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Sample records for baton rouge sacramento

  1. Energy Savings Calculations for Heat Island Reduction Strategies in Baton Rouge, Sacramento and Salt Lake City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.

    2000-03-01

    In 1997, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ''Heat Island Reduction Initiative'', to quantify the potential benefits of Heat Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., shade trees, reflective roofs, reflective pavements and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling energy use in buildings, lower the ambient air temperature and improve urban air quality in cities, and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Under this initiative, the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP) was created with the objective to investigate the potential of HIR strategies in residential and commercial buildings in three initial UHIPP cities: Baton Rouge, Sacramento and Salt Lake City. This paper summarizes our efforts to calculate the annual energy savings, peak power avoidance and annual C02 reduction of HIR strategies in the three initial cities. In this analysis, we focused on three building types that offer most savings potential: single-family residence, office and retail store. Each building type was characterized in detail by old or new construction and with a gas furnace or an electric heat pump. We defined prototypical building characteristics for each building type and simulated the impact of HIR strategies on building cooling and heating energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.IE model. Our simulations included the impact of (1) strategically-placed shade trees near buildings [direct effect], (2) use of high-albedo roofing material on building [direct effect], (3) combined strategies I and 2 [direct effect], (4) urban reforestation with high-albedo pavements and building surfaces [indirect effect] and (5) combined strategies 1, 2 and 4 [direct and indirect effects]. We then estimated the total roof area of air-conditioned buildings in each city using readily obtainable data to calculate the metropolitan-wide impact of HIR strategies. The results show, that in Baton Rouge, potential annual energy savings of $15M could be realized by

  2. Zoning, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the zoning boundaries of the East Baton Rouge Parish of the State of Louisiana. Zoning can be defined as the range of...

  3. Hydrography, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The Hydrography layer is an area geometry depicting the various water features that include the rivers, streams, creeks, lakes, etc of East Baton Rouge Parish.

  4. Lots, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This dataset depicts the polygon boundaries of the parcels of land within the Parish of East Baton Rouge, with the exception of those parcels that fall within the...

  5. City Limits, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the polygon boundaries of the incorporated city limits of Baton Rouge, Baker, and Zachary within East Baton Rouge...

  6. Energy savings for heat-island reduction strategies in Chicago and Houston (including updates for Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.

    2002-02-28

    In 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ''Heat Island Reduction Initiative'' to quantify the potential benefits of Heat-Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., shade trees, reflective roofs, reflective pavements and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling-energy use in buildings, lower the ambient air temperature and improve urban air quality in cities, and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Under this initiative, the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP) was created with the objective of investigating the potential of HIR strategies in residential and commercial buildings in three initial UHIPP cities: Baton Rouge, LA; Sacramento, CA; and Salt Lake City, UT. Later two other cities, Chicago, IL and Houston, TX were added to the UHIPP. In an earlier report we summarized our efforts to calculate the annual energy savings, peak power avoidance, and annual CO2 reduction obtainable from the introduction of HIR strategies in the initial three cities. This report summarizes the results of our study for Chicago and Houston. In this analysis, we focused on three building types that offer the highest potential savings: single-family residence, office and retail store. Each building type was characterized in detail by vintage and system type (i.e., old and new building constructions, and gas and electric heat). We used the prototypical building characteristics developed earlier for each building type and simulated the impact of HIR strategies on building cooling- and heating-energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.1E model. Our simulations included the impact of (1) strategically-placed shade trees near buildings [direct effect], (2) use of high-albedo roofing material on the building [direct effect], (3) urban reforestation with high-albedo pavements and building surfaces [indirect effect] and (4) combined strategies 1, 2, and 3 [direct and indirect effects]. We then estimated the total roof area of air

  7. Metro Council Districts, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the polygon boundaries of the twelve (12) Metropolitan Council Districts within the Parish of East Baton Rouge. The...

  8. Planning Districts, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the polygon boundaries of the 16 Planning Districts of the East Baton Rouge Parish of the State of Louisiana. The...

  9. Census Tracts & Block Groups, 2004, East Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the polygon boundaries of 107 semi-permanent census tracts and the census blocks within the Parish of East Baton Rouge....

  10. West Nile virus surveillance in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiser, Raquel M; Mackay, Andrew J; Roy, Alma; Yates, Mathew M; Vaeth, Randy H; Faget, Guy M; Folsom, Alex E; Augustine, William F; Wells, Roderick A; Perich, Michael J

    2007-03-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was detected for the first time in Louisiana in the fall of 2001. Surveillance data collected from East Baton Rouge Parish in 2002 were examined to establish baseline data on WNV activity, to support the current design of disease surveillance programs, and to target vector control efforts in the parish. The first indications of WNV activity were from a dead Northern Cardinal collected in February and from a live male cardinal sampled on 14 March. In mosquito pools, WNV was first detected on June 11. The onset of the first human case and the first detection of WNV in sentinel chickens occurred concurrently on June 24. The number of reported human cases and minimum infection rates in mosquitoes peaked in July. WNV prevalence in wild birds increased in late August and was highest in December. WNV-positive wild birds and mosquito pools were detected an average of 31 and 59 days in advance of the onset date of reported human cases, respectively, within 5 km of the residence of a human case. Antibodies to WNV were detected in sera from 7 (Northern Cardinal, House Sparrow, Northern Mockingbird, Blue Jay, Hermit Thrush, Yellow-rumped Warbler, and White-throated Sparrow) of the 42 wild bird species tested. Wild bird serology indicated WNV activity during the winter. Out of 18 mosquito species tested, the only species found positive for WNV was Culex quinquefasciatus, a result suggesting that this species was the primary epizootic/epidemic vector.

  11. Modeling complex aquifer systems: a case study in Baton Rouge, Louisiana (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hai V.; Tsai, Frank T.-C.

    2017-05-01

    This study targets two challenges in groundwater model development: grid generation and model calibration for aquifer systems that are fluvial in origin. Realistic hydrostratigraphy can be developed using a large quantity of well log data to capture the complexity of an aquifer system. However, generating valid groundwater model grids to be consistent with the complex hydrostratigraphy is non-trivial. Model calibration can also become intractable for groundwater models that intend to match the complex hydrostratigraphy. This study uses the Baton Rouge aquifer system, Louisiana (USA), to illustrate a technical need to cope with grid generation and model calibration issues. A grid generation technique is introduced based on indicator kriging to interpolate 583 wireline well logs in the Baton Rouge area to derive a hydrostratigraphic architecture with fine vertical discretization. Then, an upscaling procedure is developed to determine a groundwater model structure with 162 layers that captures facies geometry in the hydrostratigraphic architecture. To handle model calibration for such a large model, this study utilizes a derivative-free optimization method in parallel computing to complete parameter estimation in a few months. The constructed hydrostratigraphy indicates the Baton Rouge aquifer system is fluvial in origin. The calibration result indicates hydraulic conductivity for Miocene sands is higher than that for Pliocene to Holocene sands and indicates the Baton Rouge fault and the Denham Springs-Scotlandville fault to be low-permeability leaky aquifers. The modeling result shows significantly low groundwater level in the "2,000-foot" sand due to heavy pumping, indicating potential groundwater upward flow from the "2,400-foot" sand.

  12. Monitoring of fogwater chemistry in the gulf coast urban industrial corridor: Baton Rouge (louisiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, S; Ravikrishna, R; Kommalapati, R R; Valsaraj, K T

    2005-11-01

    Seventeen fog events were sampled in Baton Rouge, Louisiana during 2002-2004 as part of characterizing wet deposition by fogwater in the heavily industrialized corridor along the Louisiana Gulf Coast in the United States. These samples were analyzed for chemical characteristics such as pH, conductivity, total organic and inorganic carbon, total metals and the principal ion concentrations. The dominant ionic species in all samples were NH4+, NO3-, Cl- and SO4(2-). The pH of the fogwater sampled had a mean value of 6.7 with two cases of acidic pH of 4.7. Rainwater and fogwater pH were similar in this region. The acidity of fogwater was a result of NO3- but partly offset by high NH4+. The measured gaseous SO2 accounted for a small percentage of the observed sulfate concentration, indicating additional gas-to-particle conversion of SO2 to sulfate in fogwater. The gaseous NOx accounted for most of the dissolved nitrate and nitrite concentration in fogwater. The high chloride concentration was attributable to the degradation of chlorinated organics in the atmosphere. The metal composition was traced directly to soil-derived aerosol precursors in the air. The major metals observed in fogwater were Na, K, Ca, Fe, Al, Mg and Zn. Of these Na, K, Ca and Mg were predominant with mean concentrations > 100 microM. Al, Fe and Zn were present in the samples, at mean concentrations pesticide (atrazine) was also observed in fogwater, representing the contribution from the agricultural activities nearby.

  13. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey, Mississippi and Florida airborne survey: Baton Rouge quadrangle, Louisiana and Mississippi. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    The Baton Rouge quadrangle covers 8250 square miles in the Mississippi River delta area. The area overlies thick sections of the Gulf of Mexico Basin. Surficial exposures are dominated by Recent and Pleistocene sediment. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. A total of 87 uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly in this report. None were considered significant and all appear to relate to cultural features. Magnetic data appears to be in agreement with existing structural interpretations of the area

  14. Lessons learned from the post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on August 28 and September 18, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, Gulf States Utilities, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The purpose of the exercise was to examine the post-emergency roles, responsibilities, and resources of utility, State, local, Federal and insurance organizations in response to a hypothetical accident at the River Bend Station in Louisiana resulting in a significant release of radiation to the environment. In pursuit of this goal, five major focus areas were addressed: (1) ingestion pathway response; (2) reentry, relocation and return; (3) decontamination of recovery; (4) indemnification of financial losses; and (5) deactivation of the emergency response. This report documents the lessons learned from that exercise

  15. Environmental Magnetism and Geochemical Properties of Urban Soils from Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Implications for Anthropogenic Pollution Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, C.; Taylor, D.; Schramm, W.; Day, L.; Vedrines, H.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic properties (susceptibility and SIRM) of urban soils have been shown to be very effective tracers of anthropogenic pollution. They provide a highly sensitive and easily obtainable measurement of the compositional changes of the mineral and chemical composition in soils. The main objective of this study is to detect the presence of magnetic anthropogenic particles related to environmental pollution by measuring the magnetic signature of soil samples and relating it to heavy metal concentrations obtained by XRF analysis. For this large-scale study carried out over the past eight years, we sampled an area of 260 km2 in and around Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with a total of 257 sites, 5140 individual susceptibility measurements obtained with a hand-held field probe, and 514 discrete samples for laboratory analysis of SIRM, susceptibility, and XRF analysis. In this area rural, industrial, metropolitan, and suburban settings exist in close proximity and allow for the direct comparison of results without significant changes in pedological, climatic, or the bedrock, which influence the magnetic properties. Contour maps and histograms indicate a strong correlation between the magnetic susceptibility, SIRM, and the environmental setting, with the mode of the susceptibility shifting from 0.006x10-3 SI in rural areas to 0.273x10-3 SI in the industrialized parts of the city. The industrialized western area of Baton Rouge especially shows significantly enhanced magnetic properties. For selected sites we determined the concentrations of Mo, Zr, Sr, Ba, U, Rb, Th, Pb, Au, Se, As, Hg, Zn, W, Cu, Cr, Ni, Co, Fe, and Mn with an XRF scanner. A linear correlation between magnetic susceptibility and U, Ba, Cr, Pb, Th, and Zn is statistically significant and suggests that anthropogenic input of heavy metals has a significant influence on magnetic properties. Detailed rock magnetic, geochemical, and statistical analysis will be presented and used, together with soil maps and land

  16. Evaluation of potential hazard exposure resulting from DOE waste treatment and disposal at Rollins Environmental Services, Baton Rouge, LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The equivalent dose rate to populations potentially exposed to wastes shipped to Rollins Environmental Services, Baton Rouge, LA from Oak Ridge and Savannah River Operations of the Department of Energy was estimated. Where definitive information necessary to the estimation of a dose rate was unavailable, bounding assumptions were employed to ensure an overestimate of the actual dose rate experienced by the potentially exposed population. On this basis, it was estimated that a total of about 3.85 million pounds of waste was shipped from these DOE operations to Rollins with a maximum combined total activity of about 0.048 Curies. Populations near the Rollins site could potentially be exposed to the radionuclides in the DOE wastes via the air pathway after incineration of the DOE wastes or by migration from the soil after landfill disposal. AIRDOS was used to estimate the dose rate after incineration. RESRAD was used to estimate the dose rate after landfill disposal. Calculations were conducted with the estimated radioactive specie distribution in the wastes and, as a test of the sensitivity of the results to the estimated distribution, with the entire activity associated with individual radioactive species such as Cs-137, Ba-137, Sr-90, Co-60, U-234, U-235 and U-238. With a given total activity, the dose rates to nearby individuals were dominated by the uranium species

  17. Sequence Stratigraphic Characterization of Upper Miocene through Pleistocene Siliciclastic Aquifer Sediments, Baton Rouge Area, Southeastern Louisiana Gulf Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, E. L.; Hanor, J. S.; Tsai, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    Saltwater encroachment northward into freshwater sands of the Baton Rouge aquifer system, southeastern Louisiana, poses a serious environmental threat to this metropolitan municipal and industrial water source. The aquifer system consists of an 850-m thick succession of interbedded, unconsolidated south-dipping siliciclastic sandy units and mudstones of Upper Miocene through Pleistocene age. A geology-based understanding of the connectivity, geometry and depositional setting of this aquifer system is necessary for developing strategies to halt or control saltwater intrusion. Seventy five digitized spontaneous potential - resistivity logs for boreholes in the area provided data for interpreting environments of deposition, for correlating sand-rich and mudstone-rich zones, and for identifying periods of low and high rates of sediment aggradation. The sands have complex geometries representing braided stream, meandering channel fill, floodplain, levee, and crevasse splay facies. A high degree of lateral discontinuity of the sands makes visual correlation of units difficult. Therefore an assessment of lithology-depth relations was made by determining the frequency of occurrence of mudstone at discrete 0.15 m depth intervals in borehole logs along five 40-km long transects parallel to the strike of the aquifer units. Percent occurrence of mudstone was graphed as a function of depth using a 41-point centered moving average for smoothing, and mudstone-poor, sand-rich trends were correlated between transects. Ten major sand cycles were identified. Individual aquifer units are interpreted to be complex zones of amalgamated sand bodies deposited during times of low aggradation associated with sea-level falling-stages and lowstand system tracts. The amalgamation created a high degree of connectivity which results in these zones behaving as single hydrologic units. Mudstone-rich aquitard sequences are interpreted to be flood-plain sediments deposited during times of high

  18. Water-quality characteristics of urban storm runoff at selected sites in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, February 2006 through November 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, C. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Water samples were collected at three watersheds in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, during February 2006 through November 2009 for continued evaluation of urban storm runoff. The watersheds represented land uses characterized predominantly as established commercial, industrial, and residential. The following water-quality data are reported: physical and chemical-related properties, fecal coliform, nutrients, trace elements, and organic compounds. Results of water-quality analyses enabled calculation of event-mean concentrations and estimated annual contaminant loads and yields of storm runoff from nonpoint sources for 12 water-quality properties and constituents. Lead met or exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Level of 15 micrograms per liter for drinking water standards in 4 of 14 samples. Low level concentrations of mercury were detected in all 14 samples, and half were two to four times above the reporting limit of 0.02 micrograms per liter. The average dissolved phosphorus concentrations from each land use were two to four times the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency criterion of 0.05 milligrams per liter. Diazinon was detected in one sample at a concentration of 0.2 micrograms per liter. In the residential watershed, the largest at 216 acres, contaminant loads for 5 of the 12 water-quality properties and constituents were highest, with 4 of these being nutrients. The industrial watershed, 97 acres, had the highest contaminant loads for 6 of the 12 water-quality properties and constituents with 3 of these being metals, which is indicative of the type of land use. Zinc had the highest metal load (155 pounds per year) in the industrial watershed, compared to 36 pounds per year in the residential watershed, and 32 pounds per year in the established commercial watershed. The industrial watershed had the highest yields for 8 of the 12 water-quality properties and constituents, whereas the established commercial watershed had

  19. Louisiana Ground-Water Map No. 22: Generalized Potentiometric Surface of the Amite Aquifer and the "2,800-Foot" Sand of the Baton Rouge Area in Southeastern Louisiana, June-August 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendick, Robert B.

    2007-01-01

    The Amite aquifer and the '2,800-foot' sand of the Baton Rouge area (hereafter referred to as the '2,800-foot' sand) are principal sources of fresh ground water in southeastern Louisiana. Both the Amite aquifer and the '2,800-foot' sand are part of the Jasper equivalent aquifer system. The Amite aquifer is heavily pumped in the Bogalusa area, and the '2,800-foot' sand is one of the most heavily pumped aquifers in East Baton Rouge Parish. The Baton Rouge fault zone, which acts as a barrier to flow, trends approximately west-northwest from a point just south of The Rigolets through southern West Baton Rouge Parish, and is the approximate southern limit of freshwater in the aquifers. For the purposes of this report, freshwater is defined as water having less than 250 milligrams per liter (mg/L) of chloride, and most of the water withdrawals described in this report were assumed to be fresh. In 2005, about 18 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) was withdrawn from the Amite aquifer, primarily for public-supply use (8.4 Mgal/d) and industrial use (9.6 Mgal/d). During this same period, about 32 Mgal/d was withdrawn from the '2,800-foot' sand, primarily for public-supply use (13 Mgal/d) and industrial use (19 Mgal/d). Public-supply and industrial withdrawals from the Amite aquifer and the '2,800-foot' sand are listed in table 1. According to data from the Louisiana State Census Data Center, some of the largest population increases in the State during the period 1990 to 2000 occurred in St. Tammany (32.4 percent), Livingston (30.2 percent), and Tangipahoa (17.4 percent) Parishes. These population increases have been accompanied by increased withdrawals of ground water during the same period: 40 percent in St. Tammany Parish, 63 percent in Livingston Parish, and 35 percent in Tangipahoa Parish. An increase in population in these parishes is expected from population displacement due to damages from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita crossing the Louisiana coast in August and September

  20. The influence of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the inflammatory cytokine response and protein expression in A549 cells exposed to PM2.5 collected in the Baton Rouge-Port Allen industrial corridor of Southeastern Louisiana in 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Brian; Owens, John Wesley

    2014-03-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita hit the coast of Louisiana in 2005 and killed more than 2000 people. The two storms resulted in a significant spike in particulate matter (PM2.5) levels across the state of Louisiana. This report focuses on PM2.5 samples collected in 2005 from two monitoring sites in the neighboring cities of Baton Rouge and Port Allen, Louisiana. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) revealed the presence of PM2.5-adsorbed representative and Fenton-active transition metals. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses revealed the presence of 23 PAH compounds. Endotoxins were also detected. Metals and endotoxins were extracted with water. PAH were extracted with dichloromethane. In order to assess cytotoxicity, aqueous PM2.5 extracts were introduced to A549 Human Epithelial Lung Carcinoma Cells. Results indicated decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, with an LC50 of 235 µg/ml and 250 µg/ml, respectively, for the two sites featured here. Endotoxins alone were not cytotoxic. The concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and released LDH activity increased following exposure of A549 cells to aqueous PM2.5 extracts. Fluorescence microscopy revealed apoptotic and necrotic cell death mechanisms. ELISA revealed increased secretion of primary pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α. Global PCR gene expression revealed up-regulation of proteins associated with the cytokine storm; e.g. interleukins, chemokines, and TNF-α. Global antibody microarray was consistent with an inflammatory response, with up-regulation of cytokines involved in the down-field activation of the caspase cascade and kinase pathways. The up-regulation of metal-redox sensitive transcription factors, NF-κβ and AP-1, is consistent with a cell death mechanism initiated by Fenton-active transition metal redox catalysis.

  1. Passing the baton

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    It was not only in South Korea that batons were being passed last week. While the cream of the world’s athletes were competing in the World Athletics Championships, the cream of the world’s accelerator scientists were on their way to San Sebastian in Spain for the International Particle Accelerator Conference.  One of them was carrying a rather special baton for a handover of a different kind.   When Fermilab’s Vladimir Shiltsev handed the high-energy frontier baton to CERN’s Mike Lamont on Tuesday, it marked the end of an era: a time to look back on the phenomenal contribution the Tevatron has made to particle physics over its 25-year operational lifetime, and the great contribution Fermilab has made over that period to global collaboration in particle physics. There’s always a lot of emotion involved in passing the baton. In athletics, it’s the triumph of wining or the heartbreak of losing. But for this special baton, the...

  2. 76 FR 60733 - Safety Zone; Mississippi River, Mile Marker 230 to Mile Marker 234, in the Vicinity of Baton...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    .... Basis and Purpose The Captain of the Port New Orleans has implemented a safety zone from mile marker 230... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Mississippi River, Mile Marker 230 to Mile Marker 234, in the Vicinity of Baton Rouge, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule...

  3. Inhotim. Tunga. True Rouge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Maya Monteiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the art installation True Rouge, by the artist Tunga, from its assembly which is in Inhotim. Here there are some of the recurrent procedures, and individualities, which the artist employs in this work, in order to locate it in the corpus of the artist’s work. For this reason, beyond the formal analysis of the work itself, we studied some relationships between the triad artist - work - museum.

  4. Inhotim. Tunga. True Rouge.

    OpenAIRE

    André Maya Monteiro

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the art installation True Rouge, by the artist Tunga, from its assembly which is in Inhotim. Here there are some of the recurrent procedures, and individualities, which the artist employs in this work, in order to locate it in the corpus of the artist’s work. For this reason, beyond the formal analysis of the work itself, we studied some relationships between the triad artist - work - museum.

  5. Baton twirling on an international stage

    CERN Document Server

    Stephanie McClellan

    2013-01-01

    There aren’t many people who can throw a baton in the air, do a backhand spring and catch it with the grace of a dancer. Well, Julie Haffner from the CERN Press Office can. Baton twirling started as her hobby but soon became a passion - leading her team to win the International Baton Twirling Cup.    Gex Twirling Club performing their winning number at the 2013 International Baton Twirling Cup. (Image: Véronique Bellour). There is no telling when or where people will find their passion. For Julie Haffner, it was when she followed her cousin to a baton twirling class at the age of 10. Since that fortuitous day, she has committed herself to the sport and competed on international stages. Very close to rhythmic gymnastics, baton twirling requires skilful coordination and teamwork. Julie’s performances combine the precision of baton manipulation, the grace of a dancer and the strength of a gymnast. The first year in which she competed with the Gex Twirlin...

  6. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, EAST BATON ROUGE PARISH, LOUISIANA (AND INCORPORATED AREAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  7. 33 CFR 110.195 - Mississippi River below Baton Rouge, LA, including South and Southwest Passes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... anchorage is a line parallel to the nearest bank 1,000 feet from the water's edge into the river as measured... anchorage is a line parallel to the nearest bank 400 feet from the water's edge into the river as measured... line parallel to the nearest bank 400 feet from the water's edge into the river as measured from the...

  8. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, WEST BATON ROUGE PARISH, LA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  9. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, EAST BATON ROUGE PARISH, LOUISIANA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  10. TIGER/Line Shapefile, 2013, county, West Baton Rouge Parish, LA, Current Address Ranges Relationship File

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The TIGER/Line shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  11. 75 FR 6570 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Louisiana; Baton Rouge 1-Hour...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... from John S. Seitz, Director, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, entitled ``Reasonable... Environmental Law Clinic on behalf of the Louisiana Environmental Action Network (LEAN) (hereinafter LEAN... submitted by LCA, and to adverse comments received from LEAN. LCA submitted the following additional...

  12. Paremad filmid 3 : Moulin Rouge! / Jaanus Noormets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Noormets, Jaanus

    2006-01-01

    Muusikafilm "Moulin Rouge" : režissöör Baz Luhrmann : peaosades Nicole Kidman, Ewan McGregor : Ameerika Ühendriigid - Austraalia 2001. Lisatud nimekiri "25 paremat muusikali", mille koostas inglise telekanal Channel 4 2003.a.

  13. The baton passes to the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Held in the picturesque mountain setting of La Thuile in the Italian Alps, the international conference “Rencontres de Moriond” showed how the baton of discovery in the field of high-energy physics is definitely passing to the LHC experiments. In the well-known spirit of Moriond, the conference was an important platform for young students to present their latest results. The Higgs boson might well be within reach this year and the jet-quenching phenomenon might reveal new things soon…   New physics discussed over the Italian Alps during the "Les rencontres de Moriond" conference.  (Photographer: Paul Gerritsen. Adapted by Katarina Anthony) Known by physicists as one of the most important winter conferences, “Les rencontres de Moriond” are actually a series of conferences spread over two weeks covering the main themes of electroweak interactions, QCD and high-energy interactions, cosmology, gravitation, astropar...

  14. Automatic summary evaluation. Roug e modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Ermakova, Liana

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays there is no common approach to summary. Manual evaluation is expensive and subjective and it is not applicable in real time or on a large corpus. Widely used approaches involve little human efforts and assume comparison with a set of reference summaries. We tried to overcome drawbacks of existing metrics such as ignoring redundant information, synonyms and sentence ordering. Our method combines edit distance, ROUGE-SU and trigrams similarity measure enriched by weights for differe...

  15. A Cultural Resources Survey of Arlington Revetment and LSU Berm Levee Improvement Item, East Baton Rouge Parish Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    maize agriculture, and exhibited specific pottery types such as Plaquemine Brushed, L’Eau Noire Incised, and Harrison Bayou Incised (Quimby 1951...with over 50 works of biography, travel, and fiction published from 1921 to 1972. Examples of her titles in addition to River Road were: Cresent

  16. 2010 NOAA Near Infrared Ortho-rectified Mosaic of Louisiana: Mississippi River - Baton Rouge to Southwest Pass (NODC Accession 0104414)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  17. 2010 NOAA Ortho-rectified Mosaic from Color Aerial Imagery of MISSISSIPPI RIVER - BATON ROUGE TO LAPLACE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative of MISSISSIPPI RIVER -...

  18. 2010 NOAA Ortho-rectified Mosaic from Color Aerial Imagery of MISSISSIPPI RIVER - BATON ROUGE TO LAPLACE (NODC Accession 0074374)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative of MISSISSIPPI RIVER -...

  19. 2010 NOAA Near Infrared Ortho-rectified Mosaic of Louisiana: Mississippi River - Baton Rouge to Southwest Pass

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  20. 1997 Sacramento Inland Floodplain Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes data collected in October 1997 over the Sacramento, CA, floodplain. Laser mapping uses a pulsed laser ranging system mounted onboard an...

  1. Immigration and emigration in the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, many estimates of rates of movement are indirect and incomplete, and there is little empirical knowledge of the factors affecting immigration and emigration. I studied intensively a local population of Sinai Baton Blue butterflies in a discrete habitat patch. The study lasted the entire adult flight period, and involved almost ...

  2. Monitoring of the endemic Sinai Baton Blue butterfly Pseudophilotes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results of the monitoring of the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly in its stronghold of Farsh Shoeib on Gebel Safsafa in the St Katherine Protectorate between 2004-9 is analysed to compare them with the detailed study of Mike James in 2002-3. The butterfly appears to have a three-year population cycle, with its population crashing ...

  3. seasonal dynamics of the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BioMAP

    The Sinai Baton Blue butterfly (Pseudophilotes sinaicus Nakamura) has been described as one of the smallest butterflies in the world (Larsen 1990). It occurs only in the high mountain region of the St. Katherine's Protectorate in Sinai, one of Egypt's most recently designated. Protected Areas, and its newest UNESCO World ...

  4. Stress fracture of the ulna in an adolescent baton twirler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fines, Bonnie P.; Stacy, Scott G. [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago Hospitals, IL (United States)

    2002-02-01

    Upper extremity stress fractures are rare, with the majority of those reported occurring in the ulna. The location of the fracture is influenced by the type of activity and mechanism of injury with which it is associated. We report the first case of a mid-ulnar stress fracture in a baton twirler due to chronic torsional stress. This patient was referred to our Orthopedic Oncology clinic with a preliminary diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. (orig.)

  5. 77 FR 51604 - Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... November 2011. In response to pre- trial motions, Ms. Ieng Thirith, the Khmer Rouge's Minister of Social... question the ECCC's ability to deliver justice. In late 2008, at the request of the United States and other... Center of the University of California Berkeley conducted a survey in December 2010 across 125 Cambodian...

  6. Public Opinion Poll on Community Priorities: Sacramento

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra Health Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to measure public perceptions, opinions and priorities as they pertain to youth issues in Sacramento for the purposes of further developing public and private youth programming and public policy in the Sacramento region. By presenting a "statistically reliable" profile of public opinion on youth issues,…

  7. 33 CFR 117.189 - Sacramento River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sacramento River. 117.189 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.189 Sacramento River. (a) The draws of each bridge from Isleton to American River junction shall open on signal from May 1 through...

  8. NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) true color (RGB) orthorectified mosaic image tiles, Baton Rouge to LaPlace, Louisiana 2010 (NODC Accession 0074374)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative of the Mississippi...

  9. Underwater Cultural Resources Survey for Contraction Dikes at Red Eye Crossing, Mississippi River, Baton Rouge to the Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Distrito de Manchack, showing the project vicinity ............................ 19 Figure 7. [ca. 1810] Excerpt from Mississippi River: Rio lberville to...downriver. The group then traveled across the Gulf of Mexico to Vera Cruz , reaching that destination in September 1543. Following these disastrous...wreaking devastation on the farms of the new settlers. Governor Esteban Mir6 established an emergency fund for the Acadlans, "to succor them with corn and

  10. NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) infrared (IR) orthorectified mosaic image tiles, Baton Rouge to Southwest Pass, Louisiana 2010 (NODC Accession 0104414)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  11. NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) true color (RGB) orthorectified mosaic image tiles, Baton Rouge to Southwest Pass, Louisiana 2010 (NCEI Accession 0103945)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  12. Supplemental Cultural Resources Investigations and Site Testing for the Pointe Coupee to Arbroth Levee Enlargement and Seepage Control Project, West Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    probable lipstick tube cap, was recovered; it was stamped ’CHARLES OF THE RITZ / RITZ CARLTON " surrounding "NEW YORK* Three arms-related metal artifacts...houses. This pattern suggests a change in social, political, or religious concepts . For example, Gibson (1978) postulates that those Coles Creek sites that

  13. Physico-chemical study of some areas of fundamental significance to biophysics. Annual report, 1975--1976. [Chemistry Dept. , Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGlynn, S.P.

    1976-05-15

    Lists of titles published, symposia attended, laboratory guests, departing personnel, and equipment purchased are presented in the first part of this report. It is to be emphasized that completed work already published is mentioned only by title. Reports are provided for research recently completed or in progress in the following areas: Rydberg spectroscopy, intermediate-coupling model for linear molecules, atomic correlation lines, electronic structure of dicarbonyl compounds, absorption and emission characteristics of highly polar aromatics, valence-bond description of metal--anion interaction, and matrix elements of mono-excited Slater determinants constructed from axial spin-orbitals. (RWR)

  14. The Barriers to Millennials Visiting Rouge Urban National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Ramsay

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Intensified urbanization has led to more populated cities and less green spaces which are vital to community health, wellbeing and conservation. Rouge Urban National Park in Toronto has recently become Canada’s first urban national park. This park is ideally suited to the millennial population, offering outdoor recreation and green space that this growing market generally desires. There is, however, a lack of research into visitor motivations to urban parks and more specifically millennial motivations. Findings from 280 quantitative surveys found three main barriers to visiting the Urban National Park: distance, transportation, and awareness. The lack of public transport combined with road congestion and fewer millennials owning cars creates issues with accessibility. Poor branding and knowledge through electronic media creates low awareness within a demographic market so tied to technology.

  15. The natural history of the Sinai Baton Blue: the smallest butterfly in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge of the ecology and life history of endangered species is necessary for their successful conservation. In this chapter, I provide a detailed account of the natural history of the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly. I review current knowledge of the genus Pseudophilotes, and explore the butterfly's phylogeny. This emphasises ...

  16. the influence of ants on the distribution of the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BioMAP

    Interactions among species in a tri-trophic system: the influence of ants on the distribution of the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly. Mike James. School of Biology, Nottingham University, Nottingham NG7 2RD. ABSTRACT. Metapopulation dynamics is now so widely used to describe the distribution and abundance of species living ...

  17. Effects of Baton Usage on College Musicians' Perceptions of Ensemble Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvey, Brian A.; Wacker, Aaron T.; Felder, Logan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of baton usage on college musicians' perceptions of ensemble performance. Two conductors were videotaped while conducting a 1-minute excerpt from either a technical ("Pathfinder of Panama," John Philip Sousa) or lyrical ("Seal Lullaby," Eric Whitacre) piece of concert…

  18. Sacramento, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Sacramento, CA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  19. 78 FR 53270 - Revision of Air Quality Implementation Plan; California; Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Quality Implementation Plan; California; Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District... to the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD or District) portion of the..., Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District, Rule 214 (Federal New Source Review), Rule 203...

  20. Timber resource statistics for the Sacramento resource area of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen L. Waddell; Patricia M. Bassett

    1997-01-01

    This report is a summary of timber resource statistics for the Sacramento Resource Area of California, which includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Glenn, Lake, Napa, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, Sierra, Sutter, Tehama, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. Data were collected as part of a statewide multiresource inventory. The inventory sampled private and public lands except...

  1. Base Closure and Realignment Act (BRAC) Cleanup Plan, Sacramento Army Depot, Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    deal.BeetStaffWirtier one point, Sacrampnto developer The Sacramento Army Depot is "I came and said This is thlMarvin " Buzz " Oafea talked to a a...class of persistent, board-spectrum insecticides, that linger in the environment and accumulate in the food chain. Among them are DDT, aldrin , dieldrin

  2. Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) Report, Sacramento Army Depot, Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    REFER TO NAP #) Map Number: 48197R EPA ID Number: CAD983592080 Facility: BUZZ OATES ENTERPRIZES Address: 8615 ELDER CREEK RD City: SACRAMENTO Zip...pesticides such as DDT, Aldrin -Dieldrin, and the herbicide 2,4,5-T. 2. Request Office of Legal Counsel verify the exemption from CERCLA for routine

  3. The Killing Fields on TV: A Critical Analysis of Network Coverage of Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ted J., III; Grassmick, David E.

    In an effort to determine the nature of American network television news coverage of the Khmer Rouge rule in Cambodia, a study examined the television evening news from April 16, 1975, the date on which the Lon Nol government first offered to capitulate to the Khmer Rouge, through January 8, 1979, when news of the fall of Phnom Penh to the…

  4. Final environmental assessment: Sacramento Energy Service Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The Sacramento Area Office (SAO) of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) needs to increase the security of operations, to eliminate overcrowding at the current leased location of the existing facilities, to provide for future growth, to improve efficiency, and to reduce operating costs. The proposed action is to construct an approximate 40,000-square foot building and adjacent parking lot with a Solar Powered Electric Vehicle Charging Station installed to promote use of energy efficient transportation. As funding becomes available and technology develops, additional innovative energy-efficient measures will be incorporated into the building. For example the proposed construction of the Solar Powered Electric Vehicle Charging.

  5. Mars Express met l'Europe en orbite autour de la Planete rouge

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Apres une nuit sans sommeil, le Centre europeen d'operations spatiales (ESOC) de Darmstadt, en Allemagne, a annonce la nouvelle, jeudi 25decembre au matin: la sonde Mars Express a bien ete "capturee" par la gravite de la Planete rouge, tandis que le petit atterrisseur Beagle-2 tentait de se poser dans la plaine d'Isidis Planitia" (1 page).

  6. Use of nootkatone as a senescence indicator for Rouge La Toma Cv. grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biolatto, Andrea; Sancho, Ana M; Cantet, Rodolfo J C; Güemes, Daniel R; Pensel, Norma A

    2002-08-14

    The objective of this research was to study the usefulness of nootkatone as a senescence indicator for Rouge La Toma cv. grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.), simulating different treatments that included the normal postharvest handling of citrus fruits: temperature conditioning, cold storage, shipment periods to overseas markets such as Japan and the U.S., marketing conditions, and storage at nonchilling temperature (control treatments). The highest nootkatone levels, determined by GLC-MS analyses, were detected in fruits subjected to control treatments. No significant differences were observed in nootkatone levels between treatments either with or without temperature conditioning prior to the start of the cold storage. Levels of nootkatone increased throughout time for all assayed treatments. The linear regressions of nootkatone levels showed correlation coefficients of 0.80 and 0.83 with storage time (29 and 42 days, respectively). Therefore, nootkatone appears to be a good indicator of senescence for Rouge La Toma grapefruit.

  7. L'exploitation des algues rouges Gelidium dans la région d'El ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L'évaluation de l'évolution de la production d'algues rouges Gelidium sesquipedale dans 16 stations de la région d'El-Jadida a été entreprise dans le but d'élucider sa variation spatio-temporelle durant deux années d'étude 2011 et 2012. Les résultats montrent une variation de la production entre les différentes stations ...

  8. Parental styles in second generation effects of genocide stemming from the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Nigel P; Om, Chariya; Kim, Thida; Vorn, Sin

    2011-11-01

    This study examined the impact of parental styles on second generation effects of trauma among adolescent offspring of survivors of the Khmer Rouge (KR) genocide in Cambodia. Two hundred high school students completed measures addressing their parents' trauma stemming from the KR regime, parental styles (role reversing, overprotective), depression and anxiety. Parents' role reversing parental style and mothers' overprotective parenting were shown to mediate the impact of their trauma symptoms on the child's depression and anxiety. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  9. 77 FR 47535 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District... final action to approve revisions to the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). This revision concerns the definition of volatile...

  10. 77 FR 47581 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District... approve revisions to the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). This revision concerns the definition of volatile organic...

  11. [The workshop la Petite Rouge inc., a ressource in a rural environnement.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslongchamps, N

    1981-01-01

    The Atelier de la Petite Rouge Inc. is a resource established in a rural zone of the Ouataouais region in 1980. Up until July 1981, thanks to temporary subsidiaries, it offered services to sixty old people living to eight foster homes. These foster families are attached to the Pierre Janet psychiatric hospital centre in Hull and take people with mental health problems. The objective of the workshop is to encourage social réintégration of these people into their new milieu. The workshop is currently negociating a permanent funding with the Ministry of Social Affairs, as well as an independent status in order to preserve its non-institutional character.

  12. Distributed control of multi-robot teams: Cooperative baton passing task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, L.E.

    1998-11-01

    This research addresses the problem of achieving fault tolerant cooperation within small- to medium-sized teams of heterogeneous mobile robots. The author describes a novel behavior-based, fully distributed architecture, called ALLIANCE, that utilizes adaptive action selection to achieve fault tolerant cooperative control. The robots in this architecture possess a variety of high-level functions that they can perform during a mission, and must at all times select an appropriate action based on the requirements of the mission, the activities of other robots, the current environmental conditions, and their own internal states. Since such cooperative teams often work in dynamic and unpredictable environments, the software architecture allows the team members to respond robustly and reliably to unexpected environmental changes and modifications in the robot team that may occur due to mechanical failure, the learning of new skills, or the addition or removal of robots from the team by human intervention. After presenting ALLIANCE, they describe the implementation of this architecture on a team of physical mobile robots performing a cooperative baton passing task. These experiments illustrate the ability of ALLIANCE to achieve adaptive, fault-tolerant cooperative control amidst dynamic changes during the task.

  13. Le Rouge et le Noir e Vie de Henry Brulard, elementi di contaminazione narrativa e autobiografica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Perego

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes a comparative and text-oriented analysis of Vie de Henry Brulard and Le Rouge et le Noir and it wants to illustrate how elements of the Novel are evoked and recalled in the autobiographical writing by textual occurrences, following three themes: the presence of the father, the language, the erotic aspect. This analysis put under scrutiny how these interconnections between Fiction and Autobiography work, by showing how some autobiographical echoes that were firstly transposed in the Novel are re-elaborated and proposed again in the Autobiography after the contamination with Fiction. Thus, throughout the process of re-elaboration of mnemonic materials, memories could lose their bond with the historic event, which instead bring to the fore revealing signs of Stendhal's personal truth.

  14. Le roman sans événements : 'Oreille rouge' d’Éric Chevillard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maziarczyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though absurd humour and surreal scenes are at first sight the characteristic elements of Eric Chevillard’s style, it is an oversimplification to consider his novels as mere literary jokes. The appeal of this literature stems from the light and witty manner in which it transforms outdated novelistic conventions, deconstructs classic narrative strategies and refuses to fulfill the reader’s expectations. This article seeks to analyse minimal narration, an unusual mode of writing for Chevillard, in Oreille rouge: just like narrative excess, typical of his other works, it results in dematerialisation of the plot and redefinition of the novelistic structure.

  15. Belleville rouge, Belleville noir, Belleville rose: The Complex Identity of a Parisian quartier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Stott

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Parisian quartier of Belleville has long been the subject of scholarly literature and popular culture due to its colourful history and diverse population. Its symbolic boundaries extend beyond the geographical limits imposed by its administrative demarcation. Myths abound as to the extent of its rebellious past, its contemporary image as a melting pot and its prevalence as a décor for the noir genre. In this article a three-tiered categorisation of Belleville is adopted which corresponds to various representations of the suburb in literature, popular culture and from the perspective of its inhabitants. Belleville rouge reflects the quartier’s revolutionary past and the late 20th century struggle associated with its physical metamorphosis. Belleville noir focusses on the quartier’s criminal face, as it is depicted in Parisian film and roman noir and as it exists in reality. Belleville rose highlights the pleasures of the quartier: its cosmopolitan character whose representation verges at times on utopian.    In his Malaussène series (1985-1995, writer and former resident Daniel Pennac portrays Belleville as a unique blend of rouge, noir and rose. This fusion of fairy tale, detective fiction, myth and reality establishes a complex Bellevillois identity distinct from other contemporary representations. The article concludes that it is impossible to associate a single identity with Belleville. The quartier’s contemporary face is inextricably linked to its past, the memory of which is preserved by its inhabitants and by social and literary commentators such as Pennac. In keeping with historian Pierre Nora’s concept of cultural memory, Pennac thus assumes the role of guardian of Belleville’s cultural memory in the face of the quartier’s perpetual evolution.

  16. Adapting Impressionism: Hou Hsiao-hsien’s Le Voyage du ballon rouge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A Durham

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2007 release of a film directly inspired by a beloved French children’s movie made fifty years earlier would have been surprising enough without the additional fact that the adaptation was the work of a Taiwanese filmmaker who had never before filmed outside Asia and who spoke no French.  Hou hsiao-hsien’s Le Voyage du ballon rouge is not only a startling original film in its own right but it is also richly illustrative of the value of broadening our understanding of the intricate dialogic relations among texts.  Hou’s reinterpretation of Lamorisse’s film intersects not only with his own recurrent stylistic preferences and prior work as a filmmaker but also with a variety of self-reflective art works ranging from Chinese puppet shows to the statues in the Luxembourg garden to scenes from an internal remake of Le Ballon rouge to a visit to the Musée d’Orsay to see Félix Vallotton’s “Le Ballon.” In keeping with the extraordinary focus within the film on lighting and the color red, Hou’s homage to Lamorisse is all about allusion, reflections, and impressions.  Appropriately, one of the works it evokes is the Claude Monet painting, “Impression, soleil levant,” whose reddish sun looks strikingly like a red balloon floating through the sky and whose title named a movement which has not only endured but expanded to include analogous styles in a variety of visual arts and other media.

  17. 33 CFR 162.205 - Suisun Bay, San Joaquin River, Sacramento River, and connecting waters, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suisun Bay, San Joaquin River, Sacramento River, and connecting waters, CA. 162.205 Section 162.205 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.205 Suisun Bay, San Joaquin River, Sacramento River, and connecting waters, CA...

  18. Urban Sacramento oak reforestation: 17 years and 20,000 trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarah Wyly; Erika Teach

    2015-01-01

    The Sacramento Tree Foundation (Tree Foundation), a nonprofit organization operating in the greater Sacramento California region, has been engaged in planting native oak trees in urban and suburban areas since 1998. Through an effort to provide efficient access to tree mitigation services and support compliance with local tree protection ordinances, more than 20,038...

  19. 78 FR 10589 - Revision of Air Quality Implementation Plan; California; Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 [EPA-R09-OAR-2013-0064; FRL-9777-7] Revision of Air Quality Implementation Plan; California; Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District... Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD or District) portion of the California State...

  20. 78 FR 10554 - Interim Final Determination To Stay and Defer Sanctions, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 [EPA-R09-OAR-2013-0064; FRL-9777-8] Interim Final Determination To Stay and Defer Sanctions, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District AGENCY... on a proposed approval of a revision to the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District...

  1. The Middle Sacramento River: Human Impacts on Physical and Ecological Processes Along a Meandering River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koll Buer; Dave Forwalter; Mike Kissel; Bill Stohlert

    1989-01-01

    Native plant and wildlife communities along Northern California's middle Sacramento River (Red Bluff to Colusa) originally adapted to a changing pattern of erosion and deposition across a broad meander belt. The erosion-deposition process was in balance, with the river alternately building and eroding terraces. Human-induced changes to the Sacramento River,...

  2. 77 FR 47581 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Mojave Desert, Northern Sierra, Sacramento...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... Sierra, Sacramento Metropolitan and San Diego Air Pollution Agencies AGENCY: Environmental Protection...), Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD) and San Diego County Air Pollution Control...Rulemaking Portal: www.regulations.gov . Follow the on- line instructions. 2. Email: [email protected

  3. Exploring communication of traumatic experiences from Khmer Rouge genocide survivors to their offspring: In-depth interviews with both generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melander, Marianne; Dahlblom, Kjerstin; Jegannathan, Bhoomikumar; Kullgren, Gunnar

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic events experienced by parents who have survived genocide influence mental health among their offspring. This study aims at exploring how the communication of traumatic events between Khmer Rouge survivors and their offspring was perceived by both generations. Qualitative interviews were performed with six Khmer Rouge survivors and with six young people representing the second generation and were analysed using a content analysis approach. Parents felt that informing their children was important to instill gratitude for living a better life and to empower them. Among children, this was met with empathy but sometimes also disbelief and at times they blamed their parents for being too submissive. The study discloses the complexity, pros and cons of intergenerational sharing of trauma. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Exploring SWOT discharge algorithm accuracy on the Sacramento River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, M. T.; Yoon, Y.; Rodriguez, E.; Minear, J. T.; Andreadis, K.; Pavelsky, T. M.; Alsdorf, D. E.; Smith, L. C.; Bales, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Scheduled for launch in 2019, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission will utilize a Ka-band radar interferometer to measure river heights, widths, and slopes, globally, as well as characterize storage change in lakes and ocean surface dynamics with a spatial resolution ranging from 10 - 70 m, with temporal revisits on the order of a week. A discharge algorithm has been formulated to solve the inverse problem of characterizing river bathymetry and the roughness coefficient from SWOT observations. The algorithm uses a Bayesian Markov Chain estimation approach, treats rivers as sets of interconnected reaches (typically 5 km - 10 km in length), and produces best estimates of river bathymetry, roughness coefficient, and discharge, given SWOT observables. AirSWOT (the airborne version of SWOT) consists of a radar interferometer similar to SWOT, but mounted aboard an aircraft. AirSWOT spatial resolution will range from 1 - 35 m. In early 2013, AirSWOT will perform several flights over the Sacramento River, capturing river height, width, and slope at several different flow conditions. The Sacramento River presents an excellent target given that the river includes some stretches heavily affected by management (diversions, bypasses, etc.). AirSWOT measurements will be used to validate SWOT observation performance, but are also a unique opportunity for testing and demonstrating the capabilities and limitations of the discharge algorithm. This study uses HEC-RAS simulations of the Sacramento River to first, characterize expected discharge algorithm accuracy on the Sacramento River, and second to explore the required AirSWOT measurements needed to perform a successful inverse with the discharge algorithm. We focus on several specific research questions affecting algorithm performance: 1) To what extent do lateral inflows confound algorithm performance? We examine the ~100 km stretch of river from Colusa, CA to the Yolo Bypass, and investigate how the

  5. 103 L'exploitation des algues rouges Gelidium dans la région d'El ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PR BOKO

    L'algue rouge Gelidium forme le long de la côte atlantique marocaine des champs relativement importants. La majeure partie des .... en agar-agar. C'est une phycocolloïde formée de polysaccharide hydrosoluble, très demandée sur le marché extérieur ...... Elle a fourni tout le matériel, le champ étant un domaine public. La.

  6. Etude de l'effet de l'amodiaquine sur les globules rouges infectés ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ces images sont ensuite utilisées pour étudier l'interaction du médicament avec les globules rouges en fonction des concentrations, en ayant recours à des techniques d'analyse multivariée telles que la classification hiérarchique, la méthode des k-moyennes et l'analyse en composante principale. Les résultats obtenus ...

  7. Radioactive hydrogeochemical processes in the Chihuahua-Sacramento Basin, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burillo, J. C.; Reyes C, M.; Montero C, M. E.; Renteria V, M.; Herrera P, E. F.; Reyes, I.; Espino, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    The Chihuahua Basin is divided by its morphology into three main sub basins: Chihuahua-Sacramento sub basin, Chihuahua Dam sub basin and Chuviscar River sub basin. In the aquifers at the Sacramento sub basin, specific concentrations of uranium in groundwater range from 460 to 1260 Bq / m 3 . The presence of strata and sandy clay lenses with radiometric anomalies in the N W of Chihuahua Valley was confirmed by a litostatigraphic study and gamma spectrometry measurements of drill cuttings. High uranium activity values found in the water of some deep wells may correspond to the presence of fine material bodies of carbonaceous material, possible forming pa leo-sediment of flooding or pa leo-soils. It is suggested that these clay horizons are uranyl ion collectors. Uranyl may suffer a reduction process by organic material. Furthermore the groundwater, depending on its ph and Eh, oxidizes and re-dissolves uranium. The hydrogeochemical behavior of San Marcos dam and the N W Valley area is the subject of studies that should help to clarify the origin of the radioactive elements and their relationships with other pollutants in the watershed. (Author)

  8. Radioactive hydrogeochemical processes in the Chihuahua-Sacramento Basin, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burillo, J. C.; Reyes C, M.; Montero C, M. E.; Renteria V, M.; Herrera P, E. F. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S. C., Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Reyes, I.; Espino, M. S., E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Facultad de Ingenieria, Nuevo Campus Universitario, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    The Chihuahua Basin is divided by its morphology into three main sub basins: Chihuahua-Sacramento sub basin, Chihuahua Dam sub basin and Chuviscar River sub basin. In the aquifers at the Sacramento sub basin, specific concentrations of uranium in groundwater range from 460 to 1260 Bq / m{sup 3}. The presence of strata and sandy clay lenses with radiometric anomalies in the N W of Chihuahua Valley was confirmed by a litostatigraphic study and gamma spectrometry measurements of drill cuttings. High uranium activity values found in the water of some deep wells may correspond to the presence of fine material bodies of carbonaceous material, possible forming pa leo-sediment of flooding or pa leo-soils. It is suggested that these clay horizons are uranyl ion collectors. Uranyl may suffer a reduction process by organic material. Furthermore the groundwater, depending on its ph and Eh, oxidizes and re-dissolves uranium. The hydrogeochemical behavior of San Marcos dam and the N W Valley area is the subject of studies that should help to clarify the origin of the radioactive elements and their relationships with other pollutants in the watershed. (Author)

  9. Biology, History, Status and Conservation of Sacramento Perch, Archoplites interruptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick K Crain

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of the biology of Sacramento perch (Archoplites interruptus based mainly on recent studies of their distribution, ecology, physiology, and genetics. The Sacramento perch is the only member of the family Centrarchidae that is endemic to California. It is most closely related to the rock basses (Ambloplites spp. and is thought to have split from its eastern cousins during the Middle Miocene Period (15.5 to 5.2 million years ago, MYA. Their native range includes the Central Valley, Pajaro and Salinas rivers, tributaries to the San Francisco Estuary (e.g., Alameda Creek, and Clear Lake (Lake County. Today, they are most likely extirpated from all of their native range. They are known to persist in 28 waters outside their native range: 17 in California, nine in Nevada, and one each in Utah and Colorado. Disappearance from their native range coincided with massive changes to aquatic habitats in the Central Valley and with the introduction of alien species, including other centrarchids. Unfortunately, many populations established outside their native range have also disappeared and are continuing to do so.

  10. Metabolic diversity of the heterotrophic microorganisms and potential link to pollution of the Rouge River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiquia, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    The heterotrophic microbial communities of the Rouge River were tracked using Biolog Ecoplates to understand the metabolic diversity at different temporal and spatial scales, and potential link to river pollution. Site less impacted by anthrophogenic sources (site 1), showed markedly lower metabolic diversity. The only substrates that were utilized in the water samples were carbohydrates. Sites more impacted by anthrophogenic sources (sites 8 and 9) showed higher metabolic diversity. Higher functional diversity was linked to the physico-chemical and biological properties of the water samples (i.e. higher concentrations of DO, DOC, chlorophyll, and bacterial density). Biolog analysis was found to be useful in differentiating metabolic diversity between microbial communities; in determining factors that most influence the separation of communities; and in identifying which substrates were most utilized by the communities. It can also be used as an effective ecological indicator of changes in river function attributable to urbanization and pollution. - BIOLOG differentiated metabolic diversity between microbial communities and can be used as ecological indicator of river function attributable to urbanization and pollution.

  11. Bivariate Drought Analysis Using Streamflow Reconstruction with Tree Ring Indices in the Sacramento Basin, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewon Kwak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term streamflow data are vital for analysis of hydrological droughts. Using an artificial neural network (ANN model and nine tree-ring indices, this study reconstructed the annual streamflow of the Sacramento River for the period from 1560 to 1871. Using the reconstructed streamflow data, the copula method was used for bivariate drought analysis, deriving a hydrological drought return period plot for the Sacramento River basin. Results showed strong correlation among drought characteristics, and the drought with a 20-year return period (17.2 million acre-feet (MAF per year in the Sacramento River basin could be considered a critical level of drought for water shortages.

  12. The Sacramento Dependency Drug Court: development and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, Sharon M; Young, Nancy K; Moore, Toni; DiPirro-Beard, Sharon

    2007-05-01

    Dependency Drug Courts (DDCs) are a growing method of addressing the functional status and reunification success of families involved in child welfare and affected by substance use disorders. Despite widespread interest in DDCs, few evaluations have appeared in the literature to help inform the discussion about their effectiveness. This article provides a description of various types of DDCs and reports 24-month reunification rates from the Sacramento DDC. Results indicated that DDC participants had higher rates of treatment participation than did comparison participants. In addition, at 24 months, 42% of the DDC children had reunified versus 27.2% of the comparison children. There were no differences in treatment completion or child reunification rates by parent's primary drug problem. Rates of recidivism were extremely low for both the DDC and comparison groups and did not differ significantly. The results of the present study are encouraging and suggest that rigorous, controlled studies are merited to further evaluate the effectiveness of DDCs.

  13. 75 FR 40726 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District and South Coast Air Quality Management District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD) and South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD...

  14. 76 FR 28942 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District... Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD or District) portion of the California State... proposed modifications by adding a definition for ``Federal Major Modifications'' which incorporates the...

  15. 78 FR 66058 - Habitat Conservation Plan for South Sacramento County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ..., transportation facilities, surface and groundwater delivery facilities, water treatment facilities, solid waste sanitation facilities, public facilities, recreation facilities, energy utility facilities, aggregate mining... Water Agency, and a South Sacramento Habitat Conservation Plan Joint Powers Authority) for activities...

  16. L'algue rouge Eucheuma spinosum possibilités d'exploitation et de culture aux Antilles

    OpenAIRE

    Barbaroux, Olivier; Perez, René; Dreno, Jean-paul

    1984-01-01

    L'industrie française des algues rouges qui occupe en 1983 le 2e rang mondial, extrait des polysaccharides appelés carraghénanes de certaines espèces d'algues telles que Chondrus crispus, Gigartina stellata, G. skotsbergi, Eucheuma cottonii, E. spinosum, Iridea sp. La principale propriété de ces carraghénanes est de réagir avec les composants du lait pour donner du gel à fine structure, d'ou leur utilisation dans tous les dérivés actuels du lait (pâtisserie, flans, crèmes, glaces, fromages, l...

  17. 77 FR 76472 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... Freeway, Texas City, TX 77591, telephone: (409) 986-6700; DoubleTree by Hilton Baton Rouge, 4964 Constitution Avenue, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, telephone: (225) 925-1005. Tuesday, January 15, 2013; Hilton Garden..., January 16, 2013; Hilton Garden Inn Orange Beach Beachfront, 23092 Perdido Beach Boulevard, Orange Beach...

  18. A Colônia do Sacramento, o "Jardim da América"

    OpenAIRE

    Possomai, Paulo César

    2004-01-01

    A semelhança entre o clima da Colônia do Sacramento e o de Portugal levou vários cronistas a retratar os arredores da fortaleza como um jardim europeu. Entretan­to, o desenvolvimento agrícola em Sacramento não foi espontâneo, mas fruto da ação do governador, que proibiu a caça ao gado selvagem, principal recurso econômico da região, aos colonos que não cultivassem seus lotes. The resemblance between the climate of the Colônia do Sacramento and that of Portugal led many chroniclers to portr...

  19. Distribution and geochemistry of selected trace elements in the Sacramento River near Keswick Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antweiler, Ronald C.; Taylor, Howard E.; Alpers, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of heavy metals from the Iron Mountain Mines (IMM) Superfund site on the upper Sacramento River is examined using data from water and bed sediment samples collected during 1996-97. Relative to surrounding waters, aluminum, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, thallium, zinc and the rare-earth elements (REE) were all present in high concentrations in effluent from Spring Creek Reservoir (SCR), which enters into the Sacramento River in the Spring Creek Arm of Keswick Reservoir. SCR was constructed in part to regulate the flow of acidic, metal-rich waters draining the IMM Superfund site. Although virtually all of these metals exist in SCR in the dissolved form, upon entering Keswick Reservoir they at least partially converted via precipitation and/or adsorption to the particulate phase. In spite of this, few of the metals settled out; instead the vast majority was transported colloidally down the Sacramento River at least to Bend Bridge, 67. km from Keswick Dam.The geochemical influence of IMM on the upper Sacramento River was variable, chiefly dependent on the flow of Spring Creek. Although the average flow of the Sacramento River at Keswick Dam is 250m 3/s (cubic meters per second), even flows as low as 0.3m 3/s from Spring Creek were sufficient to account for more than 15% of the metals loading at Bend Bridge, and these proportions increased with increasing Spring Creek flow.The dissolved proportion of the total bioavailable load was dependent on the element but steadily decreased for all metals, from near 100% in Spring Creek to values (for some elements) of less than 1% at Bend Bridge; failure to account for the suspended sediment load in assessments of the effect of metals transport in the Sacramento River can result in estimates which are low by as much as a factor of 100. ?? 2012.

  20. Determination of trace elements in eyeshadow, face powder and rouge make-up cosmetics by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanias, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    Some trace elements exist in cosmetics due to the mineral origin of their raw materials and there is no information about their concentration levels in these products. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to determine the elements: cerium, cesium, europium, hafnium, lanthanum, lutetium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, sodium, tantalum, terbium, tungsten and ytterbium in eyeshadow, face powder and rouge make-up cosmetic products from the Greek market. According to the results, a wide range of values was found between the three examined cosmetics as well as between the different samples belonging to the same kind of cosmetics. This probably could be attributed to the various manufacturers of the analyzed samples. Moreover, the use of neutron activation analysis as a suitable routine method is discussed for the control of some elements which must not be contained in cosmetics. (author)

  1. De quelques retours de M. Chat : Historiographie politique dans Le fond de l’air est rouge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Hamers

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dans son film de montage Le fond de l’air est rouge, Chris Marker compile un ensemble de représentations hétérogènes issues d’une décennie de luttes (ouvrières, étudiantes, indépendantistes, etc. dans le monde. Par l’assemblage de ces images, le cinéaste déploie une historiographie a priori mélancolique et défaitiste. Le présent texte entend dépasser cette interprétation unilatérale de la critique politique des images pour y identifier les traces d’un retour chronique à l’espoir militant.

  2. Estimating Natural Flows into the California's Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, G.; Kadir, T.; Chung, F. I.

    2014-12-01

    Natural flows into the California's Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta under predevelopment vegetative conditions, if and when reconstructed, can serve as a useful guide to establish minimum stream flows, restoration targets, and a basis for assessing impacts of global warming in the Bay-Delta System. Daily simulations of natural Delta flows for the period 1922-2009 were obtained using precipitation-snowmelt-runoff models for the upper watersheds that are tributaries to the California's Central Valley, and then routing the water through the Central Valley floor area using a modified version of the California Central Valley Groundwater-Surface Water Simulation Model (C2VSIM) for water years 1922 through 2009. Daily stream inflows from all major upper watersheds were simulated using 23 Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) models. Historical precipitation and reference evapotranspiration data were extracted from the SIMETAW2 with the 4km gridded meteorological data. The Historical natural and riparian vegetation distributions were compiled from several pre-1900 historical vegetation maps of the Central Valley. Wetlands were dynamically simulated using interconnected lakes. Flows overtopping natural levees were simulated using flow rating curves. New estimates of potential evapotranspiration from different vegetative classes under natural conditions were also used. Sensitivity simulations demonstrate that evapotranspiration estimates, native vegetation distribution, surface-groundwater interaction parameters, extinction depth for groundwater uptake, and other physical processes play a key role in the magnitude and timing of upstream flows arriving at the Delta. Findings contradict a common misconception that the magnitude of inflows to the Delta under natural vegetative conditions is greater than those under the historical agricultural and urban land use development. The developed models also enable to study the impacts of global warming by modifying meteorological and

  3. 75 FR 10814 - Proposed Programmatic Safe Harbor Agreement for the Sacramento River Conservation Area Forum in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... Conservation Area Forum in Shasta, Tehama, Butte, Glenn, Colusa, Yolo, and Sutter Counties, CA AGENCY: Fish and... application for an Enhancement of Survival Permit from the Sacramento River Conservation Area Forum (applicant... Conservation Area Forum under the Act (16 U.S.C 1531 et seq.). The permit application includes a proposed Safe...

  4. 77 FR 47536 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Mojave Desert, Northern Sierra, Sacramento...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... San Diego Air Pollution Agencies AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final...), Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD) and San Diego County Air Pollution Control...) September 2008, 5. ``Control Techniques Guidelines for Miscellaneous Metal and Plastic Parts Coatings,'' EPA...

  5. Riparian valley oak (Quercus lobata) forest restoration on the middle Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Thomas Griggs; Gregory H. Golet

    2002-01-01

    In 1989 The Nature Conservancy initiated a riparian horticultural restoration program on the floodplain of the middle Sacramento River, California. At nearly all restoration sites Valley oak (Quercus lobata Nee) comprised a major component of the planting design. Valley oaks are a keystone tree species of lowland floodplain habitats in California...

  6. 76 FR 20242 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan; Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... Management District (SMAQMD), relate to the control of NO X emissions from the air pollution control landfill... NO X limitation satisfying RACT for the air pollution control landfill gas flare at the Kiefer... landfill gas flare at the Kiefer Landfill in Sacramento, California. We are approving portions of a Permit...

  7. Determinants of establishment survival for residential trees in Sacramento County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara A. Roman; John J. Battles; Joe R. McBride

    2014-01-01

    Urban forests can provide ecosystem services that motivate tree planting campaigns, and tree survival is a key element of program success and projected benefits. We studied survival in a shade tree give-away program in Sacramento, CA, monitoring a cohort of young trees for five years on single-family residential properties. We used conditional inference trees to...

  8. 77 FR 45575 - Foreign-Trade Zone 143-West Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... and distribution of carbon fiber using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor. Grafil's subzone and... Sacramento, CA Application for Extended Production Authority; Subzone 143D, Grafil Inc. (Carbon Fiber... to choose the duty rate during customs entry procedures that apply to carbon fiber (duty free) for...

  9. 75 FR 81642 - Long-Term North to South Water Transfer Program, Sacramento County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... amount of water for transfer, method to make water available, and price. The EIS/EIR will identify... Bureau of Reclamation Long-Term North to South Water Transfer Program, Sacramento County, CA AGENCY... joint EIS/EIR to analyze the effects of water transfers from water agencies in northern California to...

  10. Local-scale invasion pathways and small founder numbers in introduced Sacramento pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus grandis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew P. Kinziger; Rodney J. Nakamoto; Bret C. Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Given the general pattern of invasions with severe ecological consequences commonly resulting from multiple introductions of large numbers of individuals on the intercontinental scale, we explored an example of a highly successful, ecologically significant invader introduced over a short distance, possibly via minimal propagule pressure. The Sacramento pikeminnow (

  11. Area of Concern (AOC) 314 Verification Survey at Former McClellan AFB, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-31

    vegetation located within a triangle of three taxiways on a Sacramento County Airport controlled area (see Figure 1). Although existing records do not show...potentially affected analysis. c. Gamma Walkover Survey: The survey team used the Scionix Model 76BRS76/3M-E1-X 3x3-inch thallium -doped sodium

  12. 75 FR 20598 - Public Buildings Service; Prospect Island, Sacramento Delta, Solano County, CA; Transfer of Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION [Wildlife Order 188; 9-I-CA-1674] Public Buildings Service; Prospect Island, Sacramento Delta, Solano County, CA; Transfer of Property Pursuant to section 2 of Public Law 537, 80th Congress, approved May 19, 1948 (16 U.S.C. 667c), notice is hereby given that: 1. The...

  13. Pesticides in surface water measured at select sites in the Sacramento River basin, California, 1996-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, Joseph L.

    2000-01-01

    Pesticides were measured in one urban stream, one agricultural stream, one site on the Sacramento River, and one large flood control channel over a period of 18 months during 1996-1998. All sites were located within the Sacramento River Basin of California. Measurements were made on 83 pesticides or pesticide transformation products by either gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet light spectrometry. Some pesticides were detected frequently at the agricultural stream and downstream in the Sacramento River and at the flood control channel of the Sacramento River. These were pesticides related to rice farming (molinate, carbofuran, thiobencarb, and bentazon); herbicides used both agriculturally or for roadside maintenance (diuron, simazine, and metolachlor); or insecticides used on orchards and row corps (diazinon and chlorpyrifos). No pesticide concen-trations above enforceable water quality criteria were measured at either the agricultural site or the Sacramento River sites. In contrast to the agricul-tural site, insecticides used for household, lawn, or garden maintenance were the most frequently detected pesticides at the urban site. Diazinon, an organophosphate insecticide, exceeded recom-mended criteria for the protection of aquatic life, and the diazinon levels were frequently above known toxic levels for certain zooplankton species at the urban site. Because of the low discharge of the urban stream, pesticide concentrations were greatly diluted upon mixing with Sacramento River water.

  14. Metals transport in the Sacramento River, California, 1996-1997; Volume 2: Interpretation of metal loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpers, Charles N.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Taylor, Howard E.; Dileanis, Peter D.; Domagalski, Joseph L.

    2000-01-01

    Metals transport in the Sacramento River, northern California, from July 1996 to June 1997 was evaluated in terms of metal loads from samples of water and suspended colloids that were collected on up to six occasions at 13 sites in the Sacramento River Basin. Four of the sampling periods (July, September, and November 1996; and May-June 1997) took place during relatively low-flow conditions and two sampling periods (December 1996 and January 1997) took place during high-flow and flooding conditions, respectively. This study focused primarily on loads of cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc, with secondary emphasis on loads of aluminum, iron, and mercury.Trace metals in acid mine drainage from abandoned and inactive base-metal mines, in the East and West Shasta mining districts, enter the Sacramento River system in predominantly dissolved form into both Shasta Lake and Keswick Reservoir. The proportion of trace metals that was dissolved (as opposed to colloidal) in samples collected at Shasta and Keswick dams decreased in the order zinc ≈ cadmium > copper > lead. At four sampling sites on the Sacramento River--71, 256, 360, and 412 kilometers downstream of Keswick Dam--trace-metal loads were predominantly colloidal during both high- and low-flow conditions. The proportion of total cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc loads transported to San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta estuary (referred to as the Bay-Delta) that is associated with mineralized areas was estimated by dividing loads at Keswick Dam by loads 412 kilometers downstream at Freeport and the Yolo Bypass. During moderately high flows in December 1996, mineralization-related total (dissolved + colloidal) trace-metal loads to the Bay-Delta (as a percentage of total loads measured downstream) were cadmium, 87 percent; copper, 35 percent; lead, 10 percent; and zinc, 51 percent. During flood conditions in January 1997 loads were cadmium, 22 percent; copper, 11 percent; lead, 2 percent; and zinc, 15

  15. Chemical quality of ground water in the central Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelman, Ronald P.

    1978-01-01

    The study area includes about 1,200 square miles in the central Sacramento Valley adjacent to the Sacramento River from Knights Landing to Los Molinos, Calif. With recent agricultural development in the area, additional land has been brought under irrigation from land which had been used primarily for dry farming and grazing. This report documents the chemical character of the ground water prior to water-level declines resulting from extensive pumping for irrigation or to changes caused by extensive use of imported surface water. Chemical analyses of samples from 209 wells show that most of the area is underlain by ground water of a quality suitable for most agricultural and domestic purposes. Most of the water sampled in the area has dissolved-solids concentrations ranging from 100 to 700 milligrams per liter. The general water types for the area are a calcium magnesium bicarbonate or magnesium calcium bicarbonate and there are negligible amounts of toxic trace elements. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory H. Golet; David L. Brown; Melinda Carlson; Thomas Gardali; Adam Henderson; Karen D. Holl; Christine A. Howell; Marcel Holyoak; John W. Hunt; G. Mathias Kondolf; Eric W. Larsen; Ryan A. Luster; Charles McClain; Charles Nelson; Seth Paine

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale ecosystem restoration projects seldom undergo comprehensive evaluation to determine project effectiveness. Consequently, there are missed opportunities for learning and strategy refinement. Before our study, monitoring information from California’s middle Sacramento River had not been synthesized, despite restoration having been ongoing since 1989. Our assessment was based on the development and application of 36 quantitative ecological indicators. These indicators were used to ch...

  17. The Colonia do Sacramento as seen by travelers (18th Century)

    OpenAIRE

    Possamai, Paulo César; UFPel

    2013-01-01

    Due to the policy adopted by the Portuguese crown to protect their colonies from the ambition of other powers, we have few descriptions of Colonia do Sacramento, a fortification built in 1680 on the banks of the River Plate. Hence the importance of travelers’ reports. Few described the Portuguese village. Most of them where clerics, like the Dominican Domingo de Neyra and the Jesuits Diogo Soares and Florian Paucke. Reports also where left by the Frenchman Louis- Antoine de Bougainville and t...

  18. Selected trace elements in the Sacramento River, California: Occurrence and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Howard E.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Roth, David A.; Dileanis, Peter D.; Alpers, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of trace elements from the Iron Mountain Superfund site on the Sacramento River and selected tributaries is examined. The concentration and distribution of many trace elements—including aluminum, arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, cerium, cobalt, chromium, cesium, copper, dysprosium, erbium, europium, iron, gadolinium, holmium, potassium, lanthanum, lithium, lutetium, manganese, molybdenum, neodymium, nickel, lead, praseodymium, rubidium, rhenium, antimony, selenium, samarium, strontium, terbium, thallium, thulium, uranium, vanadium, tungsten, yttrium, ytterbium, zinc, and zirconium—were measured using a combination of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Samples were collected using ultraclean techniques at selected sites in tributaries and the Sacramento River from below Shasta Dam to Freeport, California, at six separate time periods from mid-1996 to mid-1997. Trace-element concentrations in dissolved (ultrafiltered [0.005-μm pore size]) and colloidal material, isolated at each site from large volume samples, are reported. For example, dissolved Zn ranged from 900 μg/L at Spring Creek (Iron Mountain acid mine drainage into Keswick Reservoir) to 0.65 μg/L at the Freeport site on the Sacramento River. Zn associated with colloidal material ranged from 4.3 μg/L (colloid-equivalent concentration) in Spring Creek to 21.8 μg/L at the Colusa site on the Sacramento River. Virtually all of the trace elements exist in Spring Creek in the dissolved form. On entering Keswick Reservoir, the metals are at least partially converted by precipitation or adsorption to the particulate phase. Despite this observation, few of the elements are removed by settling; instead the majority is transported, associated with colloids, downriver, at least to the Bend Bridge site, which is 67 km from Keswick Dam. Most trace elements are strongly associated with the colloid phase going

  19. A New Data Acquisition Portal for the Sacramento River Settlement Contractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narlesky, P. E., C. A.; Williams, P. E., A. M.

    2017-12-01

    In 1964, the United States Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) executed settlement contracts with the Sacramento River Settlement Contractors (SRSC), entities which hold water rights along the Sacramento River with area of origin protection or that are senior to Reclamation's water rights for Shasta Reservoir. Shasta is the cornerstone of the federal Central Valley Project (CVP), one of the nation's largest multi-purpose water conservation programs. In order to optimize CVP operations for multiple beneficial uses including water supply, fisheries, water quality, and waterfowl habitat, the SRSC voluntarily agreed to adaptively manage diversions throughout the year in close coordination with Reclamation. MBK Engineers assists the SRSC throughout this process by collecting, organizing, compiling, and distributing diversion data to Reclamation and others involved in operational decisions related to Shasta Reservoir and the CVP. To improve and expand participation in diversions reporting, we have developed the SRSC Web Portal, which launches a data-entry dashboard for members of the SRSC to facilitate recording and transmittal of both predicted and observed monthly and daily flow diversion data. This cloud-hosted system leverages a combination of Javascript interactive visualization libraries with a database-backed Python web framework to present streamlined data-entry forms and valuable SRSC program summary illustrations. SRSC program totals, which can now be aggregated through queries to the web-app's database backend, are used by Reclamation, SRSC, fish agencies, and others to inform operational decisions. By submitting diversion schedules and tracking actual diversions through the portal, contractors will also be directly contributing to the development of a richer and more consistently-formatted historical record for demand hydrology in the Sacramento River Watershed; this may be useful in future water supply studies. Adoption of this technology will foster an

  20. Sensitivity of SWOT discharge algorithm to measurement errors: Testing on the Sacramento River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Micheal; Andreadis, Konstantinos; Yoon, Yeosang; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2013-04-01

    Scheduled for launch in 2019, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission will utilize a Ka-band radar interferometer to measure river heights, widths, and slopes, globally, as well as characterize storage change in lakes and ocean surface dynamics with a spatial resolution ranging from 10 - 70 m, with temporal revisits on the order of a week. A discharge algorithm has been formulated to solve the inverse problem of characterizing river bathymetry and the roughness coefficient from SWOT observations. The algorithm uses a Bayesian Markov Chain estimation approach, treats rivers as sets of interconnected reaches (typically 5 km - 10 km in length), and produces best estimates of river bathymetry, roughness coefficient, and discharge, given SWOT observables. AirSWOT (the airborne version of SWOT) consists of a radar interferometer similar to SWOT, but mounted aboard an aircraft. AirSWOT spatial resolution will range from 1 - 35 m. In early 2013, AirSWOT will perform several flights over the Sacramento River, capturing river height, width, and slope at several different flow conditions. The Sacramento River presents an excellent target given that the river includes some stretches heavily affected by management (diversions, bypasses, etc.). AirSWOT measurements will be used to validate SWOT observation performance, but are also a unique opportunity for testing and demonstrating the capabilities and limitations of the discharge algorithm. This study uses HEC-RAS simulations of the Sacramento River to first, characterize expected discharge algorithm accuracy on the Sacramento River, and second to explore the required AirSWOT measurements needed to perform a successful inverse with the discharge algorithm. We focus on the sensitivity of the algorithm accuracy to the uncertainty in AirSWOT measurements of height, width, and slope.

  1. Pesticides and pesticide degradation products in stormwater runoff: Sacramento River Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, Joseph L.

    1996-01-01

    Pesticides in stormwater runoff, within the Sacramento River Basin, California, were assessed during a storm that occurred in January 1994. Two organophosphate insecticides (diazinon and methidathion), two carbamate pesticides (molinate and carbofuran), and one triazine herbicide (simazine) were detected. Organophosphate pesticide concentrations increased with the rising stage of the hydrographs; peak concentrations were measured near peak discharge. Diazinon oxon, a toxic degradation product of diazinon, made up approximately 1 to 3 percent of the diazinon load. The Feather River was the principal source of organophosphate pesticides to the Sacramento River during this storm. The concentrations of molinate and carbofuran, pesticides applied to rice fields during May and June, were relatively constant during and after the storm. Their presence in surface water was attributed to the flooding and subsequent drainage, as a management practice to degrade rice stubble prior to the next planting. A photodegradation product of molinate, 4-keto molinate, was in all samples where molinate was detected and made up approximately 50 percent of the total molinate load. Simazine, a herbicide used in orchards and to control weeds along the roadways, was detected in the storm runoff, but it was not possible to differentiate the two sources of that pesticide to the Sacramento River.

  2. Habitat suitability and conservation of the Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, B.J.; Wylie, G.D.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Resource managers often have little information regarding the habitat requirements and distribution of rare species. Factor analysis-based habitat suitability models describe the ecological niche of a species and identify locations where these conditions occur on the landscape using existing occurrence data. We used factor analyses to assess the suitability of habitats for Thamnophis gigas (Giant Gartersnake), a rare, threatened species endemic to the Central Valley of California, USA, and to map the locations of habitat suitable for T. gigas in the Sacramento Valley. Factor analyses indicated that the niche of T. gigas is composed of sites near rice agriculture with low stream densities. Sites with high canal densities and near wetlands also appeared suitable, but results for these variables were sensitive to potential sampling bias. In the Sacramento Valley, suitable habitats occur primarily in the central portion of the valley floor. Based upon the results of the factor analyses, recovery planning for T. gigas will require an on-the-ground assessment of the current distribution and abundance of T. gigas, maintaining the few remaining natural wetlands and the practice of rice agriculture in the Sacramento Valley, and studying the effects of agricultural practices and land use changes on populations of T. gigas. ?? 2010 by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.

  3. IMPACT OF PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL MUD CONTAMINATION ON WELLBORE CEMENT- FORMATION SHEAR BOND STRENGTH Authors: Arome Oyibo1 and Mileva Radonjic1 * 1. Craft and Hawkins Department of Petroleum Engineering, 2131 Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, aoyibo1@tigers.lsu.edu, mileva@lsu.edu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyibo, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    Wellbore cement has been used to provide well integrity through zonal isolation in oil & gas wells and geothermal wells. Cementing is also used to provide mechanical support for the casing and protect the casing from corrosive fluids. Failure of cement could be caused by several factors ranging from poor cementing, failure to completely displace the drilling fluids to failure on the path of the casing. A failed cement job could result in creation of cracks and micro annulus through which produced fluids could migrate to the surface which could lead to sustained casing pressure, contamination of fresh water aquifer and blow out in some cases. In addition, cement failures could risk the release of chemicals substances from hydraulic fracturing into fresh water aquifer during the injection process. To achieve proper cementing, the drilling fluid should be completely displaced by the cement slurry. However, this is hard to achieve in practice, some mud is usually left on the wellbore which ends up contaminating the cement afterwards. The purpose of this experimental study is to investigate the impact of both physical and chemical mud contaminations on cement-formation bond strength for different types of formations. Physical contamination occurs when drilling fluids (mud) dries on the surface of the formation forming a mud cake. Chemical contamination on the other hand occurs when the drilling fluids which is still in the liquid form interacts chemically with the cement during a cementing job. We investigated the impact of the contamination on the shear bond strength and the changes in the mineralogy of the cement at the cement-formation interface to ascertain the impact of the contamination on the cement-formation bond strength. Berea sandstone and clay rich shale cores were bonded with cement cores with the cement-formation contaminated either physically or chemically. For the physically contaminated composite cores, we have 3 different sample designs: clean/not contaminated, scrapped and washed composite cores. Similarly, for the chemically contaminated samples we had 3 different sample designs: 0%, 5% and 10% mud contaminated composite cores. Shear test were performed on the composite cores to determine the shear bond strength and the results suggested that the detrimental impact of the contamination is higher when the cores are physically contaminated i.e. when we have mud cake present at the surface of the wellbore before a cement job is performed. Also, the results showed that shear bond strength is higher for sandstone formations as compared to shale formations. Material characterization analysis was carried out to determine the micro structural changes at the cement-formation interface. The results obtained from the SEM and micro CT images taken at the bond interface confirmed that chemical contamination caused substantial changes in the spatial distribution of minerals that impacted bond strength. Keywords: Cement-Formation bond strength, mud contamination, shale, sandstone and material characterization *Corresponding author

  4. Colônia do Sacramento: a situação na fronteira platina no século XVIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Pereira Prado

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available A Colônia do Sacramento, no atual Uruguai, na primeira metade do século XVIII, constituiu uma cidade de pródigo comércio na região platina. Inseridos tanto nas rotas comerciais e sociais portuguesas quanto nas castelhanas, os habitantes de Sacramento materializavam uma fronteira múltipla, onde coexistiam espanhóis, portugueses e diferentes grupos indígenas. O presente estudo analisa os vínculos sociais e comerciais existentes entre os habitantes de Sacramento e os de Buenos Aires. No interior do espaço platino as redes sociais estabelecidas através do rio da Prata, ligando Sacramento e Buenos Aires, eram vias de acúmulo de prestígio, poder e riqueza em uma sociedade de antigo regime.The Sacramento Colony, currently Uruguayan territory, in the first half of the XVIII century, was a city with great commerce on the River Plate Region. Placed in both Portuguese and Spanish social and commercial routes, the Sacramento habitants formed a multiple frontier where Spanish, Portuguese and different indigenous groups coexisted. The present study analyses the social and commercial links that existed between the Sacramento and Buenos Aires inhabitants. In the River Plate region, the social networks developed connecting Sacramento and Buenos Ayers were gateways to social status, power and wealth in an old regime society.

  5. Biogeochemical studies of wintering waterfowl in the Imperial and Sacramento Valleys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koranda, J.J.; Stuart, M.; Thompson, S.; Conrado, C.

    1979-10-01

    Trace and major elemental composition were determined in the organs of wintering waterfowl in the Imperial and Sacramento Valleys of California, and in soils, sediments, and agricultural fertilizer that constitute the various sources of elements in the waterfowl. These data provide a biogeochemical baseline for waterfowl populations wintering in an area being developed for geothermal power. This baseline in the Imperial Valley is affected by soil and sediment composition, agricultural effluents in irrigation and stream water, and spent shot deposited by hunters in waterfowl habitats. The waterfowl acquire a set of trace elements from these sources and concentrations increase in their organs over the wintering period. Nickel, arsenic, selenium, bromine, and lead are the primary elements acquired from soil sources, agricultural effluents, and spent shot in the Imperial Valley. The assessment of effects from geothermal effluents on waterfowl populations in complex because there are large influxes of materials into the Imperial Valley ecosystem that contain trace elements, i.e., irrigation water, phosphatic fertilizers, pesticides, and lead shot. Multiple sources exist for many elements prominent in the expected geothermal effluents. The relationships between the two California valleys, the Imperial and Sacramento, are apparent in the trace element concentrations in the organs of waterfowl obtained in those two valleys. Arsenic is absent in the waterfowl organs obtained in the Sacramento Valley and relatively common in the Imperial Valley waterfowl. The effect of any release of geothermal effluent in the Imperial Valley waterfowl habitats will be difficult to describe because of the complexity of the biogeochemical baseline and the multiple sources of trace and major elements in the ecosystem.

  6. Adaptive Management Methods to Protect the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Water Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David

    2016-01-01

    The California Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is the hub for California's water supply, conveying water from Northern to Southern California agriculture and communities while supporting important ecosystem services, agriculture, and communities in the Delta. Changes in climate, long-term drought, water quality changes, and expansion of invasive aquatic plants threatens ecosystems, impedes ecosystem restoration, and is economically, environmentally, and sociologically detrimental to the San Francisco Bay/California Delta complex. NASA Ames Research Center and the USDA-ARS partnered with the State of California and local governments to develop science-based, adaptive-management strategies for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The project combines science, operations, and economics related to integrated management scenarios for aquatic weeds to help land and waterway managers make science-informed decisions regarding management and outcomes. The team provides a comprehensive understanding of agricultural and urban land use in the Delta and the major water sheds (San Joaquin/Sacramento) supplying the Delta and interaction with drought and climate impacts on the environment, water quality, and weed growth. The team recommends conservation and modified land-use practices and aids local Delta stakeholders in developing management strategies. New remote sensing tools have been developed to enhance ability to assess conditions, inform decision support tools, and monitor management practices. Science gaps in understanding how native and invasive plants respond to altered environmental conditions are being filled and provide critical biological response parameters for Delta-SWAT simulation modeling. Operational agencies such as the California Department of Boating and Waterways provide testing and act as initial adopter of decision support tools. Methods developed by the project can become routine land and water management tools in complex river delta systems.

  7. Geologic logs of geotechnical cores from the subsurface Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Katherine L.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Tinsley, John C.; Gatti, Emma; Pagenkopp, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This report presents and summarizes descriptive geologic logs of geotechnical cores collected from 2009–12 in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California, by the California Department of Water Resources. Graphic logs are presented for 1,785.7 ft of retained cores from 56 borehole sites throughout the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Most core sections are from a depth of ~100–200 feet. Cores primarily contain mud, silt, and sand lithologies. Tephra (volcanic ash and pumice), paleosols, and gravels are also documented in some core sections. Geologic observations contained in the core logs in this report provide stratigraphic context for subsequent sampling and data for future chronostratigraphic subsurface correlations.

  8. Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop Summary: August 24, 2006, Sacramento, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treanton, B.; Palomo, J.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop, sponsored by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program and organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, was held Aug. 24, 2006, in Sacramento, Calif. The workshop provided a forum for industry stakeholders to share their knowledge and experience about technologies, manufacturing approaches, markets, and issues in power electronics for a range of distributed energy resources. It focused on the development of advanced power electronic interfaces for distributed energy applications and included discussions of modular power electronics, component manufacturing, and power electronic applications.

  9. NORTH SOLDIERS IN SOUTHERN WARS: THE MILITARY RECRUITMENT IN BAHIA AND PERNAMBUCO TO THE COLONY OF THE SACRAMENTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Possamai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The North of the State of Brazil contributed to the creation and defense of Colonia do Sacramento. This article will address the military conscription in the Northern provinces, especially in Bahia and Pernambuco during the Eighteenth Century. We will give emphasis to the period of the siege from 1735 to 1737, when a large conscription was enforced in Portugal and in many Brazilian provinces in order to avoid the conquest of Sacramento by the Spaniards, as well as to strengthen Rio Grande de São Pedro, from which few men could return home.

  10. Suspended and Dissolved Matter in the Sacramento River and Delta Region Under Drought Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackleson, S. G.; Rhea, W. J.; Blaser, S.; Wilkerson, F. P.; Dugdale, R. C.; Davis, C. O.; Tufillaro, N. B.

    2016-02-01

    The State of California is experiencing the fourth year of a historic drought that, as it continues to worsen, has raised concerns about future agricultural production and prompted emergency water restrictions. The Sacramento River drainage basin and estuary fall within the drought area classified as extreme to exceptional. To document the ecological effects of this drought and to serve as baseline conditions with which to compare future non-drought conditions, a series of seasonal field campaigns were conducted between June 2014 and October 2015 to characterize the concentration, composition, and morphology of particulate and dissolved matter within the lower reaches of the Sacramento River and delta region. In situ measurements of spectral light scatter and absorption due to water impurities are compared with water sample analyses for pigment and suspended sediment concentration. In situ measurements are used to derive remote sensing algorithms for impurity concentration and composition from above-water and remotely sensed radiometric measurements. Results indicate a seasonally stable riverine water mass and particle population feeding into a delta region with complicated hydrodynamics, point sources of wetland detritus and dissolved organic matter, and heterogeneous particle assemblages. Possible changes as a result of an El Nino are discussed.

  11. Assessment of LED Technology in Ornamental Post-Top Luminaires (Host Site: Sacramento, CA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-12-01

    The DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium has evaluated four different LED replacements for existing ornamental post-top street lights in Sacramento, California. The project team was composed of the City and its consultant, PNNL (representing the Consortium), and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District. Product selection was finalized in March 2011, yielding one complete luminaire replacement and three lamp-ballast retrofit kits. Computer simulations, field measurements, and laboratory testing were performed to compare the performance and cost-effectiveness of the LED products relative to the existing luminaire with 100 W high-pressure sodium lamp. After it was confirmed the LED products were not equivalent to HPS in terms of initial photopic illumination, the following parameters were scaled proportionally to enable equitable (albeit hypothetical) comparisons: light output, input wattage, and pricing. Four replacement scenarios were considered for each LED product, incorporating new IES guidance for mesopic multipliers and lumen maintenance extrapolation, but life cycle analysis indicated cost effectiveness was also unacceptable. Although LED efficacy and pricing continue to improve, this project serves as a timely and objective notice that LED technology may not be quite ready yet for such applications.

  12. Mapping invasive aquatic vegetation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta using hyperspectral imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, E C; Mulitsch, M J; Greenberg, J A; Whiting, M L; Ustin, S L; Kefauver, S C

    2006-10-01

    The ecological and economic impacts associated with invasive species are of critical concern to land managers. The ability to map the extent and severity of invasions would be a valuable contribution to management decisions relating to control and monitoring efforts. We investigated the use of hyperspectral imagery for mapping invasive aquatic plant species in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in the Central Valley of California, at two spatial scales. Sixty-four flightlines of HyMap hyperspectral imagery were acquired over the study region covering an area of 2,139 km(2) and field work was conducted to acquire GPS locations of target invasive species. We used spectral mixture analysis to classify two target invasive species; Brazilian waterweed (Egeria densa), a submerged invasive, and water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), a floating emergent invasive. At the relatively fine spatial scale for five sites within the Delta (average size 51 ha) average classification accuracies were 93% for Brazilian waterweed and 73% for water hyacinth. However, at the coarser, Delta-wide scale (177,000 ha) these accuracy results were 29% for Brazilian waterweed and 65% for water hyacinth. The difference in accuracy is likely accounted for by the broad range in water turbidity and tide heights encountered across the Delta. These findings illustrate that hyperspectral imagery is a promising tool for discriminating target invasive species within the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta waterways although more work is needed to develop classification tools that function under changing environmental conditions.

  13. Testing Total Ammonia Levels in the Sacramento- San Joaquin Valley Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser, C.; Harris, A.; Miller, K.

    2014-12-01

    Northern California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is surrounded by many agricultural fields, making is susceptible to increased ammonia levels from nutrient rich fertilizer runoff. Last year we noticed a large bloom of Water Hyacinth, an invasive species from South America, throughout many channels of the delta which led us to believe that there was an abundance of ammonia in the water. We hypothesized this with the prior knowledge that Water Hyacinth feeds on ammonia and thrives in places with high levels of ammonia in the water. Because there are no current regulation standards for ammonia levels in the Delta, we decided to test eight points around the delta to see whether or not the ammonia levels exceed regulatory standards of nearby waters. After determining the ammonia levels of each of our eight samples, we compared the data that we collected to the maximum levels of ammonia allowed in the Central San Francisco Bay, which is 0.16 ppm. We discovered that each point that we tested in the delta had ammonia levels much lower than 0.16 ppm. With these results we concluded that unusually high levels of ammonia is not a concern in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

  14. Modeling pesticide diuron loading from the San Joaquin watershed into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantitative information on pesticide loading into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta waterways of northern California is critical for water resource management in the region, and potentially useful for biological weed control planning. The San Joaquin watershed, an agriculturally intensive area, is a...

  15. Popular Music: A Selected Bibliography of Materials in the California State University, Sacramento Library. Bibliographic Series No. 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donna Ridley, Comp.

    The bibliography lists over 400 works in the California State University Library, Sacramento, on pop, rock, country, folk, blues, and soul music from 1950 to the present. Books, periodicals, and non-book materials noted in the bibliography are appropriate for history, communication studies, and popular culture studies as well as for music. Items…

  16. Conflicts in River Management: A Conservationist's Perspective on Sacramento River Riparian Habitats—Impacts, Threats, Remedies, Opportunities, and Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Spotts

    1989-01-01

    The Sacramento River's historic riparian habitats have been reduced by over 98 percent due to cumulative, adverse human activities. These activities continue to jeopardize the remaining riparian habitats. The results of these trends is more endangered species conflicts and listings, coupled with less fish, beautiful scenery, and other resource values. This paper...

  17. Delivering Economic Development in the Context of Financial Crisis: A Workforce Gap Analysis of the Sacramento Regional Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavian, Alexander H.

    2013-01-01

    Workforce development represents a central priority in a comprehensive effort to create wealth, industry thickening, and broad-based prosperity. From the onset of the Great Recession in 2007, the Sacramento Region experienced anemic economic growth and remained behind the nation in job creation. Contextualized in the aftermath of the economic…

  18. Proceedings of the National Silviculture Workshop: Silviculture for All Resources; Sacramento, CA; May 11-14, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanie Malespin Woolever; Mike Smith; Elizabeth McGraw; Mike Lanasa; Arthur C. Zack; Chris Reichert; Robert MacWhorter; Michael R. Lennartz; Richard A. Lancia; Marc G. Rounsaville; James R. Sedell; Fred H. Everest; David R. Gibbons; Stephen R. Shifley; Melinda Moeur; David A. Marquis; Richard O. Fitzgerald; Nelson Loftus; Thomas C. Turpin; William R. Terrill; Glenn L. Crouch; Wayne D. Shepperd; Edith W. Petrick; John J. Petrick; Roger W. Dennington; Allan W. Ashton; Hubertus J. Mittmann; Gary Thompson; Ken Sonksen; David A. Stark; Michael A. Ware; Allan J. West; Patrick D. Jackson; Richard L. Bassett; Jimmie D. Chew; William B. White; Bruce W. Morse; Mike Znerold; Russell T. Graham; Peyton W. Owston; Richard G. Miller; John R. Nesbitt; Gaston Porterie; Ernest Del Rio

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 National Silviculture Workshop was held in Sacramento, California, and the Eldorado National Forest. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss, review, and share information and experiences regarding how silviculture can serve as the tool to help accomplish the objectives of many resources.

  19. Slides from the 2013 Smart Growth Summit on How to Learn from the New Orleans Urban Waters Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation Slides for 2013 Smart Growth Summit, Baton Rouge, LA, H2O Overview: How to Learn from the New Orleans Urban Waters Partnership - Danny Wiegand Urban Waters Ambassador to New Orleans November 19, 2013

  20. 75 FR 75491 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... biological specimens of Asian elephant (Elephus maximus) from wild animals in all range countries and captive...: Leonard Grigsby; Baton Rouge, LA; PRT-28273A Applicant: John Verlander, El Paso, TX; PRT-28293A Applicant...

  1. 20 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - U.S. Seaports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., GA St. Mary, GA Cocoa, FL Fernandina Beach, FL Fort Lauderdale, FL Fort Pierce, FL Jacksonville, FL..., AL Gulfport, MS Pascagoula, MS Baton Rouge, LA Gretna, LA Lake Charles, LA Louisiana Offshore Oil...

  2. Evaluation of cores from Jefferson Highway near Airline Highway : technical assistance report 16-03TA-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This technical assistance report documents the investigation conducted by the Louisiana Transportation Research Center (LTRC) of the cored concrete from Westbound Jefferson Highway near Airline Highway in Baton Rouge, LA. The petrographic analysis sh...

  3. Analysis of Louisiana vehicular input data for MOBILE 6 : technical summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 require that non-attainment and air quality : maintenance areas regularly conduct regional emissions analyses. In Louisiana, Baton Rouge : and Lake Charles are ozone non-attainment areas while New Orleans i...

  4. Evaluation of continuity detail for precast prestressed girders : research project capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    The construction of a new bridge : crossing the Mississippi River north of : Baton Rouge is currently underway. The : project, named the John James : Audubon Bridge, is a true landmark. Its : main span will be the longest cablestayed : bridge in Nort...

  5. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Daniel R Brooks, Toronto. Masha Brown, Toronto. Terry Brown, Manchester. Janusz M Bujnicki, Warsaw. Giovanna Caderni, Firenze. Chris Carlton, Baton Rouge. Dipankar Chatterji, Bangalore. Joydev Chattopadhyay, Kolkata. Amit Chattopadhyay, Hyderabad. Arabinda Chaudhuri, Hyderabad. Michael Cherry, Matieland.

  6. University Data Partnership Peer Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    In March 2012, the Connecticut (CTDOT) and New Mexico (NMDOT) Departments of Transportation met in Baton Rouge, Louisiana for a two-day peer session dedicated to exploring the intricate 12-year safety data partnership between the Louisiana Department...

  7. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Rodolfo Gambini1 Jorge Pullin2. Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Igua esq. Matajo, Montevideo, Uruguay; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA ...

  8. Canonical quantum gravity and consistent discretizations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Rodolfo Gambini1 Jorge Pullin2. Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Igua esq. Matajo, Montevideo, Uruguay; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA ...

  9. 76 FR 53853 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans and Designation of Areas for Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... detrimental effects on plants and ecosystems. C. What is the background for the Baton Rouge area under the 1..., Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and part D, NSR permit programs; include criteria for...

  10. The use of cone penetration testing to investigate sand fill subsidence at cross-drain locations: final report : Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    During construction of Interstate I-10 between Baton Rouge and LaPlace, Louisiana, highly organic swamp deposits were excavated and replaced with hydraulically pumped river sand. Recently, excessive settlement was encountered at numerous cross-drain ...

  11. Colônia do Sacramento: a situação na fronteira platina no século XVIII

    OpenAIRE

    Prado, Fabrício Pereira

    2003-01-01

    A Colônia do Sacramento, no atual Uruguai, na primeira metade do século XVIII, constituiu uma cidade de pródigo comércio na região platina. Inseridos tanto nas rotas comerciais e sociais portuguesas quanto nas castelhanas, os habitantes de Sacramento materializavam uma fronteira múltipla, onde coexistiam espanhóis, portugueses e diferentes grupos indígenas. O presente estudo analisa os vínculos sociais e comerciais existentes entre os habitantes de Sacramento e os de Buenos Aires. No interior...

  12. Termorregulação e produção de ovos de galinhas Label Rouge em ambiente equatorial semiárido

    OpenAIRE

    Souza Jr, João Batista Freire de

    2014-01-01

    Objetivou-se com este estudo avaliar as diferenças regionais na temperatura superficial através de imagens térmicas e o efeito do ambiente semiárido e do tamanho da partícula do milho no desempenho, qualidade do ovo e perda de calor sensível de poedeiras do pescoço pelado. Em Mossoró-RN, 60 galinhas da linhagem Label Rouge em fase de postura foram distribuídas em um delineamento inteiramente casualizado, onde foram fornecidas rações com diferentes tamanhos da partícula do milho ou diâmetro ge...

  13. Behaviour of uranium during late-Hercynian and alpine metamorphisms in the Aiguilles rouges and Belledonne (Valorcine, Lauziere) massifs. Western Alps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negga, H.S.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this research thesis is to define the origin of numerous uranium anomalies in the external crystalline Alpine massifs, more precisely the massif of the Aiguilles Rouges and the massif of Belledonne. The primary cause of uranium mineralization in the first massif appears to have been the retrograde metamorphism events of the late-Hercynian age. In the second massif, the same conditions of uranium mineralization appear to have been realised, but with a much higher calcium activity in the fluids. After having explained the choice of the selected areas, the sampling and the chemical analysis performed, the author describes the geological and structural framework of Western Alps: geological history of the paleozoic platform, regional geology of the studied massifs. The next part reports the petrographic and geochemical study, the analysis of the mineral chemistry, of the alteration and the metamorphism. Then the author describes the geochemistry of uranium and thorium within the studied structures

  14. „Un caractère qui a l'air si impossible“: Innerer Konflikt als Rollendialektik in Le Rouge et le Noir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Klimpe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Le Rouge et le Noir traite de l'ascension sociale du prolétaire Julien Sorel sous la Restauration. Julien est séminariste et méprise de fait les valeurs de la Restauration. En secret, il rêve de mener une existence héroïque sur le modèle de Napoléon. Le rôle idéal de Napoléon et le rôle social de prêtre sont conçus comme contraires, mais peuvent, néanmoins, difficilement être séparés dans les actions concrètes de Julien. La présente étude porte sur la dialectique entre l'idéal de Napoléon et la réalité de prêtre, et s'inscrit tant dans les sciences littéraires que dans la théorie des rôles sociaux, avec le but d'intégrer la perspective de la sociologie ainsi que celle de l'anthropologie.In Le Rouge et le Noir erzählt Stendhal den sozialen Aufstieg des Kleinbürgersohns Julien Sorel in der Restaurationsgesellschaft. Julien ist ein Priesterschüler, der die Restaurationsgesellschaft und ihre Werte verachtet und heimlich eine napoleonische Heldenexistenz ersehnt. „Napoleon“ und „Priester“ werden in der literaturwissenschaftlichen Rezeption des Werkes dabei immer wieder als Rollen interpretiert. Diese beiden Rollen sind zwar konträr konzipiert, in Juliens Handlungen aber kaum voneinander zu trennen. Die Dialektik von Napoleon-Ideal und Priester-Realität wird hier mit Hilfe literaturwissenschaftlicher Rezeptionsansätze, sowie unter den soziologischen und  anthropologischen Perspektiven der Rollentheorie untersucht.

  15. Sacramento Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — CDF-FRAP compiled the 'best available' land cover data into a single data layer, to support the various analyses required for the 2002 Forest and Range Assessment....

  16. Atmospheric transport of pesticides in the Sacramento, California, metropolitan area, 1996-1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Michael S.; Baston, David S.

    2002-01-01

    Weekly composite, bulk air was sampled with respect to wind speed and direction from January 1996 through December 1997 in one urban and two agricultural locations in Sacramento County, California. The sampling sites were located along a north-south transect, the dominant directions of the prevailing winds. The samples were analyzed for a variety of current-use pesticides, including dormant orchard spray insecticides and rice herbicides. A variety of pesticides were detected throughout the year, predominantly chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and trifluralin. The data obtained during the winter and spring suggest that some pesticides used in agricultural areas become airborne and may be transported into the urban area. Confirmation of this drift is difficult, however, because these three predominant pesticides, as well as other detected pesticides, also are heavily used in the urban environment. The spring data clearly show that molinate and thiobencarb, two herbicides used only in rice production, do drift into the urban environment.

  17. Timber resource statistics for the Sacramento resource area of California. Forest Service resource bulletin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddell, K.L.; Bassett, P.M.

    1997-03-01

    This report is a summary of timber resource statistics for the Scacramento Resource Area of California, which includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Glenn, Lake, Napa, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, Sierra, Sutter, Tehama, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. Data were collected as part of a statewide multiresource inventory. The inventory sampled private and public lands except reserved areas and National Forests. The National Forest System provided data from regional inventories of the Eldorado, Lassen, Mendocino, Plumas, Shasta-Trinity, Tahoe, and Toiyabe National Forests and the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit. Area information for parks and other reserves was obtained directly from the organizations managing these areas. Statistical tables summarize all ownerships and provide estimates of land area, timber volume, growth, mortality, and harvest. Estimates of periodic change of timberland area and timber volume are presented for all ownerships outside National Forests.

  18. Audit Report on the Sacramento Army Depot Internal Review and Audit Compliance Office's "Audits of Warranties, Quality Deficiency Reports, and Reports of Discrepancies"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1992-01-01

    The Sacramento Army Depot (SAAD) Internal Review and Audit Compliance Office (Internal Review) issued an audit report, "Audit of Warranties, Quality Deficiency Reports, and Reports of Discrepancies," on July 20, 1990...

  19. Spatial trends and impairment assessment of mercury in sport fish in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta watershed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melwani, A.R.; Bezalel, S.N.; Hunt, J.A.; Grenier, J.L.; Ichikawa, G.; Heim, W.; Bonnema, A.; Foe, C.; Slotton, D.G.; Davis, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    A three-year study was conducted to examine mercury in sport fish from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. More than 4000 fish from 31 species were collected and analyzed for total mercury in individual muscle filets. Largemouth bass and striped bass were the most contaminated, averaging 0.40 μg/g, while redear sunfish, bluegill and rainbow trout exhibited the lowest (<0.15 μg/g) concentrations. Spatial variation in mercury was evaluated with an analysis of covariance model, which accounted for variability due to fish size and regional hydrology. Significant regional differences in mercury were apparent in size-standardized largemouth bass, with concentrations on the Cosumnes and Mokelumne rivers significantly higher than the central and western Delta. Significant prey-predator mercury correlations were also apparent, which may explain a significant proportion of the spatial variation in the watershed. - Regional differences in sport fish mercury were found in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

  20. La consommation urbaine de l’huile de palme rouge en Côte d’Ivoire : quels marchés ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheyns Emmanuelle

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Au côté d’une extraction industrielle de l’huile de palme dont les débouchés sont l’exportation en Europe et, en Côte d’Ivoire, la seconde transformation en huile industrielle raffinée et produits dérivés (savons, margarines pour un marché ivoirien et sous-régional, il existe un secteur de transformation artisanal de l’huile rouge (et aussi de l’huile de palmiste et de savons qui répond à une demande différenciée des consommateurs ruraux mais aussi urbains. En termes d’équipements de transformation, le secteur artisanal est peu développé (beaucoup moins que dans d’autres pays de la sous-région. L’extraction de l’huile rouge y est soit entièrement manuelle, soit semi-mécanisée : utilisation de presses à vis verticales très simples et peu coûteuses. Les trente dernières années de développement industriel n’ont pas permis à la Côte d’Ivoire de se doter d’équipements semi-industriels ou artisanaux, intermédiaires 2 entre l’usine de 20 ou 40 t/h et la transformation manuelle par les femmes, alors que d’autres pays voisins se sont au contraire dotés de ces équipements [1]. Quoi qu’il en soit, ce secteur artisanal informel, maîtrisé par les femmes (transformation et commercialisation, approvisionne largement les marchés de consommation locaux, ruraux comme urbains, en un produit considéré comme spécifique (que ne fournit pas l’agro-industrie locale et qui semble toujours apprécié des consommateurs. Il nous amène à reconsidérer la filière « palmier à huile » sous l’angle d’une filière dont le produit est aussi « vivrier » (par opposition à produit de « rente » et qui assure un approvisionnement des marchés locaux, via des circuits informels, en répondant à une demande locale. Une première enquête 3 par entretiens approfondis auprès de 28 ménages abidjanais révèle une différenciation de la demande qui s’établit sur la qualité des produits, et qui

  1. Katrina's Lessons in California: Social and Political Trajectories of Flood Management in the Sacramento River Watershed since 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comby, E.; Le Lay, Y. F.; Piegay, H.

    2017-12-01

    Over the last decade, major changes have occurred in the way that environments are managed. They can be linked with external or internal events which may shape public perception. An external event can reveal a forgotten risk and create a social problem (Hilgartner et Bosk 1988). Following the Advocacy Coalition Framework (Sabatier 1988), we studied the role of Hurricane Katrina in flood management in California from 2005 to 2013. How do policies intend to increase the city's resilience? We compared different flood policies of the Sacramento River from 2005 to 2013, by combining field observations with a principal dataset of 340 regional newspaper items (Sacramento Bee). Media coverage was analyzed using content, quotation, and textometry as well as GIS. We underlined temporal variability in public perceptions towards floods. Some planning choices (such as levees) became controversial, while journalists praised weirs, bypasses, and dams. However, Katrina does not seem to have a real impact on urban sprawl strategies in three Sacramento neighborhoods (Fig.1). We analyzed also the limits of the comparison between New Orleans and Sacramento. Dialog between stakeholders existed in space and time between here (California) and elsewhere (Louisiana), present (post-2005) and past (Katrina catastrophe), and risk and disaster. Katrina was a national scandal with political announcements. However, flood policy was developed first at a regional and then local scales. After Katrina awareness, conflicts appear: some California residents refuse to have a policy linked to Katrina applied to them. We underlined that different stakeholders became prominent: it may be useless to tackle with only one institution. Some institutions had an integrated river management, while others kept a traditional risk management. We assessed the changes in river management while using discourse to understand the (potential) shift in human-river relationships from risk management to integrated river

  2. Fish communities of the Sacramento River Basin: Implications for conservation of native fishes in the Central Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, J.T.; Brown, L.R.

    2002-01-01

    The associations of resident fish communities with environmental variables and stream condition were evaluated at representative sites within the Sacramento River Basin, California between 1996 and 1998 using multivariate ordination techniques and by calculating six fish community metrics. In addition, the results of the current study were compared with recent studies in the San Joaquin River drainage to provide a wider perspective of the condition of resident fish communities in the Central Valley of California as a whole. Within the Sacramento drainage, species distributions were correlated with elevational and substrate size gradients; however, the elevation of a sampling site was correlated with a suite of water-quality and habitat variables that are indicative of land use effects on physiochemical stream parameters. Four fish community metrics - percentage of native fish, percentage of intolerant fish, number of tolerant species, and percentage of fish with external anomalies - were responsive to environmental quality. Comparisons between the current study and recent studies in the San Joaquin River drainage suggested that differences in water-management practices may have significant effects on native species fish community structure. Additionally, the results of the current study suggest that index of biotic integrity-type indices can be developed for the Sacramento River Basin and possibly the entire Central Valley, California. The protection of native fish communities in the Central Valley and other arid environments continues to be a conflict between human needs for water resources and the requirements of aquatic ecosystems; preservation of these ecosystems will require innovative management strategies.

  3. A preliminary investigation of the variables affecting the distribution of giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Skalos, Shannon M.; Casazza, Michael L.; Wylie, Glenn D.

    2015-09-30

    Giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) comprise a species of rare, semi-aquatic snake precinctive to the Central Valley of California. Because of the loss of more than 90% of their natural habitat, giant gartersnakes are listed as Threatened by the United States and California endangered species acts. Little is known, however, about the distribution of giant gartersnakes in the Sacramento Valley, which is where most extant populations occur. We conducted detection-nondetection surveys for giant gartersnakes throughout the rice-growing regions of the Sacramento Valley, and used occupancy models to examine evidence for the effects of landscape-scale GIS-derived variables, local habitat and vegetation composition, and prey communities on patterns of giant gartersnake occurrence. Although our results are based on a relatively small sample of sites, we found that distance to historic marsh, relative fish count, and an interaction of distance to historic marsh with proportion of habitat composed of submerged vegetation were important variables for explaining occupancy of giant gartersnakes. In particular, giant gartersnakes were more likely to occur closer to historic marsh and where relatively fewer fish were captured in traps. At locations in or near historic marsh, giant gartersnakes were more likely to occur in areas with less submerged vegetation, but this relationship was reversed (and more uncertain) at sites distant from historic marsh. Additional research with a larger sample of sites would further elucidate the distribution of giant gartersnakes in the Sacramento Valley.

  4. Assessment of shallow ground-water quality in recently urbanized areas of Sacramento, California, 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence for anthropogenic impact on shallow ground-water quality beneath recently developed urban areas of Sacramento, California, has been observed in the sampling results from 19 monitoring wells in 1998. Eight volatile organic compounds (VOCs), four pesticides, and one pesticide transformation product were detected in low concentrations, and nitrate, as nitrogen, was detected in elevated concentrations; all of these concentrations were below National and State primary and secondary maximum contaminant levels. VOC results from this study are more consistent with the results from urban areas nationwide than from agricultural areas in the Central Valley, indicating that shallow ground-water quality has been impacted by urbanization. VOCs detected may be attributed to either the chlorination of drinking water, such as trichloromethane (chloroform) detected in 16 samples, or to the use of gasoline additives, such as methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), detected in 2 samples. Pesticides detected may be attributed to use on household lawns and gardens and rights-of-way, such as atrazine detected in three samples, or to past agricultural practices, and potentially to ground-water/surface-water interactions, such as bentazon detected in one sample from a well adjacent to the Sacramento River and downstream from where bentazon historically was used on rice. Concentrations of nitrate may be attributed to natural sources, animal waste, old septic tanks, and fertilizers used on lawns and gardens or previously used on agricultural crops. Seven sample concentrations of nitrate, as nitrogen, exceeded 3.0 milligrams per liter, a level that may indicate impact from human activities. Ground-water recharge from rainfall or surface-water runoff also may contribute to the concentrations of VOCs and pesticides observed in ground water. Most VOCs and pesticides detected in ground-water samples also were detected in air and surface-water samples collected at sites within or adjacent to the

  5. Overwintering biology of Culex (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes in the Sacramento Valley of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, Brittany M; Macedo, Paula A; Kothera, Linda; Savage, Harry M; Reisen, William K

    2013-07-01

    At temperate latitudes, Culex (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes typically overwinter as adult females in reproductive arrest and also may serve as reservoir hosts for arboviruses when cold temperatures arrest viral replication. To evaluate their role in the persistence of West Nile virus (WNV) in the Sacramento Valley of California, the induction and termination of diapause were investigated for members of the Culex pipiens (L.) complex, Culex tarsalis Coquillett, and Culex stigmatosoma Dyar under field, seminatural, and experimental conditions. All Culex spp. remained vagile throughout winter, enabling the collection of 3,174 females and 1,706 males from diverse habitats during the winters of 2010-2012. Overwintering strategies included both quiescence and diapause. In addition, Cx. pipiens form molestus Forskäl females remained reproductively active in both underground and aboveground habitats. Some blood-fed, gravid, and parous Cx. tarsalis and Cx. pipiens complex females were collected throughout the winter period. Under both field and experimental conditions, Cx. tarsalis and Cx. stigmatosoma females exposed to autumnal conditions arrested primary follicular maturation at previtellogenic stage I, with primary to secondary follicular ratios or=stage I-II (host-seeking arrest) or were found in various stages of degeneration. Diapause was initiated in the majority of Cx. tarsalis and Cx. stigmatosoma females by mid-late October and was terminated after the winter solstice, but host-seeking seemed limited by temperature. An accrual of 97.52 +/- 30.7 and 162.85 +/- 79.3 degree-days after the winter solstice was estimated to be necessary for diapause termination in Cx. tarsalis under field and seminatural conditions, respectively. An increase in the proportion of blood-fed Culex females in resting collections occurred concurrently with diapause termination in field populations based on ovarian morphometrics. WNV RNA was detected in one pool of 18 males and in a

  6. Overwintering Biology of Culex (Diptera: Culicidae) Mosquitoes in the Sacramento Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    NELMS, BRITTANY M.; MACEDO, PAULA A.; KOTHERA, LINDA; SAVAGE, HARRY M.; REISEN, WILLIAM K.

    2014-01-01

    At temperate latitudes, Culex (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes typically overwinter as adult females in reproductive arrest and also may serve as reservoir hosts for arboviruses when cold temperatures arrest viral replication. To evaluate their role in the persistence of West Nile virus (WNV) in the Sacramento Valley of California, the induction and termination of diapause were investigated for members of the Culex pipiens (L.) complex, Culex tarsalis Coquillett, and Culex stigmatosoma Dyar under field, seminatural, and experimental conditions. All Culex spp. remained vagile throughout winter, enabling the collection of 3,174 females and 1,706 males from diverse habitats during the winters of 2010–2012. Overwintering strategies included both quiescence and diapause. In addition, Cx. pipiens form molestus Forskäl females remained reproductively active in both underground and aboveground habitats. Some blood-fed, gravid, and parous Cx. tarsalis and Cx. pipiens complex females were collected throughout the winter period. Under both field and experimental conditions, Cx. tarsalis and Cx. stigmatosoma females exposed to autumnal conditions arrested primary follicular maturation at previtellogenic stage I, with primary to secondary follicular ratios <1.5 (indicative of a hormonally induced diapause). In contrast, most Cx. pipiens complex females did not enter reproductive diapause and ovarian follicles matured to ≥stage I–II (host-seeking arrest) or were found in various stages of degeneration. Diapause was initiated in the majority of Cx. tarsalis and Cx. stigmatosoma females by mid-late October and was terminated after the winter solstice, but host-seeking seemed limited by temperature. An accrual of 97.52 ± 30.7 and 162.85 ± 79.3 degree-days after the winter solstice was estimated to be necessary for diapause termination in Cx. tarsalis under field and seminatural conditions, respectively. An increase in the proportion of blood-fed Culex females in resting

  7. The contribution of rice agriculture to methylmercury in surface waters: A review of data from the Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, K. Christy; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Fleck, Jacob; Tate, Kenneth W.; McCord, Stephen A.; Linquist, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a bioaccumulative pollutant produced in and exported from flooded soils, including those used for rice (Oriza sativa L.) production. Using unfiltered aqueous MeHg data from MeHg monitoring programs in the Sacramento River watershed from 1996 to 2007, we assessed the MeHg contribution from rice systems to the Sacramento River. Using a mixed-effects regression analysis, we compared MeHg concentrations in agricultural drainage water from rice-dominated regions (AgDrain) to MeHg concentrations in the Sacramento and Feather Rivers, both upstream and downstream of AgDrain inputs. We also calculated MeHg loads from AgDrains and the Sacramento and Feather Rivers. Seasonally, MeHg concentrations were higher during November through May than during June through October, but the differences varied by location. Relative to upstream, November through May AgDrain least-squares mean MeHg concentration (0.18 ng L−1, range 0.15–0.23 ng L−1) was 2.3-fold higher, while June through October AgDrain mean concentration (0.097 ng L−1, range 0.6–1.6 ng L−1) was not significantly different from upstream. June through October AgDrain MeHg loads contributed 10.7 to 14.8% of the total Sacramento River MeHg load. Missing flow data prevented calculation of the percent contribution of AgDrains in November through May. At sites where calculation was possible, November through May loads made up 70 to 90% of the total annual load. Elevated flow and MeHg concentration in November through May both contribute to the majority of the AgDrain MeHg load occurring during this period. Methylmercury reduction efforts should target elevated November through May MeHg concentrations in AgDrains. However, our findings suggest that the contribution and environmental impact of rice is an order of magnitude lower than previous studies in the California Yolo Bypass.

  8. Extracellular hydrolytic enzyme activities of the heterotrophic microbial communities of the Rouge River: an approach to evaluate ecosystem response to urbanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiquia, S M

    2011-10-01

    The potential effects of urbanization on the bioavailability of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were tested by determining the extracellular enzyme activities of the heterotrophic microbial communities of the Rouge River. The activities of 19 enzymes were monitored across two water samples (river water and groundwater) at different spatial and temporal scales. High phosphatase, esterase, and aminopeptidase activities was observed in site 9 (site most exposed to anthropogenic sources) showed higher concentrations of DOC compared to sites 1 and 8 (sites exposed to less anthropogenic sources), where moderate activities of diverse range of enzymes were observed. High relative contributions of phosphatase, esterase, and aminopeptidase activities to the overall enzyme activity as observed in site 9 stressed the increased importance of peptides as C source for heterotrophic communities and high in-stream carbon processing, which account for high nonspecific extracellular enzyme activities. In contrast, high contribution of glycosyl hydrolases occurred consistently across all sites, which highlights the significance of microbial detrital and plant biomass as carbon sources. Majority of the enzymes showed evidence of activity at various extents during spring and summer. However, higher activities of leucine aminopeptidase, valine aminopeptidase, β-glucosidase, and α-mannosidase were observed in the summer; and alkaline phosphatase and α-glucosidase in the spring. The results presented here suggest a shift in organic carbon bioavailability across all sites of contrasting urbanization, despite similarities in DOC concentrations. Hence, API ZYM technique can be used as an effective indicator of river water and groundwater system health across an urban gradient.

  9. Cœur elle y gît rouge (qui gît dans l’élégie ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Conort

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Si le recueil Cœur élégie rouge de James Sacré fait bien apparaître l’ombre d’une femme aimée et perdue, ne voir dans cette élégie qu’une dimension autobiographique serait réducteur, et il faut peut-être y entendre aussi, selon une approche réflexive, le poème qui échoue à restituer le monde, le végétal, les visages. De la sorte, l’élégie serait aussi le deuil de ce rêve, avec le constat de l’incompatibilité du poème et du monde, pour peu que le sujet lyrique s’abandonne à un aveu naïf de son amour. Le poème doit donc se reconstruire comme espérance, projet incessamment relancé d’une écriture par quoi la vie continue. L’élégie ne se contente plus de chanter la perte ni de méditer sur l’inadéquation de la langue, elle tire sa force d’un espoir qui renaît toujours et dont témoigne la prégnance de la métaphore végétale.

  10. Northern pintail body condition during wet and dry winters in the Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    Body weights and carcass composition of male and female adult northern pintails (Anas acuta) were investigated in the Sacramento Valley, California, from August to March 1979-82. Pintails were lightweight, lean, and had reduced breast, leg, and heart muscles during August-September. Ducks steadily gained weight after arrival; and body, carcass (body wt minus feathers and gastrointestinal content), fat protein, and muscle weights peaked in October-November. Fat-free dry weight remained high but variable the rest of the winter, whereas body and carcass weight and fat content declined to lows in December or January, then increased again in February or March. Gizzard weights declined from early fall to March. Males were always heavier than females, but females were fatter (percentage) than males during mid-winter. Mid-winter body weight, carcass fat, and protein content were significantly (P weight and composition during winter are probably adaptations to mild climate, predictable food supplies, and requirements for pair formation and molt.

  11. HCMM: Soil moisture in relation to geologic structure and lithology, northern California. [Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Empirical observations on the ground and examination of aerial color IR photographs indicate that in grassland terrain, the vegetation overlying sandstone tends to become less vigorous sooner in the late spring season than does the area overlain by an adjacent shale unit. The reverse relationship obtains in the fall. These relationships are thought to be a reflection of the relative porosity of each of the units and hence of their ability to retain or lose soil moisture. A comparison of the optically enlarged day and nite IR imagery of the Late Mesozoic interbedded sandstone and shale units along the western margin of the Sacramento Valley, California, taken at seasonally critical times of the year (late spring/early summer and late fall/early winter) reveals subtle seasonal variations of graytone which tend to support the empirical observations after consideration of Sun angle and azimuth, and the internal consistency of the data on each set of satellite imagery.

  12. Associations between water quality, Pasteurella multocida, and avian cholera at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, M.A.; Botzler, R.G.; Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied patterns in avian cholera mortality, the presence of Pasteurella multocida in the water or sediment, and water chemistry characteristics in 10 wetlands at the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex (California, USA), an area of recurrent avian cholera epizootics, during the winters of 1997 and 1998. Avian cholera outbreaks (a?Y50 dead birds) occurred on two wetlands during the winter of 1997, but no P. multocida were recovered from 390 water and 390 sediment samples from any of the 10 wetlands. No mortality events were observed on study wetlands during the winter of 1998; however, P. multocida was recovered from water and sediment samples in six of the 10 study wetlands. The pH levels were higher for wetlands experiencing outbreaks during the winter of 1997 than for nonoutbreak wetlands, and aluminum concentrations were higher in wetlands from which P. multocida were recovered during the winter of 1998. Water chemistry parameters (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and dissolved protein) previously linked with P. multocida and avian cholera mortality were not associated with the occurrence of avian cholera outbreaks or the presence of P. multocida in our study wetlands. Overall, we found no evidence to support the hypothesis that wetland characteristics facilitate the presence of P. multocida and, thereby, allow some wetlands to serve as long-term sources (reservoirs) for P. multocida.

  13. Factors influencing the biogeochemistry of sedimentary carbon and phosphorus in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, E.B.; Delaney, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    This study characterizes organic carbon (Corganic) and phosphorus (P) geochemistry in surface sediments of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California. Sediment cores were collected from five sites on a sample transect from the edge of the San Francisco Bay eastward to the freshwater Consumnes River. The top 8 cm of each core were analyzed (in 1-cm intervals) for Corganic, four P fractions, and redox-sensitive trace metals (uranium and manganese). Sedimentary Corganic concentrations and Corganic:P ratios decreased, while reactive P concentrations increased moving inland in the Delta. The fraction of total P represented by organic P increased inland, while that of authigenic P was higher bayward than inland reflecting increased diagenetic alteration of organic matter toward the bayward end of the transect. The redox indicator metals are consistent with decreasing sedimentary suboxia inland. The distribution of P fractions and C:P ratios reflect the presence of relatively labile organic matter in upstream surface sediments. Sediment C and P geochemistry is influenced by site-specific particulate organic matter sources, the sorptive power of the sedimentary material present, physical forcing, and early diagenetic transformations presumably driven by Corganic oxidation. ?? 2005 Estuarine Research Federation.

  14. Improving Aquatic Plant Management in the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Potter, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Management of aquatic weeds in complex watersheds and river systems present many challenges to assessment, planning and implementation of management practices for floating and submerged aquatic invasive plants. The Delta Region Areawide Aquatic Weed Project (DRAAWP), a USDA sponsored area-wide project, is working to enhance planning, decision-making and operational efficiency in the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Satellite and airborne remote sensing are used map (area coverage and biomass), direct operations, and assess management impacts on plant communities. Archived satellite records going are used to review results from previous climate and management events and aide in developing long-term strategies. Modeling at local and watershed scales provides insight into land-use effects on water quality. Plant growth models informed by remote sensing are being applied spatially across the Delta to balance location and type of aquatic plant, growth response to altered environments, phenology, environmental regulations, and economics in selection of management practices. Initial utilization of remote sensing tools developed for mapping of aquatic invasive weeds improved operational efficiency by focusing limited chemical use to strategic areas with high plant-control impact and incorporating mechanical harvesting when chemical use is restricted. These assessment methods provide a comprehensive and quantitative view of aquatic invasive plants communities in the California Delta, both spatial and temporal, informed by ecological understanding with the objective of improving management and assessment effectiveness.

  15. Characterization of subsurface stratigraphy along the lower American River floodplain using electrical resistivity, Sacramento, California, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Bethany L.; Powers, Michael H.; Ball, Lyndsay B.

    2014-01-01

    In July 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, completed a geophysical survey using electrical resistivity along an approximately 6-mile reach of the lower American River in Sacramento, California, to map near-surface lithological variations. This survey is a part of a manifold and comprehensive study of river-flow dynamics and geologic boundary-property knowledge necessary to estimate scour potential and levee erosion risk. Data were acquired on the left (south or west) bank between river mile 5 and 10.7 as well as a short section on the right bank from river mile 5.4 to 6. Thirteen direct-current resistivity profiles and approximately 8.3 miles of capacitively coupled resisistivity data were acquired along accessible areas of the floodplain between the levee and river bank. Capacitively coupled resistivity was used as a reconnaissance tool, because it allowed for greater spatial coverage of data but with lower resolution and depth of investigation than the DC resistivity method. The study area contains Pleistocene-age alluvial deposits, dominated by gravels, sands, silts, and clays, that vary in both lateral extent and depth. Several generations of lithologic logs were used to help interpret resistivity variations observed in the resistivity models.

  16. Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) monitoring techniques in the Sacramento--San Joaquin Estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    Various methods have been used to monitor the striped bass population in the Sacramento--San Joaquin Estuary. Sampling in the spring with towed plankton nets has provided an adequate description of spawning time and area, but this sampling has not adequately measured egg standing crops and larva and post-larva mortality rates. Tow-net sampling effectively measures the abundance of young in midsummer. A midwater-trawl survey is satisfactory for measuring the abundance of young in the fall but not in the winter. Techniques have not been fully evaluated for monitoring one-year-old bass. Catch-per-unit-effort data from sportfishing party boats were useful for monitoring two-year-olds, until a change in angling regulations increased recruitment age. The Petersen method and indices developed from party-boat catches are the best methods for monitoring bass that are three years old and older. Long-term trends in catch can be monitored through postcard surveys and party-boat catches

  17. Fall and winter foods of northern pintails in the Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Food habits of northern pintails (Anas acuta) were investigated on 3 national wildlife refuges in the western portion of the Sacramento Valley, California, from August to March 1979-82. Pintails consumed 97% (aggregate % dry wt) plant food during diurnal foraging on national wildlife refuge rice, summer-irrigated, and summer-dry habitats from August through January. Invertebrate use increased to 28.9-65.6% of the diet in these habitats during February and March. Rice, swamp timothy (Heleochloa schoenoides), flatsedges (Cyperus spp.), common barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crusgalli), southern naiad (Najas guadalupensis), and smartweed (Polygonum spp.) seeds, miscellaneous vegetation, snails (Gastropoda), and midge (Diptera) and water beetle (Coleoptera) larvae were most important. These foods usually were taken proportional to or greater than availability. Rice was the most important food of pintails feeding nocturnally off the refuges in harvested rice fields from October through January (99.7%) and February and March (63%; barnyardgrass formed 31% of the diet). In August and October, some pintails consumed invertebrates or bulrush (Scirpus spp. ) seedlings in marshes soon after feeding in refuge rice (Aug) or harvested commercial rice fields (Oct), thereby increasing dietary protein. In late winter, females and males obtained similar (P > 0.05) percentages of invertebrates from refuge habitats. Important dietary seeds and invertebrates contained high protein or metabolizable energy content. Management should maintain adequate seed production in fall and mid-winter and invertebrate biomass in late winter.

  18. Functional variability of habitats within the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: Restoration implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, L.V.; Cloern, J.E.; Thompson, J.K.; Monsen, N.E.

    2002-01-01

    We have now entered an era of large-scale attempts to restore ecological functions and biological communities in impaired ecosystems. Our knowledge base of complex ecosystems and interrelated functions is limited, so the outcomes of specific restoration actions are highly uncertain. One approach for exploring that uncertainty and anticipating the range of possible restoration outcomes is comparative study of existing habitats similar to future habitats slated for construction. Here we compare two examples of one habitat type targeted for restoration in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. We compare one critical ecological function provided by these shallow tidal habitats - production and distribution of phytoplankton biomass as the food supply to pelagic consumers. We measured spatial and short-term temporal variability of phytoplankton biomass and growth rate and quantified the hydrodynamic and biological processes governing that variability. Results show that the production and distribution of phytoplankton biomass can be highly variable within and between nearby habitats of the same type, due to variations in phytoplankton sources, sinks, and transport. Therefore, superficially similar, geographically proximate habitats can function very differently, and that functional variability introduces large uncertainties into the restoration process. Comparative study of existing habitats is one way ecosystem science can elucidate and potentially minimize restoration uncertainties, by identifying processes shaping habitat functionality, including those that can be controlled in the restoration design.

  19. Blood-feeding patterns of the Culex pipiens complex in Sacramento and Yolo Counties, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Matthew J; Thiemann, Tara; Macedo, Paula; Brown, David A; Scott, Thomas W

    2011-03-01

    Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex are competent vectors of West Nile virus (WNV; family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus) in the laboratory, and field-collected mosquitoes have tested positive for the virus in California and elsewhere. A better understanding of Cx. pipiens complex blood-feeding patterns will help define the threat that these mosquitoes pose to human health and their role in WNV amplification in northern California. We collected blood-engorged Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes from resting sites near and away from human habitation in Sacramento and Yolo Counties. Cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene sequences were used to identify the vertebrate species from which blood meals were taken. Of 330 engorged mosquitoes collected at 28 sites from June through August 2007 and May through August 2008, >99% fed on an avian host. Three mosquitoes contained bovine blood and none had fed on a human. American Robins (Turdus migratorius) were bitten most often, and the proportion of American Robin blood meals increased significantly over the summer. Other important avian hosts included House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus), Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica), Western Meadowlarks (Sturnella neglecta), and Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura). In rural areas, Barn Swallows, Brewer's Blackbirds (Euphagus cyanocephalus), and House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) were frequent hosts. In settings near human habitation, Mourning Doves and Western Meadowlarks were common hosts. Our data indicate that in north central California mosquitoes in the Cx. pipiens complex may be more important as epiornitic than epidemic vectors of WNV.

  20. Occurrence and Transport of Diazinon in the Sacramento River and Selected Tributaries, California, during Two Winter Storms, January?February 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileanis, Peter D.; Brown, David L.; Knifong, Donna L.; Saleh, Dina

    2003-01-01

    Diazinon, an organophosphate insecticide, is applied as an orchard dormant spray in the Sacramento Valley during the winter months when the area receives most of its annual rainfall. During winter rainstorms that frequently follow dormant spray applications, some of the applied pesticide is transported in storm runoff to the Sacramento River and its tributaries. Diazinon is also used to control insect pests on residential and commercial properties in urban areas and is frequently detected in urban storm runoff draining into the Sacramento River system. Between January 24 and February 14, 2001, diazinon concentrations and loads were measured in the Sacramento River and selected tributaries during two winter storms that occurred after dormant spray applications were made to orchards in the Sacramento Valley. Water samples were collected at 21 sites that represented agricultural and urban inputs on a variety of scales, from small tributaries and drains representing local land use to main-stem river sites representing regional effects. Concentrations of diazinon ranged from below laboratory reporting levels to 1,380 nanograms per liter (ng/L), with a median of 55 ng/L during the first monitored storm and 26 ng/L during the second. The highest concentrations were observed in small channels draining predominantly agricultural land. About 26,000 pounds of diazinon were reported applied to agricultural land in the study area just before and during the monitoring period. About 0.2 percent of the applied insecticide appeared to be transported to the lower Sacramento River during that period. The source of about one third of the total load measured in the lower Sacramento River appears to be in the portion of the drainage basin upstream of the city of Colusa. About 12 percent of the diazinon load in the lower Sacramento River was transported from the Feather River Basin, which drains much of the mountainous eastern portions of the Sacramento River Basin. Diazinon use in the

  1. Handing-over the baton

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    From left to right: M. Bühler-Broglin, A. Fucci, C. Roche, P. Troendle. After serving the Organisation for three decades, an emblematic figure of CERN, Manfred Bühler-Broglin, has just retired. At CERN he initially spent several years in experimental physics before becoming involved in the planning of CERN resources, first in the administration of research, and then in the administration of the two largest projects at CERN: LEP and the LHC. During the course of the past twenty years, he became the privileged and highly respected CERN linkman with the elected regional authorities. In this capacity he represented CERN during the delicate discussions prior to the construction of LEP and the LHC. In particular, he was Editor of the impressive Etude d'impact  (Impact study), crucial for the approval of the implementation of LHC in the Pays de Gex by the French authorities. Highly motivated by the protection of our wonderful environment, he also advised the Director-General in this fiel...

  2. Quantifying Activated Floodplains on a Lowland Regulated River: Its Application to Floodplain Restoration in the Sacramento Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip B. Williams

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a process and methodology for quantifying the extent of a type of historically prevalent, but now relatively rare, ecologically-valuable floodplains in the Sacramento lowland river system: frequently-activated floodplains. We define a specific metric the “Floodplain Activation Flow” (FAF, which is the smallest flood pulse event that initiates substantial beneficial ecological processes when associated with floodplain inundation. The “Activated Floodplain” connected to the river is then determined by comparison of FAF stage with floodplain topography. This provides a simple definition of floodplain that can be used as a planning, goal setting, monitoring, and design tool by resource managers since the FAF event is the smallest flood and corresponding floodplain area with ecological functionality—and is necessarily also inundated in larger flood events, providing additional ecological functions. For the Sacramento River we selected a FAF definition to be the river stage that occurs in two out of three years for at least seven days in the mid-March to mid-May period and "Activated Floodplains" to be those lands inundated at that stage. We analyzed Activated Floodplain area for four representative reaches along the lower Sacramento River and the Yolo Bypass using stream gauge data. Three of the most significant conclusions are described: (1 The area of active functional floodplain is likely to be less than commonly assumed based on extent of riparian vegetation; (2 Levee setbacks may not increase the extent of this type of ecologically-productive floodplain without either hydrologic or topographic changes; (3 Within the Yolo Bypass, controlled releases through the Fremont Weir could maximize the benefits associated with Activated Floodplain without major reservoir re-operation or grading. This approach identifies a significant opportunity to integrate floodplain restoration with flood management by establishing a FAF stage

  3. The weekend effect within and downwind of Sacramento ─ Part 1: Observations of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and VOC reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Goldstein

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Day-of-week patterns in human activities can be used to examine the ways in which differences in primary emissions result in changes in the rates of photochemical reactions, and the production of secondary pollutants. Data from twelve California Air Resources Board monitoring sites in Sacramento, CA, and the downwind Mountain Counties air basin are analyzed to reveal day of week patterns in ozone and its precursors in the summers of 1998–2002. Measurements of non-methane hydrocarbons are available for the summers of 2001–2003 at three of these sites and NOx at six of these sites for the full time period. This routine monitoring data is complemented by data sets of ozone and nitrogen oxide concentrations obtained in the summers of 2001 and 2003 at three sites in the region and comprehensive measurements of VOC reactivity at two sites in 2001. Daytime concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx≡NO+NO2 are approximately 35% lower on weekends at all the sites, whereas the VOC reactivity changes by less than 10%. All six sites in the Sacramento Valley have higher 8-h maximum average ozone on the weekend and are more likely to exceed the national standard of 85 ppb on the weekend. In contrast, all the sites in the Mountain Counties are less likely to exceed the federal ozone standard on the weekend. Analysis of the day-of-week trends in odd oxygen show that the weekend effect of ozone within Sacramento is strongly influenced by NO sources close to the monitoring sites. This suggests that ozone measurements from monitoring sites close to highways, including two rural locations, may not be representative of the regional abundance, and lead to underestimates of long term exposure for humans and ecosystems.

  4. Monitoring Salmonella, Campylobacter, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in traditional free-range 'Label Rouge' broiler production: a 23-year survey programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvat, G; Guyot, M; Protino, J

    2017-01-01

    'Label Rouge' broiler free-range carcasses have been monitored since 1991, and broiler flocks since 2010, for contamination by the main foodborne zoonotic bacteria. Initially, the monitoring plan mainly focused on the surveillance of Salmonella, and on indicators of the overall microbiological quality of free-range broiler carcasses such as Staphylococcus aureus and coliforms, but was extended in 2007 to include Campylobacter enumeration on carcasses and in 2010, to Salmonella in the environment of live birds. Salmonella contamination of free-range broiler carcasses rose to a peak of 16% in 1994 but less than 1% of carcasses are now regularly found to be positive. Indicators of the overall microbiological quality of carcasses are also improving. These results correlate with the low prevalence of Salmonella in free-range broiler breeding and production flocks, and with the continuous improvement of hazard analysis and critical control points in slaughterhouses, the implementation of a good manufacturing practice guide since 1997 and the application of EU regulations on Salmonella since 1998 in France. Regarding Campylobacter counts on carcasses, the situation has been improving continuously over the last few years, even if 2·5% of the carcasses are still contaminated by more than 1000 Campylobacter per g of skin. Although the current control system focusing on Salmonella is based on firm epidemiologic data and offers effective means of control (e.g. slaughtering of positive breeder flocks), existing information on Campylobacter makes it more difficult to formulate an effective control plan for free-range broilers, due to their particular exposure to environmental contamination. This long-term surveillance programme provided an extended view of the evolution of the contamination of free-range broilers and a direct measurement of the impact of mandatory and profession-driven interventions on the microbiological quality of carcasses. © 2016 The Society for Applied

  5. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory H. Golet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale ecosystem restoration projects seldom undergo comprehensive evaluation to determine project effectiveness. Consequently, there are missed opportunities for learning and strategy refinement. Before our study, monitoring information from California’s middle Sacramento River had not been synthesized, despite restoration having been ongoing since 1989. Our assessment was based on the development and application of 36 quantitative ecological indicators. These indicators were used to characterize the status of terrestrial and floodplain resources (e.g., flora and fauna, channel dynamics (e.g., planform, geomorphology, and the flow regime. Indicators were also associated with specific goal statements of the CALFED Ecosystem Restoration Program. A collective weight of evidence approach was used to assess restoration success. Our synthesis demonstrates good progress in the restoration of riparian habitats, birds and other wildlife, but not in restoration of streamflows and geomorphic processes. For example, from 1999 to 2007, there was a > 600% increase in forest patch core size, and a 43% increase in the area of the river bordered by natural habitat > 500 m wide. Species richness of landbirds and beetles increased at restoration sites, as did detections of bats. However, degraded post-Shasta Dam streamflow conditions continued. Relative to pre-dam conditions, the average number of years that pass between flows that are sufficient to mobilize the bed, and those that are of sufficient magnitude to inundate the floodplain, increased by over 100%. Trends in geomorphic processes were strongly negative, with increases in the amount of bank hardened with riprap, and decreases in the area of floodplain reworked. Overall the channel simplified, becoming less sinuous with reduced overall channel length. Our progress assessment presents a compelling case for what needs to be done to further advance the ecological restoration of the river. The most

  6. Levee Vertical Land Motion Changes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, J. W.; Brooks, B. A.; Glennie, C. L.; Ericksen, T. L.; Knowles, N.

    2017-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is home to numerous islands that provide economically and agriculturally important land. However, the island interiors are sinking and most sit below sea level, making the levee roads that surround the islands vital for their continued health and productivity. Airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data over the islands was collected in 2007 by the California Department of Water Resources and mobile LiDAR data was collected along the levee roads on Bacon, Bouldin, Jersey, and Brannan-Andrus Islands in 2015 and 2016 by the USGS. These datasets provide high resolution topographic models with 8 year separation that can be used to examine topographic change along the levees. A cross-section of each dataset was output along the approximate centerline of the levee road, so that profiles of the 2007 and 2015/2016 LiDAR observations could be compared. Regions of levee road subsidence and of levee road construction and reinforcement on the order of 0-3 centimeters per year were evident in locations around the islands. There is a high degree of spatial variability of these rates even for individual islands. These results were compared to the levee road maps published by the CA Delta Stewardship Council and it was found that the regions of reinforcement and subsidence did not always align between the published maps and the LiDAR data. Additionally, the levee road heights and rates of change, in regions of road subsidence, were compared to sea level rise projections to evaluate the risk that rising sea level may pose to the islands in the future.

  7. Sources, bioavailability, and photoreactivity of dissolved organic carbon in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanauskas, R.; Moran, M.A.; Bergamaschi, B.A.; Hollibaugh, J.T.

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed bioavailability, photoreactivity, fluorescence, and isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) collected at 13 stations in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta during various seasons to estimate the persistence of DOC from diverse shallow water habitat sources. Prospective large-scale wetland restorations in the Delta may change the amount of DOC available to the food web as well as change the quality of Delta water exported for municipal use. Our study indicates that DOC contributed by Delta sources is relatively refractory and likely mostly the dissolved remnants of vascular plant material from degrading soils and tidal marshes rather than phytoplankton production. Therefore, the prospective conversion of agricultural land into submerged, phytoplankton-dominated habitats may reduce the undesired export of DOC from the Delta to municipal users. A median of 10% of Delta DOC was rapidly utilizable by bacterioplankton. A moderate dose of simulated solar radiation (286 W m-2 for 4 h) decreased the DOC bioavailability by an average of 40%, with a larger relative decrease in samples with higher initial DOC bioavailability. Potentially, a DOC-based microbial food web could support ???0.6 ?? 109 g C of protist production in the Delta annually, compared to ???17 ?? 109 g C phytoplankton primary production. Thus, DOC utilization via the microbial food web is unlikely to play an important role in the nutrition of Delta zooplankton and fish, and the possible decrease in DOC concentration due to wetland restoration is unlikely to have a direct effect on Delta fish productivity. ?? Springer 2005.

  8. Education, bilingualism, and cognitive trajectories: Sacramento Area Latino Aging Study (SALSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Dan; Early, Dawnté R; Glymour, M Maria; Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Haan, Mary N

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the influence of education, country where education occurred, and monolingual-bilingual (English/Spanish) language usage on late life cognitive trajectories in the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (SALSA), an epidemiological study of health and cognition in Hispanics, mostly of Mexican origin, age 60 and over (N = 1,499). SALSA followed a large cohort of older Latinos for up to 7 assessment waves from 1998 to 2007. Global cognition was assessed by using the Modified Mini Mental State Examination, and the Spanish English Verbal Learning Test was used to measure episodic memory. Education, country of origin, and language usage patterns were collected at the baseline assessment and used as predictors of longitudinal trajectories of cognition. Parallel process mixed effects models were used to examine effects of education and language variables on baseline cognition and rate of cognitive decline. Mixed effects longitudinal models showed that education had strong effects on baseline global cognition and verbal memory but was not related to decline over up to 9 years of longitudinal follow-up. Differences in education effects between subgroups educated in Mexico and in the United States were minor. Monolingual-bilingual language usage was not related to cognitive decline, and bilinguals did not significantly differ from monolingual English speakers on baseline cognitive scores. Hypotheses that higher education and bilingualism protect against late life cognitive decline were not supported and education effects on late-life cognitive trajectories did not substantially differ across U.S.- and Mexico-educated groups. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Nitrification and Microbial Activity in Response to Wastewater Effluent in the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challenor, T.; Damashek, J.; Tolar, B. B.; Francis, C.; Casciotti, K. L.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonium (NH4+) to nitrate (NO3-) by a coterie of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA), is a crucial step in removing nitrogen from marine ecosystems. The Sacramento/San Joaquin River delta receives ammonium-laden effluent from the Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant (SRWTP) and nitrate from agriculture runoff. The system provides freshwater to irrigate the Central Valley and drinking water for many millions of people. In recent years, however, this environment has experienced ecological turmoil - the Pelagic Organism Decline (POD) refers to a die-out of fish and other species over the course of three decades. One explanation implicated excessive ammonium input, claiming it limited primary productivity and hurt pelagic fish down the line. A new hypothesis, however, posits that the ecosystem may soon face the opposite problem: over-productivity and hypoxia due to increased light availability and reduced turbidity. Studying the rate of nitrification and the makeup of the microbial community will further elucidate how nutrient loading has impacted this ecosystem. Nitrification rates were calculated from water samples collected in the Sacramento River starting at the SRWTP and moving downstream. Samples were spiked with 15N-labeled ammonium and incubated for 24 hours in triplicate. Four time-points were extracted and the "denitrifier" method was used to measure the isotopic ratio of N over time. DNA and RNA were extracted from filtered water at each site and PCR and qPCR assays were used targeting the amoA gene, which encodes the α-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase, responsible for oxidizing ammonium to nitrite (NO2-). Consistent with previous nitrification data, rates were highest in the lower river downstream of the SRWTP, where nitrate concentrations were correspondingly elevated. AOB predominated in the ammonia oxidizing community, and some clades were unique to this ecosystem. Nitrifying microbes provide an

  10. Aspectos do cotidiano dos mercadores na Colônia do Sacramento durante o governo de Antônio Pedro de Vasconcelos (1722-1749)

    OpenAIRE

    Possamai, Paulo César

    2002-01-01

    Este trabalho tem por propósito reconstituir a vida cotidiana dos mercadores na Colônia do Sacramento: seus problemas com a repressão ao comércio ilícito, pratica­da pelas autoridades espanholas, a concorrência dos contrabandistas britânicos e seu papel na defesa do povoado durante o sítio de 1735-1737. This paper aims to reconstruct the daily routine of the merchants in Colônia do Sacramento: the problems they faced with the Spanish officials' who attempted to inhibit illegal trade, the c...

  11. SOLDADOS DO NORTE NAS GUERRAS DO SUL: O RECRUTAMENTO MILITAR NA BAHIA E EM PERNAMBUCO PARA A COLÔNIA DO SACRAMENTO

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo César Possamai

    2011-01-01

    O Norte do Estado do Brasil contribuiu com a formação e defesa da Colônia do Sacramento. Este artigo abordará o recrutamento militar nas capitanias do Norte, especialmente na Bahia e em Pernambuco durante o século XVIII. Daremos ênfase ao período do cerco de 1735 a 1737, quando foi feito um intenso recrutamento em Portugal e em várias capitanias brasileiras visando a impedir a conquista de Sacramento pelos espanhóis, assim como fortificar o Rio Grande de São Pedro, de onde poucos homens conse...

  12. Changes in the status of harvested rice fields in the Sacramento Valley, California: Implications for wintering waterfowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael R.; Garr, Jay D.; Coates, Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Harvested rice fields provide critical foraging habitat for wintering waterfowl in North America, but their value depends upon post-harvest treatments. We visited harvested ricefields in the Sacramento Valley, California, during the winters of 2007 and 2008 (recent period) and recorded their observed status as harvested (standing or mechanically modified stubble), burned, plowed, or flooded. We compared these data with those from identical studies conducted during the 1980s (early period). We documented substantial changes in field status between periods. First, the area of flooded rice increased 4-5-fold, from about 15% to >40% of fields, because of a 3-4-fold increase in the percentage of fields flooded coupled with a 37-41% increase in the area of rice produced. Concurrently, the area of plowed fields increased from 35% of fields, burned fields declined from about 40% to 1%, and fields categorized as harvested declined from 22-54% to harvested.We encourage waterfowl managers to implement a rice field status survey in the Sacramento Valley and other North American rice growing regions as appropriate to support long-term monitoring programs and wetland habitat conservation planning for wintering waterfowl.

  13. Erratum dated 2014 June 25: Fate and Transport of Three Pharmaceuticals in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minta M. Schaefer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs are found in surface waters worldwide. Wastewater treatment plant effluent is a major source of these contaminants. The Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta (Delta is a unique aquatic ecosystem, a source of drinking water for over 25 million Californians, and a primary source of water for Central Valley agriculture. The sharp decline of four pelagic fish species in the Delta in the last decade is just one of several indicators that the ecosystem is severely impaired. Several wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs discharge into the Delta, directly or through tributaries. The presence of PPCPs in the Delta has received very little attention relative to the immense effort underway to rehabilitate the ecosystem. This study determined concentrations of PPCPs in the Sacramento River in the vicinity of the Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant using passive sampler monitoring. These data were used to estimate loads of three of the detected pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine, fluoxetine, and trimethoprim from nine other WWTPs that discharge to the Delta. The 2-D, finite element, Resource Management Associates (RMA Delta Model was then applied to determine the distribution that might result from these discharges. The model was run for the 2006, 2007, and 2009 water years. Results indicate that it is feasible that WWTP discharges could result in chronic presence of these pharmaceuticals at low ng L-1 levels at all 45 model output locations and, therefore, aquatic organisms within the Delta may be continually exposed to these contaminants.

  14. Tuning the light in senior care: Evaluating a trial LED lighting system at the ACC Care Center in Sacramento, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert G.; Wilkerson, Andrea M.; Samla, Connie; Bisbee, Dave

    2016-08-31

    This report summarizes the results from a trial installation of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting systems in several spaces within the ACC Care Center in Sacramento, CA. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) coordinated the project and invited the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to document the performance of the LED lighting systems as part of a GATEWAY evaluation. DOE tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct the investigation. SMUD and ACC staff coordinated and completed the design and installation of the LED systems, while PNNL and SMUD staff evaluated the photometric performance of the systems. ACC staff also track behavioral and health measures of the residents; some of those results are reported here, although PNNL staff were not directly involved in collecting or interpreting those data. The trial installation took place in a double resident room and a single resident room, and the corridor that connects those (and other) rooms to the central nurse station. Other spaces in the trial included the nurse station, a common room called the family room located near the nurse station, and the ACC administrator’s private office.

  15. Paleotopography and substrate lithology as controls on initiation of Waulsortian Reef Growth: examples from Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahr, W.M.; Blount, W.M.; George, P.G.; Morey, E.D.

    1986-05-01

    Frameless mud mounds, usually called Waulsortian reefs, are common in Osagean and Kinderhookian rocks of North America and western Europe. Spectacular Waulsortian reefs crop out in the Sacramento Mountains of New Mexico along 10 mi of continuous exposure, where detailed petrographic studies and field measurements of the strata between the top of the Devonian and the base of the reefs reveal: (1) down-to-the-southwest paleoslope on an uneven, gently dipping ramp; (2) widespread deposition of skeletal packstones and siliciclastics to the northeast; (3) patchy, local thicks of skeletal packstones surrounded by shaly wackestones to the southwest; (4) relict highs on the Devonian surface beneath the skeletal packstone pods; (5) clusters of sheetlike reefs weakly associated with paleotopography in the northern outcrops; and (6) large, dome-like individual reefs strongly associated with depositional topography and skeletal packstone/grainstone substrates in the southern outcrops. The pre-reef strata do not exhibit abrupt changes in thickness or lithology to indicate a break in regional slope, and the reefs are not aligned with patterns in thickness of facies that would distinguish shelf-edge environments from lagoonal environments. Like their European counterparts, the Osagean reefs in the Sacramento Mountains grew on a ramp where the nonreef facies were grainy updip and muddy downdip, and reef anatomy varied from sheetlike updip to dome-like downdip. The association between paleotopography, substrate lithology, and the initiation of Waulsortian reef growth provides new information about regional depositional patterns in the Early Mississippian.

  16. Base-flow investigation on the Sacramento River, September 25, 1985, near Sunspot, Otero County, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Clint D.

    1990-01-01

    On September 25, 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a base-flow investigation to better define the surface-water resources of the Sacramento River drainage basin in Otero County , south-central New Mexico. The investigation included all flow in the Sacramento River from the initial point of flow to the point of zero flow 20.1 river miles downstream. A total of 12 discharge measurements, 3 observations of zero flow and 2 observations of initial flow were obtained during this investigation. Discharge measurements and observations showed a general increase in discharge from river mile 22.4 to a discharge of 6.69 cu ft/sec at river mile 8.4. Discharge then decreased from river mile 8.4 to zero flow at river mile 3.3. Specific conductance and water temperature also were taken concurrently with the discharge measurements. Specific conductance of water generally decreased in a downstream direction from 600 microsiemens/cm at 25 C at river mile 21.9 to 330 microsiemens/cm at 25C at river mile 4.6. (USGS)

  17. Levee Seepage Detection in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Using Polarimetric SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, K.; Jones, C. E.; Bekaert, D. P.

    2017-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta's extensive levee system protects over 2,800 km2 of reclaimed lands and serves as the main irrigation and domestic water supply for the state of California. However, ongoing subsidence and disaster threats from floods and earthquakes make the Delta levee system highly vulnerable, endangering water supplies for 23 million California residents and 2.5 million acres of agricultural land. Levee failure in the Delta can cause saltwater intrusion from San Francisco Bay, reducing water quality and curtailing water exports to residents, commercial users, and farmers. To protect the Delta levee system, it is essential to search for signs of seepage in which water is piping through or beneath levees, which can be associated with deformation of the levees themselves. Until now, in-situ monitoring has largely been applied, however, this is a time-consuming and expensive approach. We use data acquired with NASA's UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar) airborne radar instrument to identify and characterize levee seepages and associated land subsidence through advanced remote sensing technologies. The high spatial resolution of UAVSAR can help to direct surveys to areas that are likely to be experiencing damage. UAVSAR is an L-band airborne sensor with high signal-to-noise ratio, repeat flight track accuracy, and spatial resolution of 7x7 m2 (for multi-looked products) that is necessary for detailed levee monitoring. The adaptability of radar instruments in their ability to see through smoke, haze, and clouds during the day or night, is especially relevant during disaster events, when cloud cover or lack of solar illumination inhibits traditional visual surveys of damage. We demonstrate the advantages of combining polarimetric radar imagery with geographic information systems (GIS) datasets in locating seepage features along critical levee infrastructure in the Delta for 2009-2016. The ability to efficiently locate potential

  18. Insights into controls on hexavalent chromium in groundwater provided by environmental tracers, Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Andrew H.; Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Ball, Lyndsay B.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental tracers are useful for determining groundwater age and recharge source, yet their application in studies of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater has been limited. Environmental tracer data from 166 wells located in the Sacramento Valley, northern California, were interpreted and compared to Cr concentrations to determine the origin and age of groundwater with elevated Cr(VI), and better understand where Cr(VI) becomes mobilized and how it evolves along flowpaths. In addition to major ion and trace element concentrations, the dataset includes δ18O, δ2H, 3H concentration, 14C activity (of dissolved inorganic C), δ13C, 3He/4He ratio, and noble gas concentrations (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe). Noble gas recharge temperatures (NGTs) were computed, and age-related tracers were interpreted in combination to constrain the age distribution in samples and sort them into six different age categories spanning from 10,000 yr old. Nearly all measured Cr is in the form of Cr(IV). Concentrations range from 3 mg L−1), and commonly have δ18O values enriched relative to local precipitation. These samples likely contain irrigation water and are elevated due to accelerated mobilization of Cr(VI) in the unsaturated zone (UZ) in irrigated areas. Group 2 samples are from throughout the valley and typically contain water 1000–10,000 yr old, have δ18O values consistent with local precipitation, and have unexpectedly warm NGTs. Chromium(VI) concentrations in Group 2 samples may be elevated for multiple reasons, but the hypothesis most consistent with all available data (notably, the warm NGTs) is a relatively long UZ residence time due to recharge through a deep UZ near the margin of the basin. A possible explanation for why Cr(VI) may be primarily mobilized in the UZ rather than farther along flowpaths in the oxic portion of the saturated zone is more dynamic cycling of Mn in the UZ due to transient moisture and redox conditions.

  19. Geophysical surveying in the Sacramento Delta for earthquake hazard assessment and measurement of peat thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, M. S.; Kundariya, N.; Hayashi, K.; Srinivas, A.; Burnham, M.; Oikawa, P.

    2017-12-01

    Near surface geophysical surveys were conducted in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta for earthquake hazard assessment and to provide estimates of peat thickness for use in carbon models. Delta islands have experienced 3-8 meters of subsidence during the past century due to oxidation and compaction of peat. Projected sea level rise over the next century will contribute to an ongoing landward shift of the freshwater-saltwater interface, and increase the risk of flooding due to levee failure or overtopping. Seismic shear wave velocity (VS) was measured in the upper 30 meters to determine Uniform Building Code (UBC)/ National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) site class. Both seismic and ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods were employed to estimate peat thickness. Seismic surface wave surveys were conducted at eight sites on three islands and GPR surveys were conducted at two of the sites. Combined with sites surveyed in 2015, the new work brings the total number of sites surveyed in the Delta to twenty.Soil boreholes were made at several locations using a hand auger, and peat thickness ranged from 2.1 to 5.5 meters. Seismic surveys were conducted using the multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method and the microtremor array method (MAM). On Bouldin Island, VS of the surficial peat layer was 32 m/s at a site with pure peat and 63 m/s at a site peat with higher clay and silt content. Velocities at these sites reached a similar value, about 125 m/s, at a depth of 10 m. GPR surveys were performed at two sites on Sherman Island using 100 MHz antennas, and indicated the base of the peat layer at a depth of about 4 meters, consistent with nearby auger holes.The results of this work include VS depth profiles and UBC/NEHRP site classifications. Seismic and GPR methods may be used in a complementary fashion to estimate peat thickness. The seismic surface wave method is a relatively robust method and more effective than GPR in many areas with high clay

  20. Characterizing the SWOT discharge error budget on the Sacramento River, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Y.; Durand, M. T.; Minear, J. T.; Smith, L.; Merry, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) is an upcoming satellite mission (2020 year) that will provide surface-water elevation and surface-water extent globally. One goal of SWOT is the estimation of river discharge directly from SWOT measurements. SWOT discharge uncertainty is due to two sources. First, SWOT cannot measure channel bathymetry and determine roughness coefficient data necessary for discharge calculations directly; these parameters must be estimated from the measurements or from a priori information. Second, SWOT measurement errors directly impact the discharge estimate accuracy. This study focuses on characterizing parameter and measurement uncertainties for SWOT river discharge estimation. A Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo scheme is used to calculate parameter estimates, given the measurements of river height, slope and width, and mass and momentum constraints. The algorithm is evaluated using simulated both SWOT and AirSWOT (the airborne version of SWOT) observations over seven reaches (about 40 km) of the Sacramento River. The SWOT and AirSWOT observations are simulated by corrupting the ';true' HEC-RAS hydraulic modeling results with the instrument error. This experiment answers how unknown bathymetry and roughness coefficients affect the accuracy of the river discharge algorithm. From the experiment, the discharge error budget is almost completely dominated by unknown bathymetry and roughness; 81% of the variance error is explained by uncertainties in bathymetry and roughness. Second, we show how the errors in water surface, slope, and width observations influence the accuracy of discharge estimates. Indeed, there is a significant sensitivity to water surface, slope, and width errors due to the sensitivity of bathymetry and roughness to measurement errors. Increasing water-surface error above 10 cm leads to a corresponding sharper increase of errors in bathymetry and roughness. Increasing slope error above 1.5 cm/km leads to a

  1. Initial Development of Riparian and Marsh Vegetation on Dredged-material Islands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Sidney England; Mark K. Sogge; Roy A. Woodward

    1989-01-01

    Natural vegetation establishment and development were monitored for 3 1/2 years on a new, dredged-material island located within the breached levees at Donlon Island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Vegetation measurements and maps prepared annually indicate that marsh and riparian vegetation types have developed rapidly. Topographic data for the island has...

  2. Non-Western Music: A Selected Bibliography of Materials in the California State University, Sacramento Library. Third Edition. Bibliographic Series No. 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donna Ridley, Comp.

    This bibliography cites materials dealing with non-western music which are in the Sacramento Library at California State University. The geographic areas covered are Oceania, Africa, the Middle East, and all of Asia. Listed are reference works, encyclopedias, monographs, bibliographies, songbooks, filmstrips, audiotapes, and indexes to periodicals…

  3. GATEWAY Demonstrations: Tuning the Light in Senior Care: Evaluating a Trial LED Lighting System at the ACC Care Center in Sacramento, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilkerson, Andrea M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Samla, Connie [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bisbee, Dave [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The GATEWAY program documented the performance of tunable-white LED lighting systems installed in several spaces within the ACC Care Center, a senior-care facility in Sacramento, CA. The project results included energy savings and improved lighting quality, as well as other possible health-related benefits that may have been attributable, at least in part, to the lighting changes.

  4. An urban-forest control measure for ozone in the Sacramento, CA federal non-attainment area (SFNA) Sustainable Cities and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider Taha; James Wilkinson; Robert Bornstein; Qingfu Xiao; E. Gregory McPherson; Jim Simpson; Charles Anderson; Steven Lau; Janice Lam; Cindy. Blain

    2015-01-01

    Urban forest strategies of gradually replacing high emitters of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) with low-emitting species are being considered as voluntary or emerging control measures for maintenance of the 8-h ozone standard in the Sacramento Federal Non-Attainment Area (SFNA). We describe a regulatory modeling study demonstrating the air-quality impacts...

  5. Floodplain development in engineered and natural settings determined with novel, high resolution 210-Pb geochronology: Insights from sedimentation studies along the lower Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, R.; Singer, M. B.

    2008-12-01

    This presentation summarizes results from studies of floodplain sedimentation along the middle and lower Sacramento River that investigate processes using a new, high resolution methodology for 210Pb geochronology of 1-5 m floodplain cores. This approach accounts both for grain-size effects and radon ventilation and can resolve both deposition and erosional events. Therefore, it was possible to assess sedimentation over the past century within a wide array of sedimentary environments throughout the Sacramento Valley, where other techniques are limited. In particular, the Sacramento Valley has naturally low 210Pb activity due to its proximity to the Pacific Ocean, high rates of radon ventilation due to dry, porous floodplain sediment, and deposition of widely varying grain sizes - challenges that we have addressed with our enhanced methodology. The analytical approach affords a new ability to assess and directly compare dates and rates of sedimentation and erosion in disparate sedimentary environments throughout this complex fluvial dispersal system. We compare and contrast sediment deposition in engineered floodplains called bypasses, levied ancestral floodplains which serve as floodways during high flow, with sedimentation occurring in some remaining natural floodplains adjacent to the Sacramento River. We find that bypasses tend to accumulate sand and silt at their entrances, but that rates and textures decline rapidly with distance away from the channel. Essentially, a quasi-natural physical process of levee construction by advective overbank transport and deposition of sediment is operating (Singer and Aalto, ESPL, in press). These engineered floodways tend to siphon sediment out of the active channel, such that relatively low sedimentation rates prevail in floodplains and oxbow lakes within the active meander corridor that is bypassed. However, we document significant accumulation of fine-grained material in sedimentary sinks throughout floodplains upstream

  6. Fog chemistry in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Suresh; Raghunathan, Ravikrishna; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Lee, Taehyoung; Chen, Jing; Kommalapati, Raghava R.; Murugesan, Karthik; Shen, Xinhua; Qingzhong, Yuan; Valsaraj, Kalliat T.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    Fog samples were collected in two population centers of the US Gulf Coast (Houston, Texas and Baton Rouge, Louisiana) using Caltech active strand cloud collectors. A total of 32 fogwater samples were collected in Baton Rouge (November 2004-February 2005) and Houston (February 2006). These samples were analyzed for pH, total and dissolved organic carbon, major inorganic ions, and a variety of organic compounds including organic acids, aromatics, carbonyls, and linear alkanes. Fogs in both environments were of moderate density, with typical fog liquid water contents <100 mg m -3. Fog samples collected in Houston reflect a clear influence of marine and anthropogenic inputs, while Baton Rouge samples also reflect agricultural inputs. The volume-weighted mean fog pH was somewhat more acidic (˜4.3) in Houston than in Baton Rouge (˜5.0). A wide pH range was observed in fog at both locations. Houston fog had higher concentrations of Cl -, NO 3-, Na +, Mg 2+, and Ca 2+. Sulfate to nitrate ratios were high in fogs at both locations, typical of many clouds in the eastern US. Total organic carbon concentrations were much higher in Houston fogs than in Baton Rouge fogs. Efforts to speciate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reveal large contributions from organic acids and carbonyls, with smaller contributions from other organic compound families including aromatics, alkanes, amides, and alcohols. Approximately 40% of the fog DOC was unspeciated in samples from both study locations.

  7. Groundwater Quality Data for the Northern Sacramento Valley, 2007: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Peter A.; Bennett, George L.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,180-square-mile Northern Sacramento Valley study unit (REDSAC) was investigated in October 2007 through January 2008 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw groundwater used for public water supplies within REDSAC and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of groundwater quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 66 wells in Shasta and Tehama Counties. Forty-three of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and 23 were selected to aid in evaluation of specific water-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOC], pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial constituents. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate, stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen of water), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the sources and ages of the sampled ground water. In total, over 275 constituents and field water-quality indicators were investigated. Three types of quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, and sampmatrix spikes) were collected at approximately 8

  8. A conceptual model for site-level ecology of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.; Hansen, Eric C.; Scherer, Rick D.; Patterson, Laura C.

    2015-08-14

    Giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) comprise a species of semi-aquatic snakes precinctive to marshes in the Central Valley of California (Hansen and Brode, 1980; Rossman and others, 1996). Because more than 90 percent of their historical wetland habitat has been converted to other uses (Frayer and others, 1989; Garone, 2007), giant gartersnakes have been listed as threatened by the State of California (California Department of Fish and Game Commission , 1971) and the United States (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1993). Giant gartersnakes currently occur in a highly modified landscape, with most extant populations occurring in the rice - growing regions of the Sacramento Valley, especially near areas that historically were tule marsh habitat (Halstead and others, 2010, 2014).

  9. Digital geospatial presentation of geoelectrical and geotechnical data for the lower American River and flood plain, east Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Burton, Bethany L.; Powers, Michael H.; Asch, Theodore H.

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the extent and thickness of lithologic units that may have differing scour potential, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, has performed several geoelectrical surveys of the lower American River channel and flood plain between Cal Expo and the Rio Americano High School in east Sacramento, California. Additional geotechnical data have been collected by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and its contractors. Data resulting from these surveys have been compiled into similar database formats and converted to uniform geospatial datums and projections. These data have been visualized in a digital three-dimensional framework project that can be viewed using freely available software. These data facilitate a comprehensive analysis of the resistivity structure underlying the lower American River corridor and assist in levee system management.

  10. Ontogenetic behavior and dispersal of Sacramento River white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus, with a note on body color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynard, B.; Parker, E.

    2005-01-01

    We studied Sacramento River white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus, in the laboratory to develop a conceptual model of ontogenetic behavior and provide insight into probable behavior of wild sturgeon. After hatching, free embryos initiated a low intensity, brief downstream dispersal during which fish swam near the bottom and were photonegative. The weak, short dispersal style and behavior of white sturgeon free embryos contrasts greatly with the intense, long dispersal style and behavior (photopositive and swimming far above the bottom) of dispersing free embryos of other sturgeon species. If spawned eggs are concentrated within a few kilometers downstream of a spawning site, the adaptive significance of the free embryo dispersal is likely to move fish away from the egg deposition site to avoid predation and reduce fish density prior to feeding. Larvae foraged on the open bottom, swam adaptation for avoiding predation, signaling among aggregated larvae, or both, but not for dispersal. ?? Springer 2005.

  11. Peat formation processes through the millennia in tidal marshes of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine peat formation processes throughout the millennia in four tidal marshes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Peat cores collected at each site were analyzed for bulk density, loss on ignition, and percent organic carbon. Core data and spline fit age-depth models were used to estimate inorganic sedimentation, organic accumulation, and carbon sequestration rates in the marshes. Bulk density and percent organic matter content of peat fluctuated through time at all sites, suggesting that peat formation processes are dynamic and responsive to watershed conditions. The balance between inorganic sedimentation and organic accumulation at the sites also varied through time, indicating that marshes may rely more strongly on either norganic or organic matter for peat formation at particular times in their existence. Mean carbon sequestration rates found in this study (0.38-0.79 Mg C ha-1 year-1) were similar to other long-term estimates for temperate peatlands.

  12. Occurrence and transport of diazinon in the Sacramento River, California, and selected tributaries during three winter storms, January-February 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileanis, Peter D.; Bennett, Kevin P.; Domagalski, Joseph L.

    2002-01-01

    The organophosphate pesticide diazinon is applied as a dormant orchard spray in the Sacramento Valley, California, during the winter when the area receives a majority of its annual rainfall. Dormant spray pesticides, thus, have the potential to wash off the areas of application and migrate with storm runoff to streams in the Sacramento River Basin. Previous monitoring studies have shown that rain and associated runoff from winter storms plays an important role in the transport of diazinon from point of application to the Sacramento River and tributaries. Between January 30 and February 25, 2000, diazinon concentrations in the Sacramento River and selected tributaries were monitored on 5 consecutive days during each of three winter storms that moved through the Sacramento Valley after diazinon had been applied to orchards in the basin. Water samples were collected at 17 sites chosen to represent the effect of upstream land use at local and regional scales. Most samples were analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Analysis by gas chromatography with electron capture detector and thermionic specific detector (GC/ECD/TSD) and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was done on split replicates from over 30 percent of the samples to confirm ELISA results and to provide lower analytical reporting limits at selected sites [30 ng/L (nanogram per liter) for ELISA, 20 ng/L for GC/ECD/TSD, and 2 ng/L for GC/MS]. Concentrations determined from ELISA analyses were consistently higher than concentrations for split samples analyzed by gas chromatography methods. Because of bias between diazinon concentrations using ELISA and gas chromatography methods, results from ELISA analyses were not compared to water-quality criteria. Load calculations using the ELISA analyses are similarly biased. Because the bias was consistent, however, the ELISA data is useful in site-to-site comparisons used to rank the relative levels and contributions of diazinon from

  13. Trends in nutrient concentrations, loads, and yields in streams in the Sacramento, San Joaquin, and Santa Ana Basins, California, 1975-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzer, Charles R.; Kent, Robert; Seleh, Dina K.; Knifong, Donna L.; Dileanis, Peter D.; Orlando, James L.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive database was assembled for the Sacramento, San Joaquin, and Santa Ana Basins in California on nutrient concentrations, flows, and point and nonpoint sources of nutrients for 1975-2004. Most of the data on nutrient concentrations (nitrate, ammonia, total nitrogen, orthophosphate, and total phosphorus) were from the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Information System database (35.2 percent), the California Department of Water Resources (21.9 percent), the University of California at Davis (21.6 percent), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's STOrage and RETrieval database (20.0 percent). Point-source discharges accounted for less than 1 percent of river flows in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, but accounted for close to 80 percent of the nonstorm flow in the Santa Ana River. Point sources accounted for 4 and 7 percent of the total nitrogen and total phosphorus loads, respectively, in the Sacramento River at Freeport for 1985-2004. Point sources accounted for 8 and 17 percent of the total nitrogen and total phosphorus loads, respectively, in the San Joaquin River near Vernalis for 1985-2004. The volume of wastewater discharged into the Santa Ana River increased almost three-fold over the study period. However, due to improvements in wastewater treatment, the total nitrogen load to the Santa Ana River from point sources in 2004 was approximately the same as in 1975 and the total phosphorus load in 2004 was less than in 1975. Nonpoint sources of nutrients estimated in this study included atmospheric deposition, fertilizer application, manure production, and tile drainage. The estimated dry deposition of nitrogen exceeded wet deposition in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys and in the basin area of the Santa Ana Basin, with ratios of dry to wet deposition of 1.7, 2.8, and 9.8, respectively. Fertilizer application increased appreciably from 1987 to 2004 in all three California basins, although manure production increased in the

  14. Assessing societal impacts when planning restoration of large alluvial rivers: a case study of the Sacramento River project, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golet, Gregory H; Roberts, Michael D; Larsen, Eric W; Luster, Ryan A; Unger, Ron; Werner, Gregg; White, Gregory G

    2006-06-01

    Studies have shown that ecological restoration projects are more likely to gain public support if they simultaneously increase important human services that natural resources provide to people. River restoration projects have the potential to influence many of the societal functions (e.g., flood control, water quality) that rivers provide, yet most projects fail to consider this in a comprehensive manner. Most river restoration projects also fail to take into account opportunities for revitalization of large-scale river processes, focusing instead on opportunities presented at individual parcels. In an effort to avoid these pitfalls while planning restoration of the Sacramento River, we conducted a set of coordinated studies to evaluate societal impacts of alternative restoration actions over a large geographic area. Our studies were designed to identify restoration actions that offer benefits to both society and the ecosystem and to meet the information needs of agency planning teams focusing on the area. We worked with local partners and public stakeholders to design and implement studies that assessed the effects of alternative restoration actions on flooding and erosion patterns, socioeconomics, cultural resources, and public access and recreation. We found that by explicitly and scientifically melding societal and ecosystem perspectives, it was possible to identify restoration actions that simultaneously improve both ecosystem health and the services (e.g., flood protection and recreation) that the Sacramento River and its floodplain provide to people. Further, we found that by directly engaging with local stakeholders to formulate, implement, and interpret the studies, we were able to develop a high level of trust that ultimately translated into widespread support for the project.

  15. PEAT ACCRETION HISTORIES DURING THE PAST 6000 YEARS IN MARSHES OF THE SACRAMENTO - SAN JOAQUIN DELTA, CALIFORNIA, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drexler, J Z; de Fontaine, C S; Brown, T A

    2009-07-20

    Peat cores were collected in 4 remnant marsh islands and 4 drained, farmed islands throughout the Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta of California in order to characterize the peat accretion history of this region. Radiocarbon age determination of marsh macrofossils at both marsh and farmed islands showed that marshes in the central and western Delta started forming between 6030 and 6790 cal yr BP. Age-depth models for three marshes were constructed using cubic smooth spline regression models. The resulting spline fit models were used to estimate peat accretion histories for the marshes. Estimated accretion rates range from 0.03 to 0.49 cm yr{sup -1} for the marsh sites. The highest accretion rates are at Browns Island, a marsh at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Porosity was examined in the peat core from Franks Wetland, one of the remnant marsh sites. Porosity was greater than 90% and changed little with depth indicating that autocompaction was not an important process in the peat column. The mean contribution of organic matter to soil volume at the marsh sites ranges from 6.15 to 9.25% with little variability. In contrast, the mean contribution of inorganic matter to soil volume ranges from 1.40 to 8.45% with much greater variability, especially in sites situated in main channels. These results suggest that marshes in the Delta can be viewed as largely autochthonous vs. allochthonous in character. Autochthonous sites are largely removed from watershed processes, such as sediment deposition and scour, and are dominated by organic production. Allochthonous sites have greater fluctuations in accretion rates due to the variability of inorganic inputs from the watershed. A comparison of estimated vertical accretion rates with 20th century rates of global sea-level rise shows that currently marshes are maintaining their positions in the tidal frame, yet this offers little assurance of sustainability under scenarios of increased sea-level rise in

  16. Étude par diffraction des rayons X des vernis rouges des sigillées du sud de la Gaule. Les ateliers de la Graufesenque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendier, L.; Sciau, Ph.; Dooryhee, E.

    2002-07-01

    La Graufesenque (Millau, Aveyron) 1^rst and 2^nd, centuries AC Sigillata red slips have been studied by x-ray diffraction at ESRF and on a conventional diffractometer. Although x-ray diffraction is a non-destructive characterisation technique adapted to surface study, it has not been used so mutch for Sigillata slip characterisation. The poor quality of the slip surface can be an explanation. In this work we demonstrate that it is possible to get good quality diffraction diagrams on 20-120 AC Sigillata slips. The results confirm the productions homogeneity and the hypothesis about a non-local clay used for the slips. On a counterpart, the late (second half of 2^nd century AC) Sigillata study needs because of their crackled surface a high quality beam, which can only be accessible on a synchrotron installation. These productions seems to be more heterogeneous: some Sigillata present similar diffraction diagrams for the slip and ceramic body (same clay?), some others present results similar to the precedent production period ones. Les vernis rouges de poteries sigillées (I^er et II^e siècles) de la Graufesenque (Millau, Aveyron) ont été étudiés par diffraction des rayons X à la fois à l'ESRF et sur une installation classique de laboratoire. Bien que la diffraction des rayons X soit une technique adaptée à l'étude des surfaces, cette technique a jusqu'à présent assez peu servi dans l'examen de ces objets. Ceci peut en partie s'expliquer par le mauvais état de surface de certains vernis. Dans ce travail, nous montrons que moyennant quelques précautions, il est possible d'obtenir sur une installation classique de bons diffractogranunes des vernis des sigillées datés entre 20 et 120 ap. J.C. Les résultats confirment l'homogénéité de ces productions et l'hypothèse selon laquelle ces vernis n'ont pas été fabriqués à partir des argiles locales du jurassique environnant le site. Par contre, l'étude des sigillées tardives de la deuxième moitié du

  17. ETUDE DE L'EFFET DE QUELQUES FACTEURS SUR LA CYTOTOXICITE INDUITE PAR L'AMPHOTERICINE B ASSOCIEE AUX LIPOPROTEINES DU SERUM SANGUIN CHEZ DES CELLULES DE GLOBULES ROUGES HUMAINES

    OpenAIRE

    BOUCHERIT, ATMANI Zahia

    2014-01-01

    toxiques. Dans le cadre de l'élaboration d'une stratégie de développement de cette molécule visant à augmenter l'index thérapeutique tout en réduisant la toxicité, nous avons étudié l'effet de quelques facteurs sur la cytotoxicité induite par l'amphotéricine B associée à des lipoprotéines du sérum sanguin chez le globule rouge humain (modèle universel de cellules animales supérieures). Dans notre travail nous avons abordé d'une part, les effets des caractéristiques des lipoprot...

  18. Drainage water use from the railway Mont d'Or tunnel in Vallorbe, Switzerland; Centrale du Bief-Rouge. Recuperation des eaux du tunnel du Mont d'Or a Vallorbe - Rapport 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerodetti, M.

    2009-02-15

    The 6'097 m long Railway Tunnel under the Mont d'Or (western Switzerland, under the Jura mountains) was constructed at the beginning of the 20{sup th} century and inaugurated on 16 May 1915. During the construction there was an important break-in of water in the tunnel that flooded the whole construction area. Since the completion of the tunnel, the water incursion is drained and conveyed to the Swiss entrance. The flow rate coming from the tunnel is constant at about 120 l/s and didn't show any variation during all the past decades. The idea of using the tunnel water energy in a turbine is thought of since a long time. Considering the present situation on the energy sector, the 'Societe electrique du Chatelard' (the local electricity utility) with the support of the municipal authority, decided now to realize this concept and to turbine the water from the tunnel, also known as 'Bief Rouge', for power generation. The 'Bief Rouge' project consists in catching the flow at the Vallorbe entrance of the tunnel and conducting it into a new penstock down to the river Orbe situated some 65 m downhill where electricity will be produced in a new small-scale power plant. The planned scheme will have an electrical power of 54.5 kW and be located in a new building near the existing sewage pumping station of Vallorbe. The total investment cost is 1.3 million CHF and includes the construction of a new headwater basin, a penstock, a power plant and a tailrace channel as well as the electro-mechanical equipment for power production. Based on a mean annual power production of some 465,000 kWh, the retail price of the kWh has been evaluated to 21 Swiss cents/kWh. (author)

  19. Phenotypic Variation among Culex pipiens Complex (Diptera: Culicidae) Populations from the Sacramento Valley, California: Horizontal and Vertical Transmission of West Nile Virus, Diapause Potential, Autogeny, and Host Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, Brittany M.; Kothera, Linda; Thiemann, Tara; Macedo, Paula A.; Savage, Harry M.; Reisen, William K.

    2013-01-01

    The vector competence and bionomics of Culex pipiens form pipiens L. and Cx. pipiens f. molestus Forskäl were evaluated for populations from the Sacramento Valley. Both f. pipiens and f. molestus females became infected, produced disseminated infections, and were able to transmit West Nile virus. Form molestus females also transmitted West Nile virus vertically to egg rafts and F1 progeny, whereas f. pipiens females only transmitted to egg rafts. Culex pipiens complex from urban Sacramento blood-fed on seven different avian species and two mammalian species. Structure analysis of blood-fed mosquitoes identified K = 4 genetic clusters: f. molestus, f. pipiens, a group of genetically similar hybrids (Cluster X), and admixed individuals. When females were exposed as larvae to midwinter conditions in bioenvironmental chambers, 85% (N = 79) of aboveground Cx. pipiens complex females and 100% (N = 34) of underground f. molestus females did not enter reproductive diapause. PMID:24043690

  20. Measurements of erosion potential using Gust chamber in Yolo Bypass near Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Paul A.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2018-04-27

    This report describes work performed to quantify the erodibility of surface soils in the Yolo Bypass (Bypass) near Sacramento, California, for use in the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) Yolo Bypass D-MCM mercury model. The Bypass, when not serving as a floodway, is heavily utilized for agriculture. During flood events, surface water flows over the soil, resulting in the application of a shear stress to the soil. The shear stress is a function of flow speed and is often assumed to vary as the square of flow speed. Once the shear stress reaches a critical value, erosion commences, and the erosion rate typically increases with applied shear stress. The goal of the work described here was to quantify this process and how it varies throughout the major land uses found in the Yolo Bypass.Each of the major land uses found in the Bypass was targeted for sediment coring and two side-by-side cores, 10 centimeters in diameter, were extracted at each site for testing in a Gust erosion chamber. This device consists of a cylinder with a piston and cap installed to contain a sediment sample and overlying water. In most instances, coring was done with the cylinder, the piston and cap were installed, and testing commenced immediately. The cap at the top of the cylinder contains vanes to induce rotation of the flow and is driven by an electric motor, simulating the bed shear stress experienced by the soil in a flood event. Ambient water is introduced to the cylinder, passes through the device, and carries eroded sediment out of the chamber. The exiting water is tested for turbidity, and water samples obtained to relate turbidity to suspended sediment concentration are used to compute erosion rates for each of the applied shear stresses.The result for each sediment core is (1) definition of the critical shear stress required to initiate sediment erosion and (2) estimation of coefficients required to relate erosion rate to applied shear

  1. Comparing the effects of nano-sized sugarcane fiber with cellulose and psyllium on hepatic cellular signaling in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhong Q; Yu, Yongmei; Zhang, Xian H; Floyd, Z Elizabeth; Boudreau, Anik; Lian, Kun; Cefalu, William T

    2012-01-01

    Zhong Q Wang,1,2 Yongmei Yu,1,2 Xian H Zhang,1,2 Z Elizabeth Floyd,3 Anik Boudreau,2 Kun Lian,4 William T Cefalu1,21Nutrition and Diabetes Research Laboratory, 2Botanical Research Center, 3Ubiquitin Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge, LA, USA; 4The Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA, USAAim: To compare the effects of dietary fibers on hepatic cellular signaling in mice.Methods: Mice w...

  2. Status of groundwater quality in the Southern, Middle, and Northern Sacramento Valley study units, 2005-08: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the Southern, Middle, and Northern Sacramento Valley study units was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study units are located in California's Central Valley and include parts of Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Placer, Sacramento, Shasta, Solano, Sutter, Tehama, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The three study units were designated to provide spatially-unbiased assessments of the quality of untreated groundwater in three parts of the Central Valley hydrogeologic province, as well as to provide a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality regionally and statewide. Samples were collected in 2005 (Southern Sacramento Valley), 2006 (Middle Sacramento Valley), and 2007-08 (Northern Sacramento Valley). The GAMA studies in the Southern, Middle, and Northern Sacramento Valley were designed to provide statistically robust assessments of the quality of untreated groundwater in the primary aquifer systems that are used for drinking-water supply. The assessments are based on water-quality data collected by the USGS from 235 wells in the three study units in 2005-08, and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, referred to as primary aquifers) assessed in this study are defined by the depth intervals of the wells in the CDPH database for each study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from quality of groundwater in the primary aquifers; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. The status of the current quality of the groundwater resource was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic

  3. Abundance and sexual size dimorphism of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, G.D.; Casazza, Michael L.; Gregory, C.J.; Halstead, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) is restricted to wetlands of the Central Valley of California. Because of wetland loss in this region, the Giant Gartersnake is both federally and state listed as threatened. We conducted markrecapture studies of four populations of the Giant Gartersnake in the Sacramento Valley (northern Central Valley), California, to obtain baseline data on abundance and density to assist in recovery planning for this species. We sampled habitats that ranged from natural, unmanaged marsh to constructed managed marshes and habitats associated with rice agriculture. Giant Gartersnake density in a natural wetland (1.90 individuals/ha) was an order of magnitude greater than in a managed wetland subject to active season drying (0.17 individuals/ha). Sex ratios at all sites were not different from 1 1, and females were longer and heavier than males. Females had greater body condition than males, and individuals at the least disturbed sites had significantly greater body condition than individuals at the managed wetland. The few remaining natural wetlands in the Central Valley are important, productive habitat for the Giant Gartersnake, and should be conserved and protected. Wetlands constructed and restored for the Giant Gartersnake should be modeled after the permanent, shallow wetlands representative of historic Giant Gartersnake habitat. ?? 2010 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  4. Neighborhood socioeconomic context and cognitive decline among older Mexican Americans: results from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Haan, Mary N; Osypuk, Theresa; Abdou, Cleopatra; Hinton, Ladson; Aiello, Allison E

    2011-08-15

    In 1 previous study, it was shown that neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with cognitive decline among Latinos. No studies have explored whether and to what extent individual-level socioeconomic factors account for the relation between neighborhood disadvantage and cognitive decline. The purpose of the present study was to assess the influence of neighborhood socioeconomic position (SEP) on cognitive decline and examine how individual-level SEP factors (educational level, annual income, and occupation) influenced neighborhood associations over the course of 10 years. Participants (n = 1,789) were community-dwelling older Mexican Americans from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging. Neighborhood SEP was derived by linking the participant's individual data to the 2000 decennial census. The authors assessed cognitive function with the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination. Analyses used 3-level hierarchical linear mixed models of time within individuals within neighborhoods. After adjustment for individual-level sociodemographic characteristics, higher neighborhood SEP was significantly associated with cognitive function (β = -0.033; P < 0.05) and rates of decline (β = -0.0009; P < 0.10). After adjustment for individual educational level, neighborhood SEP remained associated with baseline cognition but not with rates of decline. Differences in individual educational levels explained most of the intra- and interneighborhood variance. These results suggest that the effect of neighborhood SEP on cognitive decline among Latinos is primarily accounted for by education.

  5. The legacy of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, J.Z.; De Fontaine, C. S.; Deverel, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the world, many extensive wetlands, such as the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California (hereafter, the Delta), have been drained for agriculture, resulting in land-surface subsidence of peat soils. The purpose of this project was to study the in situ effects of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Delta. Peat cores were retrieved from four drained, farmed islands and four relatively undisturbed, marsh islands. Core samples were analyzed for bulk density and percent organic carbon. Macrofossils in the peat were dated using radiocarbon age determination. The peat from the farmed islands is highly distinct from marsh island peat. Bulk density of peat from the farmed islands is generally greater than that of the marsh islands at a given organic carbon content. On the farmed islands, increased bulk density, which is an indication of compaction, decreases with depth within the unoxidized peat zone, whereas, on the marsh islands, bulk density is generally constant with depth except near the surface. Approximately 5580 of the original peat layer on the farmed islands has been lost due to land-surface subsidence. For the center regions of the farmed islands, this translates into an estimated loss of between 29005700 metric tons of organic carbon/hectare. Most of the intact peat just below the currently farmed soil layer is over 4000 years old. Peat loss will continue as long as the artificial water table on the farmed islands is held below the land surface. ?? 2009 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  6. The legacy of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Christian S. de Fontaine,; Steven J. Deverel,

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the world, many extensive wetlands, such as the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California (hereafter, the Delta), have been drained for agriculture, resulting in land-surface subsidence of peat soils. The purpose of this project was to study the in situ effects of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Delta. Peat cores were retrieved from four drained, farmed islands and four relatively undisturbed, marsh islands. Core samples were analyzed for bulk density and percent organic carbon. Macrofossils in the peat were dated using radiocarbon age determination. The peat from the farmed islands is highly distinct from marsh island peat. Bulk density of peat from the farmed islands is generally greater than that of the marsh islands at a given organic carbon content. On the farmed islands, increased bulk density, which is an indication of compaction, decreases with depth within the unoxidized peat zone, whereas, on the marsh islands, bulk density is generally constant with depth except near the surface. Approximately 55–80% of the original peat layer on the farmed islands has been lost due to landsurface subsidence. For the center regions of the farmed islands, this translates into an estimated loss of between 2900-5700 metric tons of organic carbon/hectare. Most of the intact peat just below the currently farmed soil layer is over 4000 years old. Peat loss will continue as long as the artificial water table on the farmed islands is held below the land surface.

  7. Analysis of the value of battery storage with wind and photovoltaic generation to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaininger, H.W. [Zaininger Engineering Co., Inc., Roseville, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the results of an analysis to determine the economic and operational value of battery storage to wind and photovoltaic (PV) generation technologies to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) system. The analysis approach consisted of performing a benefit-cost economic assessment using established SMUD financial parameters, system expansion plans, and current system operating procedures. This report presents the results of the analysis. Section 2 describes expected wind and PV plant performance. Section 3 describes expected benefits to SMUD associated with employing battery storage. Section 4 presents preliminary benefit-cost results for battery storage added at the Solano wind plant and the Hedge PV plant. Section 5 presents conclusions and recommendations resulting from this analysis. The results of this analysis should be reviewed subject to the following caveat. The assumptions and data used in developing these results were based on reports available from and interaction with appropriate SMUD operating, planning, and design personnel in 1994 and early 1995 and are compatible with financial assumptions and system expansion plans as of that time. Assumptions and SMUD expansion plans have changed since then. In particular, SMUD did not install the additional 45 MW of wind that was planned for 1996. Current SMUD expansion plans and assumptions should be obtained from appropriate SMUD personnel.

  8. Weathering and transport of chromium and nickel from serpentinite in the Coast Range ophiolite to the Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher T.; Breit, George N.; Hooper, Robert L.; Holloway, JoAnn M.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Ranville, James F.

    2015-01-01

    A soil geochemical study in northern California was done to investigate the role that weathering and transport play in the regional distribution and mobility of geogenic Cr and Ni, which are both potentially toxic and carcinogenic. These elements are enriched in ultramafic rocks (primarily serpentinite) and the soils derived from them (1700–10,000 mg Cr per kg soil and 1300–3900 mg Ni per kg soil) in the Coast Range ophiolite. Chromium and Ni have been transported eastward from the Coast Range into the western Sacramento Valley and as a result, valley soil is enriched in Cr (80–1420 mg kg−1) and Ni (65–224 mg kg−1) compared to median values of U.S. soils of 50 and 15 mg kg−1, respectively. Nickel in ultramafic source rocks and soils is present in serpentine minerals (lizardite, antigorite, and chrysotile) and is more easily weathered compared to Cr, which primarily resides in highly refractory chromite ([Mg,Fe2+][Cr3+,Al,Fe3+]2O4). Although the majority of Cr and Ni in soils are in refractory chromite and serpentine minerals, the etching and dissolution of these minerals, presence of Cr- and Ni-enriched clay minerals and development of nanocrystalline Fe (hydr)oxides is evidence that a significant fractions of these elements have been transferred to potentially more labile phases.

  9. A Decision Support Information System for Urban Landscape Management Using Thermal Infrared Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Laymon, Charles A.; Howell, Burgess F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we describe efforts to use remote sensing data within the purview of an information support system, to assess urban thermal landscape characteristics as a means for developing more robust models of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect. We also present a rationale on how we have successfully translated the results from the study of urban thermal heating and cooling regimes as identified from remote sensing data, to decision-makers, planners, government officials, and the public at large in several US cities to facilitate better understanding of how the UHI affects air quality. Additionally, through the assessment of the spatial distribution of urban thermal landscape characteristics using remote sensing data, it is possible to develop strategies to mitigate the UHI that hopefully will in turn, drive down ozone levels and improve overall urban air quality. Four US cities have been the foci for intensive analysis as part of our studies: Atlanta, GA, Baton Rouge, LA, Salt Lake City, UT, and Sacramento, CA. The remote sensing data for each of these cities has been used to generate a number of products for use by "stakeholder" working groups to convey information on what the effects are of the UHI and what measures can be taken to mitigate it. In turn, these data products are used to both educate and inform policy-makers, planners, and the general public about what kinds of UHI mitigation strategies are available.

  10. Using Remote Sensing Data and Research Results for Urban Heat Island Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Maury; Luvall, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides information on the characteristics of the urban heat island, research designed to provide the data needed to develop effective urban heat island reduction strategies, and the development of local working groups to develop implementation plans. As background, an overview of research results on the urban heat island phenomenon and the resultant effect on energy usage and air quality will be explored. The use of more reflective roofing materials, paving materials, tree planting, and other initiatives will be explored as a basis for strategies to mitigate urban heat islands and improve the urban environment. Current efforts to use aircraft remote sensing data in Atlanta, Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City and our work with non-profit organizations designated to lead public education and strategic development efforts will be presented. Efforts to organize working groups comprised of key stakeholders, the process followed in communicating research results, and methodology for soliciting feedback and incorporating ideas into local plans, policies and decision-making will be discussed. Challenges in developing and transferring data products and research results to stakeholders will be presented. It is our ultimate goal that such efforts be integrated into plans and/or decision models that encourage sustainable development.

  11. The Use of ATLAS Data to Quantify Surface Radiative Budgets in Four US Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeffrey; Gonzalez, Jorge; Rickman, Douglas; Quattrochi, Dale; Schiller, Steve; Comarazamy, Daniel; Estes, Maury

    2011-01-01

    The additional heating of the air over the city is the result of the replacement of naturally vegetated surfaces with those composed of asphalt, concrete, rooftops and other manmade materials. The temperatures of these artificial surfaces can be 20 to 40 C higher than vegetated surfaces. This produces a dome of elevated air temperatures 5 to 8 C greater over the city, compared to the air temperatures over adjacent rural areas. This effect is called the "urban heat island". Urban landscapes are a complex mixture of vegetated and non-vegetated surfaces. It is difficult to take enough temperature measurements over a large city area to. The use of remotely sensed data from airborne scanners is ideal to characterize the complexity of urban albedo and radiant surface temperatures. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) operates in the visual and IR bands was used to collect data from Salt Lake City, UT, Sacramento, CA, Baton Rouge, LA. And San Juan, Puerto Rico with the main objective of investigating the Urban Heat Island (UHI). In this presentation we will examine the techniques of analyzing remotely sensed data for measuring the effect of various urban surfaces on their contribution to the urban heat island effect.

  12. Les ports de la mer Rouge, de l’Antiquité à l’époque islamique (ive siècle av. – xve siècle apr. J.-C. The Ports in the Red Sea (4th c. B.C. – 15th c. A.C.: Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Vallet

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available La mer Rouge a longtemps été considérée comme un territoire sans histoire, dont les ports n’ont retenu que peu l’attention des historiens. La multiplication des fouilles et prospections archéologiques et l’exploration de nouvelles sources écrites permettent d’envisager désormais le « fait portuaire » en mer Rouge, de l’Antiquité à l’époque islamique, sous un jour nouveau. Les trois études qui suivent mettent particulièrement en lumière l’importance les réseaux de navigation locale dans le développement de la mer Rouge comme bassin d’échange.The Red Sea has for a long time been considered as an area without history. Moreover, few historical studies have been devoted to its ports. New data collected from excavations and archaeological surveys, or from documents, invite to write a history of the genesis and development of the ports in the Red Sea, from Antiquity to Islamic times. The three following contributions underline the major importance of local maritime networks in the constitution of the Red Sea as a cohesive economical area.

  13. Losses of Sacramento River Chinook Salmon and Delta Smelt to Entrainment in Water Diversions in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim J. Kimmerer

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Pumping at the water export facilities in the southern Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta kills fish at and near the associated fish-salvage facilities. Correlative analyses of salvage counts with population indices have failed to provide quantitative estimates of the magnitude of this mortality. I estimated the proportional losses of Sacramento River Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus to place these losses in a population context. The estimate for salmon was based on recoveries of tagged smolts released in the upper Sacramento River basin, and recovered at the fish-salvage facilities in the south Delta and in a trawling program in the western Delta. The proportion of fish salvaged increased with export flow, with a mean value around 10% at the highest export flows recorded. Mortality was around 10% if pre-salvage losses were about 80%, but this value is nearly unconstrained. Losses of adult delta smelt in winter and young delta smelt in spring were estimated from salvage data (adults corrected for estimated pre-salvage survival, or from trawl data in the southern Delta (young. These losses were divided by population size and accumulated over the respective seasons. Losses of adult delta smelt were 1–50% (median 15% although the highest value may have been biased upward. Daily losses of larvae and juveniles were 0–8%, and seasonal losses accumulated were 0–25% (median 13%. The effect of these losses on population abundance was obscured by subsequent 50-fold variability in survival from summer to fall.

  14. Adaptive Management Using Remote Sensing and Ecosystem Modeling in Response to Climate Variability and Invasive Aquatic Plants for the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Water Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, D.; Potter, C. S.; Zhang, M.; Madsen, J.

    2017-12-01

    The California Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is the hub for California's water supply and supports important ecosystem services, agriculture, and communities in Northern and Southern California. Expansion of invasive aquatic plants in the Delta coupled with impacts of changing climate and long-term drought is detrimental to the San Francisco Bay/California Delta complex. NASA Ames Research Center and the USDA-ARS partnered with the State of California to develop science-based, adaptive-management strategies for invasive aquatic plant management in the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Specific mapping tools developed utilizing satellite and airborne platforms provide regular assessments of population dynamics on a landscape scale and support both strategic planning and operational decision making for resource managers. San Joaquin and Sacramento River watersheds water quality input to the Delta is modeled using the Soil-Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and a modified SWAT tool has been customized to account for unique landscape and management of agricultural water supply and drainage within the Delta. Environmental response models for growth of invasive aquatic weeds are being parameterized and coupled with spatial distribution/biomass density mapping and water quality to study ecosystem response to climate and aquatic plant management practices. On the water validation and operational utilization of these tools by management agencies and how they improve decision making, management effectiveness and efficiency will be discussed. The project combines science, operations, and economics related to integrated management scenarios for aquatic weeds to help land and water resource managers make science-informed decisions regarding management and outcomes.

  15. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Southern Sacramento Valley, California, 2005 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milby Dawson, Barbara J.; Bennett, George L.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 2,100 square-mile Southern Sacramento Valley study unit (SSACV) was investigated from March to June 2005 as part of the Statewide Basin Assessment Project of Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. This study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within SSACV, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 83 wells in Placer, Sacramento, Solano, Sutter, and Yolo Counties. Sixty-seven of the wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area. Sixteen of the wells were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry along ground-water flow paths. Four additional samples were collected at one of the wells to evaluate water-quality changes with depth. The GAMA Statewide Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of man-made organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and wastewater-indicator constituents), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, matrix spikes

  16. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Middle Sacramento Valley Study Unit, 2006 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Stephen J.; Fram, Miranda S.; Milby Dawson, Barbara J.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 3,340 square mile Middle Sacramento Valley study unit (MSACV) was investigated from June through September, 2006, as part of the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program. The GAMA Priority Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Middle Sacramento Valley study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within MSACV, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 108 wells in Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Sutter, Tehama, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. Seventy-one wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), 15 wells were selected to evaluate changes in water chemistry along ground-water flow paths (flow-path wells), and 22 were shallow monitoring wells selected to assess the effects of rice agriculture, a major land use in the study unit, on ground-water chemistry (RICE wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], gasoline oxygenates and degradates, pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the sources and ages of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks

  17. Adjusting survival estimates for premature transmitter failure: A case study from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Christopher M.; Perry, Russell W.; Brandes, Patricia L.; Adams, Noah S.

    2013-01-01

    In telemetry studies, premature tag failure causes negative bias in fish survival estimates because tag failure is interpreted as fish mortality. We used mark-recapture modeling to adjust estimates of fish survival for a previous study where premature tag failure was documented. High rates of tag failure occurred during the Vernalis Adaptive Management Plan’s (VAMP) 2008 study to estimate survival of fall-run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during migration through the San Joaquin River and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California. Due to a high rate of tag failure, the observed travel time distribution was likely negatively biased, resulting in an underestimate of tag survival probability in this study. Consequently, the bias-adjustment method resulted in only a small increase in estimated fish survival when the observed travel time distribution was used to estimate the probability of tag survival. Since the bias-adjustment failed to remove bias, we used historical travel time data and conducted a sensitivity analysis to examine how fish survival might have varied across a range of tag survival probabilities. Our analysis suggested that fish survival estimates were low (95% confidence bounds range from 0.052 to 0.227) over a wide range of plausible tag survival probabilities (0.48–1.00), and this finding is consistent with other studies in this system. When tags fail at a high rate, available methods to adjust for the bias may perform poorly. Our example highlights the importance of evaluating the tag life assumption during survival studies, and presents a simple framework for evaluating adjusted survival estimates when auxiliary travel time data are available.

  18. Stable Isotopes in the American Rivers, near Sacramento California: Application and Relevance to Sierra Nevada Paleoelevation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, T.; Davidson, E.; Wagner, A. J.; Shimabukuro, D.

    2017-12-01

    Recent models have attempted to estimate paleoelevations in the Sierra Nevada using δ18O and δ2H values from kaolinitized granite clasts and hydration rinds in volcanic glass. These models require calculation of fluvial stable isotope composition, usually considered to be a function of elevation and source isotope composition at sea-level, applied to the hypsometric curve of the upstream drainage basin. However these relationships were initially determined in mountain ranges with different hydrologic patterns. Furthermore, they relied heavily on precipitation and groundwater oxygen isotope data, incorporating little to no surface water data. Since surface waters are a combination of groundwater and overland flow, it is unclear if these theoretical relationships hold true for the modern or ancestral Sierra Nevada. To test this relationship between oxygen isotopes, elevation, and hypsometry along a transect in the Northern Sierra, water was collected from the North and South Forks of the American River from their respective headwaters to their convergence with the Sacramento River. The stable isotope data from these rivers are presented here along with the average relationship between δ18O, δ2H, and elevation. Initial results suggest that δ18O values of surface waters vary by less than 1.0‰ and δ2H by less than 3‰ above 1300 meters elevation with δ18O and δ2H values at 1325 meters of -13.3‰ and -93.2‰ and -13.6‰ and -95.8‰ at 2200 meters. These new data could be used to modify the global isotope-elevation relationship for the Sierra Nevada.

  19. Determining Water Quality Trends in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Watershed in the Face of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynett, K.; Azimi-Gaylon, S.; Doidic, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Suisun Marsh (Delta) is the largest estuary on the West Coast of the Americas and is a resource of local, State, and national significance. The Delta is simultaneously the most critical component of California's water supply, a primary focus of the state's ecological conservation measures, and a vital resource deeply imperiled by degraded water quality. Delta waterbodies are identified as impaired by salinity, excess nutrients, low dissolved oxygen, pathogens, pesticides, heavy metals, and other contaminants. Climate change is expected to exacerbate the impacts of existing stressors in the Delta and magnify the challenges of managing this natural resource. A clear understanding of the current state of the watershed is needed to better inform scientists, decision makers, and the public about potential impacts from climate change. The Delta Watershed Initiative Network (Delta WIN) leverages the ecological benefits of healthy watersheds, and enhances, expands and creates opportunities for greater watershed health by coordinating with agencies, established programs, and local organizations. At this critical junction, Delta WIN is coordinating data integration and analysis to develop better understanding of the existing and emerging water quality concerns. As first steps, Delta WIN is integrating existing water quality data, analyzing trends, and monitoring to fill data gaps and to evaluate indicators of climate change impacts. Available data will be used for trend analysis; Delta WIN will continue to monitor where data is incomplete and new questions arise. Understanding how climate change conditions may affect water quality will be used to inform efforts to build resilience and maintain water quality levels which sustain aquatic life and human needs. Assessments of historical and new data will aid in recognition of potential climate change impacts and in initiating implementation of best management practices in collaboration with

  20. Potential exposure of larval and juvenile delta smelt to dissolved pesticides in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuivila, K.M.; Moon, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    The San Francisco Estuary is critical habitat for delta smelt Hypomesus transpacificus, a fish whose abundance has declined greatly since 1983 and is now listed as threatened. In addition, the estuary receives drainage from the Central Valley, an urban and agricultural region with intense and diverse pesticide usage. One possible factor of the delta smelt population decline is pesticide toxicity during vulnerable larval and juvenile stages, but pesticide concentrations are not well characterized in delta smelt spawning and nursery habitat. The objective of this study was to estimate the potential exposure of delta smelt during their early life stages to dissolved pesticides. For 3 years (1998-2000), water samples from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta were collected during April-June in coordination with the California Department of Fish and Game's delta smelt early life stage monitoring program. Samples were analyzed for pesticides using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Water samples contained multiple pesticides, ranging from 2 to 14 pesticides in each sample. In both 1999 and 2000, elevated concentrations of pesticides overlapped in time and space with peak densities of larval and juvenile delta smelt. In contrast, high spring outflows in 1998 transported delta smelt away from the pesticide sampling sites so that exposure could not be estimated. During 2 years, larval and juvenile delta smelt were potentially exposed to a complex mixture of pesticides for a minimum of 2-3 weeks. Although the measured concentrations were well below short-term (96-h) LC50 values for individual pesticides, the combination of multiple pesticides and lengthy exposure duration could potentially have lethal or sublethal effects on delta smelt, especially during early larval development.

  1. Plant community, primary productivity, and environmental conditions following wetland re-establishment in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R.L.; Fujii, R.

    2010-01-01

    Wetland restoration can mitigate aerobic decomposition of subsided organic soils, as well as re-establish conditions favorable for carbon storage. Rates of carbon storage result from the balance of inputs and losses, both of which are affected by wetland hydrology. We followed the effect of water depth (25 and 55 cm) on the plant community, primary production, and changes in two re-established wetlands in the Sacramento San-Joaquin River Delta, California for 9 years after flooding to determine how relatively small differences in water depth affect carbon storage rates over time. To estimate annual carbon inputs, plant species cover, standing above- and below-ground plant biomass, and annual biomass turnover rates were measured, and allometric biomass models for Schoenoplectus (Scirpus) acutus and Typha spp., the emergent marsh dominants, were developed. As the wetlands developed, environmental factors, including water temperature, depth, and pH were measured. Emergent marsh vegetation colonized the shallow wetland more rapidly than the deeper wetland. This is important to potential carbon storage because emergent marsh vegetation is more productive, and less labile, than submerged and floating vegetation. Primary production of emergent marsh vegetation ranged from 1.3 to 3.2 kg of carbon per square meter annually; and, mid-season standing live biomass represented about half of the annual primary production. Changes in species composition occurred in both submerged and emergent plant communities as the wetlands matured. Water depth, temperature, and pH were lower in areas with emergent marsh vegetation compared to submerged vegetation, all of which, in turn, can affect carbon cycling and storage rates. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  2. Large-scale time-series InSAR analysis of the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta subsidence using UAVSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekaert, D. P.; Jones, C. E.; An, K.; Huang, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin delta (Delta) contains more than 1700 km of levees that protect various reclaimed lands from flooding. Most of the delta is experiencing subsidence at rates that can exceed 5 cm/yr locally, and which can affect the structural integrity of the levees. In-situ and airborne LIDAR monitoring of this extensive levee network is expensive, making Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) an attractive, cost-effective alternative that can provide uniform and consistent monitoring. InSAR has proven to be a powerful technique to study surface displacements at high accuracy (few mm/year), over large regions (up to 250 km wide swaths), and at a high spatial resolution (up to a meter). However widespread usage of InSAR, particularly within the application community, is challenged by several technical issues, the most significant of which are decorrelation noise introduced by a change of scattering properties (e.g., moisture and vegetation), and noise due to variation in atmospheric properties between different SAR acquisitions (i.e., tropospheric delay). These effects are particularly limiting in the rural/agricultural setting of the Delta. We demonstrate the usage of InSAR for spatially comprehensive subsidence monitoring both at the scale of the levees and at a scale that captures the intra-island variability. The study uses data collected over a period of six years (2009-2015) with NASA's Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) instrument, which is the prototype airborne instrument for the NISAR mission. We mitigate atmospheric noise by estimating a correction from state-of-the-art weather models, and reduce decorrelation noise by utilizing L-band SAR and using advanced time-series InSAR processing methods. Our analysis includes nine UAVSAR flight lines that cover altogether an area of approximately 8500 km2, including the Delta and the surrounding areas.

  3. Modeling pesticide loadings from the San Joaquin watershed into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Zhang, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is an ecologically rich, hydrologically complex area that serves as the hub of California's water supply. However, pesticides have been routinely detected in the Delta waterways, with concentrations exceeding the benchmark for the protection of aquatic life. Pesticide loadings into the Delta are partially attributed to the San Joaquin watershed, a highly productive agricultural watershed located upstream. Therefore, this study aims to simulate pesticide loadings to the Delta by applying the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model to the San Joaquin watershed, under the support of the USDA-ARS Delta Area-Wide Pest Management Program. Pesticide use patterns in the San Joaquin watershed were characterized by combining the California Pesticide Use Reporting (PUR) database and GIS analysis. Sensitivity/uncertainty analyses and multi-site calibration were performed in the simulation of stream flow, sediment, and pesticide loads along the San Joaquin River. Model performance was evaluated using a combination of graphic and quantitative measures. Preliminary results indicated that stream flow was satisfactorily simulated along the San Joaquin River and the major eastern tributaries, whereas stream flow was less accurately simulated in the western tributaries, which are ephemeral small streams that peak during winter storm events and are mainly fed by irrigation return flow during the growing season. The most sensitive parameters to stream flow were CN2, SOL_AWC, HRU_SLP, SLSUBBSN, SLSOIL, GWQMN and GW_REVAP. Regionalization of parameters is important as the sensitivity of parameters vary significantly spatially. In terms of evaluation metric, NSE tended to overrate model performance when compared to PBIAS. Anticipated results will include (1) pesticide use pattern analysis, (2) calibration and validation of stream flow, sediment, and pesticide loads, and (3) characterization of spatial patterns and temporal trends of pesticide yield.

  4. Present-day oxidative subsidence of organic soils and mitigation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deverel, Steven J; Ingrum, Timothy; Leighton, David

    Subsidence of organic soils in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta threatens sustainability of the California (USA) water supply system and agriculture. Land-surface elevation data were collected to assess present-day subsidence rates and evaluate rice as a land use for subsidence mitigation. To depict Delta-wide present-day rates of subsidence, the previously developed SUBCALC model was refined and calibrated using recent data for CO 2 emissions and land-surface elevation changes measured at extensometers. Land-surface elevation change data were evaluated relative to indirect estimates of subsidence and accretion using carbon and nitrogen flux data for rice cultivation. Extensometer and leveling data demonstrate seasonal variations in land-surface elevations associated with groundwater-level fluctuations and inelastic subsidence rates of 0.5-0.8 cm yr -1 . Calibration of the SUBCALC model indicated accuracy of ±0.10 cm yr -1 where depth to groundwater, soil organic matter content and temperature are known. Regional estimates of subsidence range from 1.8 cm yr -1 . The primary uncertainty is the distribution of soil organic matter content which results in spatial averaging in the mapping of subsidence rates. Analysis of leveling and extensometer data in rice fields resulted in an estimated accretion rate of 0.02-0.8 cm yr -1 . These values generally agreed with indirect estimates based on carbon fluxes and nitrogen mineralization, thus preliminarily demonstrating that rice will stop or greatly reduce subsidence. Areas below elevations of -2 m are candidate areas for implementation of mitigation measures such as rice because there is active subsidence occurring at rates greater than 0.4 cm yr -1 .

  5. Commuter exposure to PM2.5, BC, and UFP in six common transport microenvironments in Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Walter; Vijayan, Abhilash; Schulte, Nico; Herner, Jorn D.

    2017-10-01

    This study was designed to estimate and compare the air pollution exposures experienced by commuters in six common transportation modes utilized by California residents, and to evaluate the impact of practical exposure mitigation strategies in reducing commute exposures. We measured concentrations of fine particle matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), and ultrafine particles (UFP) for 161 commutes between April 2014 and November 2015 in Sacramento, CA. We collected measurements for six modes including single occupancy vehicles, high occupancy vehicles (multiple occupants), buses, light rail, train, and bicycling. The largest average concentrations for most pollutants were measured during train commutes and the lowest average concentrations were observed during light-rail commutes. Mitigation options were explored for personal vehicles, bicycling, and train commute modes. We found that ventilation settings of personal vehicles can reduce in-vehicle PM2.5, BC, and UFP concentrations by up to 75%. Similarly, bicycle route choice can reduce exposures by 15-75% with the lowest concentrations observed during commutes on dedicated bicycle paths away from traffic sources. Train commuters experienced UFP concentrations an order of magnitude greater when the locomotive engine was pulling the rail cars versus pushing the rail cars. We found that UFP concentrations during bus, bicycling, and train commutes were 1.6-5.3 times greater than personal vehicle commutes, while light rail commutes had 30% lower UFP concentrations than personal vehicle commutes. The largest exposure per mile occurred during bicycle commutes with PM2.5, BC, and UFP exposures of 1.312 μg/mile, 0.097 μg/mile, and 3.0 × 109 particles/mile, respectively. Train commutes experienced the largest exposure per mile of all of the combustion-derived transportation commute modes. BC accounted for 5-20% of total PM mass across all commute modes with an average fraction of ∼7% of PM2.5.

  6. Mapping Evapotranspiration in the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta using simulated ECOSTRESS Thermal Data: Validation and Inter-comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, A.; Jin, Y.; He, R.; Hulley, G.; Fisher, J.; Lee, C. M.; Rivera, G.; Hook, S. J.; Medellin-Azuara, J.; Kent, E. R.; Paw U, K. T.; Gao, F.; Lund, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Irrigation accounts for 80% of human freshwater consumption, and most of it return to the atmosphere through evapotranspiration (ET). In California, where our water resources are limited and heavily utilized, the need for a cost-effective, timely, and consistent spatial estimate of crop ET, from the farm to watershed level, is becoming increasingly important. The ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS), to be launched in mid-2018, will provide the most detailed and accurate temperature measurements ever acquired from space and thus unique opportunities for estimating ET at the farm scale. We simulated the ECOSTRESS thermal data at a 70 m resolution using VIIRS thermal observations and ASTER emissivity data in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region for the 2016 water year. Three remote sensing based ET methods were then applied to estimate ET using simulated ECOSTRESS data and optical data from Landsat and VIIRS, including Priestley-Taylor approaches developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) and by UC Davis (PT-UCD), and the Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) model. We compared these three sets of ET estimates with field measurements at sixteen sites over five crop types (Alfalfa, Corn, Pasture, Tomato, and Beardless Wheat). Good agreement was found between satellite-based estimates and field measurements. Our results demonstrate that thermal data from the upcoming ECOSTRESS mission will reduce the uncertainty in ET estimates. A continuous monitoring of the dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of consumptive water use at a field scale will help prepare and inform to adaptively manage water, canopy, and planting density to maximize yield with least amount of water.

  7. Modeling pesticide diuron loading from the San Joaquin watershed into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta using SWAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huajin; Luo, Yuzhou; Potter, Christopher; Moran, Patrick J; Grieneisen, Michael L; Zhang, Minghua

    2017-09-15

    Quantifying pesticide loading into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of northern California is critical for water quality management in the region, and potentially useful for biological weed control planning. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was applied to model streamflow, sediment, and pesticide diuron loading in the San Joaquin watershed, a major contributing area to the elevated pesticide levels in the downstream Delta. The Sequential Uncertainty Fitting version 2 (SUFI-2) algorithm was employed to perform calibration and uncertainty analysis. A combination of performance measures (PMs) and standardized performance evaluation criteria (PEC) was applied to evaluate model performance, while prediction uncertainty was quantified by 95% prediction uncertainty band (95PPU). Results showed that streamflow simulation was at least "satisfactory" at most stations, with more than 50% of the observed data bracketed by the 95PPU. Sediment simulation was rated as at least "satisfactory" based on two PMs, and diuron simulation was judged as "good" by all PMs. The 95PPU of sediment and diuron bracketed about 40% and 30% of the observed data, respectively. Significant correlations were observed between the diuron loads, and precipitation, streamflow, and the current and antecedent pesticide use. Results also showed that the majority (>70%) of agricultural diuron was transported during winter months, when direct exposure of biocontrol agents to diuron runoff is limited. However, exposure in the dry season could be a concern because diuron is relatively persistent in aquatic system. This study not only provides valuable information for the development of biological weed control plan in the Delta, but also serves as a foundation for the continued research on calibration, evaluation, and uncertainty analysis of spatially distributed, physically based hydrologic models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 234U/238U and δ87Sr in peat as tracers of paleosalinity in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Paces, James B.; Alpers, Charles N.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Neymark, Leonid; Bullen, Thomas D.; Taylor, Howard E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the history of paleosalinity over the past 6000+ years in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the Delta), which is the innermost part of the San Francisco Estuary. We used a combination of Sr and U concentrations, d87Sr values, and 234U/238U activity ratios (AR) in peat as proxies for tracking paleosalinity. Peat cores were collected in marshes on Browns Island, Franks Wetland, and Bacon Channel Island in the Delta. Cores were dated using 137Cs, the onset of Pb and Hg contamination from hydraulic gold mining, and 14C. A proof of concept study showed that the dominant emergent macrophyte and major component of peat in the Delta, Schoenoplectus spp., incorporates Sr and U and that the isotopic composition of these elements tracks the ambient water salinity across the Estuary. Concentrations and isotopic compositions of Sr and U in the three main water sources contributing to the Delta (seawater, Sacramento River water, and San Joaquin River water) were used to construct a three-end-member mixing model. Delta paleosalinity was determined by examining variations in the distribution of peat samples through time within the area delineated by the mixing model. The Delta has long been considered a tidal freshwater marsh region, but only peat samples from Franks Wetland and Bacon Channel Island have shown a consistently fresh signal (Browns Island) has alternated between fresh and oligohaline (0.5-5 ppt).

  9. Geology, geochemistry and petrology of basalts from Paraná Continental Magmatic Province in the Araguari, Uberlândia, Uberaba and Sacramento regions, Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Castanheira de Moraes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study covers the region between the cities of Sacramento and Araguari/Uberlândia (Minas Gerais State, Brazil, where basalt flows from the Paraná Continental Magmatic Province outcrop. The investigated rocks present tholeiitic signature, with high titanium content, and are classified as Pitanga magma-type. The preserved basalt thickness is between 10 and 200 meters and individual flows do not exceed 15 meters thick. Flows were identified as sheet lobes, smaller and thinner flows units - stacked laterally and vertically forming compound lavas -, or frontal, centimetric lobes. The basalt flows show decimetric to metric intercalations of clastic sedimentary rock, with depositional characteristics that can vary from aeolian to lacustrine, and are important markers on prevailing environmental conditions. The plagioclases are dominantly labradorite and pyroxene is augite, whereas olivine can be hyalosiderite or hortonolite/ferrohortonolite. The behavior of the major, minor and trace elements is compatible with the presence of at least two parental magmas, which were subjected to fractional crystallization mainly of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, ilmenite and magnetite. There is a chemistry distinction between basalts from Sacramento to those from Araguari/Uberlândia region, the former one showing more evolved than the last one. The high (La/LuN values are indicative of partial melting of a garnet peridotite, while the Rare Earth Elements (REE values are indicative of fractional crystallization.

  10. Changes in sediment and organic carbon accumulation in a highly-disturbed ecosystem: The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (California, USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Lerberg, Elizabeth J.; Dickhut, Rebecca M.; Kuehl, Steven A.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Wakeham, Stuart G.

    2009-01-01

    We used the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta CA (Delta, hereafter) as a model system for understanding how human activities influence the delivery of sediment and total organic carbon (TOC) over the past 50-60 years. Sediment cores were collected from sites within the Delta representing the Sacramento River (SAC), the San Joaquin River (SJR), and Franks Tract (FT), a flooded agricultural tract. A variety of anthropogenic tracers including 137 Cs, total DDE (ΣDDE) and brominated diphenyl ether (BDE) congeners were used to quantify sediment accumulation rates. This information was combined with total organic carbon (TOC) profiles to quantify rates of TOC accumulation. Across the three sites, sediment and TOC accumulation rates were four to eight-fold higher prior to 1972. Changes in sediment and TOC accumulation were coincident with completion of several large reservoirs and increased agriculture and urbanization in the Delta watershed. Radiocarbon content of TOC indicated that much of the carbon delivered to the Delta is 'pre-aged' reflecting processing in the Delta watershed or during transport to the sites rather than an input of predominantly contemporary carbon (e.g., 900-1400 years BP in surface sediments and 2200 yrs BP and 3610 yrs BP at the base of the SJR and FT cores, respectively). Together, these data suggest that human activities have altered the amount and age of TOC accumulating in the Delta since the 1940s.

  11. Evaluation of a floating fish guidance structure at a hydrodynamically complex river junction in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romine, Jason G.; Perry, Russell W.; Pope, Adam C.; Stumpner, Paul; Liedtke, Theresa L.; Kumagai, Kevin K; Reeves, Ryan L

    2016-01-01

    Survival of out-migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River delta, California, USA, varies by migration route. Survival of salmonids that enter the interior and southern Delta can be as low as half that of salmonids that remain in the main-stem Sacramento River. Reducing entrainment into the higher-mortality routes, such as Georgiana Slough, should increase overall survival. In spring 2014, a floating fish-guidance structure (FFGS) designed to reduce entrainment into Georgiana Slough was deployed just upstream of the Georgiana Slough divergence. We used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the effect of the FFGS on Chinook entrainment to Georgiana Slough. At intermediate discharge (200–400 m3 s–1), entrainment into Georgiana Slough was five percentage points lower when the FFGS was in the on state (19.1% on; 23.9% off). At higher discharge (>400 m3 s–1), entrainment was higher when the FFGS was in the on state (19.3% on; 9.7% off), and at lower discharge (0–200 m3 s–1) entrainment was lower when the FFGS was in the on state (43.7% on; 47.3% off). We found that discharge, cross-stream fish position, time of day, and proportion of flow remaining in the Sacramento River contributed to the probability of being entrained to Georgiana Slough.

  12. Implications for sustainability of a changing agricultural mosaic in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, C. E.; Deverel, S. J.; Jacobs, P.; Kelsey, R.

    2015-12-01

    Transformed from the largest wetland system on the west coast of the United States to agriculture, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is an extreme teaching example of anthropogenic threats to sustainability. For over 6,000 years, over 280,000 ha of intertidal freshwater marsh accreted due to seal level rise and sediment deposition. Farming of organic soils since 1850 resulted in land subsidence caused primarily by oxidation. Over 2 billion cubic meters of soil were lost resulting in elevations on Delta islands ranging from -1 to -8 m and increased risk of levee failures and water supply disruption. Alteration of water flows and habitat caused dramatic declines in aquatic species. A cycle in which oxidation of organic soils leads to deepening of drainage ditches to maintain an aerated root zone which in turn results in sustained oxidation and subsidence is perpetuated by the momentum of the status quo despite evidence that agricultural practices are increasingly unsustainable. Flooding of the soils breaks the oxidation/subsidence cycle. We assessed alternate land uses and the carbon market as a potential impetus for change. Using the peer-reviewed and locally calibrated SUBCALC model, we estimated net global warming potential for a range of scenarios for a representative island, from status quo to incorporating significant proportions of subsidence-mitigating land use. We analyzed economic implications by determining profit losses or gains when a simulated GHG offset market is available for wetlands using a regional agricultural production and economic optimization model, We estimated baseline GHG emissions at about 60,000 tons CO2-e per year. In contrast, modeled implementation of rice and wetlands resulted in substantial emissions reductions to the island being a net GHG sink. Subsidence would be arrested or reversed where these land uses are implemented. Results of economic modeling reveal that conversion to wetlands can have significant negative farm financial

  13. Erosion characteristics and horizontal variability for small erosion depths in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoellhamer, David H.; Manning, Andrew J.; Work, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Erodibility of cohesive sediment in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (Delta) was investigated with an erosion microcosm. Erosion depths in the Delta and in the microcosm were estimated to be about one floc diameter over a range of shear stresses and times comparable to half of a typical tidal cycle. Using the conventional assumption of horizontally homogeneous bed sediment, data from 27 of 34 microcosm experiments indicate that the erosion rate coefficient increased as eroded mass increased, contrary to theory. We believe that small erosion depths, erosion rate coefficient deviation from theory, and visual observation of horizontally varying biota and texture at the sediment surface indicate that erosion cannot solely be a function of depth but must also vary horizontally. We test this hypothesis by developing a simple numerical model that includes horizontal heterogeneity, use it to develop an artificial time series of suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) in an erosion microcosm, then analyze that time series assuming horizontal homogeneity. A shear vane was used to estimate that the horizontal standard deviation of critical shear stress was about 30% of the mean value at a site in the Delta. The numerical model of the erosion microcosm included a normal distribution of initial critical shear stress, a linear increase in critical shear stress with eroded mass, an exponential decrease of erosion rate coefficient with eroded mass, and a stepped increase in applied shear stress. The maximum SSC for each step increased gradually, thus confounding identification of a single well-defined critical shear stress as encountered with the empirical data. Analysis of the artificial SSC time series with the assumption of a homogeneous bed reproduced the original profile of critical shear stress, but the erosion rate coefficient increased with eroded mass, similar to the empirical data. Thus, the numerical experiment confirms the small-depth erosion hypothesis. A linear

  14. Riverine Nutrient Trends in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Basins, California: A Comparison to State and Regional Water Quality Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Schlegel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available doi: http://dx.doi.org/1015447/sfews.2015v13iss4art2Non-point source (NPS contaminant control strategies were initiated in California in the late 1980s under the authority of the State Porter–Cologne Act and eventually for the development of total maximum daily load (TMDL plans, under the federal Clean Water Act. Most of the NPS TMDLs developed for California’s Central Valley (CV region were related to pesticides, but not nutrients. Efforts to reduce pesticide loads and concentrations began in earnest around 1990. The NPS control strategies either encouraged or mandated the use of management practices (MPs. Although TMDLs were largely developed for pesticides, the resultant MPs might have affected the runoff of other potential contaminants (such as nutrients. This study evaluates the effect of agricultural NPS control strategies implemented in California’s CV before and between 1990 and 2013, on nutrients, by comparing trends in surface-water concentrations and loads. In general, use of MPs was encouraged during a “voluntary” period (1990 to 2004 and mandated during an “enforcement” period (2004 to 2013. Nutrient concentrations, loads, and trends were estimated by using a recently developed Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season (WRTDS model. Sufficient total phosphorus (TP, total nitrogen (TN, and nitrate (NO3 data were available to compare the voluntary and enforcement periods for twelve sites within the lower Sacramento and San Joaquin basins. Ammonia concentrations and fluxes were evaluated at a subset of these sites. For six of these sites, flow-normalized mean annual concentrations of TP or NO3 decreased at a faster rate during the enforcement period than during the voluntary period. Concentration changes during similar years and ranges of flow conditions suggest that MPs designed for pesticides may also have reduced nutrient loads. Results show that enforceable NPS policies, and accelerated MP implementation

  15. Subsidence Reversal in a Re-established Wetland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin L. Miller

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The stability of levees in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is threatened by continued subsidence of Delta peat islands. Up to 6 meters of land-surface elevation has been lost in the 150 years since Delta marshes were leveed and drained, primarily from oxidation of peat soils. Flooding subsided peat islands halts peat oxidation by creating anoxic soils, but net accumulation of new material in restored wetlands is required to recover land-surface elevations. We investigated the subsidence reversal potential of two 3 hectare, permanently flooded, impounded wetlands re-established on a deeply subsided field on Twitchell Island. The shallower wetland (design water depth 25 cm was almost completely colonized by dense emergent marsh vegetation within two years; whereas, the deeper wetland (design water depth 55 cm which developed spatially variable depths as a result of heterogeneous colonization by emergent vegetation, still had some areas remaining as open water after nine years. Changes in land-surface elevation were quantified using repeated sedimentation-erosion table measurements. New material accumulating in the wetlands was sampled by coring. Land-surface elevations increased by an average of 4 cm/yr in both wetlands from 1997 to 2006; however, the rates at different sites in the wetlands ranged from -0.5 to +9.2 cm/yr. Open water areas of the deeper wetland without emergent vegetation had the lowest rates of land-surface elevation gain. The greatest rates occurred in areas of the deeper wetland most isolated from the river water inlets, with dense stands of emergent marsh vegetation (tules and cattails. Vegetated areas of the deeper wetland in the transition zones between open water and mature emergent stands had intermediate rates of land-surface gain, as did the entire shallower wetland. These results suggest that the dominant component contributing to land-surface elevation gain in these wetlands was accumulation of organic matter, rather

  16. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. Determination of Attainment. Effective March 12, 2010 EPA has determined the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality...

  17. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Proceedings of the Indian Academy of Sciences (Earth and Planetary Sciences) wishes to place on record the valuable assistance received from the following scientists in reviewing manuscripts published during the year 2001. Ajoy K Baksi, Baton Rouge. S Bhattacharya, Kolkata. Abhijit Bhattacharya, Kharagpur.

  18. 14 CFR 1201.402 - NASA Industrial Applications Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Department of Computer Science, Baton Rouge, LA 70813-2065. (b) To obtain access to NASA-developed computer... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false NASA Industrial Applications Centers. 1201... ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION General Information § 1201.402 NASA Industrial Applications Centers. (a...

  19. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    Baton Rouge, LA 70803-1715, USA. Email: zodhomb@lsu.edu. (Biomechanics; Morphology). Kei Inouye. Department of Botany. Graduate School of Science ... School of Life Sciences. Jawaharlal Nehru University. New Delhi 110 067, India. Email: rksaxena@mail.jnu.ac.in. (Immunology; Tuberculosis). Imran Siddiqi.

  20. Evaluating the Measurement Structure of the Abbreviated HIV Stigma Scale in a Sample of African Americans Living with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eboneé T.; Yaghmaian, Rana A.; Best, Andrew; Chan, Fong; Burrell, Reginald, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to validate the 10-item version of the HIV Stigma Scale (HSS-10) in a sample of African Americans with HIV/AIDS. Method: One hundred and ten African Americans living with HIV/AIDS were recruited from 3 case management agencies in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Measurement structure of the HSS-10 was evaluated using…

  1. Got Languages? Powerful Skills for the 21st Century. Dimension 2011. Selected Proceedings of the 2011 Joint Conference of the Southern Conference on Language Teaching, the Louisiana Foreign Language Teachers' Association, and the Southeastern Association of Language Learning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Carol, Ed.; Swanson, Peter B., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT) held its annual conference March 10-12, 2011, at the Crowne Plaza in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in collaboration with the Louisiana Foreign Language Teachers Association (LFLTA) and the Southeastern Association of Language Learning Technology (SEALLT). Those individuals whose proposals were…

  2. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ata Allah Nadiri1 2 Asghar Asghari Moghaddam1 Frank T-C Tsai2 Elham Fijani1 2. Department of Geology, University of Tabriz, 29 Bahman Boulevard, Tabriz, East Azerbaijan, Iran. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Louisiana State University, 3418G Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA.

  3. 75 FR 23262 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Southwest Power Pool ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Southwest Power Pool ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee Meeting and the Entergy Regional State Committee... efforts. ICT Stakeholder Policy Committee Meeting May 12, 2010 (8 a.m.-12 p.m.), Hilton Baton Rouge...

  4. Effect of filler addition on the compressive and impact properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Effect of filler addition on the compressive and impact properties of glass fibre reinforced epoxy. NIKHIL GUPTA*, BALRAJ SINGH BRAR† and EYASSU WOLDESENBET. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA. †Baba Banda Singh Engineering College, Fateh Garh ...

  5. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Anwar Ali, New Delhi. B L Aliero, Sokoto. Anuranjan Anand, Bangalore. V Anantharaman, Bethesda. S K Apte, Mumbai. Rodolfo Aramayo, Texas. Gavin E A, Louisville. Chandrika B-Rao, Mumbai. Hemalatha Balaram, Bangalore. Partick Bateson, Cambridge. Madeleine Beekman, Sydney. Linda M Bhat, Baton Rouge.

  6. The Rajahmundry Traps, Andhra Pradesh: Evaluation of their ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    , Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA. (e-mail: ... rocks on the east bank are post K-T boundary, show normal magnetic polarity, and belong to chron. 29N. Their chemistry is ... 30 and 60m, and dip gently (~5◦) to the south. In each area, they are about ...

  7. Role of near threshold resonances in intermediate energy nuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... Author Affiliations. B K Jain1 N J Upadhyay2. UM-DAE Centre for Excellence in Basic Sciences, Mumbai University, Mumbai 400 098, India; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA ...

  8. 75 FR 62109 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (GMFMC) will convene public meetings... Embassy Suites Hotel, 4914 Constitution Ave., Baton Rouge, LA 70808. Council address: Gulf of Mexico... CONTACT: Dr. Stephen Bortone, Executive Director, Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; telephone...

  9. 76 FR 23528 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... upstream of Albert Drive. Redwood Creek Approximately 900 feet None +92 City of Zachary, downstream of... City of Zachary, downstream of Zachary- Unincorporated Areas Slaughter Highway. of East Baton Rouge..., LA 70739. City of Zachary Maps are available for inspection at the Annex Building, 4650 Main Street...

  10. Your Kids Are the Target When the Klan Comes Calling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Jerome

    1982-01-01

    Describes Ku Klux Klan recruiting and literature dissemination activities in schools and communities and two particularly difficult conflicts caused by Klan activities in Meriden (Connecticut) and East Baton Rouge (Louisiana). Explains the legal issues involved and possible board and administrator responses to such activities and conflicts.…

  11. 76 FR 39775 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Louisiana; Determination of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... no adverse comments were received. Comments were submitted by American Chemistry Council, American... Baton Rouge Area Chamber, and the Louisiana Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association, (collectively, the... notes that it will not impose substantial direct costs on tribal governments or preempt tribal law. The...

  12. Ms. Mentor Unmasked

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Paula

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Emily Toth, who writes the monthly "Ms. Mentor" academic advice column in the "Chronicle of Higher Education" and teaches in the English department at Louisiana State University, in Baton Rouge. She is the author of "Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia" (1997), "Inside Peyton Place: The Life…

  13. West Indian Sojourners in Guatemala and Honduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald N. Harpelle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Race, Nation, and West Indian Immigration to Honduras, 1890-1940. Glenn A. Chambers. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2010. xii +202 pp. (Cloth US$ 35.00Black Labor Migration in Caribbean Guatemala, 1882-1923. Frederick Douglass Opie. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2009. 145 pp. (Cloth US$ 65.00

  14. Yield and water quality for different residue managements of sugarcane in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    The focus of the study was to provide information on implementation of a modified post-harvest crop residue sweeper on sugarcane yield and water quality. Field experiments were established at three different locations in south Louisiana: Paincourtville, Duson and Baton Rouge. In each location, lar...

  15. Interface between astrophysical datasets and distributed database management systems (DAVID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, S. S.

    1988-01-01

    This is a status report on the progress of the DAVID (Distributed Access View Integrated Database Management System) project being carried out at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The objective is to implement an interface between Astrophysical datasets and DAVID. Discussed are design details and implementation specifics between DAVID and astrophysical datasets.

  16. Effect of Land Cover Type and Structure on Water Cycling Dynamics for Agricultural and Wetland Sites in the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelmann, E.; Hemes, K. S.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2016-12-01

    The Sacramento/San Joaquin river delta is an important source of fresh water for California. To reverse soil subsidence, which is linked to draining the natural wetlands for agriculture, parts of the Sacramento/San Joaquin river delta have been restored to managed wetlands. While these restored wetlands provide greenhouse gas benefits compared to agricultural use of the land, implications for the water balance of these ecosystems, specifically evapotranspiration, are not well known. Based on multiple years of eddy covariance measurements of water, CO2, and sensible energy fluxes we explored the water cycling dynamics for several sites under different land use covers in the Sacramento/San Joaquin river delta. We investigated four sites under agricultural use (rice, corn, and alfalfa crops and cow pasture) and three restored wetland sites of varying ages and structures to examine the influence of land cover type and structure on evapotranspiration, sensible energy flux, and water use efficiency. While the wetland and the rice sites are usually flooded for the majority of the year, the alfalfa, corn, and pasture sites have a water table that is maintained to be below ground level throughout the year. The three wetland sites also have different fractions of open water to vegetation, covering a gradient from very dense vegetation with no open water to a fairly open structure with large pools of open water. These differences in land cover (dry vs flooded and fraction of open water to vegetation) have an effect on the patterns of evapotranspiration on diurnal to annual timescales. Although the flooded sites (wetland sites and rice) tend to have larger annual evapotranspiration than the drained sites (cow pasture, alfalfa, and corn), the fraction of open water to vegetation affects the extend to which the flooded sites' evapotranspiration exceeds that of drained sites. On diurnal timescales, we found that flooded sites with a larger fraction of open water to vegetation

  17. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenic–biogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento plume during CARES?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kleinman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES the US Department of Energy (DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA, plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrations are enhanced by the simultaneous presence of high concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO and either isoprene, MVK + MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, respectively. Linear and bilinear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, “Bio”, for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short timescales and distance scales can be explained by CO. For each transect and species a plume perturbation, (i.e., ΔOA, defined as the difference between 90th and 10th percentiles was defined and regressions done amongst Δ values in order to probe day-to-day and location-dependent variability. Species that predicted the largest fraction of the variance in ΔOA were ΔO3 and ΔCO. Background OA was highly correlated with background methanol and poorly correlated with other tracers. Because background OA was  ∼  60 % of peak OA in the urban plume, peak OA should be primarily biogenic and therefore non-fossil, even though the day-to-day and spatial variability of plume OA is best described by an anthropogenic tracer, CO. Transects were split into subsets according to the percentile rankings of ΔCO and ΔBio, similar to an approach used by Setyan

  18. Peat accretion histories during the past 6,000 years in marshes of the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; de Fontaine, Christian S.; Brown, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how vertical accretion rates in marshes vary through the millennia. Peat cores were collected in remnant and drained marshes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Cubic smooth spline regression models were used to construct age-depth models and accretion histories for three remnant marshes. Estimated vertical accretion rates at these sites range from 0.03 to 0.49 cm year-1. The mean contribution of organic matter to soil volume at the remnant marsh sites is generally stable (4.73% to 6.94%), whereas the mean contribution of inorganic matter to soil volume has greater temporal variability (1.40% to 7.92%). The hydrogeomorphic position of each marsh largely determines the inorganic content of peat. Currently, the remnant marshes are keeping pace with sea level rise, but this balance may shift for at least one of the sites under future sea level rise scenarios.

  19. Yolo Bypass Juvenile Salmon Utilization Study 2016—Summary of acoustically tagged juvenile salmon and study fish release, Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Theresa L.; Hurst, William R.

    2017-09-12

    The Yolo Bypass is a flood control bypass in Sacramento Valley, California. Flood plain habitats may be used for juvenile salmon rearing, however, the potential value of such habitats can be difficult to evaluate because of the intermittent nature of inundation events. The Yolo Bypass Juvenile Salmon Utilization Study (YBUS) used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the movements and survival of juvenile salmon adjacent to and within the Yolo Bypass during the winter of 2016. This report presents numbers, size data, and release data (times, dates, and locations) for the 1,197 acoustically tagged juvenile salmon released for the YBUS from February 21 to March 18, 2016. Detailed descriptions of the surgical implantation of transmitters are also presented. These data are presented to support the collaborative, interagency analysis and reporting of the study findings.

  20. A project summary: Water and energy budget assessment for a non-tidal wetland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, F.E.; Snyder, R.L.; Paw, U.K.T.; Drexler, J.Z.

    2004-01-01

    The methods used to obtain universal cover coefficient (Kc) values for a non-tidal restored wetland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin river delta, US, during the summer of the year 2002 and to investigate possible differences during changing wind patterns are described. A micrometeorological tower over the wetland was established to quantify actual evapotranspiration (ETa) rates and surface energy fluxes for water and energy budget analysis. The eddy-covariance (EC) system was used to measure the surface energy budget data in the period from May 23 to November 6, 2002. The results show that K c values should be lower during westerly than northerly wind events during the midseason period due to the reduced vapor pressure deficit.

  1. O casamento espiritual da beata Josefa do Sacramento: Análise de um processo inquisitorial do século XVIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William de Souza Martins

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available O artigo pretende analisar o processo inquisitorial da beata Josefa do Sacramento, irmã da Ordem Terceira do Carmo, sentenciada pelo Tribunal da Inquisição do Santo Ofício de Lisboa em 1732, sob a acusação de molinismo. Pretende-se: contextualizar o processo mencionado no campo religioso do período; analisar as relações que as irmãs terceiras beatas mantinham com seus confessores e diretores espirituais; analisar os delitos de heresia de que eram acusadas; e analisar o conjunto das práticas religiosas das beatas envolvidas, vinculando-as a modelos de santidade e à literatura mística difundida aos fiéis.

  2. ¿Quién amasa la masa? Los proveedores de comestibles en el sitio a Colonia del Sacramento de 1735-1737

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar\\u00EDa Emilia Sandr\\u00EDn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se propone un estudio de los individuos que vivían de la provisión general de comestibles necesarios para el abastecimiento de las tropas destinadas al Sitio de Colonia del Sacramento entre los años 1735-1737. Analizar estos proveedores permite dar respuesta a preguntas en torno a los actores involucrados: quiénes eran; cuántos eran; qué porcentaje representaron dentro de la población del complejo portuario rioplatense en ese momento; si eran proveedores especializados en un solo bien, o iban rotando sus provisiones; si eran proveedores directos o eran “intermediarios” entre éstos y los destinatarios de los bienes y/o servicios; qué incidencia económica tuvieron sus provisiones dentro de los gastos totales del sitio y en comparación con la economía local del complejo portuario rioplatense; de esta manera se seguirá trabajando en el estudio de la estructura socio económica del Río de la Plata de ese momento, prestando especial atención a estos sectores medios y/o bajos. La detallada contabilidad del Proveedor General de la Expedición de la Colonia del Sacramento, ofrece una invalorable puerta de acceso a estos problemas, ya que a través de cientos de registros es posible establecer qué se compraba, quiénes lo proveían, cómo llegaba lo comprado a destino y todos los demás elementos que invitan a pensar en un mundo de la producción y la circulación mucho más rico y complejo que el conocido hasta ahora a través del gran comercio.

  3. Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bos, W. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

    1992-12-01

    Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

  4. Science advancements key to increasing management value of life stage monitoring networks for endangered Sacramento River winter-run Chinook salmon in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rachel C.; Windell, Sean; Brandes, Patricia L.; Conrad, J. Louise; Ferguson, John; Goertler, Pascale A. L.; Harvey, Brett N.; Heublein, Joseph; Isreal, Joshua A.; Kratville, Daniel W.; Kirsch, Joseph E.; Perry, Russell W.; Pisciotto, Joseph; Poytress, William R.; Reece, Kevin; Swart, Brycen G.

    2017-01-01

    A robust monitoring network that provides quantitative information about the status of imperiled species at key life stages and geographic locations over time is fundamental for sustainable management of fisheries resources. For anadromous species, management actions in one geographic domain can substantially affect abundance of subsequent life stages that span broad geographic regions. Quantitative metrics (e.g., abundance, movement, survival, life history diversity, and condition) at multiple life stages are needed to inform how management actions (e.g., hatcheries, harvest, hydrology, and habitat restoration) influence salmon population dynamics. The existing monitoring network for endangered Sacramento River winterrun Chinook Salmon (SRWRC, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in California’s Central Valley was compared to conceptual models developed for each life stage and geographic region of the life cycle to identify relevant SRWRC metrics. We concluded that the current monitoring network was insufficient to diagnose when (life stage) and where (geographic domain) chronic or episodic reductions in SRWRC cohorts occur, precluding within- and among-year comparisons. The strongest quantitative data exist in the Upper Sacramento River, where abundance estimates are generated for adult spawners and emigrating juveniles. However, once SRWRC leave the upper river, our knowledge of their identity, abundance, and condition diminishes, despite the juvenile monitoring enterprise. We identified six system-wide recommended actions to strengthen the value of data generated from the existing monitoring network to assess resource management actions: (1) incorporate genetic run identification; (2) develop juvenile abundance estimates; (3) collect data for life history diversity metrics at multiple life stages; (4) expand and enhance real-time fish survival and movement monitoring; (5) collect fish condition data; and (6) provide timely public access to monitoring data in open data

  5. Science Advancements Key to Increasing Management Value of Life Stage Monitoring Networks for Endangered Sacramento River Winter-Run Chinook Salmon in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel C. Johnson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available doi: https://doi.org/10.15447/sfews.2017v15iss3art1A robust monitoring network that provides quantitative information about the status of imperiled species at key life stages and geographic locations over time is fundamental for sustainable management of fisheries resources. For anadromous species, management actions in one geographic domain can substantially affect abundance of subsequent life stages that span broad geographic regions. Quantitative metrics (e.g., abundance, movement, survival, life history diversity, and condition at multiple life stages are needed to inform how management actions (e.g., hatcheries, harvest, hydrology, and habitat restoration influence salmon population dynamics. The existing monitoring network for endangered Sacramento River winter-run Chinook Salmon (SRWRC, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in California’s Central Valley was compared to conceptual models developed for each life stage and geographic region of the life cycle to identify relevant SRWRC metrics. We concluded that the current monitoring network was insufficient to diagnose when (life stage and where (geographic domain chronic or episodic reductions in SRWRC cohorts occur, precluding within- and among-year comparisons. The strongest quantitative data exist in the Upper Sacramento River, where abundance estimates are generated for adult spawners and emigrating juveniles. However, once SRWRC leave the upper river, our knowledge of their identity, abundance, and condition diminishes, despite the juvenile monitoring enterprise. We identified six system-wide recommended actions to strengthen the value of data generated from the existing monitoring network to assess resource management actions: (1 incorporate genetic run identification; (2 develop juvenile abundance estimates; (3 collect data for life history diversity metrics at multiple life stages; (4 expand and enhance real-time fish survival and movement monitoring; (5 collect fish condition data; and

  6. Effect of Microclimates on Evapotranspiration Rates, Energy Balance, and Water Use Estimation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, F.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Von Dessonneck, T.; Keating, K.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Hatala, J.; Knox, S.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Fujii, R.

    2012-12-01

    Research involving the atmospheric-surface exchange of greenhouse gases in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) has primarily focused on peat oxidation and resulting subsidence from over a century of agricultural land management practices. Currently there is a network of flux towers used to investigate management plans to mitigate subsidence and, in some cases, increase land elevation. Nevertheless, Delta land elevations have decreased by over 10m and water resources are largely allocated to maintain levee stability and prevent salt-water intrusion into the Delta, the source of fresh water to over to 22 million Southern Californians. These water allocations are potentially modeled using outdated evapotranspiration (ET) rates. The network of flux towers in the Delta has provided researchers the ability to calculate the atmospheric exchange of water vapor from a variety of land surfaces. From these results, ET rates are found to be reduced compared to the same land surface measurements outside the Delta region and are most likely due to the Delta's unique microclimate. In the summertime, this area is an oasis of cool, moist air (Delta Breeze) when compared to other areas in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys, where daytime high temperatures are often 5 to 10°C higher. The air mass that influences the delta region is formed from a complex interaction between the sub-tropical Pacific High pressure system, upwelling along the California coast, upper atmospheric westerlies, and the unique break in the California Coastal range (i.e. the San Francisco Bay). In general, ET rates are lower than the surrounding geography, as the onset of the "Delta Breeze" occurs in the afternoons, increasing the sensible heat exchange and reducing the energy available for latent heat. Current ET rates were calculated using eddy covariance flux systems for a variety of land uses within the Delta: agricultural crops (corn, rice, alfalfa, and irrigated pasture), a newly

  7. Reconstruction of lake history using nondestructive methods. A first record of organic endmember in sediments using solid phase fluorescence (Lake Noir Inférieur, Aiguilles Rouges Massif, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiers, Marine; Develle, Anne-Lise; Perette, Yves; Sabatier, Pierre; Belle, Simon; Pignol, Cécile; Millet, Laurent; Arnaud, Fabien

    2015-04-01

    Mountain areas are known to be highly sensitive to environmental perturbations driven by climate changes and human activities. Thus, high altitude lake sediments represent interesting archives to reconstruct past environmental variations. Because of their difficult access and their low sedimentation rate, high resolution nondestructive methods are required to limit the loss of information induced by the use of destructive analyses. Moreover, when they are located at the top of drainage basins, their reduced catchment area leads to the dominance of organic matter in the sediment which would make interesting to complete the use of traditional high resolution sedimentary geochemistry tools, such as X-ray fluorescence (XRF) logging, by organic matter-borne high resolution signals. Here we attempt to use UV-induced solid phase fluorescence (SPF) as a promising way to analyze the organic component of environmental archives as we already showed on speleothem records. A 70cm-long core was retrieved in 2012 from the high altitude Lake Noir Inférieur (2495 a.s.l.), located in the Aiguilles Rouges Massif (Northern French Alps). The catchment area, made by gneiss and amphibolites, is almost devoid of vegetation. Thus, the high OM content (up to 23.6%) of the homogenous dark brown sediments is assumed to be essentially related to autochtonous production. The preliminary age model suggests that the core spans the last 8000 yrs. In this work, we investigated the upper 15 cm of the core which represents the last 1300 yrs. We combined the two spectroscopic methods (XRF and SPF) at a 100µm step, in order to provide a high resolution overview of both mineral and organic endmembers. The XRF core scanner analytical settings were adjusted at 10 kV and 30kV in order to detect elements from Al to Pb. SPF measurements were performed with a spectrofluorimeter and emission spectra were recorded at 256 nm and 325 nm excitation wavelengths. Different organic matter types (chlorophyll

  8. El entorno local como objeto de estudio y de aplicación del saber geoambiental. Una experiencia práctica en Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ethel Benítez Martínez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este texto presenta la importancia de los métodos de aprendizaje, tanto para la enseñanza de la geografía, como para la prevención y atención de problemas socioambientales concretos. Para este propósito, se expondrá el análisis de una experiencia pedagógica llevada a cabo con estudiantes de secundaria, en torno al impacto de las acciones humanas avaladas, en forma directa e indirecta, por las autoridades gubernamentales locales y nacionales sobre el sistema de humedales que forman parte de la franja costera de la ciudad de Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay. Se espera demostrar cómo la enseñanza de la geografía en la secundaria, desde una postura reflexiva, crítica y activa, favorece el desarrollo de capacidades cognitivas en los educandos que redundan en la formación de individuos responsables, autónomos y con capacidad crítica, capaces de dar soluciones y tomar decisiones con respecto a problemas concretos como el arriba enunciado.

  9. El entorno local como objeto de estudio y de aplicación del saber geoambiental. Una experiencia práctica en Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benítez Martínez Gabriela Ethel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Este texto presenta la importancia de los métodos de aprendizaje, tanto para la enseñanza de la geografía, como para la prevención y atención de problemas socioambientales concretos. Para este propósito, se expondrá el análisis de una experiencia pedagógica llevada a cabo con estudiantes de secundaria, en torno al impacto de las acciones humanas avaladas, en forma directa e indirecta, por las autoridades gubernamentales locales y nacionales sobre el sistema de humedales que forman parte de la franja costera de la ciudad de Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay. Se espera demostrar cómo la enseñanza de la geografía en la secundaria, desde una postura reflexiva, crítica y activa, favorece el desarrollo de capacidades cognitivas en los educandos que redundan en la formación de individuos responsables, autónomos y con capacidad crítica, capaces de dar soluciones y tomar decisiones con respecto a problemas concretos como el arriba enunciado.

  10. Association between chronic kidney disease detected using creatinine and cystatin C and death and cardiovascular events in elderly Mexican Americans: the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Carmen A; Lee, Anne; Odden, Michelle C; Lopez, Lenny; Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Neuhaus, John; Haan, Mary N

    2013-01-01

    Creatinine, the current clinical standard to detect chronic kidney disease (CKD), is biased by muscle mass, age and race. The authors sought to determine whether cystatin C, an alternative marker of kidney function less biased by these factors, can identify elderly Mexican Americans with CKD who are at high risk for death and cardiovascular disease. Longitudinal, with mean follow-up of 6.8 years. Sacramento Area Latino Study of Aging (SALSA). One thousand four hundred and thirty five Mexican Americans aged 60 to 101. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, mL/min per 1.73 m(2)) was determined according to creatinine (eGFRcreat) and cystatin C (eGFRcys), and participants were classified into four mutually exclusive categories: CKD neither (eGFRcreat ≥60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2); eGFRcys ≥60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2)), CKD creatinine only (eGFRcreat Mexican Americans with CKD. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. Life-course socioeconomic position and incidence of dementia and cognitive impairment without dementia in older Mexican Americans: results from the Sacramento area Latino study on aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Haan, Mary N; Kalbfleisch, John D; Galea, Sandro; Lisabeth, Lynda D; Aiello, Allison E

    2011-05-15

    There have been few investigations of the link between changes in life-course socioeconomic position (SEP) and cognitive decline or incidence of dementia. The authors examined the impact of changes in life-course SEP on incidence of dementia and cognitive impairment but not dementia (CIND) over a decade of follow-up. Participants of Mexican origin (n = 1,789) were members of the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging cohort. Incidence of dementia/CIND was ascertained by using standard diagnostic criteria. SEP indicators at 3 life stages (childhood, adulthood, and midlife) were used to derive a measure of cumulative SEP (range, 0 to 8) and SEP mobility. Nearly 24% of the sample maintained a low SEP throughout life. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed from Cox proportional hazards regression models. In fully adjusted models, participants with a continuously high SEP had lower hazard ratios for dementia/CIND compared with those with a continuously low SEP at all 3 life stages (hazard ratio = 0.49, 95% confidence interval: 0.24, 0.98; P = 0.04). In age-adjusted models, participants experienced a 16% greater hazard of dementia/CIND with every 1-unit increase in cumulative SEP disadvantage across the life course (hazard ratio = 1.16, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.33; P = 0.04). Early exposures to social disadvantage may increase the risk of late-life dementia.

  12. Effect of Climate Extremes, Seasonal Change, and Agronomic Practices on Measured Evapotranspiration and CO2 Exchange in Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta Alfalfa Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, J.; Kent, E. R.; Leinfelder-Miles, M.; Paw U, K. T.; Little, C.; Lambert, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    Evapotranspiration and CO2 exchange was measured in five alfalfa fields in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta region from 2016 to 2017 using eddy covariance and surface renewal methods. Seasonal changes of evapotranspiration and CO2 fluxes were compared between 2016, a drought year, and 2017, a high rainfall year. Additionally, changes in evapotranspiration and CO2 flux were investigated across various agronomic considerations, such as irrigation methods (border-check flood and sub-surface), stand life, and herbicide programs. Components of the energy balance, including net radiation, latent heat, ground heat flux, and sensible heat, were evaluated considering correlations to wind speed measured by three sonic anemometers, irrigation frequency, and crop cutting cycle. Comparisons between two different types of radiometers were also carried out. Under drought conditions, we observed higher amounts of evapotranspiration in a field having a stand life of less than two years of age compared to older stands, and in a sub-surface irrigated field compared to flood irrigated fields.

  13. Morphology, bioacoustics, and ecology of Tibicen neomexicensis sp. n., a new species of cicada from the Sacramento Mountains in New Mexico, U.S.A. (Hemiptera, Cicadidae, Tibicen).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    Tibicen neomexicensis sp. n., a new species of cicada found in the Sacramento Mountains of southcentral New Mexico, is described. Tibicen neomexicensis closely resembles Tibicen chiricahua Davis morphologically, but males of the two species have highly distinct calling songs that differ in phrasal structure, amplitude burst rates, and pulse structure. Unlike Tibicen chiricahua, male Tibicen neomexicensis use conspicuous dorso-ventral abdominal movements to modulate the amplitude and frequency of their calls. Tibicen neomexicensis is also smaller on average than Tibicen chiricahua, and differences in the color patterns of the wing venation identify these two species morphologically. Both species are dependent on pinyon-juniper woodlands and have similar emergence phenologies. These species appear to be allopatric, with Tibicen chiricahua found west of the Rio Grande in New Mexico, Arizona, and Mexico, and Tibicen neomexicensis so far known only from New Mexico, east of the Rio Grande. Tibicen chiricahua and Tibicen neomexicensis males share a common genitalic structure that separates them from all other species of Tibicen, and the possible evolutionary and biogeographic history of these likely sister species is also discussed.

  14. Comparing Multiple Evapotranspiration-calculating Methods, Including Eddy Covariance and Surface Renewal, Using Empirical Measurements from Alfalfa Fields in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, J.; Kent, E. R.; Leinfelder-Miles, M.; Lambert, J. J.; Little, C.; Paw U, K. T.; Snyder, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Eddy covariance and surface renewal measurements were used to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) over a variety of crop fields in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta during the 2016 growing season. However, comparing and evaluating multiple measurement systems and methods for determining ET was focused upon at a single alfalfa site. The eddy covariance systems included two systems for direct measurement of latent heat flux: one using a separate sonic anemometer and an open path infrared gas analyzer and another using a combined system (Campbell Scientific IRGASON). For these methods, eddy covariance was used with measurements from the Campbell Scientific CSAT3, the LI-COR 7500a, the Campbell Scientific IRGASON, and an additional R.M. Young sonic anemometer. In addition to those direct measures, the surface renewal approach included several energy balance residual methods in which net radiation, ground heat flux, and sensible heat flux (H) were measured. H was measured using several systems and different methods, including using multiple fast-response thermocouple measurements and using the temperatures measured by the sonic anemometers. The energy available for ET was then calculated as the residual of the surface energy balance equation. Differences in ET values were analyzed between the eddy covariance and surface renewal methods, using the IRGASON-derived values of ET as the standard for accuracy.

  15. Hydrologic variability, water chemistry, and phytoplankton biomass in a large flood plain of the Sacramento River, CA, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemel, L.E.; Sommer, T.R.; Muller-Solger, A. B.; Harrell, W.C.

    2004-01-01

    The Yolo Bypass, a large, managed floodplain that discharges to the headwaters of the San Francisco Estuary, was studied before, during, and after a single, month-long inundation by the Sacramento River in winter and spring 2000. The primary objective was to identify hydrologic conditions and other factors that enhance production of phytoplankton biomass in the floodplain waters. Recent reductions in phytoplankton have limited secondary production in the river and estuary, and increased phytoplankton biomass is a restoration objective for this system. Chlorophyll a was used as a measure of phytoplankton biomass in this study. Chlorophyll a concentrations were low (inorganic nutrients while chlorophyll a was increasing. Discharge from the floodplain was enriched in chlorophyll a relative to downstream locations in the river and estuary during the initial draining and later when local stream inflows produced brief discharge pulses. Based on the observation that phytoplankton biomass peaks during drainage events, we suggest that phytoplankton production in the floodplain and biomass transport to downstream locations would be higher in years with multiple inundation and draining sequences.

  16. « L’éventail aux fleurs de pêcher » comme métaphore de la vie : Réflexions sur la traduction des références intertextuelles dans Rose rouge et rose blanche d’Eileen Chang

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Tan-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Eileen Chang et Rose rouge et rose blanche (1944) Eileen Chang 張愛玲 (1920-1995), auteur reconnu de la littérature chinoise contemporaine, s’est révélée en 1943 à Shanghai sous l’occupation japonaise. Entre 1943 et 1945, elle a publié la plupart de ses œuvres majeures dans différentes revues littéraires shanghaïennes. Paru en 1944, son premier ouvrage intitulé Chuanqi 傳奇 (Légendes – contes et récits) a rassemblé ses nouvelles et récits de l’époque. Dès lors, son talent littéraire a été confirmé...

  17. The Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeff; Morris, Lynn; Stewart, Fran; Thretheway, Ray; Gartland, Lisa; Russell, Camille; Reddish, Merrill; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Urban heat islands increase the demand for cooling energy and accelerate the formation of smog. They are created when natural vegetation is replaced by heat-absorbing surfaces such as building roofs and walls, parking lots, and streets. Through the implementation of measures designed to mitigate the urban heat island, communities can decrease their demand for energy and effectively "cool" the metropolitan landscape. Measures to reverse the urban heat island include afforestation and the widespread use of highly reflective surfaces. To demonstrate the potential benefits of implementing these measures, EPA has teamed up with NASA and LBNL to initiate a pilot project with three U.S. cities. As part of the pilot, NASA is using remotely-sensed data to quantify surface temperature, albedo, the thermal response number and NDVI vegetation of each city. To pursue these efforts, more information is needed about specific characteristics of several different cities. NASA used the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) to obtain high spatial resolution (10 m pixel resolution) over each of the three pilot cities (Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City). The goal of the UHIPP is to use the results from the NASA/LBNL analysis, combined with knowledge gained through working with various organizations within each pilot city to identify the most effective means of implementing strategies designed to mitigate the urban heat island, These "lessons learned" will be made available and used by cities across the U.S. to assist policy makers and others within various communities to analyze their own urban heat islands and determine which, if any, measures can be taken to help save energy and money, and to prevent pollution. The object of this session is for representatives from each of the pilot cities to present their results of the study and share the experience of working with these data in managing their urban landscape.

  18. The Urban Fabric of the City as Its Affects Thermal Energy Responses Derived from Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The physical geography of the city affects numerous aspects of its interlinked biophysical, social, and land-atmosphere characteristics - those attributes that come together to form the total urban environment. One approach to studying the multitude of interactions that occur as a result of urbanization is to view the city from a systems ecology perspective, where energy and material cycle into and out of the urban milieu. Thus, the urban ecosystem is synergistic in linking land, air, water, and living organisms in a vast network of interrelated physical, human, and biological process. Given the number and the shear complexity of the exchanges and, ultimately, their effects, that occur within the urban environment, we are focusing our research on looking at how the morphology or urban fabric of the city, drives thermal energy exchanges across the urban landscape. The study of thermal energy attributes for different cities provides insight into how thermal fluxes and characteristics are partitioned across the city landscape in response to each city's morphology. We are using thermal infrared remote sensing data obtained at a high spatial resolution from aircraft, along with satellite data, to identify and quantify thermal energy characteristics for 4 U.S. cities: Atlanta, GA, Baton Rouge, LA, Salt Lake City, UT, and Sacramento, CA. Analysis of how thermal energy is spatially distributed across the urban landscapes for these cities provides a unique perspective for understanding how the differing morphology of cities forces land-atmosphere exchanges, such as the urban heat island effect, as well as related meteorological and air quality interactions. Keyword: urban ecosystems, remote sensing, urban heat island

  19. Regional skew for California, and flood frequency for selected sites in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basin, based on data through water year 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrett, Charles; Veilleux, Andrea; Stedinger, J.R.; Barth, N.A.; Knifong, Donna L.; Ferris, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Improved flood-frequency information is important throughout California in general and in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basin in particular, because of an extensive network of flood-control levees and the risk of catastrophic flooding. A key first step in updating flood-frequency information is determining regional skew. A Bayesian generalized least squares (GLS) regression method was used to derive a regional-skew model based on annual peak-discharge data for 158 long-term (30 or more years of record) stations throughout most of California. The desert areas in southeastern California had too few long-term stations to reliably determine regional skew for that hydrologically distinct region; therefore, the desert areas were excluded from the regional skew analysis for California. Of the 158 long-term stations used to determine regional skew, 145 have minimally regulated annual-peak discharges, and 13 stations are dam sites for which unregulated peak discharges were estimated from unregulated daily maximum discharge data furnished by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers. Station skew was determined by using an expected moments algorithm (EMA) program for fitting the Pearson Type 3 flood-frequency distribution to the logarithms of annual peak-discharge data. The Bayesian GLS regression method previously developed was modified because of the large cross correlations among concurrent recorded peak discharges in California and the use of censored data and historical flood information with the new expected moments algorithm. In particular, to properly account for these cross-correlation problems and develop a suitable regression model and regression diagnostics, a combination of Bayesian weighted least squares and generalized least squares regression was adopted. This new methodology identified a nonlinear function relating regional skew to mean basin elevation. The regional skew values ranged from -0.62 for a mean basin elevation of zero to 0.61 for a mean basin elevation

  20. Assessment of fossil fuel carbon dioxide and other anthropogenic trace gas emissions from airborne measurements over Sacramento, California in spring 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Turnbull

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct quantification of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff in atmospheric samples can be used to examine several carbon cycle and air quality questions. We collected in situ CO2, CO, and CH4 measurements and flask samples in the boundary layer and free troposphere over Sacramento, California, USA, during two aircraft flights over and downwind of this urban area during spring of 2009. The flask samples were analyzed for Δ14CO2 and CO2 to determine the recently added CO2ff mole fraction. A suite of greenhouse and other trace gases, including hydrocarbons and halocarbons, were measured in the same samples. Strong correlations were observed between CO2ff and numerous trace gases associated with urban emissions. From these correlations we estimate emission ratios between CO2ff and these species, and compare these with bottom-up inventory-derived estimates. Recent county level inventory estimates for carbon monoxide (CO and benzene from the California Air Resources Board CEPAM database are in good agreement with our measured emission ratios, whereas older emissions inventories appear to overestimate emissions of these gases by a factor of two. For most other trace species, there are substantial differences (200–500% between our measured emission ratios and those derived from available emission inventories. For the first flight, we combine in situ CO measurements with the measured CO:CO2ff emission ratio of 14 ± 2 ppbCO/ppmCO2 to derive an estimate of CO2ff mole fraction throughout this flight, and also estimate the biospheric CO2 mixing ratio (CO2bio from the difference of total and fossil CO2. The resulting CO2bio varies dramatically from up to 8 ± 2 ppm in the urban plume to −6 ± 1 ppm in the surrounding boundary layer air. Finally, we use the in situ estimates of CO

  1. Chromium(VI) generation in vadose zone soils and alluvial sediments of the southwestern Sacramento Valley, California: a potential source of geogenic Cr(VI) to groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater that exceed the World Health Organization’s maximum contaminant level for drinking water (50 μg L−1) occur in several locations globally. The major mechanism for mobilization of this Cr(VI) at these sites is the weathering of Cr(III) from ultramafic rocks and its subsequent oxidation on Mn oxides. This process may be occurring in the southern Sacramento Valley of California where Cr(VI) concentrations in groundwater can approach or exceed 50 μg L−1. To characterize Cr geochemistry in the area, samples from several soil auger cores (approximately 4 m deep) and drill cores (approximately 25 m deep) were analyzed for total concentrations of 44 major, minor and trace elements, Cr associated with labile Mn and Fe oxides, and Cr(VI). Total concentrations of Cr in these samples ranged from 140 to 2220 mg per kg soil. Between 9 and 70 mg per kg soil was released by selective extractions that target Fe oxides, but essentially no Cr was associated with the abundant reactive Mn oxides (up to ~1000 mg hydroxylamine-reducible Mn per kg soil was present). Both borehole magnetic susceptibility surveys performed at some of the drill core sites and relative differences between Cr released in a 4-acid digestion versus total Cr (lithium metaborate fusion digestion) suggest that the majority of total Cr in the samples is present in refractory chromite minerals transported from ultramafic exposures in the Coast Range Mountains. Chromium(VI) in the samples studied ranged from 0 to 42 μg kg−1, representing a minute fraction of total Cr. Chromium(VI) content was typically below detection in surface soils (top 10 cm) where soil organic matter was high, and increased with increasing depth in the soil auger cores as organic matter decreased. Maximum concentrations of Cr(VI) were up to 3 times greater in the deeper drill core samples than the shallow auger cores. Although Cr(VI) in these vadose zone soils and sediments was only a

  2. Using remote sensing to monitor past changes and assess future scenarios for the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta waterways, California USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria J.; Hestir, Erin; Khanna, Shruti; Ustin, Susan L.

    2017-04-01

    Historically, deltas have been extensively affected both by natural processes and human intervention. Thus, understanding drivers, predicting impacts and optimizing solutions to delta problems requires a holistic approach spanning many sectors, disciplines and fields of expertise. Deltas are ideal model systems to understand the effects of the interaction between social and ecological domains, as they face unprecedented disturbances and threats to their biological and ecological sustainability. The challenge for deltas is to meet the goals of supporting biodiversity and ecosystem processes while also provisioning fresh water resources for human use. We provide an overview of the last 150 years of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River delta, where we illustrate the parallel process of an increase in disturbances, by particularly zooming in on the current cascading effects of invasive species on geophysical and biological processes. Using remote sensing data coupled with in situ measurements of water quality, turbidity, and species presence we show how the spread and persistence of aquatic invasive species affects sedimentation processes and ecosystem functioning. Our results show that the interactions between the biological and physical conditions in the Delta affect the trajectory of dominance by native and invasive aquatic plant species. Trends in growth and community characteristics associated with predicted impacts of climate change (sea level rise, warmer temperatures, changes in the hydrograph with high winter and low summer outflows) do not provide simple predictions. Individually, the impact of specific environmental changes on the biological components can be predicted, however it is the complex interactions of biological communities with the suite of physical changes that make predictions uncertain. Systematic monitoring is critical to provide the data needed to document and understand change of these delta systems, and to identify successful adaptation

  3. Using Satellite Remote Sensing to Map Changes in Aquatic Invasive Plant Cover in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Waterways of the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta have recently become infested with invasive aquatic weeds such as floating water hyacinth (Eichhoria crassipes) and water primrose (Ludwigia peploides). These invasive plants cause many negative impacts, including, but not limited to: the blocking of waterways for commercial shipping and boating; clogging of irrigation screens, pumps and canals; and degradation of biological habitat through shading. Zhang et al. (1997, Ecological Applications, 7(3), 1039-1053) used NASA Landsat satellite imagery together with field calibration measurements to map physical and biological processes within marshlands of the San Francisco Bay. Live green biomass (LGB) and related variables were correlated with a simple vegetation index ratio of red and near infra-red bands from Landsat images. More recently, the percent (water area) cover of water hyacinth plotted against estimated LGB of emergent aquatic vegetation in the Delta from September 2014 Landsat imagery showed a 80% overall accuracy. For the past two years, we have partnered with the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Department of Plant Sciences, University of California at Davis to conduct new validation surveys of water hyacinth and water primrose coverage and LGB in Delta waterways. A plan is underway to transfer decision support tools developed at NASA's Ames Research Center based on Landsat satellite images to improve Delta-wide integrated management of floating aquatic weeds, while reducing chemical control costs. The main end-user for this application project will be the Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW) of the California Department of Parks and Recreation, who has the responsibility for chemical control of water hyacinth in the Delta.

  4. Multi-year coupled biogeochemical and biophysical impacts of restoring drained agricultural peatlands to wetlands across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemes, K. S.; Eichelmann, E.; Chamberlain, S.; Knox, S. H.; Oikawa, P.; Sturtevant, C.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    Globally, delta ecosystems are critical for human livelihoods, but are at increasingly greater risk of degradation. The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (`Delta') has been subsiding dramatically, losing close to 100 Tg of carbon since the mid 19th century due in large part to agriculture-induced oxidation of the peat soils through drainage and cultivation. Efforts to re-wet the peat soils through wetland restoration are attractive as climate mitigation activities. While flooded wetland systems have the potential to sequester significant amounts of carbon as photosynthesis outpaces aerobic respiration, the highly-reduced conditions can result in significant methane emissions. This study will utilize three years (2014-2016) of continuous, gap-filled, CO2 and CH4 flux data from a mesonetwork of seven eddy covariance towers in the Delta to compute GHG budgets for the restored wetlands and agricultural baseline sites measured. Along with biogeochemical impacts of wetland restoration, biophysical impacts such as changes in reflectance, energy partitioning, and surface roughness, can have significant local to regional impacts on air temperature and heat fluxes. We hypothesize that despite flooded wetlands reducing albedo, wetland land cover will cool the near-surface air temperature due to increased net radiation being preferentially partitioned into latent heat flux and rougher canopy conditions allowing for more turbulent mixing with the atmosphere. This study will investigate the seasonal and diurnal patterns of turbulent energy fluxes and the surface properties that drive them. With nascent policy mechanisms set to compensate landowners and farmers for low emission land use practices beyond reforestation, it is essential that policy mechanisms take into consideration how the biophysical impacts of land use change could drive local to regional-scale climatic perturbations, enhancing or attenuating the biogeochemical impacts.

  5. Characterization of major lithologic units underlying the lower American River using water-borne continuous resistivity profiling, Sacramento, California, June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Teeple, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The levee system of the lower American River in Sacramento, California, is situated above a mixed lithology of alluvial deposits that range from clay to gravel. In addition, sand deposits related to hydraulic mining activities underlie the floodplain and are preferentially prone to scour during high-flow events. In contrast, sections of the American River channel have been observed to be scour resistant. In this study, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, explores the resistivity structure of the American River channel to characterize the extent and thickness of lithologic units that may impact the scour potential of the area. Likely lithologic structures are interpreted, but these interpretations are non-unique and cannot be directly related to scour potential. Additional geotechnical data would provide insightful data on the scour potential of certain lithologic units. Additional interpretation of the resistivity data with respect to these results may improve interpretations of lithology and scour potential throughout the American River channel and floodplain. Resistivity data were collected in three profiles along the American River using a water-borne continuous resistivity profiling technique. After processing and modeling these data, inverted resistivity profiles were used to make interpretations about the extent and thickness of possible lithologic units. In general, an intermittent high-resistivity layer likely indicative of sand or gravel deposits extends to a depth of around 30 feet (9 meters) and is underlain by a consistent low-resistivity layer that likely indicates a high-clay content unit that extends below the depth of investigation (60 feet or 18 meters). Immediately upstream of the Watt Avenue Bridge, the high-resistivity layer is absent, and the low-resistivity layer extends to the surface where a scour-resistant layer has been previously observed in the river bed.

  6. A millennial-scale record of Pb and Hg contamination in peatlands of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith; Alpers, Charles N.; Neymark, Leonid; Paces, James B.; Taylor, Howard E.; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we provide the first record of millennial patterns of Pb and Hg concentrations on the west coast of the United States. Peat cores were collected from two micro-tidal marshes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Core samples were analyzed for Pb, Hg, and Ti concentrations and dated using radiocarbon, 210Pb, and 137Cs. Pre-anthropogenic concentrations of Pb and Hg in peat ranged from 0.60 to 13.0 µg g-1and from 6.9 to 71 ng g-1, respectively. For much of the past 6000+ years, the Delta was free from anthropogenic pollution, however, beginning in ~1425 CE, Hg and Pb concentrations, Pb/Ti ratios, Pb enrichment factors (EFs), and HgEFs all increased. Pb isotope compositions of the peat suggest that this uptick was likely caused by smelting activities originating in Asia. The next increases in Pb and Hg contamination occurred during the California Gold Rush (beginning ~1850 CE), when concentrations reached their highest levels (74 µg g-1 Pb, 990 ng g-1 Hg; PbEF = 12 and HgEF = 28). Lead concentrations increased again beginning in the ~1920s with the incorporation of Pb additives in gasoline. The phase-out of lead additives in the late 1980s was reflected in Pb isotope ratios and reductions in Pb concentrations in the surface layers of the peat. The rise and fall of Hg contamination was also tracked by the peat archive, with the highest Hg concentrations occurring just before 1963 CE and then decreasing during the post-1963 period. Overall, the results show that the Delta was a pristine region for most of its ~6700-year existence; however, since ~1425 CE, it has received Pb and Hg contamination from both global and regional sources.

  7. Drainage-return, surface-water withdrawal, and land-use data for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, with emphasis on Twitchell Island, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templin, William E.; Cherry, Daniel E.

    1997-01-01

    Partial data on drainage returns and surface-water withdrawals are presented for areas of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, for March 1994 through February 1996. These areas cover most of the delta. Data are also presented for all drainage returns and some surface-water withdrawals for Twitchell Island, which is in the western part of the delta. Changes in land use between 1968 and 1991 are also presented for the delta. Measurements of monthly drainage returns and surface-water withdrawals were made using flowmeters installed in siphons and drain pipes on Twitchell Island. Estimates of monthly returns throughout the delta were made using electric power-consumption data with pump-efficiency-test data. For Twitchell Island, monthly measured drainage returns for the 1995 calendar year totaled about 11,200 acre-feet, whereas drainage returns estimated from power-consumption data totaled 5 percent less at about 10,600 acre-feet. Monthly surface-water withdrawals onto Twitchell Island through 12 of the 21 siphons totaled about 2,400 acre-feet for 1995. For most of the delta, the monthly estimated drainage returns for 1995 totaled about 430,000 acre-feet. The area consisting of Bouldin, Brannan, Staten, Tyler, and Venice Islands had the largest estimated drainage returns for calendar year 1995. Between 1968 and 1991, native vegetation in the delta decreased by 25 percent (about 40,000 acres), and grain and hay crops increased by 340 percent (about 71,000 acres). For Twitchell Island, native vegetation decreased about 77 percent (about 850 acres), while field crop acreage increased by about 44 percent (about 780 acres).

  8. A millennial-scale record of Pb and Hg contamination in peatlands of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z; Alpers, Charles N; Neymark, Leonid A; Paces, James B; Taylor, Howard E; Fuller, Christopher C

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we provide the first record of millennial patterns of Pb and Hg concentrations on the west coast of the United States. Peat cores were collected from two micro-tidal marshes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Core samples were analyzed for Pb, Hg, and Ti concentrations and dated using radiocarbon and (210)Pb. Pre-anthropogenic concentrations of Pb and Hg in peat ranged from 0.60 to 13.0μgg(-1)and from 6.9 to 71ngg(-1), respectively. For much of the past 6000+ years, the Delta was free from anthropogenic pollution, however, beginning in ~1425CE, Hg and Pb concentrations, Pb/Ti ratios, Pb enrichment factors (EFs), and HgEFs all increased. Pb isotope compositions of the peat suggest that this uptick was likely caused by smelting activities originating in Asia. The next increases in Pb and Hg contamination occurred during the California Gold Rush (beginning ~1850CE), when concentrations reached their highest levels (74μgg(-1) Pb, 990ngg(-1) Hg; PbEF=12 and HgEF=28). Lead concentrations increased again beginning in the ~1920s with the incorporation of Pb additives in gasoline. The phase-out of lead additives in the late 1980s was reflected in changes in Pb isotope ratios and reductions in Pb concentrations in the surface layers of the peat. The rise and subsequent fall of Hg contamination was also tracked by the peat archive, with the highest Hg concentrations occurring just before 1963CE and then decreasing during the post-1963 period. Overall, the results show that the Delta was a pristine region for most of its ~6700-year existence; however, since ~1425CE, it has received Pb and Hg contamination from both global and regional sources. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Pablo Fucé, Cerca de la Horca. Historia social de Colonia de Sacramento a partir de una causa criminal, Montevideo, Torre del Vigía Ediciones, 2002.

    OpenAIRE

    López, María Soledad

    2005-01-01

    Como adelanta el título del libro, el autor reconstruye el entramado del tejido social de  Colonia de Sacramento de fines del siglo XVIII a través de una vieja y curiosa causa criminal. Digo curiosa porque estudiando este incidente, el autor logró delinear las relaciones de poder entre gauchos y vecinos, caracterizar el aparato burocrático colonial y describir los espacios territoriales y simbólicos en donde las relaciones de poder se manifestaron.  Como sostiene el mismo autor “tenía frente ...

  10. Storeria occipitomaculata obscura (Florida red-bellied snake)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muse, Lindy J.; Glorioso, Brad M.; Eaglestone, Chandler A. R.

    2016-01-01

    USA: LOUISIANA: Vermilion Parish: Palmetto Island State Park (29.86335°N, 92.14848°W; WGS 84). 19 February 2016. Lindy J. Muse. Verified by Jeff Boundy. Florida Museum of Natural History (UF 177730, photo voucher). New parish record (Dundee and Rossman 1989. The Amphibians and Reptiles of Louisiana. Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 300 pp.). Storeria occipitomaculata obscura has not been documented in any of the coastal parishes of Louisiana (Boundy. 2006. Snakes of Louisiana. Louisiana Department of Wildlife & Fisheries, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 40 pp.). However, this species can be difficult to find in southern Louisiana and other populations in coastal parishes may eventually be discovered. This adult individual (SVL = 292 mm; TL = 70 mm) was found under a log in a wet bottomland forest dominated by Dwarf Palmetto and Bald Cypress.

  11. Utilization of a commercially supplied synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craft, B.C.; Saile, V.; Scott, J.D.; Morikawa, E.

    1991-01-01

    Louisiana State University (LSU) is developing the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The centerpiece of CAMD will be a 1.2 GeV electron storage ring purchased from Maxwell Laboratories, Inc. The high-tech building for CAMD has been designed by TECH-IV of Baton Rouge with engineering support from Lester B. Knight and Associates of Chicago. The storage ring has been optimized for X-ray lithography. The procedures developed at CAMD for printing integrated circuits may well be of significant importance to US competitiveness in semiconductor and related industries. However, the spectral range of the ring also supports scientific and engineering activities in several other areas. (orig.)

  12. High Frequency Monitoring of Isotopic Signatures Elucidates Potential Effects of Restoring Floodplain Habitat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, B. J.; Fogel, M. L.; Jeffres, C.; Viers, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Increasing the quality and quantity of habitat for native species in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is a high priority for California water managers. The McCormack-Williamson Tract (MWT) is a subsided island (38.253° N -121.284° W) situated at the confluence of the Cosumnes and Mokelumne rivers, near the inland extent of tidal influence. MWT experienced unexpected levee failure on February 11, 2017, during the wettest year of record for the Mokelumne-Cosumnes river system, which provided a unique opportunity to examine the potential trajectory of future restoration actions within the Delta. We carried out high frequency sampling (n=32, 13% of days) of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM) and waters in the Mokelumne and Cosumnes river systems, including nearby sloughs, and the post-failure, flooded interior of MWT. Carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes in SPOM and δ2H and δ18O of waters were analyzed and in situ water quality data were collected in tandem, thus contextualizing isotopic data. Sampling was confined to an 8 km2 region surrounding MWT (6.7 km2 interior). This unintentional flooding provided a natural before-after-control-impact experiment to study the effect that sudden inundation of a Delta island can have on food web development and ecosystem function. Source waters were isotopically distinct (p0.9), providing a semi-conservative tracer of mixing. The δ13C values of SPOM varied between -37.3 and -23.9‰ and were significantly more negative on the flooded island by 1.2‰ (p<.01), possibly due to increased recycling of organic carbon concomitant with accelerated ecosystem metabolism. Concurrently, δ15N values varied between 1.0 and 12.4‰ and were not significantly different between riverine and flooded island sites. Our data indicate that this river system is highly dynamic over short periods of flood inundation (13 weeks) with new freshwater habitats exhibiting higher productivity than their riverine counterparts and could

  13. Re-establishing marshes can return carbon sink functions to a current carbon source in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robin L.; Fujii, Roger; Schmidt, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in California was an historic, vast inland freshwater wetland, where organic soils almost 20 meters deep formed over the last several millennia as the land surface elevation of marshes kept pace with sea level rise. A system of levees and pumps were installed in the late 1800s and early 1900s to drain the land for agricultural use. Since then, land surface has subsided more than 7 meters below sea level in some areas as organic soils have been lost to aerobic decomposition. As land surface elevations decrease, costs for levee maintenance and repair increase, as do the risks of flooding. Wetland restoration can be a way to mitigate subsidence by re-creating the environment in which the organic soils developed. A preliminary study of the effect of hydrologic regime on carbon cycling conducted on Twitchell Island during the mid-1990s showed that continuous, shallow flooding allowing for the growth of emergent marsh vegetation re-created a wetland environment where carbon preservation occurred. Under these conditions annual plant biomass carbon inputs were high, and microbial decomposition was reduced. Based on this preliminary study, the U.S. Geological Survey re-established permanently flooded wetlands in fall 1997, with shallow water depths of 25 and 55 centimeters, to investigate the potential to reverse subsidence of delta islands by preserving and accumulating organic substrates over time. Ten years after flooding, elevation gains from organic matter accumulation in areas of emergent marsh vegetation ranged from almost 30 to 60 centimeters, with average annual carbon storage rates approximating 1 kg/m2, while areas without emergent vegetation cover showed no significant change in elevation. Differences in accretion rates within areas of emergent marsh vegetation appeared to result from temporal and spatial variability in hydrologic factors and decomposition rates in the wetlands rather than variability in primary production

  14. Mercury in the mix: An in situ mesocosm approach to assess relative contributions of mercury sources to methylmercury production and bioaccumulation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Kraus, T. E. C.; Ackerman, J.; Stumpner, E. B.; DeWild, J.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Tate, M.; Ogorek, J.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination is considered one of the greatest threats to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the San Francisco Estuary ecosystems. This threat is driven by the transformation of Hg, deposited in the Delta from erosion of upstream historic mining debris and atmospheric deposition, by native bacteria into the more toxic and biologically available form, methylmercury (MeHg), in the wetlands and sediment of the Delta. To effectively manage this threat, a quantitative understanding of the relative contribution of the different Hg sources to MeHg formation is needed. Mass balance estimates indicate as much as 99% of the Hg entering the Delta arrives via tributary inputs. Of the tributary Hg load, approximately 90% is adsorbed to suspended particles from tributary discharge and 10% is in the dissolved fraction, potentially of atmospheric origin. In comparison, the remaining 1-2% of the Hg entering the Delta arrives through direct atmospheric deposition (wet and dry). The relative importance of these sources to MeHg production within the Delta is not linearly related to the mass inputs because atmospherically-derived Hg is believed to be more reactive than sediment-bound Hg with respect to MeHg formation. We conducted an in situ mesocosm dosing experiment where different Hg sources to the Delta (direct atmospheric, dissolved riverine and suspended sediment) were "labeled" with different stable Hg isotopes and added to mesocosms within four different wetlands. Mercury isotopes added with the streambed sediments were equilibrated in sealed containers for six months; while the Hg isotopes associated with the precipitation and river water were equilibrated for 24 hours prior to use. After adding the isotopes, we sampled the water column, overlying air, bottom sediments and fish (Gambusia) at time intervals up to 30 days. Preliminary results from this experiment suggest that aqueous Hg sources (Hg introduced with precipitation and filtered river water) are 10

  15. Selected Geologic Literature Lower Mississippi Valley Division Area Index and Annotated Bibliography. Supplement 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    i5 2"- , BOSWELL. E. H. THE CITRONELLE AQUIFERS IN MISSISSIPPI. USGS | -W r]F ~. fi ICEFS INVESTIGAT IONS REPORT NO. 78-131, | W *SI NO TON, D.C...THE FORMATIONS ARE INCLUDED IN THE ARTICLE. 1332 ROSEN, N. C., HEAVY MINERALS AND SIZE ANALYSIS OF THE CITRONELLE FORMATION OF THE GULF COASTAL PLAIN...GEOLOGICAL FACTORS INFLUENCING RECHARGE TO THE BATON ROUGE GROUND-WATER SYSTEM, WITH EMPHASIS ON THE CITRONELLE FORMATION. UNPUBLISHED * MASTERS THESIS

  16. Community Hospital TeleHealth Consortium: Development of a Statewide TeleHealth Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-25

    the CHTC). With broad and far-reaching goals, the CHTC set out to improve and expand the opportunity of rural and urban underserved patient...Office of Naval Research Grant # N00014-99-1-0614 Southwest Louisiana Healthcare System, Inc. Lake Charles, LA Final Technical Report Community...the LCMH TeleMedicine Department. Our Lady of the Lake Medical Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, focussed on the urban underserved, placing

  17. A Dutch Perspective on Coastal Louisiana Flood Risk Reduction and Landscape Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-18

    This may require a significant management and maintenance effort. Lacking special armoring on slopes and crest, it is relatively easy (and cheap ) to...relatively cheap and produce a self-sustaining marsh in the foreseeable future. Requirement for these pilots is that actual and future subsidence...Louisiana Department of Natural Resources, Baton Rouge, LA 1998. Louisiana, 2007: Website on coastal facts. http://dnr.louisiana.gov/ crm

  18. The management of equine acute laminitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell CF; Fugler LA; Eades SC

    2014-01-01

    Colin F Mitchell, Lee Ann Fugler, Susan C Eades Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA Abstract: Laminitis is an extremely painful condition resulting in damage to the soft tissues anchoring the third phalanx to the hoof, which can result in life-threatening debilitation. Specific therapy is not available. The most important principles of therapy include aggressive nutritional and medical management of primary disease pro...

  19. Plate-Impact Measurements of a Select Model Poly(urethane urea) Elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    tetramethylene oxide) (PTMO)–diethyltoluenediamine ( DETA )-based poly(urethane urea) (PUU) elastomers have demonstrated the composition dependence of tunable...MaterialScience), diethyltoluenediamine ( DETA − Ethacure∗ 100-LC, Albemarle Corporation, Baton Rouge, Louisiana), and poly(tetramethylene oxide) (PTMO... DETA , to complete polymerization. The reaction of HMDI with the DETA diamine resulted in hard segments with urea linkages, which could self-assemble

  20. 1962 Annual Typhoon Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    TYPHOON WARNING CENTER STAFF Capt William D. Roper, USAF Lt Harry D. Hamilton, USN Ltjg Elmer A. Erdei , USN Ens Thomas G. Fitzpatrick, USN SMSGT Donald N...297 267 TYPHOON ACCELERATION AFTER RECURVATURE by LTJG E. A. Erdei , USN One of the primary problems which confronted JTWC dur- ing 1962...and Miller, B. I., Atlantic Hurricanes, Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1960 8. Erdei , E. A., “Miller-Moore Method Tested and Applied

  1. Proceedings of the AMEDD Psychology Symposium Held at Washington, DC on 27-31 October 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    HYDROCYANIC ACID) NP CK (CYANOGEN CHLORIDE) NP Incapacitating BZ NP Agents LSD 159o, W’ i’ / / /\\ - TABLE 4 Signs and Symptoms of Nerve Agent Poisoning...State University -Baton Rouge, Louisiana Paul J. Hoffman , Ph.D. Cogitan 165 University Avenue Palo Alto, California Roger A. Myers, Ph.D. Teachers College...Glass, Albert J. and Bernucci, Robert J. (Eds.). Neuropsychiatr, inWorld War II: Volume I -Zone of’ Interior, Office of.The Surgeon General, Department

  2. Deepwater Program: Exploration and Research of Northern Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Natural and Artificial Hard Bottom Habitats with Emphasis on Coral Communities: Reefs, Rigs and Wrecks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Russell Geosciences Complex, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 Phone: 225.578-2964 FAX: 225-578-2520 E-mail: hrober3@lsu.edu CO-PI Dan Warren, Robert Church...786, Viosca Knoll Area. Prepared by C & C Technologies, Inc. for Geoscience Earth & Marine Services, Inc. on behalf of Mariner Energy. Report...Deepwater OCS Activity, Interactions between the Fishing and Petroleum Industries in Deepwaters of the Gulf of Mexico. A Final Report for the U.S

  3. Cultural Resources Survey of the Western Sections of the Larose to Golden Meadow Hurricane Protection Project, Lafourche Parish, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-18

    and collections provided by Terry Boudreaux, then of Galliano , Louisiana. Boudreaux’s collections were examined and described as containing ceramics...American Antiquity 46:806-821. Rehder, John B. 1971 Sugar Plantation Settlements of Southern Louisiana: A Cultural Geography. Unpub-ished dissertation...Office of Cultural Development, Division of Archaeology, Baton Rouge. 84 Stout, Michael E., and John W. Muller 1983 Cultural Resources Survey of Larose

  4. Computer Program to Simulate the Thermal Characteristics of Heat Recovery Incinerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-01

    through the metal of the waterwalls and through the boundary layer on the feed water/steam side of the system). Heat transfer to these walls is already a... Corona , CA GSA Assist Comm Des & Cnst (FAIA) D R Dibner Washington, DC ; Off of Des & Const-PCDP (D Eakin) Washington, DC IRE-ITTD Input Proc Dir (R...Livermore, CA LEHIGH UNIVERSITY Linderman Libr , Ser Cataloguer, Bethlehem, PA LOUISIANA DIV NATURAL RESOURCES & ENERGY Div Of R&D, Baton Rouge, LA

  5. Physiological, anatomical, and ecological characteristics of southern live oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadong Qi; Jammie Favorite; Kit L. Chin; Ying Xiao

    2006-01-01

    Gas exchanges of sun-exposed and shaded leaves of southern live oak (Quercus virginiana Mill.) were studied monthly from May to September, 2000. Six healthy live oak trees with d.b.h. ranging from 21 to 148 cm on Southern University’s campus in Baton Rouge, LA, were selected for the study. Instantaneous gas exchanges were measured during clear sky...

  6. 76 FR 23188 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ... necessary to allow the community to participate in the Roger's Jewelry Bicycle Ride. This deviation allows the bridge to remain in the closed-to-navigation position during the event. DATES: This deviation is... navigation span provides a vertical clearance of 30 feet above Mean High Water in the closed-to-navigation...

  7. Organic composition of fogwater in the Texas-Louisiana gulf coast corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Suresh; Raghunathan, Ravikrishna; Kommalapati, Raghava R.; Shen, Xinhua; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Valsaraj, Kalliat T.

    Fogwater and air samples were collected in Baton Rouge between November 2004-February 2005 and during February 2006 at Houston. Organic compounds present in the fog samples were detected, quantified and then grouped into different compound classes based on molecular size, solubility and polarity using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and ion chromatography. Organic compounds were grouped as n-alkanes, aromatics and polycyclic aromatics, carbonyls, alcohols, amides and esters. Organic compounds in fog and air samples in Houston indicated clear urban/industrial anthropogenic origin, while compounds detected in Baton Rouge fog and air samples showed a mix of both agricultural and urban/industrial anthropogenic inputs. Among the various polycyclic aromatic compounds detected, the total concentration of naphthalene and its derivatives was 2.8 μg m -3 in Houston and 0.08 μg m -3 in Baton Rouge air. Analysis of concentrations of organic compounds pre- and post- fog revealed that compounds with low vapor pressure had higher scavenging efficiency in fog sampled at the two locations. Concentrations of organic compounds in fog samples were higher than those predicted by conventional air-water Henry's law equilibrium. Observed higher concentrations in the aqueous phase were modeled accounting for surface adsorption and accumulation of gas phase species and the presence of humic-like substances in fogwater.

  8. Fogwater Chemistry and Air Quality in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast Corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommalapati, R. R.; Raja, S.; Ravikrishna, R.; Murugesan, K.; Collett, J. L.; Valsaraj, K.

    2007-05-01

    The presence of fog water in polluted atmosphere can influence atmospheric chemistry and air quality. The study of interactions between fog water and atmospheric gases and aerosols are very important in understanding the atmospheric fate of the pollutants. In this Study several air samples and fogwater samples were collected in the heavily industrialized area of Gulf Coast corridor( Houston, TX and Baton Rouge, LA). A total of 32 fogwater samples were collected, comprising of nine fog events in Baton Rouge (Nov 2004 to Feb 2005) and two fog events in Houston (Feb, 2006), during the fog sampling campaigns. These samples were analyzed for pH, total and dissolved carbon, major inorganic ions, organic acids, and aromatics, aldehydes, VOCs, and linear alkanes organic compounds. Fogwater samples collected in Houston show clear influence of marine and anthropogenic environment, while Baton Rouge samples reveal a relatively less polluted environment. Also, a time series observation of air samples indicated that fog event at the monitoring site impacted the air concentrations of the pollutants. This is attributed to presence of surface active organic matter in fog water.

  9. Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water: preliminary design and performance report. Volume I. Technical report. Aerotherm report TR-76-219. [For can washing at Campbell Soup Plant in Sacramento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-10-14

    The design and performance of a solar hot water system for can washing at the Campbell Soup Plant in Sacramento, California, are presented. The collector field is located on the roof of the finished products warehouse of the Campbell Soup Sacramento plant. Water is supplied from a 3.8 cm (1/sup 1///sub 2/ in.) supply line which is located directly below an existing roof access hatch. A supply pipe will be brought up through that hatch. The water flow will then be split into two manifold lines which supply the dual rows of flat plate collectors. The preheated water from the flat plates is then passed into six sets of parallel connected concentrators. Each set consist of eight 1.83 x 3.05 m (6 x 10 foot) modules connected in series. The water from these units is gathered in a 3.8 cm (1/sup 1///sub 2/ in.) insulated pipe which transports it to the storage tank. This pipe will be attached to an existing pipe run until it reaches the can washing building. From there the pipe will follow the can washing building around to the storage tank. The storage tank is a 75,200 1 (20,000 gal) steel tank which is coated internally with a USDA approved phenolic liner. The outside of the tank is insulated. A 2.2 kw (3 hp) motor is used to pump the stored water for the tank into the can washing line. Detail drawings and descriptions of the collector field, installation, piping, controls, data acquisition equipment, and roof structure are included. Furthermore, a program schedule with equipment and manpower costs for successfully completing Phase II of this contract is included. Also included is an organization chart of the Phase II program personnel. (WHK)

  10. seasonal dynamics of the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BioMAP

    food, and oviposition sites, and to escape resource depletion, and intraspecific competitors. These behavioural patterns ... (within-patch processes), the role of movement is also considered to be a vital component in ..... To control for potential non-independence of observations (different males in the data set were seen on ...

  11. Metapopulations and the Sinai Baton Blue (Pseudophilotes sinaicus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Francis

    effects of habitat destruction and its impact on species survival in fragmented landscapes are likely to prove to be the ... Traditional population models took no account of the heterogeneous environment in which the species lived ..... patch and used this to develop an index of habitat suitability applicable to every patch. Using.

  12. Passing the Baton: An Experimental Study of Shift Handover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Bonny; Hobbs, Alan; Kanki, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Shift handovers occur in many safety-critical environments, including aviation maintenance, medicine, air traffic control, and mission control for space shuttle and space station operations. Shift handovers are associated with increased risk of communication failures and human error. In dynamic industries, errors and accidents occur disproportionately after shift handover. Typical shift handovers involve transferring information from an outgoing shift to an incoming shift via written logs, or in some cases, face-to-face briefings. The current study explores the possibility of improving written communication with the support modalities of audio and video recordings, as well as face-to-face briefings. Fifty participants participated in an experimental task which mimicked some of the critical challenges involved in transferring information between shifts in industrial settings. All three support modalities, face-to-face, video, and audio recordings, reduced task errors significantly over written communication alone. The support modality most preferred by participants was face-to-face communication; the least preferred was written communication alone.

  13. seasonal dynamics of the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BioMAP

    The movement of individuals among patches of suitable habitat is a key process in metapopulation biology ... is now an important topic in evolutionary ecology, particularly in today's increasingly fragmented landscapes ... suitable because it concerns inter-patch movement in a rare species of butterfly living in a fragmented ...

  14. Conduct urban agglomeration with the baton of transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    A key indicator of traffic activity patterns is commuting distance. Shorter commuting distances yield less traffic, fewer emissions, : and lower energy consumption. This study develops a spatial error seemingly unrelated regression model to investiga...

  15. A tale of two rivers: studies in the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers using a multi-isotope and chemical approach to investigate linkages between hydrology, nutrients, and algae (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, C.; Young, M. B.; Silva, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers are the main rivers draining the northern and southern parts of California’s Central Valley. Both watersheds are underlain by similar sediments, are dominated by similar agricultural and urban land uses, and water supplies are highly regulated in both rivers. While agricultural land uses are major sources of nutrients in the non-tidal parts of the rivers, waste water treatments plants (WWTPs) located near large cities at the upstream ends of the tidal zones are important sources of nutrients to the tidal rivers, the delta, and San Francisco Bay. The nutrients have strongly affected algal production in both rivers, but largely because of differences in the WWTPs on the two rivers, the impacts on algal productivity and ecosystem health in the two rivers have been very different. As part of several studies over the last decade, we have analyzed samples from ~50 mainstem sites and over a dozen tributaries for major chemistry and a suite of isotope tools including water, nitrate, ammonium, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and seston isotopes, with sites sampled 15-70 times each over 1-3 years, depending on study. The main focus of these studies has been investigating the linkages between hydrology, nutrient sources, biogeochemical processes, and algal production in these large rivers. In specific, the research has been aimed at testing hypotheses about controls on algal production in the rivers as related to hypoxia in the deep water shipping channel in the lower San Joaquin River and foodweb problems in the lower Sacramento River. Water chemistry, d2H, and d18O have proved useful in determining the temporal and spatial changes in water sources. However, since WWTPs are a major source of nutrients to the rivers, nitrification of ammonium from the WWTPs strongly affects the nitrate d15N and d18O of nitrate and the d15N of seston in the tidal portions of both rivers, tributaries show large seasonal changes in water amounts and

  16. Réformes, croissance, et augmentation des inégalités dans le delta du fleuve Rouge – Việt Nam (1980-2000 Reform, Growth and Increase of Inequalities in the Red River delta - Vietnam (1980-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Gironde

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cet article est une analyse de l’évolution des inégalités dans les campagnes vietnamiennes, basée sur une recherche de terrain dans le delta du fleuve Rouge. Les transformations respectives des systêmes d’activités productives des foyers étudiées dans la province de Hưng Yên remettent en cause l’idée dominante selon laquelle l’augmentation des inégalités serait faible et récent. L’accumulation réalisée par un quart des exploitations et la prolétarisation partielle d’une majorité de la population rurale révèlent, quelques années après la distribution des terres de 1994, une différenciation significative en termes de richesses et d’accès aux ressources. Les mécanismes de cette différenciation se sont mis en place dès les premières mesures de la décollectivisation de l’agriculture au tournant des années 1970-1980, contrairement à une autre idée courante selon laquelle les réformes n’auraient pas eu d’effet sur les inégalités à l’intérieur des campagnes. Les inégalités de départ augmentent avec la croissance, et sont aggravées par les orientations du gouvernement, et notamment l’action des pouvoirs locaux.Based on a field research in the Red River delta, this article analyses the augmentation and accentuation of inequalities within rural Vietnam. The various changes of livelihood systems in Hung Yen province challenge the mainstream idea whereby inequalities have increased only slightly and are of recent date. In the second half of the 1990s, the widening gap between wealth accumulation among one fourth of households, and the gradual proletarianization of a majority of the rural population is already significant. Contrary to another common idea whereby institutional reforms have been associated with almost no change in inequality within rural areas, I argue that the mechanisms inciting this differentiation were set in motion during the implementation of the first decollectivisation

  17. Distribution spatiale du singe à ventre rouge, Cercopithecus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rencontrés au Togo ont été utilisés pour faciliter l'identification de l'animal. Au total 39 chasseurs ont été interviewés. Les données collectées ont porté sur la présence/absence, ..... Ceux qui chassent la nuit estiment qu'il s'agit d'un choix stratégique pour échapper à la vigilance des agents des eaux et forêts qui n'ont pas.

  18. Distribution spatiale du singe à ventre rouge, Cercopithecus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les effectifs des singes identifiés ainsi que, leurs coordonnées géographiques, leurs activités au moment de l'observation, la distance d'observation et autres informations utiles sont ... On note le braconnage, la destruction et les perturbations de leurs habitats par l'agriculture, la transhumance et l'exploitation forestière.

  19. 76 FR 50808 - Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ...), and Delegation of Authority 245-1, I hereby certify that the United Nations and Government of Cambodia are taking credible steps to address allegations of corruption and mismanagement within the...

  20. Importance socio-économique de la prune rouge ( Haematostaphis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L'importance socio-économique de H. barteri a été étudiée au Nord-Ouest du Bénin sur la base d'enquêtes ethnobotanique et socio-économique administrées respectivement sur 230 et 100 personnes des deux sexes et choisies au hasard dans les trois groupes socioculturels majoritaires du milieu d'étude à savoir les ...

  1. DRAGON ROUGE: The Rescue of Hostages in the Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    the delegates added a resolution establishing a 10-nation ad hoc commission, to be headed by President Jomo Kenyatta of Kenya, o help with the process...delegations on the ad hoc commission began to arrive in Nairobi, Jomo Kenyatta , in his newfound role, sent a message to President Johnson asking him to withhold...tor reconciliation. The negotiations for ,’econciliation did, however, bring one bit of encouraging news: on November 12, Jomo Kenyatta announced

  2. High Spatial Resolution Airborne Multispectral Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of Urban Landscape Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have used airborne multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data collected at a high spatial resolution (i.e., 10m) over several cities in the United States to study thermal energy characteristics of the urban landscape. These TIR data provide a unique opportunity to quantify thermal responses from discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape and to identify both the spatial arrangement and patterns of thermal processes across the city. The information obtained from these data is critical to understanding how urban surfaces drive or force development of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, which exists as a dome of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities in contrast to surrounding non-urbanized areas. The UHI is most pronounced in the summertime where urban surfaces, such as rooftops and pavement, store solar radiation throughout the day, and release this stored energy slowly after sunset creating air temperatures over the city that are in excess of 2-4'C warmer in contrast with non-urban or rural air temperatures. The UHI can also exist as a daytime phenomenon with surface temperatures in downtown areas of cities exceeding 38'C. The implications of the UHI are significant, particularly as an additive source of thermal energy input that exacerbates the overall production of ground level ozone over cities. We have used the Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS), flown onboard a Lear 23 jet aircraft from the NASA Stennis Space Center, to acquire high spatial resolution multispectral TIR data (i.e., 6 bandwidths between 8.2-12.2 (um) over Huntsville, Alabama, Atlanta, Georgia, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Sacramento, California. These TIR data have been used to produce maps and other products, showing the spatial distribution of heating and cooling patterns over these cities to better understand how the morphology of the urban landscape affects development of the UHI. In turn, these data have been used

  3. Calculation Methods for Criteria Air Pollutant Emission Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    precursors volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and, to a lesser extent, nitrogen oxides. Ozone-- the primary constituent of smog --aggravates respiratory...formation of tropospheric ozone ( smog ) and acid rain. Combustion processes utilizing natural gas, coal, residual fuels (grades 4/5/6), and aviation fuel are...Newark 10.2 Lexington 9.3 Jackson 7.4 Louisville 8.4 Meridian 6.1 New Mexico Albuque• que 9.1 Louisiana Missouri Rosweli 8.6 Baton Rouge 7.6 Columbia 9.9

  4. New Orleans, LA, District: Report of the Secretary of the Army on Civil Works Activities for FY 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    110-114 Resources Sec 7001 – Definitions November 8, 2007 Development Act, Sec 7002 – Comprehensive Plan 2007 Sec 7003 – LCA in General the...Restoration, LA $ 68,518 $175,742 $ 244,261 LCA Ecosystem Restoration 4,232,995 589,299 4,822,294 Subtotal $4,301,514 $765,041 $5,066,555...Southeast LA Hurricane Evacuation 7,767 0 7.767 East Baton Rouge GIS 478,054 0 478,054 SS - Livingston Parish GIS 281,812 0 281,812 City of Gretna GIS

  5. The management of equine acute laminitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell CF

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Colin F Mitchell, Lee Ann Fugler, Susan C Eades Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA Abstract: Laminitis is an extremely painful condition resulting in damage to the soft tissues anchoring the third phalanx to the hoof, which can result in life-threatening debilitation. Specific therapy is not available. The most important principles of therapy include aggressive nutritional and medical management of primary disease processes, cryotherapy, anti-inflammatory therapy, pain management, and biomechanical support. This review focuses on the principles of evidenced-based therapies. Keywords: laminitis treatment, laminitis biomechanics, laminitis pain

  6. Quantitative methods and socio-economic applications in GIS

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fahui

    2014-01-01

    GIS AND BASIC SPATIAL ANALYSIS TASKSGetting Started with ArcGIS: Data Management and Basic Spatial Analysis ToolsSpatial and Attribute Data Management in ArcGISSpatial Analysis Tools in ArcGIS: Queries, Spatial Joins, and Map OverlaysCase Study 1: Mapping and Analyzing Population Density Pattern in Baton Rouge, LouisianaSummaryIdentifying Contiguous Polygons by Spatial Analysis ToolsMeasuring Distance and TimeMeasures of DistanceComputing Network Distance and TimeThe Distance Decay RuleCase Study 2: Computing Distances and Tra

  7. Gamma-rays Associated with Nearby Thunderstorms at Ground Level

    OpenAIRE

    Ringuette, Rebecca; Cherry, Michael L.; Granger, Douglas; Guzik, T. Gregory; Stewart, Michael; Wefel, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The TGF and Energetic Thunderstorm Rooftop Array (TETRA) is an array of NaI scintillators located at rooftop level on the campus of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. From July 2010 through March 2014, TETRA has detected 28 millisecond-duration bursts of gamma-rays at energies 50 keV - 2 MeV associated with nearby (< 8 km) thunderstorms. The ability to observe ground-level Terrestrial Gamma Flashes from close to the source allows a unique analysis of the storm cells produci...

  8. Department of Defense, Atlas/Data Abstract for the United States and Selected Areas, Fiscal Year 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    11,136 36,268 Baton Rouge 112 58 54 Port Allen 46,661 405 46,256 Slidell 105 5 100 Lockport 38,569 173 38,396 Shreveport 87 33 54 Galliano 38,568 133...the Largest Major Area of Work Dollar Volume of Prime Contract Awards Total in this State Amount FSC or Service Code Description Amount 1. JOHNS ...Services 3,518 3. BOWMAN, JOHN INC 3,152 Other Miscellaneous Buildings 3,126 4. RAYTHEON COMPANY INC 2,326 Maint/Other Miscellaneous Buildings 417 5. CET

  9. Diagnoses of hybrid hummingbirds (Aves: Trochilidae). 17. Documentation of the intrageneric hybrid (Archilochus colubris × Archilochus alexandri)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Gary R.; Dittmann, Donna L.; Cardiff, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Although the breeding ranges of Archilochus alexandri (Black-chinned Hummingbird) and Archilochus colubris (Ruby throated Hummingbird) are narrowly parapatric in central Texas and central and southern Oklahoma, there have been few reports of hybridization in the literature and no well......-documented hybrid specimens. Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of two male hybrids collected, respectively, in Grayson County, Texas, and East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. As has been the pattern in other hummingbird hybrids, both specimens exhibit a blended mosaic of plumage characters of the parental...

  10. Post-emergency response resources guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, Gulf States Utilities, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One of the products developed from that experience is this guide for understanding the responsibilities and obtaining resources for specific needs from the various participants, particularly those organizations within the federal government. This guide should assist state and local government organizations with identifying and obtaining those resources for the post-emergency response when theirs have been exhausted

  11. Riparian Habitat - Sacramento River [ds343

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This layer was obtained for inclusion in BIOS from the Chico State Geographic Information Center (GIC) Website. Permission to post these data in BIOS was provided to...

  12. Sacramento Regional Response Guide to Radiation Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    between many unique individuals. First and foremost, I would like to thank my wife, Gina and our two children , Ryan and, Lauren for their...internal contamination with radioactive thallium , non-radioactive thallium , or radioactive cesium.”67 Prussian blue is stockpiled in the Strategic...with cesium or thallium . Prussian blue works by binding radioactive materials in the intestines, stopping the absorption of the material into

  13. Managing Restored Wetlands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to Reduce Methane Emissions and Increase Carbon Uptake Laurie Koteen, Sara Knox, Cove Sturtevant, Joseph Verfaillie, Jaclyn Hatala, Dennis Baldocchi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koteen, L. E.; Knox, S. H.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Matthes, J. H.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California is a region transformed by more than a century of agricultural practices. Beginning in the 19th century, substantial regions were first drained of water and then converted to cropland in order to take advantage of the area's rich peatland soils. In the intervening time period, soil oxidation and subsidence have led to huge peat losses of up to 10 m in some places, and river water now threatens to topple the levees that were erected to keep fields from flooding. Within this region, we have been monitoring greenhouse gas exchange of several agricultural sites, a degraded pasture, and two restored wetlands. Of these land use types, restoration of wetlands is of particular interest to Delta managers as these sites attain many of the region's most pressing ecological goals, including improved water quality, increased wildlife habitat, and soil accretion. In our current investigation, we hope to assess if wetland management activities can be implemented to achieve greenhouse gas management goals as well. While we find that the restored wetlands are able to take up and store a substantial amount of carbon via rapid growth rates, they also emit methane; a greenhouse gas 25 times more potent than CO¬2. We are currently in the process of implementing two management activities with the goals of reducing methane emissions and increasing carbon uptake. Evidence from the wetland literature indicates that periodic lowering of the water table below the soil surface can reduce wetland methane emissions by: 1. Reintroducing oxygen into the soil column. This both supports growth of the methanotrophic bacteria that consume methane produced in the anaerobic zones of the soil column, and suppresses the methanogens that produce it. 2. Re-oxidization of formerly reduced compounds in the soil, (i.e. NO3-, SO42-) which can serve as alternative terminal electron acceptors of the decomposition byproducts (i.e. H2 and acetate) that lead to

  14. Clinical Macrosystem Simulation Translates Between Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, G Jesse; Maryman, James A

    2018-04-01

    Simulation has become an integral tool in healthcare facility redesign. Immersing clinical experts into their future environment has demonstrated benefits for transition planning. This study evaluates translation of a proven macrosystems testing protocol, TESTPILOT, to an organization with limited simulation experience. An experienced TESTPILOT team guided Woman's Hospital Baton Rouge's simulation preparation for their new neonatal intensive care unit. Metrics included participant evaluations, latent safety threats (LST), and clinician surveys. Latent safety threats recorded during debriefings were addressed by workflow committees. Clinicians were surveyed at four time points for readiness and preparedness on 24 key processes. The local team invested nearly 750 hours into learning and implementing seven simulations that participants rated positively. Most of the 305 LST were minor issues. Surveys at baseline (42% of staff), postsim (18%), pretransition (26%), and postmove (29%) demonstrated strong internal consistency. System readiness lagged behind staff preparedness (P structure, team coverage, and feedback were still evolving as of move day (P organizations with limited prior exposure. Woman's Hospital Baton Rouge accrued essential skills to model and orchestrate an immersive neonatal intensive care unit and then drive effective multidisciplinary debriefings. Staff immersed in the new environment began to articulate their jobs before moving in. The trajectory of system readiness improvement corroborated LST correction. Future research is needed to determine the extent of simulation required for different organizational structures.

  15. 76 FR 14052 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... California; Ione Band of Miwok Indians of California; Shingle ] Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria (Verona Tract), California; and United Auburn Indian Community of the Auburn Rancheria... Early Horizon (5550-550 B.C.). Cultural changes indicated by artifact typologies and burial patterns...

  16. Intra-patch movement in the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly: influence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The intra-patch movement of a narrowly endemic butterfly Pseudophilotes sinaicus (Lycaenidae) that exists in a metapopulation structure was studied. It was found to be extremely sedentary, rarely moving more than 40 m in or between days, and occupying a very small area during its residency of the study patch. Its level of ...

  17. Generational Change in Australian School Leadership: Collision Path or Smooth Baton Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Phil; Marks, Warren; Elliott, Virginia; Johnston-Anderson, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study examining the existence and perceived influence of "generational collide" for teachers and leaders across three generations--Baby Boomers, Generation X (Gen X) and Generation Y (Gen Y). The study sought to further determine if a teacher's generation, gender, school level or…

  18. Les maladies des mains sales : Le cas des batons de cigarette ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Objective: To search microbes on manipulated sticks of cigarette sold on streets of Lome. Material and methods: A sample of 150 manipulated sticks of cigarette was selected with 50 street vendors. The filtered extremity and the non filtered extremity of sticks was examined in the laboratory: direct exam and culture.

  19. Passing the baton of action from research to conservation implementation for Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul. B. Hamel; David Mehlman; Sebastian Herzog; Kenneth C. Rosenberg; Jason. Jones

    2012-01-01

    When El Grupo Cerúleo, a sub-committee of the Cerulean Warbler Technical Group, was formed in 2002, the task of elucidating the nonbreeding distribution, ecology and behavior of the Cerulean Warbler (Setophaga cerulea) was large, our understanding of habitat needs was limited, there was fear that little suitable habitat existed, and conservation partnerships within...

  20. Batons and Babies: A Qualitative Phenomenological Study of Mothers Who Are Band Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Renee L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine what it is to be a mother and a band director from the perspectives of 15 women. The researcher hoped to create a document which will be helpful to band directors who are or who someday may become mothers. According to statements made in the Band Director Group on Facebook, there is a need for a sense of…

  1. Las generaciones de inmigrantes y sus descendientes y el riesgo de diabetes en la población de los Estados Unidos de origen o ascendencia mexicana: el Estudio sobre Envejecimiento en Latinos del Área de Sacramento (estudio SALSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Afable-Munsuz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Se investigó si la aculturación de los inmigrantes y sus descendientes y la generación a la que pertenecen, un marcador de la asimilación, se relacionan con el riesgo de diabetes en una población de adultos mayores de ascendencia u origen mexicano. MÉTODOS: Se analizaron los datos sobre 1 789 adultos de 60 a 101 años de edad del Estudio sobre Envejecimiento en Latinos del Área de Sacramento (estudio SALSA. Se determinó la presencia de diabetes tipo 2 con base en el uso de medicamentos antidiabéticos, la mención por el paciente del diagnóstico de un médico, o una glucosa en ayunas de 126 mg/dl o mayor. Se aplicó un modelo de regresión logística para la prevalencia de diabetes. RESULTADOS: Tras ajustar por edad y sexo, se observaron asociaciones significativas pero divergentes entre las generaciones de inmigrantes y sus descendientes, la aculturación y el riesgo de diabetes. En relación con los adultos de la primera generación, los de la segunda tuvieron una razón de posibilidades (odds ratio, OR de padecer diabetes de 1,8 (intervalo de confianza [IC] de 95% = 1,4, 2,4 y los adultos de la tercera generación tuvieron una OR de 2,1 (IC de 95% = 1,4, 3,1. Sin embargo, una mayor aculturación a los Estados Unidos se relacionó con una tasa ligeramente menor de diabetes. En el modelo completo, tras la incorporación de ajustes para tener en cuenta los factores socioeconómicos y del modo de vida, la relación entre la generación y la diabetes seguía siendo significativa, no así la relación de esta última con la aculturación. CONCLUSIONES: El presente estudio respalda la idea, anteriormente cuestionada, de que la asimilación se relaciona con un mayor riesgo de diabetes entre los inmigrantes de origen mexicano. Los investigadores deben analizar más detalladamente la presencia de una relación causal entre la asimilación y la salud.

  2. Le crapaud rouge transformé en prince vert et jaune

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, Jorge P.

    2017-01-01

    Un stand du PT à Sao Paulo, avant l’élection présidentielle de 2002 Cliché : Alain Musset. Avec les élections présidentielles d’octobre 2002, après de longues années d’apprentissage démocratique, parfois interrompues par l’implantation de régimes autoritaires, le Brésil a offert une grande preuve de maturité politique. Avec la victoire de Luis Inácio Lula da Silva, dit Lula, pour la première fois en 42 ans un président élu par vote direct a intronisé un successeur également élu par vote dire...

  3. L’évolution des espaces matrimoniaux dans le delta du fleuve Rouge

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, Van Hai

    2017-01-01

    Introduction La famille entendue comme un ensemble de personnes vivant sous le même toit a toujours fait l’objet d’une attention particulière en sociologie et ethnologie depuis les travaux fondateurs de Claude Lévi-Strauss pour qui la famille conjugale est universelle (1956). La famille exprime les transformations des formes de rencontre des hommes et des femmes ainsi que des modes de vie, modifiant ainsi le sens de l’institution familiale. Dans la famille rurale, les réseaux de relations s’é...

  4. 75 FR 27641 - Safety Zone; Marathon Oil Refinery Construction, Rouge River, Detroit, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have questions on this temporary rule, call or e-mail CDR Joseph Snowden, Prevention Department, Sector Detroit, Coast Guard; telephone (313) 568-9508, e- mail Joseph.H.Snowden@uscg...

  5. Suite a une restructuration couteuse, Cicorel a plonge dans le rouge en 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    Bruggmann, A

    2003-01-01

    "Le fabricant de circuits imprimes de tres haute densite, sur materiaux parfois imprevus, a vu son revenu operationnel decroitre de 17,6% a 27,13 millions de francs, et son cash-flow avant postes exceptionnels a fondu a 453 millions" (1 page).

  6. 77 FR 27109 - Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... the Government of Cambodia to address allegations of corruption and mismanagement within the ECCC. It... engagement with the United Nations and the Cambodian government to ensure that the ECCC remains corruption... Secretary of State certifies to the Committees on Appropriations that the United Nations and Government of...

  7. Confined Disposal Facility at Pointe Mouillee for Detroit and Rouge Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-03-01

    by large populations of the burrowing mayfly Hexagenia, freshwater mussels (family Unionidae), the amphipod Gammarus , pollution intolerant midges...Citeria were developed as guidelines for EPA evaluation of propsalsandapplications to dredge sediments from fresh and saline waters. The decision whether

  8. Variabilité interspécifique de trois algues rouges : Hypnea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The studied site is the beach of Mehdia located at the north of the Moroccan Atlantic coast. The results show specific differences in the growth rates of the three studied species. Gracilaria multipartita presents a significant development of the growth parameters like the size, the weight and the total ramification, especially for ...

  9. PHOTOLYSE DIRECTE DU COLORANT ROUGE CIBACRON FB 184 PAR IRRADIATION SOLAIRE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A ALOUI

    2013-06-01

    Les résultats ont montré que la solution de plus faible concentration présentait le taux de décoloration le plus élevé. Des expériences semblables ont été réalisées durant les quatre saisons de l’année. La dégradation a été la plus rapide en été. Des essais ont été effectués en mars 2010 sur des solutions de même concentration mais de pH différents. La disparition du colorant a été la plus rapide dans la solution la plus acide. Ceci indique une plus grande réactivité de la forme moléculaire.

  10. La stimulation electrique transcutanee associee a l'infra rouge et au ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Electrical Nerve Stimulation), associé le massage et l'infrarouge pour obtenir une récupération plus rapide et efficace. L'objectif à terme est d'amener progressivement les patients de plus en plus nombreux à s'intéresser à la physiothérapie pour espérer être moins dépendants des produits pharmaceutiques.

  11. 78 FR 78463 - Summary of the Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Social Affairs, mentally incompetent to stand trial. She was released from custody in September 2012... the ECCC's ability to deliver justice. In late 2008, at the request of the United States and other... within Cambodia. The Human Rights Center of the University of California, Berkeley, conducted a survey...

  12. Mesure de la conductivité termique de la boue rouge stabilisée au ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    argile. ML Camara, A Vianou, M Keita. Abstract. No Abstract Available Journal des Sciences pour l\\'Ingenieur Vol 5 2005: 40-45. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  13. Détection par un diapason de quartz en spectroscopie d'absorption infra-rouge

    OpenAIRE

    Rincon Castillo, Boris Leonardo; Vacheret, Xavier; Spajer, Michel; Vairac, Pascal; Euphrasie, Sébastien; Jalocha, Alain; Moec, Samuel; Hirtz, Patricia; Marthouret, Nadège; Vernier, David

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Les diapasons horlogers de quartz se sont avérés des détecteurs efficaces en spectroscopie IR, couplés à une détection synchrone. Cette étude montre la cartographie de la sensibilité du résonateur, semblable à la répartition des déformations. Elle démontre la nature photo-thermo-élastique de l'interaction, la sensibilité étant améliorée d'un ordre de grandeur quand le diapason est ré-encapsulé sous vide.

  14. ‘When we are tired we shall rest’: bus boycotts in the United States of America and South Africa and prospects for comparative history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Charles Catsam

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at some of the practical, methodological, and disciplinary issues connected to comparative and transnational history through the lens of bus boycotts in South Africa and the United States in the 1950s. Comparative history by its very nature requires historians to transcend both the restrictive boundaries that the profession sometimes imposes as well as a fundamentally interdisciplinary approach to scholarship. Yet as the suggestive comparisons between boycotts in Montgomery, Alabama, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and the Transvaal in the mid-1950s show, such work can be rewarding in providing a transnational framework for understanding protest movements that transcend national borders. Catsam argues in the end of his article that “a deeper understanding of both [the American and South African] struggles together may well help us better to grasp the significance of each separately.”

  15. Cogeneration feasibility study in the Gulf States Utilities service area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Sites in the Gulf States Utilities service are considered for cogeneration feasibility studies. The sources of steam considered for the Orange, Texas and Geismar, Lake Charles, and North Baton Rouge, Louisiana sites include oil, coal, HTGR steamers, consolidated nuclear steam system, atmospheric fluidized-bed coal combustion, and coal gasification. Concepts concerning cogeneration fuel systems were categorized by technical applicability as: current technology (pulverized coal-fired boilers and fuel oil-fired boilers), advanced technology under development (HTGR steamers and the CNSS), and advanced technology for future development (atmospheric fluidized-bed boilers and coal gasification). In addition to providing data on cogeneration plant generally useful in the US, the study determined the technical and economic feasibility of steam and electric power cogeneration using coal and nuclear fuels for localized industrial complexes. Details on site selection, plant descriptions, cost estimates, economic analysis, and plant schedule and implementation. (MCW)

  16. Metabolic profile testing for Jersey cows in Louisiana: reference values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, J D; Seybt, S H; Toups, G

    1982-06-01

    One hundred twenty-seven Jersey cows (1 to 6 years of age) within a 160.93-km radius of Baton Rouge, La, were selected at random over a 3-year period to determine serum values for total creatine kinase, aspartate transaminase, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, cholesterol, total protein, globulin, urea nitrogen, and glucose. Breed and age were partitioned as possible sources of variation. Seasonal temperature and management influences were taken into account by restricting the sampling area. Seasonal temperature and management influences along with reproductive status and stage of lactation, were randomized by sampling over the 3-year period. All serum values, except aspartate transaminase, urea nitrogen, and glucose were influenced by age. Serum cholesterol, total protein, and glucose were influenced by age. serum cholesterol, total protein, and globulin tended to increase with age, whereas creatine kinase, calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase generally decreased with age.

  17. Cultural resources survey and assessment of the proposed Department of Energy Freeport to Texas City pipeline, Brazoria and Galveston Counties, Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castille, G.J.; Whelan, J.P. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An intensive survey and testing program of selected segments of a proposed Department of Energy pipeline were conducted by Coastal Environments, Inc., Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during December 1985 and January 1986. The proposed pipeline runs from Texas City, Galveston County to Bryan Mound, Brazoria County. The pedestrian survey was preceded by historical records survey to locate possible historic sites within the DOE righ-of-way. Four prehistoric sites within the ROW (41BO159, 160, 161, 162) and one outside the ROW (41BO163) were located. All are Rangia cuneata middens. The survey results are discussed with particular reference to the environmental settings of the sites and the effectiveness of the survey procedure. Two of the sites located within the ROW were subjected to additional testing. The results of the backhoe testing program are included in the site descriptions, and the scientific value of the sites are presented. 52 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. South Louisiana Enhanced Oil Recovery/Sequestration R&D Project Small Scale Field Tests of Geologic Reservoir Classes for Geologic Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hite, Roger [Blackhorse Energy LLC, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The project site is located in Livingston Parish, Louisiana, approximately 26 miles due east of Baton Rouge. This project proposed to evaluate an early Eocene-aged Wilcox oil reservoir for permanent storage of CO2. Blackhorse Energy, LLC planned to conduct a parallel CO2 oil recovery project in the First Wilcox Sand. The primary focus of this project was to examine and prove the suitability of South Louisiana geologic formations for large-scale geologic sequestration of CO2 in association with enhanced oil recovery applications. This was to be accomplished through the focused demonstration of small-scale, permanent storage of CO2 in the First Wilcox Sand. The project was terminated at the request of Blackhorse Energy LLC on October 22, 2014.

  19. Emergency Response Resources guide for nuclear power plant emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, Gulf States Utilities, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One of the products developed from that experience was this guide for understanding the responsibilities and obtaining resources for specific needs from the various participants, particularly from those organizations within the Federal Government. This first revision of that guide broadens the focus of the original document. Also, new information defines the major Federal response facilities. This guide should assist State and local government organizations with identifying and obtaining those resources for the post-emergency response when their resources have been exhausted

  20. Perceptions of cancer and its causes among "Industrial Corridor" residents: the LMRICS Planning Project. Lower Mississippi River Interagency Cancer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, A; Thomas, S M; Williams, D L; Hayden, J

    1999-04-01

    The Industrial Corridor is composed of 11 parishes heavily concentrated with petrochemical facilities along the Mississippi River from Baton Rouge to the mouth of the river. There exists a generalized belief that the proximity of these waste-emitting industries to residential areas has adversely impacted the health of the residents including increasing the rates of cancer. At the same time, Louisiana Tumor Registry data do not support the widely held belief of excess cancer rates in the corridor. A community in the corridor was chosen to explore the issues of health beliefs, health-seeking behavior, and perceived quality of life. An extensive questionnaire was developed and administered to a sample of community residents. The results of the questionnaire suggest there may be multiple factors that influence the perceived well-being and preventive health practices of corridor residents.

  1. Disaster preparedness of dialysis patients for Hurricanes Gustav and Ike 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinpeter, Myra A

    2009-01-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita resulted in massive devastation of the Gulf Coast at Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas during 2005. Because of those disasters, dialysis providers, nephrologists, and dialysis patients used disaster planning activities to work to mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with the 2005 hurricane season for future events affecting dialysis patients. As Hurricane Gustav approached, anniversary events for Hurricane Katrina were postponed because of evacuation orders for nearly the entire Louisiana Gulf Coast. As part of the hurricane preparation, dialysis units reviewed the disaster plans of patients, and patients made preparation for evacuation. Upon evacuation, many patients returned to the dialysis units that had provided services during their exile from Hurricane Katrina; other patients went to other locations as part of their evacuation plan. Patients uniformly reported positive experiences with dialysis providers in their temporary evacuation communities, provided that those communities did not experience the effects of Hurricane Gustav. With the exception of evacuees to Baton Rouge, patients continued to receive their treatments uninterrupted. Because of extensive damage in the Baton Rouge area, resulting in widespread power losses and delayed restoration of power to hospitals and other health care facilities, some patients missed one treatment. However, as a result of compliance with disaster fluid and dietary recommendations, no adverse outcomes occurred. In most instances, patients were able to return to their home dialysis unit or a nearby unit to continue dialysis treatments within 4 - 5 days of Hurricane Gustav. Hurricane Ike struck the Texas Gulf Coast near Galveston, resulting in devastation of that area similar to the devastation seen in New Orleans after Katrina. The storm surge along the Louisiana Gulf Coast resulted in flooding that temporarily closed coastal dialysis units. Patients were prepared and experienced

  2. How Natural is the Dissolved Inorganic Composition of Mississippi River Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Johnson, S. T.; Meaux, S. J.; Brown, K.; Blum, M. J.; Allison, M. A.; Halder, J.; Wassenaar, L. I.; Cuesta, A. M.; Norris, E. S.; Wang, R. S.

    2017-12-01

    The dissolved inorganic composition of rivers provides insights into natural interactions between the hydrologic cycle and the "critical zone" of watersheds, and anthropogenic modifications thereof. For instance, major ion compositions allow us to infer how effectively weathering processes counteract increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Prerequisite to such assessments is the ability to detect and correct for anthropogenic modifications of river chemistry. An observatory campaign of the Mississippi River in New Orleans from July 2015 to October 2016 with an in-situ sensor system (LOBO-SUNA) and 161 discrete water sampling events reveals systematic changes in the dissolved ion and water stable isotope compositions, nutrient loading, and physical parameters of the Mississippi River. Monthly sampling has continued since as part of the Global Rivers Observatory. We compare this high-resolution data set to long-term data generated by the USGS at St. Francisville upstream of Baton Rouge, data from the USGS Baton Rouge gaging station and in-situ sensor system, as well as other historic data. Results reveal systematic changes in major ion composition in response to hydrologic conditions. In addition to annual and interannual changes, decadal trends in concentrations of certain major ions (Na, Mg, Ca) are consistent with anthropogenic activities in the drainage basin that are reminiscent of well-known, long-term changes in nutrient fluxes that affect the northern Gulf of Mexico. Our current working hypotheses to explain observed increases in Mg and Na concentrations, for example, are contaminations from road salt, from additives used in drinking and waste water treatment, as well as from groundwater pumping, particularly in the western part of the Mississippi River basin. Uncorrected, these changes impede our abilitiy to use the current chemical composition of Mississippi River water as a quantitative indicator of natural processes in the watershed.

  3. Why Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, George A

    2015-01-01

    As Erwin Chargaff observed, "Scientific autobiography belongs to a most awkward literary genre," and mine is no exception. In reviewing my scientific life, I contrast the nutritional influences that would have existed had I been born 100 or 200 years earlier than I actually was. With this background, I trace the influences on my formative years in science beginning in high school and ending as a postdoctoral fellow in Professor E.B. Astwood's laboratory, when my directional sails were set and obesity was the compass heading. With this heading, the need for organized national and international meetings on obesity and the need for a scientific journal dealing with obesity as its subject matter became evident and occupied considerable energy over the next 30 years. The next section of this memoir traces the wanderings of an itinerant academic who moved from Boston to Los Angeles and finally to Baton Rouge. The influence of Sir William Osler's idea that there is a time for education, a time for scholarship, a time for teaching, and time to retire has always been a guide to allocating time ever since I was an intern at Johns Hopkins Hospital. It was in Baton Rouge that the final phase began: I agreed to become the first full-time executive director of the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, a decision that changed my life. The article ends with a quotation from Tennessee Williams that reflects the theater, which has given me so much pleasure over the years: "There is a time for departure even when there's no certain place to go."

  4. Biological fate, transport, and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelghani, A.; Hartley, W.; Bart, H.; Ide, C.; Ellgaard, E.; Sherry, T.; Devall, M.; Thien, L.; Horner, E.; Mizell, M.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the cluster investigators is to develop a dynamic model for the evaluation of the biological fate, transport, and ecotoxicity from multiple chemical contamination of the Mississippi River Basin. To develop this environmental model, FY 93-94 most of cluster investigators focused on Devil's Swamp Site (DSS), a cypress swamp which lies just Northwest of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, adjacent to the Mississippi River. The DSS which includes a man-made lake has contaminated sediment, water and biota. The DSS receives flood water from the Mississippi River during high flow periods and the Baton Rouge Bayou drains through the DSS. The DSS receives toxic substances and hazardous waste from a wide variety of surrounding industrial operations including an abandoned hazardous waste disposal facility. In addition, some investigators studied Bayou Trepangnier. This research cluster will continue studying Devil Swamp. The large number of investigators in this cluster resulted from incorporating related research proposals based on reviewer recommendations. The specific aims of the cluster for the first year were to conduct a physical, chemical, ecological survey and baseline toxicological characterization of the DSS from existing databases maintained by State and federal agencies, field studies (assessment) of sediment, air, water and biota, and laboratory screening studios. This assessment will provide critical information and focus for the next two years in-depth studies of critical transport and fate processes, ecotoxicity, biomarkers of effect, and uptake, metabolism and distribution of toxicants. The primary significant outcome of the cluster researchers will be the development of an ecological risk assessment model combining biotic and physical/chemical variables for DSS with a projection of model reliability and accuracy for use at other typical Mississippi River Basin sites

  5. Draft environmental impact statement. River Bend Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Federal financing of an undivided ownership interest of River Bend Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 on a 3293-acre site near St. Francisville, Louisiana is proposed in a supplement to the final environmental impact statement of September 1974. The facility would consist of a boiling-water reactor that would produce a maximum of 2894 megawatts (MW) of electrical power. A design level of 3015 MW of electric power could be realized at some time in the future. Exhaust steam would be cooled by mechanical cooling towers using makeup water obtained from and discharged to the Mississippi River. Power generated by the unit would be transmitted via three lines totaling 140 circuit miles traversing portions of the parishes of West Feliciana, East Feliciana, East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge, Pointe Coupee, and Iberville. The unit would help the applicant meet the power needs of rural electric consumers in the region, and the applicant would contribute significanlty to area tax base and employment rolls during the life of the unit. Construction related activities would disturb 700 forested acres on the site and 1156 acres along the transmission routes. Of the 60 cubic feet per second (cfs) taken from the river, 48 cfs would evaporate during the cooling process and 12 cfs would return to the river with dissolved solids concentrations increased by 500%. The terrace aquifer would be dewatered for 16 months in order to lower the water table at the building site, and Grants Bayou would be transformed from a lentic to a lotic habitat during this period. Fogging and icing due to evaporation and drift from the cooling towers would increase slightly. During the construction period, farming, hunting, and fishing on the site would be suspended, and the social infractructure would be stressed due to the influx of a maximum of 2200 workers

  6. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, SACRAMENTO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  7. Hydrology of vernal pools at three sites, southern Sacramento Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The subsurface hydrology of vernal pools at three vernal pool complexes was investigated during three wet seasons in 2002- : 2004. The complexes were at Gridley Ranch, Valensin Ranch, and the Mather Field in northern California. The selected : comple...

  8. Does tree planting pay us back? Lessons from Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekang Ko; Lara A. Roman; E. Gregory McPherson; Junhak. Lee

    2016-01-01

    The past decade could be called a renaissance of urban forestry, driven by mayoral tree planting initiatives and increased attention on city trees as green infrastructure. The political support for urban greening has been fueled by research that quantifies and projects the ecosystem services of planting initiatives (Young and McPherson 2013). Major cities have been...

  9. Sacramento State Solar Decathlon 2015: Research Performance Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Mikael [California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States). Dept. of Construction Management

    2017-03-14

    Our primary objective is to design and build a 600-1000sf home that produces more energy than it consumes and to showcase this home at the 2015 Solar Decathlon in Irvine, CA. Further objectives are to educate consumers and home builders, alike (including K-12 students – the industry’s future consumers), inspire a shift towards the adoption of net-zero energy solutions in residential building, and to be a leader in the transformation of the California residential marketplace to a net-zero standard. Our specific mission statement for this project is as follows: Solar NEST strives to discover the future of sustainable, energy-efficient housing and deliver these innovations to home buyers at an affordable price. To make substantial improvements to conventional building methods with regard to aesthetics, performance, and affordability. Through our efforts, we aspire to bridge the gap between ‘what is’ and ‘what is possible’ by providing unique, elegant simplicity.

  10. A DIMENSÃO ECLESIAL DOS SACRAMENTOS SEGUNDO KARL RAHNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Francisco Taborda

    1976-01-01

    Full Text Available Escrever sobre Karl Rahner já deixou de ser moda. Por isso mesmo vale a pena tentá-lo. Ultrapassados o entusiasmo novidadeiro e o ardor sectário, o estudo do teólogo alemão pode ser muito mais frutuo-so à reflexão teológica. Indubitavelmente — tenha-se sobre ele a opinião que for — Karl Rahner marcou profundamente a teologia católica, de cuja renovação entre os anos 50 e 70 de nosso século foi u m dos mais importantes fautores.

  11. 77 FR 74775 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... vessels above Mean High Water in the closed-to-navigation position and unlimited vertical clearance when... distribution of power and responsibilities between the Federal Government and Indian tribes. 12. Energy Effects... Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use. We have determined that it is not a ``significant...

  12. 77 FR 47789 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... vertical clearance for vessels above Mean High Water in the closed-to-navigation position and unlimited... power and responsibilities between the Federal Government and Indian tribes. 12. Energy Effects This proposed rule is not a ``significant energy action'' under Executive Order 13211, Actions Concerning...

  13. Passing the Baton: Mentoring for Adoption of Active-Learning Pedagogies by Research-Active Junior Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler; White, Harold B., III

    2015-01-01

    There are barriers to adoption of research-based teaching methods. Professional development workshops may inform faculty of these methods, but effective adoption often does not follow. In addition, newly-minted research-active faculty are often overwhelmed by the many new responsibilities (grant writing, group management, laboratory setup,…

  14. Passing the baton: Mentoring for adoption of active-learning pedagogies by research-active junior faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler; White, Harold B

    2015-01-01

    There are barriers to adoption of research-based teaching methods. Professional development workshops may inform faculty of these methods, but effective adoption often does not follow. In addition, newly-minted research-active faculty are often overwhelmed by the many new responsibilities (grant writing, group management, laboratory setup, teaching) that accompany the position and normally do not have the time to consider novel teaching approaches. This case study documents how over a three-year period, the responsibility for teaching a nontraditional "Introduction to Biochemistry" course in a problem-based learning format was successfully transferred from a senior faculty member nearing retirement (HBW) to a newly-hired research-active assistant professor (CLG). We describe our apprenticeship project involving modeling, scaffolding, fading, and coaching. We suggest that involving faculty in active-learning pedagogy early in their career with mentoring by senior faculty overcomes barriers to adopting these methods. This case describes a specific example from which potentially useful elements can be adopted and adapted wherever biochemistry is taught. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. La Vie Politique sous la Restauration a Travers ’Le Rouge et le Noir’ de Stendahl (The Political Life during the Restauration as Depicted in Le Rouge et le Noir by Stendahl)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    reSeauX du pouvoir est celul des societes secretes. Le vicaire se trouve A la tete de la congregation bisontine. la congregation etant le nom general pour...I’odieux sur l’autorite& legItime. Pauvre France !" (p.138) Pour conserver leur distinction sociale , les nobles utilisent des signes de stature. M. de la...une depense necessaire pour soutenir notre rang." (p.13) Pourtant, ce recours reussit! M. de Renal retablit ainsi sa sup~riorit6 sociale pr~tendue

  16. 75 FR 17197 - Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal Under Section 7071(c) of the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... playing a leadership role with respect to oversight of the court by currently serving as the chair of the KRT Steering Committee, a position which rotates on a quarterly basis. The United States also plays a...

  17. Laser-Driven Ultra-Relativistic Plasmas - Nuclear Fusion in Coulomb Shock Waves, Rouge Waves, and Background Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-05

    inhomogeneous media or confining structures are of great interest to quantum mechanics (QM), optics and electrodynamics , acoustics, hydrodynamics, and chem...corresponds to a quasi- classical case in QM. The reflectivity R in this case vanishes, and reflection can be neglected by a large margin. Looking in...Equation (1.1) can also be obtained via quasi- classical approximation in QM, whereby one has to search for high-order corrections for the phase of c as a

  18. Huile de palme rouge de Colombie : un équivalent tropical de l’huile d’olive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pina M.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The characterisation of the studied columbian red palm oil (fatty acid composition, regiodistribution, solid content… makes it a potential oil of speciality which may be passed for the tropical equivalent of olive oil.

  19. Autour de 1968, en France et ailleurs : Le Fond de l'air était rouge

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvain Dreyer

    2010-01-01

    Introduction

  1. 103 L'exploitation des algues rouges Gelidium dans la région d'El ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PR BOKO

    determined quantity by national quota. Keywords : red alga, Gelidium sesquipedale, production, exploitation, fishing effort, overexploitation. 1. Introduction .... L'investissement ou l'épargne n'est possible que lors des parties de bonne pêche occasionnelles où le gain perçu est substantiel et suffisant pour l'achat d'un filet ou ...

  2. Assessment of indoor air quality exposures and impacts on respiratory outcomes in River Rouge and Dearborn, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Erika; Asher, Mary; Olawoyin, Richard; Zhang, Kuangyuan

    2017-11-01

    Ambient air pollution is a public health issue which could potentially exacerbate pre-existing respiratory conditions and contribute to increases in asthma incidence. This study aims to address gaps in understanding how IAQ is impacted by outdoor air quality, which was done by sampling for indoor gaseous and particulate pollutants in residence and facilities near the sources of pollution. The study areas were selected due to non-attainment status with air quality standards, as well as demographic and socioeconomic status of those residing in these areas. Samples are obtained from five locations around the study areas. The sampling procedure involves active sampling methodologies for particulate matter (PM) and gases. Average volatile organic compounds (VOC) levels of 2.71 ppm were measured at a location, while the average particulate matter (PM) concentrations in three study locations were; 15,979 pt/cc, 9533 pt/cc, 5267 pt/cc respectively, which exceeded clean background environment level of 500-2000 pt/cc. All locations had average CO concentrations above 0.3 ppm, which is potentially associated with elevated asthma symptoms. Results demonstrated that facilities in the study area have increased levels of indoor air pollutants that potentially increase asthma and respiratory issues. The study concludes that particulate and gaseous pollutant levels in the study areas are a concerning human health issue. The study outcomes have significant implications for air quality exposure modeling and potential exposure mitigation strategies, which are expected to facilitate the implementation of public policies for improved human health conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Étude in vitro de l'effet antifalcémiant des globules rouges et de l ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    La drépanocytose est une hémoglobinopathie largement répandue chez les populations africaines noires. Actuellement, très peu de traitements conventionnels existent sur le marché, d'où le recours à la médecine traditionnelle. Maytenus senegalensis est une plante prescrite par les tradipraticiens dans la prise en charge ...

  4. Generation Y and surgical residency - Passing the baton or the end of the world as we know it? Results from a survey among medical students in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kleinert

    Full Text Available The current student generation have their own expectations toward professional life and pay particular attention to their work-life balance. Less interest in work-intensive specialties leads to a shortage of skilled candidates especially in surgery. In order to motivate students into a surgical residency, new priorities become important. A deeper understanding of the underlying arguments and students' expectations towards a surgical training are necessary to counteract a future shortage of specialized surgeons.We conducted an internet-based survey among medical students at two representative German university hospitals to gain more information about the underlying mechanisms that lead to opting for and against a surgical career. We particularly paid attention to gender differences and differences between students of different academic years.A total of 1098 students participated in the survey. Sixty-four percent were female. The majority of the students were of the opinion that surgery is an interesting and meaningful profession. In contrast, when it comes to their own career choice, most students (89% female and 81% male are not willing to choose a surgical specialty. While students are certainly willing to spend a large amount of time on their professional lives, at the same time they demand planning reliability and a sufficient work-life balance. Flexibility in working hours and an existing childcare program were identified as predominant factors for all students and in particular for female students. The same applies to a respectful conversional tone and appreciation of the individual work. Factors like prestige and salary were less relevant than "self-fulfillment" in terms of respectful interaction and balancing their working and private lives. There was significant difference in female and male students as female students have clearer ideas concerning career planning but at the same time are less self-confident than their male colleagues. Moreover, there was a significant difference between junior and senior students regarding career planning with a shift to less work-intensive specialties and especially away from a surgical residency in older students. Adjustments to working hours models, working environment, clinical curriculum and a respectful interaction are factors that might increase the willingness of young students to choose a surgical career.

  5. Guido Beck and the night of the long police batons: some observations about the relationship between physics and politics in the Argentinean context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Augusto Passos Videira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper consists in presenting the reaction of the physicist Guido Beck (1903-1988 towards the political events that occurred in the University of Buenos Aires (UBA, during the second term of 1966. It is not our intention to write a deep treatise on the problem, but to outline some of the ideas that Guido Beck had on the relation between science, State and society in South-American context. That will be done by describing his reaction to the well-known ‘night of the long police batons’. Beck had always been sensitive to the political instability in Argentinean academic system, once that political and ideological disputes could jeopardize the work towards the establishment of a scientific community in that country. As a conclusion, I defend the thesis that in Beck’s point of view the physicists at UBA had misunderstood the importance they had to Argentinean government and to part of the population in that same country.

  6. Passing the Baton: A Collaborative Approach to Development and Implementation of Context-Specific Modules for Graduate Teaching Assistants in Cognate Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Geraldine; McNamara, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A systematic approach to the training of graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) is required to meet the challenges posed by growing numbers of undergraduate and graduate students. At University College Dublin, educational developers and academic staff across six schools collaborated on the design and phased implementation of context-specific GTA…

  7. Generation Y and surgical residency - Passing the baton or the end of the world as we know it? Results from a survey among medical students in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Robert; Fuchs, Claudia; Romotzky, Vanessa; Knepper, Laura; Wasilewski, Marie-Luise; Schröder, Wolfgang; Bruns, Christiane; Woopen, Christiane; Leers, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    The current student generation have their own expectations toward professional life and pay particular attention to their work-life balance. Less interest in work-intensive specialties leads to a shortage of skilled candidates especially in surgery. In order to motivate students into a surgical residency, new priorities become important. A deeper understanding of the underlying arguments and students' expectations towards a surgical training are necessary to counteract a future shortage of specialized surgeons. We conducted an internet-based survey among medical students at two representative German university hospitals to gain more information about the underlying mechanisms that lead to opting for and against a surgical career. We particularly paid attention to gender differences and differences between students of different academic years. A total of 1098 students participated in the survey. Sixty-four percent were female. The majority of the students were of the opinion that surgery is an interesting and meaningful profession. In contrast, when it comes to their own career choice, most students (89% female and 81% male) are not willing to choose a surgical specialty. While students are certainly willing to spend a large amount of time on their professional lives, at the same time they demand planning reliability and a sufficient work-life balance. Flexibility in working hours and an existing childcare program were identified as predominant factors for all students and in particular for female students. The same applies to a respectful conversional tone and appreciation of the individual work. Factors like prestige and salary were less relevant than "self-fulfillment" in terms of respectful interaction and balancing their working and private lives. There was significant difference in female and male students as female students have clearer ideas concerning career planning but at the same time are less self-confident than their male colleagues. Moreover, there was a significant difference between junior and senior students regarding career planning with a shift to less work-intensive specialties and especially away from a surgical residency in older students. Adjustments to working hours models, working environment, clinical curriculum and a respectful interaction are factors that might increase the willingness of young students to choose a surgical career.

  8. Passing on the medicinal chemistry baton: training undergraduates to be industry-ready through research projects between the University of Nottingham and GlaxoSmithKline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Simon J F; Fray, M Jonathan; McInally, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    In this article we describe a radically different industry-academia collaboration between the School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), aiming to train students in research and give them an insight into medicinal chemistry as practiced in industry. The project concerns the discovery of potent and selective αvβ6 integrin antagonists to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; the synthetic chemistry is performed by a group of ten final-year undergraduates and the biological and physicochemical screening data are generated by GSK. The project planning, organisation and operation are discussed, together with some of the challenges and rewards of working with undergraduates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Passing the baton: a grounded practical theory of handoff communication between multidisciplinary providers in two Department of Veterans Affairs outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Christopher J; Maguen, Shira; Daley, Aaron; Cohen, Greg; Seal, Karen H

    2013-01-01

    Handoffs are communication processes that enact the transfer of responsibility between providers across clinical settings. Prior research on handoff communication has focused on inpatient settings between provider teams and has emphasized patient safety. This study examines handoff communication within multidisciplinary provider teams in two outpatient settings. To conduct an exploratory study that describes handoff communication among multidisciplinary providers, to develop a theory-driven descriptive framework for outpatient handoffs, and to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different handoff types. Qualitative, in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 31 primary care, mental health, and social work providers in two Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center outpatient clinics. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed using Grounded Practical Theory to develop a theoretical model of and a descriptive framework for handoff communication among multidisciplinary providers. Multidisciplinary providers reported that handoff decisions across settings were made spontaneously and without clear guidelines. Two situated values, clinic efficiency and patient-centeredness, shaped multidisciplinary providers' handoff decisions. Providers reported three handoff techniques along a continuum: the electronic handoff, which was the most clinically efficient; the provider-to-provider handoff, which balanced clinic efficiency and patient-centeredness; and the collaborative handoff, which was the most patient-centered. Providers described handoff choice as a practical response to manage constituent features of clinic efficiency (time, space, medium of communication) and patient-centeredness (information continuity, management continuity, relational continuity, and social interaction). We present a theoretical and descriptive framework to help providers evaluate differential handoff use, reflect on situated values guiding clinic communication, and guide future research. Handoff communication reflected multidisciplinary providers' efforts to balance clinic efficiency with patient-centeredness within the constraints of day-to-day clinical practice. Evaluating the strengths and weaknesses among alternative handoff options may enhance multidisciplinary provider handoff decision-making and may contribute to increased coordination and continuity of care across outpatient settings.

  10. Entre a batuta e o tubo de ensaio: a carreira admirável de Alexandre Borodin Between baton and test tube: the admirable career of Alexander Borodin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. L. Filgueiras

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Alexander Borodin (1833-1887 is a singularity in the history of science. Whereas other scientists may have kept lifelong interests in some artistic field, he was unique in pursuing with great success two parallel careers in both chemistry and music, managing to excell in both to the end of his life. Although he considered himself primarily a chemist, present-day appreciation of his powerful music has greatly surpassed interest for his chemistry. This article treats the life and the unusual double career of the Russian chemist-musician.

  11. Toxicity of sediment collected upriver and downriver of major cities along the lower Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Lower Mississippi River contributes significantly to the biodiversity and ecological stability of the alluvial valley. Agricultural, industrial and municipal developments have historically impacted environmental quality of the river. Toxicity of sediment and sediment pore water was used to assess the current effects of major cities on sediment quality along the Lower Mississippi River. Composite sediment samples were collected from four sites upriver and four sites downriver of five major cities: Cairo, IL; Memphis, TN; Vicksburg, MS; Baton Rouge, LA; and New Orleans, LA. Following EPA's standard methods for acute toxicity testing of freshwater solid-phase sediment, Hyalella azteca were exposed to the sediments for 10 d with two water renewals per day. Hyalella azteca were also exposed for 96 h to pore water extracted from the sediments. After the initial tests, the animals were exposed to ultraviolet light for 12 h. Sediments were analyzed for organics (organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, organophosphate insecticides, and PAHs) and metals (Cr, Cu, Pb, Mn, Ni, Zn). With the exception of upriver from Memphis, solid-phase sediments were not toxic to H. azteca. Pore water from sediments collected upriver of Memphis showed slight toxicity. Exposure of H. azteca to ultraviolet light did not increase the toxicity of the sediment or pore-water samples, indicating a lack of PAH toxicity. Chemical analyses did not reveal any contaminant levels of concern in the sediments. Based on toxicity testing and chemical analyses, quality of sediments collected from the Lower Mississippi was good, with the exception of sites sampled upriver of Memphis.

  12. Fluorescence imaging spectroscopy (FIS) for comparing spectra from corn ears naturally and artificially infected with aflatoxin producing fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Zuzana; Yao, Haibo; Kincaid, Russell; Darlington, Dawn; Brown, Robert L; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E

    2013-08-01

    In an effort to address the problem of rapid detection of aflatoxin in grain, particularly oilseeds, the current study assessed the spectral differences of aflatoxin production in kernels from a cornfield inoculated with spores from 2 different strains of toxigenic Aspergillus flavus. Aflatoxin production in corn from the same field due to natural infestation was also assessed. A small corn plot in Baton Rouge, La., U.S.A., was used during the 2008-growing season. Two groups of 400 plants were inoculated with 2 different inocula and 1 group of 400 plants was designated as controls. Any contamination detected in the controls was attributed to natural infestation. A subset of each group was imaged with a visible near infra red (VNIR) hyperspectral system under ultra violet (UV) excitation and subsequently analyzed for aflatoxin using affinity column fluorometry. Group differences were statistically analyzed. Results indicate that when all the spectral data across all groups were averaged, any potential differences between groups (treated and untreated) were obscured. However, spectral analysis based on contaminated "hot" pixel classification showed a distinct spectral shift/separation between contaminated and clean ears with fluorescence peaks at 501 and 478 nm, respectively. All inoculated and naturally infected control ears had fluorescence peaks at 501 nm that differed from uninfected corn ears. Results from this study may be useful in evaluating rapid, noninvasive instrumentation and/or methodology for aflatoxin detection in grain. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, Livingston Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, approximately 23 miles east of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is the eighth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. Two flow tests and one reservoir pressure buildup test were conducted on the lower zone during a 13-day period. A total of 12,489 barrels of water was produced. The highest flow rate achieved was about 3887 BWPD. One flow test followed by a buildup period was conducted on the combined upper and lower zones during a 3-day period. A total of 4739 barrels of water was produced. The highest flow rate achieved was about 3000 BWPD. The gas/water ratio measured during testing was about 32.0 SCF/BBL for the lower zone. The extrapolated latoratory data indicates that the solubility of the gas is 55.7 SCF/BBL. It appears that the reservoir brine is considerably undersaturated. The methane content of the flare line gas averaged 71.0 mole percent. Crown Zellerbach Company carefully studied the commercial feasibility of using the well to produce energy for a wood-drying facility and decided against the project.

  14. Prepregnancy obesity and periodontitis among pregnant females with and without gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yiqiong; Xiong, Xu; Elkind-Hirsch, Karen E; Pridjian, Gabriella; Maney, Pooja; Delarosa, Robert L; Buekens, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    This study explored whether there is an association between prepregnancy obesity and periodontitis among pregnant females. A retrospective cohort study was conducted by using data from a previous case-control study at Woman's Hospital, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One hundred fifty-nine pregnant females were recruited at their prenatal care visits. Periodontal status was assessed through dental examinations performed at an average of 31 weeks gestation. Periodontitis was defined as the presence of one or more sites exhibiting probing depth ≥4 mm or clinical attachment level ≥4 mm. A Poisson regression with robust error variance was used to estimate risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Prepregnancy obesity was statistically significantly associated with periodontitis during pregnancy, with obese females at 1.7 times higher risk compared with under/normal-weight females (RR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.2 to 2.3, P periodontitis between females with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and females without GDM. There is a positive association between prepregnancy obesity and periodontitis among pregnant females.

  15. Impact of Spatial Pumping Patterns on Groundwater Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J.; Tsai, F. T. C.

    2017-12-01

    Challenges exist to manage groundwater resources while maintaining a balance between groundwater quantity and quality because of anthropogenic pumping activities as well as complex subsurface environment. In this study, to address the impact of spatial pumping pattern on groundwater management, a mixed integer nonlinear multi-objective model is formulated by integrating three objectives within a management framework to: (i) maximize total groundwater withdrawal from potential wells; (ii) minimize total electricity cost for well pumps; and (iii) attain groundwater level at selected monitoring locations as close as possible to the target level. Binary variables are used in the groundwater management model to control the operative status of pumping wells. The NSGA-II is linked with MODFLOW to solve the multi-objective problem. The proposed method is applied to a groundwater management problem in the complex Baton Rouge aquifer system, southeastern Louisiana. Results show that (a) non-dominated trade-off solutions under various spatial distributions of active pumping wells can be achieved. Each solution is optimal with regard to its corresponding objectives; (b) operative status, locations and pumping rates of pumping wells are significant to influence the distribution of hydraulic head, which in turn influence the optimization results; (c) A wide range of optimal solutions is obtained such that decision makers can select the most appropriate solution through negotiation with different stakeholders. This technique is beneficial to finding out the optimal extent to which three objectives including water supply concern, energy concern and subsidence concern can be balanced.

  16. Terrestrial Gamma Flashes at Ground Level - TETRA-II Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleshinger, D. J.; Adams, C.; Al-Nussirat, S.; Bai, S.; Banadaki, Y.; Bitzer, P. M.; Cherry, M. L.; Hoffmann, J.; Khosravi, E.; Legault, M.; Orang, M.; Rodriguez, R.; Smith, D.; Trepanier, J. C.; Sunda-Meya, A.; Zimmer, N.

    2017-12-01

    The TGF and Energetic Thunderstorm Rooftop Array (TETRA-II) consists of an array of BGO scintillators to detect bursts of gamma rays from thunderstorms. TETRA-II will have approximately an order of magnitude greater sensitivity for individual flashes than TETRA-I, an original array of NaI scintillators at Louisiana State University that detected 37 millisecond-scale bursts of gamma rays from 2010-2015. The BGO scintillators increase the energy range of particles detected to 10 MeV and are placed in 20 detectors boxes, each with 1180 cm3 of BGO, at 4 separate locations: the campus of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana; the campus of the University of Puerto Rico at Utuado, Puerto Rico; the Centro Nacional de Metrologia de Panama (CENAMEP) in Panama City, Panama; and the Severe Weather Institute and Radar & Lightning Laboratories in Huntsville, Alabama. The data are read out with 12 microsecond resolution by National Instruments PCIe 6351 high speed data acquisition cards, with timestamps determined from a 20 MHz clock and a GPS board recording a pulse per second. Details of the array and its instrumentation, along with an overview of initial results, will be presented.

  17. Bayesian Chance-Constrained Hydraulic Barrier Design under Geological Structure Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitsazan, Nima; Pham, Hai V; Tsai, Frank T-C

    2015-01-01

    The groundwater community has widely recognized geological structure uncertainty as a major source of model structure uncertainty. Previous studies in aquifer remediation design, however, rarely discuss the impact of geological structure uncertainty. This study combines chance-constrained (CC) programming with Bayesian model averaging (BMA) as a BMA-CC framework to assess the impact of geological structure uncertainty in remediation design. To pursue this goal, the BMA-CC method is compared with traditional CC programming that only considers model parameter uncertainty. The BMA-CC method is employed to design a hydraulic barrier to protect public supply wells of the Government St. pump station from salt water intrusion in the "1500-foot" sand and the "1700-foot" sand of the Baton Rouge area, southeastern Louisiana. To address geological structure uncertainty, three groundwater models based on three different hydrostratigraphic architectures are developed. The results show that using traditional CC programming overestimates design reliability. The results also show that at least five additional connector wells are needed to achieve more than 90% design reliability level. The total amount of injected water from the connector wells is higher than the total pumpage of the protected public supply wells. While reducing the injection rate can be achieved by reducing the reliability level, the study finds that the hydraulic barrier design to protect the Government St. pump station may not be economically attractive. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  18. Somatic experiencing treatment with social service workers following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, M Laurie; Vanslyke, Jan; Allen, Marisa

    2009-01-01

    In a disaster, social service workers are often survivors themselves.This study examines whether somatic intervention using a brief (one to two session) stabilization model now called the Trauma Resiliency Model (TRM), which uses the skills of Somatic Experiencing (SE), can reduce the postdisaster symptoms of social service workers involved in postdisaster service delivery.The study was implemented with a nonrandom sample of 142 social service workers who were survivors of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, two to three months after the disasters. Ninety-one participants received SE/TRM and were compared with a matched comparison group of 51 participants through the use of propensity score matching. All participants first received group psychoeducation. Results support the benefits of the brief intervention inspired by SE. The treatment group showed statistically significant gains in resiliency indicators and decreases in posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. Although psychological symptoms increased in both groups at the three to four month follow-up, the treatment group's psychological symptoms were statistically lower than those of the comparison group.

  19. Isolation of novel bacteria within the Chloroflexi capable of reductive dechlorination of 1,2,3-trichloropropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, J; Rash, B A; Rainey, F A; Moe, W M

    2009-04-01

    Two strictly anaerobic bacterial strains were isolated from contaminated groundwater at a Superfund site located near Baton Rouge, LA, USA. These strains represent the first isolates reported to reductively dehalogenate 1,2,3-trichloropropane. Allyl chloride (3-chloro-1-propene), which is chemically unstable, was produced from 1,2,3-trichloropropane, and it was hydrolysed abiotically to allyl alcohol and also reacted with the sulfide- and cysteine-reducing agents in the medium to form various allyl sulfides. Both isolates also dehalogenated a variety of other vicinally chlorinated alkanes (1,2-dichloropropane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,1,2,2- tetrachloroethane) via dichloroelimination reactions. A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) approach targeting 16S rRNA genes indicated that both strains couple reductive dechlorination to cell growth. Growth was not observed in the absence of hydrogen (H2) as an electron donor and a polychlorinated alkane as an electron acceptor. Alkanes containing only a single chlorine substituent (1-chloropropane, 2-chloropropane), chlorinated alkenes (tetrachlorothene, trichlorothene, cisdichloroethene, trans-dichloroethene, vinyl chloride) and chlorinated benzenes (1-chlorobenzene and 1,2- dichlorobenzene) were not dechlorinated. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence data showed these isolates to represent a new lineage within the Chloroflexi. Their closest previously cultured relatives are 'Dehalococcoides' strains, with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of only 90%.

  20. The TETRA-II Experiment to Observe Terrestrial Gamma Flashes at Ground Level - Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.; Adams, C.; Al-Nussirat, S.; Bai, S.; Banadaki, Y.; Bitzer, P. M.; Hoffmann, J.; Khosravi, E.; Legault, M.; Orang, M.; Pleshinger, D. J.; Rodriguez, R.; Smith, D.; Trepanier, J. C.; Sunda-Meya, A.; Zimmer, N.

    2017-12-01

    An upgraded version of the TGF and Energetic Thunderstorm Rooftop Array (TETRA-II) consists of an array of BGO scintillators to detect bursts of gamma rays from thunderstorms at ground level in four separate locations: the campus of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana; the campus of the University of Puerto Rico at Utuado, Puerto Rico; the Centro Nacional de Metrologia de Panama (CENAMEP) in Panama City, Panama; and the Severe Weather Institute and Radar & Lightning Laboratories in Huntsville, Alabama. The original TETRA-I array of NaI scintillators at Louisiana State University detected 37 millisecond-scale bursts of gamma rays at energies 50 keV-2 MeV associated with nearby (< 8 km) thunderstorms. TETRA-II began operation in May 2016 and now has approximately an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than TETRA-I. The ability to observe ground-level Terrestrial Gamma Flashes from close to the source allows a unique analysis of the storm cells producing these events. A brief description of the TETRA-I observations, a description of TETRA-II, and preliminary results of the first events observed by TETRA-II will be presented including frequency and time history of events, spectral information, and correlation with local radar and radio data.

  1. The LSU Electron Storage Ring, the first commercially-built storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, R.

    1990-01-01

    The Brobeck Division of Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., is building the first industrially-produced storage ring. It will be located at Louisiana State University (LSU) at the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) in Baton Rouge. The purpose of this electron storage ring is to provide intense beams of x-rays to advance the state-of-the-art in lithography and to permit research in a broad area. This facility consists of a 1.2 GeV, 400 mA electron storage ring with a 200 MeV linac injector. The magnet lattice is a Chasman-Green design (double-bend achromat), and the ring circumference is 55.2 meters. There are four 3.0 meter, dispersion-free straight sections, one for injection, one for the 500 MHz RF cavity, and two for possible future insertion devices. The storge ring construction project is in the detailed-design stage, and many systems are in the initial stages of fabrication. 4 figs., 1 tab

  2. Bioremediation of selected contaminants in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Bennett, J.; Englande, A.J.; Law, V.; Mullin, D.; Mielke, H.; Eckert, J.; Fulginiti, R.; Kamath, B.; Ross, J.

    1993-01-01

    Bioremediation is generally accepted as a long-term and economic treatment option. However, quantitative information on bioremediation and biosorption is required before this option can be adopted successfully. The primary goal of this on-going project is to determine the extent of natural biodegradation of hazardous organics and biosorption of hazardous organics and heavy metals by the consortia of bacteria, fungi, and plants. Methods to enhance the biodegradation process will be studied during the second and third years of this 3-year proposed project. The Devil's Swamp area near Baton Rouge and Bayou St. John in New Orleans have been selected as the first set of test sites. Some samples from Lake Pontchartrain, bordering New Orleans on the north, have also been analyzed. It is expected that many of the contaminants found at the test site(s) are present at other sites of DOE's interest. Further, technology resulting from the proposed research involving enhanced natural biodegradation processes should be transferable to other DOE sites

  3. Cooling tower water ozonation at Southern University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.C.; Knecht, A.T.; Trahan, D.B.; Yaghi, H.M.; Jackson, G.H.; Coppenger, G.D.

    1990-01-01

    Cooling-tower water is a critical utility for many industries. In the past, inexpensive water coupled with moderate regulation of discharge water led to the neglect of the cooling tower as an energy resource. Now, with the increased cost of chemical treatment and tough EPA rules and regulations, this situation is rapidly changing. The operator of the DOE Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge as well as many other industries are forced to develop an alternate method of water treatment. The cooling tower is one of the major elements in large energy systems. The savings accrued from a well engineered cooling tower can be a significant part of the overall energy conservation plan. During a short-term ozonation study between 1987-1988, the Y-12 Plant has been successful in eliminating the need for cooling tower treatment chemicals. However, the long-term impact was not available. Since April 1988, the ozone cooling water treatment study at the Y-12 Plant has been moved to the site at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The purpose of this continued study is to determine whether the use of ozonation on cooling towers is practical from an economic, technical and environmental standpoint. This paper discusses system design, operating parameter and performance testing of the ozonation system at Southern University

  4. Resistance to Varroa destructor (Mesostigmata: Varroidae) when mite-resistant queen honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae) were free-mated with unselected drones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbo, J R; Harris, J W

    2001-12-01

    This study demonstrated (1) that honey bees, Apis mellifera L, can express a high level of resistance to Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman when bees were selected for only one resistant trait (suppression of mite reproduction); and (2) that a significant level of mite-resistance was retained when these queens were free-mated with unselected drones. The test compared the growth of mite populations in colonies of bees that each received one of the following queens: (1) resistant--queens selected for suppression of mite reproduction and artificially inseminated in Baton Rouge with drones from similarly selected stocks; (2) resistant x control--resistant queens, as above, produced and free-mated to unselected drones by one of four commercial queen producers; and (3) control--commercial queens chosen by the same four queen producers and free-mated as above. All colonies started the test with approximately 0.9 kg of bees that were naturally infested with approximately 650 mites. Colonies with resistant x control queens ended the 115-d test period with significantly fewer mites than did colonies with control queens. This suggests that beekeepers can derive immediate benefit from mite-resistant queens that have been free-mated to unselected drones. Moreover, the production and distribution of these free-mated queens from many commercial sources may be an effective way to insert beneficial genes into our commercial population of honey bees without losing the genetic diversity and the useful beekeeping characteristics of this population.

  5. EDS coal liquefaction process development. Phase V. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-01

    This report is the tenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report for US Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC01-77ET10069 (formerly EF-77-A-01-2893) for Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) Coal Liquefaction Process Development - Phase V. The Laboratory Process Research and Development studies were conducted at various Exxon Research and Engineering Co. (ER and E) facilities: Research and Development Division at Baytown, Texas; Products Research Division at Linden, New Jersey; and the Exxon Research and Development Laboratories at Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The Engineering Research and Development studies were performed at the Synthetic Fuels Engineering and Exxon Engineering Technology Departments of ER and E at Florham Park, New Jersey. The information dealing with the Management, Detailed Engineering, and Procurement activities related to revamp of the FLEXICOKING Prototype Unit was generated at Exxon Company, USA, Houston, Texas, and Exxon Engineering - Project Management Department of ER and E, Florham Park, New Jersey. The information dealing with operation of the 250 T/D Exxon Coal Liquefaction Pilot Plant (ECLP) was generated at Exxon Company, USA, Houston, Texas.

  6. Measurement of Perceived Stress Among Pregnant Women: A Comparison of Two Different Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solivan, Amber E; Xiong, Xu; Harville, Emily W; Buekens, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Assess the amount of agreement between the classification of stress from the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Assessment of Stress portion of the Prenatal Psychosocial Profile (PPP) among pregnant women. A secondary data analysis on a cross-sectional study of 301 pregnant women from the New Orleans and Baton Rouge areas who were exposed to Hurricane Katrina was conducted. Women with complete data (219) were analyzed. Women scoring in the third tertile of each instrument were compared. The kappa statistic was used to assess agreement between instruments. Additional comparisons were made with three instruments that measure other important psychosocial constructs that could be related to stress: the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS) and the Assessments of Support (partner and other support) and Self-Esteem from the PPP. No significant difference was found between the two tests. The PSS and the PPP were both statistically significantly correlated to each other (ρ = 0.71, p PSS, r = 0.72; p PSS r = -0.46; p PSS r = -0.32; p PSS, r = -0.52; p PSS and PPP, researchers are encouraged to choose and administer one instrument to participants, or to use the instruments in combination as an external reliability check.

  7. LIGO Education and Outreach at Twin Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, John

    2007-04-01

    LIGO has twin Gravitational Wave observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA. Both sites have active outreach programs but each has a different emphasis and methodology. We will briefly describe the nature of these outreach programs. We will then focus attention on the Livingston facility since its outreach program is centered on a new 9000 sq.ft. Science Education Center. We will describe the facility and its exhibits then discuss the structure of the outreach program at the Center. The objectives of the Center are to: communicate LIGO-related science concepts to the public; strengthen skills and abilities of in-service and pre-service teachers and enhance the science and mathematics skills of a broad spectrum of students in Louisiana and the surrounding region. By partnering with a museum (The Exploratorium), a university (Southern University at Baton Rouge) and a state education agency for education reform, LA GEAR UP, we have been able to quickly open up opportunities. Benefiting from our fine collaborators, we've been able to create positive impact in the local science education community in a relatively brief time span.

  8. Toward validation of a minimal competence core of morphosyntax for African American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, Ida J; Guillory, Barbara; Seibert, Marilyn; Boult, Johanna

    2013-02-01

    The authors set out to determine (a) whether African American children's spontaneous spoken language met use criteria for a revised minimal competence core with original and added morphosyntactic patterns at different geographical locations, and (b) whether pass/fail status on this core was differentiated on other criterion measures of language maturity. The authors used a common set of activities and stimuli to elicit spontaneous speech samples from Head Start students, age 3;0 (years; months). The 119 participants were distributed at a northern (Lansing, MI) and a southern (Baton Rouge, LA) location. More than 80% of the children at each location met criteria for 10 core competencies. They included sentence length, type, complexity, and morphosyntactic elaborations of sentences at the lexical, phrasal, and clausal levels. The 2 most significant predictors of pass/fail outcomes in a regression analysis were (a) clinical referral status and (b) the number of different words (NDW(100)) spoken in a speech sample. A minimal competence core analyses of spontaneous oral language samples may help to identify delayed spoken grammars in African American children.

  9. Metals and trace elements in giant garter snakes (Thamnophis gigas) from the Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, G.D.; Hothem, R.L.; Bergen, D.R.; Martin, L.L.; Taylor, R.J.; Brussee, B.E.

    2009-01-01

    The giant garter snake (GGS; Thamnophis gigas) is a federally listed threatened species endemic to wetlands of the Central Valley of California. Habitat destruction has been the main factor in the decline of GGS populations, but the effects of contaminants on this species are unknown. To contribute to the recovery of these snakes, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began studies of the life history and habitat use of GGSs in 1995. During a series of investigations conducted from 1995 to the present, specimens of dead GGSs were opportunistically collected from the Colusa National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), the Natomas Basin, and other sites in northern California. Whole snakes were stored frozen for potential future analysis. As funding became available, we analyzed tissues of 23 GGSs to determine the concentrations of total mercury (Hg) and other trace elements in livers and concentrations of Hg in brains and tail clips. Mercury concentrations (??g/g, wet weight) ranged from 0.08 to 1.64 in livers, 0.01 to 0.18 in brains, and 0.02 to 0.32 in tail clips. In livers, geometric mean concentrations (??g/g, dry weight) of arsenic (25.7) and chromium (1.02) were higher than most values from studies of other snakes. Mercury concentrations in tail clips were positively correlated with concentrations in livers and brains, with the most significant correlations occurring at the Natomas Basin and when Natomas and CNWR were combined. Results indicate the value of using tail clips as a nonlethal bioindicator of contaminant concentrations. ?? 2008 US Government.

  10. Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Market Test Development Project: Sacramento Electric Transportation Consortium RA 93-23 Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    total Motorcycle sales in the US, which amount to 462,000 units (reference 8). The best selling cars included in Table 4 are the Geo Metro, Toyota ...7 5 d, = A C>^2> Hi’ °.Ob\\ KV^-s Lotk. cti/-e.cjhO*JS OK) Stout road. l/> l/> (A U Ul 111 UUIU XZZ (A in to ooo iflOO III «NCI

  11. Pleistocene coastal sedimentation in the north cliffs of Colonia del Sacramento

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goso, C.; Perea, D.; Corona, A.; Mesa, V.

    2012-01-01

    This work is about the cliffs and the sucession of sandy and gravelly sediments in the north of Colonia city. The results obtained by thermoluminescence dating in sandy samples belong to the Quaternary period

  12. 76 FR 14049 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: California State University, Sacramento...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... by artifact typologies and burial patterns, historical linguistic evidence, and biological evidence... of California; Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria (Verona Tract... Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria (Verona Tract), California; United Auburn Indian...

  13. Consolidated Site (CS) 024 Verification Survey at Former McClellan AFB, Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-31

    volatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins/furans, and metals . The spatial distribution of radioactive materials across the site...76BRS76/3M-E1-X 3x3-inch thallium -doped sodium iodide (NaI) detectors and Ludlum Model 2221 ratemeter/scalers were the primary radiation detection

  14. A Critical Analysis of Management Indicators for the Director of Materiel Management, Sacramento ALC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Bresnahan, Patrick M. Instructor, Air Force Institute of Technology (AU), Wright-Patterson AFB OH. Personal interview. 4 April 1980. Churchman , C. West . The...1980. Schoderbek, Peter P., Asterios G. Kefalas, and Charles G. Schoderbek. Management Systems: Conceptual Considera- tions. Dallas: Business Publications, Inc., 1975. 1 111

  15. An analysis of human-induced land transformations in the San Francisco Bay/Sacramento area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtland, David A.; Gaydos, L.J.; Clarke, Keith; DeCola, Lee; Acevedo, William; Bell, Cindy

    1994-01-01

    Part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Global Change Research Program involvesstudying the area from the Pacific Ocean to the Sierra foothills to enhance understanding ofthe role that human activities play in global change. The study investigates the ways thathumans transform the land and the effects that changing the landscape may have on regionaland global systems. To accomplish this research, scientists are compiling records ofhistorical transformations in the region's land cover over the last 140 years, developing asimulation model to predict land cover change, and assembling a digital data set to analyzeand describe land transformations. The historical data regarding urban growth focusattention on the significant change the region underwent from 1850 to 1990. Animation isused to visualize a time series of the change in land cover. The historical change is beingused to calibrate a prototype cellular automata model, developed to predict changes in urbanland cover 100 years into the future. Future urban growth scenarios will be developed foranalyzing possible human-induced impacts on land cover at a regional scale. These data aidin documenting and understanding human-induced land transformations from both historical andpredictive perspectives. A descriptive analysis of the region is used to investigate therelationships among data characteristic of the region. These data consist of multilayertopography, climate, vegetation, and population data for a 256-km2 region of centralCalifornia. A variety of multivariate analysis tools are used to integrate the data inraster format from map contours, interpolated climate observations, satellite observations,and population estimates.

  16. 78 FR 75939 - Bay Delta Habitat Conservation Plan and Natural Community Conservation Plan, Sacramento, CA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... patterns, including breeding, feeding, and sheltering (50 CFR 17.3(c)). NMFS defines ``harm'' to include... impairing essential behavioral patterns, including breeding, spawning, rearing, migrating, feeding, or... conservation strategy includes measures that will be implemented outside of the statutory Delta to complement...

  17. North American montane red foxes: expansion, fragmentation, and the origin of the Sacramento Valley red fox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin N. Sacks; Mark J. Statham; John D. Perrine; Samantha M. Wisely; Keith B. Aubry

    2010-01-01

    Most native red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in the western contiguous United States appear to be climatically restricted to colder regions in the major mountain ranges and, in some areas, have suffered precipitous declines in abundance that may be linked to warming trends. However, another population of unknown origin has occurred in arid habitats in the...

  18. Uranium in the surrounding of San Marcos-Sacramento River environment (Chihuahua, Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentería-Villalobos, Marusia; Cortés, Manuel Reyes; Mantero, Juan; Manjón, Guillermo; García-Tenorio, Rafael; Herrera, Eduardo; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena

    2012-01-01

    The main interest of this study is to assess whether uranium deposits located in the San Marcos outcrops (NW of Chihuahua City, Mexico) could be considered as a source of U-isotopes in its surrounding environment. Uranium activity concentrations were determined in biota, ground, and surface water by either alpha or liquid scintillation spectrometries. Major ions were analyzed by ICP-OES in surface water and its suspended matter. For determining uranium activity in biota, samples were divided in parts. The results have shown a possible lixiviation and infiltration of uranium from geological substrate into the ground and surface water, and consequently, a transfer to biota. Calculated annual effective doses by ingestion suggest that U-isotopes in biota could not negligibly contribute to the neighboring population dose. By all these considerations, it is concluded that in this zone there is natural enhancement of uranium in all environmental samples analyzed in the present work.

  19. Uranium in the Surrounding of San Marcos-Sacramento River Environment (Chihuahua, Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentería-Villalobos, Marusia; Cortés, Manuel Reyes; Mantero, Juan; Manjón, Guillermo; García-Tenorio, Rafael; Herrera, Eduardo; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena

    2012-01-01

    The main interest of this study is to assess whether uranium deposits located in the San Marcos outcrops (NW of Chihuahua City, Mexico) could be considered as a source of U-isotopes in its surrounding environment. Uranium activity concentrations were determined in biota, ground, and surface water by either alpha or liquid scintillation spectrometries. Major ions were analyzed by ICP-OES in surface water and its suspended matter. For determining uranium activity in biota, samples were divided in parts. The results have shown a possible lixiviation and infiltration of uranium from geological substrate into the ground and surface water, and consequently, a transfer to biota. Calculated annual effective doses by ingestion suggest that U-isotopes in biota could not negligibly contribute to the neighboring population dose. By all these considerations, it is concluded that in this zone there is natural enhancement of uranium in all environmental samples analyzed in the present work. PMID:22536148

  20. [Aria con violines al Santísimo Sacramento. Ay, Dueño enamorado

    OpenAIRE

    Anónimo

    2010-01-01

    Tabla de contenido: 1. Violín primero; 2. Violín segundo; 3. Violón; 4. Órgano; 5. Recitado y aria.Folio 1. Violín primero.Folio 3. Violín segundo.Folio 5. Violón.Folio 7. Órgano.Folio 9. Recitado y aria.Folio 9-10. Letra.

  1. Edificio de oficinas para el Sacramento Municipal Utility District – Smud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreyfuss & Blackford, Arquitectos

    1963-03-01

    Full Text Available This building takes advantage of the uneveness of the ground, and seeks to enhance the attractiveness of the landscape. It includes a cafeteria, an auditorium for 190 persons, exhibition hall, space for the various departments, and other facilities. Allowance has been made for a 30% increase in the staff. One floor level has been constructed, but is not fully completed, and there is the possibility of adding another one. There is parking space for 720 automobiles. The glass walls are specially fitted with a protection, whereby the sun does not shine on the office tables. The external colour of the building changes continuously, for the aluminium reflects or absorbs the sun, depending on the time of day and the season of the year: this colour changes from bronze to quartz tone, under the effect of the sun, and from white to grey in the shade. The green turf emphasizes the delicate tones of the building. The basic requirements have been satisfied by means of a beautiful and harmonious design, which constitutes an altogether important architectural unit.Ha sido construido aprovechando los desniveles del ter reno para crear un paisaje interesante. Dispone de: cafetería, auditorio para 190 personas, sala de exposición, espacios para los distintos departamentos, etc. Se ha previsto pueda servir para un aumento de un 30% de empleados, existiendo una planta construida, pero no acabada, y la posibilidad de construir otra. Estacionamiento con capacidad para 720 coches. Toda la zona acristalada está protegida mediante dispositivos que impiden a los rayos solares incidir sobre las mesas de trabajo. El color exterior del edificio cambia continuamente, ya que el aluminio refleja o absorbe el sol, según las horas del día o la época del año, pasando de un tono bronceado a un blanco cuarcífero. En la sombra, del blanco al gris. Las fajas verdes de césped destacan la brillante delicadeza de las paredes. En forma bella y armoniosa han sido satisfechas las necesidades previstas, y el edificio constituye un conjunto orgánico importante.

  2. Agricultural Losses from Salinity in California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josué Medellín-Azuara

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea level rise, large-scale flooding, and new conveyance arrangements for water exports may increase future water salinity for local agricultural production in California’s Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta. Increasing salinity in crop root zones often decreases crop yields and crop revenues. Salinity effects are nonlinear, and vary with crop choice and other factors including drainage and residence time of irrigation water. Here, we explore changes in agricultural production in the Delta under various combinations of water management, large-scale flooding, and future sea level rise. Water management alternatives include through-Delta water exports (current conditions, dual conveyance (through-Delta and a 6,700 Mm3 yr‑1 [or 7500 cfs] capacity peripheral canal or tunnel and the flooding of five western islands with and without peripheral exports. We employ results from previous hydrodynamic simulations of likely changes in salinity for irrigation water at points in the Delta. We connect these irrigation water salinity values into a detailed agro-economic model of Delta agriculture to estimate local crop yield and farm revenue losses. Previous hydrodynamic modeling work shows that sea level rise is likely to increase salinity from 4% to 130% in this century, depending on the increase in sea level and location. Changes in water management under dual conveyance increase salinity mostly in the western Delta, and to a lesser extent in the north, where current salinity levels are now quite low. Because locations likely to experience the largest salinity increases already have a lower-value crop mix, the worst-case losses are less than 1% of total Delta crop revenues. This result also holds for salinity increases from permanent flooding of western islands that serve as a salinity barrier. Our results suggest that salinity increases could have much smaller economic effects on Delta farming than other likely changes in the Delta such as retirement of agricultural lands after large-scale flooding and habitat development. Integrating hydrodynamic, water salinity, and economic models can provide insights into controversial management issues. 

  3. H10442: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Sacramento River, California, 1992-10-23

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  4. Factors affecting long-term mortality of residential shade trees: evidence from Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekang Ko; Jun-Hak Lee; E. Gregory McPherson; Lara A. Roman

    2015-01-01

    Urban tree survival is essential to sustain the ecosystem services of urban forests and monitoring is needed to accurately assess benefits. While some urban forestry studies have reported street tree survival, little is known about the factors influencing residential yard tree survival, especially over the long-term. We assessed residential shade tree survival in...

  5. Habitat capacity for Sacramento delta - Life Cycle Modeling of Life History Diversity and Habitat Relationships

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goals of this project are to examine 1) the relative importance of multiple aquatic habitats (streams, estuaries, and nearshore areas, for example) used by...

  6. 77 FR 59647 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... firing, indiscriminately killing women and children along with Sioux warriors. Estimates of the number of... represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3...

  7. 75 FR 20547 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Initiation of Status Review for Sacramento...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... comments and information as to what, if any, critical habitat you think should be proposed for designation.... Specifically, for areas within the geographical range currently occupied by the species, we request data on: (1... addition, we request data and information on ``specific areas outside the geographical area occupied by the...

  8. Laboratory Jet Erosion Tests on the Lower American River Soil Samples, Sacramento, CA- Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Bridge, Guy West Bridge, H Street Bridge, and Paradise Beach/Glenn Hall Park. 1.1 Purpose The purpose of this study was to perform Jet Erosion...American Society of Agricultural Engineers Paper No. 992133. In Proceedings, Mini-Conference on Advances in Water Quality Modeling, 18-21 July, Toronto

  9. Sacramento River, Chico Landing to Red Bluff, California Bank Protection Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Lippia nodi flora) Southern California Milk thistle Common-Nationwide X (Silybum marianum) Poi son hemlock Common-Nat i onw i de X...Mourning dove (Zenaidura macroura) Barn owl (Tyto alba ) Screech owl (Otus asio) ABUNDANCE AND RANGE IN THE UNITED STATES Common-Nat i onw i de

  10. Ecological responses by Mexican spotted owls to environmental variation in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Ward

    2001-01-01

    Understanding the influence of environmental variation on population processes is a fundamental requisite for devising strategies that conserve species. A common tactic for conserving raptor populations is to maintain or manipulate habitat conditions that maintain or increase availability of prey species. A primary purpose of this investigation was to...

  11. Sacramento Municipal Utility District PV and Smart Grid Pilot at Anatolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawson, Mark; Sanchez, Eddie Paul

    2013-12-30

    Under DE-FOA-0000085 High Penetration Solar Deployment, the U. S. Department of Energy funded agreements with SMUD and Navigant Consulting, SunPower, GridPoint, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the California Energy Commission for this pilot demonstration project. Funding was $5,962,409.00. Cost share of $500,000 was also provided by the California Energy Commission. The project has strategic implications for SMUD, other utilities and the PV and energy-storage industries in business and resource planning, technology deployment and asset management. These implications include: -At this point, no dominant business models have emerged and the industry is open for new ideas. -Demonstrated two business models for using distributed PV and energy storage, and brainstormed several dozen more, each with different pros and cons for SMUD, its customers and the industry. -Energy storage can be used to manage high penetrations of PV and mitigate potential issues such as reverse power flow, voltage control violations, power quality issues, increased wear and tear on utility equipment, and system wide power supply issues. - Smart meters are another tool utilities can use to manage high penetrations of PV. The necessary equipment and protocols exist, and the next step is to determine how to integrate the functionality with utility programs and what level of utility control is required. - Time-of-use rates for the residential customers who hosted energy storage systems did not cause a significant change in energy usage patterns. However, the rates we used were not optimized for PV and energy storage. Opportunities exist for utilities to develop new structures.

  12. [Aria con violines, trompas y violonchelo al Santísimo Sacramento. El amante divino

    OpenAIRE

    Anónimo

    2010-01-01

    Tabla de contenido: 1. Violín primero; 2. Violín segundo; 3. Trompa primera; 4. Trompa segunda; 5. Violonchelo; 6. Órgano; 7. Recitado y aria.Folio 1. Violín primero.Folio 2. Violín segundo.Folio 3. Trompa primera.Folio 5. Trompa segunda.Folio 7. Violonchelo.Folio 8. Órgano.Folio 10. Recitado y aria.Folio 10 y 10v. Letra.

  13. [Aria con violines, trompas y violonchelo al Santísimo Sacramento. Soberano Jesús.

    OpenAIRE

    Anónimo

    2010-01-01

    Tabla de contenido: 1. Violín primero; 2. Violín segundo; 3. Trompa primera; 4. Trompa segunda; 5. Violonchelo; 6. Órgano; 7. Recitado y aria.Folio 1. Violín primero.Folio 3. Violín segundo.Folio 5. Trompa primera.Folio 6. Trompa segunda.Folio 7. Violonchelo.Folio 9. Órgano.Folio 11. Recitado y aria.Folio 11 y 12. Letra.

  14. Comparison of methods for estimating carbon dioxide storage by Sacramento's urban forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena Aguaron; E. Gregory McPherson

    2012-01-01

    Limited open-grown urban tree species biomass equations have necessitated use of forest-derived equations with diverse conclusions on the accuracy of these equations to estimate urban biomass and carbon storage. Our goal was to determine and explain variability among estimates of CO2 storage from four sets of allometric equations for the same...

  15. Conceptual model of sedimentation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoellhamer, David H.; Wright, Scott A.; Drexler, Judith Z.

    2012-01-01

    Sedimentation in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta builds the Delta landscape, creates benthic and pelagic habitat, and transports sediment-associated contaminants. Here we present a conceptual model of sedimentation that includes submodels for river supply from the watershed to the Delta, regional transport within the Delta and seaward exchange, and local sedimentation in open water and marsh habitats. The model demonstrates feedback loops that affect the Delta ecosystem. Submerged and emergent marsh vegetation act as ecosystem engineers that can create a positive feedback loop by decreasing suspended sediment, increasing water column light, which in turn enables more vegetation. Sea-level rise in open water is partially countered by a negative feedback loop that increases deposition if there is a net decrease in hydrodynamic energy. Manipulation of regional sediment transport is probably the most feasible method to control suspended sediment and thus turbidity. The conceptual model is used to identify information gaps that need to be filled to develop an accurate sediment transport model.

  16. Sacramento Municipal Utility District Geothermal Power Plant, SMUDGEO No. 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-01

    The proposed construction of 72-MW geothermal power plant is discussed. The following aspects are covered: the project as proposed by the utility; the environmental setting; the adverse consequences of the project, any significant environmental effects which cannot be avoided, and any mitigation measures to minimize significant effects; the potential feasible alternatives to the proposed project; the significant unavoidable, irreversible, and long-term environmental impacts; and the Growth Inducing Impacts. (MHR)

  17. 76 FR 61057 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ....29 establishes procedures for the treatment of soil contaminated with gasoline, diesel fuel or jet..., Ventura County Air Pollution Control District, and Placer County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY... Air Pollution Control District (VCAPCD), and Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD...

  18. Reactor control system upgrade for the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center Sacramento, CA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is currently developing a new reactor control system for the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Facility. This new control system not only provides the same functionality as the existing control system in terms of graphic displays of reactor process variables, data archival capability, and manual, automatic, pulse and square-wave modes of operation, but adds to the functionality of the previous control system by incorporating signal processing algorithms for the validation of sensors and automatic calibration and verification of control rod worth curves. With the inclusion of these automated features, the intent of this control system is not to replace the operator but to make the process of controlling the reactor easier and safer for the operator. For instance, an automatic control rod calibration method reduces the amount of time to calibrate control rods from days to minutes, increasing overall reactor utilization. The control rod calibration curve, determined using the automatic calibration system, can be validated anytime after the calibration, as long as the reactor power is between 50W and 500W. This is done by banking all of the rods simultaneously and comparing the tabulated rod worth curves with a reactivity computer estimate. As long as the deviation between the tabulated values and the reactivity estimate is within a prescribed error band, then the system is in calibration. In order to minimize the amount of information displayed, only the essential flux-related data are displayed in graphical format on the control screen. Information from the sensor validation methods is communicated to the operators via messages, which appear in a message window. The messages inform the operators that the actual process variables do not correlate within the allowed uncertainty in the reactor system. These warnings, however, cannot cause the reactor to shutdown automatically. The reactor operator has the ultimate responsibility of using this information to either keep the reactor operating or to shut the reactor down. In addition to new developments in the signal processing realm, the new control system will be migrating from a PC-based computer platform to a Sun Solaris-based computer platform. The proven history of stability and performance of the Sun Sohuis operating system are the main advantages to this change. The I/O system will also be migrating from a PC-based data collection system, which communicates plant data to the control computer using RS-232 connections, to an Ethernet-based I/O system. The Ethernet Data Acquisition System (EDAS) modules from Intelligent Instrumentation, Inc. provide an excellent solution for embedded control of a system using the more universally-accepted data transmission standard of TCP/IP. The modules contain a PROM, which operates all of the functionality of the I/O module, including the TCP/IP network access. Thus the module does not have an internal, sophisticated operating system to provide functionality but rather a small set hard-coded of instructions, which almost eliminates the possibility of the module failing due to software problems. An internal EEPROM can be modified over the Internet to change module configurations. Once configured, the module is contacted just like any other Internet host using TCP/IP socket calls. The main advantage to this architecture is its flexibility, expandability, and high throughput

  19. 77 FR 19689 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ...; Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel, California (formerly the Santa Ysabel Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Santa Ysabel Reservation); Inaja Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Inaja and Cosmit...

  20. 77 FR 19690 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ...; Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians, California; Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel, California (formerly the Santa Ysabel Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Santa Ysabel Reservation); Inaja Band of Diegueno Mission...

  1. 77 FR 19687 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... funerary objects are 1 quartzite flake; 8 potsherds of undetermined ware; 6 buffware potsherds; 11... points; 1 lot of obsidian flakes; 1 lot of wonderstone flakes; 1 lot of quartz flakes; 1 lot of quartzite...

  2. Metals and trace elements in giant garter snakes (Thamnophis gigas) from the Sacramento Valley, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Glenn D; Hothem, Roger L; Bergen, Darrin R; Martin, Lisa L; Taylor, Robert J; Brussee, Brianne E

    2009-04-01

    The giant garter snake (GGS; Thamnophis gigas) is a federally listed threatened species endemic to wetlands of the Central Valley of California. Habitat destruction has been the main factor in the decline of GGS populations, but the effects of contaminants on this species are unknown. To contribute to the recovery of these snakes, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began studies of the life history and habitat use of GGSs in 1995. During a series of investigations conducted from 1995 to the present, specimens of dead GGSs were opportunistically collected from the Colusa National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), the Natomas Basin, and other sites in northern California. Whole snakes were stored frozen for potential future analysis. As funding became available, we analyzed tissues of 23 GGSs to determine the concentrations of total mercury (Hg) and other trace elements in livers and concentrations of Hg in brains and tail clips. Mercury concentrations (microg/g, wet weight) ranged from 0.08 to 1.64 in livers, 0.01 to 0.18 in brains, and 0.02 to 0.32 in tail clips. In livers, geometric mean concentrations (microg/g, dry weight) of arsenic (25.7) and chromium (1.02) were higher than most values from studies of other snakes. Mercury concentrations in tail clips were positively correlated with concentrations in livers and brains, with the most significant correlations occurring at the Natomas Basin and when Natomas and CNWR were combined. Results indicate the value of using tail clips as a nonlethal bioindicator of contaminant concentrations.

  3. Development and Application of an Integrated Health Impacts Assessment Tool for the Sacramento Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Plans crafted by metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) lay out how billions of dollars in transportation investments will be made over a 20 to 30-year time horizon. Federal transportation authorizations require MPOs to identify and track key ind...

  4. Two-Dimensional (2-D) Acoustic Fish Tracking at River Mile 85, Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    2 3 4 5 6 7 Legend 1-Release Site 2-I80/50 3-Freeport 4-Benicia 5-Carquinez 6-Ricmond San Rafael 7-Golden Gate 8-Point Reyes 8 DCC...California Fish Tracking Consortium in Santa Cruz , California. Results RM 90.8 (natural) This study area was approximately 2 miles upstream from

  5. 75 FR 24965 - Mormon Island Auxiliary Dam (MIAD) Modification Project, Sacramento and El Dorado Counties, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... enhance the facility's ability to reduce flood damages posed by hydrologic (flood), seismic (earthquake... conducted engineering studies to identify potential corrective measures for the Folsom Facility to alleviate... reduce seismic (earthquake) risks associated with the downstream foundation. Placement of an overlay on...

  6. 77 FR 65346 - Determination of Attainment for the Sacramento Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine Particle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... docket are listed in the index, some information may be publicly available only at the hard copy location (e.g., copyrighted material), and some may not be publicly available at either location (e.g., CBI...-assured data gathered at established State and Local Air Monitoring Stations (SLAMS) in a nonattainment...

  7. 78 FR 42018 - Determination of Attainment for the Sacramento Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine Particle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... publicly available only at the hard copy location (e.g., copyrighted material, large maps, multi-volume reports), and some may not be publicly available in either location (e.g., Confidential Business... complete, quality-assured data gathered at a State and Local Air Monitoring Station(s) (SLAMS) and entered...

  8. Del rouge delator y la catacresis en el discurso identitario de La esquina es mi corazón, de Pedro Lemebel (In Memoriam)

    OpenAIRE

    Ostria Reinoso, Olga

    2015-01-01

    The following analysis proposes an interpretation of the urban chronicles La esquina es mi corazón written by Pedro Lemebel as an identitarian-literary discourse: poetic proposal that configures, from the particular textual dimension of the urban chronicle, a discourse which is generic in terms of sexual context and is also anti national. Making an attempt to dialogue with previous studies, this work focuses in two aspects not well attended by the critics but that are profoundly meaningful fo...

  9. 'Le Rouge et le Noir': a decline in flavone formation correlates with the rare color of black dahlia (Dahlia variabilis hort.) flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thill, Jana; Miosic, Silvija; Ahmed, Romel; Schlangen, Karin; Muster, Gerlinde; Stich, Karl; Halbwirth, Heidi

    2012-11-23

    More than 20,000 cultivars of garden dahlia (Dahlia variabilis hort.) are available showing flower colour from white, yellow and orange to every imaginable hue of red and purple tones. Thereof, only a handful of cultivars are so-called black dahlias showing distinct black-red tints. Flower colour in dahlia is a result of the accumulation of red anthocyanins, yellow anthochlors (6'-deoxychalcones and 4-deoxyaurones) and colourless flavones and flavonols, which act as copigments. White and yellow coloration occurs only if the pathway leading to anthocyanins is incomplete. Not in all cultivars the same step of the anthocyanin pathway is affected, but the lack of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase activity is frequently observed and this seems to be based on the suppression of the transcription factor DvIVS. The hitherto unknown molecular background for black colour in dahlia is here presented. Black cultivars accumulate high amounts of anthocyanins, but show drastically reduced flavone contents. High activities were observed for all enzymes from the anthocyanin pathway whereas FNS II activity could not be detected or only to a low extent in 13 of 14 cultivars. cDNA clones and genomic clones of FNS II were isolated. Independently from the colour type, heterologous expression of the cDNA clones resulted in functionally active enzymes. FNS II possesses one intron of varying length. Quantitative Real-time PCR showed that FNS II expression in black cultivars is low compared to other cultivars. No differences between black and red cultivars were observed in the expression of transcription factors IVS and possible regulatory genes WDR1, WDR2, MYB1, MYB2, 3RMYB and DEL or the structural genes of the flavonoid pathway. Despite the suppression of FHT expression, flavanone 3-hydroxylase (FHT, synonym F3H) enzyme activity was clearly present in the yellow and white cultivars. An increased accumulation of anthocyanins establishes the black flowering phenotypes. In the majority of black cultivars this is due to decreased flavone accumulation and thus a lack of competition for flavanones as the common precursors of flavone formation and the anthocyanin pathway. The low FNS II activity is reflected by decreased FNS II expression.

  10. 'Le Rouge et le Noir': A decline in flavone formation correlates with the rare color of black dahlia (Dahlia variabilis hort. flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thill Jana

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 20,000 cultivars of garden dahlia (Dahlia variabilis hort. are available showing flower colour from white, yellow and orange to every imaginable hue of red and purple tones. Thereof, only a handful of cultivars are so-called black dahlias showing distinct black-red tints. Flower colour in dahlia is a result of the accumulation of red anthocyanins, yellow anthochlors (6’-deoxychalcones and 4-deoxyaurones and colourless flavones and flavonols, which act as copigments. White and yellow coloration occurs only if the pathway leading to anthocyanins is incomplete. Not in all cultivars the same step of the anthocyanin pathway is affected, but the lack of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase activity is frequently observed and this seems to be based on the suppression of the transcription factor DvIVS. The hitherto unknown molecular background for black colour in dahlia is here presented. Results Black cultivars accumulate high amounts of anthocyanins, but show drastically reduced flavone contents. High activities were observed for all enzymes from the anthocyanin pathway whereas FNS II activity could not be detected or only to a low extent in 13 of 14 cultivars. cDNA clones and genomic clones of FNS II were isolated. Independently from the colour type, heterologous expression of the cDNA clones resulted in functionally active enzymes. FNS II possesses one intron of varying length. Quantitative Real-time PCR showed that FNS II expression in black cultivars is low compared to other cultivars. No differences between black and red cultivars were observed in the expression of transcription factors IVS and possible regulatory genes WDR1, WDR2, MYB1, MYB2, 3RMYB and DEL or the structural genes of the flavonoid pathway. Despite the suppression of FHT expression, flavanone 3-hydroxylase (FHT, synonym F3H enzyme activity was clearly present in the yellow and white cultivars. Conclusions An increased accumulation of anthocyanins establishes the black flowering phenotypes. In the majority of black cultivars this is due to decreased flavone accumulation and thus a lack of competition for flavanones as the common precursors of flavone formation and the anthocyanin pathway. The low FNS II activity is reflected by decreased FNS II expression.

  11. Développement d'un appareil permettant de prédire la maturité du raisin par spectroscopie proche infra-rouge(PIR)

    OpenAIRE

    Geraudie, V.; Roger, J.M.; Ojeda, H.

    2010-01-01

    / La qualité optimale des vendanges dépend étroitement du choix de la date des vendanges. Différents critères de qualité du raisin sont donc suivis au cours de sa maturation. La spectroscopie visible proche infrarouge (Vis-NIR) permet d'analyser rapidement la composition des produits de manière non-destructive. Cet article présente le développement d'un capteur basé sur l'utilisation de la spectroscopie Vis-NIR destiné au suivi de maturité, le Spectron. Il permet de connaître le taux de sucre...

  12. The Chinese red dragon and red capitalism: a thousand opportunities. [Energy in China]. Le dragon Chinois et le capitalisme rouge: les mille opportunites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    On May 11, China has invited foreign investors to assist it in undertaking its oil drilling program, raising output to 200 million tons in the year 2000, as against the 139 million tons planned in 1993. This paper describes China situation in the energy field and gives forecasting on the needs in the year 2000.

  13. Estimating methane gas generation from Devil's swamp landfill using greenhouse gas emission models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Ayodeji Thompson

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) has been a key issue in the study, design, and management of landfills. Landfill gas (LFG) is considered either as a significant source of renewable energy (if extracted and processed accordingly) or significant source of pollution and risk (if not mitigated or processed). A municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill emits a significant amount of methane, a potent GHG. Thus, quantification and mitigation of GHG emissions is an important area of study in engineering and other sciences related to landfill technology and management. The present study will focus on estimating methane generation from Devils swamp landfill (DSLF), a closed landfill in Baton Rouge, LA. The landfill operated for 53 years (1940-1993) and contains both industrial and municipal waste products. Since the Clean Air Act of 1963, landfills are now classified as New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) waste (i.e., waste that will decompose to generate LFG). Currently, the DSLF is being used as source of renewable energy through the "Waste to Energy" program. For this study, to estimate the methane potential in the DSLF, it is important to determine the characteristics and classification of the landfill's wastes. The study uses and compares different GHG modeling tools---LandGEM, a multiphase model, and a simple first-order model---to estimate methane gas emission and compare results with the actual emissions from the DSLF. The sensitivity of the methane generation rate was analyzed by the methane generation models to assess the effects of variables such as initial conditions, specific growth rate, and reaction rate constants. The study concludes that methane (L0) and initial organic concentration in waste (k) are the most important parameters when estimating methane generation using the models.

  14. Periodontal disease is associated with gestational diabetes mellitus: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xu; Elkind-Hirsch, Karen E; Vastardis, Sotirios; Delarosa, Robert L; Pridjian, Gabriella; Buekens, Pierre

    2009-11-01

    Few studies have specifically examined the relationship between periodontal disease and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The objective of this study was to examine whether maternal periodontal disease is associated with GDM. A case-control study was conducted of 53 pregnant women with GDM and 106 pregnant women without GDM at Woman's Hospital, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The periodontal examinations were performed by a calibrated dentist who was masked to the diabetic status of the pregnant women. Periodontitis was defined as the presence of any site with a probing depth (PD) >or=4 mm or a clinical attachment loss (AL) >or=4 mm. The severity of periodontal disease was measured in quartiles of PD and clinical AL. Univariable analysis and multivariable logistic regression were used to examine the relationships between periodontal disease and GDM. The percentage of periodontitis was 77.4% in women with GDM and 57.5% in women without GDM, with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.5 and a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.2 to 5.3. After adjusting for confounding variables of maternal age, parity, race, marital status, education, family income, smoking, alcohol consumption, systemic antibiotics during pregnancy, family history of diabetes, income, dental insurance coverage, and body mass index, the adjusted OR (95% CI) was 2.6 (1.1 to 6.1). The adjusted ORs (95% CIs) of GDM comparing the highest-to-lowest quartiles of PD and clinical AL were 3.8 (1.0 to 14.0) and 4.5 (1.2 to 16.9). This study supports the hypothesis of an association between periodontal disease and GDM.

  15. Exploratory monitoring of air pollutants for mutagenicity activity with the Tradescantia stamen hair system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, L A; Van't Hof, J; Hayes, C G; Burton, R M; de Serres, F J

    1978-12-01

    The Tradescantia genetic system developed by the late Dr. Arnold H. Sparrow for the study of effects of ionizing radiation is applicable to chemical mutagen detection. Early radiobiological data demonstrated that the stamen hairs were sensitive to as little as 0.25 rad of x-rays and that the number of cells showing a phenotypic change in pigmentation from blue to pink plateaus after approximately 21 days of chronic, low-level irradiation. Exposures to the air pollutants SO(2), NO(2), and O(3) and to vapors of mutagens such as 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) and ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) demonstrated the usefulness of the system as a detector of chemical mutagens. A significant number of phenotypic changes was observed following exposures to as little as 0.14 ppm of DBE. The maximum sensitivity of the system is obtained with long-term or chronic exposures because the response increases linearly in proportion to the duration of exposure up to 21 days. To monitor industrial sites for atmospheric mutagens a mobile laboratory was designed to support plant culture in the field. Environment-controlled growth chambers were installed in a trailer so that both ambient air fumigations and concurrent clean-air control exposures could be made. Sites monitored by the mobile laboratory were: Elizabeth, N. J.; Charleston, W. Va.; Birmingham, Ala.; Baton Rouge, La.; Houston, Tex.; Upland, Calif.; Magna, Utah; and Grand Canyon, Ariz. The latter site at Grand Canyon served as a clean air control study. Atmospheric contaminants from petroleum and chemical processing plants generated a significant number of phenotypic pigment changes that were 17 to 31% above the control levels; contaminants from steel and copper smelters, automotive combustion products and photochemical compounds were negative. Chemical analyses are underway to identify the atmospheric mutagens at the sites that showed a positive response.

  16. Public Talks and Science Listens: A Community-Based Participatory Approach to Characterizing Environmental Health Risk Perceptions and Assessing Recovery Needs in the Wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J.; Parras, B.; St. Marie, R.; Subra, W.; Petronella, S.; Gorenstein, J.; Fuchs-Young, R.; Santa, R.K.; Chavarria, A.; Ward, J.; Diamond, P.

    2009-01-01

    In response to the human health threats stemming from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, inter-disciplinary working groups representing P30-funded Centers of the National Institute Environmental Health Sciences were created to assess threats posed by mold, harmful alga blooms, chemical toxicants, and various infectious agents at selected sites throughout the hurricane impact zone. Because of proximity to impacted areas, UTMB NIEHS Center in Environmental Toxicology was charged with coordinating direct community outreach efforts, primarily in south Louisiana. In early October 2005, UTMB/NIEHS Center Community Outreach and Education Core, in collaboration with outreach counterparts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center @ Smithville TX/Center for Research in Environmental Disease sent two groups into southern Louisiana. One group used Lafourche Parish as a base to deliver humanitarian aid and assess local needs for additional supplies during local recovery/reclamation. A second group, ranging through New Iberia, New Orleans, Chalmette, rural Terrebonne, Lafourche and Jefferson Parishes and Baton Rouge met with community environmental leaders, emergency personnel and local citizens to 1) sample public risk perceptions, 2) evaluate the scope and reach of ongoing risk communication efforts, and 3) determine how the NIEHS could best collaborate with local groups in environmental health research and local capacity building efforts. This scoping survey identified specific information gaps limiting efficacy of risk communication, produced a community “wish list” of potential collaborative research projects. The project provided useful heuristics for disaster response and management planning and a platform for future collaborative efforts in environmental health assessment and risk communication with local advocacy groups in south Terrebonne-Lafourche parishes. PMID:20508756

  17. Physical Activity and Sleep Patterns in Hemodialysis Patients in a Suburban Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Schantel; Han, Maggie; Ye, Xiaoling; Zhang, Hanjie; Meyring-Wösten, Anna; Bonner, Marcee; Young, Candace; Thijssen, Stephan; Marsh, Daniel; Kotanko, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) patients are less active than their healthy counterparts. They are often plagued with sleep disorders that affect the quality of their sleep. Our aim was to objectively quantify activity and sleep quality among HD patients in a suburban HD population. Activity and sleep parameters were measured using a commercially available activity tracker in 29 HD patients from Baton Rouge, LA, USA. Patients in the feedback group received their activity and sleep data at each dialysis treatment. In addition, questionnaires were administered at the beginning and end of the study period. Patients were stratified based on activity levels and sleep quality. Patients walked an average of 5,281 steps/day and slept 370.5 min/night. Informing patients about their daily number of steps taken, did not increase activity. Only 3% of the population followed were active, defined as walking more than 10,000 steps per day. Patients walked significantly less on dialysis days compared to the other days of the week. Many of the patients experienced poor sleep quality, with patients in the first shift experiencing the greatest disturbance to their sleep/wake cycle. Patients in a suburban environment walked much less than those in a previously studied urban population. They rarely met the recommended goal of 10,000 steps/day, even on non-dialysis days. Interventions to increase physical activity may target any day of the week, particularly HD days. Prospective, long-term studies are needed to evaluate the use of activity trackers in dialysis patients and their impact on physical activity. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The Louisiana State University waste-to-energy incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This proposed action is for cost-shared construction of an incinerator/steam-generation facility at Louisiana State University under the State Energy Conservation Program (SECP). The SECP, created by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, calls upon DOE to encourage energy conservation, renewable energy, and energy efficiency by providing Federal technical and financial assistance in developing and implementing comprehensive state energy conservation plans and projects. Currently, LSU runs a campus-wide recycling program in order to reduce the quantity of solid waste requiring disposal. This program has removed recyclable paper from the waste stream; however, a considerable quantity of other non-recyclable combustible wastes are produced on campus. Until recently, these wastes were disposed of in the Devil's Swamp landfill (also known as the East Baton Rouge Parish landfill). When this facility reached its capacity, a new landfill was opened a short distance away, and this new site is now used for disposal of the University's non-recyclable wastes. While this new landfill has enough capacity to last for at least 20 years (from 1994), the University has identified the need for a more efficient and effective manner of waste disposal than landfilling. The University also has non-renderable biological and potentially infectious waste materials from the School of Veterinary Medicine and the Student Health Center, primarily the former, whose wastes include animal carcasses and bedding materials. Renderable animal wastes from the School of Veterinary Medicine are sent to a rendering plant. Non-renderable, non-infectious animal wastes currently are disposed of in an existing on-campus incinerator near the School of Veterinary Medicine building

  19. Icosapent ethyl for the treatment of severe hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares H

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hassan Fares,1 Carl J Lavie,2,3 James J DiNicolantonio,4 James H O'Keefe,5 Richard V Milani2 1Department of Hospital Medicine, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA, 2Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinical School, University of Queensland School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 3Department of Preventive Medicine, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge, LA, 4Mid America Heart Institute at Saint Luke's Hospital, Kansas City, MO, 5Mid America Heart Institute, University of Missouri–Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA Abstract: Hypertriglyceridemia is a highly prevalent lipid abnormality and it is associated with atherosclerosis, with a growing body of evidence linking elevated triglycerides (TGs with cardiovascular disease. The current major omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA/docosahexaenoic acid (DHA combination, lowers serum TGs while often increasing levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Icosapent ethyl is an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid with a 96% pure ethyl ester of EPA that has been recently approved for lowering TG levels in patients with very high TGs (≥500 mg/dL, and it does so without significantly affecting serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The potential benefits of omega-3 fatty acid therapy for dyslipidemias will be discussed, including the potential pros and cons of EPA alone versus the more common and readily available EPA/DHA combination therapy. Keywords: triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid

  20. Fate of phosphorus fractions in an adsorptive-filter subject to intra- and inter-event runoff phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Christian; Sansalone, John

    2012-07-30

    In-situ filtration of phosphorus (P) and particulate matter (PM) transported in runoff is increasingly implemented for urban source areas. While monitoring of filter response is commonly based on an event mean of total phosphorus (TP), this study examines the fate of specific P fractions through intra- and inter-event phenomena. This continuous filter monitoring program includes 15 wet weather loadings and the dry weather periods between these events. Aqueous P adsorption and PM-bound P (suspended, settleable and sediment) filtration phenomena are examined for runoff events from a landscaped carpark with biogenic loads in Gainesville (GNV), FL. Filter response is compared to a similar aluminum oxide Al-Ox modified media filter subject to anthropogenic loads from an urban paved source area in Baton Rouge (BTR), LA. Results for the GNV filter indicate that while intra-event settleable, sediment and dissolved P fractions are controlled by the filter, the suspended P fraction remained relatively mobile compared to the other P fractions. P adsorption is primarily influenced by intra-event flow rates, contact times, runoff volume, pH and by the inter-event chemistry of runoff stored in the filter. P effluent partitioning is dominated by the suspended PM as a consequence of effective adsorption by the filter. Inter-event phenomena generate decreasing redox with commensurate increases in alkalinity, conductivity as well as dissolved P as a consequence of re-partitioning. Dissolved P fate suggests that filters should be designed and managed to remain aerobic between wet weather events. For effective separation of suspended P and PM fractions by passive filters with low driving head, sustainability of performance, including head loss {<3 kPa}, requires upstream volumetric attenuation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A new method for estimating carbon dioxide emissions from transportation at fine spatial scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu Yuqin [School of Geographical Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Lam, Nina S N; Reams, Margaret, E-mail: gis_syq@126.com, E-mail: nlam@lsu.edu, E-mail: mreams@lsu.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, 70803 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Detailed estimates of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions at fine spatial scales are useful to both modelers and decision makers who are faced with the problem of global warming and climate change. Globally, transport related emissions of carbon dioxide are growing. This letter presents a new method based on the volume-preserving principle in the areal interpolation literature to disaggregate transportation-related CO{sub 2} emission estimates from the county-level scale to a 1 km{sup 2} grid scale. The proposed volume-preserving interpolation (VPI) method, together with the distance-decay principle, were used to derive emission weights for each grid based on its proximity to highways, roads, railroads, waterways, and airports. The total CO{sub 2} emission value summed from the grids within a county is made to be equal to the original county-level estimate, thus enforcing the volume-preserving property. The method was applied to downscale the transportation-related CO{sub 2} emission values by county (i.e. parish) for the state of Louisiana into 1 km{sup 2} grids. The results reveal a more realistic spatial pattern of CO{sub 2} emission from transportation, which can be used to identify the emission 'hot spots'. Of the four highest transportation-related CO{sub 2} emission hotspots in Louisiana, high-emission grids literally covered the entire East Baton Rouge Parish and Orleans Parish, whereas CO{sub 2} emission in Jefferson Parish (New Orleans suburb) and Caddo Parish (city of Shreveport) were more unevenly distributed. We argue that the new method is sound in principle, flexible in practice, and the resultant estimates are more accurate than previous gridding approaches.

  2. Public Talks and Science Listens: A Community-Based Participatory Approach to Characterizing Environmental Health Risk Perceptions and Assessing Recovery needs in the Wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sullivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to the human health threats stemming from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, inter-disciplinary working groups representing P30-funded Centers of the National Institute Environmental Health Sciences were created to assess threats posed by mold, harmful alga blooms, chemical toxicants, and various infectious agents at selected sites throughout the hurricane impact zone. Because of proximity to impacted areas, UTMB NIEHS Center in Environmental Toxicology was charged with coordinating direct community outreach efforts, primarily in south Louisiana. In early October 2005, UTMB/NIEHS Center Community Outreach and Education Core, in collaboration with outreach counterparts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center @ Smithville TX/Center for Research in Environmental Disease sent two groups into southern Louisiana. One group used Lafourche Parish as a base to deliver humanitarian aid and assess local needs for additional supplies during local recovery/reclamation. A second group, ranging through New Iberia, New Orleans, Chalmette, rural Terrebonne, Lafourche and Jefferson Parishes and Baton Rouge met with community environmental leaders, emergency personnel and local citizens to 1 sample public risk perceptions, 2 evaluate the scope and reach of ongoing risk communication efforts, and 3 determine how the NIEHS could best collaborate with local groups in environmental health research and local capacity building efforts. This scoping survey identified specific information gaps limiting efficacy of risk communication, produced a community “wish list” of potential collaborative research projects. The project provided useful heuristics for disaster response and management planning and a platform for future collaborative efforts in environmental health assessment and risk communication with local advocacy groups in south Terrebonne-Lafourche parishes.

  3. Spatial confidentiality and GIS: re-engineering mortality locations from published maps about Hurricane Katrina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitner Michael

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographic Information Systems (GIS can provide valuable insight into patterns of human activity. Online spatial display applications, such as Google Earth, can democratise this information by disseminating it to the general public. Although this is a generally positive advance for society, there is a legitimate concern involving the disclosure of confidential information through spatial display. Although guidelines exist for aggregated data, little has been written concerning the display of point level information. The concern is that a map containing points representing cases of cancer or an infectious disease, could be re-engineered back to identify an actual residence. This risk is investigated using point mortality locations from Hurricane Katrina re-engineered from a map published in the Baton Rouge Advocate newspaper, and a field team validating these residences using search and rescue building markings. Results We show that the residence of an individual, visualized as a generalized point covering approximately one and half city blocks on a map, can be re-engineered back to identify the actual house location, or at least a close neighbour, even if the map contains little spatial reference information. The degree of re-engineering success is also shown to depend on the urban characteristic of the neighborhood. Conclusion The results in this paper suggest a need to re-evaluate current guidelines for the display of point (address level data. Examples of other point maps displaying health data extracted from the academic literature are presented where a similar re-engineering approach might cause concern with respect to violating confidentiality. More research is also needed into the role urban structure plays in the accuracy of re-engineering. We suggest that health and spatial scientists should be proactive and suggest a series of point level spatial confidentiality guidelines before governmental decisions are made

  4. Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens sp. nov., a chlorinated-alkane-dehalogenating bacterium isolated from groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Kimberly S; Nobre, M Fernanda; da Costa, Milton S; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2013-04-01

    Two strictly anaerobic bacterial strains, designated IP3-3(T) and SBP-1, were isolated from groundwater contaminated by chlorinated alkanes and alkenes at a Superfund Site located near Baton Rouge, Louisiana (USA). Both strains reductively dehalogenate a variety of polychlorinated aliphatic alkanes, including 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane and 1,2,3-trichloropropane, when provided with hydrogen as the electron donor. To clarify their taxonomic position, strains IP3-3(T) and SBP-1 were characterized using a polyphasic approach. Both IP3-3(T) and SBP-1 are mesophilic, non-spore-forming, non-motile and Gram-stain-negative. Cells of both strains are irregular cocci with diameters of 0.4-1.1 µm. Both are resistant to ampicillin and vancomycin. The genomic DNA G+C contents of strains IP3-3(T) and SBP-1 are 55.5±0.4 and 56.2±0.2 mol% (HPLC), respectively. Major cellular fatty acids include C18 : 1ω9c, C16 : 0, C14 : 0 and C16 : 1ω9c. 16S rRNA gene sequence based phylogenetic analyses indicated that the strains cluster within the phylum Chloroflexi most closely related to but distinct from the species Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens (96.2 % pairwise similarity) and Dehalococcoides mccartyi (90.6 % pairwise similarity). Physiological and chemotaxonomic traits as well as phylogenetic analysis support the conclusion that these strains represent a novel species within the genus Dehalogenimonas for which the name Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IP3-3(T) ( = JCM 17062(T) = NRRL B-59545(T)).

  5. The TETRA-II Experiment to Observe Terrestrial Gamma Flashes at Ground Level - Analysis of Nearby Thunderstorm Activity and Comparison with Lightning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.; Adams, C.; Cherry, M. L.; Al-Nussirat, S.; Bai, S.; Banadaki, Y.; Bitzer, P. M.; Hoffman, J.; Khosravi, E.; Legault, M.; Orang, M.; Pleshinger, D. J.; Rodriguez, R.; Trepanier, J. C.; Sunda-Meya, A.; Zimmer, N.

    2017-12-01

    Terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) are millisecond bursts of high-energy electrons propagated within the atmosphere. An upgraded version of the TGF and Energetic Thunderstorm Rooftop Array (TETRA-II) consists of an array of BGO scintillators to detect TGFs from thunderstorms at ground-level in four locations: the campus of Louisiana State University (LSU) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana; the campus of the University of Puerto Rico at Utuado, Puerto Rico, in conjunction with the already existing Puerto Rico Lightning Detection Network (PRLDN) of radio receivers; the Centro Nacional de Metrologia de Panama (CENAMEP) in Panama City, Panama; and the Severe Weather Institute and Radar & Lightning Laboratories in Huntsville, Alabama. The original TETRA-I array of NaI scintillators at LSU detected 37 millisecond-scale bursts of gamma-rays at energies of 50 keV-2 MeV associated with nearby (< 8 km) thunderstorms. TETRA-II began operation in May 2016 and now has approximately an order of magnitude greater sensitivity to individual events than TETRA-I. The ability to observe ground-level bursts from close to the source allows an analysis of the storm cells producing these events. An analysis of storms associated with TETRA II gamma-ray events is provided using NEXRAD Level II base-reflectivity scans to determine specific storm features before, during, and after the occurrence of each event. Louisiana events appear to occur within most major thunderstorm types, in particular as the cell is transitioning into the dissipating stage of evolution.

  6. The influence of model resolution on ozone in industrial volatile organic compound plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Barron H; Jeffries, Harvey E; Kim, Byeong-Uk; Vizuete, William G

    2010-09-01

    Regions with concentrated petrochemical industrial activity (e.g., Houston or Baton Rouge) frequently experience large, localized releases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Aircraft measurements suggest these released VOCs create plumes with ozone (O3) production rates 2-5 times higher than typical urban conditions. Modeling studies found that simulating high O3 productions requires superfine (1-km) horizontal grid cell size. Compared with fine modeling (4-kmin), the superfine resolution increases the peak O3 concentration by as much as 46%. To understand this drastic O3 change, this study quantifies model processes for O3 and "odd oxygen" (Ox) in both resolutions. For the entire plume, the superfine resolution increases the maximum O3 concentration 3% but only decreases the maximum Ox concentration 0.2%. The two grid sizes produce approximately equal Ox mass but by different reaction pathways. Derived sensitivity to oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and VOC emissions suggests resolution-specific sensitivity to NOx and VOC emissions. Different sensitivity to emissions will result in different O3 responses to subsequently encountered emissions (within the city or downwind). Sensitivity of O3 to emission changes also results in different simulated O3 responses to the same control strategies. Sensitivity of O3 to NOx and VOC emission changes is attributed to finer resolved Eulerian grid and finer resolved NOx emissions. Urban NOx concentration gradients are often caused by roadway mobile sources that would not typically be addressed with Plume-in-Grid models. This study shows that grid cell size (an artifact of modeling) influences simulated control strategies and could bias regulatory decisions. Understanding the dynamics of VOC plume dependence on grid size is the first step toward providing more detailed guidance for resolution. These results underscore VOC and NOx resolution interdependencies best addressed by finer resolution. On the basis of these results, the

  7. Transient Flow through an Unsaturated Levee Embankment during the 2011 Mississippi River Flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, N.; Stark, T.; Vahedifard, F.; Cadigan, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Mississippi River and corresponding tributaries drain approximately 3.23 million km2 (1.25 million mi2) or the equivalent of 41% of the contiguous United States. Approximately 2,600 km ( 1,600 miles) of earthen levees presently protect major urban cities and agricultural land against the periodic Mississippi River floods within the Lower Mississippi River Valley. The 2011 flood also severely stressed the levees and highlighted the need to evaluate the behavior of levee embankments during high water levels. The performance of earthen levees is complex because of the uncertainties in construction materials, antecedent moisture contents, hydraulic properties, and lack of field monitoring. In particular, calibration of unsaturated and saturated soil properties of levee embankment and foundation layers along with the evaluation of phreatic surface during high river stage is lacking. Due to the formation of sand boils at the Duncan Point Levee in Baton Rouge, LA during the 2011 flood event, a reconnaissance survey was conducted to collect pore-water pressures in the sand foundation using piezometers and identifying the phreatic surface at the peak river level. Transient seepage analyses were performed to calibrate the foundation and levee embankment material properties using field data collected. With this calibrated levee model, numerical experiments were conducted to characterize the effects of rainfall intensity and duration, progression of phreatic surface, and seasonal climate variability prior to floods on the performance of the levee embankment. For example, elevated phreatic surface from river floods are maintained for several months and can be compounded with rainfall to lead to slope instability.

  8. Framing Honors Physical Geology around Critical Thinking and Communication Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The honors section of freshman geology at LSU has 20-35 highly motivated students with ACT scores above 30. They are usually non-majors and have had no exposure to geosciences in high school. Teaching geology in Louisiana is challenging because there are virtually no rocks exposed at the surface and students with creationist beliefs are common. In addition to exams, this course requires a series of projects: plate reconstruction, minerals in the home, a metaphor for geologic time, volcano research paper, group project on volcanoes, water resources, and a comparison essay on Hurricane Katrina and the 1927 flood of the Mississippi river. The purpose of the projects is to promote critical thinking and communication skills as well as allow students to explore in greater depth topics relevant to their every day lives such as hurricanes. Critical thinking skills emphasized are interrelated processes and systems, variable temporal/spatial scales, and analysis of controversial topics such as the age of the Earth. This course is certified by LSU's Communication across the Curriculum (CxC) program as communication intensive in written and visual communication. CxC certification requires that 40% of grading depend on communication activities. Written communication exercises focus on organization, audience, incorporation and coordination of visual elements, and proper citation of sources. Visual communication exercises include working with maps, charts and graphs, and a group project where they create a poster and/or stand alone slide presentation on volcanoes geared to a middle school audience. Topics such as origin and quality of tap water, how much copper ore is used to build their home, and local geoharzards such as the Baton Rouge Fault generate a higher interest level and higher retention of information. Preliminary assessment is positive including improved exam results, higher student evaluations, recruitment of geology majors, and anecdotal evidence of long term

  9. Public Health Data in Action: An Analysis of Using Louisiana Vital Statistics for Quality Improvement and Payment Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilack, Valery A; Gee, Rebekah E; Berthelot, Danielle P; Gurvich, Rebecca; Muri, Janet H

    2017-05-01

    Introduction In 2012, the Louisiana (LA) Department of Health and Hospitals revised the LA birth certificate to include medical reasons for births before 39 completed weeks' gestation. We compared the completeness and validity of these data with hospital discharge records. Methods For births occurring 4/1/2012-9/30/2012 at Woman's Hospital of Baton Rouge, we linked maternal delivery and newborn birth data collected through the National Perinatal Information Center with LA birth certificates. Among early term births (37-38 completed weeks' gestation), we quantified the reasons for early delivery listed on the birth certificate and compared them with ICD-9-CM codes from Woman's discharge data. Results Among 4353 birth certificates indicating delivery at Woman's Hospital, we matched 99.8% to corresponding Woman's administrative data. Among 1293 early term singleton births, the most common reasons for early delivery listed on the birth certificate were spontaneous active labor (57.5%), gestational hypertensive disorders (15.3%), gestational diabetes (8.7%), and premature rupture of membranes (8.1%). Only 2.7% of births indicated "other reason" as the only reason for early delivery. Most reasons for early delivery had >80% correspondence with ICD-9-CM codes. Lower correspondence (35 and 72%, respectively) was observed for premature rupture of membranes and abnormal heart rate or fetal distress. Discussion There was near-perfect ability to match LA birth certificates with Woman's Hospital records, and the agreement between reasons for early delivery on the birth certificate and ICD-9-CM codes was high. A benchmark of 2.7% can be used as an attainable frequency of "other reason" for early delivery reported by hospitals. Louisiana implemented an effective mechanism to identify and explain early deliveries using vital records.

  10. Micromachining. CERN Courier, Jul-Aug 1995, v. 35(5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Martin

    1995-01-01

    Full text: As well as making microcircuit components, X-ray lithography can also be used to make very small mechanical parts, either by using directly the exposed and developed photoresist, or as a mould to produce the component in another material such as ceramic or metal. In this revolutionary technology, metal components are made via the LIGA (Lithographic Galvanoformung und Abformung) technique in which the exposed and developed photoresist is coated with a conducting material and then electroplated, after which the resist is stripped away. In addition to fine size and precision resolution, X-rays offer the advantage of deep penetration and small scattering through the resist, so that patterns may be up to a millimetre deep, with very accurate straightness in directions parallel to the beam. Micromachining via LIGA was developed at KfK Karlsruhe; commercialization and further development is being vigorously pursued by the Institut fur Mikrotechnik in Mainz and by Microparts GmbH in Karlsruhe. Significant developments have been made at the Synchrotron Radiation Centre in Madison, Wisconsin, with new programmes start-ing at SRRC (Taiwan), CAMD (Baton Rouge, Louisiana), and LURE (Paris). There is now an active European Special Interest Group for LIGA. Commercially manufactured micromachines are starting to be used in sensors and connectors. The ability to integrate microdevices with microelectronics raises many interesting possibilities for the future, notably in medicine and for intelligent sensors. In all cases, however, widespread adoption will be governed by the ability to mass-produce cheaply, requiring high volume production. The high intensities of synchrotron radiation will assist in achieving these large throughputs

  11. Diagnosis, prevention, and management of canine hip dysplasia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schachner ER

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Emma R Schachner, Mandi J Lopez Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA Abstract: Canine hip dysplasia (CHD is a polygenic and multifactorial developmental disorder characterized by coxofemoral (hip joint laxity, degeneration, and osteoarthritis (OA. Current diagnostic techniques are largely subjective measures of joint conformation performed at different stages of development. Recently, measures on three-dimensional images generated from computed tomography scans predicted the development of OA associated with CHD. Continued refinement of similar imaging methods may improve diagnostic imaging techniques to identify dogs predisposed to degenerative hip joint changes. By current consensus, joint changes consistent with CHD are influenced by genetic predisposition as well as environmental and biomechanical factors; however, despite decades of work, the relative contributions of each to the development and extent of CHD signs remain elusive. Similarly, despite considerable effort to decipher the genetic underpinnings of CHD for selective breeding programs, relevant genetic loci remain equivocal. As such, prevention of CHD within domestic canine populations is marginally successful. Conservative management is often employed to manage signs of CHD, with lifelong maintenance of body mass as one of the most promising methods. Surgical intervention is often employed to prevent joint changes or restore joint function, but there are no gold standards for either goal. To date, all CHD phenotypes are considered as a single entity in spite of recognized differences in expression and response to environmental conditions and treatment. Identification of distinct CHD phenotypes and targeting evidence-based conservative and invasive treatments for each may significantly advance prevention and management of a prevalent, debilitating condition in canine companions. Keywords: canine

  12. Postpartum mental health after Hurricane Katrina: A cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harville Emily W

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural disaster is often a cause of psychopathology, and women are vulnerable to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and depression. Depression is also common after a woman gives birth. However, no research has addressed postpartum women's mental health after natural disaster. Methods Interviews were conducted in 2006–2007 with women who had been pregnant during or shortly after Hurricane Katrina. 292 New Orleans and Baton Rouge women were interviewed at delivery and 2 months postpartum. Depression was assessed using the Edinburgh Depression Scale and PTSD using the Post-Traumatic Stress Checklist. Women were asked about their experience of the hurricane with questions addressing threat, illness, loss, and damage. Chi-square tests and log-binomial/Poisson models were used to calculate associations and relative risks (RR. Results Black women and women with less education were more likely to have had a serious experience of the hurricane. 18% of the sample met the criteria for depression and 13% for PTSD at two months postpartum. Feeling that one's life was in danger was associated with depression and PTSD, as were injury to a family member and severe impact on property. Overall, two or more severe experiences of the storm was associated with an increased risk for both depression (relative risk (RR 1.77, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.08–2.89 and PTSD (RR 3.68, 95% CI 1.80–7.52. Conclusion Postpartum women who experience natural disaster severely are at increased risk for mental health problems, but overall rates of depression and PTSD do not seem to be higher than in studies of the general population.

  13. St. James marine terminal facility description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns and operates a marine terminal on the west bank of the Mississippi River at St. James, Louisiana. The St. James facility was constructed by the Department to provide marine services associated with the fill and drawdown of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) crude oil storage facilities located at Bayou Choctaw and Weeks Island, Louisiana. Although strategic to the mission of the SPR in the event of a national emergency, the St. James terminal is situated such that it has a high potential to also serve the commercial industry`s needs for crude oil terminalling and storage. The St. James terminal is located approximately 45 miles west of New Orleans and 30 miles southeast of Baton Rouge, and approximately 160 miles upstream from the mouth of the Mississippi River. Construction of the St. James terminal was initiated in 1978 and was completed in 1980. Since then, the terminal has received and transferred over 125 million barrels of crude oil to the SPR sites for storage. For crude oil distribution, the St. James terminal was connected to the neighboring LOCAP terminal by a 0.1 mile 36-inch pipeline in 1981 and to the Capline terminal by a 0.5 mile 30-inch pipeline in 1988. The terminal also has a 30-inch pipeline connection to the Koch oil terminal which was used for initial fill purposes; however, this pipeline has been disconnected and is currently inactive. A complete description of the St. James terminal facilities, operational capabilities, operational certifications, and future Government requirements are presented in Sections 2, 3, 4, and 5 respectively.

  14. An Artist's Journey Through Endangered Lands; conveying hydrological changes and land loss informed and inspired by Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varisco, M. M.

    2017-12-01

    How do we live with nature? This simple question began a 10 year art-science journey into the dynamic and endangered wetlands of southeast Louisiana and its accelerated coastal decline. Since the 1930s, nearly 1,900 square miles of Louisiana's coast have been lost. How might artworks, informed by science, convey the seriousness and urgency of this loss to a wider public? Artist Michel Varisco engaged in dialogue with environmental scientist Doug Meffert and Dan Etheridge (of Meffert + Etheridge and The Center for Bioenvironmental Research at Tulane and Xavier) about the hydrological changes which have accelerated or mitigated Louisiana's land losses. She was also inspired by the unique underwater studies of biologist Suzanne Fredericq on pollutants in the Gulf from the BP oil spill and of marine ecologist Nancy Rabalais who assesses hypoxia dynamics and their impact on "dead zones." The art work that emerged includes Shifting and Fluid States, as well as current projects Below Sea Level and Turning: prayer wheels for the Mississippi River, an art commission awarded by the City of New Orleans on view during Prospect.4 Art Biennial and AGU. Shifting is a series of large-scale photos shot from the air and water that observe the dynamic movement of the Louisiana coastline over the course of a short but powerful geologic timeline and explores the consequences of human altercations to those lands and waters via land loss and sea level rise. Turning is based on the work of Kate Orff's maps from Petrochemical America and the 1944 maps of Harold Fisk. Fisk pioneered an understanding of alluvial and sedimentological processes of the Mississippi Valley, while Orff's maps describe the Mississippi River from Baton Rouge to New Orleans during three different eras: the wild un-leveed land building era; the plantation, slavery era; and the petrochemical era of present day land loss. Shifting has been exhibited around the world and Turning has already been seen by 50,000 people.

  15. The Louisiana State University waste-to-energy incinerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-26

    This proposed action is for cost-shared construction of an incinerator/steam-generation facility at Louisiana State University under the State Energy Conservation Program (SECP). The SECP, created by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, calls upon DOE to encourage energy conservation, renewable energy, and energy efficiency by providing Federal technical and financial assistance in developing and implementing comprehensive state energy conservation plans and projects. Currently, LSU runs a campus-wide recycling program in order to reduce the quantity of solid waste requiring disposal. This program has removed recyclable paper from the waste stream; however, a considerable quantity of other non-recyclable combustible wastes are produced on campus. Until recently, these wastes were disposed of in the Devil`s Swamp landfill (also known as the East Baton Rouge Parish landfill). When this facility reached its capacity, a new landfill was opened a short distance away, and this new site is now used for disposal of the University`s non-recyclable wastes. While this new landfill has enough capacity to last for at least 20 years (from 1994), the University has identified the need for a more efficient and effective manner of waste disposal than landfilling. The University also has non-renderable biological and potentially infectious waste materials from the School of Veterinary Medicine and the Student Health Center, primarily the former, whose wastes include animal carcasses and bedding materials. Renderable animal wastes from the School of Veterinary Medicine are sent to a rendering plant. Non-renderable, non-infectious animal wastes currently are disposed of in an existing on-campus incinerator near the School of Veterinary Medicine building.

  16. Teaching the Next Generation of Scientists and Engineers the NASA Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Pamela W.; Benfield, Michael P. J.; Justice, Stefanie H.

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated Product Team (IPT) program, led by The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), is a multidisciplinary, multi-university, multi-level program whose goal is to provide opportunities for high school and undergraduate scientists and engineers to translate stakeholder needs and requirements into viable engineering design solutions via a distributed multidisciplinary team environment. The current program supports three projects. The core of the program is the two-semester senior design experience where science, engineering, and liberal arts undergraduate students from UAH, the College of Charleston, Southern University at Baton Rouge, and Ecole Suprieure des Techniques Aronautiques et de Construction Automobile (ESTACA) in Paris, France form multidisciplinary competitive teams to develop system concepts of interest to the local aerospace community. External review boards form to provide guidance and feedback throughout the semester and to ultimately choose a winner from the competing teams. The other two projects, the Innovative Student Project for the Increased Recruitment of Engineering and Science Students (InSPIRESS) Level I and Level II focus exclusively on high school students. InSPIRESS Level I allows high schools to develop a payload to be accommodated on the system being developed by senior design experience teams. InSPIRESS Level II provides local high school students first-hand experience in the senior design experience by allowing them to develop a subsystem or component of the UAH-led system over the two semesters. This program provides a model for NASA centers to engage the local community to become more involved in design projects.

  17. Cancer incidence in the industrial corridor: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, V W; Andrews, P A; Wu, X C; Correa, C N; Fontham, E T

    1998-04-01

    Because of the high density of industries along the Lower Mississippi River, there is a concern about adverse impact on health, including cancer, among residents in these parishes. This study provides an update of cancer incidence in the Industrial Corridor for the period 1989-93. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates were calculated for the seven-parish study area from Baton Rouge down to, but not including, New Orleans. Rates were also computed for the entire state of Louisiana and for the combined Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program. Cancer incidence rates for the Industrial Corridor are either similar to, or lower than, the combined SEER rates for most of the common cancers as well as for rare tumors. The only two exceptions are lung cancer in white males and kidney cancer in white females that are significantly elevated when compared to the SEER averages. Significantly lower rates are found among white males for cancers of kidney, brain, and nervous system, and melanoma; among black males, cancers of all sites combined, oral cavity, stomach, rectum, and prostate, Hodgkin's disease, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; among white females, cancers of all sites combined, cervix, uterine corpus, ovary, bladder, and melanoma; and among black females, cancers of all sites combined, oral cavity, lung, breast, ovary, and melanoma. The persistent excess of lung cancer has led to the development of a multi-agency project to evaluate the impact of potential environmental exposures, genetic susceptibility, and their interactions on lung cancer risk. The findings also confirm the urgent need to include and strengthen tobacco prevention and cessation programs in our cancer control activities.

  18. Smartphone applications to aid weight loss and management: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutton EF

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth F Sutton, Leanne M Redman Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA Abstract: The development and dissemination of smart devices has cultivated a global environment of hyperconnectivity and increased our access to information. The paralleled launch and success of the Mobile Health industry has created a market of commercially available applications or “apps” along with tools or sensors, which allow the user to receive and collect personal health information. Apps and accompanying tools now allow an individual to “self-digitize” and, pertaining to weight management, monitor their body weight, caloric intake, physical activity, and more. These products possess the ability to improve the scalability of traditional in-person weight management services considering their near ubiquity, affordability, and capability to deliver information directly and personally to the user. However, similar to the dietary supplement market, the anecdotal value of these products has driven their popularity and acceptance by the general public without requirement of scientific validation or, in the area of weight management or diet/exercise, validation of the safety and efficacy by the Food and Drug Administration prior to market launch. By conducting a literature and clinical trial search, we found remarkably few active, completed, or published studies testing the efficacy of smart device applications using randomized controlled trials. Research efforts must be focused on illuminating the efficacy of behavioral interventions and remote self-monitoring for weight loss/maintenance treatment with true, randomized controlled trials. Keywords: smartphone, mobile phone, application, app, weight, weight loss, weight maintenance

  19. Proceedings, Annual Meeting, Aquatic Plant Control Research Program (17th) Held at Sacramento, California on 16-18 November 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    productivity, diversity, and distribution of plants. During a period of academic parallel evolution , the two disciplines have independently developed...34Effectiveness of Submersed Angiosperm - Epiphyte Complexes on Exchange of Nutrients and Organic Carbon in Littoral Systems; II, Dissolved Organic

  20. Can Federal Funding Create Bicycle Friendly Cities? A Comparative Study of Bicycle Planning in Sacramento and Amsterdam

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Bicycling in the United States has traditionally been seen as a means for recreation whereas in countries like the Netherlands bicycling is viewed and utilized as an integral part of the transportation system. With increasing health and environmental concerns in the United States it is important to consider transportation alternatives. The passage of ISTEA in 1991 has allowed federal funds to be used for bicycle projects. While availability of these funds can be seen as a step in the right di...