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Sample records for baton rouge sacramento

  1. Energy Savings Calculations for Heat Island Reduction Strategies in Baton Rouge, Sacramento and Salt Lake City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.

    2000-03-01

    In 1997, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ''Heat Island Reduction Initiative'', to quantify the potential benefits of Heat Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., shade trees, reflective roofs, reflective pavements and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling energy use in buildings, lower the ambient air temperature and improve urban air quality in cities, and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Under this initiative, the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP) was created with the objective to investigate the potential of HIR strategies in residential and commercial buildings in three initial UHIPP cities: Baton Rouge, Sacramento and Salt Lake City. This paper summarizes our efforts to calculate the annual energy savings, peak power avoidance and annual C02 reduction of HIR strategies in the three initial cities. In this analysis, we focused on three building types that offer most savings potential: single-family residence, office and retail store. Each building type was characterized in detail by old or new construction and with a gas furnace or an electric heat pump. We defined prototypical building characteristics for each building type and simulated the impact of HIR strategies on building cooling and heating energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.IE model. Our simulations included the impact of (1) strategically-placed shade trees near buildings [direct effect], (2) use of high-albedo roofing material on building [direct effect], (3) combined strategies I and 2 [direct effect], (4) urban reforestation with high-albedo pavements and building surfaces [indirect effect] and (5) combined strategies 1, 2 and 4 [direct and indirect effects]. We then estimated the total roof area of air-conditioned buildings in each city using readily obtainable data to calculate the metropolitan-wide impact of HIR strategies. The results show, that in Baton Rouge, potential annual energy savings of $15M could be realized by

  2. Lots, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This dataset depicts the polygon boundaries of the parcels of land within the Parish of East Baton Rouge, with the exception of those parcels that fall within the...

  3. Parish Boundary, 2004, East Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This dataset depicts polygon boundary of East Baton Rouge Parish. This dataset was derived from many data sources such as aerial photographs and mylars and conveys...

  4. Hydrography, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The Hydrography layer is an area geometry depicting the various water features that include the rivers, streams, creeks, lakes, etc of East Baton Rouge Parish.

  5. Zoning, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the zoning boundaries of the East Baton Rouge Parish of the State of Louisiana. Zoning can be defined as the range of...

  6. City Limits, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the polygon boundaries of the incorporated city limits of Baton Rouge, Baker, and Zachary within East Baton Rouge...

  7. Energy savings for heat-island reduction strategies in Chicago and Houston (including updates for Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City); FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ''Heat Island Reduction Initiative'' to quantify the potential benefits of Heat-Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., shade trees, reflective roofs, reflective pavements and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling-energy use in buildings, lower the ambient air temperature and improve urban air quality in cities, and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Under this initiative, the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP) was created with the objective of investigating the potential of HIR strategies in residential and commercial buildings in three initial UHIPP cities: Baton Rouge, LA; Sacramento, CA; and Salt Lake City, UT. Later two other cities, Chicago, IL and Houston, TX were added to the UHIPP. In an earlier report we summarized our efforts to calculate the annual energy savings, peak power avoidance, and annual CO2 reduction obtainable from the introduction of HIR strategies in the initial three cities. This report summarizes the results of our study for Chicago and Houston. In this analysis, we focused on three building types that offer the highest potential savings: single-family residence, office and retail store. Each building type was characterized in detail by vintage and system type (i.e., old and new building constructions, and gas and electric heat). We used the prototypical building characteristics developed earlier for each building type and simulated the impact of HIR strategies on building cooling- and heating-energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.1E model. Our simulations included the impact of (1) strategically-placed shade trees near buildings[direct effect], (2) use of high-albedo roofing material on the building[direct effect], (3) urban reforestation with high-albedo pavements and building surfaces[indirect effect] and (4) combined strategies 1, 2, and 3[direct and indirect effects]. We then estimated the total roof area of air-conditioned buildings in each

  8. Planning Districts, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the polygon boundaries of the 16 Planning Districts of the East Baton Rouge Parish of the State of Louisiana. The...

  9. Metro Council Districts, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the polygon boundaries of the twelve (12) Metropolitan Council Districts within the Parish of East Baton Rouge. The...

  10. East Baton Rouge, School Desegregation, and White Flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Stephen J.; Bankston, Carl L., III

    2001-01-01

    Used archival, interview, and demographic data to conduct a historical analysis of school desegregation and its consequences in East Baton Rouge, Louisiana from 1965 through 1997. Findings show the massive white flight to nonpublic schools and adjoining suburban districts and the failure of efforts to reverse this trend. (SLD)

  11. District Composite Report: West Baton Rouge Parish. 2002-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Up to six years of data (the current year and the five previous years where available) are presented in Louisiana's District Composite Reports. This report is specific to West Baton Rouge Parish. Each year, this report is updated by adding the most current year's data and deleting the data that are more than six years old. Incorporating…

  12. Teaching Matters: Promoting Quality Instruction in East Baton Rouge Parish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This report describes challenges facing the East Baton Rouge Parish School System, Louisiana, highlighting teacher turnover and teacher preparation and support. Findings are based on national, state, and local studies that investigated the status of teachers and teaching in the community (preparation, recruitment, retention, certification,…

  13. African American Students in East Baton Rouge Parish: How Have They Fared in Desegregated Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossey, Richard

    Three generations of children have passed through the Baton Rouge (Louisiana) school system since the "Brown" decision (1954) and one generation since the federal court's 1981 desegregation order. The impact of school desegregation on African American children was studied in the East Baton Rouge School District. For the student body as a whole,…

  14. East Baton Rouge Fire Stations, UTM15 NAD83, LAGIC (2002) [ebr_fire_stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This dataset consists of twenty-nine (29) geocoded points representing fire stations in East Baton Rouge parish, Louisiana. Thirty (30) fire station, disctrict, and...

  15. West Nile virus surveillance in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiser, Raquel M; Mackay, Andrew J; Roy, Alma; Yates, Mathew M; Vaeth, Randy H; Faget, Guy M; Folsom, Alex E; Augustine, William F; Wells, Roderick A; Perich, Michael J

    2007-03-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was detected for the first time in Louisiana in the fall of 2001. Surveillance data collected from East Baton Rouge Parish in 2002 were examined to establish baseline data on WNV activity, to support the current design of disease surveillance programs, and to target vector control efforts in the parish. The first indications of WNV activity were from a dead Northern Cardinal collected in February and from a live male cardinal sampled on 14 March. In mosquito pools, WNV was first detected on June 11. The onset of the first human case and the first detection of WNV in sentinel chickens occurred concurrently on June 24. The number of reported human cases and minimum infection rates in mosquitoes peaked in July. WNV prevalence in wild birds increased in late August and was highest in December. WNV-positive wild birds and mosquito pools were detected an average of 31 and 59 days in advance of the onset date of reported human cases, respectively, within 5 km of the residence of a human case. Antibodies to WNV were detected in sera from 7 (Northern Cardinal, House Sparrow, Northern Mockingbird, Blue Jay, Hermit Thrush, Yellow-rumped Warbler, and White-throated Sparrow) of the 42 wild bird species tested. Wild bird serology indicated WNV activity during the winter. Out of 18 mosquito species tested, the only species found positive for WNV was Culex quinquefasciatus, a result suggesting that this species was the primary epizootic/epidemic vector. PMID:17536365

  16. 78 FR 45909 - Designation for the Amarillo, TX; Cairo, IL; Baton Rouge, LA; Raleigh, NC; and Belmond, IA Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ...)). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the December 28, 2012 Federal Register (77 FR 76453), GIPSA requested applications...; Baton Rouge, LA; Raleigh, NC; and Belmond, IA Areas AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards...-0689 10/1/2013 9/30/2016 Louisiana Baton Rouge, LA (225) 922-1341..... 10/1/2013 9/30/2016...

  17. The Desegregation Experience of Public School Personnel in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Douglas R.

    This historical study examines the perceptions of teachers involved in the initial desegregation of the East Baton Rouge Parish Public School System, Louisiana, in 1970, when over 600 African American and white teachers began teaching in schools that were predominantly another race (cross-over). The study also examines the impact of cross-over on…

  18. The Status of Reading Instruction in the College of Education at Southern University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, W. Cliff; Goyol, Anthony

    Forty-six members of the college of education at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, were surveyed to determine the status of reading instruction within that college. The faculty members taught a total of 114 courses in six departments: health and physical education, vocational education, recreation, special education, elementary…

  19. Census Tracts & Block Groups, 2004, East Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the polygon boundaries of 107 semi-permanent census tracts and the census blocks within the Parish of East Baton...

  20. Édouard Glissant, avec Alexandre Leupin, Les Entretiens de Baton Rouge

    OpenAIRE

    Hoarau, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Au moment où ont lieu les entretiens de Baton Rouge (entre 1990 et 1991), Édouard Glissant vient d’être nommé « Professeur Distingué des Universités » à l’université d’État de la Louisiane (LSU). Il habite alors Baton Rouge et c’est dans cet espace francophone qu’il rencontre le médiéviste Alexandre Leupin. Le Graal et la littérature et Barbarolexis, Medieval Literature and Sexuality, les deux premières publications de ce dernier (respectivement en 1983 et 1989) proposaient d’étudier des text...

  1. 76 FR 28223 - Adequacy Status of the Baton Rouge, Louisiana Maintenance Plan 8-Hour Ozone Motor Vehicle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-16

    ... Additional Rule Changes'' (69 FR 40004). Please note that an adequacy review is separate from EPA's... the new MVEB if the demonstration has not already been made, pursuant to 40 CFR 93.104(e). See, 73 FR... AGENCY Adequacy Status of the Baton Rouge, Louisiana Maintenance Plan 8- Hour Ozone Motor...

  2. 77 FR 76453 - Opportunity for Designation in Amarillo, TX; Cairo, IL; Baton Rouge, LA; Raleigh, NC; and Belmond...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Opportunity for Designation in Amarillo, TX; Cairo, IL; Baton Rouge, LA; Raleigh, NC; and Belmond, IA Areas; Request for Comments on the...

  3. ACT Profiles of 1974-75 Graduates of Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge. Research Report Vol. 7, No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, W. L., Jr.

    The study is a simple statistical analysis of the ACT scores of the 1974-75 Louisiana State University-Baton Rouge graduates. Graduate students awarded advanced degrees are not included. For each college and field of study and for each of five ACT tests, these data are given: number of students, mean, middle two-thirds; range, standard deviation,…

  4. Public School Desegregation/Redesign: A Case Study in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. Urban Education Reports Number Fourteen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Frank Andrews

    This publication presents a case study of the public school desegregation and redesign program of the East Baton Rouge Parish (Louisiana) School System, focusing on the 5 years from 1987 to 1992. Chapter 1 describes the setting and background, the sociocultural history of the area since pre-Revolutionary War days, the role and treatment of African…

  5. Hydrogeophysical Data Fusion and Geostatistical Approach to Characterize Hydrogeological Structure of the Baton Rouge Aquifer System in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshall, A. S.; Tsai, F. T.; Hanor, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    The complex siliciclastic aquifer system underneath the Baton Rouge area, Louisiana is fluvial in origin and is characterized by strongly binary heterogeneity of sandy units and mudstones as pervious and impervious hydrofacies. Two distinct east-west trending geologic faults, the Baton Rouge fault and the Denham Springs-Scotlandville fault, cut across East Baton Rouge Parish. Data from the USGS water wells suggest that the Baton Rouge fault is a low permeable fault that historically separates a sequence of freshwater aquifers north of the fault from brackish aquifers south of the fault. However, the Denham Springs-Scotlandville fault appears to be pervious. In this study we utilize wireline geophysical data and lithologic data to characterize the Baton Rouge aquifer system and delineate flow pathways thought the faults. To avoid non-uniqueness associated with the use of a single geophysical data type particularly with the presence of salinization, we interpret the sand and shale hydrofacies for each well log based on wireline short normal electrical resistivity, single-point resistance, spontaneous-potential and gamma ray. For geological model calibration we use lithologic data from drillers logs representing the actual lithology with depth. Using geophysical data for hydrogeological structure construction and using lithologic data for model calibration, we implement a generalized parameterization indicator scheme. First, we show that this methodology can effectively analyze a binary siliciclastic aquifer by depicting the spatial extent of major water bearing units, their interconnections and preferential flow paths within each unit. Second, mapping of the binary fault stratigraphy assists in the assessment of hydraulic continuity and saltwater intrusion in the siliciclastic aquifer system, which exhibits discontinuous heterogeneity due to fault throw. By juxtaposing sand units from both sides of the fault plane, horizontal flow pathways are identified if sands

  6. A Follow-Up Study of Graduates of Master's Level Special Education Teacher Preparation Programs at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Research Report, Volume 5, Number 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Robert J.; And Others

    In order to compose a picture of the typical master's level graduate of special education programs at Louisiana State University (Baton Rouge), a follow-up study involving 52 recent graduates was conducted. Each graduate was mailed a questionnaire designed to gather data in five areas: personal information, employment status, financial…

  7. Lessons learned from the post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on August 28 and September 18, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, Gulf States Utilities, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The purpose of the exercise was to examine the post-emergency roles, responsibilities, and resources of utility, State, local, Federal and insurance organizations in response to a hypothetical accident at the River Bend Station in Louisiana resulting in a significant release of radiation to the environment. In pursuit of this goal, five major focus areas were addressed: (1) ingestion pathway response; (2) reentry, relocation and return; (3) decontamination of recovery; (4) indemnification of financial losses; and (5) deactivation of the emergency response. This report documents the lessons learned from that exercise

  8. Evaluation of potential hazard exposure resulting from DOE waste treatment and disposal at Rollins Environmental Services, Baton Rouge, LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equivalent dose rate to populations potentially exposed to wastes shipped to Rollins Environmental Services, Baton Rouge, LA from Oak Ridge and Savannah River Operations of the Department of Energy was estimated. Where definitive information necessary to the estimation of a dose rate was unavailable, bounding assumptions were employed to ensure an overestimate of the actual dose rate experienced by the potentially exposed population. On this basis, it was estimated that a total of about 3.85 million pounds of waste was shipped from these DOE operations to Rollins with a maximum combined total activity of about 0.048 Curies. Populations near the Rollins site could potentially be exposed to the radionuclides in the DOE wastes via the air pathway after incineration of the DOE wastes or by migration from the soil after landfill disposal. AIRDOS was used to estimate the dose rate after incineration. RESRAD was used to estimate the dose rate after landfill disposal. Calculations were conducted with the estimated radioactive specie distribution in the wastes and, as a test of the sensitivity of the results to the estimated distribution, with the entire activity associated with individual radioactive species such as Cs-137, Ba-137, Sr-90, Co-60, U-234, U-235 and U-238. With a given total activity, the dose rates to nearby individuals were dominated by the uranium species

  9. Sequence Stratigraphic Characterization of Upper Miocene through Pleistocene Siliciclastic Aquifer Sediments, Baton Rouge Area, Southeastern Louisiana Gulf Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, E. L.; Hanor, J. S.; Tsai, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    Saltwater encroachment northward into freshwater sands of the Baton Rouge aquifer system, southeastern Louisiana, poses a serious environmental threat to this metropolitan municipal and industrial water source. The aquifer system consists of an 850-m thick succession of interbedded, unconsolidated south-dipping siliciclastic sandy units and mudstones of Upper Miocene through Pleistocene age. A geology-based understanding of the connectivity, geometry and depositional setting of this aquifer system is necessary for developing strategies to halt or control saltwater intrusion. Seventy five digitized spontaneous potential - resistivity logs for boreholes in the area provided data for interpreting environments of deposition, for correlating sand-rich and mudstone-rich zones, and for identifying periods of low and high rates of sediment aggradation. The sands have complex geometries representing braided stream, meandering channel fill, floodplain, levee, and crevasse splay facies. A high degree of lateral discontinuity of the sands makes visual correlation of units difficult. Therefore an assessment of lithology-depth relations was made by determining the frequency of occurrence of mudstone at discrete 0.15 m depth intervals in borehole logs along five 40-km long transects parallel to the strike of the aquifer units. Percent occurrence of mudstone was graphed as a function of depth using a 41-point centered moving average for smoothing, and mudstone-poor, sand-rich trends were correlated between transects. Ten major sand cycles were identified. Individual aquifer units are interpreted to be complex zones of amalgamated sand bodies deposited during times of low aggradation associated with sea-level falling-stages and lowstand system tracts. The amalgamation created a high degree of connectivity which results in these zones behaving as single hydrologic units. Mudstone-rich aquitard sequences are interpreted to be flood-plain sediments deposited during times of high

  10. Passing the baton

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    It was not only in South Korea that batons were being passed last week. While the cream of the world’s athletes were competing in the World Athletics Championships, the cream of the world’s accelerator scientists were on their way to San Sebastian in Spain for the International Particle Accelerator Conference.  One of them was carrying a rather special baton for a handover of a different kind.   When Fermilab’s Vladimir Shiltsev handed the high-energy frontier baton to CERN’s Mike Lamont on Tuesday, it marked the end of an era: a time to look back on the phenomenal contribution the Tevatron has made to particle physics over its 25-year operational lifetime, and the great contribution Fermilab has made over that period to global collaboration in particle physics. There’s always a lot of emotion involved in passing the baton. In athletics, it’s the triumph of wining or the heartbreak of losing. But for this special baton, the...

  11. District Composite Report: East Baton Rouge Parish. 2002-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The passage of the Children First Act in 1988 ushered in a new era of data collection, analysis, and reporting about the overall quality and condition of education in Louisiana. Implemented in 1990, this major piece of legislation resulted in the publication of the Progress Profiles (School Report Cards, District Composite Report, and the…

  12. Inhotim. Tunga. True Rouge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Maya Monteiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the art installation True Rouge, by the artist Tunga, from its assembly which is in Inhotim. Here there are some of the recurrent procedures, and individualities, which the artist employs in this work, in order to locate it in the corpus of the artist’s work. For this reason, beyond the formal analysis of the work itself, we studied some relationships between the triad artist - work - museum.

  13. Le rouge baiser

    OpenAIRE

    Kivland, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    A numbered limited edition of 100, each with an attractive photograph, on which the artist has more or less carefully painted the lipsticked mouth of the image with watercolours, while considering that while 'le rouge baiser permet le baiser' (the red kiss allows kissing), it also permits caressing, screwing around, adultery and fucking. Chapbook with 24 folded pages, stapled, 15x10.5cm, 16 black and white photographs

  14. Baton twirling on an international stage

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie McClellan

    2013-01-01

    There aren’t many people who can throw a baton in the air, do a backhand spring and catch it with the grace of a dancer. Well, Julie Haffner from the CERN Press Office can. Baton twirling started as her hobby but soon became a passion - leading her team to win the International Baton Twirling Cup.    Gex Twirling Club performing their winning number at the 2013 International Baton Twirling Cup. (Image: Véronique Bellour). There is no telling when or where people will find their passion. For Julie Haffner, it was when she followed her cousin to a baton twirling class at the age of 10. Since that fortuitous day, she has committed herself to the sport and competed on international stages. Very close to rhythmic gymnastics, baton twirling requires skilful coordination and teamwork. Julie’s performances combine the precision of baton manipulation, the grace of a dancer and the strength of a gymnast. The first year in which she competed with the Gex Twirlin...

  15. TIGER/Line Shapefile, 2013, county, West Baton Rouge Parish, LA, Current Address Ranges Relationship File

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The TIGER/Line shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  16. 75 FR 54778 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Louisiana; Baton Rouge 8-Hour...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... explained in the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPR) published on June 25, 2010 (75 FR 36316) and in today's... Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not... Executive Order 13132 (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999); Is not an economically significant regulatory...

  17. 75 FR 6570 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Louisiana; Baton Rouge 1-Hour...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... in the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPR) published on March 26, 2009 (74 FR 13166) and elaborated... 75 ppb (the 2008 8-hour standard). See 73 FR 16435-16514 (March 27, 2008) \\2\\ \\2\\ On September 16... FR 2938). We expect by August 2010 to have completed our reconsideration of the standard...

  18. A Survey of Attitudes about Digital Repositories among Faculty at Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lercher, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    This paper gives the result of a 2007 survey of faculty at eight academic departments at Louisiana State University, asking them about the usefulness for their needs of an extension of the scholarly communication system by digital repositories. (Contains 3 tables and 2 figures.)

  19. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, EAST BATON ROUGE PARISH, LOUISIANA (AND INCORPORATED AREAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  20. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, WEST BATON ROUGE PARISH, LA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  1. 33 CFR 110.195 - Mississippi River below Baton Rouge, LA, including South and Southwest Passes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cargos of particular hazard as defined in 33 CFR 126.10 or cargos of petroleum products in bulk may not... citations affecting § 110.195, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids... pipeline areas may be obtained from the District Engineer, Corps of Engineers, New Orleans, LA. (6)...

  2. 2010 NOAA Ortho-rectified Mosaic of Louisiana: Mississippi River - Baton Rouge to Southwest Pass

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  3. 2016 NOAA NGS Ortho-rectified Near-Infrared Mosaic of Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  4. Research in elementary particle physics. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State Univ,. Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, L.H; Haymaker, R.; Imlay, R.; McNeil, R.; Metcalf, W.; Svoboda, R.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical work on effective action expansion on an effective low; energy theory of hadron, dynamical symmetry breaking, and lattice gauge theories is described. The high-energy experimental group at Louisiana State University has analyzed data on a neutrino oscillation experiment at LAMPF. Preparations for the LSND neutrino experiment have stated. IMB data have also been analyzed. On the ZEUS electron n-proton colliding bean experiment, the production of the barrel calorimeter has been completed. Several modules of the calorimeter have been tested at Fermilab, and preparations for data taking are underway.

  5. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, EAST BATON ROUGE PARISH, LOUISIANA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  6. 2016 NOAA NGS Ortho-rectified Color Mosaic of Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  7. The Rouge Education Project: Challenges of Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talsma, Valerie

    2001-01-01

    Describes a program evaluation of the Rouge Education Project (REP), a school-based environmental education program that uses water monitoring, telecommunications, and student actions to improve water quality. Reports that results indicated that the REP met its goals of increasing awareness and concern about the Rouge River and developing a…

  8. Paremad filmid 3 : Moulin Rouge! / Jaanus Noormets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Noormets, Jaanus

    2006-01-01

    Muusikafilm "Moulin Rouge" : režissöör Baz Luhrmann : peaosades Nicole Kidman, Ewan McGregor : Ameerika Ühendriigid - Austraalia 2001. Lisatud nimekiri "25 paremat muusikali", mille koostas inglise telekanal Channel 4 2003.a.

  9. 76 FR 14052 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Collection, were donated to Sacramento State College (now California State University, Sacramento). No known... California State University, Sacramento, together with the University's College of Social Sciences and... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: California State University, Sacramento,...

  10. The Spectator's Dancing Gaze in Moulin Rouge!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, Clare

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the ways in which the choreography of "Moulin Rouge!" offers a range of gazes to the audience through the perspectives of both the characters and the camera itself. Various gendered and imperial/colonial power relationships that occur within the narrative are heightened in the choreography by referring to discourses inscribed…

  11. The baton passes to the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Held in the picturesque mountain setting of La Thuile in the Italian Alps, the international conference “Rencontres de Moriond” showed how the baton of discovery in the field of high-energy physics is definitely passing to the LHC experiments. In the well-known spirit of Moriond, the conference was an important platform for young students to present their latest results. The Higgs boson might well be within reach this year and the jet-quenching phenomenon might reveal new things soon…   New physics discussed over the Italian Alps during the "Les rencontres de Moriond" conference.  (Photographer: Paul Gerritsen. Adapted by Katarina Anthony) Known by physicists as one of the most important winter conferences, “Les rencontres de Moriond” are actually a series of conferences spread over two weeks covering the main themes of electroweak interactions, QCD and high-energy interactions, cosmology, gravitation, astropar...

  12. La Séquence rouge italienne

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Les essais réunis reconstruisent plusieurs aspects de la « séquence rouge » que l’Italie a connue entre les années 1960 et 1970. En particulier, sont traités les débats sur la question des intellectuels, les théories et les positions opéraïstes, la question de la violence dans les formations extra-parlementaires.

  13. 1997 Sacramento Inland Floodplain Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes data collected in October 1997 over the Sacramento, CA, floodplain. Laser mapping uses a pulsed laser ranging system mounted onboard an...

  14. 2010 NOAA Ortho-rectified Mosaic from Color Aerial Imagery of MISSISSIPPI RIVER - BATON ROUGE TO LAPLACE (NODC Accession 0074374)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative of MISSISSIPPI RIVER...

  15. 2010 NOAA Ortho-rectified Mosaic from Color Aerial Imagery of MISSISSIPPI RIVER - BATON ROUGE TO LAPLACE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative of MISSISSIPPI RIVER...

  16. F00476: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Mississippi River New Orleans to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 2001-08-07

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  17. 2010 NOAA Ortho-rectified Mosaic of Louisiana: Mississippi River - Baton Rouge to Southwest Pass (NODC Accession 0103945)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  18. 2010 NOAA Near Infrared Ortho-rectified Mosaic of Louisiana: Mississippi River - Baton Rouge to Southwest Pass

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  19. 2010 NOAA Near Infrared Ortho-rectified Mosaic of Louisiana: Mississippi River - Baton Rouge to Southwest Pass (NODC Accession 0104414)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  20. 77 FR 51894 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3) does... RWY 20, Orig-A Baton Rouge, LA, Baton Rouge Metropolitan, Ryan Field, ILS OR LOC RWY 22R, Amdt 11 Baton Rouge, LA, Baton Rouge Metropolitan, Ryan Field, RNAV (GPS) RWY 4L, Amdt 2 Baton Rouge, LA,...

  1. 78 FR 17720 - Notice of Lodging of Revised Second Agreement and Order Regarding Modification of the Consent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... entitled United States and the State of Louisiana v. City of Baton Rouge and Parish of East Baton Rouge... owned and operated by the City of Baton Rouge and the Parish of East Baton Rouge (collectively ``the... and Natural Resources Division, and should refer to United States v. City of Baton Rouge, D.J. Ref....

  2. The Khmer Rouge and Education: Beyond the Discourse of Destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, David

    1999-01-01

    Argues that education under the Khmer Rouge must be examined within the context of the ideology that underpinned the Communist regime and the policies and practices that emanated from that ideology. Explains that the Khmer Rouge attempted to rebuild education within the context of their ideological commitment to self-reliance. (CMK)

  3. 76 FR 50808 - Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal Pursuant to the authority vested in the Secretary of State... ``Khmer Rouge Tribunal''). This Certification and related Memorandum of Justification shall be provided...

  4. 78 FR 79477 - Announcement of Funding Awards, Choice Neighborhoods Grant Program, Fiscal Year 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... Neighborhood City of Baton Rouge/Parish of East Baton $500,000.00 Ardenwood Village......... Melrose East-Smiley Rouge, 222 Saint Louis Street, Baton Heights. Rouge, LA 70802-5817. Housing Authority of the...

  5. 75 FR 5627 - National Register of Historic Places; Weekly Listing of Historic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ..., Listed, 11/10/09 LOUISIANA East Baton Rouge Parish Downtown Baton Rouge Historic District, 3rd between roughly Main St. and N. Blvd; 210-240 Laurel & 301-355 N. Blvd., Baton Rouge, 09000899, Listed,...

  6. 76 FR 53434 - Free Flow Power Corporation, Northland Power Mississippi River LLC; Notice of Competing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ... projects hydropower on the Mississippi River, near the town of Baton Rouge, in West Baton Rouge and East Baton Rouge Parishes, Louisiana. The sole purpose of a preliminary permit, if issued, is to grant...

  7. 77 FR 76472 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... in the following locations: St. Petersburg and Destin, FL; Baton Rouge, LA; Biloxi, MS; Orange Beach...) 986-6700; DoubleTree by Hilton Baton Rouge, 4964 Constitution Avenue, Baton Rouge, LA 70808,...

  8. Stress fracture of the ulna in an adolescent baton twirler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fines, Bonnie P.; Stacy, Scott G. [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago Hospitals, IL (United States)

    2002-02-01

    Upper extremity stress fractures are rare, with the majority of those reported occurring in the ulna. The location of the fracture is influenced by the type of activity and mechanism of injury with which it is associated. We report the first case of a mid-ulnar stress fracture in a baton twirler due to chronic torsional stress. This patient was referred to our Orthopedic Oncology clinic with a preliminary diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. (orig.)

  9. Stress fracture of the ulna in an adolescent baton twirler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upper extremity stress fractures are rare, with the majority of those reported occurring in the ulna. The location of the fracture is influenced by the type of activity and mechanism of injury with which it is associated. We report the first case of a mid-ulnar stress fracture in a baton twirler due to chronic torsional stress. This patient was referred to our Orthopedic Oncology clinic with a preliminary diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. (orig.)

  10. Ford Rouge Center green roof project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, D.K. [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Rouge Center; Schickedantz, R. [William McDonough and Partners, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2003-07-01

    The Ford Motor Company is upgrading an 85-year old brownfield property located at the historic Rouge Manufacturing Complex in Dearborn, Michigan. The project is estimated to cost $2 billion. Part of the storm water management plan involves the construction of a 10.4-acre green roof for a new assembly plant to be built on the site. The evaluation of green roof technology began in November 1999 by a cross-functional team which recommended an implementation plan. A modular tray green roof system was evaluated by this team, working in conjunction with researchers from McDonough-Braungart Design Chemistry and Michigan State University. Plant and substrate parameters, as well as the functional attributes of the system, were studied. The investigation of the system was halted due to concerns about durability, weight, and prohibitive manufacturing start-up costs. Efforts were then directed to four commercially available drainage systems. After careful evaluation, the team selected the Xero flor, a German product. The advantages of the selected system were: minimal saturated weight, minimal weed growth, and the ability to grow the product at ground level. During the summer of 2002, sedum clippings and sedum seeds were used with a thin layer of substrate to grow a vegetation blanket which was subsequently installed in October.

  11. Public Opinion Poll on Community Priorities: Sacramento

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra Health Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to measure public perceptions, opinions and priorities as they pertain to youth issues in Sacramento for the purposes of further developing public and private youth programming and public policy in the Sacramento region. By presenting a "statistically reliable" profile of public opinion on youth issues, the…

  12. 33 CFR 117.189 - Sacramento River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sacramento River. 117.189 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.189 Sacramento River. (a) The draws of each bridge from Isleton to American River junction shall open on signal from May 1...

  13. The Sacramento Peak fast microphotometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrambide, M. R.; Dunn, R. B.; Healy, A. W.; Porter, R.; Widener, A. L.; November, L. J.; Spence, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    The Sacramento Peak Observatory Fast Microphotometer translates an optical system that includes a laser and photodiode detector across the film to scan the Y direction. A stepping motor moves the film gate in the X direction. This arrangement affords high positional accuracy, low noise (0.002 RMS density units), modest speed (5000 points/second), large dynamic range (4.5 density units), high stability (0.005 density units), and low scattered light. The Fast Microphotometer is interfaced to the host computer by a 6502 microprocessor.

  14. 40 CFR 52.992 - Area-wide nitrogen oxides exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requesting that the Baton Rouge serious ozone nonattainment area be exempted from the NOX control... 26, 1995, June 6, 1995, and June 16, 1995. The Baton Rouge nonattainment area consists of East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge, Pointe Coupee, Livingston, Iberville, and Ascension Parishes. The...

  15. 77 FR 4060 - Notice of Lodging of Second Agreement and Order Regarding Modification of the Consent Decree...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... Louisiana v. City of Baton Rouge, Civil Action No. 3:01-cv-00978-FJP-CN, was lodged with the United States... owned and operated by the City of Baton Rouge and the Parish of East Baton Rouge (collectively ``the... refer to United States and Louisiana v. City of Baton Rouge, D.J. Ref. 90-5-1-1-2769/1. During...

  16. Commerce alimentaire à Château-Rouge (Paris)

    OpenAIRE

    Chabrol, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Situés dans le 18ème arrondissement de Paris, les commerces du quartier de Château-Rouge polarisent une clientèle d'origine afro-caribéenne résidant dans toute l'agglomération parisienne et au-delà. Une grande partie des boutiques de produits frais y sont tenues par des commerçants originaires de Chine ou d'Asie du sud-est.

  17. NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) infrared (IR) orthorectified mosaic image tiles, Baton Rouge to Southwest Pass, Louisiana 2010 (NODC Accession 0104414)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  18. NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) true color (RGB) orthorectified mosaic image tiles, Baton Rouge to Southwest Pass, Louisiana 2010 (NODC Accession 0103945)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  19. NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) true color (RGB) orthorectified mosaic image tiles, Baton Rouge to LaPlace, Louisiana 2010 (NODC Accession 0074374)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative of the Mississippi...

  20. Reproduction, maturation, and seed production of cultured species: Proceedings of the Twelfth U.S.-Japan Meeting on Aquaculture, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, October 25-29, 1983

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The United States and Japanese counterpart panels on aquaculture were formed in 1969 under the United States-Japan Cooperative Program in Natural Resources (UJNR). The panels currently include specialists drawn from the federal departments most concerned with aquaculture. Charged with exploring and developing bilateral cooperation, the panels have focused their efforts on exchanging information related to aquaculture which could be of benefit to both countries. The UJNR was begun during t...

  1. Trends, distribution and frequency analysis of ozone data from three monitoring stations in Baton Rouge, Louisiana for the years 1995 to 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Klasinc, Leo; Kezele, Nenad; Pompe, Matevž; McGlynn, Sean P.

    2008-01-01

    Troposphere ozone concentrations exhibit pronounced, characteristic diurnal and seasonal cycles. These cycles are usually well defined. However, additional oscillations also occur; these are generally much smaller in amplitude than the 1-day or 1-year cycles and they might be attributable to anthropogenic influences (e.g., specific man-induced meteorological and chemical influences on an individual monitoring station, periodic maintenance activities, etc.). Indeed, it is possib...

  2. Nuclear interactions in high energy heavy ions and applications in astrophysics. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State Univ. , Baton Rouge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wefel, J.P.; Guzik, T.G.

    1993-01-11

    The overall objective is to study the mechanisms and the energy dependence of heavy ion fragmentation by studying the reactions of heavy ion projectiles (e.g. [sup 4]He, [sup 16]O, [sup 20]Ne, [sup 28]Si, [sup 56]Fe) in a variety of targets (H, He, C, Si, Cu, Pb) and at a number of beam energies exceeding 0.1 GeV/nucleon. The results have application to questions in high-energy nuclear astrophysics. Most of the discussion is on low-energy [sup 16]O,[sup 28]Si data analysis. The description includes analysis procedures and techniques, detector calibrations, data selections and normalizations. Cross section results for the analysis are also presented. 83 figs., 6 tabs., 73 refs.

  3. Building the New Cambodia: Educational Destruction and Construction under the Khmer Rouge, 1975-1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the educational destruction and construction in Democratic Kampuchea (Cambodia) under the Khmer Rouge regime. Explains that in constructing the Democratic Kampuchea education system the Khmer Rouge sought to harness the power of education to their agenda of egalitarian, self-reliant, and agrarian socialism. (CMK)

  4. 75 FR 27641 - Safety Zone; Marathon Oil Refinery Construction, Rouge River, Detroit, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the Rouge River, Detroit, Michigan. This zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of the Rouge River during the Marathon Oil Refinery Construction project. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect mariners and construction personnel from the hazards associated with moving large pieces of equipment in a high traffic......

  5. 75 FR 17197 - Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal Under Section 7071(c) of the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal Under Section 7071(c) of the Department of State, Foreign... address allegations of corruption and mismanagement within the Khmer Rouge Tribunal. This Certification... the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC), also commonly known as the ``Khmer Rouge Tribunal'' (KRT)....

  6. Sacramento, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Sacramento, CA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  7. Plagiarism Detection using ROUGE and WordNet

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chien-Ying; Ke, Hao-Ren

    2010-01-01

    With the arrival of digital era and Internet, the lack of information control provides an incentive for people to freely use any content available to them. Plagiarism occurs when users fail to credit the original owner for the content referred to, and such behavior leads to violation of intellectual property. Two main approaches to plagiarism detection are fingerprinting and term occurrence; however, one common weakness shared by both approaches, especially fingerprinting, is the incapability to detect modified text plagiarism. This study proposes adoption of ROUGE and WordNet to plagiarism detection. The former includes ngram co-occurrence statistics, skip-bigram, and longest common subsequence (LCS), while the latter acts as a thesaurus and provides semantic information. N-gram co-occurrence statistics can detect verbatim copy and certain sentence modification, skip-bigram and LCS are immune from text modification such as simple addition or deletion of words, and WordNet may handle the problem of word subst...

  8. The aesthetics of laboratory inscription: Claude Bernard's Cahier Rouge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Atia

    2013-03-01

    This essay explores the aesthetic sensibilities of the French physiologist Claude Bernard (1813-1878). In particular, it analyzes the Cahier Rouge (1850-1860), Bernard's acclaimed laboratory notebook. In this notebook, Bernard articulates the range of his experience as an experimental physiologist, juxtaposing without differentiation details of laboratory procedure and more personal queries, doubts, and reflections on experimentation, life, and art. Bernard's insights, it is argued, offer an aesthetic and phenomenological template for considering experimentation. His physiological point of view ranges from his own bodily aesthesis or sensory perception, through personal reflections on scientific discovery as an artistic process, to a broader metaphysical conception of life as an artistic creation. Such an aesthetic approach to physiology enables Bernard to reconcile his empirical methodology and his romantic idealism; it offers the history of laboratory science a framework for considering the individual, bodily, and emotional labor inherent in physiological experimentation. PMID:23789508

  9. „Rote Hochzeiten“; eine ethnologische Untersuchung kambodschanischer Heiratsbiographien aus der Zeit der Khmer Rouge

    OpenAIRE

    Städing, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Das Regime der Khmer Rouge (1975-1979) in Kambodscha führte eine spezielle, staatlich verordnete Heiratspraxis ein. Die aktuell zirkulierenden Diskurse zum Thema Heirat im Khmer Rouge-Regime zeigen meist eine eindimensionale Darstellung der damaligen Heiratspraxis als „Zwangsheiraten“. Die zentrale Frage, der die Arbeit in einer detaillierten Untersuchung unter Einbezug von Sherry Ortners handlungstheoretischem Ansatz zu „Agency“ nachgeht, ist, welches Handlungsvermögen die unt...

  10. Final environmental assessment: Sacramento Energy Service Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The Sacramento Area Office (SAO) of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) needs to increase the security of operations, to eliminate overcrowding at the current leased location of the existing facilities, to provide for future growth, to improve efficiency, and to reduce operating costs. The proposed action is to construct an approximate 40,000-square foot building and adjacent parking lot with a Solar Powered Electric Vehicle Charging Station installed to promote use of energy efficient transportation. As funding becomes available and technology develops, additional innovative energy-efficient measures will be incorporated into the building. For example the proposed construction of the Solar Powered Electric Vehicle Charging.

  11. Assessing the conservation status of the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly (Pseudophilotes sinaicus)

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Katy

    2013-01-01

    Arid environments are resource-limited, with scarcity of water the key limiting factor for plants and their associated fauna. Consequentially bottom-up forces often control food webs, influencing the whole system through high levels of competition. The Sinai Baton Blue butterfly, Pseudophilotes sinaicus, is Critically Endangered, with a tiny endemic distribution in the St Katherine Protectorate, South Sinai, an arid environment. Its range is restricted to that of its sole host plant, the near...

  12. "I Participate, You Participate, We Participate... They Profit," Notes on Revolutionary Educational Activism to Transcend Capital: The Rouge Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Rich; Queen, Greg; Ross, E. Wayne; Vinson, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Ten years ago, the Rouge Forum initiated its work with this statement: "The Rouge Forum is a group of educators, students, and parents seeking a democratic society. We are concerned about questions like these: How can we teach against racism, national chauvinism and sexism in an increasingly authoritarian and undemocratic society? How can we gain…

  13. The Killing Fields on TV: A Critical Analysis of Network Coverage of Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ted J., III; Grassmick, David E.

    In an effort to determine the nature of American network television news coverage of the Khmer Rouge rule in Cambodia, a study examined the television evening news from April 16, 1975, the date on which the Lon Nol government first offered to capitulate to the Khmer Rouge, through January 8, 1979, when news of the fall of Phnom Penh to the…

  14. 33 CFR 165.T09-0333 - Safety zone; Marathon Oil Refinery construction, Rouge River, Detroit, MI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Coast Guard District § 165.T09-0333 Safety zone; Marathon Oil Refinery construction, Rouge River... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety zone; Marathon Oil Refinery construction, Rouge River, Detroit, MI. 165.T09-0333 Section 165.T09-0333 Navigation and...

  15. Sacramento River National Wildlife Refuge: Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan CCP was written to guide management on Sacramento River NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  16. Qui est le loup dans Le Petit Chaperon rouge de Charles Perrault

    OpenAIRE

    Benoit, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    Le Petit Chaperon rouge de Perrault se présente comme un conte folklorique traditionnel. Quelques altérations signalent un changement de registre. La distance ironique de l'auteur lui donne un sens second. L'auteur s'amuse à proposer plusieurs chemins de lecture aux enfants et aux adultes.

  17. Mars Express met l'Europe en orbite autour de la Planete rouge

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Apres une nuit sans sommeil, le Centre europeen d'operations spatiales (ESOC) de Darmstadt, en Allemagne, a annonce la nouvelle, jeudi 25decembre au matin: la sonde Mars Express a bien ete "capturee" par la gravite de la Planete rouge, tandis que le petit atterrisseur Beagle-2 tentait de se poser dans la plaine d'Isidis Planitia" (1 page).

  18. The Sacramento power utility experience in solar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1989 the electorate of Sacramento voted to close the Rancho Seco nuclear power plant ending a problem-plagued 15 years of operation. Electric rates had doubled in the three years prior to the plant closure and the citizens had enough of nuclear power and were seeking a ''better way'' to meet their energy needs. In the short run the ''better way'' was to buy power from other utilities which had a surplus. That surplus existed because a decade ago the State of California promoted the commercialization of new energy producing technologies like wind, geothermal, biomass, cogeneration and solar. In fact, since 1980 over $20 billion has been invested in building power generation facilities based on these technologies in California. The policy of the State of California to encourage the commercialization of these technologies allowed SMUD to make a smooth transition away from nuclear power. The California power surplus that was brought about by the installation of almost 10,000 MegaWatts of independent power projects in the 1980's has been whittled away by the closure of Rancho Seco and San Onofre 1 and by rapid population growth. With the short term power contracts expiring this decade SMUD is planning to add about 1000 Mega Watts of new power generation by the year 2000. They have decided to add about 600 Mega Watts of gas-fired cogeneration by 1997 and 400 more of renewable resources or other advance technologies such as fuel cells by the year 2000. Three solar technologies look very promising: central receivers, solar dish/stirling engine systems, and photovoltaics

  19. Use of nootkatone as a senescence indicator for Rouge La Toma Cv. grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biolatto, Andrea; Sancho, Ana M; Cantet, Rodolfo J C; Güemes, Daniel R; Pensel, Norma A

    2002-08-14

    The objective of this research was to study the usefulness of nootkatone as a senescence indicator for Rouge La Toma cv. grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.), simulating different treatments that included the normal postharvest handling of citrus fruits: temperature conditioning, cold storage, shipment periods to overseas markets such as Japan and the U.S., marketing conditions, and storage at nonchilling temperature (control treatments). The highest nootkatone levels, determined by GLC-MS analyses, were detected in fruits subjected to control treatments. No significant differences were observed in nootkatone levels between treatments either with or without temperature conditioning prior to the start of the cold storage. Levels of nootkatone increased throughout time for all assayed treatments. The linear regressions of nootkatone levels showed correlation coefficients of 0.80 and 0.83 with storage time (29 and 42 days, respectively). Therefore, nootkatone appears to be a good indicator of senescence for Rouge La Toma grapefruit. PMID:12166965

  20. Crossroads gas field, Sacramento Valley, California: an exploration case history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCrae, R.O.

    1977-01-01

    The Crossroads gas field is located in the Sacramento Valley, 17 miles northwest of the city of Sacramento. The discovery well, Socal No. 1 Amstar, was completed in April 1976 from 3 sand zones, for a total productive potential of 7,200 Mcfd. The field is still in the development phase with 4 wells, all potentially productive, completed to date. The exploratory program was initiated through regional subsurface mapping of available well control and a prospective trend was outlined based on stratigraphic trap potential in Winters sand zones. The stratigraphic interpretation relying on well data and aided by one new seismic reconnaissance line indicated the probability of the pinchout of lenticular sands updip eastward into a pro-delta slope/shelf shale facies. Land acquisition was initiated with the verification of the exploratory model and continued throughout the exploratory phase of the program.

  1. Wildlife Response to Riparian Restoration on the Sacramento River

    OpenAIRE

    Golet, Gregory H.; Gardali, Thomas; Howell, Christine A.; Hunt, John; Luster, Ryan A.; Rainey, William; Roberts, Michael D; Silveira, Joseph; Swagerty, Helen; Williams, Neal

    2008-01-01

    Studies that assess the success of riparian restoration projects seldom focus on wildlife. More generally, vegetation characteristics are studied, with the assumption that animal populations will recover once adequate habitats are established. On the Sacramento River, millions of dollars have been spent on habitat restoration, yet few studies of wildlife response have been published. Here we present the major findings of a suite of studies that assessed responses of four taxonomic groups (ins...

  2. Reservoir Operating Rule Optimization for California's Sacramento Valley

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Timothy; Hui, Rui; Lund, Jay; Medellín–Azuara, Josué

    2016-01-01

    doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.15447/sfews.2016v14iss1art6 Reservoir operating rules for water resource systems are typically developed by combining intuition, professional discussion, and simulation modeling. This paper describes a joint optimization–simulation approach to develop preliminary economically-based operating rules for major reservoirs in California’s Sacramento Valley, based on optimized results from CALVIN, a hydro-economic optimization model. We infer strategic o...

  3. El Sacramento de la Penitencia, realidad antropológica y cultual.

    OpenAIRE

    Arocena-Solano, F.M. (Félix María)

    2009-01-01

    El sacramento de la Penitencia es analizado desde dos perspectivas: la primera, la antropológica, pone manifiesto el sustrato profundamente humano de la conversión y muestra el cimiento antropológico de los elementos que conforman la estructura fundamental del sacramento. La segunda perspectiva, la litúrgica, contempla la Reconciliación penitencial como realidad sagrada que vive en el ámbito del misterio del culto cristiano. Como sacramento, la Penitencia ...

  4. The USDA national animal germplasm program and the aquatic species collection. In: T.R. Tiersch and C.C. Green (eds.) Cryopreservation in Aquatic Species, 2nd Edition. World Aquaculture Society, Baton Rouge, LA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diverse genetic resources and the genetic variability within species are the raw materials by which the productivity of aquatic species populations can be increased for food production. Due to the importance of these resources there is growing international awareness that these resources are importa...

  5. The Relationship between Conservation Policy and Aquatic Genetic Resources. In: T.R. Tiersch and C.C. Green (eds.) Cryopreservation in Aquatic Species, 2nd Edition. World Aquaculture Society, Baton Rouge, LA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globally there is an increased awareness of how important genetic resources are for all forms of agriculture. This awareness has resulted in questions concerning the policies countries and the international community should pursue to ensure the sustainable use of diverse genetic resources. For aquac...

  6. Sperm quality assessment in mammals by flow cytometry In: T.R. Tiersch and C.C. Green (eds.) Cryopreservation in Aquatic Species, 2nd Edition. World Aquaculture Society, Baton Rouge, LA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fertility of a semen sample can not be predicted whereas the potential for poor fertility can be estimated by evaluating as many physiologic and morphologic factors as possible (Amann and Hammerstedt, 2002). This rationale is based on the ideology that while a significant amount of information ...

  7. A search for the production of direct leptons in nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. [Intermediate Energy Nuclear Physics Group, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State Univ. , Baton Rouge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, P.N. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1992-12-15

    Activities included contributions to the AMY Collaboration, the transverse energy detector, the Di-Lepton Spectrometer, with emphasis on the single-lepton experiment. Elastic and inelastic scattering differential cross sections and total cross sections are shown for [pi][sup +] and [pi][sup [minus

  8. Parental styles in second generation effects of genocide stemming from the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Nigel P; Om, Chariya; Kim, Thida; Vorn, Sin

    2011-11-01

    This study examined the impact of parental styles on second generation effects of trauma among adolescent offspring of survivors of the Khmer Rouge (KR) genocide in Cambodia. Two hundred high school students completed measures addressing their parents' trauma stemming from the KR regime, parental styles (role reversing, overprotective), depression and anxiety. Parents' role reversing parental style and mothers' overprotective parenting were shown to mediate the impact of their trauma symptoms on the child's depression and anxiety. The implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:22011103

  9. Les 150 ans de la Croix-Rouge française : et demain ?

    OpenAIRE

    Mattei, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    C’est à une sorte de retour vers le futur que nous convie Jean-François Mattei. Alors qu’en 2014 la Croix-Rouge française fêtera ses 150 ans d’existence, son ancien président revient sur cette société nationale née un an après le CICR. Mais celui qui préside désormais le tout nouveau Fonds Croix-Rouge porte avant tout son regard vers l’avenir et ce qu’il estime être les enjeux futurs de l’action humanitaire.

  10. Distributed control of multi-robot teams: Cooperative baton passing task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, L.E.

    1998-11-01

    This research addresses the problem of achieving fault tolerant cooperation within small- to medium-sized teams of heterogeneous mobile robots. The author describes a novel behavior-based, fully distributed architecture, called ALLIANCE, that utilizes adaptive action selection to achieve fault tolerant cooperative control. The robots in this architecture possess a variety of high-level functions that they can perform during a mission, and must at all times select an appropriate action based on the requirements of the mission, the activities of other robots, the current environmental conditions, and their own internal states. Since such cooperative teams often work in dynamic and unpredictable environments, the software architecture allows the team members to respond robustly and reliably to unexpected environmental changes and modifications in the robot team that may occur due to mechanical failure, the learning of new skills, or the addition or removal of robots from the team by human intervention. After presenting ALLIANCE, they describe the implementation of this architecture on a team of physical mobile robots performing a cooperative baton passing task. These experiments illustrate the ability of ALLIANCE to achieve adaptive, fault-tolerant cooperative control amidst dynamic changes during the task.

  11. Resilience and Healing Among Cambodian Survivors of the Khmer Rouge Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Roberta R

    2015-01-01

    In this article the author presents a qualitative study about resilience and healing among Cambodian survivors of the communist Khmer Rouge regime. The database of the Documentation Center of Cambodia (DC-Cam) was used to analyze 30 stories of people who survived but lost family members during the Khmer Rouge regime. The participants acted as civil parties in the Cambodian tribunal involving a trial of "Duch," the head of Tuol Sleng prison or (s21), where survivors' relatives were interrogated, tortured, and killed. Participation in the DC-Cam investigations and in the trial were seen as healing, resiliency factors. Resilience is a person-environment concept that addresses how people and societies overcome/recover from adverse or traumatic events. Resilience was revealed here through people's narratives of critical events that occurred at the personal, interpersonal, sociocultural, and societal levels. Thus, the participants' stories allow us to hear the "truth" of these experiences, how they have made meaning of them, and how they mustered their personal and environmental resources to deal with overwhelming demands (Gutheil & Congress, 2000). Findings suggest that participants attained closure and a sense of justice as a result of their interacting with DC-Cam staff and giving testimony to the tribunal. PMID:25923994

  12. Parental styles in the intergenerational transmission of trauma stemming from the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Nigel P; Muong, Sophear; Sochanvimean, Vannavuth

    2013-10-01

    The impact of parental styles in intergenerational transmission of trauma among mothers who survived the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia, in power from 1975 to 1979, and their teenaged children was examined in 2 studies. In Study 1, 46 Cambodian female high school students and their mothers were recruited. Each daughter completed anxiety and depression measures as well as assessment of her mother's role-reversing, overprotective, and rejecting parental styles, whereas the mothers completed measures of their trauma exposure during the Khmer Rouge regime and PTSD symptoms. In support of trauma transmission, the mother's PTSD symptoms were predictive of her daughter's anxiety. Moreover, the mother's role-reversing parental style was shown to mediate the relationship between her own and her daughter's symptoms. In support of their generalizability, the results were replicated in Study 2 in a Cambodian-American refugee sample comparing 15 mental health treatment-seeking mothers and their teenaged children with 17 nontreatment-seeking mother-child pairs. The implications of the findings within the larger literature on intergenerational trauma transmission stemming from genocide are discussed. PMID:24164520

  13. 78 FR 42018 - Determination of Attainment for the Sacramento Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine Particle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... remanded to EPA the ``Final Clean Air Fine Particle Implementation Rule'' (72 FR 20586, April 25, 2007) and... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Determination of Attainment for the Sacramento Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine..., 2012 (77 FR 65346), EPA proposed to determine that the Sacramento nonattainment area in California...

  14. 78 FR 64531 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension, Sacramento Pass Recreation Area; Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... withdrawal established by PLO No. 7060 (59 FR 28790 (1994)), for an additional 20-year term. PLO No. 7060... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension, Sacramento Pass Recreation Area..., but not from leasing under the mineral leasing laws, to protect the Sacramento Pass Recreation...

  15. 77 FR 45575 - Foreign-Trade Zone 143-West Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... located in Sacramento, California (Board Order 1620, 74 FR 24798, 5/26/2009). Activity at the facilities... years, until May 7, 2014 (Board Order 1620, May 7, 2009; 74 FR 24798, 5/26/2009). The current... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 143--West Sacramento, CA Application for Extended...

  16. Encre rouge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavoj Žižek

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ne tombez pas amoureux-ses de vous-mêmes, de ce chouette moment que nous passons maintenant. Les carnavals sont souvent de pacotille et le vrai test de ce qu’ils valent est ce qui en reste le lendemain, comment la vie quotidienne en sort transformée. Aimez le travail dur et patient – nous ne sommes que le commencement, pas la fin. Notre message est simple : le tabou est brisé – nous ne vivons pas dans le meilleur des mondes – et il nous est permis, nous y sommes même obligé-es, de penser les ...

  17. Radioactive hydrogeochemical processes in the Chihuahua-Sacramento Basin, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chihuahua Basin is divided by its morphology into three main sub basins: Chihuahua-Sacramento sub basin, Chihuahua Dam sub basin and Chuviscar River sub basin. In the aquifers at the Sacramento sub basin, specific concentrations of uranium in groundwater range from 460 to 1260 Bq / m3. The presence of strata and sandy clay lenses with radiometric anomalies in the N W of Chihuahua Valley was confirmed by a litostatigraphic study and gamma spectrometry measurements of drill cuttings. High uranium activity values found in the water of some deep wells may correspond to the presence of fine material bodies of carbonaceous material, possible forming pa leo-sediment of flooding or pa leo-soils. It is suggested that these clay horizons are uranyl ion collectors. Uranyl may suffer a reduction process by organic material. Furthermore the groundwater, depending on its ph and Eh, oxidizes and re-dissolves uranium. The hydrogeochemical behavior of San Marcos dam and the N W Valley area is the subject of studies that should help to clarify the origin of the radioactive elements and their relationships with other pollutants in the watershed. (Author)

  18. Radioactive hydrogeochemical processes in the Chihuahua-Sacramento Basin, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burillo, J. C.; Reyes C, M.; Montero C, M. E.; Renteria V, M.; Herrera P, E. F. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S. C., Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Reyes, I.; Espino, M. S., E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Facultad de Ingenieria, Nuevo Campus Universitario, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    The Chihuahua Basin is divided by its morphology into three main sub basins: Chihuahua-Sacramento sub basin, Chihuahua Dam sub basin and Chuviscar River sub basin. In the aquifers at the Sacramento sub basin, specific concentrations of uranium in groundwater range from 460 to 1260 Bq / m{sup 3}. The presence of strata and sandy clay lenses with radiometric anomalies in the N W of Chihuahua Valley was confirmed by a litostatigraphic study and gamma spectrometry measurements of drill cuttings. High uranium activity values found in the water of some deep wells may correspond to the presence of fine material bodies of carbonaceous material, possible forming pa leo-sediment of flooding or pa leo-soils. It is suggested that these clay horizons are uranyl ion collectors. Uranyl may suffer a reduction process by organic material. Furthermore the groundwater, depending on its ph and Eh, oxidizes and re-dissolves uranium. The hydrogeochemical behavior of San Marcos dam and the N W Valley area is the subject of studies that should help to clarify the origin of the radioactive elements and their relationships with other pollutants in the watershed. (Author)

  19. La Croix-Rouge lyonnaise dans la guerre, 1940-1945 ...

    OpenAIRE

    Amidieu-Michaud, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Comment la Croix-Rouge, la plus ancienne et emblématique des organisations humanitaires a-t-elle agi « sur le terrain » en un lieu précis –Lyon et environs- et pendant la période tragique de la seconde Guerre Mondiale ? Comment une société de secours destinée essentiellement aux militaires blessés sur les champs de bataille a-t-elle élargi son action pour aider les populations civiles en détresse ? Avec quels succès et quelles limites ?C'est à l'échelle d'une monographie et par des exemples p...

  20. Des Savoyards à Paris : les cols rouges de l’Hôtel Drouot

    OpenAIRE

    Arpin, Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    Les « cols rouges », à travers leur monopole de métier au sein de l’hôtel des ventes Drouot, sont un objet ethnologique et sociologique privilégié pour comprendre comment les provinciaux de Paris ont pu accéder à une intégration économique et culturelle via la constitution de communautés de travail à partir du xixe siècle. « Gens de bras », selon l’expression en usage alors pour désigner ces journaliers qui vendaient leur force de travail, les cent dix commissionnaires de l’Hôtel Drouot, appe...

  1. Adapting Impressionism: Hou Hsiao-hsien’s Le Voyage du ballon rouge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A Durham

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2007 release of a film directly inspired by a beloved French children’s movie made fifty years earlier would have been surprising enough without the additional fact that the adaptation was the work of a Taiwanese filmmaker who had never before filmed outside Asia and who spoke no French.  Hou hsiao-hsien’s Le Voyage du ballon rouge is not only a startling original film in its own right but it is also richly illustrative of the value of broadening our understanding of the intricate dialogic relations among texts.  Hou’s reinterpretation of Lamorisse’s film intersects not only with his own recurrent stylistic preferences and prior work as a filmmaker but also with a variety of self-reflective art works ranging from Chinese puppet shows to the statues in the Luxembourg garden to scenes from an internal remake of Le Ballon rouge to a visit to the Musée d’Orsay to see Félix Vallotton’s “Le Ballon.” In keeping with the extraordinary focus within the film on lighting and the color red, Hou’s homage to Lamorisse is all about allusion, reflections, and impressions.  Appropriately, one of the works it evokes is the Claude Monet painting, “Impression, soleil levant,” whose reddish sun looks strikingly like a red balloon floating through the sky and whose title named a movement which has not only endured but expanded to include analogous styles in a variety of visual arts and other media.

  2. Belleville rouge, Belleville noir, Belleville rose: The Complex Identity of a Parisian quartier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Stott

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Parisian quartier of Belleville has long been the subject of scholarly literature and popular culture due to its colourful history and diverse population. Its symbolic boundaries extend beyond the geographical limits imposed by its administrative demarcation. Myths abound as to the extent of its rebellious past, its contemporary image as a melting pot and its prevalence as a décor for the noir genre. In this article a three-tiered categorisation of Belleville is adopted which corresponds to various representations of the suburb in literature, popular culture and from the perspective of its inhabitants. Belleville rouge reflects the quartier’s revolutionary past and the late 20th century struggle associated with its physical metamorphosis. Belleville noir focusses on the quartier’s criminal face, as it is depicted in Parisian film and roman noir and as it exists in reality. Belleville rose highlights the pleasures of the quartier: its cosmopolitan character whose representation verges at times on utopian.    In his Malaussène series (1985-1995, writer and former resident Daniel Pennac portrays Belleville as a unique blend of rouge, noir and rose. This fusion of fairy tale, detective fiction, myth and reality establishes a complex Bellevillois identity distinct from other contemporary representations. The article concludes that it is impossible to associate a single identity with Belleville. The quartier’s contemporary face is inextricably linked to its past, the memory of which is preserved by its inhabitants and by social and literary commentators such as Pennac. In keeping with historian Pierre Nora’s concept of cultural memory, Pennac thus assumes the role of guardian of Belleville’s cultural memory in the face of the quartier’s perpetual evolution.

  3. Bivariate Drought Analysis Using Streamflow Reconstruction with Tree Ring Indices in the Sacramento Basin, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewon Kwak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term streamflow data are vital for analysis of hydrological droughts. Using an artificial neural network (ANN model and nine tree-ring indices, this study reconstructed the annual streamflow of the Sacramento River for the period from 1560 to 1871. Using the reconstructed streamflow data, the copula method was used for bivariate drought analysis, deriving a hydrological drought return period plot for the Sacramento River basin. Results showed strong correlation among drought characteristics, and the drought with a 20-year return period (17.2 million acre-feet (MAF per year in the Sacramento River basin could be considered a critical level of drought for water shortages.

  4. Radioactive hydrogeochemical processes in the Chihuahua-Sacramento Basin, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Burillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available La cuenca hidrológica de Chihuahua se divide por su geomorfología en tres principales subcuencas: Subcuenca Chihuahua-Sacramento, Subcuenca de la presa Chihuahua y Subcuenca del río Chuv´ícar. En los acuíferos de la subcuenca Sacramento, las concentraciones especí¿ficas del uranio en agua subterránea fluctúan de 460 a 1260 Bq/m3. Se comprobó la localización de estratos y lentes arcillo-arenosos con anomalías radiométricas en la zona NW del valle Chihuahua, mediante un estudio litoestatigráfico de barrenos y por mediciones de espectrometría gamma. Las anomalías encontradas en el agua de algunos pozos profundos se corresponden con la presencia de cuerpos de material fino areno-arcillosos mezclado con material carbonoso, formando posibles paleo-suelos o paleo-sedimentos de inundación. Se sugiere que estos horizontes areno-arcillosos son recolectores del ion uranilo y hacen que el uranilo sufra un proceso de reducción por el material orgánico. Después el agua subterránea, en dependencia del pH y el Eh, oxida nuevamente y redisuelve el uranio, pasando al agua que se extrae de los pozos. La hidrogeoquímica de la presa de San Marcos y de la zona NW del valle es objeto de estudios que deben contribuir a esclarecer el origen de los elementos radiactivos y sus relaciones con otros contaminantes en la cuenca.

  5. Aa. Vv., Lectures de Stendhal. “Le Rouge et le Noir”, sous la direction de Xavier Bourdenet

    OpenAIRE

    Arrous, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Agrégation oblige: en 2013, le Rouge a fait l’objet de nombreuses études et, inévitablement, de nombreuses redites, ce qui n’empêcha sans doute pas les agrégatifs de tirer parti de cette profusion. Dans le cas présent, c’est la réception actuelle du roman qui a été choisie, d’abord en privilégiant son inscription historique, puis en s’intéressant à la représentation des personnages, aux différents régimes du romanesque et, enfin, à la poétique de l’énonciation. Dans sa présentation, “Le Rouge...

  6. Modélisation numérique des formes d’équilibre d’un globule rouge

    OpenAIRE

    Simeoni, Matthieu Martin Jean-Andre

    2013-01-01

    Nous nous proposons dans cette étude de valider le modèle introduit par Canham et Helfrich afin de décrire les formes d’équilibre statique d’un globule rouge. Selon ce modèle, la forme du globule rouge est solution d’un problème d’optimisation sous contrainte: minimisation de l’énergie de Canham Helfrich pour un volume et une aire fixés. Après avoir formaliser le problème matématiquement, nous dérivons la conditionn d’optimalité menant à une équation différentielle ordinaire non linéaire véri...

  7. Multidromion Soliton and Rouge Wave for the (2 + 1)-Dimensional Broer-Kaup System with Variable Coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Broad new families of rational form variable separation solutions with two arbitrary lower-dimensional functions of the (2 + 1)-dimensional Broer-Kaup system with variable coefficients are derived by means of an improved mapping approach and a variable separation hypothesis. Based on the derived variable separation excitation, some new special types of localized solutions such as rouge wave, multidromion soliton, and soliton vanish phenomenon are revealed by selecting ap...

  8. Digital Elevation Model of Little Holland Tract, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This product is a digital elevation model (DEM) for the Little Holland Tract in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California based on U.S. Geological Survey...

  9. Topographic measurements of Little Holland Tract, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Topographic data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2015 for the Little Holland Tract in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California. The...

  10. Bathymetric measurements of Little Holland Tract, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Bathymetric data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2015 for the Little Holland Tract in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California. The...

  11. National uranium resource evaluation program: hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Sacramento quadrangle, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field and laboratory data are presented for 1890 sediment samples from the Sacramento Quadrangle, California. The samples were collected by Savannah River Laboratory; laboratory analysis and data reporting were performed by the Uranium Resource Evaluation Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

  12. Bivariate Drought Analysis Using Streamflow Reconstruction with Tree Ring Indices in the Sacramento Basin, California, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Jaewon Kwak; Soojun Kim; Gilho Kim; Singh, Vijay P; Jungsool Park; Hung Soo Kim

    2016-01-01

    Long-term streamflow data are vital for analysis of hydrological droughts. Using an artificial neural network (ANN) model and nine tree-ring indices, this study reconstructed the annual streamflow of the Sacramento River for the period from 1560 to 1871. Using the reconstructed streamflow data, the copula method was used for bivariate drought analysis, deriving a hydrological drought return period plot for the Sacramento River basin. Results showed strong correlation among drought characteris...

  13. Assessment of Undiscovered Natural Gas Resources of the Sacramento Basin Province of California, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheirer, Allegra Hosford; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Magoon, Leslie B.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a new assessment of undiscovered natural gas resources of the Sacramento Basin Province of California. Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the USGS mean estimates of undiscovered, technically recoverable resources are 534 billion cubic feet of natural gas and 323 thousand barrels of natural gas liquids in the Sacramento Basin Province. Additional undiscovered oil accumulations larger than 0.5 million barrels are considered unlikely.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of collagen fibers in country chicken muscle (Label Rouge and Pedres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Karaccas de Carvalho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to quantify collagen fibers in different lineages of country chicken at different ages and anatomical regions. The collection of material was carried out in both lineages (five poultries/treatment at two different times: 42 and 72 days of age. At each moment, a fragment of the pectoralis thoracic (PT and lateral iliotibial (LIT muscles was collected, which were fixed in 10% formaldehyde for 48 hours; they underwent a conventional histological approach, they were stained with picrosirius, and they were measured through the morphometry software KS-400 ZEISS®. The quantity of collagen fibers found in the muscles collected at 42 and 72 days, regardless of the region under study, was, respectively, 2.32±2.31% and 4.56±2.94%, for the Label Rouge lineage, and 2.26±1.61% and 4.92±2.12%, for the Pedres lineage. The quantity of collagen fibers in the different lineages and anatomical regions showed no significant statistical difference. However, when age (42 and 72 days was taken into account, a significant statistical difference was observed. The increased amount of collagen fibers found in the lineages under study is influenced by age and it’s probably one of the factors which can influence meat texture.

  15. Metabolic diversity of the heterotrophic microorganisms and potential link to pollution of the Rouge River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heterotrophic microbial communities of the Rouge River were tracked using Biolog Ecoplates to understand the metabolic diversity at different temporal and spatial scales, and potential link to river pollution. Site less impacted by anthrophogenic sources (site 1), showed markedly lower metabolic diversity. The only substrates that were utilized in the water samples were carbohydrates. Sites more impacted by anthrophogenic sources (sites 8 and 9) showed higher metabolic diversity. Higher functional diversity was linked to the physico-chemical and biological properties of the water samples (i.e. higher concentrations of DO, DOC, chlorophyll, and bacterial density). Biolog analysis was found to be useful in differentiating metabolic diversity between microbial communities; in determining factors that most influence the separation of communities; and in identifying which substrates were most utilized by the communities. It can also be used as an effective ecological indicator of changes in river function attributable to urbanization and pollution. - BIOLOG differentiated metabolic diversity between microbial communities and can be used as ecological indicator of river function attributable to urbanization and pollution.

  16. A Contamination Vulnerability Assessment for the Sacramento Area Groundwater Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2004-03-10

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as MtBE from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater-monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Ambient Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the GAMA Program is to assess the water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement the groundwater assessment program in cooperation with local water purveyors. In 2001 and 2002, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the groundwater basin of Sacramento suburban area, located to the north of the American River and to the east of the Sacramento River. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3

  17. Tissue residues and hazards of water-borne pesticides for federally listed and candidate fishes of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California: 1993-1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is formed at the confluence of the south-flowing Sacramento River and the north-flowing San Joaquin River. The Delta provides...

  18. Painlevé Property, Bäcklund Transformations and Rouge Wave Solutions of (3 + 1)-Dimensional Burgers Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgers equation is the simplest one in soliton theory, which has been widely applied in almost all the physical branches. In this paper, we discuss the Painlevé property of the (3+1)-dimensional Burgers equation, and then Bäcklund transformation is derived according to the truncated expansion of the obtained Painlevé analysis. Using the Bäcklund transformation, we find the rouge wave solutions to the equation via the multilinear variable separation approach. And we also give an exact solution obtained by general variable separation approach, which is proved to possess abundant structures. (general)

  19. The Legacy of the Khmer Rouge Tribunal: Maintaining the Status Quo of Cambodia's Legal and Judicial System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Ghouse, John Coughlan, Richard Smith

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    The Cambodian judicial system is fraught with deficiencies. The Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia – established to try the leaders of the Khmer Rouge and those most responsible for the atrocities committed during the regime – has been hailed as a model court from which to bolster domestic legal and judicial reform. While the ECCC has made some steps towards providing a positive legacy - enhancing the capacity of the judiciary, addressing fair trial rights and standards of justice - in the absence of political will to address corruption and political interference, this legacy is superficial at best.

  20. 33 CFR 207.640 - Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals; use, administration, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... mooring or anchoring of boats or other craft in the approaches to the lock, where such mooring will... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sacramento Deep Water Ship... REGULATIONS § 207.640 Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals; use,...

  1. Site Response in the San Joaquin/Sacramento River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, J. B.; Boatwright, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta lies on the western edge of the Great Valley and contains a system of levees that are thought to be prone to catastrophic failure from a major earthquake in the San Francisco Bay area or on faults along the western border of the Great Valley. To assess this risk we deployed digital recorders and broadband sensors in late 2006 and 2007 at 3 levee sites in the Delta (each site had a top and base sensor) and at one reference site to the west. Cone penetrometer data show that at the base, the soils have low S-wave velocities of 170 to 240 m/s. Upper soil layers are typically peats and aeolian sands. During the nine months of deployment, we recorded 3 local events (45kmBlack Diamond Mine (BDM, part of the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network). Spectra are normalized for distance. Each spectrum is smoothed with an algorithm that tries to preserve peaks; a running mean filter is also applied to the spectra from the reference site to reduce the possibility of holes in the reference spectrum appearing as a resonance in the ratio. Our primary observation is that many of the spectral ratios show large resonances, typically at 1-3 Hz and may represent a substantial risk to the levees. Sites at the tops of levees typically have stronger resonances in the 1-3 Hz range compared to base sites. The character of these ratios, however, differs substantially for each event. For example, the top site at Bethel Isl. has peaks in the site response with amplitudes between 6 and 15 (2-3Hz) for an earthquake located near Berkeley using either reference site, but is only apparent in the ratios using BDM for the other two events. This is because BYR has more amplitude in the 2- 3 Hz band then BDM typically does. The event with a depth of 16.2 km appears to have the smallest resonances when using BYR as a reference. Long-period surface waves arrive as much as 20s late compared to the high- frequency S waves on records from Delta sites producing very long

  2. 77 FR 65346 - Determination of Attainment for the Sacramento Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine Particle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Determination of Attainment for the Sacramento Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine... primary and secondary \\1\\ annual and 24-hour standards for PM 2.5 (62 FR 38652). The annual standard was... presence of such air pollutant in the ambient air. See CAA section 109(b). On October 17, 2006 (71 FR...

  3. 75 FR 40762 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... Quality Management District and South Coast Air Quality Management District AGENCY: Environmental... Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD) and South Coast Air Quality Management...://www.regulations.gov is an ``anonymous access'' system, and EPA will not know your identity or...

  4. 77 FR 59647 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The California Department of Parks and Recreation... may contact the California Department of Parks and Recreation. Repatriation of the human remains...

  5. Revised Environmental Assessment for the Sacramento Area Office Western Area Power Administration, 1994 Power Marketing Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents information on power marketing; expiring contracts; economic methods and assumptions; detailed power supply cost data; guidelines and acceptance criteria for conservation and renewable energy projects; hourly flow impacts graphs; difference in hydro dispatch; generation data; flow data; fishery resources of the Sacramento River; and water quality

  6. Biological assessment: water hyacinth control program for the Sacramento/ San Joaquin River Delta of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    A detailed Biological Assessment was developed for the proposed Areawide Water Hyacinth Control Program to outline the procedures that will be used to control this invasive aquatic plant in the Sacramento/ San Joaquin River Delta, and to help determine if this action is expected to threaten endanger...

  7. Impact of the Efficacy Process on Students in Sacramento City USD Pilot Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerty, Rebecka A.

    Research related to the implementation and impact of the efficacy process on teachers and students in four Sacramento (California) City Unified School District pilot schools over a 4-year period is described. The study investigated three research evaluation questions: (1) the extent of teachers' implementation of the efficacy process; (2) the…

  8. 77 FR 60904 - Safety Zone; Rio Vista Bass Derby Fireworks, Sacramento River, Rio Vista, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Rio Vista Bass Derby Fireworks, Sacramento River, Rio... Guard will enforce the safety zone for the Rio Vista Bass Derby Fireworks in the Captain of the Port... 38 09'18'' N, 121 41'15'' W (NAD 83) for the Rio Vista Bass Derby Fireworks in 33 CFR 165.1191....

  9. 75 FR 40726 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993... Quality Management District and South Coast Air Quality Management District AGENCY: Environmental... revisions to the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD) and South Coast...

  10. De quelques retours de M. Chat : Historiographie politique dans Le fond de l’air est rouge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Hamers

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dans son film de montage Le fond de l’air est rouge, Chris Marker compile un ensemble de représentations hétérogènes issues d’une décennie de luttes (ouvrières, étudiantes, indépendantistes, etc. dans le monde. Par l’assemblage de ces images, le cinéaste déploie une historiographie a priori mélancolique et défaitiste. Le présent texte entend dépasser cette interprétation unilatérale de la critique politique des images pour y identifier les traces d’un retour chronique à l’espoir militant.

  11. Determination of trace elements in eyeshadow, face powder and rouge make-up cosmetics by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some trace elements exist in cosmetics due to the mineral origin of their raw materials and there is no information about their concentration levels in these products. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to determine the elements: cerium, cesium, europium, hafnium, lanthanum, lutetium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, sodium, tantalum, terbium, tungsten and ytterbium in eyeshadow, face powder and rouge make-up cosmetic products from the Greek market. According to the results, a wide range of values was found between the three examined cosmetics as well as between the different samples belonging to the same kind of cosmetics. This probably could be attributed to the various manufacturers of the analyzed samples. Moreover, the use of neutron activation analysis as a suitable routine method is discussed for the control of some elements which must not be contained in cosmetics. (author)

  12. Isotopes as Tracers of Water Origin in and Near a Regional Carbonate Aquifer: The Southern Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Eastoe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-elevation groundwater sampled in 2003 in the Sacramento Mountains defines a line resembling an evaporation trend in δD-δ18O space. The trend results from recharge of winter precipitation into fractured limestone, with evaporation prior to recharge in broad mountain valleys. The same trend occurs in basin groundwater east and west of the range, indicating the high Sacramento Mountains as the principal regional water source, either direct from the limestone aquifers or from mountain-derived surface water. Tritium and carbon-14 indicate bulk residence times of a few decades in the high Sacramento Mountains and at Alamogordo, and of thousands of years south of Alamogordo and in the artesian aquifer near Artesia. Stable O, H isotope data fail to demonstrate the presence of Sacramento Mountains water in a saline aquifer of the Hueco Bolson (Texas.

  13. Sacramento, Delevan, Colusa, and Sutter National Wildlife Refuges: Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment: Volume 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Sacramento, Delevan, Colusa, and Sutter NWRs for the next 15 years. This plan outlines...

  14. Book Reviews : International Democracy Assistance for Peacebuilding: Cambodia and Beyond, by Sorpong Peou. Basingstoke, England: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007 and Dancing in Shadows: Sihanouk, The Khmer Rouge, and the United Nations in Cambodia. By Benny Widyono. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 2008.

    OpenAIRE

    Ear, Sophal

    2008-01-01

    Book review of "International democracy assistance for peacebuilding: Cambodia and beyond" by Sorpong Peou and "Dancing in the shadows: Sihanouk, the Khmer Rouge, and the United Nations in Cambodia" by Benny Widyono.

  15. A Comparison of High Occupancy Vehicle, High Occupancy Toll, and Truck-Only Lanes in the Sacramento Region

    OpenAIRE

    Rodier, Caroline J.; Johnston, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    As the evidence mounts that HOV lanes will not produce expected reductions in congestion and emission, alternatives are being sought. High occupancy toll (HOT) lanes and truck only lanes are attractive alternatives. In this study, a region-wide system of new HOV lanes, HOT lanes, and truck only lanes m the Sacramento region are compared. The travel effects are simulated with the Sacramento regional travel demand model (SACMET96). The economic benefits for both personal travel and commercial v...

  16. Isotopes as Tracers of Water Origin in and Near a Regional Carbonate Aquifer: The Southern Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher J. Eastoe; Ryan Rodney

    2014-01-01

    High-elevation groundwater sampled in 2003 in the Sacramento Mountains defines a line resembling an evaporation trend in δD-δ18O space. The trend results from recharge of winter precipitation into fractured limestone, with evaporation prior to recharge in broad mountain valleys. The same trend occurs in basin groundwater east and west of the range, indicating the high Sacramento Mountains as the principal regional water source, either direct from the limestone aquifers or from mountain-derive...

  17. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    OpenAIRE

    Golet, Gregory H.; Brown, David L.; Carlson, Melinda; Gardali, Thomas; Henderson, Adam; Holl, Karen D.; Howell, Christine A.; Holyoak, Marcel; Hunt, John W; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Larsen, Eric W; Luster, Ryan A.; McClain, Charles; Nelson, Charles; Paine, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale ecosystem restoration projects seldom undergo comprehensive evaluation to determine project effectiveness. Consequently, there are missed opportunities for learning and strategy refinement. Before our study, monitoring information from California’s middle Sacramento River had not been synthesized, despite restoration having been ongoing since 1989. Our assessment was based on the development and application of 36 quantitative ecological indicators. These indicators were used to ch...

  18. Building a Regional Voice: Stakeholder Perceptions of the Sacramento Area Council of Governments’ Blueprint Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Eisberg, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Regional planning, often touted as the answer to sporadic and unsustainable growth, has historically been weak in the Sacramento region and in California as a whole. Local governments control land use decision-making in their boundaries and regional governments have had little power or intent to disrupt that dynamic. However, a recent initiative by the State Department of Transportation (Caltrans), named the California Regional Blueprint Program, attempts to revise this paradigm. Through a mu...

  19. Overwintering Biology of Culex (Diptera: Culicidae) Mosquitoes in the Sacramento Valley of California

    OpenAIRE

    NELMS, BRITTANY M.; Macedo, Paula A.; KOTHERA, LINDA; Savage, Harry M.; REISEN, WILLIAM K.

    2013-01-01

    At temperate latitudes, Culex (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes typically overwinter as adult females in reproductive arrest and also may serve as reservoir hosts for arboviruses when cold temperatures arrest viral replication. To evaluate their role in the persistence of West Nile virus (WNV) in the Sacramento Valley of California, the induction and termination of diapause were investigated for members of the Culex pipiens (L.) complex, Culex tarsalis Coquillett, and Culex stigmatosoma Dyar un...

  20. Selected trace elements in the Sacramento River, California: occurrence and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, H E; Antweiler, R C; Roth, D A; Alpers, C N; Dileanis, P

    2012-05-01

    The impact of trace elements from the Iron Mountain Superfund site on the Sacramento River and selected tributaries is examined. The concentration and distribution of many trace elements-including aluminum, arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, cerium, cobalt, chromium, cesium, copper, dysprosium, erbium, europium, iron, gadolinium, holmium, potassium, lanthanum, lithium, lutetium, manganese, molybdenum, neodymium, nickel, lead, praseodymium, rubidium, rhenium, antimony, selenium, samarium, strontium, terbium, thallium, thulium, uranium, vanadium, tungsten, yttrium, ytterbium, zinc, and zirconium-were measured using a combination of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Samples were collected using ultraclean techniques at selected sites in tributaries and the Sacramento River from below Shasta Dam to Freeport, California, at six separate time periods from mid-1996 to mid-1997. Trace-element concentrations in dissolved (ultrafiltered [0.005-μm pore size]) and colloidal material, isolated at each site from large volume samples, are reported. For example, dissolved Zn ranged from 900 μg/L at Spring Creek (Iron Mountain acid mine drainage into Keswick Reservoir) to 0.65 μg/L at the Freeport site on the Sacramento River. Zn associated with colloidal material ranged from 4.3 μg/L (colloid-equivalent concentration) in Spring Creek to 21.8 μg/L at the Colusa site on the Sacramento River. Virtually all of the trace elements exist in Spring Creek in the dissolved form. On entering Keswick Reservoir, the metals are at least partially converted by precipitation or adsorption to the particulate phase. Despite this observation, few of the elements are removed by settling; instead the majority is transported, associated with colloids, downriver, at least to the Bend Bridge site, which is 67 km from Keswick Dam. Most trace elements are strongly associated with the colloid phase going

  1. The effect of urban form and residential cooling energy use in Sacramento, California

    OpenAIRE

    Yekang Ko; John D Radke

    2014-01-01

    The impact of urban form on residential space-conditioning energy use has been controversial in recent planning literature. This study empirically evaluates the association between urban form and residential energy use, focusing particularly on residential electricity use for space cooling in the City of Sacramento, California. We characterize urban form, property conditions, and demographic and socioeconomic characteristics by applying spatial metrics embedded within a geographic information...

  2. Evaluation de l’insécurité alimentaire dans le Comté de Sacramento

    OpenAIRE

    Bellin-Lestienne, Constance; Darmon, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    In 2001, about 56,000 adults were estimated to be food insecure in Sacramento County. This number tends to keep rising eventhough several federal food assistance programs are available to the low-income population. The objectives of our study were to describe the population using emergency food assistance programs and to evaluate the federal food programs available to low-income people. Two different methods were used. Personal interviews of key informants in charge of the federal programs we...

  3. Travel, Emissions, And Consumer Benefits Of Advanced Transit Technologies In The Sacramento Region

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, R.; Rodier, C.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine the potential travel effects, emissions, and consumer welfare benefits of advanced transit technologies. These technologies included advanced transit information, demand responsive transit, and personal rapid transit. The Sacramento Regional Travel Demand model (SACMET 95) was used to simulate the travel effects. Consumer welfare evaluation was accomplished by applying the Small-Rosen model to SACMET. Five advanced transit scenarios for the Sacrament...

  4. Sacramento model calibration using different methodologies : application to the Itabapoana-MG river basin

    OpenAIRE

    Gibertoni, R. F. C.; Pinho, José L. S.; Muhlenhoff, A. P.; Kan, A.; Schwanenberg, D.; Reis, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the considerable progresses in computational hydraulics the calibration of hydrological models still requires a meticulous and laborious effort. However, the development of model calibration supporting tools has facilitated that work and improved the obtained results. The objective of this paper, developed under a R&D project, is to evaluate the performance achieved by using different calibration techniques for the rainfall-runoff Sacramento model of the Itabapoana-MG river basin. Bom...

  5. Habitat suitability and conservation of the Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, B.J.; Wylie, G.D.; Casazza, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    Resource managers often have little information regarding the habitat requirements and distribution of rare species. Factor analysis-based habitat suitability models describe the ecological niche of a species and identify locations where these conditions occur on the landscape using existing occurrence data. We used factor analyses to assess the suitability of habitats for Thamnophis gigas (Giant Gartersnake), a rare, threatened species endemic to the Central Valley of California, USA, and to map the locations of habitat suitable for T. gigas in the Sacramento Valley. Factor analyses indicated that the niche of T. gigas is composed of sites near rice agriculture with low stream densities. Sites with high canal densities and near wetlands also appeared suitable, but results for these variables were sensitive to potential sampling bias. In the Sacramento Valley, suitable habitats occur primarily in the central portion of the valley floor. Based upon the results of the factor analyses, recovery planning for T. gigas will require an on-the-ground assessment of the current distribution and abundance of T. gigas, maintaining the few remaining natural wetlands and the practice of rice agriculture in the Sacramento Valley, and studying the effects of agricultural practices and land use changes on populations of T. gigas. ?? 2010 by the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists.

  6. Thermal and structural evolution of the external Western Alps: Insights from (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronology and RSCM thermometry in the Aiguilles Rouges/Mont Blanc massifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutoux, A.; Bellahsen, N.; Nanni, U.; Pik, R.; Verlaguet, A.; Rolland, Y.; Lacombe, O.

    2016-06-01

    In the Western Alps, the External Crystalline Massifs (ECM) are key places to investigate the kinematics and thermal structure of a collisional crustal wedge, as their paleo-brittle/ductile transition is now exhumed at the surface. New (U-Th-Sm)/He data on zircon and new Raman Spectroscopy on Carbonaceous Material (RSCM) data from the Aiguilles Rouges and the Mont Blanc massifs, coupled to HeFTy thermal modeling, constrain the thermal evolution and exhumation of the massifs. In the cover of the Aiguilles Rouges massif, we found that the maximal temperature was about 320 °C (+/- 25 °C), close to the maximal temperature reached in the cover of the Mont Blanc massif (~ 350 °C +/- 25 °C). We show that, after a fast heating period, the thermal peak lasted 10-15 Myrs in the Mont Blanc massif, and probably 5-10 Myrs in the Aiguilles Rouges massif. This thermal peak is synchronous with crustal shortening documented in the basement. (U-Th-Sm)/He data and thermal modeling point toward a coeval cooling of both massifs, like other ECM, at around 18 Ma +/- 1 Ma. This cooling was related to an exhumation due to the initiation of frontal crustal ramps below the ECM, quite synchronously along the Western Alps arc.

  7. The Baton of Entrepreneurship

    OpenAIRE

    Reichstein, Toke; Sørensen, Anders; Kaiser, Ulrich; Sofka, Wolfgang; Gartner, William B.; Fattoum, Asma; Barinaga, Ester; Langevang, Thilde; Bartholdy, Camilla; Hjorth, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    There are many thoughts and beliefs about entrepreneurship. This diversity in opinions and concepts may be triggered by the booming interest in entrepreneurship and in entrepreneurs. Journalists, politicians and academics, just to mention a few groups, have greatly turned their focus and attention towards entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship. And in the labour market, entrepreneurship has become one of the more attractive options. Entrepreneurship has indeed become a centre of at...

  8. Taking Up the Baton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU XIAOYAN

    2010-01-01

    @@ World-famous French conductor Michel Plasson,who led the Orchestre du Capitole de Toulouse for 35 years until 2003,was appointed the principal conductor of the China National Symphony Orchestra(CNSO). During his one-year term,lasson plans to present 10 concerts. Plasson made his first appearance in his new position at the National Center for the Performing Arts(NCPA)in Beijing on March 14,winning great acclaims.

  9. Clay mineralogical evidence of a bioclimatically-affected soil, Rouge River basin, South-Central Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Holocene soils in drainage basins of South-Central Ontario, Canada, are generally Fluvisols (Entisols) in floodplains transitioning to Brunisols (Inceptisols), Luvisols (Alfisols) and Podzols (Spodosols) in older terraces and in the glaciated tableland. A single landslide sourced from the highest fluvial terrace in the Rouge basin, with a rubble drop of ~ 12 m emplaced a lobe-shaped mass of reworked stream gravel, glaciolacustrine sediment and till, emplaced approximately 6 m above mean water level at a height roughly equivalent to previously dated mid-Holocene terraces and soils. Clay mineralogy of the soil formed in this transported regolith produced the usual semi-detrital/pedogenic distribution of 1:1 (Si:Al = 1:1), 2:1 and 2:1:1 clay minerals as well as primary minerals consisting of plagioclase feldspar, quartz, mica and calcite. Unexpectedly, the presence of moderate amounts of Ca-smectite in the Bk and Ck horizons, relative to a clay-mineral depleted parent material (Cuk), argues for a soil hydrological change affecting the wetting depth in the deposit. The presence of the uncommon 'maidenhair fern' (Adiantum pedantum) in the mass wasted deposit, a plant capable of high evapotranspiration, is interpreted as producing a bioclimatic disruption limiting soil water penetration to near root depth (wetting depth), thus producing a clay mineral anomaly.

  10. Production of Blackberry Wine by Microfermentation using Commercial Yeasts Fermol Rouge® and Fermol Mediterranée®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatka Petravić-Tominac

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to determine the enological traits of two commercial yeasts (Fermol Rouge® and Fermol Mediterranée® in a small scale and to evaluate the possibility of their application in commercial production of blackberry wine. Fermentation activity was monitored by measuring CO2 evolution and CO2 production rate during microfermentation of blackberry juice performed at 23°C. Blackberry wines produced by two different yeasts were analyzed in order to compare their composition differences. Fermentations were carried on to complete sugar consumption by both yeast strains. Levels of volatile acids formed by the two yeasts were significantly different and differences in concentrations of residual sugars, malic acid, lactic acid and pH-value were highly significant. There were no significant differences between concentrations of ethanol, total acids and glycerol in blackberry wines produced by both yeasts. Chemical composition of the produced blackberry wines was in accordance with the Croatian fruit wine legislation. Good fermentative properties and low potential of H2S production of both commercial yeasts could be beneficial for blackberry wine production.

  11. Adaptive Management Methods to Protect the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Water Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David

    2016-01-01

    The California Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is the hub for California's water supply, conveying water from Northern to Southern California agriculture and communities while supporting important ecosystem services, agriculture, and communities in the Delta. Changes in climate, long-term drought, water quality changes, and expansion of invasive aquatic plants threatens ecosystems, impedes ecosystem restoration, and is economically, environmentally, and sociologically detrimental to the San Francisco Bay/California Delta complex. NASA Ames Research Center and the USDA-ARS partnered with the State of California and local governments to develop science-based, adaptive-management strategies for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The project combines science, operations, and economics related to integrated management scenarios for aquatic weeds to help land and waterway managers make science-informed decisions regarding management and outcomes. The team provides a comprehensive understanding of agricultural and urban land use in the Delta and the major water sheds (San Joaquin/Sacramento) supplying the Delta and interaction with drought and climate impacts on the environment, water quality, and weed growth. The team recommends conservation and modified land-use practices and aids local Delta stakeholders in developing management strategies. New remote sensing tools have been developed to enhance ability to assess conditions, inform decision support tools, and monitor management practices. Science gaps in understanding how native and invasive plants respond to altered environmental conditions are being filled and provide critical biological response parameters for Delta-SWAT simulation modeling. Operational agencies such as the California Department of Boating and Waterways provide testing and act as initial adopter of decision support tools. Methods developed by the project can become routine land and water management tools in complex river delta systems.

  12. Biogeochemical studies of wintering waterfowl in the Imperial and Sacramento Valleys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koranda, J.J.; Stuart, M.; Thompson, S.; Conrado, C.

    1979-10-01

    Trace and major elemental composition were determined in the organs of wintering waterfowl in the Imperial and Sacramento Valleys of California, and in soils, sediments, and agricultural fertilizer that constitute the various sources of elements in the waterfowl. These data provide a biogeochemical baseline for waterfowl populations wintering in an area being developed for geothermal power. This baseline in the Imperial Valley is affected by soil and sediment composition, agricultural effluents in irrigation and stream water, and spent shot deposited by hunters in waterfowl habitats. The waterfowl acquire a set of trace elements from these sources and concentrations increase in their organs over the wintering period. Nickel, arsenic, selenium, bromine, and lead are the primary elements acquired from soil sources, agricultural effluents, and spent shot in the Imperial Valley. The assessment of effects from geothermal effluents on waterfowl populations in complex because there are large influxes of materials into the Imperial Valley ecosystem that contain trace elements, i.e., irrigation water, phosphatic fertilizers, pesticides, and lead shot. Multiple sources exist for many elements prominent in the expected geothermal effluents. The relationships between the two California valleys, the Imperial and Sacramento, are apparent in the trace element concentrations in the organs of waterfowl obtained in those two valleys. Arsenic is absent in the waterfowl organs obtained in the Sacramento Valley and relatively common in the Imperial Valley waterfowl. The effect of any release of geothermal effluent in the Imperial Valley waterfowl habitats will be difficult to describe because of the complexity of the biogeochemical baseline and the multiple sources of trace and major elements in the ecosystem.

  13. Characterizing the Fabric of the Urban Environment: A Case Study of Sacramento, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashen; Rose, L. Shea; Taha, Haider

    1999-12-01

    To estimate the impact of light-colored surfaces (roofs and pavements) and urban vegetation (trees, grass, shrubs) on meteorology and air quality of a city, it is essential to accurately estimate the fraction of various urban surfaces. In this report, we estimate the fabric of Sacramento by analyzing high-resolution (0.30-m) aerial color photographs of about 65 square km of the urban area. The analysis show that in downtown Sacramento, vegetation as seen from above the canopy covers 30% of the area, whereas roofs cover 23% and paved surface 41%. Under-the-canopy fabric consists of 52% paved surfaces, 26% roofs, and 12% grass. In the industrial areas, vegetation covers 8-14% of the area, roofs cover 19-23%, and paved surfaces cover 29-44%. The surface-type percentages in the office areas are 21% trees, 16% roofs, and 49% paved surfaces. In commercial areas,vegetation covers 5-20%, roofs 19-20%, paved surfaces 44-68%. Residential areas exhibit a wide range of percentages of surface-types . On average, vegetation covers about 36% of the area, roofs cover about 20%, and paved surfaces about 28%. Trees mostly shade streets, parking lots, grass, and sidewalks. Under the canopy the percentage of paved surfaces is significantly higher. In most non-residential areas, paved surfaces cover 50-70% of the area. In residential areas, on average, paved surfaces cover about 35% of the area. For an area of roughly 800 sq. km, defining most of metropolitan Sacramento, about half is residential. The total roof area is about 150 sq. km and the total paved surfaces (roads, parking areas, sidewalks) is about 310 sq. km. The total vegetated area is about 230 sq. km.

  14. Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop Summary: August 24, 2006, Sacramento, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treanton, B.; Palomo, J.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop, sponsored by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program and organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, was held Aug. 24, 2006, in Sacramento, Calif. The workshop provided a forum for industry stakeholders to share their knowledge and experience about technologies, manufacturing approaches, markets, and issues in power electronics for a range of distributed energy resources. It focused on the development of advanced power electronic interfaces for distributed energy applications and included discussions of modular power electronics, component manufacturing, and power electronic applications.

  15. Crevettes pénéides en mer Rouge et dans le golfe d'Aden par le navire "Météor" en 1987 (Crustacea : Decapoda : Penaeoidea)

    OpenAIRE

    Crosnier, Alain

    1995-01-01

    Une campagne du N.O. "METEOR", faite en 1987, a permis la récolte de 21 espèces de crevettes pénéides dans le golfe d'Aden et de cinq en mer Rouge. Sur les 21 espèces du Golfe d'Aden, 13 y avaient déjà été signalées, deux étaient considérées comme endémiques de la mer Rouge, quatre autres étaient connues de l'Océan Indien et une de l'Ouest-Pacifique; enfin une espèce, #Hymenopenaeus tuerkayi$, est nouvelle. Une autre espèce nouvelle, #Sicyonia parafallax$, a été capturée en mer Rouge, à l'ent...

  16. Production of Blackberry Wine by Microfermentation using Commercial Yeasts Fermol Rouge® and Fermol Mediterranée®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatka Petravić-Tominac

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false HR X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";} The aim of this paper was to determine the enological traits of two commercial yeasts (Fermol Rouge® and Fermol Mediterranée® in a small scale and to evaluate the possibility of their application in commercial production of blackberry wine. Fermentation activity was monitored by measuring CO2 evolution and CO2 production rate during microfermentation of blackberry juice performed at 23°C. Blackberry wines produced by two different yeasts were analyzed in order to compare their composition differences. Fermentations were carried on to complete sugar consumption by both yeast strains. Levels of volatile acids formed by the two yeasts were significantly different and differences in concentrations of residual sugars, malic acid, lactic acid and pH-value were highly significant. There were no significant differences between concentrations of ethanol, total acids and glycerol in blackberry wines produced by both yeasts. Chemical composition of the produced blackberry wines was in accordance with the Croatian fruit wine legislation. Good fermentative properties and low potential of H2S production of both commercial yeasts could be beneficial for blackberry wine production.

  17. Assessment of LED Technology in Ornamental Post-Top Luminaires (Host Site: Sacramento, CA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-12-01

    The DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium has evaluated four different LED replacements for existing ornamental post-top street lights in Sacramento, California. The project team was composed of the City and its consultant, PNNL (representing the Consortium), and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District. Product selection was finalized in March 2011, yielding one complete luminaire replacement and three lamp-ballast retrofit kits. Computer simulations, field measurements, and laboratory testing were performed to compare the performance and cost-effectiveness of the LED products relative to the existing luminaire with 100 W high-pressure sodium lamp. After it was confirmed the LED products were not equivalent to HPS in terms of initial photopic illumination, the following parameters were scaled proportionally to enable equitable (albeit hypothetical) comparisons: light output, input wattage, and pricing. Four replacement scenarios were considered for each LED product, incorporating new IES guidance for mesopic multipliers and lumen maintenance extrapolation, but life cycle analysis indicated cost effectiveness was also unacceptable. Although LED efficacy and pricing continue to improve, this project serves as a timely and objective notice that LED technology may not be quite ready yet for such applications.

  18. Trends in the sediment yield of the Sacramento River, California, 1957 - 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Schoellhamer

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Human activities within a watershed, such as agriculture, urbanization, and dam building, may affect the sediment yield from the watershed. Because the equilibrium geomorphic form of an estuary is dependent in part on the sediment supply from the watershed, anthropogenic activities within the watershed have the potential to affect estuary geomorphology. The Sacramento River drains the northern half of California’s Central Valley and is the primary source of sediment to San Francisco Bay. In this paper, it is shown that the delivery of suspended-sediment from the Sacramento River to San Francisco Bay has decreased by about one-half during the period 1957 to 2001. Many factors may be contributing to the trend in sediment yield, including the depletion of erodible sediment from hydraulic mining in the late 1800s, trapping of sediment in reservoirs, riverbank protection, altered land-uses (such as agriculture, grazing, urbanization, and logging, and levees. This finding has implications for planned tidal wetland restoration activities around San Francisco Bay, where an adequate sediment supply will be needed to build subsided areas to elevations typical of tidal wetlands as well as to keep pace with projected sea-level rise. In a broader context, the study underscores the need to address anthropogenic impacts on watershed sediment yield when considering actions such as restoration within downstream depositional areas.

  19. Laying performances and egg quality characteristics of F1 crossbred hens resulting from Label Rouge (T55XSA51) and two local ecotypes as parental lines

    OpenAIRE

    Senou, M.; Dahouda, M.; Idrissou, N.D.; Amoussou-Sydol, E.; Tougan, U.P.; Ahounou, S.; Yapi-Gnaoré, V.; Kayang, B.; Rognon, Xavier; Tixier Boichard, Michèle; M.T. Kpodékon

    2011-01-01

    The laying performances and the egg quality characteristics of hens of different genotypes were studied, namely: the; local hens of savannah ecotype (Es) , the local hens of forest ecotype (Ef), the Label Rouge (Lr or T55xSA51) and its crossbred products with local ecotypes: LrxEs, EsxLr and EfxLr. In family poultry farms, the hatching rate (HR), the fertility rate (FR), the average brood size (ABSH) at hatching and at the weaning (ABSW), the egg weight (EW) and the chick’s body weight (BWC) ...

  20. Evolution and floodplain history of the Middle Sacramento River from the late Quaternary to modern times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, M.; Aalto, R. E.; Fuchs, M.

    2011-12-01

    California has an extensive and storied research history in fluvial geomorphology dating back to G.K.Gilbert's studies of sediment transport in the Feather and Sacramento Rivers a century ago. Given the importance of Californian river systems in the field of geomorphology it is therefore surprising that there are still major gaps in understanding the late Quaternary evolution of the Sacramento River and the continuing responses of the modern system. Studies of river response to environmental change have been popular in Europe, but the Western US lacks so many similar investigations of the late Quaternary evolution of major rivers. We help to address this shortcoming by presenting detailed geochronology and other results from a research campaign along the largest natural reach of the largest river in California. The unique ownership history of the Rancho Llano Seco has preserved a near-pristine floodplain structure with an extensive network of natural floodplain channels. This therefore provides an excellent research environment to investigate natural occurring infilling processes and to study the fluvial history of the Sacramento River and modern floodplain development. Our research documents both the long-term evolution of the Sacramento River system and provides extensive, quantitative insight into modern day sedimentation rates in regards to topographic location. At Llano Seco there are 3 types of channels interpreted as Holocene meander belt, and anastomosing or braiding floodplain channel systems, and other floodplain units - these have been previously mapped from air photos and geologic surveys. However, the temporal control on these geologic units has been poor, with no absolute dating. To provide dates we sampled and analyzed 22 deep pits (3-5m) and more than 70 shallow cores (~1m), establishing a thorough chronology with OSL and 14-C (for long-term system dynamics) and high resolution 210-Pb and 137-Cs dating (to document modern evolution of an extensive

  1. Impact contrôle automatisé feu rouge : Eléments de réflexion critiques autour d'une revue de littérature

    OpenAIRE

    CARNIS, L

    2010-01-01

    Ce document constitue une revue critique de la littérature internationale sur le contrôle automatisé feu rouge. Il s'organise en trois parties. La première souligne la diversité existante en matière de contrôle automatisé des feux rouges. Une politique largement utilisée au niveau international, mais qui se distingue par la mise en oeuvre de structures institutionnelles spécifiques et par la recherche d'objectifs divers. La deuxième partie s'interroge sur l'efficacité de tels dispositifs de c...

  2. IMPACT OF PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL MUD CONTAMINATION ON WELLBORE CEMENT- FORMATION SHEAR BOND STRENGTH Authors: Arome Oyibo1 and Mileva Radonjic1 * 1. Craft and Hawkins Department of Petroleum Engineering, 2131 Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, aoyibo1@tigers.lsu.edu, mileva@lsu.edu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyibo, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    Wellbore cement has been used to provide well integrity through zonal isolation in oil & gas wells and geothermal wells. Cementing is also used to provide mechanical support for the casing and protect the casing from corrosive fluids. Failure of cement could be caused by several factors ranging from poor cementing, failure to completely displace the drilling fluids to failure on the path of the casing. A failed cement job could result in creation of cracks and micro annulus through which produced fluids could migrate to the surface which could lead to sustained casing pressure, contamination of fresh water aquifer and blow out in some cases. In addition, cement failures could risk the release of chemicals substances from hydraulic fracturing into fresh water aquifer during the injection process. To achieve proper cementing, the drilling fluid should be completely displaced by the cement slurry. However, this is hard to achieve in practice, some mud is usually left on the wellbore which ends up contaminating the cement afterwards. The purpose of this experimental study is to investigate the impact of both physical and chemical mud contaminations on cement-formation bond strength for different types of formations. Physical contamination occurs when drilling fluids (mud) dries on the surface of the formation forming a mud cake. Chemical contamination on the other hand occurs when the drilling fluids which is still in the liquid form interacts chemically with the cement during a cementing job. We investigated the impact of the contamination on the shear bond strength and the changes in the mineralogy of the cement at the cement-formation interface to ascertain the impact of the contamination on the cement-formation bond strength. Berea sandstone and clay rich shale cores were bonded with cement cores with the cement-formation contaminated either physically or chemically. For the physically contaminated composite cores, we have 3 different sample designs: clean/not contaminated, scrapped and washed composite cores. Similarly, for the chemically contaminated samples we had 3 different sample designs: 0%, 5% and 10% mud contaminated composite cores. Shear test were performed on the composite cores to determine the shear bond strength and the results suggested that the detrimental impact of the contamination is higher when the cores are physically contaminated i.e. when we have mud cake present at the surface of the wellbore before a cement job is performed. Also, the results showed that shear bond strength is higher for sandstone formations as compared to shale formations. Material characterization analysis was carried out to determine the micro structural changes at the cement-formation interface. The results obtained from the SEM and micro CT images taken at the bond interface confirmed that chemical contamination caused substantial changes in the spatial distribution of minerals that impacted bond strength. Keywords: Cement-Formation bond strength, mud contamination, shale, sandstone and material characterization *Corresponding author

  3. Mechanical Shredding of Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes): Impacts to Water Quality in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Management actions to control invasive aquatic species can have significant ecosystem-scale effects. We evaluated the water chemistry and nutrient effects of mechanical shredding to control water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) in an agricultural slough and a tidal wetland on the Sacramento-San Joaq...

  4. Quantity and location of groundwater recharge in the Sacramento Mountains, south-central New Mexico (USA), and their relation to the adjacent Roswell Artesian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawling, Geoffrey C.; Newton, B. Talon

    2016-06-01

    The Sacramento Mountains and the adjacent Roswell Artesian Basin, in south-central New Mexico (USA), comprise a regional hydrologic system, wherein recharge in the mountains ultimately supplies water to the confined basin aquifer. Geologic, hydrologic, geochemical, and climatologic data were used to delineate the area of recharge in the southern Sacramento Mountains. The water-table fluctuation and chloride mass-balance methods were used to quantify recharge over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Extrapolation of the quantitative recharge estimates to the entire Sacramento Mountains region allowed comparison with previous recharge estimates for the northern Sacramento Mountains and the Roswell Artesian Basin. Recharge in the Sacramento Mountains is estimated to range from 159.86 × 106 to 209.42 × 106 m3/year. Both the location of recharge and range in estimates is consistent with previous work that suggests that ~75 % of the recharge to the confined aquifer in the Roswell Artesian Basin has moved downgradient through the Yeso Formation from distal recharge areas in the Sacramento Mountains. A smaller recharge component is derived from infiltration of streamflow beneath the major drainages that cross the Pecos Slope, but in the southern Sacramento Mountains much of this water is ultimately derived from spring discharge. Direct recharge across the Pecos Slope between the mountains and the confined basin aquifer is much smaller than either of the other two components.

  5. Quantity and location of groundwater recharge in the Sacramento Mountains, south-central New Mexico (USA), and their relation to the adjacent Roswell Artesian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawling, Geoffrey C.; Newton, B. Talon

    2016-04-01

    The Sacramento Mountains and the adjacent Roswell Artesian Basin, in south-central New Mexico (USA), comprise a regional hydrologic system, wherein recharge in the mountains ultimately supplies water to the confined basin aquifer. Geologic, hydrologic, geochemical, and climatologic data were used to delineate the area of recharge in the southern Sacramento Mountains. The water-table fluctuation and chloride mass-balance methods were used to quantify recharge over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Extrapolation of the quantitative recharge estimates to the entire Sacramento Mountains region allowed comparison with previous recharge estimates for the northern Sacramento Mountains and the Roswell Artesian Basin. Recharge in the Sacramento Mountains is estimated to range from 159.86 × 106 to 209.42 × 106 m3/year. Both the location of recharge and range in estimates is consistent with previous work that suggests that ~75 % of the recharge to the confined aquifer in the Roswell Artesian Basin has moved downgradient through the Yeso Formation from distal recharge areas in the Sacramento Mountains. A smaller recharge component is derived from infiltration of streamflow beneath the major drainages that cross the Pecos Slope, but in the southern Sacramento Mountains much of this water is ultimately derived from spring discharge. Direct recharge across the Pecos Slope between the mountains and the confined basin aquifer is much smaller than either of the other two components.

  6. Improved error estimates of a discharge algorithm for remotely sensed river measurements: Test cases on Sacramento and Garonne Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeosang; Garambois, Pierre-André; Paiva, Rodrigo C. D.; Durand, Michael; Roux, Hélène; Beighley, Edward

    2016-01-01

    We present an improvement to a previously presented algorithm that used a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for estimating river discharge from remotely sensed observations of river height, width, and slope. We also present an error budget for discharge calculations from the algorithm. The algorithm may be utilized by the upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. We present a detailed evaluation of the method using synthetic SWOT-like observations (i.e., SWOT and AirSWOT, an airborne version of SWOT). The algorithm is evaluated using simulated AirSWOT observations over the Sacramento and Garonne Rivers that have differing hydraulic characteristics. The algorithm is also explored using SWOT observations over the Sacramento River. SWOT and AirSWOT height, width, and slope observations are simulated by corrupting the "true" hydraulic modeling results with instrument error. Algorithm discharge root mean square error (RMSE) was 9% for the Sacramento River and 15% for the Garonne River for the AirSWOT case using expected observation error. The discharge uncertainty calculated from Manning's equation was 16.2% and 17.1%, respectively. For the SWOT scenario, the RMSE and uncertainty of the discharge estimate for the Sacramento River were 15% and 16.2%, respectively. A method based on the Kalman filter to correct errors of discharge estimates was shown to improve algorithm performance. From the error budget, the primary source of uncertainty was the a priori uncertainty of bathymetry and roughness parameters. Sensitivity to measurement errors was found to be a function of river characteristics. For example, Steeper Garonne River is less sensitive to slope errors than the flatter Sacramento River.

  7. Enquête, transmission et désordre dans La Seine était rouge de Leïla Sebbar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Schwerdtner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Le roman La Seine était rouge. Paris, octobre 1961 de Leïla Sebbar est le récit d’une enquête sur le massacre du 17 octobre 1961 dont l’histoire a été occultée par le pouvoir en place et tue par les familles des victimes. Cet article, qui s’inspire de l’articulation proposée par Arlette Farge entre récit d’histoire et silence des sources, montre que, chez Sebbar, toute forme de représentation ou de témoignage de cette journée de violence policière rend sensibles la lacune, le silence, l’oubli. Leïla Sebbar’s novel La Seine était rouge recounts an investigation of the October 17th, 1961 massacre, accounts of which were muted by the powers that be and hushed by the victims’ families. Drawing upon Arlette Farge’s work concerning the articulation of historical narratives and silent sources, this article shows that, in Sebbar’s work, any attempt to represent or bear witness to this occasion of police brutality lends a palpable character to silence, oblivion, and the gaps inherent in recounting such an event.

  8. Sacramento Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — CDF-FRAP compiled the 'best available' land cover data into a single data layer, to support the various analyses required for the 2002 Forest and Range Assessment....

  9. A Decision Support System for Mitigating Stream Temperature Impacts in the Sacramento River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, R. J.; Zagona, E. A.; Rajagopalan, B.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing demands on the limited and variable water supply across the West can result in insufficient streamflow to sustain healthy fish habitat. We develop an integrated decision support system (DSS) for modeling and mitigating stream temperature impacts and demonstrate it on the Sacramento River system in California. Water management in the Sacramento River is a complex task with a diverse set of demands ranging from municipal supply to mitigation of fisheries impacts due to high water temperatures. Current operations utilize the temperature control device (TCD) structure at Shasta Dam to mitigate these high water temperatures downstream at designated compliance points. The TCD structure at Shasta Dam offers a rather unique opportunity to mitigate water temperature violations through adjustments to both release volume and temperature. In this study, we develop and evaluate a model-based DSS with four broad components that are coupled to produce the decision tool for stream temperature mitigation: (i) a suite of statistical models for modeling stream temperature attributes using hydrology and climate variables of critical importance to fish habitat; (ii) a reservoir thermal model for modeling the thermal structure and, consequently, the water release temperature, (iii) a stochastic weather generator to simulate weather sequences consistent with seasonal outlooks; and, (iv) a set of decision rules (i.e., 'rubric') for reservoir water releases in response to outputs from the above components. Multiple options for modifying releases at Shasta Dam were considered in the DSS, including mixing water from multiple elevations through the TCD and using different acceptable levels of risk. The DSS also incorporates forecast uncertainties and reservoir operating options to help mitigate stream temperature impacts for fish habitat, while efficiently using the reservoir water supply and cold pool storage. The use of these coupled tools in simulating impacts of future climate

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS IN THE AFTERMATH OF HURRICANE KATRINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation describes the environmental sampling completed by EPA in southeastern Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina caused major catastrophic damage. Presentation also describes EPA's Environmental Unit activities in Baton Rouge and New Orleans, LA, and Dallas, TX.

  11. Economics Recession and Historically Black Colleges and Universities: An Analysis of Factors Impacting Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Uwakonye; Gbolahan S. Osho

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research study is to know how recession affected Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Analysis was based on data obtained from the schools’ fact books. The HBCU’s chosen were Grambling State University, Southern University Baton Rouge, Alabama A&M University and Prairie View A&M University. The Non-Historically Black Colleges and Universities were used for comparison. GSU, Southern University Baton Rouge, Alabama A&M University and Prairie Vie...

  12. Spatial trends and impairment assessment of mercury in sport fish in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta watershed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-year study was conducted to examine mercury in sport fish from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. More than 4000 fish from 31 species were collected and analyzed for total mercury in individual muscle filets. Largemouth bass and striped bass were the most contaminated, averaging 0.40 μg/g, while redear sunfish, bluegill and rainbow trout exhibited the lowest (<0.15 μg/g) concentrations. Spatial variation in mercury was evaluated with an analysis of covariance model, which accounted for variability due to fish size and regional hydrology. Significant regional differences in mercury were apparent in size-standardized largemouth bass, with concentrations on the Cosumnes and Mokelumne rivers significantly higher than the central and western Delta. Significant prey-predator mercury correlations were also apparent, which may explain a significant proportion of the spatial variation in the watershed. - Regional differences in sport fish mercury were found in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

  13. Sediment-adsorbed total mercury flux through Yolo Bypass, the primary floodway and wetland in the Sacramento Valley, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springborn, Michael; Singer, Michael Bliss; Dunne, Thomas

    2011-12-15

    The fate and transport of mercury are of critical concern in lowland floodplains and wetlands worldwide, especially those with a history of upstream mining that increases the mobility of both dissolved and sediment-bound Hg in watersheds. A mass budget of total mercury (THg) quantifies sources and storage for particular areas - knowledge that is required for understanding of management options in lowland floodplains. In order to assess contaminant risk in the largest flood-control bypass, prime wetland, and restoration target in the Sacramento River basin, we estimated empirical relationships between THg, suspended sediment concentration (SSC), and streamflow (Q) for each of the major inputs and outputs using data from various publicly available sources. These relationships were improved by incorporating statistical representations of the dynamics of seasonal and intra-flood exhaustion (hysteresis) of sediment and mercury. Using continuous records of Q to estimate SSC suspended sediment flux and SSC to estimate THg flux, we computed the net transfer of sediment-adsorbed mercury through the Yolo Bypass over a decade, 1993-2003. Flood control weirs spilling Sacramento River floodwaters into the bypass deliver ~75% of the water and ~50% of the river's suspended sediment load, while one Coast Range tributary of the bypass, Cache Creek, contributes twice the THg load of the mainstem Sacramento. Although estimated sediment flux entering Yolo Bypass is balanced by efflux to the Sacramento/San Francisco Bay-Delta, there is much evidence of deposition and remobilization of sediment in Yolo Bypass during flooding. These factors point to the importance of the bypass as sedimentary reservoir and as an evolving substrate for biogeochemical processing of heavy metals. The estimates of mercury flux suggest net deposition of ~500 kg in the 24,000 ha floodway over a decade, dominated by two large floods, representing a storage reservoir for this important contaminant. PMID:22078330

  14. The Potential for Energy Retrofits within the City of Sacramento's Rental Housing Inspection Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iverson, Megan M.; Sande, Susan; Britt, Michelle L.

    2011-04-15

    This report presents the results of an analysis performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the City of Sacramento--under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Projects Technical Assistance Program--to help determine the potential for incorporating energy efficiency standards into the City’s existing Rental Housing Inspection Program as part of Sacramento’s efforts to create a Climate Action Plan.

  15. Transfert Radiatif hors équilibre thermodynamique local dans les atmosphères d'étoiles supergéantes rouges

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Julien

    2012-01-01

    L'eau est un constituant essentiel de l'atmosphère des supergéantes rouges (RSG), dont l'influence reste mal comprise. Le spectre observé de l'eau de ces étoiles ne peut être reproduit que par l'ajout d'une coquille de gaz moléculaire, les MOLsphères. Cependant, l'hypothèse des MOLsphères reste fragile et sujette à caution. Dans le but de mieux interpréter les spectres observés, la synthèse de spectres hors équilibre thermodynamique local est une approche potentiellement importante. Les effet...

  16. Enquête, transmission et désordre dans La Seine était rouge de Leïla Sebbar

    OpenAIRE

    Karin Schwerdtner

    2012-01-01

    Le roman La Seine était rouge. Paris, octobre 1961 de Leïla Sebbar est le récit d’une enquête sur le massacre du 17 octobre 1961 dont l’histoire a été occultée par le pouvoir en place et tue par les familles des victimes. Cet article, qui s’inspire de l’articulation proposée par Arlette Farge entre récit d’histoire et silence des sources, montre que, chez Sebbar, toute forme de représentation ou de témoignage de cette journée de violence policière rend sensibles la lacune, le silence, l’oubli...

  17. Behaviour of uranium during late-Hercynian and alpine metamorphisms in the Aiguilles rouges and Belledonne (Valorcine, Lauziere) massifs. Western Alps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research thesis is to define the origin of numerous uranium anomalies in the external crystalline Alpine massifs, more precisely the massif of the Aiguilles Rouges and the massif of Belledonne. The primary cause of uranium mineralization in the first massif appears to have been the retrograde metamorphism events of the late-Hercynian age. In the second massif, the same conditions of uranium mineralization appear to have been realised, but with a much higher calcium activity in the fluids. After having explained the choice of the selected areas, the sampling and the chemical analysis performed, the author describes the geological and structural framework of Western Alps: geological history of the paleozoic platform, regional geology of the studied massifs. The next part reports the petrographic and geochemical study, the analysis of the mineral chemistry, of the alteration and the metamorphism. Then the author describes the geochemistry of uranium and thorium within the studied structures

  18. Utopie ou mégalomanie ? Le canal antique du Nil à la Mer Rouge/Canal de Trajan ou l’histoire d’une gageure

    OpenAIRE

    Aubert, Jean-Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Le canal de Suez, entre Port Saïd et la mer Rouge, a succédé à un canal antique conduisant du Nil au golfe de Suez à travers le Ouadi Toumilat. Ouvrage commencé par les pharaons, repris par l’envahisseur perse, puis par un roi hellénistique et un empereur romain, il n’a probablement été navigable que de manière éphémère jusqu’à l’époque arabe. Les travaux entrepris sur son tracé à diverses époques concernaient plus l’exploitation des capacités d’irrigation que l’entretien de la voie fluviale ...

  19. Quel avenir pour les filières animales « sans OGM » en France? Illustration par le poulet Label Rouge

    OpenAIRE

    Milanesi, Julien

    2009-01-01

    Les producteurs de poulet Label Rouge ayant adopté une démarche d'alimentation sans-OGM payent aujourd'hui une prime pour s'approvisionner en soja non génétiquement modifié (GM). La généralisation des cultures de maïs GM en France se traduirait, du fait des efforts de protection et de ségrégation qu'auraient à effectuer les producteurs de maïs non GM, par un surcoût en approvisionnement supplémentaire pour ces éleveurs. En considérant ces surcoûts comme des externalités négatives, l'article e...

  20. „Un caractère qui a l'air si impossible“: Innerer Konflikt als Rollendialektik in Le Rouge et le Noir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Klimpe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Le Rouge et le Noir traite de l'ascension sociale du prolétaire Julien Sorel sous la Restauration. Julien est séminariste et méprise de fait les valeurs de la Restauration. En secret, il rêve de mener une existence héroïque sur le modèle de Napoléon. Le rôle idéal de Napoléon et le rôle social de prêtre sont conçus comme contraires, mais peuvent, néanmoins, difficilement être séparés dans les actions concrètes de Julien. La présente étude porte sur la dialectique entre l'idéal de Napoléon et la réalité de prêtre, et s'inscrit tant dans les sciences littéraires que dans la théorie des rôles sociaux, avec le but d'intégrer la perspective de la sociologie ainsi que celle de l'anthropologie.In Le Rouge et le Noir erzählt Stendhal den sozialen Aufstieg des Kleinbürgersohns Julien Sorel in der Restaurationsgesellschaft. Julien ist ein Priesterschüler, der die Restaurationsgesellschaft und ihre Werte verachtet und heimlich eine napoleonische Heldenexistenz ersehnt. „Napoleon“ und „Priester“ werden in der literaturwissenschaftlichen Rezeption des Werkes dabei immer wieder als Rollen interpretiert. Diese beiden Rollen sind zwar konträr konzipiert, in Juliens Handlungen aber kaum voneinander zu trennen. Die Dialektik von Napoleon-Ideal und Priester-Realität wird hier mit Hilfe literaturwissenschaftlicher Rezeptionsansätze, sowie unter den soziologischen und  anthropologischen Perspektiven der Rollentheorie untersucht.

  1. Assessment of shallow ground-water quality in recently urbanized areas of Sacramento, California, 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Evidence for anthropogenic impact on shallow ground-water quality beneath recently developed urban areas of Sacramento, California, has been observed in the sampling results from 19 monitoring wells in 1998. Eight volatile organic compounds (VOCs), four pesticides, and one pesticide transformation product were detected in low concentrations, and nitrate, as nitrogen, was detected in elevated concentrations; all of these concentrations were below National and State primary and secondary maximum contaminant levels. VOC results from this study are more consistent with the results from urban areas nationwide than from agricultural areas in the Central Valley, indicating that shallow ground-water quality has been impacted by urbanization. VOCs detected may be attributed to either the chlorination of drinking water, such as trichloromethane (chloroform) detected in 16 samples, or to the use of gasoline additives, such as methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), detected in 2 samples. Pesticides detected may be attributed to use on household lawns and gardens and rights-of-way, such as atrazine detected in three samples, or to past agricultural practices, and potentially to ground-water/surface-water interactions, such as bentazon detected in one sample from a well adjacent to the Sacramento River and downstream from where bentazon historically was used on rice. Concentrations of nitrate may be attributed to natural sources, animal waste, old septic tanks, and fertilizers used on lawns and gardens or previously used on agricultural crops. Seven sample concentrations of nitrate, as nitrogen, exceeded 3.0 milligrams per liter, a level that may indicate impact from human activities. Ground-water recharge from rainfall or surface-water runoff also may contribute to the concentrations of VOCs and pesticides observed in ground water. Most VOCs and pesticides detected in ground-water samples also were detected in air and surface-water samples collected at sites within or adjacent to the

  2. A preliminary investigation of the variables affecting the distribution of giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Skalos, Shannon M.; Casazza, Michael L.; Wylie, Glenn D.

    2015-01-01

    Giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) comprise a species of rare, semi-aquatic snake precinctive to the Central Valley of California. Because of the loss of more than 90% of their natural habitat, giant gartersnakes are listed as Threatened by the United States and California endangered species acts. Little is known, however, about the distribution of giant gartersnakes in the Sacramento Valley, which is where most extant populations occur. We conducted detection-nondetection surveys for giant gartersnakes throughout the rice-growing regions of the Sacramento Valley, and used occupancy models to examine evidence for the effects of landscape-scale GIS-derived variables, local habitat and vegetation composition, and prey communities on patterns of giant gartersnake occurrence. Although our results are based on a relatively small sample of sites, we found that distance to historic marsh, relative fish count, and an interaction of distance to historic marsh with proportion of habitat composed of submerged vegetation were important variables for explaining occupancy of giant gartersnakes. In particular, giant gartersnakes were more likely to occur closer to historic marsh and where relatively fewer fish were captured in traps. At locations in or near historic marsh, giant gartersnakes were more likely to occur in areas with less submerged vegetation, but this relationship was reversed (and more uncertain) at sites distant from historic marsh. Additional research with a larger sample of sites would further elucidate the distribution of giant gartersnakes in the Sacramento Valley.

  3. Overwintering biology of Culex (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes in the Sacramento Valley of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, Brittany M; Macedo, Paula A; Kothera, Linda; Savage, Harry M; Reisen, William K

    2013-07-01

    At temperate latitudes, Culex (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes typically overwinter as adult females in reproductive arrest and also may serve as reservoir hosts for arboviruses when cold temperatures arrest viral replication. To evaluate their role in the persistence of West Nile virus (WNV) in the Sacramento Valley of California, the induction and termination of diapause were investigated for members of the Culex pipiens (L.) complex, Culex tarsalis Coquillett, and Culex stigmatosoma Dyar under field, seminatural, and experimental conditions. All Culex spp. remained vagile throughout winter, enabling the collection of 3,174 females and 1,706 males from diverse habitats during the winters of 2010-2012. Overwintering strategies included both quiescence and diapause. In addition, Cx. pipiens form molestus Forskäl females remained reproductively active in both underground and aboveground habitats. Some blood-fed, gravid, and parous Cx. tarsalis and Cx. pipiens complex females were collected throughout the winter period. Under both field and experimental conditions, Cx. tarsalis and Cx. stigmatosoma females exposed to autumnal conditions arrested primary follicular maturation at previtellogenic stage I, with primary to secondary follicular ratios or=stage I-II (host-seeking arrest) or were found in various stages of degeneration. Diapause was initiated in the majority of Cx. tarsalis and Cx. stigmatosoma females by mid-late October and was terminated after the winter solstice, but host-seeking seemed limited by temperature. An accrual of 97.52 +/- 30.7 and 162.85 +/- 79.3 degree-days after the winter solstice was estimated to be necessary for diapause termination in Cx. tarsalis under field and seminatural conditions, respectively. An increase in the proportion of blood-fed Culex females in resting collections occurred concurrently with diapause termination in field populations based on ovarian morphometrics. WNV RNA was detected in one pool of 18 males and in a

  4. Characterization of subsurface stratigraphy along the lower American River floodplain using electrical resistivity, Sacramento, California, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Bethany L.; Powers, Michael H.; Ball, Lyndsay B.

    2014-01-01

    In July 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, completed a geophysical survey using electrical resistivity along an approximately 6-mile reach of the lower American River in Sacramento, California, to map near-surface lithological variations. This survey is a part of a manifold and comprehensive study of river-flow dynamics and geologic boundary-property knowledge necessary to estimate scour potential and levee erosion risk. Data were acquired on the left (south or west) bank between river mile 5 and 10.7 as well as a short section on the right bank from river mile 5.4 to 6. Thirteen direct-current resistivity profiles and approximately 8.3 miles of capacitively coupled resisistivity data were acquired along accessible areas of the floodplain between the levee and river bank. Capacitively coupled resistivity was used as a reconnaissance tool, because it allowed for greater spatial coverage of data but with lower resolution and depth of investigation than the DC resistivity method. The study area contains Pleistocene-age alluvial deposits, dominated by gravels, sands, silts, and clays, that vary in both lateral extent and depth. Several generations of lithologic logs were used to help interpret resistivity variations observed in the resistivity models.

  5. Mineral content of culinary and medicinal plants cultivated by Hmong refugees living in Sacramento, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, Jan L; Clegg, Michael S; Keen, Carl L; Grivetti, Louis E

    2002-03-01

    Since the end of the American-Vietnamese War in 1975, more than 1.5 million refugees from Southeast Asia have resettled in the United States. Included among these displaced persons were the Hmong from Laos, a subsistence-based, shifting-cultivation, agricultural society. Hmong who resettled in urban areas have viewed vacant lots adjacent to urban dwellings as potential garden sites for production of familiar herbs and vegetables. In the present study exotic culinary and medicinal herbs grown by Hmong refugees in Sacramento, California were identified and analyzed for mineral composition. The herbs grown in these urban gardens were significant ingredients of Hmong recipes, and herb leaves, or infusions of steamed herb leaves were widely consumed as a component of pregnancy and post-partum diets. Six common species, Acorus gramineus, aff. Angelica, Dendranthema indicum, Eupatorium lindleyana, Sedum aff. sarmentosum, and Sedum aff. spectabile, were used in combination to season chicken. Polygonum odoratum, also widely cultivated, was used to season fish. Exotic culinary-medicinal species with highest mineral profiles included: Basella alba (Ca, Mg, Mn, Zn); Houttuynia cordata (Fe, Mg, Mn); Justica gendarussa (Ca, Mg, Zn); and Polygonum odoratum (Ca, Mg, Mn). While vacant lots sometimes are heavy metal contamination sites, we found no detectable levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, or lead in the samples analyzed. PMID:11939106

  6. Chemical quality of ground water in the Tehama-Colusa Canal service area, Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, Gilbert L.

    1976-01-01

    The Tehama-Colusa Canal Service Area consists of about 450 square miles of irrigable land located on the west side of the Sacramento Valley, Calif. Upon the completion of the Tehama-Colusa Canal, it is expected that most of the service area will switch from passive forms of agriculture (dry farming and grazing) to intensive irrigated farming. Importation and application of surface water may affect the chemical quality of native ground water. This study documents the chemical quality of native ground water before large-scale importation and application of surface water provide the potential of altering the ground-water chemistry. Analyses of samples from 222 wells show that most of the area is underlain by ground water of a quality suitable for most agricultural and domestic uses. In the vicinities of College City-Arbuckle and the city of Williams, boron, chloride, sodium, and dissolved solids may be a threat to future agricultural activities where boron- or chloride-sensitive crops would be grown. The source of degraded ground water in the two areas is local intermittent streams that drain areas having numerous saline springs and seeps. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Factors influencing the biogeochemistry of sedimentary carbon and phosphorus in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, E.B.; Delaney, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    This study characterizes organic carbon (Corganic) and phosphorus (P) geochemistry in surface sediments of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California. Sediment cores were collected from five sites on a sample transect from the edge of the San Francisco Bay eastward to the freshwater Consumnes River. The top 8 cm of each core were analyzed (in 1-cm intervals) for Corganic, four P fractions, and redox-sensitive trace metals (uranium and manganese). Sedimentary Corganic concentrations and Corganic:P ratios decreased, while reactive P concentrations increased moving inland in the Delta. The fraction of total P represented by organic P increased inland, while that of authigenic P was higher bayward than inland reflecting increased diagenetic alteration of organic matter toward the bayward end of the transect. The redox indicator metals are consistent with decreasing sedimentary suboxia inland. The distribution of P fractions and C:P ratios reflect the presence of relatively labile organic matter in upstream surface sediments. Sediment C and P geochemistry is influenced by site-specific particulate organic matter sources, the sorptive power of the sedimentary material present, physical forcing, and early diagenetic transformations presumably driven by Corganic oxidation. ?? 2005 Estuarine Research Federation.

  8. La consommation urbaine de l’huile de palme rouge en Côte d’Ivoire : quels marchés ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheyns Emmanuelle

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Au côté d’une extraction industrielle de l’huile de palme dont les débouchés sont l’exportation en Europe et, en Côte d’Ivoire, la seconde transformation en huile industrielle raffinée et produits dérivés (savons, margarines pour un marché ivoirien et sous-régional, il existe un secteur de transformation artisanal de l’huile rouge (et aussi de l’huile de palmiste et de savons qui répond à une demande différenciée des consommateurs ruraux mais aussi urbains. En termes d’équipements de transformation, le secteur artisanal est peu développé (beaucoup moins que dans d’autres pays de la sous-région. L’extraction de l’huile rouge y est soit entièrement manuelle, soit semi-mécanisée : utilisation de presses à vis verticales très simples et peu coûteuses. Les trente dernières années de développement industriel n’ont pas permis à la Côte d’Ivoire de se doter d’équipements semi-industriels ou artisanaux, intermédiaires 2 entre l’usine de 20 ou 40 t/h et la transformation manuelle par les femmes, alors que d’autres pays voisins se sont au contraire dotés de ces équipements [1]. Quoi qu’il en soit, ce secteur artisanal informel, maîtrisé par les femmes (transformation et commercialisation, approvisionne largement les marchés de consommation locaux, ruraux comme urbains, en un produit considéré comme spécifique (que ne fournit pas l’agro-industrie locale et qui semble toujours apprécié des consommateurs. Il nous amène à reconsidérer la filière « palmier à huile » sous l’angle d’une filière dont le produit est aussi « vivrier » (par opposition à produit de « rente » et qui assure un approvisionnement des marchés locaux, via des circuits informels, en répondant à une demande locale. Une première enquête 3 par entretiens approfondis auprès de 28 ménages abidjanais révèle une différenciation de la demande qui s’établit sur la qualité des produits, et qui

  9. Responses to Episodic Floodplain Aggradation: Hydraulic Mining Sediment in the Sacramento Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, L. A.; Ghoshal, S.

    2006-12-01

    This study is concerned with episodic sedimentation of floodplains along the lower Yuba and Feather Rivers in response to a period of 31 years of hydraulic gold mining in the Sierra Nevada, California. It presents preliminary findings from field reconnaissance in the summer of 2006, relates these findings to earlier studies in the Bear River, and draws implications of long-term floodplain evolution and river response. The floodplain sedimentation caused by hydraulic mining constitutes one of the greatest episodes of anthropogenic alluviation known to have occurred over a period of a few decades. The volume of hydraulic mining sediment produced in the Bear River and Yuba River at Deer Creek was 270 and 400 m3 106, respectively. Mining began in 1853 and largely ceased in 1884 by court injunction. Over this period of 31 years, specific sediment production rates for these two basins were on the order of 16.8 and 9.4 Mt yr-1 in the Bear and Yuba Rivers, respectively. The high sediment deliveries overwhelmed the transport capacity of the rivers. Sedimentation depths in the lower Bear averaged 2.4 m at the time of maximum aggradation. Representative stratigraphic sections from bank exposures reveal two to three meters of historical sediment overlying the pre- mining soil along the lower Feather and Yuba Rivers as well. Rates of overbank sedimentation were extreme during the period of floodplain aggradation. Although mining began in 1853, relatively little sediment was delivered to the Sacramento Valley until the 1862 floods. Assuming that floodplain aggradation was largely completed by the time of maximum bed aggradation (given by Gilbert in 1917), the end of aggradation occurred around 1900 at the Narrows and around 1905 at Marysville. Taking the period of floodplain aggradation as between 1862 and 1902, rates of overbank sedimentation were 250 cm / 40 years = 6.3 cm yr-1 for forty years. This substantial sediment sink is now acting as a source of sediment to the modern

  10. Biology and population dynamics of Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthys macrolepidotus in the San Francisco Estuary: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Matern

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sacramento splittail(Pogonichthys macrolepidotus is a cyprinid fish endemic to the Central Valley of California with a range that centers on the San Francisco Estuary. It is a state Species of Special Concern and was only recently (2003 delisted as a threatened species by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Splittail live 7-9 years, tolerate a wide range of environmental conditions, and have high fecundity. Typically, adults migrate upstream in January and February and spawn on seasonally inundated floodplains in March and April. In May the juveniles migrate back downstream to shallow, brackish water rearing grounds, where they feed on detritus and invertebrates for 1-2 years before migrating back upstream to spawn. Seven long-term sampling programs in the estuary indicate that the splittail population is maintained by strong year classes resulting from successful spawning in wet years, although some spawning occurs in all years. Modeling shows them to be resilient, but managing floodplains to promote frequent successful spawning is needed to keep them abundant. Additionally, it is important to provide safe migration corridors between spawning and rearing grounds as well as abundant high-quality brackish water rearing habitat. Key research needs are (1 to examine how the timing, magnitude, and duration of high flows contribute to the generation of strong year classes, (2 to describe differences in young of year survival on the floodplain and in river margins from hatching to down-river migration, (3 explore the possible trophic effects of new invaders such as the overbite clam and Siberian prawn, and (4 determine the response of splittail populations to climate change and sea level rise.

  11. Bathymetric survey and digital elevation model of Little Holland Tract, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Alexander G.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Stevens, Andrew W.; Carlson, Emily M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a bathymetric survey in Little Holland Tract, a flooded agricultural tract, in the northern Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the “Delta”) during the summer of 2015. The new bathymetric data were combined with existing data to generate a digital elevation model (DEM) at 1-meter resolution. Little Holland Tract (LHT) was historically diked off for agricultural uses and has been tidally inundated since an accidental levee breach in 1983. Shallow tidal regions such as LHT have the potential to improve habitat quality in the Delta. The DEM of LHT was developed to support ongoing studies of habitat quality in the area and to provide a baseline for evaluating future geomorphic change. The new data comprise 138,407 linear meters of real-time-kinematic (RTK) Global Positioning System (GPS) elevation data, including both bathymetric data collected from personal watercraft and topographic elevations collected on foot at low tide. A benchmark (LHT15_b1) was established for geodetic control of the survey. Data quality was evaluated both by comparing results among surveying platforms, which showed systematic offsets of 1.6 centimeters (cm) or less, and by error propagation, which yielded a mean vertical uncertainty of 6.7 cm. Based on the DEM and time-series measurements of water depth, the mean tidal prism of LHT was determined to be 2,826,000 cubic meters. The bathymetric data and DEM are available at http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7RX9954. 

  12. Microenvironmental characteristics important for personal exposures to aldehydes in Sacramento, CA, and Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymer, J. H.; Akland, G.; Johnson, T. R.; Long, T.; Michael, L.; Cauble, L.; McCombs, M.

    Oxygenated additives in gasoline are designed to decrease the ozone-forming hydrocarbons and total air toxics, yet they can increase the emissions of aldehydes and thus increase human exposure to these toxic compounds. This paper describes a study conducted to characterize targeted aldehydes in microenvironments in Sacramento, CA, and Milwaukee, WI, and to improve our understanding of the impact of the urban environment on human exposure to air toxics. Data were obtained from microenvironmental concentration measurements, integrated, 24-h personal measurements, indoor and outdoor pollutant monitors at the participants' residences, from ambient pollutant monitors at fixed-site locations in each city, and from real-time diaries and questionnaires completed by the technicians and participants. As part of this study, a model to predict personal exposures based on individual time/activity data was developed for comparison to measured concentrations. Predicted concentrations were generally within 25% of the measured concentrations. The microenvironments that people encounter daily provide for widely varying exposures to aldehydes. The activities that occur in those microenvironments can modulate the aldehyde concentrations dramatically, especially for environments such as "indoor at home." By considering personal activity, location (microenvironment), duration in the microenvironment, and a knowledge of the general concentrations of aldehydes in the various microenvironments, a simple model can do a reasonably good job of predicting the time-averaged personal exposures to aldehydes, even in the absence of monitoring data. Although concentrations of aldehydes measured indoors at the participants' homes tracked well with personal exposure, there were instances where personal exposures and indoor concentrations differed significantly. Key to the ability to predict exposure based on time/activity data is the quality and completeness of the microenvironmental

  13. Age Determination of the Remaining Peat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; de Fontaine, Christian S.; Knifong, Donna L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California was once a 1,400 square kilometer (km2) tidal marsh, which contained a vast layer of peat ranging up to 15 meters (m) thick (Atwater and Belknap, 1980). Because of its favorable climate and highly fertile peat soils, the majority of the Delta was drained and reclaimed for agriculture during the late 1800s and early 1900s. Drainage of the peat soils changed the conditions in the surface layers of peat from anaerobic (having no free oxygen present) to aerobic (exposed to the atmosphere). This change in conditions greatly increased the decomposition rate of the peat, which consists largely of organic (plant) matter. Thus began the process of land-surface subsidence, which initially was a result of peat shrinkage and compaction, and later largely was a result of oxidation by which organic carbon in the peat essentially vaporized to carbon dioxide (Deverel and others, 1998; Ingebritsen and Ikehara, 1999). Because of subsidence, the land-surface elevation on farmed islands in the Delta has decreased from a few meters to as much as 8 m below local mean sea level (California Department of Water Resources, 1995; Steve Deverel, Hydrofocus, Inc., written commun., 2007). The USGS, in collaboration with the University of California at Davis, and Hydrofocus Inc. of Davis, California, has been studying the formation of the Delta and the impact of wetland reclamation on the peat column as part of a project called Rates and Evolution of Peat Accretion through Time (REPEAT). The purpose of this report is to provide results on the age of the remaining peat soils on four farmed islands in the Delta.

  14. Prolonged grief following the recent death of a daughter among mothers who experienced distal losses during the Khmer Rouge era: Validity of the prolonged grief construct in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Nigel P; Strasser, Judith; Taing, Sopheap; Horiuchi, Shoko; Chhim, Sotheara; Packman, Wendy

    2014-09-30

    This study addressed the validity of the prolonged grief (PG) construct in a Cambodian context. Eighty mothers who lost a young adult daughter stemming from a crowd stampede incident during the annual water festival were interviewed at the six-month post-loss point along with a control group of similarly aged women who were not recently bereaved. Both groups were assessed for PG, PTSD, anxiety, and depression symptoms and well as for the number of distal losses experienced during the Khmer Rouge (KR) regime - knowing that all the women were old enough to have lived through the KR regime. Support for the discriminant validity of PG was shown in a factor analysis in which its core symptoms were distinguished from anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms. Also, support was found for its incremental validity as shown in the unique sensitivity of PG in distinguishing the two groups when controlling for the other symptoms. Lastly, a positive relationship was found between the number of distal deaths experienced during the KR regime and PG symptom severity among the group of recently bereaved mothers, providing support for the predictive validity of PG. Implications as well as study limitations are discussed. PMID:24863868

  15. Soil-water dynamics and tree water uptake in the Sacramento Mountains of New Mexico (USA): a stable isotope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierke, Casey; Newton, B. Talon; Phillips, Fred M.

    2016-04-01

    In the southwestern United States, precipitation in the high mountains is a primary source of groundwater recharge. Precipitation patterns, soil properties and vegetation largely control the rate and timing of groundwater recharge. The interactions between climate, soil and mountain vegetation thus have important implications for the groundwater supply. This study took place in the Sacramento Mountains, which is the recharge area for multiple regional aquifers in southern New Mexico. The stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen were used to determine whether infiltration of precipitation is homogeneously distributed in the soil or whether it is partitioned among soil-water `compartments', from which trees extract water for transpiration as a function of the season. The results indicate that "immobile" or "slow" soil water, which is derived primarily from snowmelt, infiltrates soils in a relatively uniform fashion, filling small pores in the shallow soils. "Mobile" or "fast" soil water, which is mostly associated with summer thunderstorms, infiltrates very quickly through macropores and along preferential flow paths, evading evaporative loss. It was found that throughout the entire year, trees principally use immobile water derived from snowmelt mixed to differing degrees with seasonally available mobile-water sources. The replenishment of these different water pools in soils appears to depend on initial soil-water content, the manner in which the water was introduced to the soil (snowmelt versus intense thunderstorms), and the seasonal variability of the precipitation and evapotranspiration. These results have important implications for the effect of climate change on recharge mechanisms in the Sacramento Mountains.

  16. Soil-water dynamics and tree water uptake in the Sacramento Mountains of New Mexico (USA): a stable isotope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierke, Casey; Newton, B. Talon; Phillips, Fred M.

    2016-06-01

    In the southwestern United States, precipitation in the high mountains is a primary source of groundwater recharge. Precipitation patterns, soil properties and vegetation largely control the rate and timing of groundwater recharge. The interactions between climate, soil and mountain vegetation thus have important implications for the groundwater supply. This study took place in the Sacramento Mountains, which is the recharge area for multiple regional aquifers in southern New Mexico. The stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen were used to determine whether infiltration of precipitation is homogeneously distributed in the soil or whether it is partitioned among soil-water `compartments', from which trees extract water for transpiration as a function of the season. The results indicate that "immobile" or "slow" soil water, which is derived primarily from snowmelt, infiltrates soils in a relatively uniform fashion, filling small pores in the shallow soils. "Mobile" or "fast" soil water, which is mostly associated with summer thunderstorms, infiltrates very quickly through macropores and along preferential flow paths, evading evaporative loss. It was found that throughout the entire year, trees principally use immobile water derived from snowmelt mixed to differing degrees with seasonally available mobile-water sources. The replenishment of these different water pools in soils appears to depend on initial soil-water content, the manner in which the water was introduced to the soil (snowmelt versus intense thunderstorms), and the seasonal variability of the precipitation and evapotranspiration. These results have important implications for the effect of climate change on recharge mechanisms in the Sacramento Mountains.

  17. Handing-over the baton

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    From left to right: M. Bühler-Broglin, A. Fucci, C. Roche, P. Troendle. After serving the Organisation for three decades, an emblematic figure of CERN, Manfred Bühler-Broglin, has just retired. At CERN he initially spent several years in experimental physics before becoming involved in the planning of CERN resources, first in the administration of research, and then in the administration of the two largest projects at CERN: LEP and the LHC. During the course of the past twenty years, he became the privileged and highly respected CERN linkman with the elected regional authorities. In this capacity he represented CERN during the delicate discussions prior to the construction of LEP and the LHC. In particular, he was Editor of the impressive Etude d'impact  (Impact study), crucial for the approval of the implementation of LHC in the Pays de Gex by the French authorities. Highly motivated by the protection of our wonderful environment, he also advised the Director-General in this fiel...

  18. Site Response And Slow Basin Waves In The Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, J. B.; Sell, R.

    2009-12-01

    About 1700 km of levees protect farmland and communities from inundation in the delta of the Sacramento/San Joaquin Rivers at the western edge of the Great Valley in California. These levees are made from dredged soils, such as peat, and are characterized by low shear-wave velocities (about 200m/s) and are vulnerable to breaking from major earthquakes in the greater San Francisco Bay area. We have investigated the seismic response of sites in the delta by deploying a set of broadband seismometers to record local moderate-sized earthquakes. Each of the 11 sites has a 30s broadband, 3-component seismograph digitized continuously at 100 sps/channel. In the summer of 2008 we expanded the original array, which covered a small area near Bethel Is., to cover a greater proportion of the delta, and it now extends from Tracy in the south to Bethel Is. in the northwest to Eight Mile Road in the northeast, an area of about 20 by 30 km. Several of the sites are on levees and the others are on farmland. One site is on a outcrop just west of the Clifton Court Forebay in the foothills. During the last year we have recorded nine events in the M 3 to 4 range with good signal to noise at the array. Site response was estimated with spectral ratios of S waves using Black Diamond Mine, a station in the UC Berkeley seismic network, as a reference station. Site responses at levee sites typically show large resonances in the 1-3 Hz range with amplifications greater than 10 for the Sept. 6, 2008 M4.1 Alamo event. Other sites show amplifications between 2 and 7 at various frequencies between 1 and 10 Hz. Sites within the delta show late-arriving Rayleigh waves with a period of about one second. A three-element array at the Holland Marina (spacing 180-290m) shows these waves to be traveling at about 610 m/s with a back azimuth about 20 degrees off the azimuth to the epicenter. Observations of well-developed, one-second surface waves across basins are not common, but they are similar to

  19. DO TISSUE CARBON AND NITROGEN LIMIT POPULATION GROWTH OF WEEVILS INTRODUCED TO CONTROL WATERHYACINTH AT A SITE IN THE SACRAMENTO-SAN JOAQUIN DELTA, CALIFORNIA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms), is a serious problem in the Sacramento Delta. Two weevil species have been introduced as biological control agents. To date, they have not had long-term impact on water hyacinth abundance. Factors such as weather, disease, predators, and plant qua...

  20. In situ measurement of ammonium utilization by phytoplankton in the Sacramento River to determine the impacts of high nutrient loading on the base of the food web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, C.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S. R.; Young, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    High concentrations of ammonium in the Sacramento River and San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary (SFE) have been hypothesized to inhibit the growth of larger phytoplankton such as diatoms, which are an important food source to zooplankton at the base of the pelagic food web. The goal of this research is to use stable isotope approaches to distinguish ammonium and nitrate utilization at the base of the food web in a range of habitats extending from freshwater portions of Sacramento River through San Pablo Bay. Preliminary results from transects sampled over a range of hydrologic conditions between 2007 and 2010 indicate shifts in the δ15N composition of the bulk particulate organic matter (POM) where ammonium concentrations increase downstream of the Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant and again where ammonium concentrations decrease near the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers. However, interpretation of δ15N of bulk POM as a proxy for δ15N of phytoplankton is complicated by the fact that the C:N ratios of bulk POM often increase to values greater than 8 downstream of the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, suggesting that in this region of the estuary bulk POM includes a significant proportion of terrestrial detrital material. Given the interest in understanding nitrogen source utilization in this portion of the estuary, work is currently underway to isolate algae from bulk POM using flow cytometry prior to isotopic analysis. δ15N vales from isolated algal samples will allow downstream changes in nutrient source utilization to be distinguished from mixing of different POM sources. Because considerable bulk POM isotopic data have been collected over the last ten years, greater understanding of the relationship between δ15N-POM and δ15N of isolated algal and terrestrial fractions will allow for improved use of the bulk POM isotope record to understand the potential link between historical changes in phytoplankton nutrient

  1. The persistence of lead from past gasoline emissions and mining drainage in a large riparian system: Evidence from lead isotopes in the Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, C.E.; Alpers, C.N.; Bouse, R.; Taylor, H.E.; Unruh, D.M.; Flegal, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Lead concentrations and isotope ratios measured in river water colloids and streambed sediment samples along 426 km of the Sacramento River, California reveal that the influence of lead from the historical mining of massive sulfide deposits in the West Shasta Cu-mining district (at the headwaters of the Sacramento River) is confined to a 60 km stretch of river immediately downstream of that mining region, whereas inputs from past leaded gasoline emissions and historical hydraulic Au-mining in the Sierra Nevadan foothills are the dominant lead sources in the remaining 370 km of the river. Binary mixing calculations suggest that more than 50% of the lead in the Sacramento River outside of the region of influence of the West Shasta Cu-mining district is derived from past depositions of leaded gasoline emissions. This predominance is the first direct documentation of the geographic extent of gasoline lead persistence throughout a large riparian system (>160,000 km2) and corroborates previous observations based on samples taken at the mouth of the Sacramento River. In addition, new analyses of sediment samples from the hydraulic gold mines of the Sierra Nevada foothills confirm the present-day fluxes into the Sacramento River of contaminant metals derived from historical hydraulic Au-mining that occurred during the latter half of the 19th and early part of the 20th centuries. These fluxes occur predominantly during periods of elevated river discharge associated with heavy winter precipitation in northern California. In the broadest context, the study demonstrates the potential for altered precipitation patterns resulting from climate change to affect the mobility and transport of soil-bound contaminants in the surface environment. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. A conceptual model for site-level ecology of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.; Hansen, Eric C.; Scherer, Rick D.; Patterson, Laura C.

    2015-01-01

    Giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) comprise a species of semi-aquatic snakes precinctive to marshes in the Central Valley of California (Hansen and Brode, 1980; Rossman and others, 1996). Because more than 90 percent of their historical wetland habitat has been converted to other uses (Frayer and others, 1989; Garone, 2007), giant gartersnakes have been listed as threatened by the State of California (California Department of Fish and Game Commission , 1971) and the United States (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1993). Giant gartersnakes currently occur in a highly modified landscape, with most extant populations occurring in the rice - growing regions of the Sacramento Valley, especially near areas that historically were tule marsh habitat (Halstead and others, 2010, 2014).

  3. Evolution and flooding history of the Sacramento River over the late Quaternary illustrated on pristine floodplains near Chico, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, M.; Aalto, R. E.; Singer, M. B.; Fuchs, M.

    2009-12-01

    Different river systems are often seen to respond individually to climate and environmental forcing during the late Quaternary, with a large number of prior studies investigating the unique history of various European rivers. In order to broaden our understanding of climate-induced late Quaternary morpho-dynamic change within a wider range of fluvial environments, more studies are needed from regions that differ substantially from Europe. The Sacramento River downstream of the city of Chico, California, features three different types of surface (palaeo) channel systems - meandering, braiding and anastomosing. This provides an excellent study region to investigate controls on channel and floodplain development by external (and internal) forcing over the Quaternary. This and the fact that two of these palaeochannel systems play a major role in flood and sediment conveyance make this area attractive for research on flooding and river/floodplain development. Furthermore, the climate and sea level forcing over the Quaternary are substantially different here from most European study areas, providing valuable new perspective. We present results from our investigation of a near-pristine fluvial environment along the largest river in California - the Llano Seco reach of the Sacramento River, between Chico and the downstream wetlands of Butte Sink. The Llano Seco Ranch has a unique ownership history that makes it the only remaining significant undisturbed floodplain along the Sacramento River, featuring more than 20,000 acres of superb habitat nourished by a natural geomorphic system. Despite its importance to science and society and the prior recognition of beautifully preserved Quaternary and Holocene channel systems, fluvial features in this area have not been rigorously dated. Furthermore, there have been no detailed studies of deep stratigraphic profiles afforded by the extensive, well preserved deposits of fluvial sediments and floodplain soils. Our research

  4. Paired Magnetic Susceptibility Cyclostratigraphy and Revised Magnetostratigraphy with Late Cretaceous Euler Pole from Forbes Formation, Sand Creek, Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotznick, S. P.; Raub, T.; Mitchell, R. N.; Ward, P. D.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetostratigraphy in Upper Cretaceous rocks of Sacramento Valley has successfully complemented biostratigraphy for correlating between circum-Pacific basins. Most paleomagnetic measurements were done pre-1990 using alternating field demagnetization only, due to oxidation accompanying thermal demagnetization. We present paleomagnetic data collected via thermal demagnetization in a flowing nitrogen atmosphere from 223 cores collected over a 130m of section of Forbes Formation in Sand Creek, CA spanning upper Dobbins Shale, Forbes Unit 2 and lower Unit 3. These results uniformly indicate Reversed Chron 33R, contra previously published magnetostratigraphy of the area (Ward et al. 1983, Verosub et al. 1989). Additionally, these paleomagnetic results yield a tightly-constrained paleolatitude for Forbes Formation of 31±3°, which varies significantly from previous APWP models ca. 83 Ma (Besse and Courtillot, 2002) suggesting an unaccounted-for deficiency in reconstructions of North America at this time. This discrepancy might indicate an inaccurate cratonic reference pole, underestimated intrabatholithic or distributed plate boundary deformation, and/or true polar wander. As opposed to other units yielding anomalous late Cretaceous paleolatitudes from outboard terranes, Forbes Formation in Sacramento Valley laps unambiguously onto the North American continent. A 25m AW34 core was collected using a Winkie drillrig near the top of Dobbins Shale Mbr. Paleomagnetic measurements on subsamples from the Winkie core, unaffected by surface weathering, combine with the surficial dataset, and we propose a new set of Euler pole solutions potentially quantifying Basin and Range extension and late Cretaceous intra-Sierran shear. Through magnetic susceptibility measurements of the Winkie core, we were able to resolve orbital cycles which, paired with rock magnetic measurements, constrain basin subsidence and sedimentation rate off the Sierran arc at its age of termination. Re

  5. Characterizing Land Surface Change and Levee Stability in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Using UAVSAR Radar Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cathleen; Bawden, Gerald; Deverel, Steven; Dudas, Joel; Hensley, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is one of the primary water sources for the state of California and represents a complex geographical area comprised of tidal marshland, levee rimmed islands that are used primarily for agriculture, and urban encroachment. Land subsidence has dropped many of the Delta islands 3 to >7 meters below mean sea level and requires nearly 1700 km of levees to maintain the integrity of the islands and flow of water through the Delta. The current average subsidence rates for each island varies, with 1.23 cm/yr on Sherman Island and 2.2 cm/yr for Bacon Island, as determined by ground-based instruments located at isolated points in the Delta. The Delta's status as the most critical water resource for the state, an endangered ecosystem, and an area continuously threatened with levee breakage from hydrostatic pressure and the danger of earthquakes on several major faults in the San Francisco area make it a focus of monitoring efforts by both the state and national government. This activity is now almost entirely done by ground-based efforts, but the benefits of using remote sensing for wide scale spatial coverage and frequent temporal coverage is obvious. The UAVSAR airborne polarimetric and differential interferometric L-band synthetic aperture radar system has been used to collected monthly images of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and much of the adjacent Suisun Marsh since July 2009 to characterize levee stability, image spatially varied subsidence, and assess how well the UAVSAR performs in an area with widespread agriculture production.

  6. PEAT ACCRETION HISTORIES DURING THE PAST 6000 YEARS IN MARSHES OF THE SACRAMENTO - SAN JOAQUIN DELTA, CALIFORNIA, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drexler, J Z; de Fontaine, C S; Brown, T A

    2009-07-20

    Peat cores were collected in 4 remnant marsh islands and 4 drained, farmed islands throughout the Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta of California in order to characterize the peat accretion history of this region. Radiocarbon age determination of marsh macrofossils at both marsh and farmed islands showed that marshes in the central and western Delta started forming between 6030 and 6790 cal yr BP. Age-depth models for three marshes were constructed using cubic smooth spline regression models. The resulting spline fit models were used to estimate peat accretion histories for the marshes. Estimated accretion rates range from 0.03 to 0.49 cm yr{sup -1} for the marsh sites. The highest accretion rates are at Browns Island, a marsh at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Porosity was examined in the peat core from Franks Wetland, one of the remnant marsh sites. Porosity was greater than 90% and changed little with depth indicating that autocompaction was not an important process in the peat column. The mean contribution of organic matter to soil volume at the marsh sites ranges from 6.15 to 9.25% with little variability. In contrast, the mean contribution of inorganic matter to soil volume ranges from 1.40 to 8.45% with much greater variability, especially in sites situated in main channels. These results suggest that marshes in the Delta can be viewed as largely autochthonous vs. allochthonous in character. Autochthonous sites are largely removed from watershed processes, such as sediment deposition and scour, and are dominated by organic production. Allochthonous sites have greater fluctuations in accretion rates due to the variability of inorganic inputs from the watershed. A comparison of estimated vertical accretion rates with 20th century rates of global sea-level rise shows that currently marshes are maintaining their positions in the tidal frame, yet this offers little assurance of sustainability under scenarios of increased sea-level rise in

  7. The changing positions of Zabîd's Red Sea port sites Les différents emplacements des ports de Zabîd en Mer Rouge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Keall

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Les chroniqueurs médiévaux mentionnent de manière confuse les noms des différentes colonies qui, avec le temps, servirent de port d'entrée à la ville de Zabîd qui n'était pas situé en bordure de la Mer Rouge. Des indices peuvent être déchiffrés quant à ces changements en se basant sur l'époque à laquelle ces chroniques ont été établies. Mais les témoignages sont bien plus précieux que la mention à une époque antérieure.La prospection archéologique de la côte révèle les réels motifs en observant que les colonies portuaires ont été forcées de se déplacer dû à un rivage changeant qui rendait inutilisable la précédente colonie portuaire. Quand celle-ci allait à un nouvel emplacement, on lui assignait un nouveau nom. Ce genre d'observations a été constaté dans la baie portuaire de Ghulayfiqah ainsi que de al-Fâzzah. Le site de ces colonies n'était, en général, utilisé que pour une durée ne dépassant pas les deux ou trois siècles.Medieval writers report confusingly the names of different settlements that over time served as ports of entry for the city of Zabîd that lay inland from the Red Sea coast. Clues can be drawn concerning these changes by considering the time when these reports were made. Eye witness accounts are clearly far more valuable than the citation of a report from an earlier time. Archaeological scrutiny of the coast reveals the real pattern by observing that port settlements were forced to move in response to a changing shoreline which rendered a former harbour unusable. When the settlement moved to a new locale, a new name was assigned. Observations of this kind have been made in the coastal bays of both Ghulayfiqah and al-Fâzzah. Settlement sites were generally occupied for no more than two to three centuries.

  8. Identifying sources of dissolved organic carbon in agriculturally dominated rivers using radiocarbon age dating: Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickman, James O.; DiGiorgio, Carol L.; Davisson, M. Lee; Lucero, Delores M.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    We used radiocarbon measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to resolve sources of riverine carbon within agriculturally dominated landscapes in California. During 2003 and 2004, average Δ14C for DOC was -254‰ in agricultural drains in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, -218‰ in the San Joaquin River, -175‰ in the California State Water Project and -152‰ in the Sacramento River. The age of bulk DOC transiting the rivers of California's Central Valley is the oldest reported for large rivers and suggests wide-spread loss of soil organic matter caused by agriculture and urbanization. Using DAX 8 adsorbent, we isolated and measured 14C concentrations in hydrophobic acid fractions (HPOA); river samples showed evidence of bomb-pulse carbon with average Δ14C of 91 and 76‰ for the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers, respectively, with older HPOA, -204‰, observed in agricultural drains. An operationally defined non-HPOA fraction of DOC was observed in the San Joaquin River with seasonally computed Δ14C values of between -275 and -687‰; the source of this aged material was hypothesized to be physically protected organic-matter in high clay-content soils and agrochemicals (i.e., radiocarbon-dead material) applied to farmlands. Mixing models suggest that the Sacramento River contributes about 50% of the DOC load in the California State Water Project, and agricultural drains contribute approximately one-third of the load. In contrast to studies showing stabilization of soil carbon pools within one or two decades following land conversion, sustained loss of soil organic matter, occurring many decades after the initial agricultural-land conversion, was observed in California's Central Valley.

  9. Morphology, bioacoustics, and ecology of Tibicen neomexicensis sp. n., a new species of cicada from the Sacramento Mountains in New Mexico, U.S.A. (Hemiptera, Cicadidae, Tibicen)

    OpenAIRE

    Brian Stucky

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Tibicen neomexicensis sp. n., a new species of cicada found in the Sacramento Mountains of southcentral New Mexico, is described. Tibicen neomexicensis closely resembles Tibicen chiricahua Davis morphologically, but males of the two species have highly distinct calling songs that differ in phrasal structure, amplitude burst rates, and pulse structure. Unlike Tibicen chiricahua , male Tibicen neomexicensis use conspicuous dorso-ventral abdominal movements to modulate the amplitude and...

  10. Tomographic Rayleigh wave group velocities in the Central Valley, California, centered on the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jon B.; Erdem, Jemile; Seats, Kevin; Lawrence, Jesse

    2016-04-01

    If shaking from a local or regional earthquake in the San Francisco Bay region were to rupture levees in the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta, then brackish water from San Francisco Bay would contaminate the water in the Delta: the source of freshwater for about half of California. As a prelude to a full shear-wave velocity model that can be used in computer simulations and further seismic hazard analysis, we report on the use of ambient noise tomography to build a fundamental mode, Rayleigh wave group velocity model for the region around the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta in the western Central Valley, California. Recordings from the vertical component of about 31 stations were processed to compute the spatial distribution of Rayleigh wave group velocities. Complex coherency between pairs of stations was stacked over 8 months to more than a year. Dispersion curves were determined from 4 to about 18 s. We calculated average group velocities for each period and inverted for deviations from the average for a matrix of cells that covered the study area. Smoothing using the first difference is applied. Cells of the model were about 5.6 km in either dimension. Checkerboard tests of resolution, which are dependent on station density, suggest that the resolving ability of the array is reasonably good within the middle of the array with resolution between 0.2 and 0.4°. Overall, low velocities in the middle of each image reflect the deeper sedimentary syncline in the Central Valley. In detail, the model shows several centers of low velocity that may be associated with gross geologic features such as faulting along the western margin of the Central Valley, oil and gas reservoirs, and large crosscutting features like the Stockton arch. At shorter periods around 5.5 s, the model's western boundary between low and high velocities closely follows regional fault geometry and the edge of a residual isostatic gravity low. In the eastern part of the valley, the boundaries of the low

  11. Intercontinental quantum liaisons between entangled electrons in ion traps of thermoluminescent crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Desbrandes, R; Desbrandes, Robert; Gent, Daniel Van

    2006-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper were carried out with space-separated entangled thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) crystals in Baton Rouge, Louisiana (USA) and Givarlais (France) at 8,182 km between entangled samples. Samples consisted of doped lithium fluoride TLD's that were simultaneously irradiated in pairs together at one location by Bremsstrahlung radiation generated by a Varian CLINAC unit. One of the paired TLD crystals was then mailed to Baton Rouge and its entangled counterpart remained in Givarlais. The crystal in Baton Rouge (master) was then subjected to thermal stimulation which elicited a measurable light emission response in the counterpart (slave) under a photomultiplier in Givarlais. Highly correlated passive light emissions were observed in the nonheated slave TLD while the master TLD was ramped up in temperature and then allowed to cool to ambient temperature. Maximum correlations in the slave TLD light emissions were observed at the turn around temperature which is the point where t...

  12. What do Correlations tell us about Anthropogenic – Biogenic Interactions and SOA Formation in the Sacramento Plume during CARES?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Kuang, Chongai; Sedlacek, Art; Senum, Gunnar I.; Springston, Stephen R.; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Qi; Jayne, John T.; Fast, Jerome D.; Hubbe, John M.; Shilling, John E.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2016-02-15

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA plume and surrounding region. We present data from 56 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA) can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrations are enhanced by the simultaneous presence of high concentrations of CO and either isoprene, MVK+MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein) or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. Linear and bi-linear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, “Bio”, for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short time and distance scales can be explained by CO.

  13. The legacy of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Christian S. de Fontaine; Steven J. Deverel

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the world, many extensive wetlands, such as the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California (hereafter, the Delta), have been drained for agriculture, resulting in land-surface subsidence of peat soils. The purpose of this project was to study the in situ effects of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Delta. Peat cores were retrieved from four drained, farmed islands and four relatively undisturbed, marsh islands. Core samples were analyzed for bulk density and percent organic carbon. Macrofossils in the peat were dated using radiocarbon age determination. The peat from the farmed islands is highly distinct from marsh island peat. Bulk density of peat from the farmed islands is generally greater than that of the marsh islands at a given organic carbon content. On the farmed islands, increased bulk density, which is an indication of compaction, decreases with depth within the unoxidized peat zone, whereas, on the marsh islands, bulk density is generally constant with depth except near the surface. Approximately 55–80% of the original peat layer on the farmed islands has been lost due to landsurface subsidence. For the center regions of the farmed islands, this translates into an estimated loss of between 2900-5700 metric tons of organic carbon/hectare. Most of the intact peat just below the currently farmed soil layer is over 4000 years old. Peat loss will continue as long as the artificial water table on the farmed islands is held below the land surface.

  14. The legacy of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, J.Z.; De Fontaine, C. S.; Deverel, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the world, many extensive wetlands, such as the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California (hereafter, the Delta), have been drained for agriculture, resulting in land-surface subsidence of peat soils. The purpose of this project was to study the in situ effects of wetland drainage on the remaining peat in the Delta. Peat cores were retrieved from four drained, farmed islands and four relatively undisturbed, marsh islands. Core samples were analyzed for bulk density and percent organic carbon. Macrofossils in the peat were dated using radiocarbon age determination. The peat from the farmed islands is highly distinct from marsh island peat. Bulk density of peat from the farmed islands is generally greater than that of the marsh islands at a given organic carbon content. On the farmed islands, increased bulk density, which is an indication of compaction, decreases with depth within the unoxidized peat zone, whereas, on the marsh islands, bulk density is generally constant with depth except near the surface. Approximately 5580 of the original peat layer on the farmed islands has been lost due to land-surface subsidence. For the center regions of the farmed islands, this translates into an estimated loss of between 29005700 metric tons of organic carbon/hectare. Most of the intact peat just below the currently farmed soil layer is over 4000 years old. Peat loss will continue as long as the artificial water table on the farmed islands is held below the land surface. ?? 2009 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  15. Water Hyacinth Identification Using CART Modeling With Hyperspectral Data in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, S.; Hestir, E. L.; Santos, M. J.; Greenberg, J. A.; Ustin, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is an invasive aquatic weed that is causing severe economic and ecological impacts in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (California, USA). Monitoring its distribution using remote sensing is the crucial first step in modeling its predicted spread and implementing control and eradication efforts. However, accurately mapping this species is confounded by its several phenological forms, namely a healthy vegetative canopy, flowering canopy with dense conspicuous terminal flowers above the foliage, and floating dead and senescent forms. The full range of these phenologies may be simultaneously present at any time, given the heterogeneity of environmental and ecological conditions in the Delta. There is greater spectral variation within water hyacinth than between any of the co-occurring species (pennywort and water primrose), so classification approaches must take these different phenological stages into consideration. We present an approach to differentiating water hyacinth from co-occurring species based on knowledge of relevant variation in leaf chlorophyll, floral pigments, foliage water content, and variation in leaf structure using a classification and regression tree (CART) applied to airborne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery.

  16. Analysis of the value of battery storage with wind and photovoltaic generation to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaininger, H.W. [Zaininger Engineering Co., Inc., Roseville, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the results of an analysis to determine the economic and operational value of battery storage to wind and photovoltaic (PV) generation technologies to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) system. The analysis approach consisted of performing a benefit-cost economic assessment using established SMUD financial parameters, system expansion plans, and current system operating procedures. This report presents the results of the analysis. Section 2 describes expected wind and PV plant performance. Section 3 describes expected benefits to SMUD associated with employing battery storage. Section 4 presents preliminary benefit-cost results for battery storage added at the Solano wind plant and the Hedge PV plant. Section 5 presents conclusions and recommendations resulting from this analysis. The results of this analysis should be reviewed subject to the following caveat. The assumptions and data used in developing these results were based on reports available from and interaction with appropriate SMUD operating, planning, and design personnel in 1994 and early 1995 and are compatible with financial assumptions and system expansion plans as of that time. Assumptions and SMUD expansion plans have changed since then. In particular, SMUD did not install the additional 45 MW of wind that was planned for 1996. Current SMUD expansion plans and assumptions should be obtained from appropriate SMUD personnel.

  17. Evapotranspiration rates and crop coefficients for a restored marsh in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, J.Z.; Anderson, F.E.; Snyder, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    The surface renewal method was used to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) for a restored marsh on Twitchell Island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA. ET estimates for the marsh, together with reference ET measurements from a nearby climate station, were used to determine crop coefficients over a 3-year period during the growing season. The mean ET rate for the study period was 6 mm day-1, which is high compared with other marshes with similar vegetation. High ET rates at the marsh may be due to the windy, semi-arid Mediterranean climate of the region, and the permanently flooded nature of the marsh, which results in very low surface resistance of the vegetation. Crop coefficient (Kc) values for the marsh ranged from 0.73 to 1.18. The mean Kc value over the entire study period was 0-95. The daily Kc values for any given month varied from year to year, and the standard deviation of daily Kc values varied between months. Although several climate variables were undoubtedly responsible for this variation, our analysis revealed that wind direction and the temperature of standing water in the wetland were of particular importance in determining ET rates and Kc values.

  18. Peat Formation Processes Through the Millennia in Tidal Marshes of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, J.Z.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine peat formation processes throughout the millennia in four tidal marshes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Peat cores collected at each site were analyzed for bulk density, loss on ignition, and percent organic carbon. Core data and spline fit age-depth models were used to estimate inorganic sedimentation, organic accumulation, and carbon sequestration rates in the marshes. Bulk density and percent organic matter content of peat fluctuated through time at all sites, suggesting that peat formation processes are dynamic and responsive to watershed conditions. The balance between inorganic sedimentation and organic accumulation at the sites also varied through time, indicating that marshes may rely more strongly on either inorganic or organic matter for peat formation at particular times in their existence. Mean carbon sequestration rates found in this study (0. 38-0. 79 Mg C ha-1 year-1) were similar to other long-term estimates for temperate peatlands. ?? 2011 Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation (outside the USA).

  19. Abundance and sexual size dimorphism of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, G.D.; Casazza, M.L.; Gregory, C.J.; Halstead, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) is restricted to wetlands of the Central Valley of California. Because of wetland loss in this region, the Giant Gartersnake is both federally and state listed as threatened. We conducted markrecapture studies of four populations of the Giant Gartersnake in the Sacramento Valley (northern Central Valley), California, to obtain baseline data on abundance and density to assist in recovery planning for this species. We sampled habitats that ranged from natural, unmanaged marsh to constructed managed marshes and habitats associated with rice agriculture. Giant Gartersnake density in a natural wetland (1.90 individuals/ha) was an order of magnitude greater than in a managed wetland subject to active season drying (0.17 individuals/ha). Sex ratios at all sites were not different from 1 1, and females were longer and heavier than males. Females had greater body condition than males, and individuals at the least disturbed sites had significantly greater body condition than individuals at the managed wetland. The few remaining natural wetlands in the Central Valley are important, productive habitat for the Giant Gartersnake, and should be conserved and protected. Wetlands constructed and restored for the Giant Gartersnake should be modeled after the permanent, shallow wetlands representative of historic Giant Gartersnake habitat. ?? 2010 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  20. Drainage water use from the railway Mont d'Or tunnel in Vallorbe, Switzerland; Centrale du Bief-Rouge. Recuperation des eaux du tunnel du Mont d'Or a Vallorbe - Rapport 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerodetti, M.

    2009-02-15

    The 6'097 m long Railway Tunnel under the Mont d'Or (western Switzerland, under the Jura mountains) was constructed at the beginning of the 20{sup th} century and inaugurated on 16 May 1915. During the construction there was an important break-in of water in the tunnel that flooded the whole construction area. Since the completion of the tunnel, the water incursion is drained and conveyed to the Swiss entrance. The flow rate coming from the tunnel is constant at about 120 l/s and didn't show any variation during all the past decades. The idea of using the tunnel water energy in a turbine is thought of since a long time. Considering the present situation on the energy sector, the 'Societe electrique du Chatelard' (the local electricity utility) with the support of the municipal authority, decided now to realize this concept and to turbine the water from the tunnel, also known as 'Bief Rouge', for power generation. The 'Bief Rouge' project consists in catching the flow at the Vallorbe entrance of the tunnel and conducting it into a new penstock down to the river Orbe situated some 65 m downhill where electricity will be produced in a new small-scale power plant. The planned scheme will have an electrical power of 54.5 kW and be located in a new building near the existing sewage pumping station of Vallorbe. The total investment cost is 1.3 million CHF and includes the construction of a new headwater basin, a penstock, a power plant and a tailrace channel as well as the electro-mechanical equipment for power production. Based on a mean annual power production of some 465,000 kWh, the retail price of the kWh has been evaluated to 21 Swiss cents/kWh. (author)

  1. Comparing the effects of nano-sized sugarcane fiber with cellulose and psyllium on hepatic cellular signaling in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wang,

    2012-01-01

    Zhong Q Wang,1,2 Yongmei Yu,1,2 Xian H Zhang,1,2 Z Elizabeth Floyd,3 Anik Boudreau,2 Kun Lian,4 William T Cefalu1,21Nutrition and Diabetes Research Laboratory, 2Botanical Research Center, 3Ubiquitin Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge, LA, USA; 4The Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA, USAAim: To compare the effects of dietary fibers on hepatic cellular signaling in mice.Methods: Mice w...

  2. Measurement of fossil fuel derived carbon dioxide and other anthropogenic trace gases above Sacramento, California in Spring 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Turnbull

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct quantification of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff in atmospheric samples can be used to examine several carbon cycle and air quality questions. We collected in-situ CO2, CO, and CH4 measurements and flask samples in the boundary layer and free troposphere over Sacramento, California, USA, during two aircraft flights over and downwind of this urban area during spring of 2009. The flask samples were analyzed for Δ14CO2 and CO2 to determine the recently added CO2ff mole fraction. A suite of additional greenhouse gases including hydrocarbons and halocarbons were measured in the same samples. Strong correlations were observed between CO2ff and numerous trace gases associated with urban emissions. From these correlations we estimate emission ratios between CO2ff and these species, and compare these with bottom-up inventory-derived estimates. Recent county level inventory estimates for carbon monoxide (CO and benzene from the California Air Resources Board CEPAM database are in good agreement with our measured emission ratios, whereas older emissions inventories appear to overestimate emissions of these gases. For most other trace species, there are substantial differences between our measured emission ratios and those derived from available emission inventories. For the first flight, we combine in situ CO measurements with the measured CO:CO2ff emission ratio of 14±2 ppbCO/ppmCO2 to derive an estimate of CO2ff mole fraction throughout this flight, and also estimate the biospheric CO2 mixing ratio (CO2bio from the difference of total and fossil CO2. The resulting CO2bio varies substantially between air in the urban plume and the surrounding boundary layer air. Finally, we use the in situ estimates of CO2ff mole fraction to infer total fossil fuel CO2

  3. Determining Water Quality Trends in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Watershed in the Face of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynett, K.; Azimi-Gaylon, S.; Doidic, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Suisun Marsh (Delta) is the largest estuary on the West Coast of the Americas and is a resource of local, State, and national significance. The Delta is simultaneously the most critical component of California's water supply, a primary focus of the state's ecological conservation measures, and a vital resource deeply imperiled by degraded water quality. Delta waterbodies are identified as impaired by salinity, excess nutrients, low dissolved oxygen, pathogens, pesticides, heavy metals, and other contaminants. Climate change is expected to exacerbate the impacts of existing stressors in the Delta and magnify the challenges of managing this natural resource. A clear understanding of the current state of the watershed is needed to better inform scientists, decision makers, and the public about potential impacts from climate change. The Delta Watershed Initiative Network (Delta WIN) leverages the ecological benefits of healthy watersheds, and enhances, expands and creates opportunities for greater watershed health by coordinating with agencies, established programs, and local organizations. At this critical junction, Delta WIN is coordinating data integration and analysis to develop better understanding of the existing and emerging water quality concerns. As first steps, Delta WIN is integrating existing water quality data, analyzing trends, and monitoring to fill data gaps and to evaluate indicators of climate change impacts. Available data will be used for trend analysis; Delta WIN will continue to monitor where data is incomplete and new questions arise. Understanding how climate change conditions may affect water quality will be used to inform efforts to build resilience and maintain water quality levels which sustain aquatic life and human needs. Assessments of historical and new data will aid in recognition of potential climate change impacts and in initiating implementation of best management practices in collaboration with

  4. Towards up-scaling restored wetland CO2 and CH4 exchange in the Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturtevant, C. S.; Knox, S. H.; Koteen, L. E.; Matthes, J. H.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Returning agricultural land to wetlands in the Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta of northern California (hereafter, the Delta) can help reverse the land subsidence that is currently threatening a large proportion of California's water supply. Wetland restoration maintains plant productivity while drastically reducing the rapid peat decomposition that has occurred since this region was drained for agricultural use in the 1850s. Rebuilding the peat soils i) protects California's water supply by reducing pressure on levies, and ii) mitigates globally rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The more anaerobic soil environment of wetlands, however, promotes methane (CH4) production, a 25x more potent greenhouse gas than CO2. It is therefore important to understand the impact of wetland restoration on both these gases to evaluate both subsidence reversal and climate change mitigation goals. To this end, we are conducting eddy covariance measurements of gas exchange in restored Delta wetlands to quantify ecosystem-scale sequestration/emission of CO2 and CH4. The ultimate goal of these measurements is to be able to predict the effects of wetland restoration on Delta-wide fluxes of these important greenhouse gases. Wetlands, however, are spatially variable ecosystems, varying in substrate, plant species, plant density, and open water fraction, to name a few. Extending site-level measurements to other areas therefore requires attributing spatial variability in CO2 and CH4 exchange to respective sources and identifying spatially available indicators of this change. This poster presents preliminary results evaluating the spatial variability of CO2 and CH4 fluxes in two restored Delta wetlands and how this variability can be up-scaled to region-wide estimates using remotely sensed indicators.

  5. The sources and budget for dissolved sulfate in a fractured carbonate aquifer, southern Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change in the SW USA is likely to involve drier conditions and higher surface temperatures. In order to better understand the evolution of water chemistry and the sources of aqueous SO4 in these semi-arid settings, chemical and S isotope compositions were determined of springs, groundwater, and bedrock associated with a Permian fractured carbonate aquifer located in the southern Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico, USA. The results suggest that the evolution of water chemistry in the semi-arid carbonate aquifer is mainly controlled by dedolomitization of bedrock, which was magnified by increasing temperature and increasing dissolution of gypsum/anhydrite along the groundwater flow path. The δ34S of dissolved SO4 in spring and groundwater samples varied from +9.0‰ to +12.8‰, reflecting the mixing of SO4 from the dissolution of Permian gypsum/anhydrite (+12.3‰ to +13.4‰) and oxidation of sulfide minerals (−24.5‰ to −4.2‰). According to S isotope mass balance constraints, the contribution of sulfide-derived SO4 was considerable in the High Mountain recharge areas, accounting for up to ∼10% of the total SO4 load. However, sulfide weathering decreased in importance in the lower reaches of the watershed. A smaller SO4 input of ∼2–4% was contributed by atmospheric wet deposition. This study implies that the δ34S variation of SO4 in semi-arid environments can be complex, but that S isotopes can be used to distinguish among the different sources of weathering. Here it was found that H2SO4 dissolution due to sulfide oxidation contributes up to 5% of the total carbonate weathering budget, while most of the SO4 is released from bedrock sources during dedolomitization.

  6. Adjusting survival estimates for premature transmitter failure: A case study from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Christopher M.; Perry, Russell W.; Brandes, Patricia L.; Adams, Noah S.

    2013-01-01

    In telemetry studies, premature tag failure causes negative bias in fish survival estimates because tag failure is interpreted as fish mortality. We used mark-recapture modeling to adjust estimates of fish survival for a previous study where premature tag failure was documented. High rates of tag failure occurred during the Vernalis Adaptive Management Plan’s (VAMP) 2008 study to estimate survival of fall-run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during migration through the San Joaquin River and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California. Due to a high rate of tag failure, the observed travel time distribution was likely negatively biased, resulting in an underestimate of tag survival probability in this study. Consequently, the bias-adjustment method resulted in only a small increase in estimated fish survival when the observed travel time distribution was used to estimate the probability of tag survival. Since the bias-adjustment failed to remove bias, we used historical travel time data and conducted a sensitivity analysis to examine how fish survival might have varied across a range of tag survival probabilities. Our analysis suggested that fish survival estimates were low (95% confidence bounds range from 0.052 to 0.227) over a wide range of plausible tag survival probabilities (0.48–1.00), and this finding is consistent with other studies in this system. When tags fail at a high rate, available methods to adjust for the bias may perform poorly. Our example highlights the importance of evaluating the tag life assumption during survival studies, and presents a simple framework for evaluating adjusted survival estimates when auxiliary travel time data are available.

  7. Potential exposure of larval and juvenile delta smelt to dissolved pesticides in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuivila, K.M.; Moon, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    The San Francisco Estuary is critical habitat for delta smelt Hypomesus transpacificus, a fish whose abundance has declined greatly since 1983 and is now listed as threatened. In addition, the estuary receives drainage from the Central Valley, an urban and agricultural region with intense and diverse pesticide usage. One possible factor of the delta smelt population decline is pesticide toxicity during vulnerable larval and juvenile stages, but pesticide concentrations are not well characterized in delta smelt spawning and nursery habitat. The objective of this study was to estimate the potential exposure of delta smelt during their early life stages to dissolved pesticides. For 3 years (1998-2000), water samples from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta were collected during April-June in coordination with the California Department of Fish and Game's delta smelt early life stage monitoring program. Samples were analyzed for pesticides using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Water samples contained multiple pesticides, ranging from 2 to 14 pesticides in each sample. In both 1999 and 2000, elevated concentrations of pesticides overlapped in time and space with peak densities of larval and juvenile delta smelt. In contrast, high spring outflows in 1998 transported delta smelt away from the pesticide sampling sites so that exposure could not be estimated. During 2 years, larval and juvenile delta smelt were potentially exposed to a complex mixture of pesticides for a minimum of 2-3 weeks. Although the measured concentrations were well below short-term (96-h) LC50 values for individual pesticides, the combination of multiple pesticides and lengthy exposure duration could potentially have lethal or sublethal effects on delta smelt, especially during early larval development.

  8. Present-day oxidative subsidence of organic soils and mitigation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deverel, Steven J.; Ingrum, Timothy; Leighton, David

    2016-05-01

    Subsidence of organic soils in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta threatens sustainability of the California (USA) water supply system and agriculture. Land-surface elevation data were collected to assess present-day subsidence rates and evaluate rice as a land use for subsidence mitigation. To depict Delta-wide present-day rates of subsidence, the previously developed SUBCALC model was refined and calibrated using recent data for CO2 emissions and land-surface elevation changes measured at extensometers. Land-surface elevation change data were evaluated relative to indirect estimates of subsidence and accretion using carbon and nitrogen flux data for rice cultivation. Extensometer and leveling data demonstrate seasonal variations in land-surface elevations associated with groundwater-level fluctuations and inelastic subsidence rates of 0.5-0.8 cm yr-1. Calibration of the SUBCALC model indicated accuracy of ±0.10 cm yr-1 where depth to groundwater, soil organic matter content and temperature are known. Regional estimates of subsidence range from 1.8 cm yr-1. The primary uncertainty is the distribution of soil organic matter content which results in spatial averaging in the mapping of subsidence rates. Analysis of leveling and extensometer data in rice fields resulted in an estimated accretion rate of 0.02-0.8 cm yr-1. These values generally agreed with indirect estimates based on carbon fluxes and nitrogen mineralization, thus preliminarily demonstrating that rice will stop or greatly reduce subsidence. Areas below elevations of -2 m are candidate areas for implementation of mitigation measures such as rice because there is active subsidence occurring at rates greater than 0.4 cm yr-1.

  9. Eddy Covariance Measured Methane and Carbon Dioxide Fluxes for a Restored Wetland, Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, F.; Detto, M.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Hatala, J.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Fujii, R.

    2010-12-01

    There is an increase in investment to protect and restore natural wetlands due to environmental benefits such as soil carbon storage, atmospheric carbon sequestration, and in the case of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (SSJ-Delta), subsidence reversal. Although these ecosystems can actively increase stored carbon or limit oxidation of existing soil organic carbon (e.g. peat), anaerobic conditions created by permanent and semi-permanent flooding can result in the release of methane (CH4), a more potent greenhouse gas. In the summer of 2010, continuous eddy covariance measurements of CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) were collected from a restored wetland marsh on Twitchell Island in the SSJ-Delta. The eddy covariance instrumentation includes a CSAT3 sonic anemometer(Campbell Scientific, Logan, UT USA) , an open-path CO2/H2O infrared gas analyzer (LI-7500, LI-COR Biogeosciences, Lincoln NE USA) and closed-path tunable diode laser fast methane sensor (FMA or FGGA, Los Gatos Research). From June 22-30, an open-path methane analyzer (LI-7700, LI-COR Biogeosciences) was installed for 2-3 weeks to compare with the closed-path method. Initial results over the growing season, show the wetland’s potential to be a sink for CO2, as maximum daily values are around -10 µmol m-2 s-1. However, CH4 emissions may offset this potential as average CH4 emissions from the open and closed path comparison study were close to 200 nmol m-2 s-1, with peak rates as high as 400 nmol m-2 s-1. Here we present results showing diurnal and seasonal trends of CH4 and CO2 fluxes, which are dependent upon air, leaf, and water temperatures, differences in humidity, and plant stomatal controls, all driven by changes in daily and seasonal variations in solar radiation.

  10. Synergistic effects of disturbance and control in the decline of Eichhornia crassipes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, S.; Santos, M. J.; Ustin, S.

    2009-12-01

    Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is an aquatic invasive that has spread from Brazil to many regions in the world. In California, water hyacinth has reached a treat level and has been actively managed in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. To better understand the change in water hyacinth and other co-occurring aquatic vegetation we collected hyperspectral HyMap data from 2004 to 2008 over the entire Delta. We analyzed change in the classified data looking at the impact of natural variability, disturbance events, and chemical control on water hyacinth distribution in the Delta. Our results show that seasonal variability in salinity levels allows water hyacinth to occur throughout the Delta, in spite of being a freshwater plant that is extremely sensitive to salinity. Decline in submersed vegetation leads to decline in water hyacinth cover in the following year; this is likely due to the potential role of submersed species as an anchor/substrate for water hyacinth. Chemical control also decreases water hyacinth cover but the change is not sustainable if conditions continue to be favorable to its growth and spread. The synergistic effect of disturbance along with control measures in the last three years has led to a steep reduction in water hyacinth cover. In 2005 December and the beginning of 2006, two major floods flushed the species downstream. In winter of 2007, a week of continuous frost days further depleted already vulnerable populations. Regional climate models predict an increase in salinity levels in the Delta and increased risk of flooding and salt water intrusions due to sea-level rise and levee failure. While this might control and reduce water hyacinth in the Delta, it is likely that there will be regions in the Delta that will serve as nurseries and help the plant resurge during low-salinity seasons. This is likely aggravated as global warming reduces the persistence of continuous frost days that are capable of killing large populations of water

  11. Un estudio iconográfico de las estampas que ilustran el libro de "La historia sacra del Santísimo Sacramento contra las heregias destos tiempos"

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo Portela, Juan Isaac

    2014-01-01

    En este artículo se hace un estudio iconográfico de las dos estampas que ilustran el libro del dominico fray Alonso de Ribera, La Historia Sacra del Santissimo Sacramento contra las heregias destos tiempos, editado por Luis Sánchez en Madrid en 1626. En dichas estampas se plasman dos aspectos que van a ser fundamentales de la religiosidad contrarreformista española del siglo XVII, la defensa a ultranza de la Eucaristía y la lucha contra la herejía.

  12. La historia sacra del Santísimo Sacramento contra las heregias destos tiempos"An iconographic study of the engravings illustrating the work

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo Portela, Juan Isaac

    2014-01-01

    En este artículo se hace un estudio iconográfico de las dos estampas que ilustran el libro del dominico fray Alonso de Ribera, La Historia Sacra del Santissimo Sacramento contra las heregias destos tiempos, editado por Luis Sánchez en Madrid en 1626. En dichas estampas se plasman dos aspectos que van a ser fundamentales de la religiosidad contrarreformista española del siglo XVII, la defensa a ultranza de la Eucaristía y la lucha contra la herejía. In this article is made an iconographic s...

  13. A Decision Support Information System for Urban Landscape Management Using Thermal Infrared Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Laymon, Charles A.; Howell, Burgess F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we describe efforts to use remote sensing data within the purview of an information support system, to assess urban thermal landscape characteristics as a means for developing more robust models of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect. We also present a rationale on how we have successfully translated the results from the study of urban thermal heating and cooling regimes as identified from remote sensing data, to decision-makers, planners, government officials, and the public at large in several US cities to facilitate better understanding of how the UHI affects air quality. Additionally, through the assessment of the spatial distribution of urban thermal landscape characteristics using remote sensing data, it is possible to develop strategies to mitigate the UHI that hopefully will in turn, drive down ozone levels and improve overall urban air quality. Four US cities have been the foci for intensive analysis as part of our studies: Atlanta, GA, Baton Rouge, LA, Salt Lake City, UT, and Sacramento, CA. The remote sensing data for each of these cities has been used to generate a number of products for use by "stakeholder" working groups to convey information on what the effects are of the UHI and what measures can be taken to mitigate it. In turn, these data products are used to both educate and inform policy-makers, planners, and the general public about what kinds of UHI mitigation strategies are available.

  14. Using Remote Sensing Data and Research Results for Urban Heat Island Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Maury; Luvall, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides information on the characteristics of the urban heat island, research designed to provide the data needed to develop effective urban heat island reduction strategies, and the development of local working groups to develop implementation plans. As background, an overview of research results on the urban heat island phenomenon and the resultant effect on energy usage and air quality will be explored. The use of more reflective roofing materials, paving materials, tree planting, and other initiatives will be explored as a basis for strategies to mitigate urban heat islands and improve the urban environment. Current efforts to use aircraft remote sensing data in Atlanta, Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City and our work with non-profit organizations designated to lead public education and strategic development efforts will be presented. Efforts to organize working groups comprised of key stakeholders, the process followed in communicating research results, and methodology for soliciting feedback and incorporating ideas into local plans, policies and decision-making will be discussed. Challenges in developing and transferring data products and research results to stakeholders will be presented. It is our ultimate goal that such efforts be integrated into plans and/or decision models that encourage sustainable development.

  15. La historia sacra del Santísimo Sacramento contra las heregias destos tiempos"An iconographic study of the engravings illustrating the work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvo Portela, Juan Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se hace un estudio iconográfico de las dos estampas que ilustran el libro del dominico fray Alonso de Ribera, La Historia Sacra del Santissimo Sacramento contra las heregias destos tiempos, editado por Luis Sánchez en Madrid en 1626. En dichas estampas se plasman dos aspectos que van a ser fundamentales de la religiosidad contrarreformista española del siglo XVII, la defensa a ultranza de la Eucaristía y la lucha contra la herejía. In this article is made an iconographic study of the two prints that illustrate the book of the Dominican Fray Alonso de Ribera, La Historia Sacra del Santissimo Sacramento contra las heregias destos tiempos, edited by Luis Sanchez in Madrid in 1626. In these prints are reflected two aspects that are going to be essential on the religiosity Spanish Counterreform of the seventeenth century, the stubborn defense of the Eucharist and the fight against heresy.

  16. First Airswot Interferometric Radar Water Surface Elevations and Flooded Inundation Extent from the Sacramento River and Edwards AFB Wetland Complex, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, L. H.; Smith, L. C.; Gleason, C. J.; Baney, O. N.; Chu, V. W.; Bennett, M. M.; Pavelsky, T.; Sadowy, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's forthcoming Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission aims to quantify global freshwater fluxes from space using Ka-band interferometric radar. AirSWOT is the airborne calibration/validation instrument for SWOT with first-pass data collected over the Sacramento River in May 2013 and a wetland complex on Edwards AFB (Piute Ponds) in May 2014. Here, AirSWOT elevation and coherence data are compared with high resolution airborne imagery and concurrent in-situ field mappings of inundation area and water surface elevation. For the Sacramento River, AirSWOT water surface elevations are compared with field-surveyed elevations collected using a high precision GPS Lagrangian river drifter escorted down 30 km of river length. Additionally, field mapped river shorelines are compared with shorelines extracted from AirSWOT coherence data. For the Piute Ponds, we use an exhaustive field mapping of inundation extent and flooded vegetation to assess the ability of AirSWOT coherence and backscatter to map shorelines in a complex lake and wetland environment containing varying vegetation and soil moisture conditions.

  17. Evaluation of groundwater residence time in a high mountain aquifer system (Sacramento Mountains, USA): insights gained from use of multiple environmental tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Lewis; Timmons, Stacy

    2016-06-01

    The New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources (USA) has conducted a regional investigation of groundwater residence time within the southern Sacramento Mountains aquifer system using multiple environmental tracers. Results of the tracer surveys indicate that groundwater in the southern Sacramento Mountains ranges in age from less than 1 year to greater than 50 years, although the calculated ages contain uncertainties and vary significantly depending on which tracer is used. A distinctive feature of the results is discordance among the methods used to date groundwater in the study area. This apparent ambiguity results from the effects of a thick unsaturated zone, which produces non-conservative behavior among the dissolved gas tracers, and the heterogeneous character and semi-karstic nature of the aquifer system, which may yield water from matrix porosity, fractures, solution-enlarged conduits, or a combination of the three. The data also indicate mixing of groundwater from two or more sources, including recent recharge originating from precipitation at high elevations, old groundwater stored in the matrix, and pre-modern groundwater upwelling along fault zones. The tracer data have also been influenced by surface-water/groundwater exchange via losing streams and lower elevation springs (groundwater recycling). This study highlights the importance of using multiple tracers when conducting large-scale investigations of a heterogeneous aquifer system, and sheds light on characteristics of groundwater flow systems that can produce discrepancies in calculations of groundwater age.

  18. Evaluation of groundwater residence time in a high mountain aquifer system (Sacramento Mountains, USA): insights gained from use of multiple environmental tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Lewis; Timmons, Stacy

    2016-04-01

    The New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources (USA) has conducted a regional investigation of groundwater residence time within the southern Sacramento Mountains aquifer system using multiple environmental tracers. Results of the tracer surveys indicate that groundwater in the southern Sacramento Mountains ranges in age from less than 1 year to greater than 50 years, although the calculated ages contain uncertainties and vary significantly depending on which tracer is used. A distinctive feature of the results is discordance among the methods used to date groundwater in the study area. This apparent ambiguity results from the effects of a thick unsaturated zone, which produces non-conservative behavior among the dissolved gas tracers, and the heterogeneous character and semi-karstic nature of the aquifer system, which may yield water from matrix porosity, fractures, solution-enlarged conduits, or a combination of the three. The data also indicate mixing of groundwater from two or more sources, including recent recharge originating from precipitation at high elevations, old groundwater stored in the matrix, and pre-modern groundwater upwelling along fault zones. The tracer data have also been influenced by surface-water/groundwater exchange via losing streams and lower elevation springs (groundwater recycling). This study highlights the importance of using multiple tracers when conducting large-scale investigations of a heterogeneous aquifer system, and sheds light on characteristics of groundwater flow systems that can produce discrepancies in calculations of groundwater age.

  19. California GAMA Program: Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Results for the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces of Northern California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J E; Hudson, G B; Eaton, G F; Leif, R

    2005-01-20

    In response to concerns expressed by the California Legislature and the citizenry of the State of California, the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), implemented a program to assess groundwater quality, and provide a predictive capability for identifying areas that are vulnerable to contamination. The program was initiated in response to concern over public supply well closures due to contamination by chemicals such as methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE) from gasoline, and solvents from industrial operations. As a result of this increased awareness regarding groundwater quality, the Supplemental Report of the 1999 Budget Act mandated the SWRCB to develop a comprehensive ambient groundwater monitoring plan, and led to the initiation of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The primary objective of the California Aquifer Susceptibility (CAS) project (under the GAMA Program) is to assess water quality and to predict the relative susceptibility to contamination of groundwater resources throughout the state of California. Under the GAMA program, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) collaborate with the SWRCB, the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Department of Health Services (DHS), and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) to implement this groundwater assessment program. In 2003, LLNL carried out this vulnerability study in the Sacramento Valley and Volcanic Provinces. The goal of the study is to provide a probabilistic assessment of the relative vulnerability of groundwater used for the public water supply to contamination from surface sources. This assessment of relative contamination vulnerability is made based on the results of two types of analyses that are not routinely carried out at public water supply wells: ultra low-level measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and groundwater age dating (using the tritium-helium-3 method). In addition, stable oxygen isotope measurements

  20. The effectiveness of courses developed to recruit and retain minority students in the geology major at California State University, Sacramento

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammersley, L. C.

    2014-12-01

    The lack of diversity in the geosciences has long been recognized as a problem. While improvements have been made, the proportion of Bachelor's degrees in the earth sciences awarded to Hispanic students in 2012 was only 5.6%, a huge disparity with the 17% of the U.S. population that is Hispanic. At California State University, Sacramento, 19% of the student population is Hispanic but, of the 61 students that earned an undergraduate degree in geology between 2005 and 2010, only four were Hispanic. In response to the lack of diversity in the geology major, we developed a new Geology of Mexico course with the goal of recruiting Hispanic students to the major. We present a quantitative evaluation of the effectiveness of this course in attracting Hispanic students, encouraging them to take more geology courses, and recruiting them to the major. Data was collected in the Geology of Mexico course and in the equivalent Physical Geology course. During the period evaluated, 93% of enrollment in Geology of Mexico was Hispanic compared with 18.5% in Physical Geology. We found that Hispanic students in Physical Geology earned lower grades than did nonminority students, while Hispanic students in Geology of Mexico earned grades comparable with nonminority students in Physical Geology. Overall, Geology of Mexico students also showed more positive attitude changes to the geosciences and were more likely to take another geology course. The recruitment rate into the major for Hispanic students in Geology of Mexico was comparable to the recruitment rate for nonminority students in Physical Geology. Since 2008, the proportion of Hispanic geology majors has risen from 4.5% to 14.1% and, notably, the proportion of underrepresented minorities has increased from 4.5% to 22.2%, reflecting a significant overall increase in diversity of the major. In order to increase retention of minority students, we developed a field course for new majors who were not yet ready for upper division courses

  1. The nature of organic carbon in density-fractionated sediments in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (California)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeham, S. G.; Canuel, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    Rivers are the primary means by which sediments and carbon are transported from the terrestrial biosphere to the oceans but gaps remain in our understanding of carbon associations from source to sink. Bed sediments from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (CA) were fractionated according to density and analyzed for sediment mass distribution, elemental (C and N) composition, mineral surface area, and stable carbon and radiocarbon isotope compositions of organic carbon (OC) and fatty acids to evaluate the nature of organic carbon in river sediments. OC was unevenly distributed among density fractions. Mass and OC were in general concentrated in mesodensity (1.6-2.0 and 2.0-2.5 g cm-3) fractions, comprising 84.0 ± 1.3 % of total sediment mass and 80.8 ± 13.3 % of total OC (TOC). Low-density ( 2.5 g cm-3) organic-poor, mineral-rich material made-up 13.7 ± 1.4 % of sediment mass and 2.0 ± 0.9 % of TOC. Stable carbon isotope compositions of sedimentary OC were relatively uniform across bulk and density fractions (δ13C -27.4 ± 0.5 ‰). Radiocarbon content varied from Δ14C values of -382 (radiocarbon age 3800 yr BP) to +94 ‰ (modern) indicating a mix of young and old OC. Fatty acids were used to further constrain the origins of sedimentary OC. Short-chain n-C14-n-C18 fatty acids of algal origin were depleted in 13C (δ13C -37.5 to -35.2 ‰) but were enriched in 14C (Δ14C > 0) compared to long-chain n-C24-n-C28 acids of vascular plant origins with higher δ13C (-33.0 to -31.0 ‰) but variable Δ14C values (-180 and 61 ‰). These data demonstrate the potentially complex source and age distributions found within river sediments and provide insights about sediment and organic matter supply to the Delta.

  2. Effects of Winter Flooding Peat Soils on Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, F. E.; Pellerin, B. A.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Knox, S. H.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Fujii, R.

    2013-12-01

    Harvested cornfields make up nearly 80% of cropland intentionally flooded during the winter (October through February) in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to support waterfowl migration along the Pacific Flyway. This area is characterized by peat-rich islands that when flooded have the potential to be a source of methane production and emission, while reducing carbon dioxide respiration. Given the extent of winter flooding in the Delta, we evaluated the greenhouse gas emissions during this period and compared it to conventional winter fallow management. We constructed two eddy covariance towers on Staten Island, one in a cornfield flooded during the winter and the other one in a reference cornfield that remains fallow. Each tower included measurements of carbon dioxide, latent, sensible, and ground heat fluxes, as well as a suite of radiation measurements. A LI-COR Open Path Methane Analyzer (LI-7700) was initially installed at the flooded site and then alternated between the two sites every three to four weeks throughout the study. A second LI-7700 was deployed for continuous measurements at both towers in the winter of 2012/2013. Both fields have been under the same management for growing corn in the summer for the past twenty-five years. After harvest, the residual corn is chopped and then tilled into the soil before the winter season. Methane emissions slowly increased during the winter flooded period in 2011-2012, with maximum emissions (~234 mg-C m-2 day-1) occurring immediately following field drainage in mid-February. Methane emissions during the second winter period (e.g. 2012-2013) were similar to the first season in magnitude and timing, but showed two distinct events where emissions slowly increased followed by a maximum emission pulse and then a rapid decrease. Preliminary data analysis suggests the influence of strong Pacific storms occurring in the beginning of the second flooded season as a source of disturbance and agitating mechanism leading to

  3. Civilizing the Conversation? Using Surveys to Inform Water Management and Science in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanak, E.; Phillips Chappelle, C.

    2013-12-01

    Improving ecosystem outcomes in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is a complex, high-stakes water resource management challenge. The Delta is a major hub for water supply conveyance and a valued ecological resource. Yet long-term declines in native fish populations have resulted in severe legal constraints on water exports and fueled growing public debates about the roles and responsibilities of flow modification and other sources of ecosystem stress. Meanwhile, scientific uncertainty, and the inability of the scientific community to effectively communicate what *is* known, has frustrated policymakers and encouraged 'combat science' - the commissioning and use of competing scientific opinions in the courtroom. This paper summarizes results from a study designed to inform the policy process through the use of confidential surveys of scientific researchers (those publishing in peer-reviewed journals, n=122) and engaged stakeholders and policymakers (n=240). The surveys, conducted in mid-2012, sought respondents' views on the sources of ecosystem stress and priority ecosystem management actions. The scientist survey is an example of the growing use of expert elicitation to address gaps in the scientific literature, particularly where there is uncertainty about priorities for decisionmaking (e.g., Cvitanovic et al. 2013, J. of Env. Mgmt; McDaniels et al. 2012, Risk Analysis). The stakeholder survey is a useful complement, enabling the identification of areas of consensus and divergence among stakeholder groups and between these groups and scientific experts. The results suggest such surveys are a promising tool for addressing complex water management problems. We found surprisingly high agreement among scientists on the relative roles of stressors and the most promising management actions; they emphasized restoring more natural processes through habitat and flow actions within the watershed, consistent with 'reconciliation ecology' approaches (Rosenzweig 2003

  4. Greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration potential in restored freshwater marshes in the Sacramento San-Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, S. H.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Oikawa, P. Y.; Matthes, J. H.; Dronova, I.; Anderson, F. E.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    Wetlands can be effective carbon sinks due to limited decomposition rates in anaerobic soil. As such there is a growing interest in the use of restored wetlands as biological carbon sequestration projects for greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction programs. However, using wetlands to offset emissions requires accurate accounting of both carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) exchange since wetlands are also sources of CH4. To date few studies have quantified CO2 and CH4 exchange from restored wetlands or assessed how these fluxes vary during ecosystem development. In this study, we report on multiple years of eddy covariance measurements of CO2 and CH4 fluxes from two restored freshwater marshes of differing ages (one restored in 1997 and the other in 2010) in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, CA. Measurements at the younger restored wetland started in October 2010 and began in April 2011 at the older site. The younger restored wetland showed considerable year-to-year variability in the first 4 years following restoration, with CO2 uptake ranging from 12 to 420 g C-CO2 m-2 yr-1. Net CO2 uptake at the older wetland was overall greater than at the younger site, ranging from 292 to 585 g C-CO2 m-2 yr-1. Methane emissions were on average higher at the younger wetland (46 g C-CH4 m-2 yr-1) relative to the older one (33 g C-CH4 m-2 yr-1). In terms of the GHG budgets (assuming a global warming potential of 34), the younger wetland was consistently a GHG source, emitting on average 1439 g CO2 eq m-2 yr-1, while the older wetland was a GHG sink in two of the years of measurement (sequestering 651 and 780 g CO2 eq m-2 yr-1 in 2012 and 2013, respectively) and a source of 750 g CO2 eq m-2 yr-1 in 2014. This study highlights how dynamic CO2 and CH4 fluxes are in the first years following wetland restoration and suggests that restored wetlands have the potential to act as GHG sinks but this may depend on time since restoration.

  5. Implications for sustainability of a changing agricultural mosaic in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, C. E.; Deverel, S. J.; Jacobs, P.; Kelsey, R.

    2015-12-01

    Transformed from the largest wetland system on the west coast of the United States to agriculture, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is an extreme teaching example of anthropogenic threats to sustainability. For over 6,000 years, over 280,000 ha of intertidal freshwater marsh accreted due to seal level rise and sediment deposition. Farming of organic soils since 1850 resulted in land subsidence caused primarily by oxidation. Over 2 billion cubic meters of soil were lost resulting in elevations on Delta islands ranging from -1 to -8 m and increased risk of levee failures and water supply disruption. Alteration of water flows and habitat caused dramatic declines in aquatic species. A cycle in which oxidation of organic soils leads to deepening of drainage ditches to maintain an aerated root zone which in turn results in sustained oxidation and subsidence is perpetuated by the momentum of the status quo despite evidence that agricultural practices are increasingly unsustainable. Flooding of the soils breaks the oxidation/subsidence cycle. We assessed alternate land uses and the carbon market as a potential impetus for change. Using the peer-reviewed and locally calibrated SUBCALC model, we estimated net global warming potential for a range of scenarios for a representative island, from status quo to incorporating significant proportions of subsidence-mitigating land use. We analyzed economic implications by determining profit losses or gains when a simulated GHG offset market is available for wetlands using a regional agricultural production and economic optimization model, We estimated baseline GHG emissions at about 60,000 tons CO2-e per year. In contrast, modeled implementation of rice and wetlands resulted in substantial emissions reductions to the island being a net GHG sink. Subsidence would be arrested or reversed where these land uses are implemented. Results of economic modeling reveal that conversion to wetlands can have significant negative farm financial

  6. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenic-biogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento plume during CARES?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, L.; Kuang, C.; Sedlacek, A.; Senum, G.; Springston, S.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Jayne, J.; Fast, J.; Hubbe, J.; Shilling, J.; Zaveri, R.

    2016-02-01

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) the US Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA, plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA) can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrations are enhanced by the simultaneous presence of high concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) and either isoprene, MVK + MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein), or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, respectively. Linear and bilinear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, "Bio", for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short timescales and distance scales can be explained by CO. For each transect and species a plume perturbation, (i.e., ΔOA, defined as the difference between 90th and 10th percentiles) was defined and regressions done amongst Δ values in order to probe day-to-day and location-dependent variability. Species that predicted the largest fraction of the variance in ΔOA were ΔO3 and ΔCO. Background OA was highly correlated with background methanol and poorly correlated with other tracers. Because background OA was ˜ 60 % of peak OA in the urban plume, peak OA should be primarily biogenic and therefore non-fossil, even though the day-to-day and spatial variability of plume OA is best described by an anthropogenic tracer, CO. Transects were split into subsets according to the percentile rankings of ΔCO and ΔBio, similar to an approach used by Setyan et al. (2012) and Shilling et al

  7. Peat accretion histories during the past 6,000 years in marshes of the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; de Fontaine, Christian S.; Brown, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how vertical accretion rates in marshes vary through the millennia. Peat cores were collected in remnant and drained marshes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Cubic smooth spline regression models were used to construct age-depth models and accretion histories for three remnant marshes. Estimated vertical accretion rates at these sites range from 0.03 to 0.49 cm year-1. The mean contribution of organic matter to soil volume at the remnant marsh sites is generally stable (4.73% to 6.94%), whereas the mean contribution of inorganic matter to soil volume has greater temporal variability (1.40% to 7.92%). The hydrogeomorphic position of each marsh largely determines the inorganic content of peat. Currently, the remnant marshes are keeping pace with sea level rise, but this balance may shift for at least one of the sites under future sea level rise scenarios.

  8. Evaluating the Measurement Structure of the Abbreviated HIV Stigma Scale in a Sample of African Americans Living with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eboneé T.; Yaghmaian, Rana A.; Best, Andrew; Chan, Fong; Burrell, Reginald, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to validate the 10-item version of the HIV Stigma Scale (HSS-10) in a sample of African Americans with HIV/AIDS. Method: One hundred and ten African Americans living with HIV/AIDS were recruited from 3 case management agencies in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Measurement structure of the HSS-10 was evaluated using…

  9. Interface between astrophysical datasets and distributed database management systems (DAVID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, S. S.

    1988-01-01

    This is a status report on the progress of the DAVID (Distributed Access View Integrated Database Management System) project being carried out at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The objective is to implement an interface between Astrophysical datasets and DAVID. Discussed are design details and implementation specifics between DAVID and astrophysical datasets.

  10. 30 CFR 918.10 - State regulatory program approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State regulatory program approval. 918.10... INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE LOUISIANA § 918.10 State... and Mining Division, 625 N. 4th Street, P.O. Box 94275, Baton Rouge, LA 70804-9275. (b) Office...

  11. West Indian Sojourners in Guatemala and Honduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald N. Harpelle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Race, Nation, and West Indian Immigration to Honduras, 1890-1940. Glenn A. Chambers. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2010. xii +202 pp. (Cloth US$ 35.00Black Labor Migration in Caribbean Guatemala, 1882-1923. Frederick Douglass Opie. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2009. 145 pp. (Cloth US$ 65.00

  12. 40 CFR 52.977 - Control strategy and regulations: Ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Ozone... and regulations: Ozone. Determination of Attainment. Effective March 12, 2010 EPA has determined the Baton Rouge 1-hour ozone nonattainment area has attained the 1-hour ozone National Ambient Air...

  13. From Dreams to Dollars: Joining the Theory of Planning with the Practicality of Budget to Maximize Both

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Myrtle E. B.

    2008-01-01

    The integrated online planning and budget development system at Baton Rouge Community College is an innovative approach to systematically link college strategic priorities and unit plan objectives with financial resources. Using two industry standards (Microsoft Access and Sungard Banner), a user-friendly program was developed that has facilitated…

  14. 76 FR 34252 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993; IMS Global...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ..., Jacksonville, FL; LCTCS Online, Baton Rouge, LA; and Norwegian Centre for ICT in Education, Hamar, Norway, have... the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on September 13, 2000 (65 FR 55283). The last... pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on April 5, 2011 (76 FR 18797). Patricia A. Brink, Director of...

  15. 76 FR 20994 - Privacy Act of 1974; Deletion of an Existing System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: HRSA's Bureau of Primary Health Care's National Hansen's Disease Program (NHDP) located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, formerly leased hospital space where the elderly Hansen's disease... those residents' valuables as needed. In September 2009, when the hospital lease expired, those...

  16. The Heritage Fallacy: Race, Loyalty, and the First Grambling-Southern Football Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    On Armistice Day 1932, the Southern University Bushmen football team left Baton Rouge and traveled to Monroe, Louisiana to play the Tigers of Louisiana Negro Normal and Industrial Institute for the first time. Normal was far younger than Southern. It was a two-year junior college in the northeast cotton town of Grambling, and its football team was…

  17. Got Languages? Powerful Skills for the 21st Century. Dimension 2011. Selected Proceedings of the 2011 Joint Conference of the Southern Conference on Language Teaching, the Louisiana Foreign Language Teachers' Association, and the Southeastern Association of Language Learning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Carol, Ed.; Swanson, Peter B., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT) held its annual conference March 10-12, 2011, at the Crowne Plaza in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in collaboration with the Louisiana Foreign Language Teachers Association (LFLTA) and the Southeastern Association of Language Learning Technology (SEALLT). Those individuals whose proposals were…

  18. 14 CFR 1201.402 - NASA Industrial Applications Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and innovative technology to nonaerospace sectors of the economy—NASA operates a network of Industrial..., Department of Computer Science, Baton Rouge, LA 70813-2065. (b) To obtain access to NASA-developed computer software, contact: Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC), University of...

  19. Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bos, W. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

    1992-12-01

    Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

  20. Influence of neighbourhood socioeconomic position on the transition to type II diabetes in older Mexican Americans: the Sacramento Area Longitudinal Study on Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Lorena; Lee, Anne; Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Neuhaus, John M; Aiello, Allison; Elfassy, Tali; Haan, Mary N

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the influence of neighbourhood socioeconomic position (NSEP) on development of diabetes over time. Design A longitudinal cohort study. Setting The data reported were from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging, a longitudinal study of the health of 1789 older Latinos. Participants Community-dwelling older Mexican Americans residing in the Sacramento Metropolitan Statistical Area. Main outcome Multistate Markov regression were used to model transitions through four possible states over time: 1=normal; 2=pre-diabetic; 3=diabetic; and 4=death without diabetes. Results At baseline, nearly 50% were non-diabetic, 17.5% were pre-diabetic and nearly 33% were diabetic. At the end of follow-up, there were a total of 824 people with type 2 diabetes. In a fully adjusted MSM regression model, among non-diabetics, higher NSEP was not associated with a transition to pre-diabetes. Among non-diabetics, higher NSEP was associated with an increased risk of diabetes (HR=1.66, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.42) and decreased risk of death without diabetes (HR: 0.56, 95% CI 0.33 to 0.96). Among pre-diabetics, higher NSEP was significantly associated with a transition to non-diabetic status (HR: 1.22, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.50). Adjusting for BMI, age, education, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, medical insurance and nativity did not affect this relationship. Conclusions Our findings show that high NSEP poses higher risk of progression from normal to diabetes compared with a lower risk of death without diabetes. This work presents a possibility that these associations are modified by nativity or culture. PMID:27515749

  1. 234U/238U and δ87Sr in peat as tracers of paleosalinity in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Paces, James B.; Alpers, Charles N.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Neymark, Leonid; Bullen, Thomas D.; Taylor, Howard E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the history of paleosalinity over the past 6000+ years in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the Delta), which is the innermost part of the San Francisco Estuary. We used a combination of Sr and U concentrations, d87Sr values, and 234U/238U activity ratios (AR) in peat as proxies for tracking paleosalinity. Peat cores were collected in marshes on Browns Island, Franks Wetland, and Bacon Channel Island in the Delta. Cores were dated using 137Cs, the onset of Pb and Hg contamination from hydraulic gold mining, and 14C. A proof of concept study showed that the dominant emergent macrophyte and major component of peat in the Delta, Schoenoplectus spp., incorporates Sr and U and that the isotopic composition of these elements tracks the ambient water salinity across the Estuary. Concentrations and isotopic compositions of Sr and U in the three main water sources contributing to the Delta (seawater, Sacramento River water, and San Joaquin River water) were used to construct a three-end-member mixing model. Delta paleosalinity was determined by examining variations in the distribution of peat samples through time within the area delineated by the mixing model. The Delta has long been considered a tidal freshwater marsh region, but only peat samples from Franks Wetland and Bacon Channel Island have shown a consistently fresh signal (<0.5 ppt) through time. Therefore, the eastern Delta, which occurs upstream from Bacon Channel Island along the San Joaquin River and its tributaries, has also been fresh for this time period. Over the past 6000+ years, the salinity regime at the western boundary of the Delta (Browns Island) has alternated between fresh and oligohaline (0.5-5 ppt).

  2. Etude préliminaire pour l’évaluation et le suivi du niveau de qualité des viandes bovines Label Rouge d’Aquitaine, par une méthode simplifiée alternative à celle du comité français d’accréditation (COFRAC)

    OpenAIRE

    Ellies-Oury, Marie-Pierre; Dauvergne, Arlette; Papillon, Sandrine; Jacob, Hervé; Picard, Brigitte; Micol, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Les Organismes de Défense et de Gestion (ODG) ont la possibilité d’utiliser une méthode alternative au programme 133 du COFRAC pour prouver la supériorité sensorielle des produits Label Rouge (LR). En Aquitaine, il existe 4 LR en viande bovine : Boeuf Blond d’Aquitain, Boeuf Excellence, Boeuf de Chalosse et Boeuf de nos Campagnes. Dans un premier temps, un jury de 16 personnes qualifiées représentant les différents maillons de chacune des filières (éleveurs, abatteurs, chevillards...

  3. Quality-control results for ground-water and surface-water data, Sacramento River Basin, California, National Water-Quality Assessment, 1996-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Cathy; Domagalski, Joseph L.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluating the extent that bias and variability affect the interpretation of ground- and surface-water data is necessary to meet the objectives of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Quality-control samples used to evaluate the bias and variability include annual equipment blanks, field blanks, field matrix spikes, surrogates, and replicates. This report contains quality-control results for the constituents critical to the ground- and surface-water components of the Sacramento River Basin study unit of the NAWQA Program. A critical constituent is one that was detected frequently (more than 50 percent of the time in blank samples), was detected at amounts exceeding water-quality standards or goals, or was important for the interpretation of water-quality data. Quality-control samples were collected along with ground- and surface-water samples during the high intensity phase (cycle 1) of the Sacramento River Basin NAWQA beginning early in 1996 and ending in 1998. Ground-water field blanks indicated contamination of varying levels of significance when compared with concentrations detected in environmental ground-water samples for ammonia, dissolved organic carbon, aluminum, and copper. Concentrations of aluminum in surface-water field blanks were significant when compared with environmental samples. Field blank samples collected for pesticide and volatile organic compound analyses revealed no contamination in either ground- or surface-water samples that would effect the interpretation of environmental data, with the possible exception of the volatile organic compound trichloromethane (chloroform) in ground water. Replicate samples for ground water and surface water indicate that variability resulting from sample collection, processing, and analysis was generally low. Some of the larger maximum relative percentage differences calculated for replicate samples occurred between samples having lowest absolute concentration differences and(or) values near

  4. Extensometer, water-level, and lithologic data from Bacon and Bethel Islands in Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, September 1987 to August 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Barry D.; Leighton, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Compaction, water-level, and lithologic data were collected at extensometer sites on Bacon and Bethel Islands, anchored at 436 and 536 feet below land surface, respectively. The data reported here are part of a study of the processes causing subsidence in the Sacramento?San Joaquin Delta. The depths were selected to ensure that they were well below the peat layer and the primary aquifer, which minimized the effects of peat loss and shallow ground-water withdrawal. Compaction and depth to ground water were measured monthly at Bacon Island from September 1987 through August 1993 and at Bethel Island from August 1988 through August 1993. After automatic digital data loggers were installed at Bacon Island in December 1988 and at Bethel Island in September 1989, hourly readings also were made. Calculated rates of compaction were 0.0015 and 0.0016 feet per year at Bacon and Bethel Islands, respectively. Cumulative compaction at the Bacon Island site from September 1987 to August 1993 was about 0.009 feet. Cumulative compaction at the Bethel Island site from August 1988 to August 1993 was about 0.008 feet.

  5. Use of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes to trace the larval striped bass food chain in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary, California, April to September 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Walter; Sutton, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    To assess one potential cause for the decline of the striped bass fishery in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary, stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were used to examine the trophic structures of the larval striped bass food chain, and to trace the flux of these elements through the food chain components. Study results generally confirm a food chain consisting of the elements, phytoplankton/detritus-->zooplankton/Neomysis shrimp-->larval striped bass. The stable isotope ratios generally become more positive as one progresses from the lower to the higher trophic level food chain components, and no unusual trophic structure was found in the food chain. However, the data indicate an unidentified consumer organism occupying an intermediate position between the lower and higher trophic levels of the larval striped bass food chain. Based on expected trophic interactions, this unidentified consumer would have a stable carbon isotope ratio of about 28/mil and a stable nitrogen isotope ratio of about 8/mi. Three possible feeding stages for larval striped bass also were identified, based on their lengths. The smallest length fish seem to subsist on their yolk sac remnants, and the largest length fish subsist on Neomysis shrimp and zooplankton. The intermediate-length fish represent a transition stage between primary food sources and/or use of a mixture of food sources. (USGS)

  6. Assessment of fossil fuel carbon dioxide and other anthropogenic trace gas emissions from airborne measurements over Sacramento, California in spring 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Turnbull

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct quantification of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff in atmospheric samples can be used to examine several carbon cycle and air quality questions. We collected in situ CO2, CO, and CH4 measurements and flask samples in the boundary layer and free troposphere over Sacramento, California, USA, during two aircraft flights over and downwind of this urban area during spring of 2009. The flask samples were analyzed for Δ14CO2 and CO2 to determine the recently added CO2ff mole fraction. A suite of greenhouse and other trace gases, including hydrocarbons and halocarbons, were measured in the same samples. Strong correlations were observed between CO2ff and numerous trace gases associated with urban emissions. From these correlations we estimate emission ratios between CO2ff and these species, and compare these with bottom-up inventory-derived estimates. Recent county level inventory estimates for carbon monoxide (CO and benzene from the California Air Resources Board CEPAM database are in good agreement with our measured emission ratios, whereas older emissions inventories appear to overestimate emissions of these gases by a factor of two. For most other trace species, there are substantial differences (200–500% between our measured emission ratios and those derived from available emission inventories. For the first flight, we combine in situ CO measurements with the measured CO:CO2ff emission ratio of 14 ± 2 ppbCO/ppmCO2 to derive an estimate of CO2ff mole fraction throughout this flight, and also estimate the biospheric CO2 mixing ratio (CO2bio from the difference of total and fossil CO2. The resulting CO2bio varies dramatically from up to 8 ± 2 ppm in the urban plume to −6 ± 1 ppm in the surrounding boundary layer air. Finally, we use the in situ estimates of CO

  7. Chromium(VI) generation in vadose zone soils and alluvial sediments of the southwestern Sacramento Valley, California: a potential source of geogenic Cr(VI) to groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater that exceed the World Health Organization’s maximum contaminant level for drinking water (50 μg L−1) occur in several locations globally. The major mechanism for mobilization of this Cr(VI) at these sites is the weathering of Cr(III) from ultramafic rocks and its subsequent oxidation on Mn oxides. This process may be occurring in the southern Sacramento Valley of California where Cr(VI) concentrations in groundwater can approach or exceed 50 μg L−1. To characterize Cr geochemistry in the area, samples from several soil auger cores (approximately 4 m deep) and drill cores (approximately 25 m deep) were analyzed for total concentrations of 44 major, minor and trace elements, Cr associated with labile Mn and Fe oxides, and Cr(VI). Total concentrations of Cr in these samples ranged from 140 to 2220 mg per kg soil. Between 9 and 70 mg per kg soil was released by selective extractions that target Fe oxides, but essentially no Cr was associated with the abundant reactive Mn oxides (up to ~1000 mg hydroxylamine-reducible Mn per kg soil was present). Both borehole magnetic susceptibility surveys performed at some of the drill core sites and relative differences between Cr released in a 4-acid digestion versus total Cr (lithium metaborate fusion digestion) suggest that the majority of total Cr in the samples is present in refractory chromite minerals transported from ultramafic exposures in the Coast Range Mountains. Chromium(VI) in the samples studied ranged from 0 to 42 μg kg−1, representing a minute fraction of total Cr. Chromium(VI) content was typically below detection in surface soils (top 10 cm) where soil organic matter was high, and increased with increasing depth in the soil auger cores as organic matter decreased. Maximum concentrations of Cr(VI) were up to 3 times greater in the deeper drill core samples than the shallow auger cores. Although Cr(VI) in these vadose zone soils and sediments was only a

  8. Use of dissolved inorganic carbon isotopes to track photosynthesis, respiration, and nitrification along a 56 mile transect in the Sacramento River and San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Peek, S.; Young, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    A decline in phytoplankton stocks in the San Francisco Bay and Delta is thought to contribute to the pelagic organism decline observed over the past two decades. One factor controlling phytoplankton growth rate is the availability of nutrients. Although there is an excess of nutrients in the Bay and Delta, the type and relative abundance of nutrients is critical to phytoplankton growth. To evaluate the response of phytoplankton to nutrient sources and to better understand phytoplankton dynamics downstream, we tested the hypothesis that the δ13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) along with conventional water chemistry analyses will record events such as increased nitrification (related to the Sacramento River Wastewater Treatment Plant ammonium input) and algal blooms, and reflect the balance between photosynthesis and bacterial respiration. Multiple parameters affect [DIC] and its δ13C, including DIC sources, pH, and biological processes. Consumption of CO2 by phytoplankton during photosynthesis and by autotrophic bacteria during nitrification both result in increases in δ13C-DIC. However, photosynthesis and nitrification have very different relationships to chlorophyll and nutrient concentrations. The balance between heterotrophic bacterial respiration and photosynthesis should be reflected in trends in DIC, nutrient, and chlorophyll concentration, and δ13C-DIC. The δ13C of DIC should also be reflected in the δ13C of phytoplankton with approximately a 20 per mil fractionation. Significant deviation in the fractionation factor may indicate local variations in growth rate, nutrient availability, or speciation. Combined, these parameters should provide a gauge of the relative importance of the above mentioned processes. To test this hypothesis, we collected 19 water samples per cruise between July 2012 and July 2013 along a 56 mile transect between Rio Vista on the Sacramento River and San Francisco Bay near Angel Island during 8 cruises on the USGS RV

  9. A millennial-scale record of Pb and Hg contamination in peatlands of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith; Alpers, Charles N.; Neymark, Leonid; Paces, James B.; Taylor, Howard E.; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we provide the first record of millennial patterns of Pb and Hg concentrations on the west coast of the United States. Peat cores were collected from two micro-tidal marshes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Core samples were analyzed for Pb, Hg, and Ti concentrations and dated using radiocarbon, 210Pb, and 137Cs. Pre-anthropogenic concentrations of Pb and Hg in peat ranged from 0.60 to 13.0 µg g-1and from 6.9 to 71 ng g-1, respectively. For much of the past 6000+ years, the Delta was free from anthropogenic pollution, however, beginning in ~1425 CE, Hg and Pb concentrations, Pb/Ti ratios, Pb enrichment factors (EFs), and HgEFs all increased. Pb isotope compositions of the peat suggest that this uptick was likely caused by smelting activities originating in Asia. The next increases in Pb and Hg contamination occurred during the California Gold Rush (beginning ~1850 CE), when concentrations reached their highest levels (74 µg g-1 Pb, 990 ng g-1 Hg; PbEF = 12 and HgEF = 28). Lead concentrations increased again beginning in the ~1920s with the incorporation of Pb additives in gasoline. The phase-out of lead additives in the late 1980s was reflected in Pb isotope ratios and reductions in Pb concentrations in the surface layers of the peat. The rise and fall of Hg contamination was also tracked by the peat archive, with the highest Hg concentrations occurring just before 1963 CE and then decreasing during the post-1963 period. Overall, the results show that the Delta was a pristine region for most of its ~6700-year existence; however, since ~1425 CE, it has received Pb and Hg contamination from both global and regional sources.

  10. Littoral fish assemblages of the alien-dominated Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, 1980-1983 and 2001-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L.R.; Michniuk, D.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed monthly boat electrofishing data to characterize the littoral fish assemblages of five regions of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (northern, southern, eastern, western, and central), California, during two sampling periods, 1980-1983 (1980s) and 2001-2003 (2000s), to provide information pertinent to the restoration of fish populations in this highly altered estuary. During the 1980s, almost 11,000 fish were captured, including 13 native species and 24 alien species. During the 2000s, just over 39,000 fish were captured, including 15 native species and 24 alien species. Catch per unit effort (CPUE) of total fish, alien fish, and centrarchid fish were greater in the 2000s compared with the 1980s, largely because of increased centrarchid fish CPUE. These differences in CPUE were associated with the spread of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), particularly an alien aquatic macrophyte Egeria densa. Native fish CPUE declined from the 1980s to the 2000s, but there was no single factor that could explain the decline. Native fish were most abundant in the northern region during both sampling periods. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling indicated similar patterns of fish assemblage composition during the two sampling periods, with the northern and western regions characterized by the presence of native species. The separation of the northern and western regions from the other regions was most distinct in the 2000s. Our results suggest that native fish restoration efforts will be most successful in the northern portion of the Delta. Management decisions on the Delta should include consideration of possible effects on SAV in littoral habitats and the associated fish assemblages and ecological processes. ?? 2007 Estuarine Research Federation.

  11. Assessing the contribution of wetlands and subsided islands to dissolved organic matter and disinfection byproduct precursors in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta: A geochemical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, T.E.C.; Bergamaschi, B.A.; Hernes, P.J.; Spencer, R.G.M.; Stepanauskas, R.; Kendall, C.; Losee, R.F.; Fujii, R.

    2008-01-01

    This study assesses how rivers, wetlands, island drains and open water habitats within the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta affect dissolved organic matter (DOM) content and composition, and disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation. Eleven sites representative of these habitats were sampled on six dates to encompass seasonal variability. Using a suite of qualitative analyses, including specific DBP formation potential, absorbance, fluorescence, lignin content and composition, C and N stable isotopic compositions, and structural groupings determined using CPMAS (cross polarization, magic angle spinning) 13C NMR, we applied a geochemical fingerprinting approach to characterize the DOM from different Delta habitats, and infer DOM and DBP precursor sources and estimate the relative contribution from different sources. Although river input was the predominant source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), we observed that 13-49% of the DOC exported from the Delta originated from sources within the Delta, depending on season. Interaction with shallow wetlands and subsided islands significantly increased DOC and DBP precursor concentrations and affected DOM composition, while deep open water habitats had little discernable effect. Shallow wetlands contributed the greatest amounts of DOM and DBP precursors in the spring and summer, in contrast to island drains which appeared to be an important source during winter months. The DOM derived from wetlands and island drains had greater haloacetic acid precursor content relative to incoming river water, while two wetlands contributed DOM with greater propensity to form trihalomethanes. These results are pertinent to restoration of the Delta. Large scale introduction of shallow wetlands, a proposed restoration strategy, could alter existing DOC and DBP precursor concentrations, depending on their hydrologic connection to Delta channels. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Preliminary assessment of DOC and THM precursor loads from a freshwater restored wetland, an agricultural field, and a tidal wetland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, R.; Bergamaschi, B.A.; Ganju, N.K.; Fleck, J.A.; Burow-Fogg, K.R.; Schoellhamer, D.; Deverel, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Water exported from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta supplies drinking water to more than 22 million people in California. At certain times of the year, Delta waters contain relatively high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and bromide. During these times, chlorination of Delta water for drinking water disinfection will form disinfection byproducts, such as trihalomethanes (THMs), that can exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level for THMs of 80 mg/L. Important sources of DOC and THM precursors (types of DOC that form THMs when chlorinated) to the Delta include rivers, drainage water from peat islands, water from wetlands and areas with extensive riparian vegetation, and in-channel growth of algae and macrophytes. Due to proposed ecosystem restoration and creation of wetlands in the Delta, there is an urgent need for information on the relative loads of DOC and THM precursors produced from three different land uses: restored wetlands constructed for subsidence mitigation, tidal wetlands, and agricultural operations. We have been conducting research in the Delta to provide this information. A restored wetland and agricultural field located on Twitchell Island, and a tidal wetland on Browns Island have been monitored for flow, DOC, and THM precursors. Initial results indicate that the loads of DOC and THM precursors are similar for the restored wetland (surface water only) and the agricultural field. These land uses produce DOC loads of about 14 and 11 g C/m2/yr, respectively, and THM precursor loads of about 1.7 and 1.0 g THM/m2/yr, respectively. Estimates of DOC and THM precursor loads for the tidal wetland site on Browns Island and seepage associated with the restored wetland are being developed.

  13. Le jugement divin, variations byzantines. Duel judiciaire et épreuve du fer rouge dans la pratique judiciaire à Byzance (XIIIe-XIVe siècles) Byzantine Variations of the Divine Judgment: The Trial by Duel and the Ordeal of the Red-Hot Iron in Byzantine Judicial Practice (13th-14th Centuries)

    OpenAIRE

    Georgios Katsenis

    2009-01-01

    Le contact du monde byzantin avec les Croisades et l’Orient latin eut des répercussions dans le domaine de la justice byzantine. Au lieu des méthodes de preuve établies par le droit romain, l’application du duel judiciaire et de l’épreuve du fer rouge apparaît sous une forme presque identique à l’occidentale. L’absence d’un pouvoir central efficace et la crise conséquente des règles du droit romain permettaient leur diffusion à travers le monde byzantin. Malgré les réactions des savants ecclé...

  14. Genèse des magmas associés à l'ouverture d'un domaine océanique : Géochimie des laves du Nord-Est de l'Afrique (Mer Rouge-Afar) et d'Arabie

    OpenAIRE

    Barrat, Jean-Alix

    1991-01-01

    L'existence d'un point chaud localisé en Afar est confirmée. Principalement deux composants mantelliques interviennent dans la genèse des laves du Sud de la Mer Rouge et d'Afar: un manteau appauvri en LREE et une source présentant des caractéristiques du pôle HIMU. Certains basaltes des plateaux éthiopiens et d'Afar (en particulier ceux émis avant l'ouverture du Golfe de Tadjoura) sont contaminés par la croûte continentale. Les résultats analytiques présentés ici, suggèrent que certains basal...

  15. The Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeff; Morris, Lynn; Stewart, Fran; Thretheway, Ray; Gartland, Lisa; Russell, Camille; Reddish, Merrill; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Urban heat islands increase the demand for cooling energy and accelerate the formation of smog. They are created when natural vegetation is replaced by heat-absorbing surfaces such as building roofs and walls, parking lots, and streets. Through the implementation of measures designed to mitigate the urban heat island, communities can decrease their demand for energy and effectively "cool" the metropolitan landscape. Measures to reverse the urban heat island include afforestation and the widespread use of highly reflective surfaces. To demonstrate the potential benefits of implementing these measures, EPA has teamed up with NASA and LBNL to initiate a pilot project with three U.S. cities. As part of the pilot, NASA is using remotely-sensed data to quantify surface temperature, albedo, the thermal response number and NDVI vegetation of each city. To pursue these efforts, more information is needed about specific characteristics of several different cities. NASA used the Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) to obtain high spatial resolution (10 m pixel resolution) over each of the three pilot cities (Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City). The goal of the UHIPP is to use the results from the NASA/LBNL analysis, combined with knowledge gained through working with various organizations within each pilot city to identify the most effective means of implementing strategies designed to mitigate the urban heat island, These "lessons learned" will be made available and used by cities across the U.S. to assist policy makers and others within various communities to analyze their own urban heat islands and determine which, if any, measures can be taken to help save energy and money, and to prevent pollution. The object of this session is for representatives from each of the pilot cities to present their results of the study and share the experience of working with these data in managing their urban landscape.

  16. Shade trees reduce building energy use and CO2 emissions from power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, H.

    2001-11-01

    Urban shade trees offer significant benefits in reducing building air-conditioning demand and improving urban air quality by reducing smog. The savings associated with these benefits vary by climate region and can be up to $200 per tree. The cost of planting trees and maintaining them can vary from $10 to $500 per tree. Tree-planting programs can be designed to have lower costs so that they offer potential savings to communities that plant trees. Our calculations suggest that urban trees play a major role in sequestering C02 and thereby delay global warming. We estimate that a tree planted in Los Angeles avoids the combustion of 18 kg of carbon annually, even though it sequesters only 4.5-11 kg (as it would if growing in a forest). In this sense, one shade tree in Los Angeles is equivalent to three to five forest trees. In a recent analysis for Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City, we estimated that planting an average of four shade trees per house (each with a top view cross section of 50 m2) would lead to an annual reduction in carbon emissions from power plants of 16,000, 41,000, and 9000 t, respectively (the per-tree reduction in carbon emissions is about 10-11 kg per year). These reductions only account for the direct reduction in the net cooling- and heating-energy use of buildings. Once the impact of the community cooling is included, these savings are increased by at least 25 percent.

  17. Shade trees reduce building energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions from power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Urban shade trees offer significant benefits in reducing building air-conditioning demand and improving urban air quality by reducing smog. The savings associated with these benefits vary by climate region and can be up to 200 US dollars per tree. The cost of planting trees and maintaining them can vary from 10 US dollars to 500 US dollars per tree. Tree-planting programs can be designed to have lower costs so that they offer potential savings to communities that plant trees. Our calculations suggest that urban trees play a major role in sequestering CO{sub 2} and thereby delay global warming. We estimate that a tree planted in Los Angeles avoids the combustion of 18 kg of carbon annually, even though it sequesters only 4.5-11 kg (as it would if growing in a forest). In this sense, one shade tree in Los Angeles is equivalent to three to five forest trees. In a recent analysis for Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City, we estimated that planting an average of four shade trees per house (each with a top view cross section of 50 m{sup 2}) would lead to an annual reduction in carbon emissions from power plants of 16,000, 41,000, and 9000 t, respectively (the per-tree reduction in carbon emissions is about 10-11 kg per year). These reductions only account for the direct reduction in the net cooling- and heating-energy use of buildings. Once the impact of the community cooling is included, these savings are increased by at least 25%. (author)

  18. Shade trees reduce building energy use and CO2 emissions from power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban shade trees offer significant benefits in reducing building air-conditioning demand and improving urban air quality by reducing smog. The savings associated with these benefits vary by climate region and can be up to$200 per tree. The cost of planting trees and maintaining them can vary from$10 to$500 per tree. Tree-planting programs can be designed to have lower costs so that they offer potential savings to communities that plant trees. Our calculations suggest that urban trees play a major role in sequestering C02 and thereby delay global warming. We estimate that a tree planted in Los Angeles avoids the combustion of 18 kg of carbon annually, even though it sequesters only 4.5-11 kg (as it would if growing in a forest). In this sense, one shade tree in Los Angeles is equivalent to three to five forest trees. In a recent analysis for Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City, we estimated that planting an average of four shade trees per house (each with a top view cross section of 50 m2) would lead to an annual reduction in carbon emissions from power plants of 16,000, 41,000, and 9000 t, respectively (the per-tree reduction in carbon emissions is about 10-11 kg per year). These reductions only account for the direct reduction in the net cooling- and heating-energy use of buildings. Once the impact of the community cooling is included, these savings are increased by at least 25 percent

  19. Re-establishing marshes can return carbon sink functions to a current carbon source in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robin L.; Fujii, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in California was an historic, vast inland freshwater wetland, where organic soils almost 20 meters deep formed over the last several millennia as the land surface elevation of marshes kept pace with sea level rise. A system of levees and pumps were installed in the late 1800s and early 1900s to drain the land for agricultural use. Since then, land surface has subsided more than 7 meters below sea level in some areas as organic soils have been lost to aerobic decomposition. As land surface elevations decrease, costs for levee maintenance and repair increase, as do the risks of flooding. Wetland restoration can be a way to mitigate subsidence by re-creating the environment in which the organic soils developed. A preliminary study of the effect of hydrologic regime on carbon cycling conducted on Twitchell Island during the mid-1990s showed that continuous, shallow flooding allowing for the growth of emergent marsh vegetation re-created a wetland environment where carbon preservation occurred. Under these conditions annual plant biomass carbon inputs were high, and microbial decomposition was reduced. Based on this preliminary study, the U.S. Geological Survey re-established permanently flooded wetlands in fall 1997, with shallow water depths of 25 and 55 centimeters, to investigate the potential to reverse subsidence of delta islands by preserving and accumulating organic substrates over time. Ten years after flooding, elevation gains from organic matter accumulation in areas of emergent marsh vegetation ranged from almost 30 to 60 centimeters, with average annual carbon storage rates approximating 1 kg/m2, while areas without emergent vegetation cover showed no significant change in elevation. Differences in accretion rates within areas of emergent marsh vegetation appeared to result from temporal and spatial variability in hydrologic factors and decomposition rates in the wetlands rather than variability in primary production

  20. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations and compositions, and trihalomethane formation potentials in waters from agricultural peat soils, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California; implications for drinking-water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Roger; Ranalli, Anthony J.; Aiken, George R.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    1998-01-01

    Water exported from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River delta (Delta) is an important drinking-water source for more than 20 million people in California. At times, this water contains elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and bromide, and exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level for trihalomethanes of 0.100 milligrams per liter if chlorinated for drinking water. About 20 to 50 percent of the trihalomethane precursors to Delta waters originates from drainage water from peat soils on Delta islands. This report elucidates some of the factors and processes controlling and affecting the concentration and quality of dissolved organic carbon released from peat soils and relates the propensity of dissolved organic carbon to form trihalomethanes to its chemical composition.Soil water was sampled from near-surface, oxidized, well-decomposed peat soil (upper soil zone) and deeper, reduced, fibrous peat soil (lower soil zone) from one agricultural field in the west central Delta over 1 year. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon in the upper soil zone were highly variable, with median concentrations ranging from 46.4 to 83.2 milligrams per liter. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon in samples from the lower soil zone were much less variable and generally slightly higher than samples from the upper soil zone, with median concentrations ranging from 49.3 to 82.3 milligrams per liter. The dissolved organic carbon from the lower soil zone had significantly higher aromaticity (as measured by specific ultraviolet absorbance) and contained significantly greater amounts of aromatic humic substances (as measured by XAD resin fractionation and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of XAD isolates) than the dissolved organic carbon from the upper soil zone. These results support the conclusion that more aromatic forms of dissolved organic carbon are produced under anaerobic conditions compared to aerobic conditions

  1. Mercury in the mix: An in situ mesocosm approach to assess relative contributions of mercury sources to methylmercury production and bioaccumulation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Kraus, T. E. C.; Ackerman, J.; Stumpner, E. B.; DeWild, J.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Tate, M.; Ogorek, J.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination is considered one of the greatest threats to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the San Francisco Estuary ecosystems. This threat is driven by the transformation of Hg, deposited in the Delta from erosion of upstream historic mining debris and atmospheric deposition, by native bacteria into the more toxic and biologically available form, methylmercury (MeHg), in the wetlands and sediment of the Delta. To effectively manage this threat, a quantitative understanding of the relative contribution of the different Hg sources to MeHg formation is needed. Mass balance estimates indicate as much as 99% of the Hg entering the Delta arrives via tributary inputs. Of the tributary Hg load, approximately 90% is adsorbed to suspended particles from tributary discharge and 10% is in the dissolved fraction, potentially of atmospheric origin. In comparison, the remaining 1-2% of the Hg entering the Delta arrives through direct atmospheric deposition (wet and dry). The relative importance of these sources to MeHg production within the Delta is not linearly related to the mass inputs because atmospherically-derived Hg is believed to be more reactive than sediment-bound Hg with respect to MeHg formation. We conducted an in situ mesocosm dosing experiment where different Hg sources to the Delta (direct atmospheric, dissolved riverine and suspended sediment) were "labeled" with different stable Hg isotopes and added to mesocosms within four different wetlands. Mercury isotopes added with the streambed sediments were equilibrated in sealed containers for six months; while the Hg isotopes associated with the precipitation and river water were equilibrated for 24 hours prior to use. After adding the isotopes, we sampled the water column, overlying air, bottom sediments and fish (Gambusia) at time intervals up to 30 days. Preliminary results from this experiment suggest that aqueous Hg sources (Hg introduced with precipitation and filtered river water) are 10

  2. An Automated Telescope for Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, G. S.; Guzik, T. G.; Tohline, J. E.; Landolt, A.

    1997-12-01

    In this time of limited resources, the problem of providing an up to date facility for education and outreach needs to be addressed. One solution to this problem is a joint venture between Louisiana State University, BREC (the Park and creation Commission of East Baton Rouge Parish), and BRAS (the Baton Rouge Astronomical Society). The result of this collaboration is a facility with outreach and educational space, a 20 inch Ritchey-Chretien telescope with CCD camera, and volunteers from the amateur community for help with the outreach mission. We present an overview of the project, and show how the telescope will be completely automated to allow use of the telescope by LSU students and our outreach partners on the Internet. We explore the possibility for use of this facility by a world wide audience over the web.

  3. Storeria occipitomaculata obscura (Florida red-bellied snake)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muse, Lindy J.; Glorioso, Brad M.; Eaglestone, Chandler A. R.

    2016-01-01

    USA: LOUISIANA: Vermilion Parish: Palmetto Island State Park (29.86335°N, 92.14848°W; WGS 84). 19 February 2016. Lindy J. Muse. Verified by Jeff Boundy. Florida Museum of Natural History (UF 177730, photo voucher). New parish record (Dundee and Rossman 1989. The Amphibians and Reptiles of Louisiana. Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 300 pp.). Storeria occipitomaculata obscura has not been documented in any of the coastal parishes of Louisiana (Boundy. 2006. Snakes of Louisiana. Louisiana Department of Wildlife & Fisheries, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 40 pp.). However, this species can be difficult to find in southern Louisiana and other populations in coastal parishes may eventually be discovered. This adult individual (SVL = 292 mm; TL = 70 mm) was found under a log in a wet bottomland forest dominated by Dwarf Palmetto and Bald Cypress.

  4. Co-creating Understanding in Water Use & Agricultural Resilience in a Multi-scale Natural-human System: Sacramento River Valley--California's Water Heartland in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, D. H.; Brimlowe, J.; Chaudry, A.; Gray, K.; Greene, T.; Guzley, R.; Hatfield, C.; Houk, E.; Le Page, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Sacramento River Valley (SRV), valued for its $2.5 billion agricultural production and its biodiversity, is the main supplier of California's water, servicing 25 million people. . Despite rapid changes to the region, little is known about the collective motivations and consequences of land and water use decisions, or the social and environmental vulnerability and resilience of the SRV. The overarching research goal is to examine whether the SRV can continue to supply clean water for California and accommodate agricultural production and biodiversity while coping with climate change and population growth. Without understanding these issues, the resources of the SRV face an uncertain future. The defining goal is to construct a framework that integrates cross-disciplinary and diverse stakeholder perspectives in order to develop a comprehensive understanding of how SRV stakeholders make land and water use decisions. Traditional approaches for modeling have failed to take into consideration multi-scale stakeholder input. Currently there is no effective method to facilitate producers and government agencies in developing a shared representation to address the issues that face the region. To address this gap, researchers and stakeholders are working together to collect and consolidate disconnected knowledge held by stakeholder groups (agencies, irrigation districts, and producers) into a holistic conceptual model of how stakeholders view and make decisions with land and water use under various management systems. Our approach integrates a top-down approach (agency stakeholders) for larger scale management decisions with a conceptual co-creation and data gathering bottom-up approach with local agricultural producer stakeholders for input water and landuse decisions. Land use change models that combine a top-down approach with a bottom-up stakeholder approach are rare and yet essential to understanding how the social process of land use change and ecosystem function are

  5. Understanding the Effects of Climate and Water Management on Carbon and Energy Fluxes for Restored Wetlands in the Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, F.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Von Dessonneck, T.; Keating, K.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Hatala, J.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Byrd, K. B.; Windham-Myers, L.; Detto, M.; Fujii, R.

    2011-12-01

    Our research efforts focus on the differences in carbon and energy fluxes due to the effects of water management on two 3.5-hectare restored wetlands on Twitchell Island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta). These flux measurements are part of an ongoing, long-term study investigating management techniques to mitigate subsidence through atmospheric carbon sequestration and soil carbon storage. Wetlands were established in 1997, with the western wetland managed at a water depth of 25cm and the eastern wetland managed at a depth of 55cm. Over the past 14 years, the western pond has developed into a dense canopy of emergent marsh species with some floating vegetation. The eastern wetland is a combination of the same emergent marsh species and floating vegetation as the western wetland, but it also includes areas of open water, submerged vegetation, and algae. Carbon and energy flux measurements are collected using the eddy covariance method, comprised of a CSAT3 sonic anemometer, an open-path CO2/H2O infrared gas analyzer, and a closed-path tunable diode laser fast methane sensor. The Delta is a unique place as the temperate climate and clear summer skies are conducive for maximum daily CO2 uptake rates to be on the order of 30 μmol m-2 s-1 or higher. These elevated rates of CO2 uptake were measured in the eastern wetland during 2002 through 2004. However, in 2010, maximum CO2 uptake rates were only about 10 μmol m-2 s-1. We hypothesize that large mats of accumulating senescent material have slowed or stopped the growth of the emergent marsh species, which were not present during the measurements taken in 2002 through 2004. Additionally, we added CH4 flux measurements in 2010, and the anaerobic conditions created by permanent flooding resulted in rates of 250 nmol m-2 s-1 or higher. CH4 values are some of the highest observed compared to other Delta flux studies (rice, pasture, and natural wetlands), which yield measurements ranging from 10 - 100 nmol m-2 s-1

  6. Le jugement divin, variations byzantines. Duel judiciaire et épreuve du fer rouge dans la pratique judiciaire à Byzance (XIIIe-XIVe siècles Byzantine Variations of the Divine Judgment: The Trial by Duel and the Ordeal of the Red-Hot Iron in Byzantine Judicial Practice (13th-14th Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Katsenis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Le contact du monde byzantin avec les Croisades et l’Orient latin eut des répercussions dans le domaine de la justice byzantine. Au lieu des méthodes de preuve établies par le droit romain, l’application du duel judiciaire et de l’épreuve du fer rouge apparaît sous une forme presque identique à l’occidentale. L’absence d’un pouvoir central efficace et la crise conséquente des règles du droit romain permettaient leur diffusion à travers le monde byzantin. Malgré les réactions des savants ecclésiastiques, comme Démétrios Chomatianos, l’épreuve du fer rouge était largement appliquée en Epire pendant le XIIIe siècle. En Nicée, dans l’affaire de lèse-majesté (1252 où Michel Paléologue, le futur empereur, fut accusé – et durant l’instruction de laquelle un duel judiciaire eut lieu – des pressions furent exercées sur l’accusé pour qu’il subisse l’ordalie. Bien que plus tard Michel ait aboli les ordalies et le duel judiciaire, leur existence ne disparaîtra pas : pendant le XIVe siècle, l’application du fer rouge est attestée par l’empereur Jean Cantacuzène et la pratique du « chaudron » figure dans le Code d’Etienne Dušan, roi des Serbes.The contact of the Byzantine world with the Crusades and the Latin East provoked repercussions in the domain of Byzantine justice. Instead of the methods of proof established by the Roman law, the application of judicial combat and that of trial by hot iron appear in form almost similar to the Western. The lack of a strong central power and the subsequent crisis of the rules of Roman law permitted their diffusion throughout the Byzantine world. Despite the reaction of ecclesiastical scholars, like Demetrios Chomatianos, trial by hot iron was widely applied in Epirus during the 13th century. In Nicea, in the case of high treason (1252, where Michael Palaiologos, the future emperor, was accused – and where a judicial combat took place during the

  7. The management of equine acute laminitis

    OpenAIRE

    Eades, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Colin F Mitchell, Lee Ann Fugler, Susan C Eades Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA Abstract: Laminitis is an extremely painful condition resulting in damage to the soft tissues anchoring the third phalanx to the hoof, which can result in life-threatening debilitation. Specific therapy is not available. The most important principles of therapy include aggressive nutritional and medical management of primary disease pro...

  8. Book Reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Redactie KITLV

    1983-01-01

    -Anthony P. Maingot, Eric Williams, Forged from the love of liberty: selected speeches of Dr. Eric Williams. Compiled and introduced by Paul K. Sutton. Trinidad: Longman Caribbean, 1981. 473 pp. -Sue N. Greene, Selwyn R. Cudjoe, Resistance and Caribbean literature. Athens OH, Chicago and London: Ohio University Press. 1980. xii + 319 pp. -Sue N. Greene, O.R. Dathorne, Dark Ancestor: the literature of the Black man in the Caribbean. Baton Rouge and London: Louisiana State University Press, 198...

  9. Does Healthy Food Cost More in Poor Neighborhoods? An Analysis of Retail Food Cost and Spatial Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Hatzenbuehler, Patrick L.; Gillespie, Jeffrey M.; O'Neil, Carol E.

    2012-01-01

    The organization of the Baton Rouge, Louisiana, retail food industry was analyzed to determine whether spatial competition influenced the cost and availability of food items. Using a spatial competition gravity variable, the costs of two separate market baskets were analyzed in January 2009, and the factors influencing spatial competition were determined. Store type (chain or supercenter) was found to be the most significant determinant of food costs, validating findings of past studies. Alth...

  10. Hurricane Katrina-related maternal stress, maternal mental health, and early infant temperament

    OpenAIRE

    Tees, Michael T.; Harville, Emily W.; Xiong, Xu; BUEKENS, Pierre; Pridjian, Gabriella; Elkind-Hirsch, Karen

    2009-01-01

    To investigate temperament in infants whose mothers were exposed to Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath, and to determine if high hurricane exposure is associated with difficult infant temperament. A prospective cohort study of women giving birth in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, LA (n=288) in 2006–2007 was conducted. Questionnaires and interviews assessed the mother’s experiences during the hurricane, living conditions, and psychological symptoms, two months and 12 months postpartum. Infant te...

  11. Smartphone applications to aid weight loss and management: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton EF; Redman LM

    2016-01-01

    Elizabeth F Sutton, Leanne M Redman Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA Abstract: The development and dissemination of smart devices has cultivated a global environment of hyperconnectivity and increased our access to information. The paralleled launch and success of the Mobile Health industry has created a market of commercially available applications or “apps” along with tools or sensors, which allow the user to receive an...

  12. Method of analysis at the U.S. Geological Survey California Water Science Center, Sacramento Laboratory - determination of haloacetic acid formation potential, method validation, and quality-control practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzi, Barbara C.; Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of haloacetic acid formation potential of water samples has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey California Water Science Center Sacramento Laboratory. The haloacetic acid formation potential is measured by dosing water samples with chlorine under specified conditions of pH, temperature, incubation time, darkness, and residual-free chlorine. The haloacetic acids formed are bromochloroacetic acid, bromodichloroacetic acid, dibromochloroacetic acid, dibromoacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, monobromoacetic acid, monochloroacetic acid, tribromoacetic acid, and trichloroacetic acid. They are extracted, methylated, and then analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector. Method validation experiments were performed to determine the method accuracy, precision, and detection limit for each of the compounds. Method detection limits for these nine haloacetic acids ranged from 0.11 to 0.45 microgram per liter. Quality-control practices include the use of blanks, quality-control samples, calibration verification standards, surrogate recovery, internal standard, matrix spikes, and duplicates.

  13. A GIS and Remote Sensing Investigation of the Relationship of Terrain, Soil, and other Physiographic Factors on the Pine Community of Lincoln National Park in the Sacramento Mountains of Southwest New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, A. E.; Pingitore, N. E.; Keller, R. G.; Conklin, D.

    2004-12-01

    The health of forests is important to a community on several levels. Forests provide economic viability for people, habitat for wildlife, and natural beauty for all to enjoy. Loss of forest ecosystems impact communities greatly. In this study we will utilize GIS and Remote Sensing applications to better understand the dynamics of White Pine Blister Rust (WPBR) infestation in the White Pine Community of the Sacramento Mountains of Southwest New Mexico. Both field spectral sampling of the needles as well as imagery analysis will be incorporated to better understand the infestation, progression and vulnerability of the forest to this and other diseases. Use of ancillary data such as topography, geology, hydrology, and soil composition will be used to construct a GIS database. The data produced from this study will be incorporated with the existing USDA Forest Service database to produce a more inclusive catalog for supervisors, researchers, and the public to use.

  14. Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water: preliminary design and performance report. Volume I. Technical report. Aerotherm report TR-76-219. [For can washing at Campbell Soup Plant in Sacramento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-10-14

    The design and performance of a solar hot water system for can washing at the Campbell Soup Plant in Sacramento, California, are presented. The collector field is located on the roof of the finished products warehouse of the Campbell Soup Sacramento plant. Water is supplied from a 3.8 cm (1/sup 1///sub 2/ in.) supply line which is located directly below an existing roof access hatch. A supply pipe will be brought up through that hatch. The water flow will then be split into two manifold lines which supply the dual rows of flat plate collectors. The preheated water from the flat plates is then passed into six sets of parallel connected concentrators. Each set consist of eight 1.83 x 3.05 m (6 x 10 foot) modules connected in series. The water from these units is gathered in a 3.8 cm (1/sup 1///sub 2/ in.) insulated pipe which transports it to the storage tank. This pipe will be attached to an existing pipe run until it reaches the can washing building. From there the pipe will follow the can washing building around to the storage tank. The storage tank is a 75,200 1 (20,000 gal) steel tank which is coated internally with a USDA approved phenolic liner. The outside of the tank is insulated. A 2.2 kw (3 hp) motor is used to pump the stored water for the tank into the can washing line. Detail drawings and descriptions of the collector field, installation, piping, controls, data acquisition equipment, and roof structure are included. Furthermore, a program schedule with equipment and manpower costs for successfully completing Phase II of this contract is included. Also included is an organization chart of the Phase II program personnel. (WHK)

  15. Fogwater Chemistry and Air Quality in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast Corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommalapati, R. R.; Raja, S.; Ravikrishna, R.; Murugesan, K.; Collett, J. L.; Valsaraj, K.

    2007-05-01

    The presence of fog water in polluted atmosphere can influence atmospheric chemistry and air quality. The study of interactions between fog water and atmospheric gases and aerosols are very important in understanding the atmospheric fate of the pollutants. In this Study several air samples and fogwater samples were collected in the heavily industrialized area of Gulf Coast corridor( Houston, TX and Baton Rouge, LA). A total of 32 fogwater samples were collected, comprising of nine fog events in Baton Rouge (Nov 2004 to Feb 2005) and two fog events in Houston (Feb, 2006), during the fog sampling campaigns. These samples were analyzed for pH, total and dissolved carbon, major inorganic ions, organic acids, and aromatics, aldehydes, VOCs, and linear alkanes organic compounds. Fogwater samples collected in Houston show clear influence of marine and anthropogenic environment, while Baton Rouge samples reveal a relatively less polluted environment. Also, a time series observation of air samples indicated that fog event at the monitoring site impacted the air concentrations of the pollutants. This is attributed to presence of surface active organic matter in fog water.

  16. Réformes, croissance, et augmentation des inégalités dans le delta du fleuve Rouge – Việt Nam (1980-2000 Reform, Growth and Increase of Inequalities in the Red River delta - Vietnam (1980-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Gironde

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cet article est une analyse de l’évolution des inégalités dans les campagnes vietnamiennes, basée sur une recherche de terrain dans le delta du fleuve Rouge. Les transformations respectives des systêmes d’activités productives des foyers étudiées dans la province de Hưng Yên remettent en cause l’idée dominante selon laquelle l’augmentation des inégalités serait faible et récent. L’accumulation réalisée par un quart des exploitations et la prolétarisation partielle d’une majorité de la population rurale révèlent, quelques années après la distribution des terres de 1994, une différenciation significative en termes de richesses et d’accès aux ressources. Les mécanismes de cette différenciation se sont mis en place dès les premières mesures de la décollectivisation de l’agriculture au tournant des années 1970-1980, contrairement à une autre idée courante selon laquelle les réformes n’auraient pas eu d’effet sur les inégalités à l’intérieur des campagnes. Les inégalités de départ augmentent avec la croissance, et sont aggravées par les orientations du gouvernement, et notamment l’action des pouvoirs locaux.Based on a field research in the Red River delta, this article analyses the augmentation and accentuation of inequalities within rural Vietnam. The various changes of livelihood systems in Hung Yen province challenge the mainstream idea whereby inequalities have increased only slightly and are of recent date. In the second half of the 1990s, the widening gap between wealth accumulation among one fourth of households, and the gradual proletarianization of a majority of the rural population is already significant. Contrary to another common idea whereby institutional reforms have been associated with almost no change in inequality within rural areas, I argue that the mechanisms inciting this differentiation were set in motion during the implementation of the first decollectivisation

  17. Is it restoration or reconciliation? California's experience restoring the Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta provides lessons learned and pathways forward to sustain critical ecosystem functions and services in a highly managed riverine delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viers, J. H.; Kelsey, R.

    2014-12-01

    Reconciling the needs of nature and people in California's Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta represents one of the most critical ecosystem management imperatives in western North America. Over 150 years the Delta has been managed for near-term human benefits and in the process 95% of riverine and deltaic wetlands have been lost throughout the region. Despite extensive land conversion and alteration of hydrological and physical processes, the Delta remains important habitat for migratory birds and is home to over 60% of California's native fish species. It is also the waterwheel for the state's vast water distribution network and is maintained by a system of constructed levees that are at risk from catastrophic failure due to sea level rise, floods, and/or seismic activity. Such a collapse would have dire consequences for > 25M humans and world's 10th largest economy that depend on its freshwater. Thus, the ultimate cost of this ecosystem alteration and simplification is a riverscape that is no longer reliable for nature or people. For 30 years, attempts to 'restore' Delta ecosystems and improve reliability have met with mixed results. For example, reconnection of floodplains to floodwaters has resulted in improved ecological health for native fishes and recharge to localized aquifers. Uncoordinated releases of discharges below dams, however, have resulted in diminished water quality and populations of indicator species. Attempts to create wildlife friendly farms have been countered by an increase in perennial agriculture and commensurate increases in irrigation water demand. From these lessons learned, we demonstrate three key components of a reconciled Delta that will be necessary in the future: 1) full restoration of critical habitats, reconnecting land and water to rebuild ecosystem function; 2) landscape redesign, incorporating natural and engineered infrastructure to create a biologically diverse, resilient landscape to support both agriculture and natural

  18. 77 FR 51604 - Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... possibly misconduct. However, neither the NGO, nor missions by the UN's Office of Human Resource Management... oversight of the ECCC's operations, and the donor community and NGOs must continue their vigilant engagement... 13, 2012. Thomas R. Nides, Deputy Secretary for Management and Resources. Section 7044(c) of...

  19. Alain Dubos : Rouges rivières

    OpenAIRE

    Renard, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Dans ce roman que l’auteur souhaite respectueux de l’histoire douloureuse des hommes des grandes prairies canadiennes, les faits et la chronologie racontés sont ceux des minorités de « sangs-mêlés », ces métis issus d’anciens Français de souche, parfois aussi d’Irlandais, et d’Indiennes (Cris, Assiniboines…). L’histoire de ces minorités commence à l’automne 1869, soit deux ans après la naissance de la Confédération canadienne, alors dirigée par John Mac Donald (Écossais d’origine). L’auteur n...

  20. Composição proximal e qualidade da carne de frangos das linhagens Paraíso Pedrês e Pescoço Pelado Physical-chemical characteristics of meat in chickens of the Paraíso Pedrês and Label Rouge lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bitencourt Faria

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foram avaliadas as características físico-químicas da carne de frangos de duas linhagens (Paraíso Pedrês e Pescoço Pelado criados em sistema semiextensivo, machos e fêmeas, abatidos aos 65, 75, 85 e 95 dias. As características analisadas nos cortes peito e coxa foram umidade, proteína, extrato etéreo, cinzas, cor (CIEL*a*b*, pH final e perda de peso por cocção. As fêmeas da linhagem Paraíso Pedrês apresentaram no peito mais gordura (0,86% em comparação aos machos das linhagens Paraíso Pedrês (0,63% e Pescoço Pelado (0,57%. A coxa das aves da linhagem Pescoço Pelado aos 85 dias apresentou maior umidade e menor porcentagem de gordura em comparação à linhagem Paraíso Pedrês, e aos 95 dias, as fêmeas Paraíso Pedrês apresentaram mais gordura que os machos. A cor amarela (b* no peito foi mais intensa nas aves Pescoço Pelado (6,24 que nas aves Paraíso Pedrês (5,41. Também foi mais intensa nas fêmeas (6,47 que nos machos (5,18. A cor da coxa nas aves Pescoço Pelado foi mais amarelada aos 95 dias (6,87 que aos 85 dias (5,90. Aves da linhagem Pescoço Pelado podem fornecer cortes mais magros, no caso dos machos, e com coloração mais amarelada, no caso das fêmeas, que aves da linhagem Pescoço Pelado.The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical and chemical characteristics of chicken meat from two lines (Paraíso Pedrês or Label Rouge and Pescoço Pelado, raised in a semi-extensive system, and slaughtered at 65, 75, 85 and 95 days of age. The variables assessed in the breast and leg of experimental animals were moisture, protein, fat, ashes, objective colour (CIEL*a*b* system, final pH and cooking loss. The breast of Paraíso Pedrês females showed a higher fat content (0.86% than in males of the Paraíso Pedrês (0.63% or Pescoço Pelado (0.57% lines. In the leg, Pescoço Pelado chicken slaughtered at 85 days showed higher moisture and lower fat than the Paraíso Pedrês line, while Para

  1. Riparian Habitat - Sacramento River [ds343

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This layer was obtained for inclusion in BIOS from the Chico State Geographic Information Center (GIC) Website. Permission to post these data in BIOS was provided...

  2. Managing Restored Wetlands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to Reduce Methane Emissions and Increase Carbon Uptake Laurie Koteen, Sara Knox, Cove Sturtevant, Joseph Verfaillie, Jaclyn Hatala, Dennis Baldocchi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koteen, L. E.; Knox, S. H.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Matthes, J. H.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California is a region transformed by more than a century of agricultural practices. Beginning in the 19th century, substantial regions were first drained of water and then converted to cropland in order to take advantage of the area's rich peatland soils. In the intervening time period, soil oxidation and subsidence have led to huge peat losses of up to 10 m in some places, and river water now threatens to topple the levees that were erected to keep fields from flooding. Within this region, we have been monitoring greenhouse gas exchange of several agricultural sites, a degraded pasture, and two restored wetlands. Of these land use types, restoration of wetlands is of particular interest to Delta managers as these sites attain many of the region's most pressing ecological goals, including improved water quality, increased wildlife habitat, and soil accretion. In our current investigation, we hope to assess if wetland management activities can be implemented to achieve greenhouse gas management goals as well. While we find that the restored wetlands are able to take up and store a substantial amount of carbon via rapid growth rates, they also emit methane; a greenhouse gas 25 times more potent than CO¬2. We are currently in the process of implementing two management activities with the goals of reducing methane emissions and increasing carbon uptake. Evidence from the wetland literature indicates that periodic lowering of the water table below the soil surface can reduce wetland methane emissions by: 1. Reintroducing oxygen into the soil column. This both supports growth of the methanotrophic bacteria that consume methane produced in the anaerobic zones of the soil column, and suppresses the methanogens that produce it. 2. Re-oxidization of formerly reduced compounds in the soil, (i.e. NO3-, SO42-) which can serve as alternative terminal electron acceptors of the decomposition byproducts (i.e. H2 and acetate) that lead to

  3. Post-emergency response resources guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, Gulf States Utilities, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One of the products developed from that experience is this guide for understanding the responsibilities and obtaining resources for specific needs from the various participants, particularly those organizations within the federal government. This guide should assist state and local government organizations with identifying and obtaining those resources for the post-emergency response when theirs have been exhausted

  4. Quantitative methods and socio-economic applications in GIS

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fahui

    2014-01-01

    GIS AND BASIC SPATIAL ANALYSIS TASKSGetting Started with ArcGIS: Data Management and Basic Spatial Analysis ToolsSpatial and Attribute Data Management in ArcGISSpatial Analysis Tools in ArcGIS: Queries, Spatial Joins, and Map OverlaysCase Study 1: Mapping and Analyzing Population Density Pattern in Baton Rouge, LouisianaSummaryIdentifying Contiguous Polygons by Spatial Analysis ToolsMeasuring Distance and TimeMeasures of DistanceComputing Network Distance and TimeThe Distance Decay RuleCase Study 2: Computing Distances and Tra

  5. Neurologic amebiasis caused by Balamuthia mandrillaris in an Indian flying fox (Pteropus giganteus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, Nicholas A; Ali, Ibne; Higbie, Christine; Jackson, Jonathan; Pirie, Gordon; Bauer, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    A 4-5-month-old intact male Indian flying fox (Pteropus giganteus) was presented to the Baton Rouge Zoo's veterinary hospital with an acute onset of obtundation that was diagnosed with amebic encephalitis. Histologic examination revealed numerous amebic trophozoites within necrotic foci, affecting the occipital cerebrum and surrounding the mesencephalic aqueduct. The etiologic agent, Balamuthia mandrillaris, was determined by multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and indirect fluorescent antibody test. The current report documented a case of amebic encephalitis within the order Chiroptera. PMID:26762405

  6. Gamma-rays Associated with Nearby Thunderstorms at Ground Level

    CERN Document Server

    Ringuette, Rebecca; Granger, Douglas; Guzik, T Gregory; Stewart, Michael; Wefel, John P

    2014-01-01

    The TGF and Energetic Thunderstorm Rooftop Array (TETRA) is an array of NaI scintillators located at rooftop level on the campus of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. From July 2010 through March 2014, TETRA has detected 28 millisecond-duration bursts of gamma-rays at energies 50 keV - 2 MeV associated with nearby (< 8 km) thunderstorms. The ability to observe ground-level Terrestrial Gamma Flashes from close to the source allows a unique analysis of the storm cells producing these events. The results of the initial analysis will be presented.

  7. A hard x-ray micro-analytical beamline at the CAMD synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is collaborating with Louisiana State University (LSU) in constructing a synchrotron x-ray micro-analytical beamline at the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) in Baton Rouge. This project grew from earlier work at the National Synchrotron Light source (NSLS), where a team of ANL researchers developed techniques to examine small-scale structures in diffusion zones of a variety of materials. The ANL/CAMD beamline will use x-ray fluorescence, diffraction, and absorption spectroscopy techniques to reveal both compositional and structural information on a microscopic scale

  8. 2012 NOAA Color Ortho-rectified Mosaic of Sacramento River (Sacramento to Colusa), California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  9. Assessing Community Resilience to Coastal Hazards in the Lower Mississippi River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Cai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an assessment of community resilience to coastal hazards in the Lower Mississippi River Basin (LMRB region in southeastern Louisiana. The assessment was conducted at the census block group scale. The specific purpose of this study was to provide a quantitative method to assess and validate the community resilience to coastal hazards, and to identify the relationships between a set of socio-environmental indicators and community resilience. The Resilience Inference Measurement (RIM model was applied to assess the resilience of the block groups. The resilience index derived was empirically validated through two statistical procedures: K-means cluster analysis of exposure, damage, and recovery variables to derive the resilience groups, and discriminant analysis to identify the key indicators of resilience. The discriminant analysis yielded a classification accuracy of 73.1%. The results show that block groups with higher resilience were concentrated generally in the northern part of the study area, including those located north of Lake Pontchartrain and in East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge, and Lafayette parishes. The lower-resilience communities were located mostly along the coastline and lower elevation area including block groups in southern Plaquemines Parish and Terrebonne Parish. Regression analysis between the resilience scores and the indicators extracted from the discriminant analysis suggests that community resilience was significantly linked to multicomponent capacities. The findings could help develop adaptation strategies to reduce vulnerability, increase resilience, and improve long-term sustainability for the coastal region.

  10. Generational Change in Australian School Leadership: Collision Path or Smooth Baton Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Phil; Marks, Warren; Elliott, Virginia; Johnston-Anderson, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study examining the existence and perceived influence of "generational collide" for teachers and leaders across three generations--Baby Boomers, Generation X (Gen X) and Generation Y (Gen Y). The study sought to further determine if a teacher's generation, gender, school level or…

  11. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, CITY OF SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  12. Emergency Response Resources guide for nuclear power plant emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, Gulf States Utilities, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One of the products developed from that experience was this guide for understanding the responsibilities and obtaining resources for specific needs from the various participants, particularly from those organizations within the Federal Government. This first revision of that guide broadens the focus of the original document. Also, new information defines the major Federal response facilities. This guide should assist State and local government organizations with identifying and obtaining those resources for the post-emergency response when their resources have been exhausted

  13. Cogeneration feasibility study in the Gulf States Utilities service area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Sites in the Gulf States Utilities service are considered for cogeneration feasibility studies. The sources of steam considered for the Orange, Texas and Geismar, Lake Charles, and North Baton Rouge, Louisiana sites include oil, coal, HTGR steamers, consolidated nuclear steam system, atmospheric fluidized-bed coal combustion, and coal gasification. Concepts concerning cogeneration fuel systems were categorized by technical applicability as: current technology (pulverized coal-fired boilers and fuel oil-fired boilers), advanced technology under development (HTGR steamers and the CNSS), and advanced technology for future development (atmospheric fluidized-bed boilers and coal gasification). In addition to providing data on cogeneration plant generally useful in the US, the study determined the technical and economic feasibility of steam and electric power cogeneration using coal and nuclear fuels for localized industrial complexes. Details on site selection, plant descriptions, cost estimates, economic analysis, and plant schedule and implementation. (MCW)

  14. Overview 2004 of NASA Stirling-Convertor CFD-Model Development and Regenerator R&D Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Roy C.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Wilson, Scott D.; Demko, Rikako

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on accomplishments in 2004 in development of Stirling-convertor CFD model at NASA GRC and via a NASA grant, a Stirling regenerator-research effort being conducted via a NASA grant (a follow-on effort to an earlier DOE contract), and a regenerator-microfabrication contract for development of a "next-generation Stirling regenerator." Cleveland State University is the lead organization for all three grant/contractual efforts, with the University of Minnesota and Gedeor Associates as subcontractors. Also, the Stirling Technology Co. and Sunpower, Inc. are both involved in all three efforts, either as funded or unfunded participants. International Mezzo Technologies of Baton Rouge, LA is the regenerator fabricator for the regenerator-microfabrication contract. Results of the efforts in these three areas are summarized.

  15. A 45-Year-Old Woman With 3 Weeks of Cough and Night Sweats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyaw, Than Htaik; Sullivan, Lacey; Klingsberg, Ross C

    2016-03-01

    A 45-year-old woman who received a renal transplant 7 years prior presented with a 3-week history of low-grade fever, night sweats, and a dry cough with scant sputum production. Additionally, she reported generalized weakness and increased fatigability. She denied hemoptysis or weight loss, and there had been no change in medication or foreign travel. She had no history of latent tuberculosis or sick contacts. She had recently relocated to Baton Rouge, Louisiana. She was sexually active with her boyfriend who worked as a prison guard. She also reported that she was briefly incarcerated 7 years ago shortly after her renal transplantation. Her immunosuppression consisted of tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and prednisone. PMID:26965979

  16. A model of Nevado del Ruiz Volcano, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stanley N.; Meyer, Hansjürgen

    A workshop was held at the Observatorio Vulcanologico de Colombia in Manizales, Colombia, March 28 to April 1, 1988, to review the accumulated data on the disastrous November 13, 1985, eruption and related activity of Nevado del Ruiz volcano (Figure 1). Approximately 30 scientists from eight countries presented data, developed a preliminary model, and addressed the future problems of Ruiz. The volcano (see Figure 2) erupted just prior to the meeting, covering the meeting site with 1-2 mm of ash.The workshop was convened by Stanley N. Williams (Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge) and Hansjürgen Meyer (Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia). A special volume of the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research is planned for the papers and letters presented at the workshop, with some additional contributions. Publication is expected in mid-1989.

  17. Cultural resources survey and assessment of the proposed Department of Energy Freeport to Texas City pipeline, Brazoria and Galveston Counties, Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castille, G.J.; Whelan, J.P. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An intensive survey and testing program of selected segments of a proposed Department of Energy pipeline were conducted by Coastal Environments, Inc., Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during December 1985 and January 1986. The proposed pipeline runs from Texas City, Galveston County to Bryan Mound, Brazoria County. The pedestrian survey was preceded by historical records survey to locate possible historic sites within the DOE righ-of-way. Four prehistoric sites within the ROW (41BO159, 160, 161, 162) and one outside the ROW (41BO163) were located. All are Rangia cuneata middens. The survey results are discussed with particular reference to the environmental settings of the sites and the effectiveness of the survey procedure. Two of the sites located within the ROW were subjected to additional testing. The results of the backhoe testing program are included in the site descriptions, and the scientific value of the sites are presented. 52 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Draft environmental impact statement. River Bend Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federal financing of an undivided ownership interest of River Bend Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 on a 3293-acre site near St. Francisville, Louisiana is proposed in a supplement to the final environmental impact statement of September 1974. The facility would consist of a boiling-water reactor that would produce a maximum of 2894 megawatts (MW) of electrical power. A design level of 3015 MW of electric power could be realized at some time in the future. Exhaust steam would be cooled by mechanical cooling towers using makeup water obtained from and discharged to the Mississippi River. Power generated by the unit would be transmitted via three lines totaling 140 circuit miles traversing portions of the parishes of West Feliciana, East Feliciana, East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge, Pointe Coupee, and Iberville. The unit would help the applicant meet the power needs of rural electric consumers in the region, and the applicant would contribute significanlty to area tax base and employment rolls during the life of the unit. Construction related activities would disturb 700 forested acres on the site and 1156 acres along the transmission routes. Of the 60 cubic feet per second (cfs) taken from the river, 48 cfs would evaporate during the cooling process and 12 cfs would return to the river with dissolved solids concentrations increased by 500%. The terrace aquifer would be dewatered for 16 months in order to lower the water table at the building site, and Grants Bayou would be transformed from a lentic to a lotic habitat during this period. Fogging and icing due to evaporation and drift from the cooling towers would increase slightly. During the construction period, farming, hunting, and fishing on the site would be suspended, and the social infractructure would be stressed due to the influx of a maximum of 2200 workers

  19. Biological fate, transport, and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the cluster investigators is to develop a dynamic model for the evaluation of the biological fate, transport, and ecotoxicity from multiple chemical contamination of the Mississippi River Basin. To develop this environmental model, FY 93-94 most of cluster investigators focused on Devil's Swamp Site (DSS), a cypress swamp which lies just Northwest of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, adjacent to the Mississippi River. The DSS which includes a man-made lake has contaminated sediment, water and biota. The DSS receives flood water from the Mississippi River during high flow periods and the Baton Rouge Bayou drains through the DSS. The DSS receives toxic substances and hazardous waste from a wide variety of surrounding industrial operations including an abandoned hazardous waste disposal facility. In addition, some investigators studied Bayou Trepangnier. This research cluster will continue studying Devil Swamp. The large number of investigators in this cluster resulted from incorporating related research proposals based on reviewer recommendations. The specific aims of the cluster for the first year were to conduct a physical, chemical, ecological survey and baseline toxicological characterization of the DSS from existing databases maintained by State and federal agencies, field studies (assessment) of sediment, air, water and biota, and laboratory screening studios. This assessment will provide critical information and focus for the next two years in-depth studies of critical transport and fate processes, ecotoxicity, biomarkers of effect, and uptake, metabolism and distribution of toxicants. The primary significant outcome of the cluster researchers will be the development of an ecological risk assessment model combining biotic and physical/chemical variables for DSS with a projection of model reliability and accuracy for use at other typical Mississippi River Basin sites

  20. Methylmercury in water, sediment, and invertebrates in created wetlands of Rouge Park, Toronto, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thousands of hectares of wetlands are created annually because wetlands provide beneficial ecosystem services. Wetlands are also key sites for production of the bioaccumulative neurotoxin methylmercury (MeHg), but little is known about MeHg production in created systems. Here, we studied methylmercury in sediment, water, and invertebrates in created wetlands of various ages. Sediment MeHg reached 8 ng g−1 in the newest wetland, which was significantly greater than in natural, control wetlands. This trend was mirrored in several invertebrate taxa, whose concentrations reached as high as 1.6 μg g−1 in the newest wetland, above levels thought to affect reproduction in birds. The MeHg concentrations in created wetland invertebrate taxa generally decreased with increasing wetland age, possibly due to a combination of deeper anoxia and less organic matter accumulation in younger wetlands. A short-term management intervention and/or improved engineering design may be necessary to reduce the mercury-associated risk in newly created wetlands. - Highlights: ► Investigated methylmercury accumulation in created wetland ecosystems. ► Concentrations and bioaccumulation significantly elevated in new created wetlands. ► Short-term effect may be due to deeper anoxia, less organic matter in new wetlands. ► Intervention or improved design required to reduce short-term ecological risk. - Sediment methylmercury concentrations and bioaccumulation in many invertebrate taxa are significantly elevated in newly created wetlands.

  1. 78 FR 78463 - Summary of the Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... within Cambodia. The Human Rights Center of the University of California, Berkeley, conducted a survey... (September 2011), the Human Rights Council reaffirmed the importance of the ECCC as an independent and... time. In addition, ECCC administrative leadership conducted an all-staff meeting in October to...

  2. Suite a une restructuration couteuse, Cicorel a plonge dans le rouge en 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    Bruggmann, A

    2003-01-01

    "Le fabricant de circuits imprimes de tres haute densite, sur materiaux parfois imprevus, a vu son revenu operationnel decroitre de 17,6% a 27,13 millions de francs, et son cash-flow avant postes exceptionnels a fondu a 453 millions" (1 page).

  3. 77 FR 27109 - Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... United Nations and Government of Cambodia are taking credible steps to address allegations of corruption... corruption. In August 2009 the United Nations Office of Legal Affairs and the Government of Cambodia reached... coordination with other donor nations, has conducted diplomatic efforts with both the United Nations Office...

  4. Spectroscopie des supernovæ à grand décalage vers le rouge

    OpenAIRE

    Sainton, Grégory

    2004-01-01

    This thesis allowed to compare the spectral features of type Ia supernovae in function of the redshift ("evolution"). Within the collaboration of the Supernova Cosmology Project (SCP) and the SuperNova Legacy Survey (SNLS), which both aim at discovering highly redshifted type Ia supernovae, a large fraction of this thesis is devoted to the spectral data reduction. One used to work on the reduction of the whole set of data from the échellettes spectrograph ESI mounted on the focus of the 10 me...

  5. Red suns. The Soviet nuclear ambition; Soleil rouges. L'ambition nucleaire sovietique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilieva, M

    1999-07-01

    Historically, the soviet nuclear electric power came from the armed forces. The privileged channels were the RKMK type reactors in place of fast reactors. After 1971 two channels are developed the PWR type reactors and the RBMK type reactors. Until the eighties years, the nuclear programme had to resolve the question of energy development; The lack of means and the Chernobyl accident made this question still to be solved. (N.C.)

  6. Par-delà le rouge et le noir : les situationnistes et l'héritage du mouvement ouvrier

    OpenAIRE

    Angaut, Jean-Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Amongst the intellectual movements that tried, during the second part of the twentieth century, to give an extension to the marxist and libertarian revolutionnary traditions, situationnists are a very special case. Indeed, they claimed to inspire from this traditions, with their renewed criticism of capitalism as well as their refusal of all sorts of hierarchy, and in the same time the claimed to go beyond the antagonism between anarchism and marxism. We will first expose how the ambition to ...

  7. Par-delà le rouge et le noir : les situationnistes et l'héritage du mouvement ouvrier

    OpenAIRE

    Angaut, Jean-Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Version française d'une communication prononcée lors du colloque international "Is Black and Red Dead?", organisé à l'Université de Nottingham les 7 et 8 septembre 2009. Une version développée en langue anglaise est en cours de publication (2012) dans le volume Politics in Black and Red, Palgrave-MacMillan

  8. Novel anterior cruciate ligament graft fixation device reduces slippage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez MJ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mandi J Lopez,1 Allen Borne,2 W Todd Monroe,3 Prakash Bommala,1 Laura Kelly,1 Nan Zhang11Laboratory for Equine and Comparative Orthopedic Research, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, 2Louisiana State University, New Orleans Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, New Orleans, 3Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USAAbstract: Clinically significant laxity occurs in 10%–30% of knees after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Graft slippage and tension loss at the hamstring graft tibial fixation site during and after reconstruction surgery contribute to postoperative joint laxity and are detrimental to long-term knee stability and graft properties. Limiting graft slippage will reduce associated complications. We sought to compare the in vitro mechanical properties and in vivo joint stabilization, postoperative limb use, and graft incorporation of the novel GraftGrab™ (GG device designed to reduce hamstring graft tibial fixation slippage with the commercially available bioabsorbable Bio-Post™ and spiked washer (BP. Mechanical testing was performed on canine tibia-hamstring graft constructs to quantify initial fixation properties. In vivo joint stabilization, postoperative limb use and graft incorporation of hamstring graft reconstructions were determined in a canine model. Outcomes included tibial translation and ground reaction forces preoperatively and 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, three-dimensional graft and bone tunnel dimensions at the latter two time points, and graft-bone microstructure, as well as mechanical properties 8 weeks after implantation. Immediately after fixation, all grafts slipped from the BP constructs versus about 30% of GG constructs. In vivo limb use remained low, and tibial translation increased with time in the BP cohort. These results together

  9. Celebrate Klubb Rouge’s First Birthday

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To celebrate its first birthday,Klubb Rouge is holding "experience night- life at Klubb Rouge" promotion in Beijing.To reward its patrons,Klubb Rouge will partner with various retailers in offering a one-month discount

  10. 78 FR 75939 - Bay Delta Habitat Conservation Plan and Natural Community Conservation Plan, Sacramento, CA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... permits would also cover 19 animal species that are not currently listed under the ESA: Chinook salmon...; identification of funding sources; and an assessment of alternatives to take of listed animal species. Activities... Entertainment Center, 848 M Street, Fresno, CA 93721. 2. Thursday, January 16, 2014, 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.,...

  11. 77 FR 47581 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Mojave Desert, Northern Sierra, Sacramento...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from automotive parts and component, automobile refinishing... consider your comment. Electronic files should avoid the use of special characters, any form of...

  12. 75 FR 10814 - Proposed Programmatic Safe Harbor Agreement for the Sacramento River Conservation Area Forum in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On December 21, 2009, we published a Federal Register notice (74 FR 67897) announcing..., notice (74 FR 67897). We provide this notice under section 10(c) of the Act and our National... Conservation Area Forum in Shasta, Tehama, Butte, Glenn, Colusa, Yolo, and Sutter Counties, CA AGENCY: Fish...

  13. 78 FR 66058 - Habitat Conservation Plan for South Sacramento County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ..., 2008 (73 FR 32729). The draft EIS/ EIR will evaluate the impacts of several alternatives related to the... Game code section 1600, and the Porter-Cologne Act, and other applicable law, on a project-by-project...) California tiger salamander, central California distinct population segment (Ambystoma californiense)...

  14. 77 FR 19687 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation... Parks and Recreation has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... associated funerary objects may contact the California Department of Parks and Recreation. Repatriation...

  15. 77 FR 19690 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation... Parks and Recreation has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... affiliated with the human remains may contact the California Department of Parks and Recreation....

  16. 77 FR 15801 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation... Parks and Recreation has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... associated funerary objects may contact the California Department of Parks and Recreation. Repatriation...

  17. 77 FR 19689 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation... Parks and Recreation has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... affiliated with the human remains may contact the California Department of Parks and Recreation....

  18. 78 FR 10589 - Revision of Air Quality Implementation Plan; California; Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... version of Rule 214 into the SIP on July 20, 2011 (76 FR 43183). There are no previous versions of Rule... identified by EPA on July 20, 2011 (76 FR 43183). \\2\\ New or modified major stationary sources of air... fully approved into the California SIP on July 20, 2011. See 76 FR 43183. II. EPA's Evaluation...

  19. 78 FR 53270 - Revision of Air Quality Implementation Plan; California; Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... rulemaking (76 FR 43183, July 20, 2011). EPA is also making technical amendments to the Code of Federal... February 14, 2013 (78 FR 10589), EPA proposed to fully approve the following rules that were submitted for... the SIP (76 FR 43183, July 20, 2011), the District had expected that Rule 202 would be removed...

  20. Habitat capacity for Sacramento delta - Life Cycle Modeling of Life History Diversity and Habitat Relationships

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goals of this project are to examine 1) the relative importance of multiple aquatic habitats (streams, estuaries, and nearshore areas, for example) used by...

  1. 77 FR 31830 - Opportunity for Designation in the West Sacramento, CA; Frankfort, IN; Indianapolis, IN; and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ...-Agri Inspection Company, Ltd. (Cal-Agri); Frankfort Grain Inspection, Inc. (Frankfort); Indianapolis... procedures prescribed in section 79(f) of the USGSA. Areas Open for Designation Cal-Agri Pursuant to Section... to the northern California State line. California Agri's assigned geographic area does not...

  2. Reactor control system upgrade for the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center Sacramento, CA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, M. A.

    1999-03-10

    Argonne National Laboratory is currently developing a new reactor control system for the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Facility. This new control system not only provides the same functionality as the existing control system in terms of graphic displays of reactor process variables, data archival capability, and manual, automatic, pulse and square-wave modes of operation, but adds to the functionality of the previous control system by incorporating signal processing algorithms for the validation of sensors and automatic calibration and verification of control rod worth curves. With the inclusion of these automated features, the intent of this control system is not to replace the operator but to make the process of controlling the reactor easier and safer for the operator. For instance, an automatic control rod calibration method reduces the amount of time to calibrate control rods from days to minutes, increasing overall reactor utilization. The control rod calibration curve, determined using the automatic calibration system, can be validated anytime after the calibration, as long as the reactor power is between 50W and 500W. This is done by banking all of the rods simultaneously and comparing the tabulated rod worth curves with a reactivity computer estimate. As long as the deviation between the tabulated values and the reactivity estimate is within a prescribed error band, then the system is in calibration. In order to minimize the amount of information displayed, only the essential flux-related data are displayed in graphical format on the control screen. Information from the sensor validation methods is communicated to the operators via messages, which appear in a message window. The messages inform the operators that the actual process variables do not correlate within the allowed uncertainty in the reactor system. These warnings, however, cannot cause the reactor to shutdown automatically. The reactor operator has the ultimate responsibility of using this information to either keep the reactor operating or to shut the reactor down. In addition to new developments in the signal processing realm, the new control system will be migrating from a PC-based computer platform to a Sun Solaris-based computer platform. The proven history of stability and performance of the Sun Sohuis operating system are the main advantages to this change. The I/O system will also be migrating from a PC-based data collection system, which communicates plant data to the control computer using RS-232 connections, to an Ethernet-based I/O system. The Ethernet Data Acquisition System (EDAS) modules from Intelligent Instrumentation, Inc. provide an excellent solution for embedded control of a system using the more universally-accepted data transmission standard of TCP/IP. The modules contain a PROM, which operates all of the functionality of the I/O module, including the TCP/IP network access. Thus the module does not have an internal, sophisticated operating system to provide functionality but rather a small set hard-coded of instructions, which almost eliminates the possibility of the module failing due to software problems. An internal EEPROM can be modified over the Internet to change module configurations. Once configured, the module is contacted just like any other Internet host using TCP/IP socket calls. The main advantage to this architecture is its flexibility, expandability, and high throughput.

  3. Uranium in the Surrounding of San Marcos-Sacramento River Environment (Chihuahua, Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentería-Villalobos, Marusia; Cortés, Manuel Reyes; Mantero, Juan; Manjón, Guillermo; García-Tenorio, Rafael; Herrera, Eduardo; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena

    2012-01-01

    The main interest of this study is to assess whether uranium deposits located in the San Marcos outcrops (NW of Chihuahua City, Mexico) could be considered as a source of U-isotopes in its surrounding environment. Uranium activity concentrations were determined in biota, ground, and surface water by either alpha or liquid scintillation spectrometries. Major ions were analyzed by ICP-OES in surface water and its suspended matter. For determining uranium activity in biota, samples were divided in parts. The results have shown a possible lixiviation and infiltration of uranium from geological substrate into the ground and surface water, and consequently, a transfer to biota. Calculated annual effective doses by ingestion suggest that U-isotopes in biota could not negligibly contribute to the neighboring population dose. By all these considerations, it is concluded that in this zone there is natural enhancement of uranium in all environmental samples analyzed in the present work. PMID:22536148

  4. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Sacramento Basin Province (009) Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Central Region Energy Team assesses oil and gas resources of the United States. The onshore and State water areas of the United States comprise 71...

  5. Sacramento Municipal Utility District PV and Smart Grid Pilot at Anatolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawson, Mark; Sanchez, Eddie Paul

    2013-12-30

    Under DE-FOA-0000085 High Penetration Solar Deployment, the U. S. Department of Energy funded agreements with SMUD and Navigant Consulting, SunPower, GridPoint, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the California Energy Commission for this pilot demonstration project. Funding was $5,962,409.00. Cost share of $500,000 was also provided by the California Energy Commission. The project has strategic implications for SMUD, other utilities and the PV and energy-storage industries in business and resource planning, technology deployment and asset management. These implications include: -At this point, no dominant business models have emerged and the industry is open for new ideas. -Demonstrated two business models for using distributed PV and energy storage, and brainstormed several dozen more, each with different pros and cons for SMUD, its customers and the industry. -Energy storage can be used to manage high penetrations of PV and mitigate potential issues such as reverse power flow, voltage control violations, power quality issues, increased wear and tear on utility equipment, and system wide power supply issues. - Smart meters are another tool utilities can use to manage high penetrations of PV. The necessary equipment and protocols exist, and the next step is to determine how to integrate the functionality with utility programs and what level of utility control is required. - Time-of-use rates for the residential customers who hosted energy storage systems did not cause a significant change in energy usage patterns. However, the rates we used were not optimized for PV and energy storage. Opportunities exist for utilities to develop new structures.

  6. H10264: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Sacramento River, California, 1988-07-26

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  7. H10342: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Sacramento River, Californnia, 1991-02-25

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  8. Berriasian (Early Cretaceous) radiometric ages from the Grindstone Creek Section, Sacramento Valley, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Grindstone Creek Section, Glenn County, Northern California is a sequence of hemipelagic mudstone, siltstone and sandstone interbedded with concretionary limestone and a few thin tuffs and bentonites. Two tuffs have been collected from a narrow interval of this sequence and subjected to mineralogical and isotopic analyses. U-Pb isotopic analyses of zircon fractions from these volcanic horizons indicate an age of 137.1 + 1.6/-0.6 Ma. A detailed investigation has been conducted on the calcareous nannofossil stratigraphy of this section based on numerous samples with moderately preserved assemblages. The nannoflora is largely of Tethyan affinity, and allows direct correlation with the Berriasian stratotype section, with sections with published magnetostratigraphies and with a DSDP site drilled between known magnetic anomalies. The dated tuffs lie in the lower part of the upper Berriasian Cretarhabdus angustiforatus Zone (Assipetra infracretacea Subzone) and within the narrow range of Rhagodiscus nebulosus. At three different sections, this subzone can be correlated with M-sequence Polarity Zones M16 and M16n. An independent magnetostratigraphic correlation is provided at DSDP Site 387, drilled between anomalies M15 and M16, where basal sediments contain R. nebulosus. Buchia collected within a meter of the lower tuff lie within the B. uncitoides Zone which is Berriasian in age. The upper tuff level, which occurs 65 m above the lower tuff, is situated within the overlying B. pacifica Zone. This zone had previously been correlated with the early Valanginian, but is clearly also partly of Berriasian age based on nannofossil stratigraphy. Our results allow an estimate of the age of the Berriasian-Valanginian and Jurassic-Cretaceous boundaries of 135.1 Ma and 141.1 Ma, respectively, and these fall within the range of, but differ significantly from, several published time-scales. (orig.)

  9. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Sacramento Basin Province Quarter-Mile Cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Cell maps for each oil and gas assessment unit were created by the USGS to illustrate the degree of exploration, type of production, and distribution of production...

  10. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Sacramento Basin Province (009) Total Petroleum Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Total Petroleum System is used in the National Assessment Project and incorporates the Assessment Unit, which is the fundamental geologic unit used for the...

  11. Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map Database, Natomas A99 PMR, Sacramento County, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme, orthographic...

  12. An 800-year paleoflood record from the Sacramento Valley, California [abstract

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Roger; Sullivan, Donald

    1996-01-01

    EXTRACT (SEE PDF FOR FULL ABSTRACT): Four cores recovered from Little Packer Lake in Glenn County, California, have provided a paleoflood record for the past 800 years. ... The sequence of flood deposits in the top 2 meters of the record shows a reasonable agreement with the known history of floods during the past 150 years. At least three major flood events are indicated for AD 1400-1525, although these dates may have to be revised when more dates become available.

  13. EFFECTS OF DIETARY METHYLMERCURY ON JUVENILE SACRAMENTO BLACKFISH BIOENERGETICS. (R825433)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. H10315: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Sacramento River, California, 1989-12-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  15. 75 FR 24965 - Mormon Island Auxiliary Dam (MIAD) Modification Project, Sacramento and El Dorado Counties, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ..., November 27, 2009 (74 FR 62346). The public review period on the Draft Supplemental EIS/EIR ended on... utilization of jet grouting to stabilize the foundation of MIAD will not meet Reclamation's dam...

  16. 75 FR 81642 - Long-Term North to South Water Transfer Program, Sacramento County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... production. Rice has been the crop idled most frequently in previous transfer programs. Water transfers under... quality, climate change, cultural resources, noise, recreation, energy, visual resources, socioeconomics... joint EIS/EIR to analyze the effects of water transfers from water agencies in northern California...

  17. H10398: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Sacramento River, California, 1991-09-20

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  18. 2012 NOAA Ortho-rectified Color Mosaic of Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  19. H10373: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Sacramento River, California, 1991-07-03

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  20. Metals and trace elements in giant garter snakes (Thamnophis gigas) from the Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, G.D.; Hothem, R.L.; Bergen, D.R.; Martin, L.L.; Taylor, R.J.; Brussee, B.E.

    2009-01-01

    The giant garter snake (GGS; Thamnophis gigas) is a federally listed threatened species endemic to wetlands of the Central Valley of California. Habitat destruction has been the main factor in the decline of GGS populations, but the effects of contaminants on this species are unknown. To contribute to the recovery of these snakes, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began studies of the life history and habitat use of GGSs in 1995. During a series of investigations conducted from 1995 to the present, specimens of dead GGSs were opportunistically collected from the Colusa National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), the Natomas Basin, and other sites in northern California. Whole snakes were stored frozen for potential future analysis. As funding became available, we analyzed tissues of 23 GGSs to determine the concentrations of total mercury (Hg) and other trace elements in livers and concentrations of Hg in brains and tail clips. Mercury concentrations (??g/g, wet weight) ranged from 0.08 to 1.64 in livers, 0.01 to 0.18 in brains, and 0.02 to 0.32 in tail clips. In livers, geometric mean concentrations (??g/g, dry weight) of arsenic (25.7) and chromium (1.02) were higher than most values from studies of other snakes. Mercury concentrations in tail clips were positively correlated with concentrations in livers and brains, with the most significant correlations occurring at the Natomas Basin and when Natomas and CNWR were combined. Results indicate the value of using tail clips as a nonlethal bioindicator of contaminant concentrations. ?? 2008 US Government.

  1. 76 FR 61069 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... Quality Management District, Ventura County Air Pollution Control District, and Placer County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY... (SMAQMD), Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (VCAPCD), and Placer County Air Pollution...

  2. Looking Back at International Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Gwyn

    2012-03-01

    With the 11th International Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation coming up in July 2012 in Lyons, France, we thought it might be of interest to our readers to review all the past meetings in this series. We thank Denny Mills of the APS, Argonne for putting the list together. Prior to these larger meetings, and in the early days, facilities held their own meetings similar to the user meetings of today. However, the meeting held at ACO in Orsay, France in 1977 was the first such meeting with an international flavor and so it is on the list. However it is not counted as number 1 since it was agreed way back to start the numbering with the 1982 DESY meeting. The 2005 USA National Meeting scheduled at CAMD in Baton Rouge had to be canceled due to Hurricane Katrina. It was ultimately held in 2007, with the CLS hosted meeting the following year. And a personal note from the magazine - Synchrotron Radiation News was born at the 1987 meeting in Madison, Wisconsin with a proposal that was put to a special session of the meeting organized by Susan Lord. Initial proposals were to model it after the CERN Courier, but it soon adopted its own distinct flavor.

  3. Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, Livingston Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, approximately 23 miles east of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is the eighth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. Two flow tests and one reservoir pressure buildup test were conducted on the lower zone during a 13-day period. A total of 12,489 barrels of water was produced. The highest flow rate achieved was about 3887 BWPD. One flow test followed by a buildup period was conducted on the combined upper and lower zones during a 3-day period. A total of 4739 barrels of water was produced. The highest flow rate achieved was about 3000 BWPD. The gas/water ratio measured during testing was about 32.0 SCF/BBL for the lower zone. The extrapolated latoratory data indicates that the solubility of the gas is 55.7 SCF/BBL. It appears that the reservoir brine is considerably undersaturated. The methane content of the flare line gas averaged 71.0 mole percent. Crown Zellerbach Company carefully studied the commercial feasibility of using the well to produce energy for a wood-drying facility and decided against the project.

  4. Graduate Medical Education as a Lever for Collaborative Change: One Institution's Experience with a Campuswide Patient Safety Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vath, Richard J.; Musso, Mandi W.; Rabalais, Lauren S.; Dunbar, Alston; Hosea, Stephen; Johnson, Angela C.; Bolton, Michael; Rhynes, Vernon K.; Caffery, Terrell S.; Tynes, L. Lee; Mantzor, Savarra; Miller, Bahnsen; Calongne, Laurinda L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The 2013 closure of a public hospital in Baton Rouge, LA transformed graduate medical education (GME) at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center (OLOL). Administrators were tasked with incorporating residents into patient safety and quality improvement initiatives to fulfill regulatory obligations. This report outlines our experiences as we built these patient safety and quality improvement initiatives in a rapidly expanding independent academic medical center. Methods: We joined the Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers (AIAMC) to meet and learn from national peers. To fulfill the scholarly activity requirement of the AIAMC's National Initiative IV, we formed a multidisciplinary team to develop a patient safety education project. Prioritized monthly team meetings allowed for project successes to be celebrated and circulated within the organization. Results: The public-private partnership that more than quadrupled the historic size of GME at OLOL has, in the past 2 years, led to the development of an interdisciplinary team. This team has expanded to accommodate residency program leadership from across the campus. Our National Initiative IV project won a national award and inspired several follow-up initiatives. In addition, this work led to the formation of a Patient Safety and Clinical Quality Improvement fellowship that matched its first fellow in 2015. Conclusion: Through the commitment and support of hospital and medical education leaders, as well as a focus on promoting cultural change through scholarly activity, we were able to greatly expand patient safety and quality improvement efforts in our institution. PMID:27046411

  5. Bioremediation of selected contaminants in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioremediation is generally accepted as a long-term and economic treatment option. However, quantitative information on bioremediation and biosorption is required before this option can be adopted successfully. The primary goal of this on-going project is to determine the extent of natural biodegradation of hazardous organics and biosorption of hazardous organics and heavy metals by the consortia of bacteria, fungi, and plants. Methods to enhance the biodegradation process will be studied during the second and third years of this 3-year proposed project. The Devil's Swamp area near Baton Rouge and Bayou St. John in New Orleans have been selected as the first set of test sites. Some samples from Lake Pontchartrain, bordering New Orleans on the north, have also been analyzed. It is expected that many of the contaminants found at the test site(s) are present at other sites of DOE's interest. Further, technology resulting from the proposed research involving enhanced natural biodegradation processes should be transferable to other DOE sites

  6. Annual report 1991 - Science and Engineering Alliance, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-02-21

    Nineteen ninety-one was a busy and productive year for the Science and Engineering Alliance (SEA). This report covers the major programs and activities of the SEA during the fiscal year 1991 (the year ending September 30, 1991), which was the first year of operation. Where warranted, the report highlights some of the events from the last quarter of the calendar year. The SEA is a non-profit consortium of four Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The SEA members are Alabama A&M University (Normal, Alabama); Jackson State University (Jackson, Mississippi); Prairie View A&M University (Prairie View, Texas); and Southern University and A&M College (Baton Rouge, Louisiana). The SEA`s mission is to help increase the number of well-qualified minority scientists for the next century and beyond, and to provide input into the research and development needs of the nation. The SEA collaborates on research projects with government agencies, national laboratories, private foundations, industry and other universities in a broad range of technical areas.

  7. Conversion of the Bayou Choctaw geological site characterization report to a three-dimensional model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua S. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Rautman, Christopher Arthur

    2004-02-01

    The geologic model implicit in the original site characterization report for the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has been converted to a numerical, computer-based three-dimensional model. The original site characterization model was successfully converted with minimal modifications and use of new information. The geometries of the salt diapir, selected adjacent sedimentary horizons, and a number of faults have been modeled. Models of a partial set of the several storage caverns that have been solution-mined within the salt mass are also included. Collectively, the converted model appears to be a relatively realistic representation of the geology of the Bayou Choctaw site as known from existing data. A small number of geometric inconsistencies and other problems inherent in 2-D vs. 3-D modeling have been noted. Most of the major inconsistencies involve faults inferred from drill hole data only. Modem computer software allows visualization of the resulting site model and its component submodels with a degree of detail and flexibility that was not possible with conventional, two-dimensional and paper-based geologic maps and cross sections. The enhanced visualizations may be of particular value in conveying geologic concepts involved in the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve site to a lay audience. A Microsoft WindowsTM PC-based viewer and user-manipulable model files illustrating selected features of the converted model are included in this report.

  8. Spatial variability of triazine herbicides in the Lower Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J.A.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    During May 15-17, 1990, an intense rainstorm moved across Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio where triazine herbicides are heavily used for growing agricultural crops. Following the storm, the peak concentrations of triazine herbicides in some secondary tributaries to the Upper Mississippi and Ohio Rivers were as high as 36 ??g/L. This runoff water was funneled into the Lower Mississippi River at the Upper Mississippi-Ohio River confluence at Cairo, IL. The spatial variability of this runoff event was measured by collecting midchannel water samples for triazine herbicide analysis from 1 to 2 m below the surface of the Mississippi River every ???16 km from Baton Rouge, LA, upriver to the Mississippi-Ohio River confluence during May 26-29, 1990. All samples were analyzed for triazine herbicides by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. The results showed a background level of ???2.7 ??g/L, an upriver gradient of 0.2 ??g/L per 100 km, and longitudinal spatial variability that is hypothesized to be the result of cross-channel gradients and "slugs" of water from various upriver tributaries with length scales of 100-150 km and amplitudes of ???1 ??g/L.

  9. The LSU Electron Storage Ring, the first commercially-built storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brobeck Division of Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., is building the first industrially-produced storage ring. It will be located at Louisiana State University (LSU) at the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) in Baton Rouge. The purpose of this electron storage ring is to provide intense beams of x-rays to advance the state-of-the-art in lithography and to permit research in a broad area. This facility consists of a 1.2 GeV, 400 mA electron storage ring with a 200 MeV linac injector. The magnet lattice is a Chasman-Green design (double-bend achromat), and the ring circumference is 55.2 meters. There are four 3.0 meter, dispersion-free straight sections, one for injection, one for the 500 MHz RF cavity, and two for possible future insertion devices. The storge ring construction project is in the detailed-design stage, and many systems are in the initial stages of fabrication. 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Development of master CMOS test vehicle chip for space radiation effect studies using CAMD X-ray synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A master CMOS test vehicle chip using currently avilable CMOS technologies from MOSIS Foundry has been designed for use in in monitoring electrical performance of CMOS based systems on board in space flights against the total dose effect. The master test chip includes designs of selected CMOS devices and logic circuits to monitor in an integrated manner the behavior of several radiation sensitive parameters namely, I-V characteristics, speed-power product, propagation delay time and fan-out capability, CMOS latchup, hot-carrier-induced charge effects in VLSI switching circuits and critical logic path through the functional logic device by a dynamic shift register. A methodology to evaluate test vehicle chip is proposed incorporating experimental studies, analytical modeling and their correlation with the experimental data. CMOS test chip fabricated from MOSIS Foundry will be probed for static and dynamic data acquisition under preirradiated and postirradiated conditions and simulated operating environment. Space radiation exposure to the test devices will be simulated using Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) X-ray synchrotron as a radiation source. (orig.)

  11. Training community therapists to deliver cognitive behavioral therapy in the aftermath of disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblen, Jessica L; Norris, Fran H; Gibson, Laura; Lee, Linda

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we examine the effectiveness of disseminating Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Postdisaster Distress (CBT-PD) to community therapists in Baton Rouge, Louisiana following Hurricane Katrina. One hundred four therapists attended a two-day training in CBT-PD with on-going case consultation. Pre- and post-training, therapists rated eight core cognitive behavioral therapy elements on their importance, how well they understood how to deliver the element, and how confident they were in their ability to deliver the element. Post-training they completed a CBT-PD knowledge questionnaire and session fidelity forms. Seventy-seven clients completed satisfaction questionnaires and reported on how often they utilized the skills taught in CBT-PD. Therapists showed significant improvements in their ratings of the importance of various elements of cognitive behavioral therapy, their knowledge and understanding of those elements, and their confidence that they could use them effectively. Immediately following the training 90% of therapists demonstrated excellent retention of CBT-PD. Self-report measures from both therapists and clients indicated that critical session elements were delivered. This work suggests that CBT-PD can be applied in a real-world setting and that community therapists can be trained in relatively short time spans with on-going support. This finding is especially important in the disaster field given that communities are likely to find themselves in emergency situations in which a number of non-expert trauma therapists will need to deliver trauma services. PMID:20828088

  12. Application data as an indicator for post-Katrina recovery of LSU Postdoctoral dental programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Paul C; Strother, Elizabeth A; Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L

    2011-06-01

    Devastated by the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in August 2005, the New Orleans campus of the Louisiana State University School of Dentistry was closed for two years. With help from the university's Systems Office, the school created a temporary campus in Baton Rouge, seventy-five miles from the New Orleans campus. The eight postdoctoral education programs, however, were forced to find clinic and seminar space in other facilities and cities. Of the seventy-nine students in these programs, only sixteen did not continue after the storm. This article describes how each program maintained its curriculum while the main campus was closed. By comparing numbers of student applications to these programs in each year since Hurricane Katrina with the average baseline for each in the ten years preceding the storm, this article illustrates the current viability of these residency programs. Total applications in 2005-07 were significantly lower than baseline measures, but applications in 2008 and 2009 have returned to pre-storm levels. A comparison of these application numbers with national trends also demonstrates that these programs have rebounded from the effects of Hurricane Katrina. PMID:21642522

  13. Survival and recovery: maintaining the educational mission of the Louisiana state university school of medicine in the aftermath of hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicarlo, Richard P; Hilton, Charles W; Chauvin, Sheila W; Delcarpio, Joseph B; Lopez, Fred A; McClugage, Samuel G; Letourneau, Janis G; Smith, Ronnie; Hollier, Larry H

    2007-08-01

    Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and the coastlines of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama on August 29, 2005. The flooding in New Orleans left hundreds of thousands of people homeless and threatened to close businesses and institutions, including Louisiana State University (LSU) School of Medicine and its two principle training sites in New Orleans, Charity Hospital and University Hospital. In the weeks immediately after the storm, LSU School of Medicine resumed undergraduate and graduate medical education in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and elsewhere. The authors discuss the specific challenges they faced in relocating administrative operations, maintaining the mission of medical education, and dealing with the displacement of faculty, staff, residents, students, and patients, and the processes used to overcome these challenges. They focus on the school's educational missions, but challenges faced by the offices of student affairs, faculty affairs, and admissions are also discussed. LSU School of Medicine's experience provides lessons about organizational preparedness for a mass disaster that may be of interest to other medical schools. PMID:17762247

  14. Entre a batuta e o tubo de ensaio: a carreira admirável de Alexandre Borodin Between baton and test tube: the admirable career of Alexander Borodin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. L. Filgueiras

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Alexander Borodin (1833-1887 is a singularity in the history of science. Whereas other scientists may have kept lifelong interests in some artistic field, he was unique in pursuing with great success two parallel careers in both chemistry and music, managing to excell in both to the end of his life. Although he considered himself primarily a chemist, present-day appreciation of his powerful music has greatly surpassed interest for his chemistry. This article treats the life and the unusual double career of the Russian chemist-musician.

  15. Entre a batuta e o tubo de ensaio: a carreira admirável de Alexandre Borodin Between baton and test tube: the admirable career of Alexander Borodin

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos A. L. Filgueiras

    2002-01-01

    Alexander Borodin (1833-1887) is a singularity in the history of science. Whereas other scientists may have kept lifelong interests in some artistic field, he was unique in pursuing with great success two parallel careers in both chemistry and music, managing to excell in both to the end of his life. Although he considered himself primarily a chemist, present-day appreciation of his powerful music has greatly surpassed interest for his chemistry. This article treats the life and the unusual d...

  16. Live Earth气候危机音乐会上海接力棒%Relay Baton in Shanghai of the Concerts for a Climate in Crisis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    2007年7月7日晚7时,Live Earth气候危机音乐会上海站演出在上海东方明珠电视塔下隆重拉开帷幕。国际巨星莎拉·布莱曼,香港及台湾地区的知名艺人陈奕迅、许慧欣、辛晓琪、黄晓明、黄耀明、容祖儿、SOLAR乐队以及内地当红女子十二乐坊都云集于此,他们用各自的表演来支持LIVE EARTH的倡议。

  17. Modification de la bentonite par un sel de diphosphonim – Applications à l’adsorption des colorants textiles (rouge, bleu et jaune Bemacide).

    OpenAIRE

    MEHDI, fatima

    2014-01-01

    L’objectif de notre étude est d’améliorer les propriétés de sorption de la bentonite vis-à-vis les colorants qui sont classés parmi les produits les plus toxiques et comparaison entre bentonite sodique et modifiée. La première partie du travail concerne la préparation et la caractérisation des bentonites modifiées avec un sel de diphosphonium(p-HpHBM). Les bentonites modifiées sont obtenues par échange cationique entre les cations inorganiques qui se trouvent dans les feuillets de...

  18. Etude du risque d'inondation en aval du delta du fleuve rouge en utilisant la teledetection et les sig: Le cas du district de Bac Hung Hai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Duc Viet

    The Bac Hung Hai zone is the greatest basin in the Red River Delta in Vietnam and also one of the most densely populated regions of the planet. It is mainly a rural region and its economy is dominated by agriculture. In the context of frequent and larger floods in the Bac Hung Hai zone, causing deep socio-economical consequences, the focus of this study is to establish cartography of the high risk areas for flooding in the Bac Hung Hai region using remote sensing and GIS to assist land management. The preparation of a map describing land management in this region is more complicated because parcels for farming are very small and not homogeneous. A consistent and precise map of land use is essential for studies of flooding. The secondary objective is to improve the land use map. To this effect, a classification has been applied to the combination of the spectral bands and textures (TM and ETM+) of Landsat and a radar image (ERS). The addition of this information to the spectral bands increases the accuracy of classification by 1% to 4%, according to the dates selected. Additionally, in the study zone where there are few days without clouds, a problem related to the optical satellite image is the cloud cover. Then, the use of radar images will provide ground information for areas hidden by clouds where spectral images are not sufficient. To reach these goals, we have determined the main biophysical considerations that influence flooding. Then, these considerations have been combined in a multi-criteria analysis to evaluate the risks of flooding in the entire basin area. The results show that high to very high risks affect 47% of the area studied and that the south-east region, center, and north-east present the greatest risk. Keywords. Flood risks, remote sensing, GIS, land use, multicriteria analysis, Red river delta, Vietnam.

  19. Recherches sur le bouquet de vieillissement des vins rouges de Bordeaux : Etudes sensorielle et moléculaire d’un concept olfactif complexe

    OpenAIRE

    Picard, Magali

    2015-01-01

    A wine with ageing potential is noticeable by its ability to improve over time, expressing the aromatic complexity particularly expected by wine tasters. The development of wine ageing bouquet, the "signature" of the organoleptic quality of fine wines aged in bottle, is one of the most fascinating but least known phenomena in oenology. Indeed, both its sensory and molecular markers are poorly documented.A three-step holistic approach made it possible to decipher the sensory characteristics of...

  20. "I'm* Two Rabbits" / "J'ai un Rouge Pullover*". How Corrective Feedback Is Handled in Collaborative Exchange Programmes between Early Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choffat-Durr, Anne; Macaire, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    This article presents how, in the social dynamics of two classrooms involved in an exchange programme, young learners provide their peers with asynchronous feedback taking place in the digital medium. Within two Call Triangles that interact thanks to Computer Mediated Communication tools, teachers sharing the same methodological precept on…

  1. Effets de la guerre civile au centre-Mozambique et évaluation d'une intervention de la Croix Rouge

    OpenAIRE

    Garenne, Michel; Coninx, R.; Dupuy, C.

    1996-01-01

    Afin de mesurer l'évolution de la mortalité avant, pendant et après la guerre civile, une enquête a été conduite dans le district de Maringué, au Mozambique, en octobre 1994. L'enquête a porté sur les histoires des maternités de 1503 femmes de 15 à 60 ans. Les résultats de l'analyse révèlent une évolution complexe de la mortalité des enfants. Au cours de la fin de la période coloniale, la mortalité des moins de 5 ans baisse de 373 pour mille (1955-1959) à 270 pour mille (1970-1974). Puis elle...

  2. Les débuts du Christianisme en Afrique de l’est et le commerce de la mer Rouge et de l’Océan Indien

    OpenAIRE

    Seland, Eivind Heldaas

    2014-01-01

    The ancient East African kingdom of Aksum gradually adopted Christianity from the early- to mid-fourth-century reign of Ezana onwards. The well-known narrative of the late Roman church-historian Rufinus relates a top-down process of conversion, starting with the ruler himself. The report, corroborated by the adoption of Christian symbolism on Ezana’s late coinage, and monotheistic as well as overtly Christian references in royal inscriptions, is generally considered trustworthy. While not cha...

  3. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Flower Pigments in Chocolate Cosmos, Cosmos atrosanguineus, and its Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amamiya, Kotarou; Iwashina, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Two major anthocyanins, cyanidin 3-O-glucoside and 3-O-rutinoside, were isolated from the black flowers of Cosmos atrosanguineus cultivar 'Choco Mocha', together with three minor anthocyanins, cyanidin 3-O-malonylglucoside, pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside and 3-O-rutinoside. A chalcone, butein 4'-O-glucoside and three minor flavanones were isolated from the red flowers of C. atrosanguineis x C. sulphureus cultivar 'Rouge Rouge'. The anthocyanins and chalcone accumulation of cultivar 'Choco Mocha' and its hybrid cultivars 'Brown Rouge', 'Forte Rouge', 'Rouge Rouge' and 'Noel Rouge' was surveyed by quantitative HPLC. Total anthocyanins of black flower cultivars 'Choco Mocha' and 'Brown Rouge' were 3-4-folds higher than that of the red flower cultivar 'Noel Rouge'. On the other hand, total chalcone of 'Noel Rouge' was 10-77-folds higher compared with those of other cultivars, 'Brown Rouge', 'Forte Rouge' and 'Rouge Rouge'. It was shown that the flower color variations from red to black of Chocolate Cosmos and its hybrids are due to the difference in the relative amounts of anthocyanins and chalcone. PMID:26996024

  4. Projecting cumulative benefits of multiple river restoration projects: an example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River system in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondolf, G Mathias; Angermeier, Paul L; Cummins, Kenneth; Dunne, Thomas; Healey, Michael; Kimmerer, Wim; Moyle, Peter B; Murphy, Dennis; Patten, Duncan; Railsback, Steve; Reed, Denise J; Spies, Robert; Twiss, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Despite increasingly large investments, the potential ecological effects of river restoration programs are still small compared to the degree of human alterations to physical and ecological function. Thus, it is rarely possible to "restore" pre-disturbance conditions; rather restoration programs (even large, well-funded ones) will nearly always involve multiple small projects, each of which can make some modest change to selected ecosystem processes and habitats. At present, such projects are typically selected based on their attributes as individual projects (e.g., consistency with programmatic goals of the funders, scientific soundness, and acceptance by local communities), and ease of implementation. Projects are rarely prioritized (at least explicitly) based on how they will cumulatively affect ecosystem function over coming decades. Such projections require an understanding of the form of the restoration response curve, or at least that we assume some plausible relations and estimate cumulative effects based thereon. Drawing on our experience with the CALFED Bay-Delta Ecosystem Restoration Program in California, we consider potential cumulative system-wide benefits of a restoration activity extensively implemented in the region: isolating/filling abandoned floodplain gravel pits captured by rivers to reduce predation of outmigrating juvenile salmon by exotic warmwater species inhabiting the pits. We present a simple spreadsheet model to show how different assumptions about gravel pit bathymetry and predator behavior would affect the cumulative benefits of multiple pit-filling and isolation projects, and how these insights could help managers prioritize which pits to fill. PMID:18810527

  5. Statement of C.D. Zerby before the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, Sacramento, California, March 21, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The text of C. D. Zerby's presentation before the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission on disposal of radioactive wastes in salt deposits is given. Some of the topics discussed are; development sequence for a terminal storage facility; description of a repository in salt; geological properties of salt formations important for waste disposal; and performance characteristics of waste repository

  6. The effects of low-tide rainfall on metal content of suspended sediment in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalski, S. M.; Torres, R.; Bizimis, M.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Fleck, J.; Goni, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Rain falling near low tide is capable of eroding and transporting cohesive sediment from marsh and mudflat surfaces. Given that metals adsorb strongly to silt- and clay-sized particles, it is conceivable that lowtide rainfall may also liberate previously-deposited metals from storage in intertidal sediment. To investigate the potential for rainfall as an agent of remobilization of metals, this study tested the hypothesis of sediment, and therefore metals and nutrients, mobilization during these punctuated low-tide rainfall events. Water samples were collected during low-tide rain events in winter and wind resuspension events in summer from a marsh in central California. The concentrations of suspended sediment, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen, and total adsorbed concentration (mass of metal per volume of filtered water) of most metals were higher during a low tide rainfall event than during wind-only and fair-weather events. Metal contents (mass of metal per mass of sediment) were also greater during the rain event for most metals. Principle components analysis and the relationships between total adsorbed metals and SSC suggest rainfall during low tide can mobilize a different source of sediment than the background sediment available for tidal and wind-wave resuspension. The metal content of bulk sediment samples from around the study area could not be matched satisfactorily to the suspended sediment in any of the events, implying that bulk sediment should not be used to extrapolate to suspended sediment in terms of adsorbed metal content. Some of the adsorbed metals were present during the rain event in amounts that could be toxic, depending on the actual bioavailability of the metals.; Summary plots of measured organic parameters. (A) POC (B) PN (C) C:N (D) total leachable metal concentration, sum of all measured metals. The solid line inside box is the median and the dashed line is the mean.

  7. Rainfall-runoff processes modelling using Sacramento and Brook models in the Cal Rodó catchment (Pyrenees, Spain)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buchtele, Josef; Buchtelová, Marie; Gallart, F.; Llorens, P.; Salvary, C.; Herrmann, A.

    Paříž : UNESCO, 2000, s. 15-22. [Catchment Hydrological and Biochemical Processes in Changing Environment. Liblice (CZ), 22.09.1998-24.09.1998] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2060917 Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology

  8. 76 FR 9709 - Water Quality Challenges in the San Francisco Bay/Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ..., supplying some or all of the drinking water to 25 million people and irrigation water to 4 million acres of... current status of the EPA and Water Boards' \\13\\ responses to adverse water quality conditions that have... Order 12866, entitled Regulatory Planning and Review (58 FR 51,735, October 4, 1993), this is...

  9. Projecting Cumulative Benefits of Multiple River Restoration Projects: An Example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River System in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondolf, G. Mathias; Angermeier, Paul L.; Cummins, Kenneth; Dunne, Thomas; Healey, Michael; Kimmerer, Wim; Moyle, Peter B.; Murphy, Dennis; Patten, Duncan; Railsback, Steve; Reed, Denise J.; Spies, Robert; Twiss, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Despite increasingly large investments, the potential ecological effects of river restoration programs are still small compared to the degree of human alterations to physical and ecological function. Thus, it is rarely possible to “restore” pre-disturbance conditions; rather restoration programs (even large, well-funded ones) will nearly always involve multiple small projects, each of which can make some modest change to selected ecosystem processes and habitats. At present, such projects are typically selected based on their attributes as individual projects (e.g., consistency with programmatic goals of the funders, scientific soundness, and acceptance by local communities), and ease of implementation. Projects are rarely prioritized (at least explicitly) based on how they will cumulatively affect ecosystem function over coming decades. Such projections require an understanding of the form of the restoration response curve, or at least that we assume some plausible relations and estimate cumulative effects based thereon. Drawing on our experience with the CALFED Bay-Delta Ecosystem Restoration Program in California, we consider potential cumulative system-wide benefits of a restoration activity extensively implemented in the region: isolating/filling abandoned floodplain gravel pits captured by rivers to reduce predation of outmigrating juvenile salmon by exotic warmwater species inhabiting the pits. We present a simple spreadsheet model to show how different assumptions about gravel pit bathymetry and predator behavior would affect the cumulative benefits of multiple pit-filling and isolation projects, and how these insights could help managers prioritize which pits to fill.

  10. Environmental fate of mosquito adulticides and effects on non-target invertebrates in wetlands of the Sacramento Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) is a synergist of pyrethroid pesticides found in many products for structural pest control, mosquito control, and home and garden uses....

  11. Methyl halide and chloroform emissions from a subsiding Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta island converted to rice fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. A. H.; Rhew, R. C.; Whelan, M. E.; Zhou, K.; Deverel, S. J.

    2011-02-01

    Net fluxes of methyl halides and chloroform were measured from recently converted rice fields on Twitchell Island, California, using field- and laboratory-based incubations. A stable isotope tracer method was used to demonstrate that the net emissions of CH 3Cl and CH 3Br during the growing season were predominantly the result of large gross production rates, with gross consumption rates being relatively minor. In agreement with prior studies, the production rates for methyl halides differed significantly at different rice plant growth phases. The Twitchell Island rice field, however, had production rates of CH 3Cl during the growth phases that were higher than rates reported at commercial rice fields, presumably because of higher soil chloride concentrations. Laboratory soil incubations showed that the non-flooded rice field soils acted as a small net sink for CH 3Cl and as small net sources for CH 3Br, CH 3I and CHCl 3. Despite the higher CH 3Cl emissions during the growing season, the overall emissions of halomethanes from the conversion of all potential islands in the San Joaquin Delta to rice paddies is predicted to be an insignificant source of halomethanes.

  12. Potential effects of global warming on the Sacramento/San Joaquin watershed and the San Francisco estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Noah; Cayan, Daniel R.

    2002-01-01

    California's primary hydrologic system, the San Francisco estuary and its upstream watershed, is vulnerable to the regional hydrologic consequences of projected global climate change. Projected temperature anomalies from a global climate model are used to drive a combined model of watershed hydrology and estuarine dynamics. By 2090, a projected temperature increase of 2.1°C results in a loss of about half of the average April snowpack storage, with greatest losses in the northern headwaters. Consequently, spring runoff is reduced by 5.6 km3(∼20% of historical annual runoff), with associated increases in winter flood peaks. The smaller spring flows yield spring/summer salinity increases of up to 9 psu, with larger increases in wet years.

  13. SACRAMENTOS E IDENTIDAD EN LA ÚLTIMA CANOA: TRAVESÍA DE UN KAWESKAR AL BORDE DEL MAPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena López Torres

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo ahonda en el conflicto identitario que el kaweskar experimenta en su interacción con los religiosos y militares que se emplazan en las márgenes de Puerto Edén, zona periférica en la que son confinados los escasos descendientes. Dentro de sus fronteras los niños kaweskar inician un proceso educativo que difiere con los patrones de aprendizaje de su etnia, adquiriendo costumbres y conocimientos coincidentes con los preceptos de la religión católica. Wegmann cuestiona el perfil identitario que la nación chilena ha instaurado a nivel macro y la supuesta integración de los indígenas como ciudadanos chilenos.This article explores the identity conflict that the Kaweskar experience in interacting with religious and military groups located on the shores of Puerto Eden, a peripheral zone where few descendants are confined. Within these borders Kaweskar children begin an educational process that differs from the learning patterns of their ethnicity, thus assimilating customs and knowledge based on the precepts of the Catholic religion. Wegmann questions the identity profile that the Chilean nation has set at a macro level and the alleged integration of indigenous people as Chilean citizens.

  14. Modeling tidal freshwater marsh sustainability in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta under a broad suite of potential future scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the adaptation and application of a one-dimensional marsh surface elevation model, the Wetland Accretion Rate Model of Ecosystem Resilience (WARMER), to explore the conditions that lead to sustainable tidal freshwater marshes in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta. We defined marsh accretion parameters to encapsulate the range of observed values over historic and modern time-scales based on measurements from four marshes in high and low energy fluvial environments as well as possible future trends in sediment supply and mean sea level. A sensitivity analysis of 450 simulations was conducted encompassing a range of eScholarship provides open access, scholarly publishing services to the University of California and delivers a dynamic research platform to scholars worldwide. porosity values, initial elevations, organic and inorganic matter accumulation rates, and sea-level rise rates. For the range of inputs considered, the magnitude of SLR over the next century was the primary driver of marsh surface elevation change. Sediment supply was the secondary control. More than 84% of the scenarios resulted in sustainable marshes with 88 cm of SLR by 2100, but only 32% and 11% of the scenarios resulted in surviving marshes when SLR was increased to 133 cm and 179 cm, respectively. Marshes situated in high-energy zones were marginally more resilient than those in low-energy zones because of their higher inorganic sediment supply. Overall, the results from this modeling exercise suggest that marshes at the upstream reaches of the Delta—where SLR may be attenuated—and high energy marshes along major channels with high inorganic sediment accumulation rates will be more resilient to global SLR in excess of 88 cm over the next century than their downstream and low-energy counterparts. However, considerable uncertainties exist in the projected rates of sea-level rise and sediment avail-ability. In addition, more research is needed to constrain future rates of aboveground and belowground plant productivity under increased CO2 concentrations and flooding.

  15. Icosapent ethyl for the treatment of severe hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares H

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hassan Fares,1 Carl J Lavie,2,3 James J DiNicolantonio,4 James H O'Keefe,5 Richard V Milani2 1Department of Hospital Medicine, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA, 2Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinical School, University of Queensland School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 3Department of Preventive Medicine, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge, LA, 4Mid America Heart Institute at Saint Luke's Hospital, Kansas City, MO, 5Mid America Heart Institute, University of Missouri–Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA Abstract: Hypertriglyceridemia is a highly prevalent lipid abnormality and it is associated with atherosclerosis, with a growing body of evidence linking elevated triglycerides (TGs with cardiovascular disease. The current major omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA/docosahexaenoic acid (DHA combination, lowers serum TGs while often increasing levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Icosapent ethyl is an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid with a 96% pure ethyl ester of EPA that has been recently approved for lowering TG levels in patients with very high TGs (≥500 mg/dL, and it does so without significantly affecting serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The potential benefits of omega-3 fatty acid therapy for dyslipidemias will be discussed, including the potential pros and cons of EPA alone versus the more common and readily available EPA/DHA combination therapy. Keywords: triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid

  16. Diagnosis, prevention, and management of canine hip dysplasia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schachner ER

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Emma R Schachner, Mandi J Lopez Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA Abstract: Canine hip dysplasia (CHD is a polygenic and multifactorial developmental disorder characterized by coxofemoral (hip joint laxity, degeneration, and osteoarthritis (OA. Current diagnostic techniques are largely subjective measures of joint conformation performed at different stages of development. Recently, measures on three-dimensional images generated from computed tomography scans predicted the development of OA associated with CHD. Continued refinement of similar imaging methods may improve diagnostic imaging techniques to identify dogs predisposed to degenerative hip joint changes. By current consensus, joint changes consistent with CHD are influenced by genetic predisposition as well as environmental and biomechanical factors; however, despite decades of work, the relative contributions of each to the development and extent of CHD signs remain elusive. Similarly, despite considerable effort to decipher the genetic underpinnings of CHD for selective breeding programs, relevant genetic loci remain equivocal. As such, prevention of CHD within domestic canine populations is marginally successful. Conservative management is often employed to manage signs of CHD, with lifelong maintenance of body mass as one of the most promising methods. Surgical intervention is often employed to prevent joint changes or restore joint function, but there are no gold standards for either goal. To date, all CHD phenotypes are considered as a single entity in spite of recognized differences in expression and response to environmental conditions and treatment. Identification of distinct CHD phenotypes and targeting evidence-based conservative and invasive treatments for each may significantly advance prevention and management of a prevalent, debilitating condition in canine companions. Keywords: canine

  17. Continuing development of regenerable sorbents for fluidized-bed combustion. Semiannual technical progress report No. 2, April 1-September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalfadelis, C D

    1980-01-01

    Our efforts were directed primarily to preparation for and/the initial operation of the laboratory-scale hot fluidized bed test system (LSHFB). The initial test sequence in the LSHFB system was performed with a fixed-bed of 100 grams of barium titanate synthetic sorbent. The sorbent bed was alternately sulfated and regenerated five times. Sulfation was accomplished at 900/sup 0/C, with a synthetic flue gas mixture comprising 10.1% CO/sub 2/, 4.95% O/sub 2/, 0.2435% SO/sub 2/ and 84.7% N/sub 2/. Regeneration was performed at 1025/sup 0/C with a gas containing 8.0% CO and 92.0% N/sub 2/. After an initial drop in sulfation performance after the first sulfation/regeneration cycle, performance held steady, or was shown to be improving, during the succeeding four cycles. Although the initial operation of this system proceeded relatively smoothly, the reactor was found to have been irreparably damaged by the end of the initial test sequence. A new reactor was subsequently designed, fabricated, and installed in the unit. Concurrently, sorbent pellet preparation by extrusion was investigated in the Catalyst Preparation Facility at the Baton Rouge Laboratory of Exxon Research and Engineering Company. Preparation of sorbent pellets for use in the LSHFB operation was continued on a laboratory-scale at Linden throughout the reporting period. Cost and time estimates were prepared for operation of the bench-scale fluidized bed coal combustion and regeneration facilities, including preparation of the requisite volumes of synthetic sorbent pellets needed for that program.

  18. The Louisiana State University waste-to-energy incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proposed action is for cost-shared construction of an incinerator/steam-generation facility at Louisiana State University under the State Energy Conservation Program (SECP). The SECP, created by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, calls upon DOE to encourage energy conservation, renewable energy, and energy efficiency by providing Federal technical and financial assistance in developing and implementing comprehensive state energy conservation plans and projects. Currently, LSU runs a campus-wide recycling program in order to reduce the quantity of solid waste requiring disposal. This program has removed recyclable paper from the waste stream; however, a considerable quantity of other non-recyclable combustible wastes are produced on campus. Until recently, these wastes were disposed of in the Devil's Swamp landfill (also known as the East Baton Rouge Parish landfill). When this facility reached its capacity, a new landfill was opened a short distance away, and this new site is now used for disposal of the University's non-recyclable wastes. While this new landfill has enough capacity to last for at least 20 years (from 1994), the University has identified the need for a more efficient and effective manner of waste disposal than landfilling. The University also has non-renderable biological and potentially infectious waste materials from the School of Veterinary Medicine and the Student Health Center, primarily the former, whose wastes include animal carcasses and bedding materials. Renderable animal wastes from the School of Veterinary Medicine are sent to a rendering plant. Non-renderable, non-infectious animal wastes currently are disposed of in an existing on-campus incinerator near the School of Veterinary Medicine building

  19. Teaching the Next Generation of Scientists and Engineers the NASA Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Pamela W.; Benfield, Michael P. J.; Justice, Stefanie H.

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated Product Team (IPT) program, led by The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), is a multidisciplinary, multi-university, multi-level program whose goal is to provide opportunities for high school and undergraduate scientists and engineers to translate stakeholder needs and requirements into viable engineering design solutions via a distributed multidisciplinary team environment. The current program supports three projects. The core of the program is the two-semester senior design experience where science, engineering, and liberal arts undergraduate students from UAH, the College of Charleston, Southern University at Baton Rouge, and Ecole Suprieure des Techniques Aronautiques et de Construction Automobile (ESTACA) in Paris, France form multidisciplinary competitive teams to develop system concepts of interest to the local aerospace community. External review boards form to provide guidance and feedback throughout the semester and to ultimately choose a winner from the competing teams. The other two projects, the Innovative Student Project for the Increased Recruitment of Engineering and Science Students (InSPIRESS) Level I and Level II focus exclusively on high school students. InSPIRESS Level I allows high schools to develop a payload to be accommodated on the system being developed by senior design experience teams. InSPIRESS Level II provides local high school students first-hand experience in the senior design experience by allowing them to develop a subsystem or component of the UAH-led system over the two semesters. This program provides a model for NASA centers to engage the local community to become more involved in design projects.

  20. Smartphone applications to aid weight loss and management: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutton EF

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth F Sutton, Leanne M Redman Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA Abstract: The development and dissemination of smart devices has cultivated a global environment of hyperconnectivity and increased our access to information. The paralleled launch and success of the Mobile Health industry has created a market of commercially available applications or “apps” along with tools or sensors, which allow the user to receive and collect personal health information. Apps and accompanying tools now allow an individual to “self-digitize” and, pertaining to weight management, monitor their body weight, caloric intake, physical activity, and more. These products possess the ability to improve the scalability of traditional in-person weight management services considering their near ubiquity, affordability, and capability to deliver information directly and personally to the user. However, similar to the dietary supplement market, the anecdotal value of these products has driven their popularity and acceptance by the general public without requirement of scientific validation or, in the area of weight management or diet/exercise, validation of the safety and efficacy by the Food and Drug Administration prior to market launch. By conducting a literature and clinical trial search, we found remarkably few active, completed, or published studies testing the efficacy of smart device applications using randomized controlled trials. Research efforts must be focused on illuminating the efficacy of behavioral interventions and remote self-monitoring for weight loss/maintenance treatment with true, randomized controlled trials. Keywords: smartphone, mobile phone, application, app, weight, weight loss, weight maintenance

  1. Estimating methane gas generation from Devil's swamp landfill using greenhouse gas emission models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Ayodeji Thompson

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) has been a key issue in the study, design, and management of landfills. Landfill gas (LFG) is considered either as a significant source of renewable energy (if extracted and processed accordingly) or significant source of pollution and risk (if not mitigated or processed). A municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill emits a significant amount of methane, a potent GHG. Thus, quantification and mitigation of GHG emissions is an important area of study in engineering and other sciences related to landfill technology and management. The present study will focus on estimating methane generation from Devils swamp landfill (DSLF), a closed landfill in Baton Rouge, LA. The landfill operated for 53 years (1940-1993) and contains both industrial and municipal waste products. Since the Clean Air Act of 1963, landfills are now classified as New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) waste (i.e., waste that will decompose to generate LFG). Currently, the DSLF is being used as source of renewable energy through the "Waste to Energy" program. For this study, to estimate the methane potential in the DSLF, it is important to determine the characteristics and classification of the landfill's wastes. The study uses and compares different GHG modeling tools---LandGEM, a multiphase model, and a simple first-order model---to estimate methane gas emission and compare results with the actual emissions from the DSLF. The sensitivity of the methane generation rate was analyzed by the methane generation models to assess the effects of variables such as initial conditions, specific growth rate, and reaction rate constants. The study concludes that methane (L0) and initial organic concentration in waste (k) are the most important parameters when estimating methane generation using the models.

  2. Gasifier burner ignition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    The BI-GAS pilot plant is designed such that its lower region (Stage I) is the combustion zone where oxygen and steam contact and react with recycled char. As with other combustion systems, provisions must be made to initiate combustion at start-up, to reinitiate combustion in case of a process upset where combustion is lost, and to continuously monitor the presence of combustion. An ignition system had to be developed, capable of reliable and repeated operation at pressures up to 1500 psi in a methane-rich or otherwise reducing atmosphere. The initial development work was done by Babcock and Wilcox and included development of both the ignitor system and the flame confirmation system. B and W's initial proposal specifically dealt with investigating a hypergolic (chemical auto-combustion) igniter. Hypergolic ignition is the spontaneous combustion of a compound upon contact with an oxygen containing media. This oxygen source includes air, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water. The liquid compound studied was triethylaluminum (Al(C/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 3/) otherwise identified as TEA and supplied by Ethyl Corporation, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The hypergolic ignition system has been operated successfully and proved reliable at high pressure (750 psig) through repeated testing over a three-year period. The system designed by Stearns-Roger based on the study by Babcock and Wilcox was basically correct. Two relatively minor design defects and operational revisions to improve performance were accomplished by on-site personnel with little expenditure of time or money. The remaining problems currently experienced with the TEA ignition system are considered minor. Further work should continue to determine the lowest possible TEA concentration that can be used and still provide consistent ignition, and the system should be tested soon at the full design operating pressure of 1500 psig.

  3. Public Talks and Science Listens: A Community-Based Participatory Approach to Characterizing Environmental Health Risk Perceptions and Assessing Recovery needs in the Wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sullivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to the human health threats stemming from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, inter-disciplinary working groups representing P30-funded Centers of the National Institute Environmental Health Sciences were created to assess threats posed by mold, harmful alga blooms, chemical toxicants, and various infectious agents at selected sites throughout the hurricane impact zone. Because of proximity to impacted areas, UTMB NIEHS Center in Environmental Toxicology was charged with coordinating direct community outreach efforts, primarily in south Louisiana. In early October 2005, UTMB/NIEHS Center Community Outreach and Education Core, in collaboration with outreach counterparts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center @ Smithville TX/Center for Research in Environmental Disease sent two groups into southern Louisiana. One group used Lafourche Parish as a base to deliver humanitarian aid and assess local needs for additional supplies during local recovery/reclamation. A second group, ranging through New Iberia, New Orleans, Chalmette, rural Terrebonne, Lafourche and Jefferson Parishes and Baton Rouge met with community environmental leaders, emergency personnel and local citizens to 1 sample public risk perceptions, 2 evaluate the scope and reach of ongoing risk communication efforts, and 3 determine how the NIEHS could best collaborate with local groups in environmental health research and local capacity building efforts. This scoping survey identified specific information gaps limiting efficacy of risk communication, produced a community “wish list” of potential collaborative research projects. The project provided useful heuristics for disaster response and management planning and a platform for future collaborative efforts in environmental health assessment and risk communication with local advocacy groups in south Terrebonne-Lafourche parishes.

  4. Spatial confidentiality and GIS: re-engineering mortality locations from published maps about Hurricane Katrina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitner Michael

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographic Information Systems (GIS can provide valuable insight into patterns of human activity. Online spatial display applications, such as Google Earth, can democratise this information by disseminating it to the general public. Although this is a generally positive advance for society, there is a legitimate concern involving the disclosure of confidential information through spatial display. Although guidelines exist for aggregated data, little has been written concerning the display of point level information. The concern is that a map containing points representing cases of cancer or an infectious disease, could be re-engineered back to identify an actual residence. This risk is investigated using point mortality locations from Hurricane Katrina re-engineered from a map published in the Baton Rouge Advocate newspaper, and a field team validating these residences using search and rescue building markings. Results We show that the residence of an individual, visualized as a generalized point covering approximately one and half city blocks on a map, can be re-engineered back to identify the actual house location, or at least a close neighbour, even if the map contains little spatial reference information. The degree of re-engineering success is also shown to depend on the urban characteristic of the neighborhood. Conclusion The results in this paper suggest a need to re-evaluate current guidelines for the display of point (address level data. Examples of other point maps displaying health data extracted from the academic literature are presented where a similar re-engineering approach might cause concern with respect to violating confidentiality. More research is also needed into the role urban structure plays in the accuracy of re-engineering. We suggest that health and spatial scientists should be proactive and suggest a series of point level spatial confidentiality guidelines before governmental decisions are made

  5. Postpartum mental health after Hurricane Katrina: A cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harville Emily W

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural disaster is often a cause of psychopathology, and women are vulnerable to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and depression. Depression is also common after a woman gives birth. However, no research has addressed postpartum women's mental health after natural disaster. Methods Interviews were conducted in 2006–2007 with women who had been pregnant during or shortly after Hurricane Katrina. 292 New Orleans and Baton Rouge women were interviewed at delivery and 2 months postpartum. Depression was assessed using the Edinburgh Depression Scale and PTSD using the Post-Traumatic Stress Checklist. Women were asked about their experience of the hurricane with questions addressing threat, illness, loss, and damage. Chi-square tests and log-binomial/Poisson models were used to calculate associations and relative risks (RR. Results Black women and women with less education were more likely to have had a serious experience of the hurricane. 18% of the sample met the criteria for depression and 13% for PTSD at two months postpartum. Feeling that one's life was in danger was associated with depression and PTSD, as were injury to a family member and severe impact on property. Overall, two or more severe experiences of the storm was associated with an increased risk for both depression (relative risk (RR 1.77, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.08–2.89 and PTSD (RR 3.68, 95% CI 1.80–7.52. Conclusion Postpartum women who experience natural disaster severely are at increased risk for mental health problems, but overall rates of depression and PTSD do not seem to be higher than in studies of the general population.

  6. Indigenous Cases of Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) in Southern Mississippi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Luis A; Dobbs, Thomas; Walker, Sue; Waller, William; Stryjewska, Barbara M

    2015-07-01

    Hansen's disease or leprosy is a chronic infection of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by Mycobacterium leprae. In the U.S., leprosy is mainly reported in immigrants, but indigenous leprosy cases have been also reported in this country, especially in semitropical southern states (i.e., Texas, Louisiana). The objective of this series of cases is to describe indigenous leprosy cases reported in southern Mississippi (MS) during the period 2012-2014. Information was collected from medical records at Hattiesburg Clinic and the MS Department of Health. Four cases were reported during the period of study (3 Caucasian males, 1 African-American woman). Non of visited endemic leprosy country. The age ranged from 60 to 83 years (median: 75.5 years). Of the four cases, three presented with a slowly progressive erythematous rash disseminated mainly on the thorax and abdomen, with a lesser degree on the extremities. The time between onset of rash until the diagnosis ranged from 5 to 16 months (median: 7 months). Only one case had direct contact with armadillos (blood exposure). Non of these patients had a history of immunosuppression. The most common symptoms were neuropathic pain (n=2), generalized pruritus (n=2) and loss of sensation in extremities (n=2). One case had severe peripheral neuropathy with muscle weakness, atrophy in left arm, and wasting on left hand. Skin biopsies showed diffuse granulomatous infiltrate with foamy histiocytes along with acid fast bacilli by Fite stain. By Ridley-Jopling classification system, three cases were diagnosis as lepromatous leprosy, and one, borderline lepromatous. Treatment included clofazimine, dapsone and rifampin that was offered free of charge by the National Hansen's Diseases Program, Baton Rouge, L.A. One patient did not tolerate therapy. In conclusion, a slowly progressive disseminated erythematous skin rash on the trunk should raise suspicion for leprosy in the elderly population in south MS. PMID:26434167

  7. The influence of model resolution on ozone in industrial volatile organic compound plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Barron H; Jeffries, Harvey E; Kim, Byeong-Uk; Vizuete, William G

    2010-09-01

    Regions with concentrated petrochemical industrial activity (e.g., Houston or Baton Rouge) frequently experience large, localized releases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Aircraft measurements suggest these released VOCs create plumes with ozone (O3) production rates 2-5 times higher than typical urban conditions. Modeling studies found that simulating high O3 productions requires superfine (1-km) horizontal grid cell size. Compared with fine modeling (4-kmin), the superfine resolution increases the peak O3 concentration by as much as 46%. To understand this drastic O3 change, this study quantifies model processes for O3 and "odd oxygen" (Ox) in both resolutions. For the entire plume, the superfine resolution increases the maximum O3 concentration 3% but only decreases the maximum Ox concentration 0.2%. The two grid sizes produce approximately equal Ox mass but by different reaction pathways. Derived sensitivity to oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and VOC emissions suggests resolution-specific sensitivity to NOx and VOC emissions. Different sensitivity to emissions will result in different O3 responses to subsequently encountered emissions (within the city or downwind). Sensitivity of O3 to emission changes also results in different simulated O3 responses to the same control strategies. Sensitivity of O3 to NOx and VOC emission changes is attributed to finer resolved Eulerian grid and finer resolved NOx emissions. Urban NOx concentration gradients are often caused by roadway mobile sources that would not typically be addressed with Plume-in-Grid models. This study shows that grid cell size (an artifact of modeling) influences simulated control strategies and could bias regulatory decisions. Understanding the dynamics of VOC plume dependence on grid size is the first step toward providing more detailed guidance for resolution. These results underscore VOC and NOx resolution interdependencies best addressed by finer resolution. On the basis of these results, the

  8. Hurricane Katrina-related maternal stress, maternal mental health, and early infant temperament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tees, Michael T; Harville, Emily W; Xiong, Xu; Buekens, Pierre; Pridjian, Gabriella; Elkind-Hirsch, Karen

    2010-07-01

    To investigate temperament in infants whose mothers were exposed to Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath, and to determine if high hurricane exposure is associated with difficult infant temperament. A prospective cohort study of women giving birth in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, LA (n = 288) in 2006-2007 was conducted. Questionnaires and interviews assessed the mother's experiences during the hurricane, living conditions, and psychological symptoms, 2 months and 12 months postpartum. Infant temperament characteristics were reported by the mother using the activity, adaptability, approach, intensity, and mood scales of the Early Infant and Toddler Temperament Questionnaires, and "difficult temperament" was defined as scoring in the top quartile for three or more of the scales. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between hurricane experience, mental health, and infant temperament. Serious experiences of the hurricane did not strongly increase the risk of difficult infant temperament (association with three or more serious experiences of the hurricane: adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63-3.58 at 2 months; 0.58, 0.15-2.28 at 12 months). Maternal mental health was associated with report of difficult infant temperament, with women more likely to report having a difficult infant temperament at 1 year if they had screened positive for PTSD (aOR 1.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-5.41), depression, (aOR 3.16, 95% CI 1.22-8.20) or hostility (aOR 2.17, 95% CI 0.81-5.82) at 2 months. Large associations between maternal stress due to a natural disaster and infant temperament were not seen, but maternal mental health was associated with reporting difficult temperament. Further research is needed to determine the effects of maternal exposure to disasters on child temperament, but in order to help babies born in the aftermath of disaster, the focus may need to be on the mother's mental health. PMID:19554438

  9. Zvezdnaja põl / Irina Zhubritskaja-Kesa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Zhubritskaja-Kesa, Irina

    2006-01-01

    Prantsuse maalikunstnikust Henri de Touluse-Lautrecist ja tema ühest lemmikmodellist Moulin Rouge'i tantsijannast La Goulue'st (kankaani looja Louise Weber). Kunstnik sai kuulsaks La Goulue'd kujutava Moulin Rouge'i reklaamplakatiga

  10. Formulasi Sediaan Pewarna Pipi Menggunakan Ekstrak Bunga Kecombrang (Etlingera elatior Jack) sebagai Pewarna

    OpenAIRE

    Ara, Iweni

    2015-01-01

    Rouge is a cosmetic preparation that is used to blush cheeks with an artistic touch to improve the aesthetics of makeup. Rouges are made in different of colors ranging from pink to dark red. Torch ginger flower contains anthocyanin providing red pigments. The purpose of this study was to formulate torch ginger flower extract (EtlingeraelatiorJack) as dye in solid rouge. The extract was prepared by maceration method using 96% ethanol that contained 5% citric acid. Rouge formula used torch g...

  11. 7 CFR 917.14 - District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... County, Yuba County, and Sierra County. (c) Sacramento River District includes and consists of Sacramento... the Sacramento River District, and that portion of Solano County not included in the Sacramento River..., Calaveras County, and Alpine County. (m) Stanislaus District includes and consists of Merced...

  12. Évolution des corps gras utilisés dans la formulation des rouges à lèvres au cours des quinze dernières années

    OpenAIRE

    de Clermont-Gallerande Hélène

    2006-01-01

    Cosmetic companies all consider the lipstick as an attractive product. It has indeed a strong image for trademarks and represents at the same time a product that customers can easilly afford. Women have been attracted by lipsticks for years, even though they have not noticed the chemical changes of its consistance over the times. The main country regulations, toxicological and industrial laws are presented, as well as their consequences towards the chemical conception of the lipstick. A quick...

  13. Évolution des corps gras utilisés dans la formulation des rouges à lèvres au cours des quinze dernières années

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Clermont-Gallerande Hélène

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetic companies all consider the lipstick as an attractive product. It has indeed a strong image for trademarks and represents at the same time a product that customers can easilly afford. Women have been attracted by lipsticks for years, even though they have not noticed the chemical changes of its consistance over the times. The main country regulations, toxicological and industrial laws are presented, as well as their consequences towards the chemical conception of the lipstick. A quick review of the evolution of the chemical formulas over the last 15 years is presented through examples that illustrate the biggest changes. To finish with, the most recent cosmetical formulas are mentioned.

  14. Nouvelle méthode de mesure in situ de paléovitesse de déformation - Application à la zone de cisaillement de l'Ailao Shan-Fleuve Rouge

    OpenAIRE

    Sassier, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    We developped a direct method to measure palaeo-strain rate from syntectonic dykes in the Ailao Shan-Red River strike slip shear zone. Our method combines 232Th/208Pb dating on monazites and quantification of deformation of these dykes. Strain rate measurements (≈ 3*10-14s-1) are one order of magnitude inferior to strain rates independantly estimated for the bulk shear zone. Quartz piezometer yield palaeo-stress estimates that allow to calculate strain rates inferring a power flow law. Compar...

  15. Effets d'une impulsion laser infra-rouge femtoseconde sur les micro-nanostructures des mineraux implications pour les analyses in-situ pa LA-ICP-MS

    OpenAIRE

    D' Abzac, François Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Infra Red femtosecond laser ablation coupled to Mass Spectrometry is a powerful tool for in-situ analysis of geological samples. Nevertheless, implications linked to this type of ablation are still not well defined. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) coupled to Focused Ion Beam milling (FIB) allows direct characterization of ablation damage and particles. Thus, IR-femtosecond laser ablation can be considered as stoechiometric and mainly photo-mechanical. Particles are generated by coalesc...

  16. Étude comparative du conte de Charles Perrault, « Le petit Chaperon rouge », en français et de deux traductions en espagnol. Problèmes de traduction et tendances constatées

    OpenAIRE

    Mertens Krumbach, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    La complejidad es seguramente lo que mejor define la traducción literaria en general y la traducción de la literatura infantil en concreto, de ahí la aparición de diversos trabajos de búsqueda sobre la teoría y la práctica de la traducción, que incluso han llevado al nacimiento de una nueva ciencia, la traductología. El cuento de Charles Perrault, “Le petit Chaperon rouge” (La Caperucita Roja), es el ejemplo mismo de una obra literaria para niños que ha dado la vuelta al mundo. Un análisis de...

  17. The red atom: the help of USSR to german scientists between 1945 and 1961; L'atome rouge: l'aide a l'Urss des savants allemands entre 1945 et 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andurand, R

    2009-01-15

    A part of history is told with the essential role played by German scientists between 1945 and 1961 in the acquisition by the Russians of nuclear weapons and their proliferation. This first sector resumes the life of Gustav Herz and Heinz Barwich. (N.C.)

  18. The red atom: the help to USSR of German scientists between 1945-1961;L'atome rouge: l'aide a l'Urss des savants allemands entre 1945-1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andurand, R.

    2010-03-15

    This article concludes the saga of German scientists who worked for the Soviets from 1945 to 1965 and helped them to fill in record time late they had on Americans. The last stage of this fascinating history is devoted to a comparative presentation of scientific and technological advances of France and the Soviet empire. (N.C.)

  19. The red atom: the help to USSR of German scientists between 1945-1961; L'atome rouge: l'aide a l'URSS des savants allemands entre 1945-1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andurand, R.

    2010-01-15

    In previous chapters has been exposed the saga of German scientists who worked for the Soviets from 1945 to 1965 and helped them to fill in record time the late that they had on Americans. However, without the help of German scientists, Russian scientists who were of an exceptional level would have succeeded anyway, but they would take the same time as the others for the same result. This article tells the uranium extraction by Belgians and the French organisation of uranium enrichment. The difficulties encountered by the French in relation with uranium hexafluoride enlighten the difficulties encountered by Russians and Germans on uranium enrichment that finally lead them to the uranium enrichment optimization. (N.C.)

  20. The red atom. The help of german scientists to USSR between 1945-1961; L'atome rouge. L'aide a l'Urss des savants allemands entre 1945-1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andurand, R

    2009-03-15

    In this issue is tackled the cooperation between German and Russian scientists in nuclear energy from 1945 to 1961 and especially about the uranium enrichment by gaseous diffusion of uranium hexafluoride in cascade. The problems they encountered and their solutions are related until the explosion of the first Russian atomic bomb even if it was not a bomb with enriched uranium but with plutonium got in a nuclear reactor. (N.C.)

  1. The red atom - the help to Russia of German scientists between 1945 - 1961; L'atome rouge - l'aide a l'Urss des savants allemands entre 1945-1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andurand, R

    2009-09-15

    The fifth chapter of the cooperation between German scientists and USSR from 1945 to 1961 is tackled in this issue. It treats how the german scientists were ostracized and then, their return to Germany. The returns began in 1954. The lives of Gustav Hertz, Heinz Barwich, Bruno Pontecorvo, klaus Fuchs, Manfred von Ardenne, Peter Adolf von Thiessen, Max Christian Theodor Steenbeck, Gernot Zippe, Max Vollmer, are in relation with the development of nuclear research where they brought their contribution. (N.C.)

  2. Chromospheric Variability: Analysis of 36 years of Time Series from the National Solar Observatory/Sacramento Peak Ca II K-line Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Keil, Stephen L.; Worden, Simon P.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of more than 36 years of time series of seven parameters measured in the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program elucidates five elucidates five components of the variation: (1) the solar cycle (period approx. 11 years), (2) quasi-periodic variations (periods approx 100 days), (3) a broad band stochastic process (wide range of periods), (4) rotational modulation, and (5) random observational errors. Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of the chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis illuminates periodic and quasi periodic signals, details of frequency modulation due to differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the rather complex harmonic structure (1) and (2) at time scales in the range approx 0.1 - 10 years. These results using only full-disk data further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced by NASA's Kepler observatory. Component (3) consists of variations over a range of timescales, in the manner of a 1/f random noise process. A timedependent Wilson-Bappu effect appears to be present in the solar cycle variations (1), but not in the stochastic process (3). Component (4) characterizes differential rotation of the active regions, and (5) is of course not characteristic of solar variability, but the fact that the observational errors are quite small greatly facilitates the analysis of the other components. The recent data suggest that the current cycle is starting late and may be relatively weak. The data analyzed in this paper can be found at the National Solar Observatory web site http://nsosp.nso.edu/cak_mon/, or by file transfer protocol at ftp://ftp.nso.edu/idl/cak.parameters.

  3. Flood-inundation map and water-surface profiles for floods of selected recurrence intervals, Consumnes River and Deer Creek, Sacramento County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Joel R.; Harmon, Jerry G.; McPherson, Kelly R.

    1998-01-01

    The damage caused by the January 1997 floods along the Cosumnes River and Deer Creek generated new interest in planning and managing land use in the study area. The 1997 floodflow peak, the highest on record and considered to be a 150-year flood, caused levee failures at 24 locations. In order to provide a technical basis for floodplain management practices, the U.S. Goelogical Survey, in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, completed a flood-inundation map of the Cosumnes River and Deer Creek drainage from Dillard Road bridge to State Highway 99. Flood frequency was estimated from streamflow records for the Cosumnes River at Michigan Bar and Deer Creek near Sloughhouse. Cross sections along a study reach, where the two rivers generally flow parallel to one another, were used with a step-backwater model (WSPRO) to estimate the water-surface profile for floods of selected recurrence intervals. A flood-inundation map was developed to show flood boundaries for the 100-year flood. Water-surface profiles were developed for the 5-, 10-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year floods.

  4. Method of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey California District Sacramento Laboratory?Determination of Trihalomethane Formation Potential, Method Validation, and Quality-Control Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Bush, Noel

    2004-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of the trihalomethane formation potential of water samples has been developed. The trihalomethane formation potential is measured by dosing samples with chlorine under specified conditions of pH, temperature, incubation time, darkness, and residual-free chlorine, and then analyzing the resulting trihalomethanes by purge and trap/gas chromatography equipped with an electron capture detector. Detailed explanations of the method and quality-control practices are provided. Method validation experiments showed that the trihalomethane formation potential varies as a function of time between sample collection and analysis, residual-free chlorine concentration, method of sample dilution, and the concentration of bromide in the sample.

  5. O recolhimento de Santo António do Sacramento de Torre de Moncorvo (1661–1814) : clausura e destinos femininos

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Maria Adília Bento Fernandes da

    2013-01-01

    A historiografia, que respeita aos estudos das mulheres, faz sobressair um arquétipo de feminilidade sustentado numa legitimação natural, religiosa e cientifica difícil de questionar. A esta legitimação subjaz o contributo das mulheres, determinante para a ordem social e moral. Confrontadas com esta específica contingência e aceites como um ser fraco e volúvel que pode pôr em causa tal contributo, elas vão estimular a fundação de instituições de assistência como os recolhimento...

  6. Simulace tvorby odtoku ve dvou geochemicky kontrastních povodích západních Čech modelem Sacramento (SAC-SMA)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krám, P.; Buchtele, Josef; Buchtelová, Marie

    Bratislava : Slovenský hydrometeorologický ústav, 2005, s. 173-178. ISBN 80-88907-53-5. [Hydrologické dni 2005. Bratislava (SK), 21.09.2005-23.09.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA205/03/0468 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/01/1135 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : hydrologic model * rainfall-runoff model ing * streamwater generation Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology

  7. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available -A. James Arnold, Michael Gilkes, The literate imagination: essays on the novels of Wilson Harris. London: Macmillan, 1989. xvi + 180 pp. -Jean Besson, John O. Stewart, Drinkers, drummers, and decent folk: ethnographic narratives of village Trinidad. Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1989. xviii + 230 pp. -Hymie Rubinstein, Neil Price, Behind the planter's back. London: MacMillan, 1988. xiv + 274 pp. -Robert Dirks, Joseph M. Murphy, Santería: an African religion in America. Boston: Beacon Press, 1988. xi + 189 pp. -A.J.R. Russell-Wood, Joseph C. Miller, Way of Death: merchant capitalism and the Angolan slave trade, 1720-1830. Madison, Wisconsin: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1988. xxx + 770 pp. -Anne Pérotin-Dumon, Lawrence C. Jennings, French reaction to British slave Emancipation. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1988. ix + 228 pp. -Mary Butler, Hilary McD. Beckles, White servitude and black slavery in Barbados, 1627-1715. Knoxville: University of Tennesse Press, 1989. xv + 218 pp. -Franklin W, Knight, Douglas Hall, In miserable slavery: Thomas Thistlewod in Jamaica, 1750-1786. London: MacMillan, 1989. xxi + 322 pp. -Ruby Hope King, Harry Goulbourne, Teachers, education and politics in Jamaica 1892-1972. London: Macmillan, 1988. x + 198 pp. -Mary Turner, Francis J. Osbourne S.J., History of the Catholic Church in Jamaica. Chicago: Loyola University Press, 1988. xi + 532 pp. -Christina A. Siracusa, Robert J. Alexander, Biographical dictionary of Latin American and Caribbean political leaders. New York, Westport, London: Greenwood Press, 1988. x + 509 pp. -Sue N. Greene, Brenda F. Berrian ,Bibliography of women writers from the Caribbean (1831-1986. Washington D.C.: Three Continents Press, 1989. 360 pp., Aart Broek (eds -Romain Paquette, Singaravélou, Pauvreté et développement dans les pays tropicaux, hommage a Guy Lasserre. Bordeaux: Centre d'Etudes de Géographie Tropicale-C.N.R.S./CRET-Institut de

  8. How does undergraduate college biology students' level of understanding, in regard to the role of the seed plant root system, relate to their level of understanding of photosynthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njeng'ere, James Gicheha

    This research study investigated how undergraduate college biology students' level of understanding of the role of the seed plant root system relates to their level of understanding of photosynthesis. This research was conducted with 65 undergraduate non-majors biology who had completed 1 year of biology at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge and Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond. A root probe instrument was developed from some scientifically acceptable propositional statements about the root system, the process of photosynthesis, as well as the holistic nature of the tree. These were derived from research reviews of the science education and the arboriculture literature. This was administered to 65 students selected randomly from class lists of the two institutions. Most of the root probe's items were based on the Live Oak tree. An in-depth, clinical interview-based analysis was conducted with 12 of those tested students. A team of root experts participated by designing, validating and answering the same questions that the students were asked. A "systems" lens as defined by a team of college instructors, root experts (Shigo, 1991), and this researcher was used to interpret the results. A correlational coefficient determining students' level of understanding of the root system and their level of understanding of the process of photosynthesis was established by means of Pearson's r correlation (r = 0.328) using the SAS statistical analysis (SAS, 1987). From this a coefficient of determination (r2 = 0.104) was determined. Students' level of understanding of the Live Oak root system (mean score 5.94) was not statistically different from their level of understanding of the process of photosynthesis (mean score 5.54) as assessed by the root probe, t (129) = 0.137, p > 0.05 one tailed-test. This suggests that, to some degree, level of the root system limits level of understanding of photosynthesis and vice versa. Analysis of quantitative and qualitative

  9. Tremors in the Bayou: The Events on the Napoleonville Salt Dome, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, W. L.; Horton, S.; Benz, H.; Hickman, S.; Leeds, A.; Leith, W. S.; Meremonte, M.; Rubinstein, J. L.; Withers, M. M.; Herrmann, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    Beginning in early June, 2012, an extended series of earth tremors were reported by residents of Bayou Corne in Assumption Parish, Louisiana, and at well control facilities on the nearby Napoleonville salt dome. The salt dome contains numerous caverns resulting from solution mining; some are used to store LPG and natural gas while others produce saltwater brine. Residents also reported natural gas bubbling at nearby locations in Bayou Corne and Grand Bayou. Some of the tremors were large enough to produce "cracks in sheet rock and foundations" (The Advocate, Baton Rouge, July 5, 2012). It was thus quite surprising to find that no earthquakes were detected in this region by either the USGS NEIC or the USArray Array Network Facility despite the presence of Transportable Array station 544A only 10 km from Bayou Corne. Careful inspection of the seismograms at 544A did reveal multiple events characterized by virtually no body wave energy and strong surface waves at the times of reported tremors. In response to a request for assistance from the State of Louisiana six temporary seismic stations with Trillium broad band sensors were deployed in the immediate epicentral region by the USGS and University of Memphis starting on July 12. Seismograms recorded by the temporary stations revealed a variable rate of tremor activity, with several hundred events registered on active days. Even at very close distance (S-P < 0.5 s) the body waves are weak and surface waves prominent, indicating a very shallow source depth. Precise location of the events is complicated by the presence of the high-seismic velocity and steep-sided Napoleonville salt dome that reaches to within 220 m of the surface and is overlain and surrounded by very low velocity sediments. Following several repositionings of the seismic network we have determined that the source region lies on the western edge of the salt dome top at very shallow depth and in the vicinity of an abandoned brine supply cavern. Tremor

  10. Using Fossil Shark Teeth to Illustrate Evolution and Introduce Basic Geologic Concepts in a High School Biology Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, J. G.; Nunn, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Shell Foundation sponsors a program at Louisiana State University called Shell Undergraduate Recruitment and Geoscience Education (SURGE). The purpose of SURGE is to help local high school science teachers incorporate geology into their classrooms by providing resources and training. As part of this program, a workshop for high school biology teachers was held at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge on June 3-5, 2007. We had the teachers do a series of activities on fossil shark teeth to illustrate evolution and introduce basic earth science concepts such as geologic time, superposition, and faunal succession and provided the teachers with lesson plans and materials. As an example, one of our exercises explores the evolution of the megatoothed shark lineage leading to Carcharocles megalodon, the largest predatory shark in history with teeth up to 17 cm long. Megatoothed shark teeth make excellent evolutionary subjects because they have a good fossil record and show continuous transitions in morphology from the Eocene to Pliocene. Our activity follows the learning cycle model. We take advantage of the curiosity of sharks shared by most people, and allow students to explore the variations among different shark teeth and explain the causes of those variations. The objectives of this exercise are to have the students: 1) sort fossil shark teeth into biologically reasonable species; 2) form hypotheses about evolutionary relationships among fossil shark teeth; and 3) describe and interpret evolutionary trends in the fossil Megatoothed lineage. To do the activity, students are divided into groups of 2-3 and given a shuffled set of 72 shark tooth cards with different images of megatoothed shark teeth. They are instructed to group the shark tooth cards into separate species of sharks. After sorting the cards, students are asked to consider the evolutionary relationships among their species and arrange their species chronologically according to the species first

  11. LaURGE: Louisiana Undergraduate Recruitment and Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, J. A.; Agnew, J.

    2009-12-01

    NSF and the Shell Foundation sponsor a program called Louisiana Undergraduate Recruitment and Geoscience Education (LaURGE). Goals of LaURGE are: 1) Interweave geoscience education into the existing curriculum; 2) Provide teachers with lesson plans that promote interest in geoscience, critical thinking by students, and are consistent with current knowledge in geoscience; and 3) Provide teachers with supplies that make these lessons the highlights of the course. Biology workshops were held at LSU in Baton Rouge and Centenary College in Shreveport in July 2009. 25 teachers including 5 African-Americans attended the workshops. Teachers were from public and private schools in seven different parishes. Teacher experience ranged from 3 years to 40 years. Courses impacted are Biology, Honors Biology, AP Biology, and Environmental Science. The workshops began with a field trip to Mississippi to collect fossil shark teeth and create a virtual field trip. After the field trip, teachers do a series of activities on fossil shark teeth to illustrate evolution and introduce basic concepts such as geologic time, superposition, and faunal succession. Teachers were also given a $200 budget from which to select fossils for use in their classrooms. One of our exercises explores the evolution of the megatoothed shark lineage leading to Carcharocles megalodon, the largest predatory shark in history with teeth up to 17 cm long. Megatoothed shark teeth have an excellent fossil record and show continuous transitions in morphology from the Eocene to Pliocene. We take advantage of the curiosity of sharks shared by most people, and allow teachers to explore the variations among different shark teeth and to explain the causes of those variations. Objectives are to have teachers (and their students): 1) sort fossil shark teeth into biologically reasonable species; 2) form hypotheses about evolutionary relationships; and 3) describe and interpret evolutionary trends in the fossil Megatoothed

  12. Experimental Evaluation of Permeability in Wellbore Cements under Elevated Temperatue, Pressure and Salinity Using a Liquid Pressure-Pulse Decay Permeameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, K.; Radonjic, M.

    2013-12-01

    Kolawole Bello (kbello1@tigers.lsu.edu) and Mileva Radonjic (mileva@lsu.edu), Craft and Hawkins Department of Petroleum Engineering, 2131 Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 Geopressured reservoirs in the northern Gulf of Mexico basin along the coast of Louisiana have been determined to be viable source of geothermal energy and also for carbon sequestration. These reservoirs are made of unconsolidated sandstone capped by shale layers and possess temperatures as high as 140°C. In addition, high salinities of 100 g/L are associated with these reservoirs due to the dissolution of surrounding salt domes. In production of geothermal reservoir, cementing cost accounts for 50% of total costs unlike in oil and gas wells where cementing cost is approximately 15%. This difference in cost is caused by the difference in fluid chemistry. In this project, we propose in-situ harvesting of heat energy resulting in differential temperature across the cement. As a result of thermal loading, hydrated cement fractures. In addition, leaching occurs in wellbore cements when exposed to pH less than 13 causing an increase in permeability. This consequently leads to lack of zonal isolation and compromises the mechanical integrity of the cement. This study provides ways of evaluating wellbore cements under conditions experienced in geopressured reservoirs. For the first time, we have state of the art equipment capable of measuring brine permeability of cement using Liquid Pressure-pulse Decay Permeameter (PDPL). Under in-situ confining pressure, brine permeability is more accurate than gas permeability due to the decrease in pore throat diameter. PDPL provides an efficient and accurate way of measuring brine permeability in low permeability materials at reservoir temperature and pressure. This permeability is function of pressure decay over time. Permeability measurements were taken before and after cyclic thermal loading of cement cores at

  13. Don’t drop the patient: teamwork for cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daksha Patel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of a team is to work together towards a common goal. On an athletics track, relay race teams run with a baton that is passed from one team member to another, without breaking the pace. If the baton is dropped, the team is disqualified.

  14. Don't drop the patient: teamwork for cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Daksha Patel; Sally Crook

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of a team is to work together towards a common goal. On an athletics track, relay race teams run with a baton that is passed from one team member to another, without breaking the pace. If the baton is dropped, the team is disqualified.

  15. Revisiting Summarization Evaluation for Scientific Articles

    OpenAIRE

    Cohan, Arman; Goharian, Nazli

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of text summarization approaches have been mostly based on metrics that measure similarities of system generated summaries with a set of human written gold-standard summaries. The most widely used metric in summarization evaluation has been the ROUGE family. ROUGE solely relies on lexical overlaps between the terms and phrases in the sentences; therefore, in cases of terminology variations and paraphrasing, ROUGE is not as effective. Scientific article summarization is one such cas...

  16. Kino plaadimasinas / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    Areeni muusikakriitikud kuulavad filmimuusika heliplaate: "O Brother, Where Art Thou?", "The Royal Tenenbaums", "Amelie From Montmartre", "Moulin Rouge", "Training Day", "Mulholland Drive", "Ocean's 11"

  17. 76 FR 44535 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Northern Sierra Air Quality Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Management District, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District, and South Coast Air Quality... proposing to approve revisions to the Northern Sierra Air Quality Management District (NSAQMD), Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD), and South Coast Air Quality Management District......

  18. 76 FR 44493 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Northern Sierra Air Quality Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Management District, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District, and South Coast Air Quality... taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Northern Sierra Air Quality Management District (NSAQMD), Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD), and South Coast Air...

  19. 78 FR 21582 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Butte County Air Quality Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Butte County Air Quality Management District and Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District AGENCY: Environmental... County Air Quality Management District (BCAQMD) and Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

  20. La mesure du danger

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, B R

    2013-01-01

    Que signifie l’expression «l’espèce est menacée et figure sur la Liste rouge»? Le présent article se propose d’expliquer la mesure du degré de menace à l’exemple de la Liste rouge des amphibiens de 2005.

  1. Cracking efficiency, quality and service problems- explain in detail of Beijing Union Medical College Hospital "performance Baton"%破解效率、质量与服务难题——详解北京协和医院"绩效指挥棒"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段文利; 史真真; 邢培正

    2009-01-01

    @@ 日前,北京协和医院公布了2009年上半年综合绩效考核结果,各项业绩指标呈现良好态势;门诊量比去年同期增长10%,出院人数增长16.3%,手术量增长18%,平均住院日下降0.9天,病人满意度进一步提升,医疗投诉率持续走低.

  2. Method of Analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey California District Sacramento Laboratory-- Determination of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Water by High Temperature Catalytic Oxidation, Method Validation, and Quality-Control Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Susan M.; Fram, Miranda S.; Crepeau, Kathryn L.

    2003-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of dissolved organic carbon concentration in water samples. This method includes the results of the tests used to validate the method and the quality-control practices used for dissolved organic carbon analysis. Prior to analysis, water samples are filtered to remove suspended particulate matter. A Shimadzu TOC-5000A Total Organic Carbon Analyzer in the nonpurgeable organic carbon mode is used to analyze the samples by high temperature catalytic oxidation. The analysis usually is completed within 48 hours of sample collection. The laboratory reporting level is 0.22 milligrams per liter.

  3. Mosquito Management on National Wildlife Refuges, Ecosystem Effects Study. Phase II, Part 1 - Effects of Ultra Low Volume Applications of Pyrethrin, Malathion and Permethrin on Macro-Invertebrates in the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Mosquito control districts often use ultra-low volume (ULV) applications of insecticides to control adult mosquitoes. Few field studies have tested the effects of...

  4. A Irmandade do Santíssimo Sacramento de Caneças na transição da monarquia constitucional para a républica: impacte da revolução republicana nas sociabilidades religiosas

    OpenAIRE

    Morgado, Fátima Cristima Castelo

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The present work aims to study the impact of religious confrontation provoked by the establishment of the Republic on the safekeeping and maintenance of the sociability of the rural community religious by the Caneças Brotherhood of Blessed Sacrament. For the case study, the normative influence is analyzed, namely the Law on the Separation of State from Churches, April 20, 1911, in the vitality of the Brotherhood. The aim is to understand the influence of the Law in the legal reco...

  5. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected, natural color 6" orthoimagery sacramento urban area public domain, Published in 2006, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, US Geological Survey.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of...

  6. Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.

    1997-01-01

    Work is being done at three universities to help today's NASA engineers use the knowledge and experience of their Apolloera predecessors in designing liquid rocket engines. Ground-breaking work is being done in important subject areas to create a prototype of the most important functions for the Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS). The goal of RENS is to develop an interactive, realtime application that engineers can utilize for comprehensive preliminary propulsion system design functions. RENS will employ computer science and artificial intelligence research in knowledge acquisition, computer code parallelization and objectification, expert system architecture design, and object-oriented programming. In 1995, a 3year grant from the NASA Lewis Research Center was awarded to Dr. Douglas Moreman and Dr. John Dyer of Southern University at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to begin acquiring knowledge in liquid rocket propulsion systems. Resources of the University of West Florida in Pensacola were enlisted to begin the process of enlisting knowledge from senior NASA engineers who are recognized experts in liquid rocket engine propulsion systems. Dr. John Coffey of the University of West Florida is utilizing his expertise in interviewing and concept mapping techniques to encode, classify, and integrate information obtained through personal interviews. The expertise extracted from the NASA engineers has been put into concept maps with supporting textual, audio, graphic, and video material. A fundamental concept map was delivered by the end of the first year of work and the development of maps containing increasing amounts of information is continuing. Find out more information about this work at the Southern University/University of West Florida. In 1996, the Southern University/University of West Florida team conducted a 4day group interview with a panel of five experts to discuss failures of the RL10 rocket engine in conjunction with the Centaur launch vehicle. The

  7. Finding Trapped Miners by Using a Prototype Seismic Recording System Made from Music-Recording Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this project was to use off-the-shelf music recording equipment to build and test a prototype seismic system to listen for people trapped in underground chambers (mines, caves, collapsed buildings). Previous workers found that an array of geophones is effective in locating trapped miners; displaying the data graphically, as well as playing it back into an audio device (headphones) at high speeds, was found to be effective for locating underground tapping. The desired system should record the data digitally to allow for further analysis, be capable of displaying the data graphically, allow for rudimentary analysis (bandpass filter, deconvolution), and allow the user to listen to the data at varying speeds. Although existing seismic reflection systems are adequate to record, display and analyze the data, they are relatively expensive and difficult to use and do not have an audio playback option. This makes it difficult for individual mines to have a system waiting on the shelf for an emergency. In contrast, music recording systems, like the one I used to construct the prototype system, can be purchased for about 20 percent of the cost of a seismic reflection system and are designed to be much easier to use. The prototype system makes use of an ~$3,000, 16-channel music recording system made by Presonus, Inc., of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Other manufacturers make competitive systems that would serve equally well. Connecting the geophones to the recording system required the only custom part of this system - a connector that takes the output from the geophone cable and breaks it into 16 microphone inputs to be connected to the music recording system. The connector took about 1 day of technician time to build, using about $300 in off-the-shelf parts. Comparisons of the music recording system and a standard seismic reflection system (A 24-channel 'Geode' system manufactured by Geometrics, Inc., of San Jose, California) were carried out at two locations. Initial

  8. The LIFE Cognition Study: design and baseline characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sink KM

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Kaycee M Sink,1 Mark A Espeland,2 Julia Rushing,2 Cynthia M Castro,3 Timothy S Church,4 Ronald Cohen,5 Thomas M Gill,6 Leora Henkin,2 Janine M Jennings,7 Diana R Kerwin,8 Todd M Manini,5 Valerie Myers,9 Marco Pahor,5 Kieran F Reid,10 Nancy Woolard,1 Stephen R Rapp,11 Jeff D Williamson1 On behalf of LIFE Investigators 1Department of Internal Medicine, Section on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, Sticht Center on Aging, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 2Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 3Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 4Pennington Biomedical, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA; 5Institute on Aging and Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 6Yale School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 7Department of Psychology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 8Texas Alzheimer’s and Memory Disorders, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, TX, USA; 9Klein Buendel, Inc., Golden, CO, USA; 10Nutrition, Exercise Physiology and Sarcopenia Laboratory, Jean Mayer United States Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA; 11Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Observational studies have shown beneficial relationships between exercise and cognitive function. Some clinical trials have also demonstrated improvements in cognitive function in response to moderate–high intensity aerobic exercise; however, these have been limited by relatively small sample sizes and short durations. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE Study is the largest and longest randomized controlled clinical trial of physical activity with cognitive outcomes, in older sedentary

  9. Quantifying late Pleistocene lithospheric flexure and fault movements in the Mississippi Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z.; Tornqvist, T. E.; Dawers, N. H.; Gasparini, N. M.; Milne, G. A.; Mauz, B.

    2011-12-01

    It is well known that a significant portion of the Mississippi Delta (MD) land surface is subsiding at rates on the order of a centimeter per year. Several recent studies have argued that lithospheric flexure due to sediment loading in the MD and fault movements in southeast Louisiana induce as much as ~6 mm/yr of subsidence, and therefore would be major driving forces of land-surface subsidence in the MD. However, geological rates of lithospheric flexure and fault movements have rarely been quantified. In this study, we quantify geological rates of these two processes in and near the MD by means of quartz optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of late Pleistocene sediments. Lithospheric flexure is quantified by studying long profiles of the Lower Mississippi River (LMR). Recent OSL dating of the Prairie Complex strata in the Lower Mississippi Valley (LMV) and MD identified segments of ~80 ka (MIS 5a) old LMR remnants. Comparing the reconstructed MIS 5a LMR long profile with the present-day long profile demonstrates that the former has been deformed due to lithospheric flexure associated with MD sediment loading, featuring uplift in the southern LMV and down-warping in the MD. Using the present-day long profile as a proxy for deformation of the MIS 5a long profile, the bulge in the southern LMV exhibits an average uplift rate of <0.15 mm/yr, whereas most of the MD north of 29.6°N has subsided <0.4 mm/yr on average during the past 80 ka. Farther south, where the Prairie Complex occurs 100 to 150 m below present-day sea level, subsidence rates due to lithospheric flexure may be up to 1 to 2 mm/yr. The half-wavelength of the flexural bulge in the LMV suggests a minimum elastic thickness of the lithosphere for this region of ~60 km. Fault movements were quantified at four locations along the Baton Rouge fault zone (BRFZ) in southeast Louisiana. Geomorphic and stratigraphic studies were used to identify fault-displaced strata that were subsequently OSL dated

  10. Water use and quality of fresh surface-water resources in the Barataria-Terrebonne Basins, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Thibaut, Penny M.; Demcheck, Dennis K.; Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Ensminger, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    from the herbicide atrazine and excessive nutrients. Atrazine concentrations in the Mississippi River at Baton Rouge briefly exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level of 3.0 micrograms per liter during periods in the late spring and early summer. Trace metals in bottom material collected from Bayou Lafourche indicate that the reach of Bayou Lafourche from Donaldsonville to Golden Meadow is adversely affected by low-level contamination. Dissolved nitrate had a mean concentration of 1.4 milligrams per liter in the Mississippi River near Bayou Lafourche and can contribute to excessive plant growth. Long-term salinity records near Bayou Lafourche indicate no pronounced trends, with the exception of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway at Houma. At this site, salinities remained low until 1961, when the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway was connected to the Gulf of Mexico by the Houma Navigation Canal. The sources of saltwater are variable. Some saltwater has entered Bayou Lafourche south of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway; at other times saltwater has moved up the Houma Navigation Canal and has flowed east in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, north into Company Canal, and southeast in Bayou Lafourche towards Larose, Louisiana.

  11. A geomorphic approach to the analysis of bedload and bed morphology of the Lower Mississippi River near the Old River Control Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Richard L.; Latrubesse, Edgardo M.

    2016-09-01

    The Mississippi River is the ultimate single-thread meandering river. Five hundred kilometers upstream from its mouth, about 25% of the river's discharge and sediment load is diverted into the Atchafalaya River. This diversion is controlled by the Old River Control Structure (ORCS), built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) in stages since 1961, to stop the avulsion of the Mississippi River into the Atchafalaya. The effects of ORCS on sediment and water discharge and geomorphic change to the Lower Mississippi River (LMR) channel are not yet completely understood and require placing the river into a geomorphic context, first classifying the channel into similar categories before evaluating change. The objectives of this study are to estimate the LMR bedload, develop and apply a geomorphic classification of the LMR near the ORCS, and explore geomorphic change within the classified areas. We studied a 115-km-long stretch between ORCS and Baton Rouge that is highly impacted by engineering. We used six sets of bathymetric multibeam echosounder surveys conducted by the USACE, multitemporal cartographies, and a field survey supported by multibeam echosounder bathymetry, acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements, sediment samples collection, and geomorphic observations. A three-dimensional method for estimating bedload from time-elapsed bathymetric surveys was developed and applied on seven sets of time-elapsed surveys downstream from ORCS from 2010, 2011, and 2012. We estimate that the fraction of bedload as a percentage of total sand load between 2003 and 2011 was 13.2%. A bedform classification scheme, based on bedform height, was developed. The bed was almost completely mantled by sandy bedforms above the - 24-m isoline. The studied reach was divided into ten zones according to four geomorphic types based on channel planform, geologic controls, presence of islands, and other morphometric parameters. These zones were shown to be physically distinct

  12. Promoting physical activity for elders with compromised function: the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE Study physical activity intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejeski WJ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available W Jack Rejeski,1 Robert Axtell,2 Roger Fielding,3 Jeffrey Katula,1 Abby C King,4 Todd M Manini,5 Anthony P Marsh,1 Marco Pahor,5 Alvito Rego,6 Catrine Tudor-Locke,7 Mark Newman,8 Michael P Walkup,9 Michael E Miller9  On behalf of the LIFE Study Investigator Group 1Department of Health and Exercise Science, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, 2Exercise Science Department, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT, 3Nutrtion, Exercise Physiology, and Sarcopenia Laboratory, Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, 4Department of Health Research and Policy and Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, 5Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 6Department of Internal Medicine, Northwestern School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, 7Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, 8Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 9Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Division of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE Study is a Phase III randomized controlled clinical trial (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01072500 that will provide definitive evidence regarding the effect of physical activity (PA on major mobility disability in older adults (70–89 years old who have compromised physical function. This paper describes the methods employed in the delivery of the LIFE Study PA intervention, providing insight into how we promoted adherence and monitored the fidelity of treatment. Data are presented on participants' motives and self-perceptions at the onset of the trial along with accelerometry data on patterns of PA during exercise training. Prior to the onset of training, 31.4% of

  13. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    1990-07-01

    and the United States: national stereotypes and the literary imagination. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1988. xv + 152 pp. -Evelyne Huber, Michel-Rolph Trouillot, Haiti: state against nation: the origins and legacy of Duvalierism. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1990. 282 pp. -Leon-Francois Hoffman, Alfred N. Hunt, Hiati's influence on Antebellum America: slumbering volcano of the Caribbean. Baton Rouge and London: Louisiana State University Press, 1988. xvi + 196 pp. -Brenda Gayle Plummer, David Healy, Drive to hegemony: the United States in the Caribbean, 1898-1917. Madison, Wisconsin: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1988. xi + 370 pp. -Anthony J. Payne, Jorge Heine ,The Caribbean and world politics: cross currents and cleavages. New York and London: Holmes and Meier Publishers, Inc., 1988. ix + 385 pp., Leslie Manigat (eds -Anthony P. Maingot, Jacqueline Anne Braveboy-Wagner, The Caribbean in world affairs: the foreign policies of the English-speaking states. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1989. vii + 244 pp. -Edward M. Dew, H.F. Munneke, De Surinaamse constitutionele orde. Nijmegen, The Netherlands: Ars Aequi Libri, 1990. v + 120 pp. -Charles Rutheiser, O. Nigel Bolland, Colonialism and resistance in Belize: essays in historical sociology. Benque Viejo del Carmen, Belize: Cubola Productions / Institute of Social and Economic Research / Society for the Promotion of Education and Research, 1989. ix + 218 pp. -Ken I. Boodhoo, Selwyn Ryan, Trinidad and Tobago: the independence experience, 1962-1987. St. Augustine, Trinidad: ISER, 1988. xxiii + 599 pp. -Alan M. Klein, Jay Mandle ,Grass roots commitment: basketball and society in Trinidad and Tobago. Parkersburg, Iowa: Caribbean Books, 1988. ix + 75 pp., Joan Mandle (eds -Maureen Warner-Lewis, Reinhard Sander, The Trinidad Awakening: West Indian literature of the nineteen-thirties. Westport: Greenwood Press, 1988. 168 pp.

  14. Formulasi Sediaan Pewarna Pipi Dalam Bentuk Padat Dengan Menggunakan Ekstrak Bunga Belimbing Wuluh (Averrhoa)

    OpenAIRE

    Fahraint, Izafella

    2014-01-01

    Rouge is a kind of cosmetic that used for coloring cheek with artistic touch so it can improve the aesthetics of make up. Rouge are made on various colors from pink to dark red. Belimbing wuluhs flower contains of antocyanin pigment which produce is red color. The objective of this observation was to make the rouge in a solid form using belimbing wuluh flower (Ai -errhoa bi/imbi L.) extract as a colourant. Extract was made by macerating 500 g belimbing wuluh flower using 96% ethanol which ...

  15. Group Chemical Changes and Physical Property Correlations in Refining of Lube Base Stocks. Ir and Nmr Spectroscopy Corrélations entre les propriétés physiques et les changements de composition chimique au cours du raffinage des huiles de base. Spectrométrie infra rouge et résonance magnétique nucléaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh H.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes occurring in the chemical composition of lubricating oil base stocks with different degreeand typeof refining have been investigated by IR and NMR spectroscopy. Significant conclusions about the chemical composition have been reached through the study of structural parameters. Correlations between molecular parameters such as aromaticity , average number of carbon atoms per alkyl substituentand the Viscosity Indexof base oils are reported. The term degree of refininghas been assigned a quantitative value in combination with the VI to denote the progressive refining of raw lube distillates to base stocks. Les modifications de la composition chimique d'huiles lubrifiantes au cours de divers type de raffinage à des degrés variables de sévérité sont étudiées par spectrométries IR et RMN. L'étude des paramètres structuraux aboutit à des conclusions significatives sur la composition chimique. Des corrélations entre l'indice de viscosité et des paramètres structuraux tels que l'aromaticité et le nombre moyen d'atomes de carbone par substituant alkyl sont dégagées. On attribue au terme degré de raffinage une valeur quantitative - combiné avec l'indice de viscosité pour signifier le raffinage progressif de distillats bruts en huiles de base.

  16. Group Chemical Changes and Physical Property Correlations in Refining of Lube Base Stocks. Ir and Nmr Spectroscopy Corrélations entre les propriétés physiques et les changements de composition chimique au cours du raffinage des huiles de base. Spectrométrie infra rouge et résonance magnétique nucléaire

    OpenAIRE

    Singh H.; Gulati I. B.

    2006-01-01

    Changes occurring in the chemical composition of lubricating oil base stocks with different degreeand typeof refining have been investigated by IR and NMR spectroscopy. Significant conclusions about the chemical composition have been reached through the study of structural parameters. Correlations between molecular parameters such as aromaticity , average number of carbon atoms per alkyl substituentand the Viscosity Indexof base oils are reported. The term degree of refininghas been assigned ...

  17. Concept and measure of improved equity: attempt of implementation to the 'blue-white-red' tariff option of EDF; Concept et mesure d'equite amelioree: tentative d'application a l'option tarifaire ''bleu-blanc-rouge'' d'EDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezzina, J. [Montpellier-1 Unirv. Faculte des Sciences Economiques, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Droit de l' Energie - ATER - CREDEN, 34 (France)

    1997-12-01

    The issue of cross-subsidies and cost allocation practices concerns a large part of debates facing the deregulation of electric public utilities. The first aim of this paper is to deal with the regulation of an electric multi-product monopoly in association with equity and efficiency dimensions. To this end, we develop a concept and measure of improved equity. From a practical point of view, we also try to compute improved equity measurement considering the case of EDF tariff for domestic customers. (author)

  18. The red atom. The help at USSR of German scientists between 1945 and 1961. how did USSR recover the nazi uranium; L'atome rouge. L'aide a l'Urss des savants allemands entre 1945 et 1961. Comment l'Urss a recupere l'uranium nazi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andurand, R

    2009-07-15

    In the previous chapters was exposed the saga of German scientists that worked for Soviet scientists from 1945 to 1961 and allowed these ones to make up for the delay in a record time they had on the American people. However, without the help of German scientists, that were at exceptional level they would succeed regardless but they would take the same time than the others ones to reach the same result. To be complete, one should, in this fourth chapter, precise how the Soviet people succeeded to recover the uranium from the nazi nuclear programme. (N.C.)

  19. Mitmekesine, mitmel viisil kesine / Ly Lestberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lestberg, Ly, 1965-

    2004-01-01

    Arvustus: Robbe-Grillet, Alain. Džinn : punane auk ebaühtlaste sillutuskivide vahel : moodsa aja lugemik = Djinn : un trou rouge entre les pavés disjoints / Heli Alliku tõlge. [Tallinn] : Valgus, 2004. (Homo ludens)

  20. [Raamat] / Tarmo Rajamets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rajamets, Tarmo, 1969-

    2004-01-01

    Tutvustus: Robbe-Grillet, Alain. Džinn : punane auk ebaühtlaste sillutuskivide vahel : moodsa aja lugemik = Djinn : un trou rouge entre les pavés disjoints / Heli Alliku tõlge. [Tallinn] : Valgus, 2004. (Homo ludens)

  1. Palm Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oil is obtained from the fruit of the oil palm tree. Palm oil is used for preventing vitamin ... de Palme Rouge, Huile de Palmiste, Main Ja, Oil Palm Tree, Palm, Palm Fruit Oil, Palm Kernel Oil, ...

  2. Investigation of Stainless Steel Corrosion in Ultrahigh-Purity Water and Steam Systems by Surface Analytical Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xia; Iacocca, Ronald G.; Bustard, Bethany L.; Kemp, Craig A. J.

    2010-02-01

    Stainless steel pipes with different degrees of rouging and a Teflon®-coated rupture disc with severe corrosion were thoroughly investigated by combining multiple surface analytical techniques. The surface roughness and iron oxide layer thickness increase with increasing rouge severity, and the chromium oxide layer coexists with the iron oxide layer in samples with various degrees of rouging. Unlike the rouging observed for stainless steel pipes, the fast degradation of the rupture disc was caused by a crevice corrosion environment created by perforations in the protective Teflon coating. This failure analysis clearly shows the highly corrosive nature of ultrapure water used in the manufacture of pharmaceutical products, and demonstrates some of the unexpected corrosion mechanisms that can be encountered in these environments.

  3. Dose to man from a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the request of the Sacramento Municipal Utilities District, we used our computer codes, MATHEW and ADPIC, to assess the environmental impact of a loss-of-coolant accident at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant, about 40 kilometres southeast of Sacramento, California. Meteorological input was selected so that the effluent released by the accident would be transported over the Sacramento metropolitan area. With the release rates provided by the Sacramento Municipal Utilities District, we calculated the largest total dose for a 24-hour release as 70 rem about one kilometre northwest of the reactor. The largest total dose in the Sacramento metropolitan area is 780 millirem. Both doses are from iodine-131, via the forage-cow-milk pathway to an infant's thyroid. The largest dose near the nuclear plant can be minimized by replacing contaminated milk and by giving the cows dry feed. To our knowledge, there are no milk cows within the Sacramento metropolitan area

  4. République de Djibouti : paysage de l'Ardoukôba

    OpenAIRE

    Pouyllau, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Paysage volcanique autour de l'Ardoukôba : vue générale vers l'Est depuis le sommet de l'un des trois cônes du volcan rouge Ardoukôba. Le volcan Ardoukôba est un volcan rouge actif de la région de Tadjourah. Il est né en 1978 et n'a connu qu'une éruption (du 7 au 14 nov. 1978).

  5. Self-Recognition by Toddlers with Williams Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    C. H Cashon

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The development of self-recognition is considered an important marker of cognitive development (Howe & Courage, 1997) and language development (Lewis & Ramsay, 2004) and may also be related to the development of empathy (Bishof-Kohler, 1988). Self-recognition is traditionally tested with the Rouge Task (Amsterdam, 1972) in which a child, after a spot of rouge was unobtrusively placed on his or her nose, is positioned in front of a mirror. Children who reach ...

  6. Chemistry of new particle growth in mixed urban and biogenic emissions – insights from CARES

    OpenAIRE

    Setyan, A.; C. Song; Merkel, M; W. B. Knighton; Onasch, T. B.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, D.R.; A. Wiedensohler; Shilling, J. E.; Zhang, Q

    2014-01-01

    Regional new particle formation and growth events (NPEs) were observed on most days over the Sacramento and western Sierra foothills area of California in June 2010 during the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effect Study (CARES). Simultaneous particle measurements at both the T0 (Sacramento, urban site) and the T1 (Cool, rural site located ~40 km northeast of Sacramento) sites of CARES indicate that the NPEs usually occurred in the morning with the appearance of an ultra...

  7. Chemistry of new particle growth in mixed urban and biogenic emissions – insights from CARES

    OpenAIRE

    Setyan, A.; C. Song; Merkel, M; W. B. Knighton; Onasch, T. B.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, D.R.; A. Wiedensohler; Shilling, J. E.; Zhang, Q

    2014-01-01

    Regional new particle formation and growth events (NPE) were observed on most days over the Sacramento and western Sierra Foothills area of California in June 2010 during the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effect Study (CARES). Simultaneous particle measurements at both the T0 (Sacramento, urban site) and the T1 (Cool, rural site located ~40 km northeast of Sacramento) sites of CARES indicate that the NPE usually occurred in the morning with the appearance of an ...

  8. 76 FR 60862 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... species. Applicant: Ivan Schwab, University of California, Department of Ophthalmology, Sacramento, CA... The following applicants each request a permit to import the sport- hunted trophy of one male...

  9. 75 FR 42747 - Smart Grid Update; Notice of Commissioner and Staff Attendance at FERC/NARUC Collaborative on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Smart Grid Update; Notice of Commissioner and Staff Attendance at FERC/NARUC Collaborative on Smart Response Meeting July 15, 2010. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives.../NARUC Collaborative on Smart Response: Sacramento Convention Center, 1400 J Street, Sacramento, CA...

  10. 75 FR 36109 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: California Department of Parks and Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... Notice of Inventory Completion (73 FR 20937-20939, April 17, 2008). In the collection, there are 24... Recreation, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given in... Recreation, Sacramento, CA, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C....

  11. 78 FR 21540 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Butte County Air Quality Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not... Management District and Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District AGENCY: Environmental... revisions to the Butte County Air Quality Management District (BCAQMD) and Sacramento Metropolitan...

  12. 77 FR 27475 - Announcement of Funding Awards; Choice Neighborhoods Grant Program for Fiscal Years (FY) 2010 and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... (project in San Francisco, Bayview neighborhood. CA), 720 Olive Street, Suite 2500, St. Louis, MO 63101.... Housing Authority of the City 242,500 George M. Reese Court; of Meridian, 2425 E Street, East End... Rivers; River of Sacramento, 801 12th District-Railyards Street, Sacramento, CA 95814- neighborhood....

  13. 40 CFR 52.993 - Emissions inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emissions inventories. 52.993 Section...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Louisiana § 52.993 Emissions inventories. (a) The Governor of the State of Louisiana submitted the 1990 base year emission inventories for the Baton...

  14. Britain needs a more proactive academic culture in which we reach out to the next generation of scholars

    OpenAIRE

    Ridge-Newman, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    In the run-up to the 2012 London Olympics, it seems timely to consider the ways in which we can also exercise the minds of our young people by passing on the academic baton of knowledge. Anthony Ridge-Newman discusses how creativity and collaboration make for fulfilling efforts in engaging the next generation of scholars.

  15. DU Yuzhou Delivered the Council's Work (2001-2011 )

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ting

    2011-01-01

    On November 11th, the Third Council Conference of the China National Textile and Apparel Council (CNTAC) was held in the city of Beijing. Mr. DU Yuzhou, now honorary president of China National Textile and Apparel Council, delivered the work report during the Council Conference before he relayed baton to his successor.

  16. 77 FR 24948 - BOST5 Hydroelectric LLC; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service List for a Programmatic Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Langley, Coushatta of Culture, Recreation & Tourism, P.O. Tribe of Louisiana, P.O. Box Box 44247, Baton... Department of Culture, Representative, U.S. Army Recreation & Tourism, P.O. Box 44247, Corps of Engineers..., including traditional cultural properties. If historic properties are identified within the motion,...

  17. 77 FR 24947 - BOST3 Hydroelectric LLC; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service List for a Programmatic Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Langley, Coushatta of Culture, Recreation & Tourism, P.O. Tribe of Louisiana, P.O. Box Box 44247, Baton... Department of Culture, Representative, U.S. Army Recreation & Tourism, P.O. Box 44247, Corps of Engineers..., including traditional cultural properties. If historic properties are identified within the motion,...

  18. Efficient Skyline Computation in Structured Peer-to-Peer Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cui, Bin; Chen, Lijiang; Xu, Linhao;

    2009-01-01

    skyline computation problem on a structured peer-to-peer network. In order to achieve low communication cost and quick response time, we utilize the iMinMax(\\theta ) method to transform high-dimensional data to one-dimensional value and distribute the data in a structured peer-to-peer network called BATON...

  19. 150 ans d’humanitaire, vus du CICR… et d’ailleurs

    OpenAIRE

    Pascal, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    En 2013, le Comité international de la Croix-Rouge fêtait ses 150 ans, tout comme le fera un an plus tard la Croix-Rouge française. Et en 2019, la Revue internationale de la Croix-Rouge en fera autant. Trois occasions de revenir sur le numéro spécial que cette dernière a publié en 2012 – CICR : 150 ans d’action humanitaire – en nous arrêtant sur deux contributions : celle de Paul Bouvier (« Soin humanitaire et petites choses dans des lieux déshumanisés », p. 359-373) et celle de Rony Brauman ...

  20. The Red Thread Linking China and France——Notes on Co-production of a Modern Dance Performance in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang; Qing

    2014-01-01

    <正>Jointly planned and sponsored by the CPAFFC and the Pavillon Rouge des Arts of France,The Red Thread(Le Fil Rouge),a musical and choreographic work was created and performed in China from April 16 to May 23.As one of the activities in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between China and France,this project was included in"Festival Croisements 2014"with strong support from the French Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs and Ministry of Culture,the French Embassy in China,