apparent through the tremendous works done in the field over the past decades. The challenges for realization of Mg battery are complicated, multidisciplinary, and the tremendous work done to overcome these challenges is very hard to organize in a regular review paper. Additionally, we claim that organization of the huge amount of information accumulated by the great scientific progress achieved by various groups in the field will shed the light on the unexplored research domains and give clear perspectives and guidelines for next breakthrough to take place. In this Perspective, we provide a convenient map of Mg battery research in a form of radar chart of Mg electrolytes, which evaluates the electrolyte under the important components of Mg batteries. The presented radar charts visualize the accumulated knowledge on Mg battery and allow for navigation of not only the current research state but also future perspective of Mg battery at a glance.

  6. Recent progress in Open Data production and consumption - examples from a Governmental institute (SMHI) and a collaborative EU research project (SWITCH-ON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arheimer, Berit; Falkenroth, Esa

    2014-05-01

    The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) has a long tradition both in producing and consuming open data on a national, European and global scale. It is also promoting community building among water scientists in Europe by participating in and initiating collaborative projects. This presentation will exemplify the contemporary European movement imposed by the INSPIRE directive and the Open Data Strategy, by showing the progress in openness and shift in attitudes during the last decade when handling Research Data and Public Sector Information at a national European institute. Moreover, the presentation will inform about a recently started collaborative project (EU FP7 project No 603587) coordinated by SMHI and called SWITCH-ON http://water-switch-on.eu/. The project addresses water concerns and currently untapped potential of open data for improved water management across the EU. The overall goal of the project is to make use of open data, and add value to society by repurposing and refining data from various sources. SWITCH-ON will establish new forms of water research and facilitate the development of new products and services based on principles of sharing and community building in the water society. The SWITCH-ON objectives are to use open data for implementing: 1) an innovative spatial information platform with open data tailored for direct water assessments, 2) an entirely new form of collaborative research for water-related sciences, 3) fourteen new operational products and services dedicated to appointed end-users, 4) new business and knowledge to inform individual and collective decisions in line with the Europe's smart growth and environmental objectives. The presentation will discuss challenges, progress and opportunities with the open data strategy, based on the experiences from working both at a Governmental institute and being part of the global research community.

  7. Electrochemistry-based Battery Modeling for Prognostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Kulkarni, Chetan Shrikant

    2013-01-01

    Batteries are used in a wide variety of applications. In recent years, they have become popular as a source of power for electric vehicles such as cars, unmanned aerial vehicles, and commericial passenger aircraft. In such application domains, it becomes crucial to both monitor battery health and performance and to predict end of discharge (EOD) and end of useful life (EOL) events. To implement such technologies, it is crucial to understand how batteries work and to capture that knowledge in the form of models that can be used by monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis algorithms. In this work, we develop electrochemistry-based models of lithium-ion batteries that capture the significant electrochemical processes, are computationally efficient, capture the effects of aging, and are of suitable accuracy for reliable EOD prediction in a variety of usage profiles. This paper reports on the progress of such a model, with results demonstrating the model validity and accurate EOD predictions.

  8. The Palmottu natural analogue project. Progress report 1995. The behaviour of natural radionuclides in and around uranium deposits, Nr. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruskeeniemi, T.; Blomqvist, R.

    1996-01-01

    Natural analogue studies at Palmottu (in Finland) have concentrated on characterising the general geological, hydrogeological and radiochemical setting of the uranium mineralisation. Since 1992 a research program focusing on the hydrogeological characterisation of potential flow routes has been in progress, and the basis for a constrained flow system has already been identified. Sophisticated studies have also been performed on groundwater redox chemistry and matrix diffusion processes. The report consists of an introduction to the activities carried out in 1995 followed by topical summaries documented by the principal investigators in charge of each activity. The following summaries are included in the report (1) Hydrogeological studies at Palmottu, (2) Modelling of groundwater flow, (3) TV-logging of boreholes, (4) Mineralogical and petrological studies, (5) Radionuclide migration studies and (6) Humic substances. Full technical and scientific results are documented in appropriate topical reports and publications referred to in this Progress Report. (46 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.)

  9. Third International Conference on Batteries for Utility Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-03-18

    This is a collection of essays presented at the above-named conference held at Kobe, Japan, from March 18 through 22, 1991. At the utility energy storage session, a power research program plan, operational and economic benefits of BESP (battery energy storage plant), the Moonlight Project, etc., were presented, respectively, by EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) of the U.S., BEWAG Corporation of Germany, and NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) of Japan, etc. At the improved lead-acid batteries session, the characteristics of improved lead-acid batteries, load levelling and life cycle, problems in BESP, comparisons and tests, etc., were presented by Japan, Italy, the U.S., etc. At the advanced batteries session, presentations were made about the sodium-sulfur battery, zinc-bromine battery, redox battery, etc. Furthermore, there were sessions on consumer energy systems, control and power conditioning technology, and commercialization and economic studies. A total 53 presentations were made. (NEDO)

  10. BX in-situ oil-shale project. Quarterly technical progress report, June 1, 1981-August 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougan, P.M.

    1981-09-20

    June 1, 1981-August 31, 1981 was the third consecutive quarter of superheated steam injection at the BX In Situ Oil Shale Project. Injection was continuous except for the period of July 14th to August 1st when the injection was suspended during the drilling of core hole BX-37. During the quarter, 99,760 barrels of water as superheated steam were injected into Project injection wells at an average well head temperature of 752/sup 0/F and an average wellhead pressure of 1312 PSIG. During the same period, 135,469 barrels of fluid were produced from the Project production wells for a produced to injected fluid ratio of 1.36 to 1.0. Net oil production during the quarter was 38 barrels.

  11. Rechargeable batteries applications handbook

    CERN Document Server

    1998-01-01

    Represents the first widely available compendium of the information needed by those design professionals responsible for using rechargeable batteries. This handbook introduces the most common forms of rechargeable batteries, including their history, the basic chemistry that governs their operation, and common design approaches. The introduction also exposes reader to common battery design terms and concepts.Two sections of the handbook provide performance information on two principal types of rechargeable batteries commonly found in consumer and industrial products: sealed nickel-cad

  12. Micro Calorimeter for Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-01

    As battery technology forges ahead and consumer demand for safer, more affordable, high-performance batteries grows, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has added a patented Micro Calorimeter to its existing family of R&D 100 Award-winning Isothermal Battery Calorimeters (IBCs). The Micro Calorimeter examines the thermal signature of battery chemistries early on in the design cycle using popular coin cell and small pouch cell designs, which are simple to fabricate and study.

  13. Battery systems engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Rahn, Christopher D

    2012-01-01

    A complete all-in-one reference on the important interdisciplinary topic of Battery Systems Engineering Focusing on the interdisciplinary area of battery systems engineering, this book provides the background, models, solution techniques, and systems theory that are necessary for the development of advanced battery management systems. It covers the topic from the perspective of basic electrochemistry as well as systems engineering topics and provides a basis for battery modeling for system engineering of electric and hybrid electric vehicle platforms. This original

  14. Battery Aging and the Kinetic Battery Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Batteries are omnipresent, and with the uprise of the electrical vehicles will their use will grow even more. However, the batteries can deliver their required power for a limited time span. They slowly degrade with every charge-discharge cycle. This degradation needs to be taken into account when

  15. Progress and Lessons Learned in Transuranic Waste Disposition at The Department of Energy's Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.D. Mousseau; S.C. Raish; F.M. Russo

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and operated by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC(BBWI) It describes the results to date in meeting the 6,000-cubic-meter Idaho Settlement Agreement milestone that was due December 31, 2005. The paper further describes lessons that have been learned from the project in the area of transuranic (TRU) waste processing and waste certification. Information contained within this paper would be beneficial to others who manage TRU waste for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

  16. Advanced fuel gas desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project. Technical progress report No. 19, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The {open_quotes}Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project{close_quotes} is a $150.5 million cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy and Pure Air, a general partnership of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc. The AFGD process is one of several alternatives to conventional flue gas desulfurization (FGD) being demonstrated under the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The AFGD demonstration project is located at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company`s Bailly Generating Station, about 12 miles northeast of Gary, Indiana.

  17. Electric Vehicle Battery Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    A serious drawback to electric vehicles [batteries only] is the idle time needed to recharge their batteries. In this challenge, students can develop ideas and concepts for battery change-out at automotive service stations. Such a capability would extend the range of electric vehicles.

  18. The Science of Battery Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, John P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; El Gabaly Marquez, Farid [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; McCarty, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Sugar, Joshua Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Talin, Alec A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Fenton, Kyle R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Power Sources Design and Development; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Power Sources Design and Development; Harris, Charles Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanosystems Synthesis/Analysis; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanosystems Synthesis/Analysis; Hayden, Carl C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Chemistry Dept.; Kliewer, Christopher Jesse [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Chemistry Dept.; Hudak, Nicholas S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Power Sources Research and Development; Leung, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure Physics; McDaniel, Anthony H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Hydrogen and Combustion Technology; Tenney, Craig M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Chemical and Biological Systems; Zavadil, Kevin R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Lab.

    2015-01-01

    This report documents work that was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, Science of Battery Degradation. The focus of this work was on the creation of new experimental and theoretical approaches to understand atomistic mechanisms of degradation in battery electrodes that result in loss of electrical energy storage capacity. Several unique approaches were developed during the course of the project, including the invention of a technique based on ultramicrotoming to cross-section commercial scale battery electrodes, the demonstration of scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to probe lithium transport mechanisms within Li-ion battery electrodes, the creation of in-situ liquid cells to observe electrochemical reactions in real-time using both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and STXM, the creation of an in-situ optical cell utilizing Raman spectroscopy and the application of the cell for analyzing redox flow batteries, the invention of an approach for performing ab initio simulation of electrochemical reactions under potential control and its application for the study of electrolyte degradation, and the development of an electrochemical entropy technique combined with x-ray based structural measurements for understanding origins of battery degradation. These approaches led to a number of scientific discoveries. Using STXM we learned that lithium iron phosphate battery cathodes display unexpected behavior during lithiation wherein lithium transport is controlled by nucleation of a lithiated phase, leading to high heterogeneity in lithium content at each particle and a surprising invariance of local current density with the overall electrode charging current. We discovered using in-situ transmission electron microscopy that there is a size limit to lithiation of silicon anode particles above which particle fracture controls electrode degradation. From electrochemical entropy measurements, we discovered that entropy

  19. Annual report on reactor safety research projects sponsored by the Ministry of Economics and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany. Reporting period 2005. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Within its competence for energy research, the Bundesministerium fuer Wirtschaft und Technology (BMWi) (Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology) sponsors investigations into the safety of nuclear power plants. The objective of these investigations is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such investigations by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work and are published by the Research Management Division of GRS within the framework of general information on the progress in reactor safety research. The compilation of the reports is classified according to general topics related to reactor safety research. Further, use is made of the classification system 'Joint Safety Research Index' of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities). The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. It has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties. (orig.)

  20. Annual report on reactor safety research projects sponsored by the Ministry of Economics and Labour of the Federal Republic of Germany. Reporting period 2004. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Within its competence for energy research, the Bundesministerium fuer Wirtschaft und Technology (BMWi) (Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology) sponsors investigations into the safety of nuclear power plants. The objective of these investigations is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such investigations by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work and are published by the Research Management Division of GRS within the framework of general information on the progress in reactor safety research. The compilation of the reports is classified according to general topics related to reactor safety research. Further, use is made of the classification system 'Joint Safety Research Index' of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities). The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. It has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties. (orig.)

  1. Annual report on reactor safety research projects sponsored by the Ministry of Economics and Labour of the Federal Republic of Germany. Reporting period 2004. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Within its competence for energy research, the Bundesministerium fuer Wirtschaft und Technology (BMWi) (Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology) sponsors investigations into the safety of nuclear power plants. The objective of these investigations is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such investigations by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work and are published by the Research Management Division of GRS within the framework of general information on the progress in reactor safety research. The compilation of the reports is classified according to general topics related to reactor safety research. Further, use is made of the classification system 'Joint Safety Research Index' of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities). The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. It has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties. (orig.)

  2. Projectables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Troels A.; Merritt, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    CNC cutting machines have become essential tools for designers and architects enabling rapid prototyping, model-building and production of high quality components. Designers often cut from new materials, discarding the irregularly shaped remains. We introduce ProjecTables, a visual augmented...... reality system for interactive packing of model parts onto sheet materials. ProjecTables enables designers to (re)use scrap materials for CNC cutting that would have been previously thrown away, at the same time supporting aesthetic choices related to wood grain, avoiding surface blemishes, and other...... relevant material properties. We conducted evaluations of ProjecTables with design students from Aarhus School of Architecture, demonstrating that participants could quickly and easily place and orient model parts reducing material waste. Contextual interviews and ideation sessions led to a deeper...

  3. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989 - Volume 1 - Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-12-01

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality.

  4. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress Report for the Period April 1 to June 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the progress of 13 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period April 1 to June 30, 1989. These projects are for the 300 area process trenches (300 area), 183-H solar evaporation basins (100-H area), 200 areas low-level burial grounds, nonradioactive dangerous waste landfill (southeast of the 200 areas), 1301-N liquid waste disposal facility (100-N area), 1324-N surface impoundment and 1324-NA percolation pond (100-N area), 1325-N liquid waste disposal facility (100-N area), 216-A-10 crib (200-east area), 216-A-29 ditch (200-east area), 216-A-36B crib (200-east area), 216-B-36B crib (200-east area), 216-B-3 pond (east of the 200-east area), 2101-M pond (200-east area), grout treatment facility (200-east area).

  5. 42 CFR 137.351 - Is a Self-Governance Tribe required to submit construction project progress and financial reports...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Is a Self-Governance Tribe required to submit..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Roles of Self-Governance Tribe in Establishing and Implementing Construction Project Agreements § 137.351 Is a Self-Governance Tribe required to...

  6. Working Group 7.0 Environmental Transport and Health Effects, Chernobyl Studies Project. Progress report, October 1994 -- March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This document presents the details from the working group 7.0 Chernobyl Studies Project. This working group looked at the environmental transport and health effects from the fallout due to the meltdown of Chernobylsk-4 reactor. Topics include: hydrological transport; chromosome painting dosimetry; EPR, TL and OSL dosimetry; stochastic effects; thyroid studies; and leukemia studies

  7. Displacement of diesel fuel with wind energy in rural Alaskan villages. Final progress and project closeout report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meiners, Dennis [Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority, Anchorage, AK (United States); Drouhilet, Steve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Reeve, Brad [Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority, Anchorage, AK (United States); Bergen, Matt [Kotzebue Electric Association, Kotzebue, AK (United States)

    2002-03-11

    The basic concept behind this project was to construct a wind diesel hybrid power system which combines and maximizes the intermittent and variable energy output of wind turbine(s) with diesel generator(s) to provide continuous high quality electric power to weak isolated mini-grids.

  8. [Implementing population-based integrated care for a region: a work-in-progress report on the project "Gesundes Kinzigtal"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Helmut; Schmitt, Gwendolyn; Roth, Monika; Stunder, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    The regional integrated care model "Gesundes Kinzigtal" pursues the idea of integrated health care with special focus on increasing the health gain of the served population. Physicians (general practitioners) and psychotherapists, physiotherapists, hospitals, nursing services, non-profit associations, fitness centers, and health insurance companies work closely together with a regional management company and its programs on prevention and care coordination and enhancement. The 10 year-project is run by a company that was founded by the physician network "MQNK" and "OptiMedis AG", a corporation with public health background specialising in integrated health care. The aim of this project is to enhance prevention and quality of health care for a whole region in a sustainable way, and to decrease costs of care. The article describes the special funding model of the project, the engagement of patients, and the different health and prevention programmes. The programmes and projects are developed, implemented, and evaluated by multidisciplinary teams. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. High performance anode for advanced Li batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, Carla [Applied Sciences, Inc., Cedarville, OH (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The overall objective of this Phase I SBIR effort was to advance the manufacturing technology for ASI’s Si-CNF high-performance anode by creating a framework for large volume production and utilization of low-cost Si-coated carbon nanofibers (Si-CNF) for the battery industry. This project explores the use of nano-structured silicon which is deposited on a nano-scale carbon filament to achieve the benefits of high cycle life and high charge capacity without the consequent fading of, or failure in the capacity resulting from stress-induced fracturing of the Si particles and de-coupling from the electrode. ASI’s patented coating process distinguishes itself from others, in that it is highly reproducible, readily scalable and results in a Si-CNF composite structure containing 25-30% silicon, with a compositionally graded interface at the Si-CNF interface that significantly improve cycling stability and enhances adhesion of silicon to the carbon fiber support. In Phase I, the team demonstrated the production of the Si-CNF anode material can successfully be transitioned from a static bench-scale reactor into a fluidized bed reactor. In addition, ASI made significant progress in the development of low cost, quick testing methods which can be performed on silicon coated CNFs as a means of quality control. To date, weight change, density, and cycling performance were the key metrics used to validate the high performance anode material. Under this effort, ASI made strides to establish a quality control protocol for the large volume production of Si-CNFs and has identified several key technical thrusts for future work. Using the results of this Phase I effort as a foundation, ASI has defined a path forward to commercialize and deliver high volume and low-cost production of SI-CNF material for anodes in Li-ion batteries.

  10. Hood River and Pelton Ladder monitoring and evaluation project and Hood River fish habitat project : annual progress report 1999-2000.; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Michael B.; McCanna, Joseph P.; Jennings, Mick

    2001-01-01

    The Hood River subbasin is home to four species of anadromous salmonids: chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and sea run cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki). Indigenous spring chinook salmon were extirpated during the late 1960's. The naturally spawning spring chinook salmon currently present in the subbasin are progeny of Deschutes stock. Historically, the Hood River subbasin hatchery steelhead program utilized out-of-basin stocks for many years. Indigenous stocks of summer and winter steelhead were listed in March 1998 by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a ''Threatened'' Species along with similar genetically similar steelhead in the Lower Columbia Basin. This annual report summarizes work for two consecutive contract periods: the fiscal year (FY) 1999 contract period was 1 October, 1998 through 30 September, 1999 and 1 October, 1999 through 30 September, 2000 for FY 2000. Work implemented during FY 1999 and FY 2000 included (1) acclimation of hatchery spring chinook salmon and hatchery summer and winter steelhead smolts, (2) spring chinook salmon spawning ground surveys on the West Fork Hood River (3) genetic analysis of steelhead and cutthroat[contractual service with the ODFW], (4) Hood River water temperature studies, (5) Oak Springs Hatchery (OSH) and Round Butte Hatchery (RBH) coded-wire tagging and clipping evaluation, (6) preparation of the Hood River Watershed Assessment (Coccoli et al., December 1999) and the Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan (Coccoli et al., February 2000), (7) project implementation of early action habitat protection and restoration projects, (8) Pelton Ladder evaluation studies, (9) management oversight and guidance to BPA and ODFW engineering on HRPP facilities, and (10) preparation of an annual report summarizing project objectives for FY 1999 and FY 2000

  11. Recent progress of the NEA Stripa project on in situ experiments in granite associated with the disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlyle, S.G.; Carlsson, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    The NEA Stripa project has devoted considerable effort to the measurement and assessment of the hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry and migration phenomena of the stripa granite and to the simulation of conditions likely to be found within an engineered repository in granitic rock. These include refining existing, and developing new, geophysical and hydraulic techniques for the mapping and characterization of fractures in crystalline rocks; conducting field experiments to assess the migration of tracers in single-and multiple-fracture systems; and studying the behaviour of bentonite clay as the back-filling and sealing material in a granitic environment. This paper summarizes the most important findings and outlines the main aims of possible future research under any phase 3 of the project. The latter may include making mathematical predictions of the hydrogeological behavior of the Stripa granite and their subsequent validation by field measurements

  12. Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project. Technical progress report No. 15, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate that, by combining state-of-the-art technology, highly efficient plant operation and maintenance capabilities and by-product gypsum sales, significant reductions of SO{sub 2} emissions can be achieved at approximately one-half the life cycle cost of a conventional Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system. Further, this emission reduction is achieved without generating solid waste and while minimizing liquid wastewater effluent. Basically, this project entails the design, construction and operation of a nominal 600 MWe AFGD facility to remove SO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company`s Bailly Generating Station.

  13. The Palmottu natural analogue project. Progress report 1996. The behaviour of natural radionuclides in and around uranium deposits, Nr. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampinen, P.; Ruskeeniemi, T.; Blomqvist, R.

    1997-01-01

    The report summarises the activities carried out in the Palmottu Natural Analogue project in 1996. Efforts has mainly been directed toward the hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical studies of the site. Other activities in 1996 have included up-dating the structural model of the site and radionuclide migration studies. The topical summaries documented are: (1) Hydrogeological studies, (2) Up-dating the structural model of the site, (3) Hydrogeochemical studies at Palmottu, and (4) Radionuclide migration studies. (41 refs.)

  14. Research in progress: FY 1984. Summaries of projects sponsored by the Office of Health and Environmental Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    This report provides a compilation of summaries of the research projects supported by the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) during Fiscal Year 1984. OHER is a component of the Office of Energy Research within the US Department of Energy, responsible for developing a comprehensive understanding of the health and environmental effects of energy technology development and use as well as other Departmental operations. The OHER program is broad in scope and diverse in character with substantial commitments to both applied and basic research. The research projects have been organized to reflect the major themes and focus of the OHER program. Each research category is preceeded by a short narrative to provide some perspective of the scope of activities which follow. Within each research category, the summaries are organized by efforts performed in DOE laboratories (onsite laboratories) and those performed elsewhere (offsite contractors) to help characterize their respective role in the program. The compilation of project titles and summaries, despite its volume, is still a relatively superficial source of information. It does not provide a sound basis for considering program quality or even relevance

  15. Cost Savings for Manufacturing Lithium Batteries in a Flexible Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Paul A.; Ahmed, Shabbir; Gallagher, Kevin G.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2015-06-01

    The flexible plant postulated in this study would produces types of batteries for electric-drive vehicles of the types hybrid (HEV), 10-mile range and 40-mile range plug-in hybrids (PHEV) and a 150-mile range battery-electric (EV). The annual production rate of the plant is 235,000 per year (30,000 EV batteries and 100,000 HEV batteries). The unit cost savings as calculated with the Argonne BatPaC model for this flex plant vs. dedicated plants range from 8% for the EV battery packs to 23% for the HEV packs including the battery management systems (BMS). The investment cost savings are even larger, ranging from 21% for EVs to 43% for HEVs. The costs of the 1.0-kWh HEV batteries are projected to approach $710 per unit and that of the EV batteries $228 per kWh with the most favorable cell chemistries and including the BMS. The best single indicator of the cost of producing lithium-manganate spinel/graphite batteries in a flex plant is the total cell area of the battery. For the four batteries studied, the price range is $20-24 per m2 of cell area including the cost of the BMS, averaging $21 per m2 for the entire flex plant.

  16. The PixFEL project: Progress towards a fine pitch X-ray imaging camera for next generation FEL facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, G., E-mail: giuliana.rizzo@pi.infn.it [Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Batignani, G. [Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Benkechkache, M.A. [Università di Trento, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, I-38123 Trento (Italy); University Constantine 1, Department of Electronics in the Science and Technology Faculty, I-25017, Constantine (Algeria); Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G. [Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Comotti, D. [Università di Pavia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell' Informazione, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [Università di Trento, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, I-38123 Trento (Italy); TIFPA INFN, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Fabris, L. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Università di Bergamo, Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienze Applicate, I-24044 Dalmine (Italy); Forti, F. [Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P. [Università di Pavia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell' Informazione, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Manghisoni, M. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Università di Bergamo, Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienze Applicate, I-24044 Dalmine (Italy); and others

    2016-07-11

    The INFN PixFEL project is developing the fundamental building blocks for a large area X-ray imaging camera to be deployed at next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities with unprecedented intensity. Improvement in performance beyond the state of art in imaging instrumentation will be explored adopting advanced technologies like active edge sensors, a 65 nm node CMOS process and vertical integration. These are the key ingredients of the PixFEL project to realize a seamless large area focal plane instrument composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. In order to minimize the dead area and reduce ambiguities in image reconstruction, a fine pitch active edge thick sensor is being optimized to cope with very high intensity photon flux, up to 10{sup 4} photons per pixel, in the range from 1 to 10 keV. A low noise analog front-end channel with this wide dynamic range and a novel dynamic compression feature, together with a low power 10 bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, has been realized in a 110 μm pitch with a 65 nm CMOS process. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be also explored in the future to build a four-side buttable readout chip with high density memories. In the long run the objective of the PixFEL project is to build a flexible X-ray imaging camera for operation both in burst mode, like at the European X-FEL, or in continuous mode with the high frame rates anticipated for future FEL facilities.

  17. The PixFEL project: Progress towards a fine pitch X-ray imaging camera for next generation FEL facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, G.; Batignani, G.; Benkechkache, M.A.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Comotti, D.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Fabris, L.; Forti, F.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.

    2016-01-01

    The INFN PixFEL project is developing the fundamental building blocks for a large area X-ray imaging camera to be deployed at next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities with unprecedented intensity. Improvement in performance beyond the state of art in imaging instrumentation will be explored adopting advanced technologies like active edge sensors, a 65 nm node CMOS process and vertical integration. These are the key ingredients of the PixFEL project to realize a seamless large area focal plane instrument composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. In order to minimize the dead area and reduce ambiguities in image reconstruction, a fine pitch active edge thick sensor is being optimized to cope with very high intensity photon flux, up to 10"4 photons per pixel, in the range from 1 to 10 keV. A low noise analog front-end channel with this wide dynamic range and a novel dynamic compression feature, together with a low power 10 bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, has been realized in a 110 μm pitch with a 65 nm CMOS process. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be also explored in the future to build a four-side buttable readout chip with high density memories. In the long run the objective of the PixFEL project is to build a flexible X-ray imaging camera for operation both in burst mode, like at the European X-FEL, or in continuous mode with the high frame rates anticipated for future FEL facilities.

  18. Laboratory and field studies related to the radionuclide migration project. Progress report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, W.R.; Thompson, J.L.

    1984-04-01

    The FY 1983 laboratory and field studies related to the Radionuclide Migration project are described. Results are presented for radiochemical analyses of water samples collected from the RNM-1 well and the RNM-2S satellite well at the Cambric site. Data are included for tritium, 36 Cl, 85 Kr, 90 Sr, 129 I, and 137 Cs. Preliminary results from water collection at the Cheshire site are reported. Laboratory studies emphasize the sorptive behavior of tuff and its dependence on mineralogy. 18 references, 7 figures, 13 tables

  19. General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety and fuels program. Progress reportt, January 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maraman, W.J.

    1980-04-01

    This formal monthly report covers the studies related to the use of 238 PuO 2 in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The two programs involved are the general-purpose heat source development and space nuclear safety and fuels. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work

  20. Fossil Energy Program report, 1 October 1976--30 September 1977. [Objectives, progress and plans for each contract or project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, H. Neal; Batchelor, James; Crim, Winfred; Furlong, Leroy; Harvie, Robert; Hunter, Juanita; Jones, William; Karnes, Anita; Ludwig, Linda; Miller, C. Lowell; Mills, G. Alex; Sacks, Stephen; Watkins, J. Wade; Watson, Coni; Weaver, Val

    1978-08-01

    This report is an integral part of the documentation system of the Fossil Energy Program of the Department of Energy. It contains descriptions of each contract and project, arranged in conformance with planning and budgetary documents. The results of contracts are reported at various intervals, depending on the type of contract, but at least annually. These reports are not listed individually in the ''Publications'' sections but are available from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, Springfield, Virginia 22161. The Department of Energy also publishes several abstract journals: Fossil Energy Update, Energy Research Abstracts, and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis.

  1. Implementation and assessment of a yeast orphan gene research project: involving undergraduates in authentic research experiences and progressing our understanding of uncharacterized open reading frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Bethany V; Schultheis, Patrick J; Strome, Erin D

    2016-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first eukaryotic organism to be sequenced; however, little progress has been made in recent years in furthering our understanding of all open reading frames (ORFs). From October 2012 to May 2015 the number of verified ORFs had only risen from 75.31% to 78%, while the number of uncharacterized ORFs had decreased from 12.8% to 11% (representing > 700 genes still left in this category; http://www.yeastgenome.org/genomesnapshot). Course-based research has been shown to increase student learning while providing experience with real scientific investigation; however, implementation in large, multi-section courses presents many challenges. This study sought to test the feasibility and effectiveness of incorporating authentic research into a core genetics course, with multiple instructors, to increase student learning and progress our understanding of uncharacterized ORFs. We generated a module-based annotation toolkit and utilized easily accessible bioinformatics tools to predict gene function for uncharacterized ORFs within the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD). Students were each assigned an uncharacterized ORF, which they annotated using contemporary comparative genomics methodologies, including multiple sequence alignment, conserved domain identification, signal peptide prediction and cellular localization algorithms. Student learning outcomes were measured by quizzes, project reports and presentations, as well as a post-project questionnaire. Our results indicate that the authentic research experience had positive impacts on students' perception of their learning and their confidence to conduct future research. Furthermore, we believe that creation of an online repository and adoption and/or adaptation of this project across multiple researchers and institutions could speed the process of gene function prediction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Wearable textile battery rechargeable by solar energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Hee; Kim, Joo-Seong; Noh, Jonghyeon; Lee, Inhwa; Kim, Hyeong Jun; Choi, Sunghun; Seo, Jeongmin; Jeon, Seokwoo; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Jung-Yong; Choi, Jang Wook

    2013-01-01

    Wearable electronics represent a significant paradigm shift in consumer electronics since they eliminate the necessity for separate carriage of devices. In particular, integration of flexible electronic devices with clothes, glasses, watches, and skin will bring new opportunities beyond what can be imagined by current inflexible counterparts. Although considerable progresses have been seen for wearable electronics, lithium rechargeable batteries, the power sources of the devices, do not keep pace with such progresses due to tenuous mechanical stabilities, causing them to remain as the limiting elements in the entire technology. Herein, we revisit the key components of the battery (current collector, binder, and separator) and replace them with the materials that support robust mechanical endurance of the battery. The final full-cells in the forms of clothes and watchstraps exhibited comparable electrochemical performance to those of conventional metal foil-based cells even under severe folding-unfolding motions simulating actual wearing conditions. Furthermore, the wearable textile battery was integrated with flexible and lightweight solar cells on the battery pouch to enable convenient solar-charging capabilities.

  3. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of commercializing a biotechnology that uses plants to remediate soils, sediments, surface waters, and groundwaters contaminated by heavy metals and radionuclides. This technology, known as phytoremediation, is particularly suited to remediation of soils or water where low levels of contaminants are widespread. Project objectives are to provide an accurate estimate of the capability and rate of phytoremediation for removal of contaminants of concern from soils and groundwaters at Department of Energy (DOE) sites and to develop data suitable for engineering design and economic feasibility evaluations, including methods for destruction or final disposition of plants containing contaminants of concern. The bioremediation systems being evaluated could be less expensive than soil removal and treatment systems, given the areal extent and topography of sites under consideration and the investment of energy and money in soil-moving and -treating processes. In situ technology may receive regulatory acceptance more easily than ex situ treatments requiring excavation, processing, and replacement of surface soils. In addition, phytoremediation may be viable for cleanup of contaminated waters, either as the primary treatment or the final polishing stage, depending on the contaminant concentrations and process economics considerations

  4. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of commercializing a biotechnology that uses plants to remediate soils, sediments, surface waters, and groundwaters contaminated by heavy metals and radionuclides. This technology, known as phytoremediation, is particularly suited to remediation of soils or water where low levels of contaminants are widespread. Project objectives are to provide an accurate estimate of the capability and rate of phytoremediation for removal of contaminants of concern from soils and groundwaters at Department of Energy (DOE) sites and to develop data suitable for engineering design and economic feasibility evaluations, including methods for destruction or final disposition of plants containing contaminants of concern. The bioremediation systems being evaluated could be less expensive than soil removal and treatment systems, given the areal extent and topography of sites under consideration and the investment of energy and money in soil-moving and -treating processes. In situ technology may receive regulatory acceptance more easily than ex situ treatments requiring excavation, processing, and replacement of surface soils. In addition, phytoremediation may be viable for cleanup of contaminated waters, either as the primary treatment or the final polishing stage, depending on the contaminant concentrations and process economics considerations.

  5. The Palmottu Analogue Project, Progress Report 1993. The behaviour of natural radionuclides in and around uranium deposits, Nr. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruskeeniemi, T.; Blomqvist, R.; Suksi, J.; Niini, H.

    1994-01-01

    The report gives a summary of the results of investigations carried out in 1993 at the Palmottu natural analogue study site, which comprises a small U-Th mineralization in Nummi-Pusula, southwestern Finland. Additionally, the report includes several separate articles dealing with various aspects of the Palmottu Analogue Project: (1) 3-dimensional model of fracture zones, (2) redox chemistry of uranium in groundwater, (3) humic substances in groundwater, (4) uranium mineralogy, (5) importance of selective extractions in uranium migration studies, (6) modelling of matrix diffusion, and (7) uranium in surficial deposits. The Palmottu Analogue Project aims at a more profound understanding of radionuclide transport processes in fractured crystalline bedrock. The essential factors controlling transport are groundwater flow and interaction between water and rock. Accordingly, the study includes (1) structural interpretations partly based on geophysical measurements, (2) hydrological studies including hydraulic drill-hole measurements, (3) flow modelling, (4) hydrogeochemical characterization of groundwater, uranium chemistry and colloid chemistry, (5) mineralogical studies, (6) geochemical interpretation and modelling, (7) studies on mobilization and retardation of uranium, and (8) modelling of uranium series data. Paleohydrogeological aspects are of special interest, due to the anticipated future glaciation of the Fennoscandian Shield. Surficial sediments and waters are studied to gain information on postglacial migration in the overburden. (orig.)

  6. Progress in study of Prespa Lake using nuclear and related techniques (IAEA Regional Project RER/8/008)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anovski, Todor

    2001-09-01

    One of the main objective of the IAEA - Regional project RER/8/008 entitled Study of Prespa Lake Using Nuclear and Related Techniques was to provide a scientific basis for sustainable and environmental management of the Lake Prespa (Three lakes: Ohrid, Big Prespa and Small Prespa are on the borders between Albania, Republic of Macedonia and Greece, and are separated by the Mali i Thate and Galichica, mostly Carstificated mountains), see Fig. 1. In this sense investigations connected with the hydrogeology, water quality (Physics-chemical, biological and radiological characteristics) and water balance determination by application of Environmental isotopes ( i.e. H,D,T,O-18,O-18 etc.,) distribution, artificial water tracers and other relevant analytical techniques such as: AAS, HPLC, Total α and β-activity, α and γ-spectrometry as well as ultra sonic measurements (defining of the Lake bottom profile) through regional cooperation / Scientists from Albania, Greece and Republic of Macedonia, participated in the implementation of the Project/ during one hydrological year, had been initiated and valuable results obtained, a part of which are presented in this report. This cooperation was the only way for providing necessary data for better understanding beside the other, of the water quality of the Prespa Lake and its hydrological relationship to Ohrid Lake too, representing a unique regional hydro system in the world. (Author)

  7. New Secondary Batteries Using Electronically Conductive Polymer Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Charles R.; White, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    A Li/Polypyrrole secondary battery was designed and built, and the effect of controlling the morphology of the polymer on enhancement of counterion diffusion in the polymer phase was explored. The experimental work was done at Colorado State University, while the mathematical modeling of the battery was done at Texas A and M University. Manuscripts and publications resulting from the project are listed.

  8. Progress of the radioactive waste management at the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute and the role of an IAEA technical co-operation project in this process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nang, N.T.; Ngoc, O.V.; Nhu Thuy, T.T.; Nghi, D.V.; Thu, N.T.

    2002-01-01

    At present, the main radioactive waste generator in Vietnam is the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute (DNRI). For safe management of radioactive waste generated from this nuclear center, in 1982 Soviet specialists newly constructed one combined technology system for low level radioactive waste management. The existing system consists of two main parts, a Liquid Radioactive Waste Treatment Station and a Storage/Disposal Facility. The liquid treatment station can in principle meet the needs for this nuclear center but disposal technology and storage/disposal facilities are not good enough both with respect to safety and economy, especially the storage/disposal facility placed in Dalat, the tourist city. In order to help DNRI and Vietnam to solve the radioactive waste management problem, the IAEA Technical Co-operation (TC) project VIE/9/007 was implemented in Vietnam. The facilities and IAEA experts provided under this project gradually help to develop radioactive waste management at DNRI, Vietnam. This paper outlines progress under way in the management of the radioactive waste at the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI), Dalat, Vietnam, and the role of the IAEA Technical Co-operation (TC) project in this process. (author)

  9. Quality Indicators in Laboratory Medicine: the status of the progress of IFCC Working Group "Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety" project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacovelli, Laura; Lippi, Giuseppe; Sumarac, Zorica; West, Jamie; Garcia Del Pino Castro, Isabel; Furtado Vieira, Keila; Ivanov, Agnes; Plebani, Mario

    2017-03-01

    The knowledge of error rates is essential in all clinical laboratories as it enables them to accurately identify their risk level, and compare it with those of other laboratories in order to evaluate their performance in relation to the State-of-the-Art (i.e. benchmarking) and define priorities for improvement actions. Although no activity is risk free, it is widely accepted that the risk of error is minimized by the use of Quality Indicators (QIs) managed as a part of laboratory improvement strategy and proven to be suitable monitoring and improvement tools. The purpose of QIs is to keep the error risk at a level that minimizes the likelihood of patients. However, identifying a suitable State-of-the-Art is challenging, because it calls for the knowledge of error rates measured in a variety of laboratories throughout world that differ in their organization and management, context, and the population they serve. Moreover, it also depends on the choice of the events to keep under control and the individual procedure for measurement. Although many laboratory professionals believe that the systemic use of QIs in Laboratory Medicine may be effective in decreasing errors occurring throughout the total testing process (TTP), to improve patient safety as well as to satisfy the requirements of International Standard ISO 15189, they find it difficult to maintain standardized and systematic data collection, and to promote continued high level of interest, commitment and dedication in the entire staff. Although many laboratories worldwide express a willingness to participate to the Model of QIs (MQI) project of IFCC Working Group "Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety", few systematically enter/record their own results and/or use a number of QIs designed to cover all phases of the TTP. Many laboratories justify their inadequate participation in data collection of QIs by claiming that the number of QIs included in the MQI is excessive. However, an analysis of results suggests

  10. Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Vaughan T. J.

    2013-10-18

    This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing

  11. Foothill Transit Battery Electric Bus Demonstration Results: Second Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, Leslie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jeffers, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-06-28

    This report summarizes results of a battery electric bus (BEB) evaluation at Foothill Transit, located in the San Gabriel and Pomona Valley region of Los Angeles County, California. Foothill Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate its fleet of Proterra BEBs in revenue service. The focus of this evaluation is to compare performance of the BEBs to that of conventional technology and to track progress over time toward meeting performance targets. This project has also provided an opportunity for DOE to conduct a detailed evaluation of the BEBs and charging infrastructure. This is the second report summarizing the results of the BEB demonstration at Foothill Transit and it provides data on the buses from August 2015 through December 2016. Data are provided on a selection of compressed natural gas buses as a baseline comparison.

  12. Thermal analysis of a LiFePo4 Battery

    OpenAIRE

    Balanguer Escolano, David

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this final thesis project was to study and test a 3,3V LiFePo4 battery in outer space conditions to be able to determine its working range, its limitations and its problems. To do so a measuring set-up to read and estimate the capacity of a battery was built and programmed. Then the LiFePo4 battery was tested at different temperatures between -20°C and 40°C in a vacuum chamber at a pressure under 100 microbars. The results showed that the battery can still operate prope...

  13. Lifetime Improvement by Battery Scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Schmitt, Jens B.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the lifetime of their batteries. For devices that have multiple batteries or that have the option to connect an extra battery, battery scheduling, thereby exploiting the recovery properties of the batteries, can help to extend the system lifetime. Due to

  14. Lifetime improvement by battery scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the lifetime of its battery. For devices that have multiple batteries or that have the option to connect an extra battery, battery scheduling, thereby exploiting the recovery properties of the batteries, can help to extend the system lifetime. Due to the

  15. A Desalination Battery

    KAUST Repository

    Pasta, Mauro; Wessells, Colin D.; Cui, Yi; La Mantia, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Water desalination is an important approach to provide fresh water around the world, although its high energy consumption, and thus high cost, call for new, efficient technology. Here, we demonstrate the novel concept of a "desalination battery", which operates by performing cycles in reverse on our previously reported mixing entropy battery. Rather than generating electricity from salinity differences, as in mixing entropy batteries, desalination batteries use an electrical energy input to extract sodium and chloride ions from seawater and to generate fresh water. The desalination battery is comprised by a Na 2-xMn 5O 10 nanorod positive electrode and Ag/AgCl negative electrode. Here, we demonstrate an energy consumption of 0.29 Wh l -1 for the removal of 25% salt using this novel desalination battery, which is promising when compared to reverse osmosis (∼ 0.2 Wh l -1), the most efficient technique presently available. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. A desalination battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasta, Mauro; Wessells, Colin D; Cui, Yi; La Mantia, Fabio

    2012-02-08

    Water desalination is an important approach to provide fresh water around the world, although its high energy consumption, and thus high cost, call for new, efficient technology. Here, we demonstrate the novel concept of a "desalination battery", which operates by performing cycles in reverse on our previously reported mixing entropy battery. Rather than generating electricity from salinity differences, as in mixing entropy batteries, desalination batteries use an electrical energy input to extract sodium and chloride ions from seawater and to generate fresh water. The desalination battery is comprised by a Na(2-x)Mn(5)O(10) nanorod positive electrode and Ag/AgCl negative electrode. Here, we demonstrate an energy consumption of 0.29 Wh l(-1) for the removal of 25% salt using this novel desalination battery, which is promising when compared to reverse osmosis (~ 0.2 Wh l(-1)), the most efficient technique presently available. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  17. A Desalination Battery

    KAUST Repository

    Pasta, Mauro

    2012-02-08

    Water desalination is an important approach to provide fresh water around the world, although its high energy consumption, and thus high cost, call for new, efficient technology. Here, we demonstrate the novel concept of a "desalination battery", which operates by performing cycles in reverse on our previously reported mixing entropy battery. Rather than generating electricity from salinity differences, as in mixing entropy batteries, desalination batteries use an electrical energy input to extract sodium and chloride ions from seawater and to generate fresh water. The desalination battery is comprised by a Na 2-xMn 5O 10 nanorod positive electrode and Ag/AgCl negative electrode. Here, we demonstrate an energy consumption of 0.29 Wh l -1 for the removal of 25% salt using this novel desalination battery, which is promising when compared to reverse osmosis (∼ 0.2 Wh l -1), the most efficient technique presently available. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. Association EURATOM-FZJ. Annual progress report 2010. Nuclear fusion project. SC-FZJ 86(11)/4.1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schorn, Ralph P.

    2011-01-01

    Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ) as a EURATOM Association coordinates its fusion research activities within the Nuclear Fusion Project (KFS). The programme is based on several institutes and is well embedded into the European fusion research structure, where FZJ is now focussing on the two topics ''plasma-wall interactions'' and ''ITER technology''. The major part of the Juelich research activities is located within the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK). The former Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP, now IEK-4 Plasma Physics) has by far the largest share of scientific staff in physics and technology for fusion, operates the TEXTOR tokamak, performs scientific work on JET and DIII-D, supports the Wendelstein 7-X construc-tion and takes up significant projects related to the ITER development. IEK-2 (Microstructure and Properties of Materials) operates the high heat flux test facilities JUDITH 1 and 2 which are installed inside a hot cell and in a controlled area which is licensed to operate with toxic and radiating materials; this group represents the materials science expertise within the Juelich fusion programme. The Central Technology Division (ZAT) provides engineering expertise and specialised workshop capacities. The Juelich Supercomputing Centre (JSC) operates various types of supercomputer systems, among which one device (HPC-FF) is dedicated exclusively to fusion research within EFDA. The Association EURATOM-FZJ has very close contacts to the neighbouring EURATOM associations in Belgium and The Netherlands. In 1996 they together have founded the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC) which provides a clustering of resources in order to perform a co-ordinated R and D programme, to operate or construct large facilities (TEXTOR, MAGNUM-PSI), to combine different kinds of expertise and to allow for the forming of a strong partner-ship as a consortium within the ITER construction phase. An updated TEC agreement with a

  19. Costs of lithium-ion batteries for vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.

    2000-08-21

    One of the most promising battery types under development for use in both pure electric and hybrid electric vehicles is the lithium-ion battery. These batteries are well on their way to meeting the challenging technical goals that have been set for vehicle batteries. However, they are still far from achieving the current cost goals. The Center for Transportation Research at Argonne National Laboratory undertook a project for the US Department of Energy to estimate the costs of lithium-ion batteries and to project how these costs might change over time, with the aid of research and development. Cost reductions could be expected as the result of material substitution, economies of scale in production, design improvements, and/or development of new material supplies. The most significant contributions to costs are found to be associated with battery materials. For the pure electric vehicle, the battery cost exceeds the cost goal of the US Advanced Battery Consortium by about $3,500, which is certainly enough to significantly affect the marketability of the vehicle. For the hybrid, however, the total cost of the battery is much smaller, exceeding the cost goal of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles by only about $800, perhaps not enough to deter a potential buyer from purchasing the power-assist hybrid.

  20. Polyoxometalate flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Travis M.; Pratt, Harry D.

    2016-03-15

    Flow batteries including an electrolyte of a polyoxometalate material are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, the flow battery includes an electrochemical cell including an anode portion, a cathode portion and a separator disposed between the anode portion and the cathode portion. Each of the anode portion and the cathode portion comprises a polyoxometalate material. The flow battery further includes an anode electrode disposed in the anode portion and a cathode electrode disposed in the cathode portion.

  1. Lithium battery management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Thomas J [Waukesha, WI

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  2. Laboratory and field studies related to the Radionuclide Migration project: Progress report, October 1, 1986-September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.L.

    1988-02-01

    In this report we describe the research done by personnel of the Los Alamos National Laboratory in support of the Radionuclide Migration project during FY 1987. We are engaged in collecting data concerning the movement of radionuclides at three locations on the Nevada Test Site. We continue to monitor the elution of tritium and krypton from the RNM-2S well at the Cambric site and have described in detail the elution of 36 Cl from the same well. The data from this field study provide us with the opportunity to test the validity of several models of solute transport through geologic media. We have detected tritium and fission products in a water sample from the hole UE20n number1, which was drilled this year at the Cheshire site on Pahute Mesa. We are also continuing our efforts to learn how radionuclides have moved in test areas 3 and 4 near the Aleman site. Our laboratory work this year includes (1) a characterization of the size and density of two stable plutonium(IV) colloid suspensions prepared by different techniques and (2) a study of the transmission of colloidal-size polystyrene beads through crushed-rock columns. 18 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs

  3. Progress in evaluation of radionuclide geochemical information developed by DOE high-level nuclear waste repository site projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; O'Kelley, G.D.; Case, F.I.; Land, J.F.

    1989-08-01

    Information that is being developed by projects within the Department of Energy (DOE) pertinent to the potential geochemical behavior of radionuclides at candidate sites for a high-level radioactive waste repository is being evaluated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). During this report period, all experiments were conducted with tuff from the proposed high-level nuclear waste site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The principal emphasis in this report period was on column studies of migration of uranium and technetium in water from well J-13 at the Yucca Mountain site. Columns 1 cm in diameter and about 5 cm long were constructed and carefully packed with ground tuff. The characteristics of the columns were tested by determination of elution curves of tritium and TcO 4 - . Elution peaks obtained in past studies with uranium were asymmetrical and the shapes were often complex, observations that suggested irreversibilities in the sorption reaction. To try to understand these observations, the effects of flow rate and temperature on uranium migration were studied in detail. Sorption ratios calculated from the elution peaks became larger as the flow rate decreased and as the temperature increased. These observations support the conclusion that the sorption of uranium is kinetically hindered. To confirm this, batch sorption ratio experiments were completed for uranium as a function of time for a variety of conditions

  4. Report on the progress of various ongoing projects on out JEOL 3000f 300 kV FEG TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulcock, S.R.; Zou, J.; Cai, D.; Ringer, S.P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Electron Microscope Unit (EMU) at the University of Sydney has recently installed a new JEOL 3000F Field Emission Gun TEM. With a point resolution of 1.95 Angstroms, it is the ideal tool for high resolution imaging. The microscope also has an Oxford INCA EDS system and GATAN GIF attached, and with an incident probe of diameter ≥0.5nm. As such, it is an excellent tool for microanalysis and in conjunction with a VGSTEM, these facilities are ideal for a large variety of materials microscopy and microanalysis at high resolution. These facilities are also central to the outreach work of the EMU'S Key Centre and add important capability to the Nanostructural Analysis Network Organisation (NANO) the new Australian Major National Research Facility in characterisation. In this poster we will be presenting results from a number of ongoing projects which demonstrate some of the capabilities of both microscopes, including high resolution imaging, phase analysis in Al alloys, compositional gradients in novel glass optical fibres, alternative mechanisms for the formation of misfit dislocation in quantum dots and compositional analysis in quantum well structures. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  5. Renewable energies look for mega-batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaut, Cecile

    2013-01-01

    As the development of wind and photovoltaic energy raises the problem of energy storage because of the intermittent character of these both energies, this article proposes an overview of trends and projects for large scale energy storage. It notably evokes the liquid metal battery project which is expected to be experimented in 2014, and should be able to store 2 MWh for 500 kW. Its operation principle is described. It is inspired by a technique used in aluminium production. It does not need any expensive and fragile separation membrane, it is modular, and it could last about ten years. Two other technologies are then evoked: a sodium-sulphur battery manufactured by NGK in Japan for massive storage, and the lithium-ion battery which is already present in most of electric vehicles. For this last one, energy storage could be an opportunity for manufacturer as the electric vehicle market is not very dynamic

  6. Nonleaking battery terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, W. E.; Nagle, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Three different terminals were designed for usage in a 40 ampere/hour silver zinc battery which has a 45% KOH by weight electrolyte in a plastic battery case. Life tests, including thermal cycling, electrical charge and discharge for up to three years duration, were conducted on these three different terminal designs. Tests for creep rate and tensile strength were conducted on the polyphenylene oxide plastic battery cases. Some cases were unused and others containing KOH electrolyte were placed on life tests. The design and testing of nonleaking battery terminals for use with a KOH electrolyte in a plastic case are considered.

  7. Battery Thermal Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyser, Matthew A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-08

    The operating temperature is critical in achieving the right balance between performance, cost, and life for both Li-ion batteries and ultracapacitors. The chemistries of advanced energy-storage devices - such as lithium-based batteries - are very sensitive to operating temperature. High temperatures degrade batteries faster while low temperatures decrease their power and capacity, affecting vehicle range, performance, and cost. Understanding heat generation in battery systems - from the individual cells within a module, to the inter-connects between the cells, and across the entire battery system - is imperative for designing effective thermal-management systems and battery packs. At NREL, we have developed unique capabilities to measure the thermal properties of cells and evaluate thermal performance of battery packs (air or liquid cooled). We also use our electro-thermal finite element models to analyze the thermal performance of battery systems in order to aid battery developers with improved thermal designs. NREL's tools are used to meet the weight, life, cost, and volume goals set by the U.S. Department of Energy for electric drive vehicles.

  8. Advanced solid state batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levasseur, A; Delmas, C; Menetrier, M; Hagenmuller, P

    1984-01-01

    Direct electrochemical storage of electricity is attractive because of its adaptability to vehicle traction as well as to stationary applications. Important advancements are necessary to improve primary or secondary batteries so far used. The aim of this study was to develop and to characterize materials for the next generation of advanced, rechargeable solid state batteries for vehicle transport and stationary storage applications. One of the best electricity storage systems was the lithium/intercalation compound secondary battery, though up to now the behavior of liquid organic electrolytes did not allow for good recycling in such systems. The research program for these batteries is described.

  9. Ballistic negatron battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, M.S.R. [Koneru Lakshmiah Univ.. Dept. of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Green fields, Vaddeswaram (India)

    2012-07-01

    If we consider the Statistics there is drastic increase in dependence of batteries from year to year, due to necessity of power storage equipment at homes, power generating off grid and on grid Wind, PV systems, etc.. Where wind power is leading in renewable sector, there is a need to look at its development. Considering the scenario in India, most of the wind resource areas are far away from grid and the remaining areas which are near to grid are of low wind currents which is of no use connecting these equipment directly to grid. So, there is a need for a power storage utility to be integrated, such as the BNB (Ballistic Negatron Battery). In this situation a country like India need a battery which should be reliable, cheap and which can be industrialized. So this paper presents the concept of working, design, operation, adaptability of a Ballistic Negatron Battery. Unlike present batteries with low energy density, huge size, more weight, more charging time and low resistant to wear level, this Ballistic Negatron Battery comes with, 1) High energy storage capability (many multiples more than the present most advanced battery). 2) Very compact in size. 3) Almost negligible in weight compared to present batteries. 4) Charges with in very less time. 5) Never exhibits a wear level greater than zero. Seems like inconceivable but adoptable with simple physics. This paper will explains in detail the principle, model, design, construction and practical considerations considered in making this battery. (Author)

  10. Market research of batteries placed on the market and returned, in particular lithium batteries; Marktstudie des Batterieaufkommens und der Batterierueckgabe, speziell der Lithium-Batterien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisenzahl, Sonja; Sittig, Peter-Paul; Hoeck, Michael [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Industriebetriebslehre, Produktionswirtschaft und Logistik

    2013-06-15

    The resource-efficient handling of raw materials also includes the knowledge of already processed raw materials in the meanings of the recycling management. The research project 'Hybride Lithiumgewinnung', which is funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and GC Potential (German: WK Potential), will investigate the raw material Lithium in particular. The study of the recovery of secondary raw materials focuses on the device batteries. The findings of the market study on device batteries will be presented with the priority for Lithium device batteries. A status analysis of resent battery systems focusing Lithium batteries and a stockpile analysis in a German sorting facility for used Lithium batteries were conducted. The aim of the investigation is the varying kinds of chemical composition of Lithium batteries and to determine the age distribution of the used Lithium batteries. (orig.)

  11. Progress on Optimizing Miscanthus Biomass Production for the European Bioeconomy: Results of the EU FP7 Project OPTIMISC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Iris; Clifton-Brown, John; Trindade, Luisa M.; van der Linden, Gerard C.; Schwarz, Kai-Uwe; Müller-Sämann, Karl; Anisimov, Alexander; Chen, C.-L.; Dolstra, Oene; Donnison, Iain S.; Farrar, Kerrie; Fonteyne, Simon; Harding, Graham; Hastings, Astley; Huxley, Laurie M.; Iqbal, Yasir; Khokhlov, Nikolay; Kiesel, Andreas; Lootens, Peter; Meyer, Heike; Mos, Michal; Muylle, Hilde; Nunn, Chris; Özgüven, Mensure; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; Schüle, Heinrich; Tarakanov, Ivan; van der Weijde, Tim; Wagner, Moritz; Xi, Qingguo; Kalinina, Olena

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the complete findings of the EU-funded research project OPTIMISC, which investigated methods to optimize the production and use of miscanthus biomass. Miscanthus bioenergy and bioproduct chains were investigated by trialing 15 diverse germplasm types in a range of climatic and soil environments across central Europe, Ukraine, Russia, and China. The abiotic stress tolerances of a wider panel of 100 germplasm types to drought, salinity, and low temperatures were measured in the laboratory and a field trial in Belgium. A small selection of germplasm types was evaluated for performance in grasslands on marginal sites in Germany and the UK. The growth traits underlying biomass yield and quality were measured to improve regional estimates of feedstock availability. Several potential high-value bioproducts were identified. The combined results provide recommendations to policymakers, growers and industry. The major technical advances in miscanthus production achieved by OPTIMISC include: (1) demonstration that novel hybrids can out-yield the standard commercially grown genotype Miscanthus x giganteus; (2) characterization of the interactions of physiological growth responses with environmental variation within and between sites; (3) quantification of biomass-quality-relevant traits; (4) abiotic stress tolerances of miscanthus genotypes; (5) selections suitable for production on marginal land; (6) field establishment methods for seeds using plugs; (7) evaluation of harvesting methods; and (8) quantification of energy used in densification (pellet) technologies with a range of hybrids with differences in stem wall properties. End-user needs were addressed by demonstrating the potential of optimizing miscanthus biomass composition for the production of ethanol and biogas as well as for combustion. The costs and life-cycle assessment of seven miscanthus-based value chains, including small- and large-scale heat and power, ethanol, biogas, and insulation

  12. Progress on optimizing miscanthus biomass production for the European bioeconomy: Results of the EU FP7 project OPTIMISC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Lewandowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the complete findings of the EU-funded research project OPTIMISC, which investigated methods to optimize the production and use of miscanthus biomass. Miscanthus bioenergy and bioproduct chains were investigated by trialing fifteen diverse germplasm types in a range of climatic and soil environments across central Europe, Ukraine, Russia and China. The abiotic stress tolerances of a wider panel of 100 germplasm types to drought, salinity and low temperatures were measured in the laboratory and a field trial in Belgium. A small selection of germplasm types was evaluated for performance in grasslands on marginal sites in Germany and the UK. The growth traits underlying biomass yield and quality were measured to improve regional estimates of feedstock availability. Several potential high-value bioproducts were identified. The combined results provide recommendations to policymakers, growers and industry. The major technical advances in miscanthus production achieved by OPTIMISC include: 1 demonstration that novel hybrids can out-yield the standard commercially grown genotype Miscanthus x giganteus; 2 characterisation of the interactions of physiological growth responses with environmental variation within and between sites; 3 quantification of biomass-quality-relevant traits; 4 abiotic stress tolerances of miscanthus genotypes; 5 selections suitable for production on marginal land; 6 field establishment methods for seeds using plugs; 7 evaluation of harvesting methods; and 8 quantification of energy used in densification (pellet technologies with a range of hybrids with differences in stem wall properties. End-user needs were addressed by demonstrating the potential of optimizing miscanthus biomass composition for the production of ethanol and biogas as well as for combustion. The costs and life-cycle assessment of seven miscanthus-based value chains, including small- and large-scale heat and power, ethanol, biogas and

  13. Progress on Optimizing Miscanthus Biomass Production for the European Bioeconomy: Results of the EU FP7 Project OPTIMISC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Iris; Clifton-Brown, John; Trindade, Luisa M; van der Linden, Gerard C; Schwarz, Kai-Uwe; Müller-Sämann, Karl; Anisimov, Alexander; Chen, C-L; Dolstra, Oene; Donnison, Iain S; Farrar, Kerrie; Fonteyne, Simon; Harding, Graham; Hastings, Astley; Huxley, Laurie M; Iqbal, Yasir; Khokhlov, Nikolay; Kiesel, Andreas; Lootens, Peter; Meyer, Heike; Mos, Michal; Muylle, Hilde; Nunn, Chris; Özgüven, Mensure; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; Schüle, Heinrich; Tarakanov, Ivan; van der Weijde, Tim; Wagner, Moritz; Xi, Qingguo; Kalinina, Olena

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the complete findings of the EU-funded research project OPTIMISC, which investigated methods to optimize the production and use of miscanthus biomass. Miscanthus bioenergy and bioproduct chains were investigated by trialing 15 diverse germplasm types in a range of climatic and soil environments across central Europe, Ukraine, Russia, and China. The abiotic stress tolerances of a wider panel of 100 germplasm types to drought, salinity, and low temperatures were measured in the laboratory and a field trial in Belgium. A small selection of germplasm types was evaluated for performance in grasslands on marginal sites in Germany and the UK. The growth traits underlying biomass yield and quality were measured to improve regional estimates of feedstock availability. Several potential high-value bioproducts were identified. The combined results provide recommendations to policymakers, growers and industry. The major technical advances in miscanthus production achieved by OPTIMISC include: (1) demonstration that novel hybrids can out-yield the standard commercially grown genotype Miscanthus x giganteus; (2) characterization of the interactions of physiological growth responses with environmental variation within and between sites; (3) quantification of biomass-quality-relevant traits; (4) abiotic stress tolerances of miscanthus genotypes; (5) selections suitable for production on marginal land; (6) field establishment methods for seeds using plugs; (7) evaluation of harvesting methods; and (8) quantification of energy used in densification (pellet) technologies with a range of hybrids with differences in stem wall properties. End-user needs were addressed by demonstrating the potential of optimizing miscanthus biomass composition for the production of ethanol and biogas as well as for combustion. The costs and life-cycle assessment of seven miscanthus-based value chains, including small- and large-scale heat and power, ethanol, biogas, and insulation

  14. Metal-air battery research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrin, E.; Cooper, J. F.

    1982-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Metal-air Battery Program during the calendar year 1981. The principal objective is to develop a refuelable battery as an automotive energy source for general-purpose electric vehicles and to conduct engineering demonstrations of its ability to provide vehicles with the range, acceleration, and rapid refueling capability of current internal-combustion-engine automobiles. The second objective is to develop an electrically-rechargeable battery for specific-mission electric vehicles, such as commuter vehicles, that can provide low-cost transportation. The development progression is to: (1) develop a mechanically rechargeable aluminum-air power cell using model electrodes, (2) develop cost-effective anode and cathode materials and structures as required to achieve reliability and efficiency goals, and to establish the economic competitiveness of this technology, and (3) develop and integrated propulsion system utilizing the power cell.

  15. Photovoltaic battery charging experience in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, S.T. Jr.

    1997-12-01

    With the turn of the century, people in remote areas still live without electricity. Conventional electrification will hardly reach the remaining 50% of the population of the Philippines in remote areas. With photovoltaic technology, the delivery of electricity to remote areas can be sustainable. Malalison island was chosen as a project site for electrification using photovoltaic technology. With the fragile balance of ecology and seasonal income in this island, the PV electrification proved to be a better option than conventional fossil based electrification. The Solar Battery Charging Station (SBCS) was used to suit the economic and geographical condition of the island. Results showed that the system can charge as many as three batteries in a day for an average fee of $0.54 per battery. Charging is measured by an ampere-hour counter to determine the exact amount of charge the battery received. The system was highly accepted by the local residents and the demand easily outgrew the system within four months. A technical, economic and social evaluation was done. A recovery period of seven years and five months is expected when competed with the conventional battery charging in the mainland. The technical, economic, institutional and social risks faced by the project were analyzed. Statistics showed that there is a potential of 920,000 households that can benefit from PV electrification in the Philippines. The data and experiences gained in this study are valuable in designing SBCS for remote unelectrified communities in the Philippines and other developing countries.

  16. Joint optimisation of arbitrage profits and battery life degradation for grid storage application of battery electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kies, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    To meet European decarbonisation targets by 2050, the electrification of the transport sector is mandatory. Most electric vehicles rely on lithium-ion batteries, because they have a higher energy/power density and longer life span compared to other practical batteries such as zinc-carbon batteries. Electric vehicles can thus provide energy storage to support the system integration of generation from highly variable renewable sources, such as wind and photovoltaics (PV). However, charging/discharging causes batteries to degradate progressively with reduced capacity. In this study, we investigate the impact of the joint optimisation of arbitrage revenue and battery degradation of electric vehicle batteries in a simplified setting, where historical prices allow for market participation of battery electric vehicle owners. It is shown that the joint optimisation of both leads to stronger gains then the sum of both optimisation strategies and that including battery degradation into the model avoids state of charges close to the maximum at times. It can be concluded that degradation is an important aspect to consider in power system models, which incorporate any kind of lithium-ion battery storage.

  17. Battery energy storage system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, C.S.P.; Evenblij, B.H.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to store electrical energy adds several interesting features to a ships distribution network, as silent power, peak shaving and a ride through in case of generator failure. Modern intrinsically safe Li-ion batteries bring these within reach. For this modern lithium battery applications

  18. Silicon Betavoltaic Batteries Structures

    OpenAIRE

    V.N. Murashev; S.A. Legotin; O.I. Rabinovich; O.R. Abdulaev; U.V. Osipov

    2015-01-01

    For low-power miniature energy creation sources the particular interest is nickel Ni63. This paper discusses the main types of betavoltaic battery structures with the prospects for industrial application using - isotope of nickel Ni63. It is shown that the prospects for improving the effective efficiency are planar multijunction betavoltaic batteries.

  19. Deep diode atomic battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, T.R.; Cline, H.E.

    1977-01-01

    A deep diode atomic battery is made from a bulk semiconductor crystal containing three-dimensional arrays of columnar and lamellar P-N junctions. The battery is powered by gamma rays and x-ray emission from a radioactive source embedded in the interior of the semiconductor crystal

  20. Lithium Battery Diaper Ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maridet, Claire; Taïeb, Alain

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of lithium battery diaper ulceration in a 16-month-old girl. Gastrointestinal and ear, nose, and throat lesions after lithium battery ingestion have been reported, but skin involvement has not been reported to our knowledge. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. High Performance Cathodes for Li-Air Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Yangchuan

    2013-08-22

    The overall objective of this project was to develop and fabricate a multifunctional cathode with high activities in acidic electrolytes for the oxygen reduction and evolution reactions for Li-air batteries. It should enable the development of Li-air batteries that operate on hybrid electrolytes, with acidic catholytes in particular. The use of hybrid electrolytes eliminates the problems of lithium reaction with water and of lithium oxide deposition in the cathode with sole organic electrolytes. The use of acid electrolytes can eliminate carbonate formation inside the cathode, making air breathing Li-air batteries viable. The tasks of the project were focused on developing hierarchical cathode structures and bifunctional catalysts. Development and testing of a prototype hybrid Li-air battery were also conducted. We succeeded in developing a hierarchical cathode structure and an effective bifunctional catalyst. We accomplished integrating the cathode with existing anode technologies and made a pouch prototype Li-air battery using sulfuric acid as catholyte. The battery cathodes contain a nanoscale multilayer structure made with carbon nanotubes and nanofibers. The structure was demonstrated to improve battery performance substantially. The bifunctional catalyst developed contains a conductive oxide support with ultra-low loading of platinum and iridium oxides. The work performed in this project has been documented in seven peer reviewed journal publications, five conference presentations, and filing of two U.S. patents. Technical details have been documented in the quarterly reports to DOE during the course of the project.

  2. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 80. Quarterly report, July--September, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This report contains information on petroleum enhanced recovery projects. In addition to project descriptions, contract numbers, principal investigators and project management information is included.

  3. Battery Pack Thermal Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-14

    This presentation describes the thermal design of battery packs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. A battery thermal management system essential for xEVs for both normal operation during daily driving (achieving life and performance) and off-normal operation during abuse conditions (achieving safety). The battery thermal management system needs to be optimized with the right tools for the lowest cost. Experimental tools such as NREL's isothermal battery calorimeter, thermal imaging, and heat transfer setups are needed. Thermal models and computer-aided engineering tools are useful for robust designs. During abuse conditions, designs should prevent cell-to-cell propagation in a module/pack (i.e., keep the fire small and manageable). NREL's battery ISC device can be used for evaluating the robustness of a module/pack to cell-to-cell propagation.

  4. Redox-assisted Li+-storage in lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qizhao; Wang Qing

    2016-01-01

    Interfacial charge transfer is the key kinetic process dictating the operation of lithium-ion battery. Redox-mediated charge propagations of the electronic (e − and h + ) and ionic species (Li + ) at the electrode–electrolyte interface have recently gained increasing attention for better exploitation of battery materials. This article briefly summarises the energetic and kinetic aspects of lithium-ion batteries, and reviews the recent progress on various redox-assisted Li + storage approaches. From molecular wiring to polymer wiring and from redox targeting to redox flow lithium battery, the role of redox mediators and the way of the redox species functioning in lithium-ion batteries are discussed. (topical review)

  5. Heat input control in coke ovens battery using artificial intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R.; Kannan, C.; Sistla, S.; Kumar, D. [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India)

    2005-07-01

    Controlled heating is very essential for producing coke with certain desired properties. Controlled heating involves controlling the heat input into the battery dynamically depending on the various process parameters like current battery temperature, the set point of battery temperature, moisture in coal, ambient temperature, coal fineness, cake breakage etc. An artificial intelligence (AI) based heat input control has been developed in which currently some of the above mentioned process parameters are considered and used for calculating the pause time which is applied between reversal during the heating process. The AI based model currently considers 3 input variables, temperature deviation history, current deviation of the battery temperature from the target temperature and the actual heat input into the battery. Work is in progress to control the standard deviation of coke end temperature using this model. The new system which has been developed in-house has replaced Hoogovens supplied model. 7 figs.

  6. Multikilowatt Bipolar Nickel/Hydrogen Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    High energy densities appear feasible. Nickel/hydrogen battery utilizing bipolar construction in common pressure vessel, addressing needs for multikilowatt storage for low-Earth-orbit applications, designed and 10-cell prototype model tested. Modular-concept-design 35-kW battery projected energy densities of 20 to 24 Wh/b (160 to 190 kj/kg) and 700 to 900 Wh/ft3 (90 to 110 MJ/m3) and incorporated significant improvements over state-of-the-art storage systems.

  7. The game changing 'Battery'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Full text: A new energy storage system with the potential to change the way the world utilises electricity has been developed in South Australia. “ With the capability and flexibility to store energy generated by solar or wind power or capture off-peak power for later use, the ZEN Freedom Power Bank offers benefits to householders, businesses and utilities,” ZEN Energy Systems chief executive officer Richard Turner said. He recently represented Australia by invitation at the International Cleantech Forum in San Fransisco and used the spotlight to feature the technology he believes is a world-first and the 'holy grail' of renewable energy. The system is comprised of hi-density storage lithium ion batteries linked to innovative 'active' battery balancing and control software, allowing both 'on-grid' and 'off-grid' management options. The electronic software has been designed in a joint development project with ZEN sister company, US-based Greensmith Energy Management Systems. The units will be assembled in Australia for supply to the local market as well as for export. “This technology enables low cost, large format 'dumb' lithium ion cells to perform as effectively as, or better than, high cost 'smart' cells, virtually halving the cost of the batteries or providing twice the storage capacity for the same cost,” Turner said. “The control software then enables centralised control of large communities of systems to manage peak demand or other issues within the public power grid. The base residential/business system will be capable of managing and storing 20 kilowatt hours of energy per day, which is the daily consumption of an average Australian home. For larger properties, additional 20kWh energy storage modules can be easily added,” Turner explained. “Reliance on the public grid is greatly reduced and it provides up to 24-hour energy backup if the grid goes down.” In the future, the Power Bank will be electric vehicle charge station-ready, allowing

  8. A review of flexible lithium-sulfur and analogous alkali metal-chalcogen rechargeable batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong-Jie; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-08-29

    Flexible energy storage systems are imperative for emerging flexible devices that are revolutionizing our life. Lithium-ion batteries, the current main power sources, are gradually approaching their theoretical limitation in terms of energy density. Therefore, alternative battery chemistries are urgently required for next-generation flexible power sources with high energy densities, low cost, and inherent safety. Flexible lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries and analogous flexible alkali metal-chalcogen batteries are of paramount interest owing to their high energy densities endowed by multielectron chemistry. In this review, we summarized the recent progress of flexible Li-S and analogous batteries. A brief introduction to flexible energy storage systems and general Li-S batteries has been provided first. Progress in flexible materials for flexible Li-S batteries are reviewed subsequently, with a detailed classification of flexible sulfur cathodes as those based on carbonaceous (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, and carbonized polymers) and composite (polymers and inorganics) materials and an overview of flexible lithium anodes and flexible solid-state electrolytes. Advancements in other flexible alkali metal-chalcogen batteries are then introduced. In the next part, we emphasize the importance of cell packaging and flexibility evaluation, and two special flexible battery prototypes of foldable and cable-type Li-S batteries are highlighted. In the end, existing challenges and future development of flexible Li-S and analogous alkali metal-chalcogen batteries are summarized and prospected.

  9. Project SQUID: Quarterly Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1950-07-01

    JET ENGINES. ( HYU -eÄl) Submitted by» J» Lemeleon^ New York University, No data on the operations of the glass-walled pulse jet have been...It is felt at HYU that a better understanding of the rela- tively simple phenomenon of the Rijke tube is, therefore, essential before headway...tnd combustion, KYTJ-7R6. Lerge amplitude ges vibration theory 19 HyU -7R7. Photo-ignition 1.4 NYU-7R8. Hydrocorbon Fleme Bends 67 i NYU

  10. Foam shell project: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overturf, G.; Reibold, B.; Cook, B.; Schroen-Carey, D.

    1994-01-01

    The authors report on their work to produce a foam shell target for two possible applications: (1) as liquid-layered cryogenic target on Omega Upgrade, and (2) as a back-up design for the NIF. This target consists of a roughly 1 mm diameter and 100 μm thick spherical low-density foam shell surrounding a central void. The foam will be slightly overfilled with liquid D 2 or DT, the overfilled excess being symmetrically distributed on the inside of the shell and supported by thermal gradient techniques. The outside of the foam is overcoated with full density polymer which must be topologically smooth. The technology for manufacturing this style of foam shell involves microencapsulation techniques and has been developed by the Japanese at ILE. Their goal is to determine whether this technology can be successfully adapted to meet US ICF objectives. To this end a program of foam shell development has been initiated at LLNL in collaboration with both the General Atomics DOE Target Fabrication Contract Corporation and the Target Fabrication Group at LLE

  11. FURTHER STUDIES ON UNCERTAINTY, CONFOUNDING, AND VALIDATION OF THE DOSES IN THE TECHA RIVER DOSIMETRY SYSTEM: Concluding Progress Report on the Second Phase of Project 1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2009-10-23

    This is the concluding Progress Report for Project 1.1 of the U.S./Russia Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER). An overwhelming majority of our work this period has been to complete our primary obligation of providing a new version of the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS), which we call TRDS-2009D; the D denotes deterministic. This system provides estimates of individual doses to members of the Extended Techa River Cohort (ETRC) and post-natal doses to members of the Techa River Offspring Cohort (TROC). The latter doses were calculated with use of the TRDS-2009D. The doses for the members of the ETRC have been made available to the American and Russian epidemiologists in September for their studies in deriving radiogenic risk factors. Doses for members of the TROC are being provided to European and Russian epidemiologists, as partial input for studies of risk in this population. Two of our original goals for the completion of this nine-year phase of Project 1.1 were not completed. These are completion of TRDS-2009MC, which was to be a Monte Carlo version of TRDS-2009 that could be used for more explicit analysis of the impact of uncertainty in doses on uncertainty in radiogenic risk factors. The second incomplete goal was to be the provision of household specific external doses (rather than village average). This task was far along, but had to be delayed due to the lead investigator’s work on consideration of a revised source term.

  12. Thermal management of batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbard, H. F.; Chen, C.-C.

    Control of the internal temperature during high rate discharge or charge can be a major design problem for large, high energy density battery systems. A systematic approach to the thermal management of such systems is described for different load profiles based on: thermodynamic calculations of internal heat generation; calorimetric measurements of heat flux; analytical and finite difference calculations of the internal temperature distribution; appropriate system designs for heat removal and temperature control. Examples are presented of thermal studies on large lead-acid batteries for electrical utility load levelling and nickel-zinc and lithium-iron sulphide batteries for electric vehicle propulsion.

  13. Research on Frequency Control of Grid Connected Sodium-Sulfur Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Fenglin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium sulfur battery is the only energy storage battery with large capacity and high energy density. It has a great application prospect in the peak load shifting of power grid, due to the lack of domestic research on it, it is urgent to evaluate the effect of grid-connection of sodium sulfur battery scientifically. According to the experimental data of the sodium sulfur battery project, the battery model is built. Compared with the real discharge curve, the error of the model simulation curve is small, so the battery model is effective. The AC / DC power grid model is built, and the rectifier and inverter control circuits are designed to simulate the scenario that the wind turbine and the battery are supplied to the passive load. The simulation results show that the grid-connected model of the sodium sulfur battery under the two control strategies can stabilize the larger frequency fluctuation.

  14. HST Replacement Battery Initial Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Stan; Waldo, Greg; Hollandsworth, Roger

    2009-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) original Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) batteries were replaced during the Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) after 19 years and one month on orbit.The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the findings from the assessment of the initial sm4 replacement battery performance. The batteries are described, the 0 C capacity is reviewed, descriptions, charts and tables reviewing the State Of Charge (SOC) Performance, the Battery Voltage Performance, the battery impedance, the minimum voltage performance, the thermal performance, the battery current, and the battery system recharge ratio,

  15. Polyanion-Type Electrode Materials for Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qiao; Bai, Ying; Wu, Feng; Wu, Chuan

    2017-03-01

    Sodium-ion batteries, representative members of the post-lithium-battery club, are very attractive and promising for large-scale energy storage applications. The increasing technological improvements in sodium-ion batteries (Na-ion batteries) are being driven by the demand for Na-based electrode materials that are resource-abundant, cost-effective, and long lasting. Polyanion-type compounds are among the most promising electrode materials for Na-ion batteries due to their stability, safety, and suitable operating voltages. The most representative polyanion-type electrode materials are Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 and NaTi 2 (PO 4 ) 3 for Na-based cathode and anode materials, respectively. Both show superior electrochemical properties and attractive prospects in terms of their development and application in Na-ion batteries. Carbonophosphate Na 3 MnCO 3 PO 4 and amorphous FePO 4 have also recently emerged and are contributing to further developing the research scope of polyanion-type Na-ion batteries. However, the typical low conductivity and relatively low capacity performance of such materials still restrict their development. This paper presents a brief review of the research progress of polyanion-type electrode materials for Na-ion batteries, summarizing recent accomplishments, highlighting emerging strategies, and discussing the remaining challenges of such systems.

  16. Polyanion‐Type Electrode Materials for Sodium‐Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qiao; Wu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Sodium‐ion batteries, representative members of the post‐lithium‐battery club, are very attractive and promising for large‐scale energy storage applications. The increasing technological improvements in sodium‐ion batteries (Na‐ion batteries) are being driven by the demand for Na‐based electrode materials that are resource‐abundant, cost‐effective, and long lasting. Polyanion‐type compounds are among the most promising electrode materials for Na‐ion batteries due to their stability, safety, and suitable operating voltages. The most representative polyanion‐type electrode materials are Na3V2(PO4)3 and NaTi2(PO4)3 for Na‐based cathode and anode materials, respectively. Both show superior electrochemical properties and attractive prospects in terms of their development and application in Na‐ion batteries. Carbonophosphate Na3MnCO3PO4 and amorphous FePO4 have also recently emerged and are contributing to further developing the research scope of polyanion‐type Na‐ion batteries. However, the typical low conductivity and relatively low capacity performance of such materials still restrict their development. This paper presents a brief review of the research progress of polyanion‐type electrode materials for Na‐ion batteries, summarizing recent accomplishments, highlighting emerging strategies, and discussing the remaining challenges of such systems. PMID:28331782

  17. Results of cycling with battery charging management; Resultats de cyclage avec gestion de charge au niveau batterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verniolle, J.; Fernandez, C. [European Space Research and Technology Centre, Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    1996-12-31

    In order to investigate the charging mode of an in-series assembly of lithium-carbon battery cells, a test has been performed on 5 commercial cells (18650) of 0.95 Ah nominal capacity. Results show that it is possible to cycle the cells at 80% of their output capacities during more than 2000 cycles. The management of the battery consists in maintaining a constant battery voltage as soon as a cell reaches its limit voltage during constant current charging. The initial dispersion of cells has been maintained practically constant during the cycling and the charge state of all cells has decreased progressively. (J.S.)

  18. Results of cycling with battery charging management; Resultats de cyclage avec gestion de charge au niveau batterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verniolle, J; Fernandez, C [European Space Research and Technology Centre, Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    In order to investigate the charging mode of an in-series assembly of lithium-carbon battery cells, a test has been performed on 5 commercial cells (18650) of 0.95 Ah nominal capacity. Results show that it is possible to cycle the cells at 80% of their output capacities during more than 2000 cycles. The management of the battery consists in maintaining a constant battery voltage as soon as a cell reaches its limit voltage during constant current charging. The initial dispersion of cells has been maintained practically constant during the cycling and the charge state of all cells has decreased progressively. (J.S.)

  19. Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program Administration and Habitat Projects, Annual Progress Report, Project Period: Program Administration: January 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997 Habitat Projects: January 1, 1997 - March 31, 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, Cecilia; Kuchenbecker, Lyle; Perry, Patty

    1998-10-28

    This agreement provided funding for operation and administration of the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program including staffing of an Executive Director, Program Planner, and clerical personnel. The contract covers maintaining program services, project planning, subwatershed plans (CRMP's), public involvement and education, interagency coordination/clearing house, monitoring, and technical support activities that have taken place in the Grande Ronde basin. Cost-share has been received from the Bureau of Reclamation and the Governor's Watershed Enhancement Board.

  20. Radiographic identification of ingested disc batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maves, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the hazards by posed the accidental ingestion and impaction of small disc batteries have been widely publicized in the medical and lay press. These foreign bodies, when lodged in the esophagus, leak a caustic solution of 26 to 45% sodium or potassium hydroxide which can cause a burn injury to the esophagus in a very short period of time. Because of the considerable clinical morbidity and mortality from this foreign body, it becomes imperative for the radiologist to quickly and accurately identify disc batteries on plain radiographs. This communication offers a series of radiologic signs important in the identification of disc batteries demonstrate a double density shadow due to the bilaminar structure of the battery. On lateral view, the edges of most disc batteries are round and again present a step-off at the junction of the cathode and anode. These findings are differentiated from the more common esophageal foreign body of a coin which does not have a double density on frontal projection, has a much sharper edge and no visible stepoff. (orig.)