WorldWideScience

Sample records for baton rouge sacramento

  1. Energy Savings Calculations for Heat Island Reduction Strategies in Baton Rouge, Sacramento and Salt Lake City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.

    2000-03-01

    In 1997, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ''Heat Island Reduction Initiative'', to quantify the potential benefits of Heat Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., shade trees, reflective roofs, reflective pavements and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling energy use in buildings, lower the ambient air temperature and improve urban air quality in cities, and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Under this initiative, the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP) was created with the objective to investigate the potential of HIR strategies in residential and commercial buildings in three initial UHIPP cities: Baton Rouge, Sacramento and Salt Lake City. This paper summarizes our efforts to calculate the annual energy savings, peak power avoidance and annual C02 reduction of HIR strategies in the three initial cities. In this analysis, we focused on three building types that offer most savings potential: single-family residence, office and retail store. Each building type was characterized in detail by old or new construction and with a gas furnace or an electric heat pump. We defined prototypical building characteristics for each building type and simulated the impact of HIR strategies on building cooling and heating energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.IE model. Our simulations included the impact of (1) strategically-placed shade trees near buildings [direct effect], (2) use of high-albedo roofing material on building [direct effect], (3) combined strategies I and 2 [direct effect], (4) urban reforestation with high-albedo pavements and building surfaces [indirect effect] and (5) combined strategies 1, 2 and 4 [direct and indirect effects]. We then estimated the total roof area of air-conditioned buildings in each city using readily obtainable data to calculate the metropolitan-wide impact of HIR strategies. The results show, that in Baton Rouge, potential annual energy savings of $15M could be realized by

  2. Zoning, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the zoning boundaries of the East Baton Rouge Parish of the State of Louisiana. Zoning can be defined as the range of...

  3. Hydrography, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The Hydrography layer is an area geometry depicting the various water features that include the rivers, streams, creeks, lakes, etc of East Baton Rouge Parish.

  4. City Limits, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the polygon boundaries of the incorporated city limits of Baton Rouge, Baker, and Zachary within East Baton Rouge...

  5. Energy savings for heat-island reduction strategies in Chicago and Houston (including updates for Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.

    2002-02-28

    In 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ''Heat Island Reduction Initiative'' to quantify the potential benefits of Heat-Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., shade trees, reflective roofs, reflective pavements and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling-energy use in buildings, lower the ambient air temperature and improve urban air quality in cities, and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Under this initiative, the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP) was created with the objective of investigating the potential of HIR strategies in residential and commercial buildings in three initial UHIPP cities: Baton Rouge, LA; Sacramento, CA; and Salt Lake City, UT. Later two other cities, Chicago, IL and Houston, TX were added to the UHIPP. In an earlier report we summarized our efforts to calculate the annual energy savings, peak power avoidance, and annual CO2 reduction obtainable from the introduction of HIR strategies in the initial three cities. This report summarizes the results of our study for Chicago and Houston. In this analysis, we focused on three building types that offer the highest potential savings: single-family residence, office and retail store. Each building type was characterized in detail by vintage and system type (i.e., old and new building constructions, and gas and electric heat). We used the prototypical building characteristics developed earlier for each building type and simulated the impact of HIR strategies on building cooling- and heating-energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.1E model. Our simulations included the impact of (1) strategically-placed shade trees near buildings [direct effect], (2) use of high-albedo roofing material on the building [direct effect], (3) urban reforestation with high-albedo pavements and building surfaces [indirect effect] and (4) combined strategies 1, 2, and 3 [direct and indirect effects]. We then estimated the total roof area of air

  6. Energy savings for heat-island reduction strategies in Chicago and Houston (including updates for Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City); FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.

    2002-01-01

    In 1997, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ''Heat Island Reduction Initiative'' to quantify the potential benefits of Heat-Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., shade trees, reflective roofs, reflective pavements and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling-energy use in buildings, lower the ambient air temperature and improve urban air quality in cities, and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Under this initiative, the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP) was created with the objective of investigating the potential of HIR strategies in residential and commercial buildings in three initial UHIPP cities: Baton Rouge, LA; Sacramento, CA; and Salt Lake City, UT. Later two other cities, Chicago, IL and Houston, TX were added to the UHIPP. In an earlier report we summarized our efforts to calculate the annual energy savings, peak power avoidance, and annual CO2 reduction obtainable from the introduction of HIR strategies in the initial three cities. This report summarizes the results of our study for Chicago and Houston. In this analysis, we focused on three building types that offer the highest potential savings: single-family residence, office and retail store. Each building type was characterized in detail by vintage and system type (i.e., old and new building constructions, and gas and electric heat). We used the prototypical building characteristics developed earlier for each building type and simulated the impact of HIR strategies on building cooling- and heating-energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.1E model. Our simulations included the impact of (1) strategically-placed shade trees near buildings[direct effect], (2) use of high-albedo roofing material on the building[direct effect], (3) urban reforestation with high-albedo pavements and building surfaces[indirect effect] and (4) combined strategies 1, 2, and 3[direct and indirect effects]. We then estimated the total roof area of air-conditioned buildings in each

  7. Census Tracts & Block Groups, 2004, East Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the polygon boundaries of 107 semi-permanent census tracts and the census blocks within the Parish of East Baton Rouge....

  8. Metro Council Districts, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the polygon boundaries of the twelve (12) Metropolitan Council Districts within the Parish of East Baton Rouge. The...

  9. Case Study of Resilient Baton Rouge: Applying Depression Collaborative Care and Community Planning to Disaster Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Keegan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Addressing behavioral health impacts of major disasters is a priority of increasing national attention, but there are limited examples of implementation strategies to guide new disaster responses. We provide a case study of an effort being applied in response to the 2016 Great Flood in Baton Rouge. Methods: Resilient Baton Rouge was designed to support recovery after major flooding by building local capacity to implement an expanded model of depression collaborative care for adults, coupled with identifying and responding to local priorities and assets for recovery. For a descriptive, initial evaluation, we coupled analysis of documents and process notes with descriptive surveys of participants in initial training and orientation, including preliminary comparisons among licensed and non-licensed participants to identify training priorities. Results: We expanded local behavioral health service delivery capacity through subgrants to four agencies, provision of training tailored to licensed and non-licensed providers and development of advisory councils and partnerships with grassroots and government agencies. We also undertook initial efforts to enhance national collaboration around post-disaster resilience. Conclusion: Our partnered processes and lessons learned may be applicable to other communities that aim to promote resilience, as well as planning for and responding to post-disaster behavioral health needs.

  10. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey, Mississippi and Florida airborne survey: Baton Rouge quadrangle, Louisiana and Mississippi. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    The Baton Rouge quadrangle covers 8250 square miles in the Mississippi River delta area. The area overlies thick sections of the Gulf of Mexico Basin. Surficial exposures are dominated by Recent and Pleistocene sediment. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. A total of 87 uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly in this report. None were considered significant and all appear to relate to cultural features. Magnetic data appears to be in agreement with existing structural interpretations of the area

  11. Digital Mapping Techniques '05--Workshop Proceedings, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, April 24-27, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, David R.

    2005-01-01

    Intorduction: The Digital Mapping Techniques '05 (DMT'05) workshop was attended by more than 100 technical experts from 47 agencies, universities, and private companies, including representatives from 25 state geological surveys (see Appendix A). This workshop was similar in nature to the previous eight meetings, held in Lawrence, Kansas (Soller, 1997), in Champaign, Illinois (Soller, 1998), in Madison, Wisconsin (Soller, 1999), in Lexington, Kentucky (Soller, 2000), in Tuscaloosa, Alabama (Soller, 2001), in Salt Lake City, Utah (Soller, 2002), in Millersville, Pennsylvania (Soller, 2003), and in Portland, Oregon (Soller, 2004). This year's meeting was hosted by the Louisiana Geological Survey, from April 24-27, 2005, on the Louisiana State University campus in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. As in the previous meetings, the objective was to foster informal discussion and exchange of technical information. It is with great pleasure I note that the objective was successfully met, as attendees continued to share and exchange knowledge and information, and to renew friendships and collegial work begun at past DMT workshops. Each DMT workshop has been coordinated by the Association of American State Geologists (AASG) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Data Capture Working Group, which was formed in August 1996, to support the AASG and the USGS in their effort to build a National Geologic Map Database (see Soller and Berg, this volume, and http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/info/standards/datacapt/). The Working Group was formed because increased production efficiencies, standardization, and quality of digital map products were needed for the database?and for the State and Federal geological surveys?to provide more high-quality digital maps to the public. At the 2005 meeting, oral and poster presentations and special discussion sessions emphasized: 1) methods for creating and publishing map products (here, 'publishing' includes Web-based release); 2) field data capture software and

  12. Monitoring of fogwater chemistry in the gulf coast urban industrial corridor: Baton Rouge (louisiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, S; Ravikrishna, R; Kommalapati, R R; Valsaraj, K T

    2005-11-01

    Seventeen fog events were sampled in Baton Rouge, Louisiana during 2002-2004 as part of characterizing wet deposition by fogwater in the heavily industrialized corridor along the Louisiana Gulf Coast in the United States. These samples were analyzed for chemical characteristics such as pH, conductivity, total organic and inorganic carbon, total metals and the principal ion concentrations. The dominant ionic species in all samples were NH4+, NO3-, Cl- and SO4(2-). The pH of the fogwater sampled had a mean value of 6.7 with two cases of acidic pH of 4.7. Rainwater and fogwater pH were similar in this region. The acidity of fogwater was a result of NO3- but partly offset by high NH4+. The measured gaseous SO2 accounted for a small percentage of the observed sulfate concentration, indicating additional gas-to-particle conversion of SO2 to sulfate in fogwater. The gaseous NOx accounted for most of the dissolved nitrate and nitrite concentration in fogwater. The high chloride concentration was attributable to the degradation of chlorinated organics in the atmosphere. The metal composition was traced directly to soil-derived aerosol precursors in the air. The major metals observed in fogwater were Na, K, Ca, Fe, Al, Mg and Zn. Of these Na, K, Ca and Mg were predominant with mean concentrations > 100 microM. Al, Fe and Zn were present in the samples, at mean concentrations fogwaters, and these were shown to result from particulates (PM2.5) in the atmosphere. The contribution to both ions and metals from the marine sources in the Louisiana Gulf Coast was minimal. The concentrations of all principal ionic species and metals in fogwater were 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than in rainwater. Several linear alkane organic compounds were observed in the fogwater, representing the contributions from petroleum products at concentrations far exceeding their aqueous solubility. A pesticide (atrazine) was also observed in fogwater, representing the contribution from the agricultural

  13. Lessons learned from the post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on August 28 and September 18, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, Gulf States Utilities, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The purpose of the exercise was to examine the post-emergency roles, responsibilities, and resources of utility, State, local, Federal and insurance organizations in response to a hypothetical accident at the River Bend Station in Louisiana resulting in a significant release of radiation to the environment. In pursuit of this goal, five major focus areas were addressed: (1) ingestion pathway response; (2) reentry, relocation and return; (3) decontamination of recovery; (4) indemnification of financial losses; and (5) deactivation of the emergency response. This report documents the lessons learned from that exercise

  14. Airborne concentrations of benzene for dock workers at the ExxonMobil refinery and chemical plant, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA (1977-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widner, Thomas E; Gaffney, Shannon H; Panko, Julie M; Unice, Kenneth M; Burns, Amanda M; Kreider, Marisa; Marshall, J Ralph; Booher, Lindsay E; Gelat, Richard H; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2011-03-01

    Benzene is a natural constituent of crude oil and natural gas (0.1-3.0% by volume). Materials that are refined from crude oil and natural gas contain some residual benzene. Few datasets have appeared in the peer-reviewed literature characterizing exposures to benzene at specific refineries or during specific tasks. In this study, historical samples of airborne benzene collected from 1977-2005 at the ExxonMobil Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA, docks were evaluated. Workers were categorized into 11 job titles, and both non-task (≤180 min sample duration) and task-related (<180 min) benzene concentrations were assessed. Approximately 800 personal air samples (406 non-task and 397 task-related) were analyzed. Non-task samples showed that concentrations varied significantly across job titles and generally resulted from exposures during short-duration tasks such as tank sampling. The contractor - tankerman job title had the highest average concentration [N=38, mean 1.4 parts per million (ppm), standard deviation (SD) 2.6]. Task-related samples indicated that the highest exposures were associated with the disconnection of cargo loading hoses (N=134, mean 11 ppm, SD 32). Non-task samples for specific job categories showed that concentrations have decreased over the past 30 years. Recognizing the potential for benzene exposure, this facility has required workers to use respiratory protective equipment during selected tasks and activities; thus, the concentrations measured were likely greater than those that the employee actually experienced. This study provides a job title- and task-focused analysis of occupational exposure to benzene during dock facility operations that is insightful for understanding the Baton Rouge facility and others similar to it over the past 30 years.

  15. A Cultural Resources Survey of Arlington Revetment and LSU Berm Levee Improvement Item, East Baton Rouge Parish Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Light gm Slas 14 14 Lis Smm pmlew aumk Simm Milk glass 1 Modern brown glass I Olive glass _ Tin cm key 11 Shotg cartridge 1 Slate 1 Mortar 1 1 Piece of...Parish, Louisiana. Anthropological Report No. 1. Archaeological Survey and Antiquities Commission, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism , Baton

  16. Water-quality characteristics of urban storm runoff at selected sites in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, February 2006 through November 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, C. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Water samples were collected at three watersheds in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, during February 2006 through November 2009 for continued evaluation of urban storm runoff. The watersheds represented land uses characterized predominantly as established commercial, industrial, and residential. The following water-quality data are reported: physical and chemical-related properties, fecal coliform, nutrients, trace elements, and organic compounds. Results of water-quality analyses enabled calculation of event-mean concentrations and estimated annual contaminant loads and yields of storm runoff from nonpoint sources for 12 water-quality properties and constituents. Lead met or exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Level of 15 micrograms per liter for drinking water standards in 4 of 14 samples. Low level concentrations of mercury were detected in all 14 samples, and half were two to four times above the reporting limit of 0.02 micrograms per liter. The average dissolved phosphorus concentrations from each land use were two to four times the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency criterion of 0.05 milligrams per liter. Diazinon was detected in one sample at a concentration of 0.2 micrograms per liter. In the residential watershed, the largest at 216 acres, contaminant loads for 5 of the 12 water-quality properties and constituents were highest, with 4 of these being nutrients. The industrial watershed, 97 acres, had the highest contaminant loads for 6 of the 12 water-quality properties and constituents with 3 of these being metals, which is indicative of the type of land use. Zinc had the highest metal load (155 pounds per year) in the industrial watershed, compared to 36 pounds per year in the residential watershed, and 32 pounds per year in the established commercial watershed. The industrial watershed had the highest yields for 8 of the 12 water-quality properties and constituents, whereas the established commercial watershed had

  17. The influence of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the inflammatory cytokine response and protein expression in A549 cells exposed to PM2.5 collected in the Baton Rouge-Port Allen industrial corridor of Southeastern Louisiana in 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Brian; Owens, John Wesley

    2014-03-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita hit the coast of Louisiana in 2005 and killed more than 2000 people. The two storms resulted in a significant spike in particulate matter (PM2.5) levels across the state of Louisiana. This report focuses on PM2.5 samples collected in 2005 from two monitoring sites in the neighboring cities of Baton Rouge and Port Allen, Louisiana. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) revealed the presence of PM2.5-adsorbed representative and Fenton-active transition metals. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses revealed the presence of 23 PAH compounds. Endotoxins were also detected. Metals and endotoxins were extracted with water. PAH were extracted with dichloromethane. In order to assess cytotoxicity, aqueous PM2.5 extracts were introduced to A549 Human Epithelial Lung Carcinoma Cells. Results indicated decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, with an LC50 of 235 µg/ml and 250 µg/ml, respectively, for the two sites featured here. Endotoxins alone were not cytotoxic. The concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and released LDH activity increased following exposure of A549 cells to aqueous PM2.5 extracts. Fluorescence microscopy revealed apoptotic and necrotic cell death mechanisms. ELISA revealed increased secretion of primary pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α. Global PCR gene expression revealed up-regulation of proteins associated with the cytokine storm; e.g. interleukins, chemokines, and TNF-α. Global antibody microarray was consistent with an inflammatory response, with up-regulation of cytokines involved in the down-field activation of the caspase cascade and kinase pathways. The up-regulation of metal-redox sensitive transcription factors, NF-κβ and AP-1, is consistent with a cell death mechanism initiated by Fenton-active transition metal redox catalysis.

  18. Passing the baton

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    It was not only in South Korea that batons were being passed last week. While the cream of the world’s athletes were competing in the World Athletics Championships, the cream of the world’s accelerator scientists were on their way to San Sebastian in Spain for the International Particle Accelerator Conference.  One of them was carrying a rather special baton for a handover of a different kind.   When Fermilab’s Vladimir Shiltsev handed the high-energy frontier baton to CERN’s Mike Lamont on Tuesday, it marked the end of an era: a time to look back on the phenomenal contribution the Tevatron has made to particle physics over its 25-year operational lifetime, and the great contribution Fermilab has made over that period to global collaboration in particle physics. There’s always a lot of emotion involved in passing the baton. In athletics, it’s the triumph of wining or the heartbreak of losing. But for this special baton, the...

  19. A case of Dipylidium caninum in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, S M; Adams, R C; Miller, J E; Smith, R E; Thompson, A K

    1986-03-01

    The relevant literature concerning human dipylidiasis has been reviewed with specific reference to the association of children and their pet dog and cats. A specific case is recounted which is considered to be typical of the condition as encountered by pediatricians and general practitioners.

  20. 78 FR 75248 - Safety Zone; Sacramento New Years Eve Fireworks Display, Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ... Zone; Sacramento New Years Eve Fireworks Display, Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard... safety zone in the navigable waters of the Sacramento River in Sacramento, CA on December 31, 2013 during... Sacramento River around the Tower Bridge in Sacramento, CA in approximate position 38[deg]34'49.98'' N, 121...

  1. 78 FR 75898 - Safety Zone; Sacramento New Years Eve Fireworks Display, Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... Zone; Sacramento New Years Eve Fireworks Display, Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard... safety zone in the navigable waters of the Sacramento River in Sacramento, CA on December 31, 2013 during... Sacramento River around the Tower Bridge in Sacramento, CA in approximate position 38[deg]34'49.98'' N, 121...

  2. Baton twirling on an international stage

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie McClellan

    2013-01-01

    There aren’t many people who can throw a baton in the air, do a backhand spring and catch it with the grace of a dancer. Well, Julie Haffner from the CERN Press Office can. Baton twirling started as her hobby but soon became a passion - leading her team to win the International Baton Twirling Cup.    Gex Twirling Club performing their winning number at the 2013 International Baton Twirling Cup. (Image: Véronique Bellour). There is no telling when or where people will find their passion. For Julie Haffner, it was when she followed her cousin to a baton twirling class at the age of 10. Since that fortuitous day, she has committed herself to the sport and competed on international stages. Very close to rhythmic gymnastics, baton twirling requires skilful coordination and teamwork. Julie’s performances combine the precision of baton manipulation, the grace of a dancer and the strength of a gymnast. The first year in which she competed with the Gex Twirlin...

  3. 78 FR 15878 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... Operation Regulations; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... operating schedule that governs the Tower Drawbridge across Sacramento River, mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA... temporary change to the operation of the Tower Drawbridge, mile 59.0, over Sacramento River, at Sacramento...

  4. 77 FR 52599 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... regulation that governs the Tower Drawbridge across Sacramento River, mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The... change to the operation of the Tower Drawbridge, mile 59.0, over Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The...

  5. 78 FR 23489 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of deviation... operating regulation that governs the Tower Drawbridge across Sacramento River, mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA... Tower Drawbridge, mile 59.0, over Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The Tower Drawbridge navigation...

  6. 77 FR 44139 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ... Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the community to participate in the Fleet Feet Event, Run... Tower Drawbridge, mile 59.0, Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The Tower Drawbridge navigation span...

  7. 76 FR 11960 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary..., mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the community to participate in the... Tower Drawbridge, mile 59.0, Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The Tower Drawbridge navigation span...

  8. 77 FR 22216 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... schedule that governs the Tower Drawbridge across the Sacramento River, mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The... River, at Sacramento, CA. The Tower Drawbridge navigation span provides a vertical clearance of 30 feet...

  9. 76 FR 26181 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the community to participate in the Hope... Drawbridge, mile 59.0, over Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The drawbridge navigation span provides a...

  10. 76 FR 11679 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary..., mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the community to participate in the... the Tower Drawbridge, mile 59.0, Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The Tower Drawbridge navigation...

  11. 76 FR 23188 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ... Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary..., mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the community to participate in the... Tower Drawbridge, mile 59.0, Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The Tower Drawbridge navigation span...

  12. 76 FR 79067 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary..., mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow community celebration of New Year's... Tower Drawbridge, mile 59.0, Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The Tower Drawbridge navigation span...

  13. 76 FR 20843 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary..., mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the community to participate in the... the Tower Drawbridge, mile 59.0, Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The Tower Drawbridge navigation...

  14. 77 FR 10372 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary..., mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the community to participate in the... Tower Drawbridge, mile 59.0, Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The Tower Drawbridge navigation span...

  15. 77 FR 10371 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary..., mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the bridge owner to conduct... change to the operation of the Tower Drawbridge, mile 59.0, Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The...

  16. 75 FR 16006 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary..., mile 59.4, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the bridge owner to make bridge... Sacramento River, at Sacramento, CA. The I Street Drawbridge navigation span provides 109 feet vertical...

  17. Cultural Resources Assessment of the Faulkner Lake Revetment, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-06

    Palmer commande-- e vessels above the town (consisting of the U.S.S. Hartford, Albatross, Sachem, Estrella , and Arizona) . With tTeexception of the first...Hudson) 53 Tunica Indians 27 Tuscaloosa Trend 33, 44 80 000 U Union (see Federal) U.S.S. Albatross 47, 49 Arizona 49 Essex 47, 49 Estrella 49 Genessee

  18. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, EAST BATON ROUGE PARISH, LOUISIANA (AND INCORPORATED AREAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  19. Mississippi River, Baton Rouge to the Gulf, Louisiana, Project. Supplement II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    Hlydrocotyl Persimmon Diospyros virginiana Picke relweed Pontederia cordata Rattlebox Daubentonia drummundii Rose au Phragmites australis Saltgrass Distichlis...menhaden, genus Brevoortia, with respect to salinity, in the upper drainage basin of Barataria Bay, Louisiana. M.S. Thesis. Louisiana State University

  20. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, WEST BATON ROUGE PARISH, LA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  1. 33 CFR 110.195 - Mississippi River below Baton Rouge, LA, including South and Southwest Passes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... designated anchorage (e.g. cargo transfer, tank cleaning, stack blowing, etc.) may be restricted by other... hawsed position, as rigged for sea transits. Deck-mounted cranes, deck booms and stiff legs may be used...

  2. 75 FR 6570 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Louisiana; Baton Rouge 1-Hour...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... from John S. Seitz, Director, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, entitled ``Reasonable... Environmental Law Clinic on behalf of the Louisiana Environmental Action Network (LEAN) (hereinafter LEAN... submitted by LCA, and to adverse comments received from LEAN. LCA submitted the following additional...

  3. 2016 NOAA NGS Ortho-rectified Color Mosaic of Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  4. 2010 NOAA Ortho-rectified Mosaic of Louisiana: Mississippi River - Baton Rouge to Southwest Pass

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  5. Research in elementary particle physics. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State Univ,. Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, L.H; Haymaker, R.; Imlay, R.; McNeil, R.; Metcalf, W.; Svoboda, R.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical work on effective action expansion on an effective low; energy theory of hadron, dynamical symmetry breaking, and lattice gauge theories is described. The high-energy experimental group at Louisiana State University has analyzed data on a neutrino oscillation experiment at LAMPF. Preparations for the LSND neutrino experiment have stated. IMB data have also been analyzed. On the ZEUS electron n-proton colliding bean experiment, the production of the barrel calorimeter has been completed. Several modules of the calorimeter have been tested at Fermilab, and preparations for data taking are underway.

  6. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, EAST BATON ROUGE PARISH, LOUISIANA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  7. 77 FR 75556 - Safety Zone; Sacramento New Year's Eve Fireworks Display, Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... Zone; Sacramento New Year's Eve Fireworks Display, Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard... safety zones during the Sacramento New Year's Eve Fireworks Display in the navigable waters of the Sacramento River on December 31, 2012 and January 1, 2013. The fireworks displays will occur from 9 p.m. to 9...

  8. 78 FR 42452 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of deviation... Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the bridge owner to make bridge repairs. This deviation... Sacramento, CA. The drawbridge navigation span provides 109 feet vertical clearance above Mean High Water in...

  9. 78 FR 15879 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... Operation Regulations; Sacramento River, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... operating regulation that governs the Tower Drawbridge across the Sacramento River, mile 59.0, at Sacramento, CA. The deviation is necessary to allow the community to participate in the First Annual ``Biggest...

  10. Sacramento Metropolitan Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    addition, several Federal candidate species, the California Hibiscus , California tiger salamander, Sacramento Anthicid Beetle, Sacramento Valley tiger...Board, California Waste Management Board, and Department of Health Services contribute to this list. The Yolo County Health Services Agency maintains and...operation and maintenance of the completed recreational facility. Recreation development is limited to project lands unless health and safety

  11. Paremad filmid 3 : Moulin Rouge! / Jaanus Noormets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Noormets, Jaanus

    2006-01-01

    Muusikafilm "Moulin Rouge" : režissöör Baz Luhrmann : peaosades Nicole Kidman, Ewan McGregor : Ameerika Ühendriigid - Austraalia 2001. Lisatud nimekiri "25 paremat muusikali", mille koostas inglise telekanal Channel 4 2003.a.

  12. 77 FR 51894 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... RWY 20, Orig-A Baton Rouge, LA, Baton Rouge Metropolitan, Ryan Field, ILS OR LOC RWY 22R, Amdt 11 Baton Rouge, LA, Baton Rouge Metropolitan, Ryan Field, RNAV (GPS) RWY 4L, Amdt 2 Baton Rouge, LA, Baton... Fort Huachuca/Sierra Vista, AZ, Sierra Vista Muni/Libby AAF, RADAR 1, Amdt 5, CANCELLED [FR Doc. 2012...

  13. 76 FR 81827 - Safety Zone; Sacramento New Years Eve Fireworks Display, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... Zone; Sacramento New Years Eve Fireworks Display, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... during the Sacramento New Years Eve Fireworks Display in the navigable waters of the Sacramento River... Sacramento New Years Eve Fireworks Display safety zones in the navigable waters of the Sacramento River near...

  14. The baton passes to the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Held in the picturesque mountain setting of La Thuile in the Italian Alps, the international conference “Rencontres de Moriond” showed how the baton of discovery in the field of high-energy physics is definitely passing to the LHC experiments. In the well-known spirit of Moriond, the conference was an important platform for young students to present their latest results. The Higgs boson might well be within reach this year and the jet-quenching phenomenon might reveal new things soon…   New physics discussed over the Italian Alps during the "Les rencontres de Moriond" conference.  (Photographer: Paul Gerritsen. Adapted by Katarina Anthony) Known by physicists as one of the most important winter conferences, “Les rencontres de Moriond” are actually a series of conferences spread over two weeks covering the main themes of electroweak interactions, QCD and high-energy interactions, cosmology, gravitation, astropar...

  15. F00476: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Mississippi River New Orleans to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 2001-08-07

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  16. 2010 NOAA Near Infrared Ortho-rectified Mosaic of Louisiana: Mississippi River - Baton Rouge to Southwest Pass (NODC Accession 0104414)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  17. 2010 NOAA Ortho-rectified Mosaic from Color Aerial Imagery of MISSISSIPPI RIVER - BATON ROUGE TO LAPLACE (NODC Accession 0074374)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative of MISSISSIPPI RIVER -...

  18. 77 FR 40800 - Safety Zone: Sacramento River Closure for Aerial Cable Installation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone: Sacramento River Closure for Aerial Cable Installation, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Coast... zone in the navigable waters of the Sacramento River near Sherman Island, CA in support of the...; Sacramento River Closure for Aerial Cable Installation, Sacramento, CA. (a) Location. This temporary safety...

  19. 1997 Sacramento Inland Floodplain Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes data collected in October 1997 over the Sacramento, CA, floodplain. Laser mapping uses a pulsed laser ranging system mounted onboard an...

  20. seasonal dynamics of the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BioMAP

    of habitat in fragmented landscapes. ... the persistence of species occupying fragmented landscapes (Hanski & Gilpin 1997). Migration into ...... al Ecology 72: 533-. Sch rvation Biology 12: 284-292. James, M. (2006f) The natural history of the Sinai Baton Blue: the smallest butterfly in the world. Egyptian. Journal of Biology 8: ...

  1. Immigration and emigration in the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, many estimates of rates of movement are indirect and incomplete, and there is little empirical knowledge of the factors affecting immigration and emigration. I studied intensively a local population of Sinai Baton Blue butterflies in a discrete habitat patch. The study lasted the entire adult flight period, and involved almost ...

  2. OS SACRAMENTAIS, SACRAMENTOS DOS POBRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Codina

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Basta ter tido um pouco de experiência pastoral com setores populares, concretamente na América Latina, para constatar a importância dos sacramentais na vida cristã do povo. Além das manifestações de piedade popular que se costuma estudar sob a rubrica de religiosidade popular (peregrinações, festas de padroeiro, procissões..., gostaria de destacar aqui outros elementos mais estreitamente ligados ao mundo dos sacramentos, ainda que não formem parte dos sete sacramentos tridentinos.

  3. The limits of automatic summarisation according to ROUGE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schluter, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses some central caveats of summarisation, incurred in the use of the ROUGE metric for evaluation, with respect to optimal solutions. The task is NPhard, of which we give the first proof. Still, as we show empirically for three central benchmark datasets for the task, greedy algo...

  4. Sacramento District History (1929-2004)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Collins, Willie; Asay, Laura; Davy, Barbara J; Doyle, Brian; Fast, James P; Gonzalez, Jennifer L; Layton, Debra A; Nevins, Michael J; Taylor, James H; Van Dam, Carl

    2004-01-01

    Although the Sacramento District was established in 1929, this document recaptures the legendary history from the mid-1800's and the repercussions the Central Valley endured regarding the navigation...

  5. 77 FR 27109 - Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... hold a Khmer Rouge official accountable for war crimes committed under the Khmer Rouge regime. The... in October 2010, the Secretary General commended the work of the Independent Counselor and the effect... report to the UN Controller and the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, which closely monitors...

  6. NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) true color (RGB) orthorectified mosaic image tiles, Baton Rouge to LaPlace, Louisiana 2010 (NODC Accession 0074374)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative of the Mississippi...

  7. 76 FR 14052 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California State University, Sacramento, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... Sacramento County, CA, during a test excavation project. The Far Western Anthropological Research Group Inc... from ethnohistoric and ethnographic sources indicate that the site was most likely occupied by Nisenan... the Sacramento River and Miwok-speakers resided south of the American River. Ethnographic data and...

  8. Study of Electric Music Baton using Haptic Interface for Assistance of Visually Disabled Persons

    OpenAIRE

    浅川, 貴史

    2012-01-01

    [Abstract] We have made a proposal for a music baton system for visual disabled persons. The system is constituted by an acceleration sensor, a radio module, and a haptic interface device. When a conductor moves the baton, Players are able to acknowledge the action using the haptic interface device. We have carried out an experiment of comparing the visual and the haptic interface. The result declared that a pre-motion is important for the visual interface. In the paper, we make a proposal fo...

  9. The Barriers to Millennials Visiting Rouge Urban National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Ramsay

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Intensified urbanization has led to more populated cities and less green spaces which are vital to community health, wellbeing and conservation. Rouge Urban National Park in Toronto has recently become Canada’s first urban national park. This park is ideally suited to the millennial population, offering outdoor recreation and green space that this growing market generally desires. There is, however, a lack of research into visitor motivations to urban parks and more specifically millennial motivations. Findings from 280 quantitative surveys found three main barriers to visiting the Urban National Park: distance, transportation, and awareness. The lack of public transport combined with road congestion and fewer millennials owning cars creates issues with accessibility. Poor branding and knowledge through electronic media creates low awareness within a demographic market so tied to technology.

  10. The aesthetics of laboratory inscription: Claude Bernard's Cahier Rouge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Atia

    2013-03-01

    This essay explores the aesthetic sensibilities of the French physiologist Claude Bernard (1813-1878). In particular, it analyzes the Cahier Rouge (1850-1860), Bernard's acclaimed laboratory notebook. In this notebook, Bernard articulates the range of his experience as an experimental physiologist, juxtaposing without differentiation details of laboratory procedure and more personal queries, doubts, and reflections on experimentation, life, and art. Bernard's insights, it is argued, offer an aesthetic and phenomenological template for considering experimentation. His physiological point of view ranges from his own bodily aesthesis or sensory perception, through personal reflections on scientific discovery as an artistic process, to a broader metaphysical conception of life as an artistic creation. Such an aesthetic approach to physiology enables Bernard to reconcile his empirical methodology and his romantic idealism; it offers the history of laboratory science a framework for considering the individual, bodily, and emotional labor inherent in physiological experimentation.

  11. Effects of Baton Usage on College Musicians' Perceptions of Ensemble Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvey, Brian A.; Wacker, Aaron T.; Felder, Logan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of baton usage on college musicians' perceptions of ensemble performance. Two conductors were videotaped while conducting a 1-minute excerpt from either a technical ("Pathfinder of Panama," John Philip Sousa) or lyrical ("Seal Lullaby," Eric Whitacre) piece of concert…

  12. Sacramento, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Sacramento, CA, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  13. 78 FR 53270 - Revision of Air Quality Implementation Plan; California; Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Quality Implementation Plan; California; Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District... to the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD or District) portion of the..., Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District, Rule 214 (Federal New Source Review), Rule 203...

  14. Putting the sun to work in Sacramento

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    At dawn this morning, the sun went to work for customers of the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). The largest photovoltaic (PV) power plant in the world, adjacent to the closed nuclear power plant at Rancho Seco, generated enough electricity for over a thousand customers, rooftop solar water heaters lowered thousands of residential electric bills and rooftop PV systems turned hundreds of Sacramento homes into mini power plants. SMUD, in partnership with their customers-owners, is leading the way in putting the sun to work today. SMUD plans to have at least half of its energy come from energy efficiency, existing hydroelectric plants and renewable resources in this decade. SMUD expects investments made in solar power today to provide its customer-owners with substantial long-term energy, environmental and community benefits. This article describes some of SMUD's efforts

  15. Timber resource statistics for the Sacramento resource area of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen L. Waddell; Patricia M. Bassett

    1997-01-01

    This report is a summary of timber resource statistics for the Sacramento Resource Area of California, which includes Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Glenn, Lake, Napa, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, Sierra, Sutter, Tehama, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. Data were collected as part of a statewide multiresource inventory. The inventory sampled private and public lands except...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 1580 - High Threat Urban Areas (HTUAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... * Chula Vista, Escondido, and San Diego, and a 10-mile buffer extending from the border of the combined... buffer extending from the city border Louisville, KY. LA Baton Rouge Area * Baton Rouge and a 10-mile buffer extending from the city border Baton Rouge, LA. New Orleans Area New Orleans and a 10-mile buffer...

  17. Final environmental assessment: Sacramento Energy Service Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The Sacramento Area Office (SAO) of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) needs to increase the security of operations, to eliminate overcrowding at the current leased location of the existing facilities, to provide for future growth, to improve efficiency, and to reduce operating costs. The proposed action is to construct an approximate 40,000-square foot building and adjacent parking lot with a Solar Powered Electric Vehicle Charging Station installed to promote use of energy efficient transportation. As funding becomes available and technology develops, additional innovative energy-efficient measures will be incorporated into the building. For example the proposed construction of the Solar Powered Electric Vehicle Charging.

  18. 77 FR 24252 - Notice of Release From Federal Grant Assurance Obligations for Sacramento International Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... Assurance Obligations for Sacramento International Airport (SMF), Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Federal Aviation... of land comprising approximately 6.50 acres of airport property at the Sacramento International Airport, California. The County of Sacramento proposes to release the 6.50 acres for sale to the...

  19. Mars Express met l'Europe en orbite autour de la Planete rouge

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Apres une nuit sans sommeil, le Centre europeen d'operations spatiales (ESOC) de Darmstadt, en Allemagne, a annonce la nouvelle, jeudi 25decembre au matin: la sonde Mars Express a bien ete "capturee" par la gravite de la Planete rouge, tandis que le petit atterrisseur Beagle-2 tentait de se poser dans la plaine d'Isidis Planitia" (1 page).

  20. An Investigation into Heavy Metal Contamination and Mobilization in the Lower Rouge River, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihadeh, M.; Forrester, J.; Napieralski, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Similar to many densely populated watersheds in the Great Lakes Basin, the Rouge River in Michigan drains a heavily urbanized watershed, which, over time, has accumulated a substantial amount of contamination due to decades of manufacturing and refining industries. Statistically significant levels of heavy metals have been found in the bed sediment of the Rouge; however, little is known about the mobilization of these contaminated bed sediments. The goal of this study was to ascertain the extent to which these potentially contaminated sediments are mobilized and transported downstream. Suspended sediment samples were collected at four sites along the lower Rouge River using composite depth integrated sediment samples three times per week, resulting in a total of twenty samples from each site. Turbidity was measured simultaneously using a YSI datalogger at all sampling locations. Sediment was also extracted from floodplain soil pits and silted vegetation, as well as river bed sediment cores along stream channel cross-sections. Heavy metal concentrations (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Zn) were analyzed using ICP-MS and compared against both background characteristics for Michigan soils and EPA Hazardous Criteria Limits. As expected, a positive correlation exists between turbidity and heavy metal concentrations. Even in the sampling sites furthest upstream, heavy metal concentrations exceeded background soil characteristics, with a few also exceeding hazardous criteria limits. The heavy metal concentrations found in the Lower Rouge affirm the elevated pollution classification of the river, depict the overall influence of industrialization on stream health, and verify that contaminated sediments are being deposited in aquatic and floodplain environments during variable flow or high discharge events. Results from this study emphasize the need to remediate bed sediments in the Rouge and suggest that there may be significant bioaccumulation potential for organisms

  1. Radionuclide Site Survey Report Sacramento, California (RN-70)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walker, Frank

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to validate that the Sacramento, CA, site will fulfill treaty requirements as set forth by the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization...

  2. RadNet Air Data From Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Sacramento, CA from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  3. 77 FR 47789 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ...-Club Yacht Association, the Recreational Boaters of California, the Capital City Yacht Club, the Sacramento Yacht Club, River View Yacht Club and Hornblower Cruises. D. Discussion of Proposed Rule Under the...

  4. Use of nootkatone as a senescence indicator for Rouge La Toma Cv. grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biolatto, Andrea; Sancho, Ana M; Cantet, Rodolfo J C; Güemes, Daniel R; Pensel, Norma A

    2002-08-14

    The objective of this research was to study the usefulness of nootkatone as a senescence indicator for Rouge La Toma cv. grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.), simulating different treatments that included the normal postharvest handling of citrus fruits: temperature conditioning, cold storage, shipment periods to overseas markets such as Japan and the U.S., marketing conditions, and storage at nonchilling temperature (control treatments). The highest nootkatone levels, determined by GLC-MS analyses, were detected in fruits subjected to control treatments. No significant differences were observed in nootkatone levels between treatments either with or without temperature conditioning prior to the start of the cold storage. Levels of nootkatone increased throughout time for all assayed treatments. The linear regressions of nootkatone levels showed correlation coefficients of 0.80 and 0.83 with storage time (29 and 42 days, respectively). Therefore, nootkatone appears to be a good indicator of senescence for Rouge La Toma grapefruit.

  5. Parental styles in second generation effects of genocide stemming from the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Nigel P; Om, Chariya; Kim, Thida; Vorn, Sin

    2011-11-01

    This study examined the impact of parental styles on second generation effects of trauma among adolescent offspring of survivors of the Khmer Rouge (KR) genocide in Cambodia. Two hundred high school students completed measures addressing their parents' trauma stemming from the KR regime, parental styles (role reversing, overprotective), depression and anxiety. Parents' role reversing parental style and mothers' overprotective parenting were shown to mediate the impact of their trauma symptoms on the child's depression and anxiety. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  6. 75 FR 40762 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District and South Coast Air Quality Management District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

  7. 77 FR 45575 - Foreign-Trade Zone 143-West Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... Sacramento, CA Application for Extended Production Authority; Subzone 143D, Grafil Inc. (Carbon Fiber Production); Sacramento, California An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the... its facilities located in Sacramento, California. The application conforming to the requirements of...

  8. 75 FR 81642 - Long-Term North to South Water Transfer Program, Sacramento County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ..., Sacramento County, CA AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an...., Chico, CA. Wednesday, January 12, 2011, 2-4 p.m., Sacramento, CA. Thursday, January 13, 2011, 6-8 p.m..., MP-410, Sacramento, CA 95825. Scoping meetings will be held at: Chico at the Chico Masonic Family...

  9. 76 FR 3157 - Joint Operations Center Relocation Project, Sacramento County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ..., Sacramento County, CA AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an... Reclamation, 2800 Cottage Way, Sacramento, CA 95825 or e-mail [email protected] . The public scoping meetings... construct a new JOC in the Sacramento area to be occupied by June 2015. The new JOC would provide typical...

  10. 77 FR 15801 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ...: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION..., 1416 9th Street, Room 902, Sacramento, CA 95814, telephone (916) 653-8893. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION... associated funerary objects were removed from the Morris Mound site (CA-SAC-199) in Sacramento County, CA...

  11. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (16th, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, November 5-8, 1994). Volume 2: Research Papers, Oral Reports, and Posters (Continued).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, David, Ed.

    This PME-NA proceedings volume contains the full text of 41 research papers. In addition, brief usually one-page reports, are provided for 11 oral presentations and 13 poster sessions. The full research reports are as follows: "Cognitive Analysis of Chinese Students' Mathematical Problem Solving" (J. Cai and E. A. Silver); (2)…

  12. Proceedings of the Annual Day of Scientific Lectures (17th), and Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists (13th), Held in Baton Rouge, LA on March 21-24, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    Metropolitian Coca Cola Boston Compact BW -Rf r rfz-rr" c .r fret[ 203 Tomorrow’s job’s will require more education Years of schooling Future needed...Morgan Pennsylvania State Universiiy SPONSORSHIPS Alabama A&M University Students acEulty Marvin Sykes Dr. M. C. George Steven Pearson Michael Henry...Ibraham Francis Nyandeh Gabriel Ndow Melody Mixon Scholarship students selected by Dr. Kennedy Reed Sponsorship students selected by Mr. Gerald Davis

  13. Environmental Scan of the Greater Sacramento Area, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los Rios Community Coll. District, Sacramento, CA. Office of Planning and Research.

    This report provides a comprehensive look at the external environment impacting Los Rios Community College District (LRCCD) (California). It summarizes the social, economic, and political changes at the state and national levels, in general, and in the Sacramento-Yolo Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (CMSA) served by LRCCD, more…

  14. Effects of Bank Revetment on Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Harvey; Chester C. Watson

    1989-01-01

    Twelve low radius of curvature bends, half of which were rivetted, were studied in the Butte Basin reach of Sacramento River, California, to determine whether bank revetment deleteriously affected salmonid habitat. At low discharge (128.6 cubic meters/s) it was demonstrated that revetment does not cause channel narrowing or deepening, nor does it prevent re-entrainment...

  15. 77 FR 3664 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... performed on this proposal to various waterway user organizations including the Pacific Inter-Club Yacht Association, the Recreational Boaters of California, the Capital City Yacht Club, the Sacramento Yacht Club, River View Yacht Club and Hornblower Cruises. The Coast Guard policy regarding the promulgation of...

  16. Parental styles in the intergenerational transmission of trauma stemming from the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Nigel P; Muong, Sophear; Sochanvimean, Vannavuth

    2013-10-01

    The impact of parental styles in intergenerational transmission of trauma among mothers who survived the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia, in power from 1975 to 1979, and their teenaged children was examined in 2 studies. In Study 1, 46 Cambodian female high school students and their mothers were recruited. Each daughter completed anxiety and depression measures as well as assessment of her mother's role-reversing, overprotective, and rejecting parental styles, whereas the mothers completed measures of their trauma exposure during the Khmer Rouge regime and PTSD symptoms. In support of trauma transmission, the mother's PTSD symptoms were predictive of her daughter's anxiety. Moreover, the mother's role-reversing parental style was shown to mediate the relationship between her own and her daughter's symptoms. In support of their generalizability, the results were replicated in Study 2 in a Cambodian-American refugee sample comparing 15 mental health treatment-seeking mothers and their teenaged children with 17 nontreatment-seeking mother-child pairs. The implications of the findings within the larger literature on intergenerational trauma transmission stemming from genocide are discussed. © 2013 American Orthopsychiatric Association.

  17. 103 L'exploitation des algues rouges Gelidium dans la région d'El ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PR BOKO

    L'algue rouge Gelidium forme le long de la côte atlantique marocaine des champs .... limité aux sites d'accès relativement facile par voie terrestre, c'est à dire l'axe situé .... de collecte en attendant le tonnage justifiant le transport par camion.

  18. Distributed control of multi-robot teams: Cooperative baton passing task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, L.E.

    1998-11-01

    This research addresses the problem of achieving fault tolerant cooperation within small- to medium-sized teams of heterogeneous mobile robots. The author describes a novel behavior-based, fully distributed architecture, called ALLIANCE, that utilizes adaptive action selection to achieve fault tolerant cooperative control. The robots in this architecture possess a variety of high-level functions that they can perform during a mission, and must at all times select an appropriate action based on the requirements of the mission, the activities of other robots, the current environmental conditions, and their own internal states. Since such cooperative teams often work in dynamic and unpredictable environments, the software architecture allows the team members to respond robustly and reliably to unexpected environmental changes and modifications in the robot team that may occur due to mechanical failure, the learning of new skills, or the addition or removal of robots from the team by human intervention. After presenting ALLIANCE, they describe the implementation of this architecture on a team of physical mobile robots performing a cooperative baton passing task. These experiments illustrate the ability of ALLIANCE to achieve adaptive, fault-tolerant cooperative control amidst dynamic changes during the task.

  19. Le roman sans événements : 'Oreille rouge' d’Éric Chevillard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maziarczyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though absurd humour and surreal scenes are at first sight the characteristic elements of Eric Chevillard’s style, it is an oversimplification to consider his novels as mere literary jokes. The appeal of this literature stems from the light and witty manner in which it transforms outdated novelistic conventions, deconstructs classic narrative strategies and refuses to fulfill the reader’s expectations. This article seeks to analyse minimal narration, an unusual mode of writing for Chevillard, in Oreille rouge: just like narrative excess, typical of his other works, it results in dematerialisation of the plot and redefinition of the novelistic structure.

  20. Adapting Impressionism: Hou Hsiao-hsien’s Le Voyage du ballon rouge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A Durham

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2007 release of a film directly inspired by a beloved French children’s movie made fifty years earlier would have been surprising enough without the additional fact that the adaptation was the work of a Taiwanese filmmaker who had never before filmed outside Asia and who spoke no French.  Hou hsiao-hsien’s Le Voyage du ballon rouge is not only a startling original film in its own right but it is also richly illustrative of the value of broadening our understanding of the intricate dialogic relations among texts.  Hou’s reinterpretation of Lamorisse’s film intersects not only with his own recurrent stylistic preferences and prior work as a filmmaker but also with a variety of self-reflective art works ranging from Chinese puppet shows to the statues in the Luxembourg garden to scenes from an internal remake of Le Ballon rouge to a visit to the Musée d’Orsay to see Félix Vallotton’s “Le Ballon.” In keeping with the extraordinary focus within the film on lighting and the color red, Hou’s homage to Lamorisse is all about allusion, reflections, and impressions.  Appropriately, one of the works it evokes is the Claude Monet painting, “Impression, soleil levant,” whose reddish sun looks strikingly like a red balloon floating through the sky and whose title named a movement which has not only endured but expanded to include analogous styles in a variety of visual arts and other media.

  1. Groundwater quality in the Southern Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California's drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State's groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The Southern Sacramento Valley is one of the study units being evaluated.

  2. Groundwater quality in the Northern Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California's drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State's groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The Northern Sacramento Valley is one of the study units being evaluated.

  3. Elite weapons for lego fanatics build working handcuffs, body armor, batons, sunglasses, and the world's hardest hitting brick guns

    CERN Document Server

    Hüdepohl, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The last LEGO brick weapon construction book and design guide you'll ever need, Elite Weapons for LEGO Fanatics features building instructions for thirteen fully functional LEGO masterpieces, including the monstrous, 27-inch-long Dinosaur Superior, a fully automatic combat rifle that can puncture aluminum cans, and a highly detailed HK G3 brick replica. Also featuring a helmet, a baton, handcuffs, sunglasses, and a grappling hook gun, which allows you to retrieve distant objects without ever leaving your seat, Elite Weapons for LEGO Fanatics includes a chapter on how to find the LEGO pieces you need and a comic book story featuring a hero using the weapons in action. LEGO fans of all ages and skill levels will find a treasure trove of models, including: • Hammerhead Jr., a single-shot crossbow and it's big brother, the heavy-duty Hammerhead Sr. • Panzer Pod combat helmet • KlopSTOCK baton • Melody, a rubber-firing machine pistol • Nice-1, a pocket-sized pistol that packs a punch • Chinahook harpoon gun ...

  4. Etude de l'effet de l'amodiaquine sur les globules rouges infectés ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ces images sont ensuite utilisées pour étudier l'interaction du médicament avec les globules rouges en fonction des concentrations, en ayant recours à des techniques d'analyse multivariée telles que la classification hiérarchique, la méthode des k-moyennes et l'analyse en composante principale. Les résultats obtenus ...

  5. 77 FR 19690 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ...: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... Department of Parks and Recreation, 1416 9th Street, Room 902, Sacramento, CA 95814, telephone (916) 653-8893... located in San Diego County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's...

  6. 77 FR 19689 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ...: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... Department of Parks and Recreation, 1416 9th Street, Room 902, Sacramento, CA 95814, telephone (916) 653-8893... located in San Diego County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's...

  7. 77 FR 19687 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ...: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION..., 1416 9th Street, Room 902, Sacramento, CA 95814, telephone (916) 653-8893. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION... associated funerary objects were removed from ten sites located in northeastern San Diego County, CA. This...

  8. 77 FR 76451 - Designation for the West Sacramento, CA; Frankfort, IN; and Richmond, VA Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Designation for the West Sacramento, CA; Frankfort, IN; and Richmond, VA Areas. AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and...-Agri West Sacramento, CA(916) 374-9700.. 1/1/2013 12/31/2015 Frankfort Frankfort, IN(765) 258-3624...

  9. 77 FR 15389 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ...: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION..., 1416 9th Street, Room 902, Sacramento, CA 95814, telephone (916) 653-8893. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION... associated funerary objects were removed from the Cole Creek site (CA-LAK-425), Lake County, CA. This notice...

  10. 75 FR 20598 - Public Buildings Service; Prospect Island, Sacramento Delta, Solano County, CA; Transfer of Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION [Wildlife Order 188; 9-I-CA-1674] Public Buildings Service; Prospect Island, Sacramento Delta, Solano County, CA; Transfer of Property Pursuant to section 2 of Public... General Services Administration transferred 1253 acres of land identified as Prospect Island, Sacramento...

  11. 78 FR 10589 - Revision of Air Quality Implementation Plan; California; Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... Quality Implementation Plan; California; Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District... Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD or District) portion of the California State... sources within the areas covered by the plan as necessary to assure that the National Ambient Air Quality...

  12. 50 CFR 226.204 - Critical habitat for Sacramento winter-run chinook salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Critical habitat for Sacramento winter-run chinook salmon. 226.204 Section 226.204 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL... § 226.204 Critical habitat for Sacramento winter-run chinook salmon. The following waterways, bottom and...

  13. Diel and seasonal movements by adult Sacramento pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus grandis) in the Eel River, northwestern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bret C. Harvey; Rodney J. Nakamoto

    1999-01-01

    Abstract - In late summer and fall, radio-tagged adult Sacramento pike-minnow (Ptychocheilus grandis) at three sites in the Eel River of northwestern California moved more at night than during the day. Fish moved up to 535 m at night and returned to their original positions the following morning. Adult Sacramento pikeminnow at all sites occupied only pools during the...

  14. Exploring SWOT discharge algorithm accuracy on the Sacramento River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, M. T.; Yoon, Y.; Rodriguez, E.; Minear, J. T.; Andreadis, K.; Pavelsky, T. M.; Alsdorf, D. E.; Smith, L. C.; Bales, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Scheduled for launch in 2019, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission will utilize a Ka-band radar interferometer to measure river heights, widths, and slopes, globally, as well as characterize storage change in lakes and ocean surface dynamics with a spatial resolution ranging from 10 - 70 m, with temporal revisits on the order of a week. A discharge algorithm has been formulated to solve the inverse problem of characterizing river bathymetry and the roughness coefficient from SWOT observations. The algorithm uses a Bayesian Markov Chain estimation approach, treats rivers as sets of interconnected reaches (typically 5 km - 10 km in length), and produces best estimates of river bathymetry, roughness coefficient, and discharge, given SWOT observables. AirSWOT (the airborne version of SWOT) consists of a radar interferometer similar to SWOT, but mounted aboard an aircraft. AirSWOT spatial resolution will range from 1 - 35 m. In early 2013, AirSWOT will perform several flights over the Sacramento River, capturing river height, width, and slope at several different flow conditions. The Sacramento River presents an excellent target given that the river includes some stretches heavily affected by management (diversions, bypasses, etc.). AirSWOT measurements will be used to validate SWOT observation performance, but are also a unique opportunity for testing and demonstrating the capabilities and limitations of the discharge algorithm. This study uses HEC-RAS simulations of the Sacramento River to first, characterize expected discharge algorithm accuracy on the Sacramento River, and second to explore the required AirSWOT measurements needed to perform a successful inverse with the discharge algorithm. We focus on several specific research questions affecting algorithm performance: 1) To what extent do lateral inflows confound algorithm performance? We examine the ~100 km stretch of river from Colusa, CA to the Yolo Bypass, and investigate how the

  15. Metabolic diversity of the heterotrophic microorganisms and potential link to pollution of the Rouge River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiquia, S.M., E-mail: smtiquia@umd.umich.ed [Department of Natural Sciences, University of Michigan, 115F Science Building, Dearborn, MI 48128 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The heterotrophic microbial communities of the Rouge River were tracked using Biolog Ecoplates to understand the metabolic diversity at different temporal and spatial scales, and potential link to river pollution. Site less impacted by anthrophogenic sources (site 1), showed markedly lower metabolic diversity. The only substrates that were utilized in the water samples were carbohydrates. Sites more impacted by anthrophogenic sources (sites 8 and 9) showed higher metabolic diversity. Higher functional diversity was linked to the physico-chemical and biological properties of the water samples (i.e. higher concentrations of DO, DOC, chlorophyll, and bacterial density). Biolog analysis was found to be useful in differentiating metabolic diversity between microbial communities; in determining factors that most influence the separation of communities; and in identifying which substrates were most utilized by the communities. It can also be used as an effective ecological indicator of changes in river function attributable to urbanization and pollution. - BIOLOG differentiated metabolic diversity between microbial communities and can be used as ecological indicator of river function attributable to urbanization and pollution.

  16. Metabolic diversity of the heterotrophic microorganisms and potential link to pollution of the Rouge River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiquia, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    The heterotrophic microbial communities of the Rouge River were tracked using Biolog Ecoplates to understand the metabolic diversity at different temporal and spatial scales, and potential link to river pollution. Site less impacted by anthrophogenic sources (site 1), showed markedly lower metabolic diversity. The only substrates that were utilized in the water samples were carbohydrates. Sites more impacted by anthrophogenic sources (sites 8 and 9) showed higher metabolic diversity. Higher functional diversity was linked to the physico-chemical and biological properties of the water samples (i.e. higher concentrations of DO, DOC, chlorophyll, and bacterial density). Biolog analysis was found to be useful in differentiating metabolic diversity between microbial communities; in determining factors that most influence the separation of communities; and in identifying which substrates were most utilized by the communities. It can also be used as an effective ecological indicator of changes in river function attributable to urbanization and pollution. - BIOLOG differentiated metabolic diversity between microbial communities and can be used as ecological indicator of river function attributable to urbanization and pollution.

  17. Reservoir Operating Rule Optimization for California's Sacramento Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Nelson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.15447/sfews.2016v14iss1art6Reservoir operating rules for water resource systems are typically developed by combining intuition, professional discussion, and simulation modeling. This paper describes a joint optimization–simulation approach to develop preliminary economically-based operating rules for major reservoirs in California’s Sacramento Valley, based on optimized results from CALVIN, a hydro-economic optimization model. We infer strategic operating rules from the optimization model results, including storage allocation rules to balance storage among multiple reservoirs, and reservoir release rules to determine monthly release for individual reservoirs. Results show the potential utility of considering previous year type on water availability and various system and sub-system storage conditions, in addition to normal consideration of local reservoir storage, season, and current inflows. We create a simple simulation to further refine and test the derived operating rules. Optimization model results show particular insights for balancing the allocation of water storage among Shasta, Trinity, and Oroville reservoirs over drawdown and refill seasons, as well as some insights for release rules at major reservoirs in the Sacramento Valley. We also discuss the applicability and limitations of developing reservoir operation rules from optimization model results.

  18. Radioactive hydrogeochemical processes in the Chihuahua-Sacramento Basin, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burillo, J. C.; Reyes C, M.; Montero C, M. E.; Renteria V, M.; Herrera P, E. F. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S. C., Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Reyes, I.; Espino, M. S., E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.mx [Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Facultad de Ingenieria, Nuevo Campus Universitario, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    The Chihuahua Basin is divided by its morphology into three main sub basins: Chihuahua-Sacramento sub basin, Chihuahua Dam sub basin and Chuviscar River sub basin. In the aquifers at the Sacramento sub basin, specific concentrations of uranium in groundwater range from 460 to 1260 Bq / m{sup 3}. The presence of strata and sandy clay lenses with radiometric anomalies in the N W of Chihuahua Valley was confirmed by a litostatigraphic study and gamma spectrometry measurements of drill cuttings. High uranium activity values found in the water of some deep wells may correspond to the presence of fine material bodies of carbonaceous material, possible forming pa leo-sediment of flooding or pa leo-soils. It is suggested that these clay horizons are uranyl ion collectors. Uranyl may suffer a reduction process by organic material. Furthermore the groundwater, depending on its ph and Eh, oxidizes and re-dissolves uranium. The hydrogeochemical behavior of San Marcos dam and the N W Valley area is the subject of studies that should help to clarify the origin of the radioactive elements and their relationships with other pollutants in the watershed. (Author)

  19. Biology, History, Status and Conservation of Sacramento Perch, Archoplites interruptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick K Crain

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of the biology of Sacramento perch (Archoplites interruptus based mainly on recent studies of their distribution, ecology, physiology, and genetics. The Sacramento perch is the only member of the family Centrarchidae that is endemic to California. It is most closely related to the rock basses (Ambloplites spp. and is thought to have split from its eastern cousins during the Middle Miocene Period (15.5 to 5.2 million years ago, MYA. Their native range includes the Central Valley, Pajaro and Salinas rivers, tributaries to the San Francisco Estuary (e.g., Alameda Creek, and Clear Lake (Lake County. Today, they are most likely extirpated from all of their native range. They are known to persist in 28 waters outside their native range: 17 in California, nine in Nevada, and one each in Utah and Colorado. Disappearance from their native range coincided with massive changes to aquatic habitats in the Central Valley and with the introduction of alien species, including other centrarchids. Unfortunately, many populations established outside their native range have also disappeared and are continuing to do so.

  20. Radioactive hydrogeochemical processes in the Chihuahua-Sacramento Basin, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burillo, J. C.; Reyes C, M.; Montero C, M. E.; Renteria V, M.; Herrera P, E. F.; Reyes, I.; Espino, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    The Chihuahua Basin is divided by its morphology into three main sub basins: Chihuahua-Sacramento sub basin, Chihuahua Dam sub basin and Chuviscar River sub basin. In the aquifers at the Sacramento sub basin, specific concentrations of uranium in groundwater range from 460 to 1260 Bq / m 3 . The presence of strata and sandy clay lenses with radiometric anomalies in the N W of Chihuahua Valley was confirmed by a litostatigraphic study and gamma spectrometry measurements of drill cuttings. High uranium activity values found in the water of some deep wells may correspond to the presence of fine material bodies of carbonaceous material, possible forming pa leo-sediment of flooding or pa leo-soils. It is suggested that these clay horizons are uranyl ion collectors. Uranyl may suffer a reduction process by organic material. Furthermore the groundwater, depending on its ph and Eh, oxidizes and re-dissolves uranium. The hydrogeochemical behavior of San Marcos dam and the N W Valley area is the subject of studies that should help to clarify the origin of the radioactive elements and their relationships with other pollutants in the watershed. (Author)

  1. Bivariate Drought Analysis Using Streamflow Reconstruction with Tree Ring Indices in the Sacramento Basin, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewon Kwak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term streamflow data are vital for analysis of hydrological droughts. Using an artificial neural network (ANN model and nine tree-ring indices, this study reconstructed the annual streamflow of the Sacramento River for the period from 1560 to 1871. Using the reconstructed streamflow data, the copula method was used for bivariate drought analysis, deriving a hydrological drought return period plot for the Sacramento River basin. Results showed strong correlation among drought characteristics, and the drought with a 20-year return period (17.2 million acre-feet (MAF per year in the Sacramento River basin could be considered a critical level of drought for water shortages.

  2. L'algue rouge Eucheuma spinosum possibilités d'exploitation et de culture aux Antilles

    OpenAIRE

    Barbaroux, Olivier; Perez, René; Dreno, Jean-paul

    1984-01-01

    L'industrie française des algues rouges qui occupe en 1983 le 2e rang mondial, extrait des polysaccharides appelés carraghénanes de certaines espèces d'algues telles que Chondrus crispus, Gigartina stellata, G. skotsbergi, Eucheuma cottonii, E. spinosum, Iridea sp. La principale propriété de ces carraghénanes est de réagir avec les composants du lait pour donner du gel à fine structure, d'ou leur utilisation dans tous les dérivés actuels du lait (pâtisserie, flans, crèmes, glaces, fromages, l...

  3. Climate Change and Flood Operations in the Sacramento Basin, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann D. Willis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ann D. Willis, Jay R. Lund, Edwin S. Townsley, and Beth A. Faberdoi: http://dx.doi.org/10.15447/sfews.2014v9iss2art3Climate warming is likely to challenge many current conceptions and regulatory policies, particularly for water management. A warmer climate is likely to hinder flood operations in California’s Sacramento Valley by decreasing snowpack storage and increasing the rain fraction of major storms. This work examines how a warmer climate would change flood peaks and volumes for nine major historical floods entering Shasta, Oroville, and New Bullards Bar reservoirs, using current flood flow forecast models and current flood operating rules. Shasta and Oroville have dynamic flood operation curves that accommodate many climate-warming scenarios. New Bullards Bar’s more static operating rule performs poorly for these conditions. Revisiting flood operating rules is an important adaptation for climate warming.

  4. 78 FR 5837 - Cancellation of Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report on the Sacramento...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... statewide economy. The SRWRS cost-sharing partners had identified their long-term needs for additional water... Sacramento were the cost-sharing partners. Reclamation published a notice of intent to prepare the EIS/EIR on...

  5. DOJ News Release: Local Contractor Pleads Guilty To Defrauding City Of Sacramento Of Stimulus Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. — US Attorney Benjamin B. Wagner announced today that Peter Scott, President of Advantage Demolition and Engineering (ADE), 47, of Roseville, pleaded guilty today to two counts of submitting false contractor bonds.

  6. 75 FR 40726 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District and South Coast Air Quality Management District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD) and South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD...

  7. 77 FR 76472 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... Freeway, Texas City, TX 77591, telephone: (409) 986-6700; DoubleTree by Hilton Baton Rouge, 4964 Constitution Avenue, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, telephone: (225) 925-1005. Tuesday, January 15, 2013; Hilton Garden..., January 16, 2013; Hilton Garden Inn Orange Beach Beachfront, 23092 Perdido Beach Boulevard, Orange Beach...

  8. Images of Khmer Rouge atrocities, 1975-2015 : Visualizing the crimes of the Pol Pot’s regime in transnational contexts of memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.D.F. Benzaquen-Gautier (Stéphanie)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe Khmer Rouge or Communist Party of Kampuchea came to power in April 1975 in the context of the Second Indochina War. Through extreme violence the new leadership implemented a radical transformation of Cambodian society, the effects of which keep affecting the population at many

  9. Wildlife Response to Riparian Restoration on the Sacramento River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory H Golet

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies that assess the success of riparian restoration projects seldom focus on wildlife. More generally, vegetation characteristics are studied, with the assumption that animal populations will recover once adequate habitats are established. On the Sacramento River, millions of dollars have been spent on habitat restoration, yet few studies of wildlife response have been published. Here we present the major findings of a suite of studies that assessed responses of four taxonomic groups (insects, birds, bats, and rodents. Study designs fell primarily into two broad categories: comparisons of restoration sites of different ages, and comparisons of restoration sites with agricultural and remnant riparian sites. Older restoration sites showed increased abundances of many species of landbirds and bats relative to younger sites, and the same trend was observed for the Valley elderberry longhorn beetle (Desmocerus californicus dimorphus, a federally threatened species. Species richness of landbirds and ground-dwelling beetles appeared to increase as restoration sites matured. Young restoration sites provided benefits to species that utilize early successional riparian habitats, and after about 10 years, the sites appeared to provide many of the complex structural habitat elements that are characteristic of remnant forest patches. Eleven-year old sites were occupied by both cavity-nesting birds and special-status crevice-roosting bats. Restored sites also supported a wide diversity of bee species, and had richness similar to remnant sites. Remnant sites had species compositions of beetles and rodents more similar to older sites than to younger sites. Because study durations were short for all but landbirds, results should be viewed as preliminary. Nonetheless, in aggregate, they provide convincing evidence that restoration along the Sacramento River has been successful in restoring riparian habitats for a broad suite of faunal species. Not only did

  10. Equal Educational Opportunity in the Sacramento City Unified School District; A Report to the Board of Education, The Sacramento City Unified School District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacramento City Unified School District, CA. Citizens Advisory Committee on Equal Educational Opportunity.

    A 1965 report presents the findings of a citizens committee on racial tension and school segregation in Sacramento, California. Discussed are defacto segregation and its causes and effects, equal educational opportunity, the neighborhood school concept, and intergroup relations. A series of recommendations for improvement are included. (NH)

  11. Determination of trace elements in eyeshadow, face powder and rouge make-up cosmetics by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanias, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    Some trace elements exist in cosmetics due to the mineral origin of their raw materials and there is no information about their concentration levels in these products. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to determine the elements: cerium, cesium, europium, hafnium, lanthanum, lutetium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, sodium, tantalum, terbium, tungsten and ytterbium in eyeshadow, face powder and rouge make-up cosmetic products from the Greek market. According to the results, a wide range of values was found between the three examined cosmetics as well as between the different samples belonging to the same kind of cosmetics. This probably could be attributed to the various manufacturers of the analyzed samples. Moreover, the use of neutron activation analysis as a suitable routine method is discussed for the control of some elements which must not be contained in cosmetics. (author)

  12. 76 FR 9709 - Water Quality Challenges in the San Francisco Bay/Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... Water Quality Challenges in the San Francisco Bay/Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Estuary AGENCY... the San Francisco Bay/ Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Estuary (Bay Delta Estuary) in California. EPA is... programs to address recent significant declines in multiple aquatic species in the Bay Delta Estuary. EPA...

  13. Distribution and geochemistry of selected trace elements in the Sacramento River near Keswick Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antweiler, Ronald C.; Taylor, Howard E.; Alpers, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of heavy metals from the Iron Mountain Mines (IMM) Superfund site on the upper Sacramento River is examined using data from water and bed sediment samples collected during 1996-97. Relative to surrounding waters, aluminum, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, thallium, zinc and the rare-earth elements (REE) were all present in high concentrations in effluent from Spring Creek Reservoir (SCR), which enters into the Sacramento River in the Spring Creek Arm of Keswick Reservoir. SCR was constructed in part to regulate the flow of acidic, metal-rich waters draining the IMM Superfund site. Although virtually all of these metals exist in SCR in the dissolved form, upon entering Keswick Reservoir they at least partially converted via precipitation and/or adsorption to the particulate phase. In spite of this, few of the metals settled out; instead the vast majority was transported colloidally down the Sacramento River at least to Bend Bridge, 67. km from Keswick Dam.The geochemical influence of IMM on the upper Sacramento River was variable, chiefly dependent on the flow of Spring Creek. Although the average flow of the Sacramento River at Keswick Dam is 250m 3/s (cubic meters per second), even flows as low as 0.3m 3/s from Spring Creek were sufficient to account for more than 15% of the metals loading at Bend Bridge, and these proportions increased with increasing Spring Creek flow.The dissolved proportion of the total bioavailable load was dependent on the element but steadily decreased for all metals, from near 100% in Spring Creek to values (for some elements) of less than 1% at Bend Bridge; failure to account for the suspended sediment load in assessments of the effect of metals transport in the Sacramento River can result in estimates which are low by as much as a factor of 100. ?? 2012.

  14. Prevalence and risk factors For vitamin D deficiency among healthy infants in Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the vitamin D status of healthy infants 6-18 months of age in Sacramento, CA. Patients and Methods: This was a one-year, cross-sectional study among a convenience sample of healthy infants seen at routine “well child” or follow-up appointments at t...

  15. 78 FR 66058 - Habitat Conservation Plan for South Sacramento County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... scoping meetings in local news media and on the Internet at http://www.fws.gov/sacramento . ADDRESSES... sphere of influence; and land within Galt's adopted sphere of influence. Almost all ground disturbance... resources, transportation, air quality, land use, recreation, water use, local economy, and environmental...

  16. Revised Environmental Assessment for the Sacramento Area Office Western Area Power Administration, 1994 Power Marketing Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This document presents information on power marketing; expiring contracts; economic methods and assumptions; detailed power supply cost data; guidelines and acceptance criteria for conservation and renewable energy projects; hourly flow impacts graphs; difference in hydro dispatch; generation data; flow data; fishery resources of the Sacramento River; and water quality

  17. 77 FR 47536 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Mojave Desert, Northern Sierra, Sacramento...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... San Diego Air Pollution Agencies AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final...), Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD) and San Diego County Air Pollution Control...) September 2008, 5. ``Control Techniques Guidelines for Miscellaneous Metal and Plastic Parts Coatings,'' EPA...

  18. Determinants of establishment survival for residential trees in Sacramento County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara A. Roman; John J. Battles; Joe R. McBride

    2014-01-01

    Urban forests can provide ecosystem services that motivate tree planting campaigns, and tree survival is a key element of program success and projected benefits. We studied survival in a shade tree give-away program in Sacramento, CA, monitoring a cohort of young trees for five years on single-family residential properties. We used conditional inference trees to...

  19. Sacramento River, Chico Landing to Red Bluff, California Bank Protection Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    i onwi de X X X X X X X (Turdus migratorius) Ruby-crowned kinglet Common-Nat i onwide X X X X X (Regulus calendula ) Water pipit Common-Nat i...City. In addition, State Point of Historical Interest, Glenn-011, Swifts Point, is located on the Sacramento River near Hamilton City and Glenn- Oil

  20. Local-scale invasion pathways and small founder numbers in introduced Sacramento pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus grandis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew P. Kinziger; Rodney J. Nakamoto; Bret C. Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Given the general pattern of invasions with severe ecological consequences commonly resulting from multiple introductions of large numbers of individuals on the intercontinental scale, we explored an example of a highly successful, ecologically significant invader introduced over a short distance, possibly via minimal propagule pressure. The Sacramento pikeminnow (

  1. Dissolved pesticide concentrations entering the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, California, 2012-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, James L.; McWayne, Megan; Sanders, Corey; Hladik, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Surface-water samples were collected from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers where they enter the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey for a suite of 99 current-use pesticides and pesticide degradates. Samples were collected twice per month from May 2012 through July 2013 and from May 2012 through April 2013 at the Sacramento River at Freeport, and the San Joaquin River near Vernalis, respectively. Samples were analyzed by two separate laboratory methods by using gas chromatography with mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Method detection limits ranged from 0.9 to 10.5 nanograms per liter (ng/L). A total of 37 pesticides and degradates were detected in water samples collected during the study (18 herbicides, 11 fungicides, 7 insecticides, and 1 synergist). The most frequently detected pesticides overall were the herbicide hexazinone (detected in 100 percent of the samples); 3,4-dichloroaniline (97 percent), which is a degradate of the herbicides diuron and propanil; the fungicide azoxystrobin (83 percent); and the herbicides diuron (72 percent), simazine (66 percent), and metolachlor (64 percent). Insecticides were rarely detected during the study. Pesticide concentrations varied from below the method detection limits to 984 ng/L (hexazinone). Twenty seven pesticides and (or) degradates were detected in Sacramento River samples, and the average number of pesticides per sample was six. The most frequently detected compounds in these samples were hexazinone (detected in 100 percent of samples), 3,4-dichloroaniline (97 percent), azoxystrobin (88 percent), diuron (56 percent), and simazine (50 percent). Pesticides with the highest detected maximum concentrations in Sacramento River samples included the herbicide clomazone (670 ng/L), azoxystrobin (368 ng/L), 3,4-dichloroaniline (364 ng/L), hexazinone (130 ng/L), and propanil (110 ng/L), and all but hexazinone are primarily associated with

  2. Pesticides in surface water measured at select sites in the Sacramento River basin, California, 1996-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, Joseph L.

    2000-01-01

    Pesticides were measured in one urban stream, one agricultural stream, one site on the Sacramento River, and one large flood control channel over a period of 18 months during 1996-1998. All sites were located within the Sacramento River Basin of California. Measurements were made on 83 pesticides or pesticide transformation products by either gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet light spectrometry. Some pesticides were detected frequently at the agricultural stream and downstream in the Sacramento River and at the flood control channel of the Sacramento River. These were pesticides related to rice farming (molinate, carbofuran, thiobencarb, and bentazon); herbicides used both agriculturally or for roadside maintenance (diuron, simazine, and metolachlor); or insecticides used on orchards and row corps (diazinon and chlorpyrifos). No pesticide concen-trations above enforceable water quality criteria were measured at either the agricultural site or the Sacramento River sites. In contrast to the agricul-tural site, insecticides used for household, lawn, or garden maintenance were the most frequently detected pesticides at the urban site. Diazinon, an organophosphate insecticide, exceeded recom-mended criteria for the protection of aquatic life, and the diazinon levels were frequently above known toxic levels for certain zooplankton species at the urban site. Because of the low discharge of the urban stream, pesticide concentrations were greatly diluted upon mixing with Sacramento River water.

  3. Copper, cadmium, and zinc concentrations in aquatic food chains from the Upper Sacramento River (California) and selected tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, M.K.; Castleberry, D. T.; May, T. W.; Martin, B.A.; Bullard, F. N.

    1995-01-01

    Metals enter the Upper Sacramento River above Redding, California, primarily through Spring Creek, a tributary that receives acid-mine drainage from a US EPA Superfund site known locally as Iron Mountain Mine. Waterweed (Elodea canadensis) and aquatic insects (midge larvae, Chironomidae; and mayfly nymphs, Ephemeroptera) from the Sacramento River downstream from Spring Creek contained much higher concentrations of copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn) than did similar taxa from nearby reference tributaries not exposed to acid-mine drainage. Aquatic insects from the Sacramento River contained especially high maximum concentrations of Cu (200 mg/kg dry weight in midge larvae), Cd (23 mg/kg dry weight in mayfly nymphs), and Zn (1,700 mg/kg dry weight in mayfly nymphs). Although not always statistically significant, whole-body concentrations of Cu, Cd, and Zn in fishes (threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus; Sacramento sucker, Catostomus occidentalis; Sacramento squawfish, Ptychocheilus grandis; and chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytasch) from the Sacramento River were generally higher than in fishes from the reference tributaries.

  4. Metals transport in the Sacramento River, California, 1996-1997; Volume 2: Interpretation of metal loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpers, Charles N.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Taylor, Howard E.; Dileanis, Peter D.; Domagalski, Joseph L.

    2000-01-01

    Metals transport in the Sacramento River, northern California, from July 1996 to June 1997 was evaluated in terms of metal loads from samples of water and suspended colloids that were collected on up to six occasions at 13 sites in the Sacramento River Basin. Four of the sampling periods (July, September, and November 1996; and May-June 1997) took place during relatively low-flow conditions and two sampling periods (December 1996 and January 1997) took place during high-flow and flooding conditions, respectively. This study focused primarily on loads of cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc, with secondary emphasis on loads of aluminum, iron, and mercury.Trace metals in acid mine drainage from abandoned and inactive base-metal mines, in the East and West Shasta mining districts, enter the Sacramento River system in predominantly dissolved form into both Shasta Lake and Keswick Reservoir. The proportion of trace metals that was dissolved (as opposed to colloidal) in samples collected at Shasta and Keswick dams decreased in the order zinc ≈ cadmium > copper > lead. At four sampling sites on the Sacramento River--71, 256, 360, and 412 kilometers downstream of Keswick Dam--trace-metal loads were predominantly colloidal during both high- and low-flow conditions. The proportion of total cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc loads transported to San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta estuary (referred to as the Bay-Delta) that is associated with mineralized areas was estimated by dividing loads at Keswick Dam by loads 412 kilometers downstream at Freeport and the Yolo Bypass. During moderately high flows in December 1996, mineralization-related total (dissolved + colloidal) trace-metal loads to the Bay-Delta (as a percentage of total loads measured downstream) were cadmium, 87 percent; copper, 35 percent; lead, 10 percent; and zinc, 51 percent. During flood conditions in January 1997 loads were cadmium, 22 percent; copper, 11 percent; lead, 2 percent; and zinc, 15

  5. Selected trace elements in the Sacramento River, California: Occurrence and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Howard E.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Roth, David A.; Dileanis, Peter D.; Alpers, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of trace elements from the Iron Mountain Superfund site on the Sacramento River and selected tributaries is examined. The concentration and distribution of many trace elements—including aluminum, arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, cerium, cobalt, chromium, cesium, copper, dysprosium, erbium, europium, iron, gadolinium, holmium, potassium, lanthanum, lithium, lutetium, manganese, molybdenum, neodymium, nickel, lead, praseodymium, rubidium, rhenium, antimony, selenium, samarium, strontium, terbium, thallium, thulium, uranium, vanadium, tungsten, yttrium, ytterbium, zinc, and zirconium—were measured using a combination of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Samples were collected using ultraclean techniques at selected sites in tributaries and the Sacramento River from below Shasta Dam to Freeport, California, at six separate time periods from mid-1996 to mid-1997. Trace-element concentrations in dissolved (ultrafiltered [0.005-μm pore size]) and colloidal material, isolated at each site from large volume samples, are reported. For example, dissolved Zn ranged from 900 μg/L at Spring Creek (Iron Mountain acid mine drainage into Keswick Reservoir) to 0.65 μg/L at the Freeport site on the Sacramento River. Zn associated with colloidal material ranged from 4.3 μg/L (colloid-equivalent concentration) in Spring Creek to 21.8 μg/L at the Colusa site on the Sacramento River. Virtually all of the trace elements exist in Spring Creek in the dissolved form. On entering Keswick Reservoir, the metals are at least partially converted by precipitation or adsorption to the particulate phase. Despite this observation, few of the elements are removed by settling; instead the majority is transported, associated with colloids, downriver, at least to the Bend Bridge site, which is 67 km from Keswick Dam. Most trace elements are strongly associated with the colloid phase going

  6. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory H. Golet; David L. Brown; Melinda Carlson; Thomas Gardali; Adam Henderson; Karen D. Holl; Christine A. Howell; Marcel Holyoak; John W. Hunt; G. Mathias Kondolf; Eric W. Larsen; Ryan A. Luster; Charles McClain; Charles Nelson; Seth Paine

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale ecosystem restoration projects seldom undergo comprehensive evaluation to determine project effectiveness. Consequently, there are missed opportunities for learning and strategy refinement. Before our study, monitoring information from California’s middle Sacramento River had not been synthesized, despite restoration having been ongoing since 1989. Our assessment was based on the development and application of 36 quantitative ecological indicators. These indicators were used to ch...

  7. Groundwater budgets for Detrital, Hualapai, and Sacramento Valleys, Mohave County, Arizona, 2007-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bradley D.; Truini, Margot

    2011-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Arizona Department of Water Resources, initiated an investigation of the hydrogeology and water resources of Detrital, Hualapai, and Sacramento Valleys in northwestern Arizona in 2005, and this report is part of that investigation. Water budgets were developed for Detrital, Hualapai, and Sacramento Valleys to provide a generalized understanding of the groundwater systems in this rural area that has shown some evidence of human-induced water-level declines. The valleys are within the Basin and Range physiographic province and consist of thick sequences of permeable alluvial sediment deposited into basins bounded by relatively less permeable igneous and metamorphic rocks. Long-term natural recharge rates (1940-2008) for the alluvial aquifers were estimated to be 1,400 acre-feet per year (acre-ft/yr) for Detrital Valley, 5,700 acre-ft/yr for Hualapai Valley, and 6,000 acre-ft/yr for Sacramento Valley. Natural discharge rates were assumed to be equal to natural recharge rates, on the basis of the assumption that all groundwater withdrawals to date have obtained water from groundwater storage. Groundwater withdrawals (2007-08) for the alluvial aquifers were less than 300 acre-ft/yr for Detrital Valley, about 9,800 acre-ft/yr for Hualapai Valley, and about 4,500 acre-ft/yr for Sacramento Valley. Incidental recharge from leaking water-supply pipes, septic systems, and wastewater-treatment plants accounted for about 35 percent of total recharge (2007-08) across the study area. Natural recharge and discharge values in this study were 24-50 percent higher than values in most previously published studies. Water budgets present a spatially and temporally "lumped" view of water resources and incorporate many sources of uncertainty in this study area where only limited data presently are available.

  8. Sensitivity of SWOT discharge algorithm to measurement errors: Testing on the Sacramento River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Micheal; Andreadis, Konstantinos; Yoon, Yeosang; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2013-04-01

    Scheduled for launch in 2019, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission will utilize a Ka-band radar interferometer to measure river heights, widths, and slopes, globally, as well as characterize storage change in lakes and ocean surface dynamics with a spatial resolution ranging from 10 - 70 m, with temporal revisits on the order of a week. A discharge algorithm has been formulated to solve the inverse problem of characterizing river bathymetry and the roughness coefficient from SWOT observations. The algorithm uses a Bayesian Markov Chain estimation approach, treats rivers as sets of interconnected reaches (typically 5 km - 10 km in length), and produces best estimates of river bathymetry, roughness coefficient, and discharge, given SWOT observables. AirSWOT (the airborne version of SWOT) consists of a radar interferometer similar to SWOT, but mounted aboard an aircraft. AirSWOT spatial resolution will range from 1 - 35 m. In early 2013, AirSWOT will perform several flights over the Sacramento River, capturing river height, width, and slope at several different flow conditions. The Sacramento River presents an excellent target given that the river includes some stretches heavily affected by management (diversions, bypasses, etc.). AirSWOT measurements will be used to validate SWOT observation performance, but are also a unique opportunity for testing and demonstrating the capabilities and limitations of the discharge algorithm. This study uses HEC-RAS simulations of the Sacramento River to first, characterize expected discharge algorithm accuracy on the Sacramento River, and second to explore the required AirSWOT measurements needed to perform a successful inverse with the discharge algorithm. We focus on the sensitivity of the algorithm accuracy to the uncertainty in AirSWOT measurements of height, width, and slope.

  9. A New Data Acquisition Portal for the Sacramento River Settlement Contractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narlesky, P. E., C. A.; Williams, P. E., A. M.

    2017-12-01

    In 1964, the United States Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) executed settlement contracts with the Sacramento River Settlement Contractors (SRSC), entities which hold water rights along the Sacramento River with area of origin protection or that are senior to Reclamation's water rights for Shasta Reservoir. Shasta is the cornerstone of the federal Central Valley Project (CVP), one of the nation's largest multi-purpose water conservation programs. In order to optimize CVP operations for multiple beneficial uses including water supply, fisheries, water quality, and waterfowl habitat, the SRSC voluntarily agreed to adaptively manage diversions throughout the year in close coordination with Reclamation. MBK Engineers assists the SRSC throughout this process by collecting, organizing, compiling, and distributing diversion data to Reclamation and others involved in operational decisions related to Shasta Reservoir and the CVP. To improve and expand participation in diversions reporting, we have developed the SRSC Web Portal, which launches a data-entry dashboard for members of the SRSC to facilitate recording and transmittal of both predicted and observed monthly and daily flow diversion data. This cloud-hosted system leverages a combination of Javascript interactive visualization libraries with a database-backed Python web framework to present streamlined data-entry forms and valuable SRSC program summary illustrations. SRSC program totals, which can now be aggregated through queries to the web-app's database backend, are used by Reclamation, SRSC, fish agencies, and others to inform operational decisions. By submitting diversion schedules and tracking actual diversions through the portal, contractors will also be directly contributing to the development of a richer and more consistently-formatted historical record for demand hydrology in the Sacramento River Watershed; this may be useful in future water supply studies. Adoption of this technology will foster an

  10. Exploring the roles of temperature and NOx on ozone production in the Sacramento urban plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafranchi, B. W.; Cohen, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the role of temperature and NOx (NOx = NO+NO2) on ozone (O3) production in the Sacramento urban plume over a stretch of seven years (2001-2007) using data collected at UC Blodgett Forest Research Station (a forested site in the Sierra Nevadas about 80 km downwind of Sacramento, CA) and at a series of California Air Resources Board (CARB) sites along the Sacramento-Blodgett transect. The consistent daytime wind patterns between the Central Valley of California and the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains permits the assumption of plume transport from downtown Sacramento, over the CARB monitoring sites in the eastern suburbs, and past the Blodgett Forest research site. While NOx emissions are limited primarily to the urban and suburban regions of the transect, biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are significant throughout the transect, thus there is a fast transition from VOC-limited to NOx-limited as the plume travels away from the urban center, and we have the opportunity to analyze the differences in ozone production across these two chemical regimes. For this analysis, the Sacramento-Blodgett transect is separated into three segments: urban, suburban, and rural, defined by the locations of selected monitoring sites. Ozone concentrations across each segment are controlled by chemical production (Pchem) and loss (Lchem), deposition to surfaces (Ldep), and mixing with background air (Lmix). At an assumed deposition rate, mixing rate, and background O3 concentration, the net chemical flux of ozone (Pchem - Lchem) can be inferred from differences in ozone concentrations between adjacent monitoring sites. We show that ozone production rates, in general, increase with temperature. We also show that decreases in NOx emissions over the period from 2001-2007 have been effective at reducing ozone production at all points along the transect, but only on days where temperatures are highest. At low temperatures, this decrease is less apparent

  11. Ground-water quality in the southeastern Sacramento Valley aquifer, California, 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milby Dawson, Barbara J.

    2001-01-01

    In 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey sampled 29 domestic wells and 2 monitoring wells in the southeastern Sacramento Valley as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. This area, designated as the NAWQA Sacramento subunit study area, was chosen because it had the largest amount of ground-water use in the Sacramento River Basin. The Sacramento subunit study area is about 4,400 square kilometers and includes intense agricultural and urban development. The wells sampled ranged from 14.9 to 79.2 meters deep. Ground-water samples from 31 wells were analyzed for 6 field measurements, 14 inorganic constituents, 6 nutrient constituents, organic carbon, 86 pesticides, 87 volatile organic compounds, tritium (hydrogen-3), radon-222, deuterium (hydrogen-2), and oxygen-18. Nitrate levels were lower than the 2000 drinking-water standards in all but one well, but many detections were in the range that indicated an effect by human activities on ground-water quality. Radon was detected in all wells, and was measured at levels above the proposed Federal 2000 maximum contaminant level in 90 percent of the wells. Five pesticides and one pesticide degradation product were detected in ground-water samples and concentrations were below 2000 drinking-water standards. All pesticides detected during this study have been used in the Sacramento Valley. Thirteen volatile organic compounds were detected in ground water. One detection of trichloroethene was above Federal 2000 drinking-water standards, and another, tetrachloromethane, was above California 1997 drinking-water standards; both occurred in a well that had eight volatile organic compound detections and is near a known source of ground-water contamination. Pesticides and volatile organic compounds were detected in agricultural and urban areas; both pesticides and volatile organic compounds were detected at a higher frequency in urban wells. Ground-water chemistry indicates that natural

  12. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (16th, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, November 5-8, 1994). Volume 1: Plenary Sessions, Technology Focus Groups, Discussion Groups and Research Papers, Oral Reports and Posters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, David, Ed.

    This volume contains the full text of 2 plenary papers and 26 research reports. In addition, brief, usually one-page, reports are provided for 6 discussion groups, 10 technology focus groups, 7 symposiums, 7 oral presentations, and 17 position sessions. The two full plenary reports are: (1) "Problems of Reification: Representations and…

  13. Colônia do Sacramento: a situação na fronteira platina no século XVIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Pereira Prado

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available A Colônia do Sacramento, no atual Uruguai, na primeira metade do século XVIII, constituiu uma cidade de pródigo comércio na região platina. Inseridos tanto nas rotas comerciais e sociais portuguesas quanto nas castelhanas, os habitantes de Sacramento materializavam uma fronteira múltipla, onde coexistiam espanhóis, portugueses e diferentes grupos indígenas. O presente estudo analisa os vínculos sociais e comerciais existentes entre os habitantes de Sacramento e os de Buenos Aires. No interior do espaço platino as redes sociais estabelecidas através do rio da Prata, ligando Sacramento e Buenos Aires, eram vias de acúmulo de prestígio, poder e riqueza em uma sociedade de antigo regime.The Sacramento Colony, currently Uruguayan territory, in the first half of the XVIII century, was a city with great commerce on the River Plate Region. Placed in both Portuguese and Spanish social and commercial routes, the Sacramento habitants formed a multiple frontier where Spanish, Portuguese and different indigenous groups coexisted. The present study analyses the social and commercial links that existed between the Sacramento and Buenos Aires inhabitants. In the River Plate region, the social networks developed connecting Sacramento and Buenos Ayers were gateways to social status, power and wealth in an old regime society.

  14. Analyse sédimentologique des 'Couches Rouges' du bassin intramontagneux de Sicuani (Sud du Pérou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Le bassin des 'Couches Rouges' de Sicuani (sud du Pérou est un bassin continental intramontagneux dont le fonctionnement débute dès les premiers mouvements tectoniques andins du Sénonien. La sédimentation est essentiellement d'origine fluviatile. Les termes les plus proximaux sont représentés par les rivières en tresse à galets et les plus distaux par la plaine d'inondation à chenaux divagants. Le sens constant des apports sédimentaires implique une paléopente régionale inclinée vers le nord. A cette époque, la principale source des sédiments n'est donc pas représentée par la Cordillère orientale mais plutôt par les reliefs situés au sud-ouest des affleurements. Le taux de sédimentation relativement élevé, le guidage des transits sédimentaires par d'anciennes failles majeures et l'existence de structures de déformation synsédimentaire compressives font du bassin de Sicuani un bassin tectoniquement actif, comparable à celui de Cuzco. La première phase tectonique andine ne correspond donc plus à un événement ponctuel mais bien au contraire à un continuum tectonique en compression au cours duquel se développe la sédimentation des 'Couches Rouges' sud péruviennes. Ce continuum tectonique est associé à une activité volcanique intermittente, en partie responsable de l'alimentation des bassins. La cuenca de las 'Capas Rojas' de Sicuani (sur del Perú es una cuenca continental intramontañosa cuyo funcionamiento empezó desde los primeros movimientos tectónicos andinos del Senoniano. La sedimentación tiene un origen fundamentalmente fluviátil. Los términos más proximales corresponden a ríos en trenza con cantos y los más distales a la llanura de inundación con canales divagantes. La permanencia del sentido de los aportes sedimentarios implica la existencia de una paleopendiente regional inclinada hacia el norte. Es así como, en esta época, la fuente principal de los sedimentos no estuvo representada por

  15. 18 CFR 270.401 - Jurisdictional agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., Springfield, VA 22153. (5) California, except Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) and No. 2 (Buena Vista..., Office of Conservation, PO Box 94275, Baton Rouge, LA 70804. (15) Maryland—Department of Natural...

  16. 14 CFR 1201.402 - NASA Industrial Applications Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and innovative technology to nonaerospace sectors of the economy—NASA operates a network of Industrial..., Department of Computer Science, Baton Rouge, LA 70813-2065. (b) To obtain access to NASA-developed computer...

  17. 77 FR 4060 - Notice of Lodging of Second Agreement and Order Regarding Modification of the Consent Decree...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... Modification'') in United States and Louisiana v. City of Baton Rouge, Civil Action No. 3:01-cv-00978-FJP-CN...-0097, phone confirmation number (202) 514-5271. If requesting a copy from the Consent Decree Library by...

  18. University Data Partnership Peer Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    In March 2012, the Connecticut (CTDOT) and New Mexico (NMDOT) Departments of Transportation met in Baton Rouge, Louisiana for a two-day peer session dedicated to exploring the intricate 12-year safety data partnership between the Louisiana Department...

  19. Analysis of Louisiana vehicular input data for MOBILE 6 : technical summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 require that non-attainment and air quality : maintenance areas regularly conduct regional emissions analyses. In Louisiana, Baton Rouge : and Lake Charles are ozone non-attainment areas while New Orleans i...

  20. Evaluation of continuity detail for precast prestressed girders : research project capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    The construction of a new bridge : crossing the Mississippi River north of : Baton Rouge is currently underway. The : project, named the John James : Audubon Bridge, is a true landmark. Its : main span will be the longest cablestayed : bridge in Nort...

  1. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Rodolfo Gambini1 Jorge Pullin2. Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Igua esq. Matajo, Montevideo, Uruguay; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA ...

  2. Adaptive Management Methods to Protect the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Water Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David

    2016-01-01

    The California Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is the hub for California's water supply, conveying water from Northern to Southern California agriculture and communities while supporting important ecosystem services, agriculture, and communities in the Delta. Changes in climate, long-term drought, water quality changes, and expansion of invasive aquatic plants threatens ecosystems, impedes ecosystem restoration, and is economically, environmentally, and sociologically detrimental to the San Francisco Bay/California Delta complex. NASA Ames Research Center and the USDA-ARS partnered with the State of California and local governments to develop science-based, adaptive-management strategies for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The project combines science, operations, and economics related to integrated management scenarios for aquatic weeds to help land and waterway managers make science-informed decisions regarding management and outcomes. The team provides a comprehensive understanding of agricultural and urban land use in the Delta and the major water sheds (San Joaquin/Sacramento) supplying the Delta and interaction with drought and climate impacts on the environment, water quality, and weed growth. The team recommends conservation and modified land-use practices and aids local Delta stakeholders in developing management strategies. New remote sensing tools have been developed to enhance ability to assess conditions, inform decision support tools, and monitor management practices. Science gaps in understanding how native and invasive plants respond to altered environmental conditions are being filled and provide critical biological response parameters for Delta-SWAT simulation modeling. Operational agencies such as the California Department of Boating and Waterways provide testing and act as initial adopter of decision support tools. Methods developed by the project can become routine land and water management tools in complex river delta systems.

  3. Biogeochemical studies of wintering waterfowl in the Imperial and Sacramento Valleys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koranda, J.J.; Stuart, M.; Thompson, S.; Conrado, C.

    1979-10-01

    Trace and major elemental composition were determined in the organs of wintering waterfowl in the Imperial and Sacramento Valleys of California, and in soils, sediments, and agricultural fertilizer that constitute the various sources of elements in the waterfowl. These data provide a biogeochemical baseline for waterfowl populations wintering in an area being developed for geothermal power. This baseline in the Imperial Valley is affected by soil and sediment composition, agricultural effluents in irrigation and stream water, and spent shot deposited by hunters in waterfowl habitats. The waterfowl acquire a set of trace elements from these sources and concentrations increase in their organs over the wintering period. Nickel, arsenic, selenium, bromine, and lead are the primary elements acquired from soil sources, agricultural effluents, and spent shot in the Imperial Valley. The assessment of effects from geothermal effluents on waterfowl populations in complex because there are large influxes of materials into the Imperial Valley ecosystem that contain trace elements, i.e., irrigation water, phosphatic fertilizers, pesticides, and lead shot. Multiple sources exist for many elements prominent in the expected geothermal effluents. The relationships between the two California valleys, the Imperial and Sacramento, are apparent in the trace element concentrations in the organs of waterfowl obtained in those two valleys. Arsenic is absent in the waterfowl organs obtained in the Sacramento Valley and relatively common in the Imperial Valley waterfowl. The effect of any release of geothermal effluent in the Imperial Valley waterfowl habitats will be difficult to describe because of the complexity of the biogeochemical baseline and the multiple sources of trace and major elements in the ecosystem.

  4. Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop Summary: August 24, 2006, Sacramento, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treanton, B.; Palomo, J.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop, sponsored by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program and organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, was held Aug. 24, 2006, in Sacramento, Calif. The workshop provided a forum for industry stakeholders to share their knowledge and experience about technologies, manufacturing approaches, markets, and issues in power electronics for a range of distributed energy resources. It focused on the development of advanced power electronic interfaces for distributed energy applications and included discussions of modular power electronics, component manufacturing, and power electronic applications.

  5. NORTH SOLDIERS IN SOUTHERN WARS: THE MILITARY RECRUITMENT IN BAHIA AND PERNAMBUCO TO THE COLONY OF THE SACRAMENTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Possamai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The North of the State of Brazil contributed to the creation and defense of Colonia do Sacramento. This article will address the military conscription in the Northern provinces, especially in Bahia and Pernambuco during the Eighteenth Century. We will give emphasis to the period of the siege from 1735 to 1737, when a large conscription was enforced in Portugal and in many Brazilian provinces in order to avoid the conquest of Sacramento by the Spaniards, as well as to strengthen Rio Grande de São Pedro, from which few men could return home.

  6. Cultural Resources Survey of Palmetto and Coochie Revetments, Mississippi River M-326 to 315

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-11

    1840 - SION G. ROWAN ’WILKINSON S PAUL PANDELLY!COKTESWORTH P. SMm .- - ’WILLIAM STAMPS SCHOOL MOSES UD .P E WILLIAM STAMPS1 SECTION WIL.IA\\ -1830 /AND... Tourism , Baton Rouge. Smith, Steven D., Philip G. Rivet, Kathleen M. Byrd, and Nancy W. Hawkins 1983 Louisiana’s Comprehensive Archaeological Plan. State...of Louisiana, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism , Officer of Cultural Development, Division of Archaeology, Baton Rouge. Society of

  7. Analysis of available wind resources and their suitability for hydrogen production in the Sacramento area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomy, O.J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper looks at the technical, economic, environmental and regulatory barriers to the production of hydrogen from local wind resources in Sacramento, CA. Both central and distributed hydrogen generation are compared. The technical analysis uses 6 years of hourly wind data from Solano County to define the diurnal and seasonal wind resource. The impacts of a fluctuating power source on the electrolyzer are examined as well as the grid or hydrogen distribution and storage infrastructure constraints for implementation. An economic analysis comparing the price of hydrogen produced from the local wind resource is done with sensitivity analyses for capital and operating costs of both wind turbines and electrolyzers. In addition, the economic analysis includes considerations of increased demand for wind electricity by California utilities attempting to meet their Renewable Portfolio Standards. The environmental analysis compares the emissions reductions of CO 2 and criteria pollutants for different energy usage scenarios. These include comparing electricity and transportation emissions rates to optimize the use of wind energy and natural gas, as well as comparison of SULEV hybrid vehicles with FCV's and H 2 ICE's. Finally, an examination of the existing regulatory structure and policies that could prevent or encourage the use of wind to produce hydrogen in Sacramento is also included. (author)

  8. Assessing the Performance of a Network of Low Cost Particulate Matter Sensors Deployed in Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A. D.; Brown, S. G.; McCarthy, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    A new generation of low cost air quality sensors have the potential to provide valuable information on the spatial-temporal variability of air pollution - if the measurements have sufficient quality. This study examined the performance of a particulate matter sensor model, the AirBeam (HabitatMap Inc., Brooklyn, NY), over a three month period in the urban environment of Sacramento, California. Nineteen AirBeam sensors were deployed at a regulatory air monitoring site collocated with meteorology measurements and as a local network over an 80 km2 domain in Sacramento, CA. This study presents the methodology to evaluate the precision, accuracy, and reliability of the sensors over a range of meteorological and aerosol conditions. The sensors demonstrated a robust degree of precision during collocated measurement periods (R2 = 0.98 - 0.99) and a moderate degree of correlation against a Beta Attenuation Monitor PM2.5 monitor (R2 0.6). A normalization correction is applied during the study period so that each AirBeam sensor in the network reports a comparable value. The role of the meteorological environment on the accuracy of the sensor measurements is investigated, along with the possibility of improving the measurements through a meteorology weighted correction. The data quality of the network of sensors is examined, and the spatial variability of particulate matter through the study domain derived from the sensor network is presented.

  9. Assessment of LED Technology in Ornamental Post-Top Luminaires (Host Site: Sacramento, CA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-12-01

    The DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium has evaluated four different LED replacements for existing ornamental post-top street lights in Sacramento, California. The project team was composed of the City and its consultant, PNNL (representing the Consortium), and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District. Product selection was finalized in March 2011, yielding one complete luminaire replacement and three lamp-ballast retrofit kits. Computer simulations, field measurements, and laboratory testing were performed to compare the performance and cost-effectiveness of the LED products relative to the existing luminaire with 100 W high-pressure sodium lamp. After it was confirmed the LED products were not equivalent to HPS in terms of initial photopic illumination, the following parameters were scaled proportionally to enable equitable (albeit hypothetical) comparisons: light output, input wattage, and pricing. Four replacement scenarios were considered for each LED product, incorporating new IES guidance for mesopic multipliers and lumen maintenance extrapolation, but life cycle analysis indicated cost effectiveness was also unacceptable. Although LED efficacy and pricing continue to improve, this project serves as a timely and objective notice that LED technology may not be quite ready yet for such applications.

  10. Termorregulação e produção de ovos de galinhas Label Rouge em ambiente equatorial semiárido

    OpenAIRE

    Souza Jr, João Batista Freire de

    2014-01-01

    Objetivou-se com este estudo avaliar as diferenças regionais na temperatura superficial através de imagens térmicas e o efeito do ambiente semiárido e do tamanho da partícula do milho no desempenho, qualidade do ovo e perda de calor sensível de poedeiras do pescoço pelado. Em Mossoró-RN, 60 galinhas da linhagem Label Rouge em fase de postura foram distribuídas em um delineamento inteiramente casualizado, onde foram fornecidas rações com diferentes tamanhos da partícula do milho ou diâmetro ge...

  11. Behaviour of uranium during late-Hercynian and alpine metamorphisms in the Aiguilles rouges and Belledonne (Valorcine, Lauziere) massifs. Western Alps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negga, H.S.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this research thesis is to define the origin of numerous uranium anomalies in the external crystalline Alpine massifs, more precisely the massif of the Aiguilles Rouges and the massif of Belledonne. The primary cause of uranium mineralization in the first massif appears to have been the retrograde metamorphism events of the late-Hercynian age. In the second massif, the same conditions of uranium mineralization appear to have been realised, but with a much higher calcium activity in the fluids. After having explained the choice of the selected areas, the sampling and the chemical analysis performed, the author describes the geological and structural framework of Western Alps: geological history of the paleozoic platform, regional geology of the studied massifs. The next part reports the petrographic and geochemical study, the analysis of the mineral chemistry, of the alteration and the metamorphism. Then the author describes the geochemistry of uranium and thorium within the studied structures

  12. Proceedings of the National Silviculture Workshop: Silviculture for All Resources; Sacramento, CA; May 11-14, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanie Malespin Woolever; Mike Smith; Elizabeth McGraw; Mike Lanasa; Arthur C. Zack; Chris Reichert; Robert MacWhorter; Michael R. Lennartz; Richard A. Lancia; Marc G. Rounsaville; James R. Sedell; Fred H. Everest; David R. Gibbons; Stephen R. Shifley; Melinda Moeur; David A. Marquis; Richard O. Fitzgerald; Nelson Loftus; Thomas C. Turpin; William R. Terrill; Glenn L. Crouch; Wayne D. Shepperd; Edith W. Petrick; John J. Petrick; Roger W. Dennington; Allan W. Ashton; Hubertus J. Mittmann; Gary Thompson; Ken Sonksen; David A. Stark; Michael A. Ware; Allan J. West; Patrick D. Jackson; Richard L. Bassett; Jimmie D. Chew; William B. White; Bruce W. Morse; Mike Znerold; Russell T. Graham; Peyton W. Owston; Richard G. Miller; John R. Nesbitt; Gaston Porterie; Ernest Del Rio

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 National Silviculture Workshop was held in Sacramento, California, and the Eldorado National Forest. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss, review, and share information and experiences regarding how silviculture can serve as the tool to help accomplish the objectives of many resources.

  13. Delivering Economic Development in the Context of Financial Crisis: A Workforce Gap Analysis of the Sacramento Regional Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavian, Alexander H.

    2013-01-01

    Workforce development represents a central priority in a comprehensive effort to create wealth, industry thickening, and broad-based prosperity. From the onset of the Great Recession in 2007, the Sacramento Region experienced anemic economic growth and remained behind the nation in job creation. Contextualized in the aftermath of the economic…

  14. Popular Music: A Selected Bibliography of Materials in the California State University, Sacramento Library. Bibliographic Series No. 22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donna Ridley, Comp.

    The bibliography lists over 400 works in the California State University Library, Sacramento, on pop, rock, country, folk, blues, and soul music from 1950 to the present. Books, periodicals, and non-book materials noted in the bibliography are appropriate for history, communication studies, and popular culture studies as well as for music. Items…

  15. Conflicts in River Management: A Conservationist's Perspective on Sacramento River Riparian Habitats—Impacts, Threats, Remedies, Opportunities, and Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Spotts

    1989-01-01

    The Sacramento River's historic riparian habitats have been reduced by over 98 percent due to cumulative, adverse human activities. These activities continue to jeopardize the remaining riparian habitats. The results of these trends is more endangered species conflicts and listings, coupled with less fish, beautiful scenery, and other resource values. This paper...

  16. Autour de 1968, en France et ailleurs : Le Fond de l'air était rouge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Dreyer

    2010-01-01

    "; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";}

    Abstract (E: The reception of Le Fond de l’air est rouge (Grin Without a Cat by Chris. Marker (1978-2008 turned the film into an emblem of May ’68, which is given much attention, but only to propose an analysis full of contrasts. In this film, which remembers the “red years”, Marker puts the political commitment of his generation into perspective and tackles the problem of the relationship between the French movements and the struggles of the Third World. The solidarity as expressed by French militants seldom goes beyond a statement of principles and the fascination for revolutions abroad is a substitute for a disappointing local situation. Le Fond de l’air est rouge however pays tribute to the spirit of May ’68, in particular in its collective modes of realization and enunciation, which allow a new definition of the committed artwork in the “era of suspicion”.

     

    Abstract (F: La réception du Fond de l’air est rouge (1978-2008 de Chris. Marker en a fait un emblème de Mai 68, événement auquel il accorde il est vrai une large place mais pour en proposer une analyse contrastée : dans ce film en forme de retour mémoriel sur les années « rouges

  17. Sacramento Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — CDF-FRAP compiled the 'best available' land cover data into a single data layer, to support the various analyses required for the 2002 Forest and Range Assessment....

  18. Data for four geologic test holes in the Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkstresser, C.F.; French, J.J.; Schaal, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    The report provides geological and geophysical data for four of seven test holes drilled as a part of the Central Valley Aquifer Project, which is part of the Regional Aquifer Systems Analysis. The holes were drilled with a rotary well drilling machine to depths of 900 feet in the southwestern part of the Sacramento Valley in Solano and Yolo Counties. Geologic data for each well include lithology, texture, color, character of the contact, sorting, rounding, and cementation, determined from cuttings, cores, and sidewall covers. Fifty cores, 3 feet long, were obtained from each hole, and from eight to fourteen sidewall cores were collected. Geophysical data include a dual-induction log, spherically focused log (SFL), compensated neutron-formation density log, gamma-ray log, and a caliper log. These data are presented in four tables and on four plates. (USGS)

  19. Atmospheric transport of pesticides in the Sacramento, California, metropolitan area, 1996-1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Michael S.; Baston, David S.

    2002-01-01

    Weekly composite, bulk air was sampled with respect to wind speed and direction from January 1996 through December 1997 in one urban and two agricultural locations in Sacramento County, California. The sampling sites were located along a north-south transect, the dominant directions of the prevailing winds. The samples were analyzed for a variety of current-use pesticides, including dormant orchard spray insecticides and rice herbicides. A variety of pesticides were detected throughout the year, predominantly chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and trifluralin. The data obtained during the winter and spring suggest that some pesticides used in agricultural areas become airborne and may be transported into the urban area. Confirmation of this drift is difficult, however, because these three predominant pesticides, as well as other detected pesticides, also are heavily used in the urban environment. The spring data clearly show that molinate and thiobencarb, two herbicides used only in rice production, do drift into the urban environment.

  20. Audit Report on the Sacramento Army Depot Internal Review and Audit Compliance Office's "Audits of Warranties, Quality Deficiency Reports, and Reports of Discrepancies"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1992-01-01

    The Sacramento Army Depot (SAAD) Internal Review and Audit Compliance Office (Internal Review) issued an audit report, "Audit of Warranties, Quality Deficiency Reports, and Reports of Discrepancies," on July 20, 1990...

  1. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Conflict: Strategic Insights for California's Policymakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazezi, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta - a major water supply source in California and a unique habitat for many native and invasive species--is on the verge of collapse due to a prolonged conflict over how to manage the Delta. There is an urgent need to expedite the resolution of this conflict because the continuation of the status quo would leave irreversible environmental consequences for the entire state. In this paper a systematic technique is proposed for providing strategic insights into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta conflict. Game theory framework is chosen to systematically analyze behavioral characteristics of decision makers as well as their options in the conflict with respect to their preferences using a formal mathematical language. The Graph Model for Conflict Resolution (GMCR), a recent game-theoretic technique, is applied to model and analyze the Delta conflict in order to better understand the options, preferences, and behavioral characteristics of the major decision makers. GMCR II as a decision support system tool based on GMCR concept is used to facilitate the analysis of the problem through a range of non-cooperative game theoretic stability definitions. Furthermore, coalition analysis is conducted to analyze the potential for forming partial coalitions among decision makers, and to investigate how forming a coalition can influence the conflict resolution process. This contribution shows that involvement of the State of California is necessary for developing an environmental-friendly resolution for the Delta conflict. It also indicates that this resolution is only achievable through improving the fragile levee systems and constructing a new water export facility.

  2. Groundwater Pumping and Streamflow in the Yuba Basin, Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, D. R.; Fogg, G. E.; Wallender, W. W.

    2011-12-01

    Water transfers during drought in California's Sacramento Valley can lead to increased groundwater pumping, and as yet unknown effects on stream baseflow. Two existing groundwater models of the greater Sacramento Valley together with localized, monitoring of groundwater level fluctuations adjacent to the Bear, Feather, and Yuba Rivers, indicate cause and effect relations between the pumping and streamflow. The models are the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and C2VSIM developed by Department of Water Resources. Using two models which have similar complexity and data but differing approaches to the agricultural water boundary condition illuminates both the water budget and its uncertainty. Water budget and flux data for localized areas can be obtained from the models allowing for parameters such as precipitation, irrigation recharge, and streamflow to be compared to pumping on different temporal scales. Continuous groundwater level measurements at nested, near-stream piezometers show seasonal variations in streamflow and groundwater levels as well as the timing and magnitude of recharge and pumping. Preliminary results indicate that during years with relatively wet conditions 65 - 70% of the surface recharge for the groundwater system comes from irrigation and precipitation and 30 - 35% comes from streamflow losses. The models further indicate that during years with relatively dry conditions, 55 - 60% of the surface recharge for the groundwater system comes from irrigation and precipitation while 40 - 45% comes from streamflow losses. The models irrigation water demand, surface-water and groundwater supply, and deep percolation are integrated producing values for irrigation pumping. Groundwater extractions during the growing season, approximately between April and October, increase by almost 200%. The effects of increased pumping seasonally are not readily evident in stream stage measurements. However, during dry time

  3. Evaluating the Aquatic Habitat Potential of Flooded Polders in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Durand

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available https://doi.org/10.15447/sfews.2017v15iss4art4Large tracts of land in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta are subsided due to agricultural practices, creating polders up to 10 m below sea level that are vulnerable to flooding. As protective dikes breach, these become shallow, open water habitats that will not resemble any historical state. I investigated physical and biotic drivers of novel flooded polder habitat, using a Native Species Benefit Index (NSBI to predict the nature of future Delta ecosystems. Results suggest that flooded polders in the north Delta will have the ecology and fish community composition of a tidal river plain, those in the Cache-Lindsey Complex will have that of a tidal backwater, those in the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers a brackish estuary, and those in the south Delta a fresh water lake. Flooded east-side Delta polders will likely be a transitional zone between south Delta lake-like ecosystems and north Delta tidal river plains. I compared each regional zone with the limited available literature and data on local fish assemblies to find support for NSBI predictions. Because flood probabilities and repair prioritization analyses suggest that polders in the south Delta are most likely to flood and be abandoned, without extensive intervention, much of the Delta will become a freshwater lake ecosystem, dominated by alien species. Proactive management of flooded tracts will nearly always hedge risks, save money and offer more functional habitats in the future; however, without proper immediate incentives, it will be difficult to encourage strong management practices.

  4. La consommation urbaine de l’huile de palme rouge en Côte d’Ivoire : quels marchés ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheyns Emmanuelle

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Au côté d’une extraction industrielle de l’huile de palme dont les débouchés sont l’exportation en Europe et, en Côte d’Ivoire, la seconde transformation en huile industrielle raffinée et produits dérivés (savons, margarines pour un marché ivoirien et sous-régional, il existe un secteur de transformation artisanal de l’huile rouge (et aussi de l’huile de palmiste et de savons qui répond à une demande différenciée des consommateurs ruraux mais aussi urbains. En termes d’équipements de transformation, le secteur artisanal est peu développé (beaucoup moins que dans d’autres pays de la sous-région. L’extraction de l’huile rouge y est soit entièrement manuelle, soit semi-mécanisée : utilisation de presses à vis verticales très simples et peu coûteuses. Les trente dernières années de développement industriel n’ont pas permis à la Côte d’Ivoire de se doter d’équipements semi-industriels ou artisanaux, intermédiaires 2 entre l’usine de 20 ou 40 t/h et la transformation manuelle par les femmes, alors que d’autres pays voisins se sont au contraire dotés de ces équipements [1]. Quoi qu’il en soit, ce secteur artisanal informel, maîtrisé par les femmes (transformation et commercialisation, approvisionne largement les marchés de consommation locaux, ruraux comme urbains, en un produit considéré comme spécifique (que ne fournit pas l’agro-industrie locale et qui semble toujours apprécié des consommateurs. Il nous amène à reconsidérer la filière « palmier à huile » sous l’angle d’une filière dont le produit est aussi « vivrier » (par opposition à produit de « rente » et qui assure un approvisionnement des marchés locaux, via des circuits informels, en répondant à une demande locale. Une première enquête 3 par entretiens approfondis auprès de 28 ménages abidjanais révèle une différenciation de la demande qui s’établit sur la qualité des produits, et qui

  5. Spatial trends and impairment assessment of mercury in sport fish in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta watershed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melwani, A.R.; Bezalel, S.N.; Hunt, J.A.; Grenier, J.L.; Ichikawa, G.; Heim, W.; Bonnema, A.; Foe, C.; Slotton, D.G.; Davis, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    A three-year study was conducted to examine mercury in sport fish from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. More than 4000 fish from 31 species were collected and analyzed for total mercury in individual muscle filets. Largemouth bass and striped bass were the most contaminated, averaging 0.40 μg/g, while redear sunfish, bluegill and rainbow trout exhibited the lowest (<0.15 μg/g) concentrations. Spatial variation in mercury was evaluated with an analysis of covariance model, which accounted for variability due to fish size and regional hydrology. Significant regional differences in mercury were apparent in size-standardized largemouth bass, with concentrations on the Cosumnes and Mokelumne rivers significantly higher than the central and western Delta. Significant prey-predator mercury correlations were also apparent, which may explain a significant proportion of the spatial variation in the watershed. - Regional differences in sport fish mercury were found in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

  6. Katrina's Lessons in California: Social and Political Trajectories of Flood Management in the Sacramento River Watershed since 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comby, E.; Le Lay, Y. F.; Piegay, H.

    2017-12-01

    Over the last decade, major changes have occurred in the way that environments are managed. They can be linked with external or internal events which may shape public perception. An external event can reveal a forgotten risk and create a social problem (Hilgartner et Bosk 1988). Following the Advocacy Coalition Framework (Sabatier 1988), we studied the role of Hurricane Katrina in flood management in California from 2005 to 2013. How do policies intend to increase the city's resilience? We compared different flood policies of the Sacramento River from 2005 to 2013, by combining field observations with a principal dataset of 340 regional newspaper items (Sacramento Bee). Media coverage was analyzed using content, quotation, and textometry as well as GIS. We underlined temporal variability in public perceptions towards floods. Some planning choices (such as levees) became controversial, while journalists praised weirs, bypasses, and dams. However, Katrina does not seem to have a real impact on urban sprawl strategies in three Sacramento neighborhoods (Fig.1). We analyzed also the limits of the comparison between New Orleans and Sacramento. Dialog between stakeholders existed in space and time between here (California) and elsewhere (Louisiana), present (post-2005) and past (Katrina catastrophe), and risk and disaster. Katrina was a national scandal with political announcements. However, flood policy was developed first at a regional and then local scales. After Katrina awareness, conflicts appear: some California residents refuse to have a policy linked to Katrina applied to them. We underlined that different stakeholders became prominent: it may be useless to tackle with only one institution. Some institutions had an integrated river management, while others kept a traditional risk management. We assessed the changes in river management while using discourse to understand the (potential) shift in human-river relationships from risk management to integrated river

  7. Cœur elle y gît rouge (qui gît dans l’élégie ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Conort

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Si le recueil Cœur élégie rouge de James Sacré fait bien apparaître l’ombre d’une femme aimée et perdue, ne voir dans cette élégie qu’une dimension autobiographique serait réducteur, et il faut peut-être y entendre aussi, selon une approche réflexive, le poème qui échoue à restituer le monde, le végétal, les visages. De la sorte, l’élégie serait aussi le deuil de ce rêve, avec le constat de l’incompatibilité du poème et du monde, pour peu que le sujet lyrique s’abandonne à un aveu naïf de son amour. Le poème doit donc se reconstruire comme espérance, projet incessamment relancé d’une écriture par quoi la vie continue. L’élégie ne se contente plus de chanter la perte ni de méditer sur l’inadéquation de la langue, elle tire sa force d’un espoir qui renaît toujours et dont témoigne la prégnance de la métaphore végétale.

  8. Changes in Rice Pesticide Use and Surface Water Concentrations in the Sacramento River Watershed, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, James L.; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    Pesticides applied to rice fields in California are transported into the Sacramento River watershed by the release of rice field water. Despite monitoring and mitigation programs, concentrations of two rice pesticides, molinate and thiobencarb, continue to exceed the surface-water concentration performance goals established by the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board. There have been major changes in pesticide use over the past decade, and the total amount of pesticides applied remains high. Molinate use has declined by nearly half, while thiobencarb use has more than doubled; carbofuran has been eliminated and partially replaced by the pyrethroid pesticide lambda-cyhalothrin. A study was conducted in 2002 and 2003 by the U.S. Geological Survey to determine if the changes in pesticide use on rice resulted in corresponding changes in pesticide concentrations in surface waters. During the rice growing season (May-July), water samples, collected weekly at three sites in 2002 and two sites in 2003, were analyzed for pesticides using both solid-phase and liquid-liquid extraction in combination with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Analytes included lambda-cyhalothrin, molinate, thiobencarb, and two degradation products of molinate: 2-keto-molinate and 4-keto-molinate. Molinate, thiobencarb, and 4-keto-molinate were detected in all samples, 2-keto-molinate was detected in less than half of the samples, and lambda-cyhalothrin was not detected in any samples. At two of the sites sampled in 2002 (Colusa Basin Drain 1 and Sacramento Slough), concentrations of molinate were similar, but thiobencarb concentrations differed by a factor of five. Although concentrations cannot be estimated directly from application amounts in different watersheds, the ratio of molinate to thiobencarb concentrations can be compared with the ratio of molinate to thiobencarb use in the basins. The higher concentration ratio in the Sacramento Slough Basin, compared with the ratio

  9. The contribution of rice agriculture to methylmercury in surface waters: A review of data from the Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, K. Christy; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Fleck, Jacob; Tate, Kenneth W.; McCord, Stephen A.; Linquist, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a bioaccumulative pollutant produced in and exported from flooded soils, including those used for rice (Oriza sativa L.) production. Using unfiltered aqueous MeHg data from MeHg monitoring programs in the Sacramento River watershed from 1996 to 2007, we assessed the MeHg contribution from rice systems to the Sacramento River. Using a mixed-effects regression analysis, we compared MeHg concentrations in agricultural drainage water from rice-dominated regions (AgDrain) to MeHg concentrations in the Sacramento and Feather Rivers, both upstream and downstream of AgDrain inputs. We also calculated MeHg loads from AgDrains and the Sacramento and Feather Rivers. Seasonally, MeHg concentrations were higher during November through May than during June through October, but the differences varied by location. Relative to upstream, November through May AgDrain least-squares mean MeHg concentration (0.18 ng L−1, range 0.15–0.23 ng L−1) was 2.3-fold higher, while June through October AgDrain mean concentration (0.097 ng L−1, range 0.6–1.6 ng L−1) was not significantly different from upstream. June through October AgDrain MeHg loads contributed 10.7 to 14.8% of the total Sacramento River MeHg load. Missing flow data prevented calculation of the percent contribution of AgDrains in November through May. At sites where calculation was possible, November through May loads made up 70 to 90% of the total annual load. Elevated flow and MeHg concentration in November through May both contribute to the majority of the AgDrain MeHg load occurring during this period. Methylmercury reduction efforts should target elevated November through May MeHg concentrations in AgDrains. However, our findings suggest that the contribution and environmental impact of rice is an order of magnitude lower than previous studies in the California Yolo Bypass.

  10. Sacramento Municipal Utility district's interim onsite storage building for low level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillis, E.

    1986-01-01

    In order to meet current and anticipated needs for the low level radwaste management program at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District has a design and construction program underway which will provide an onsite interim storage facility that can be expanded in two and one-half year increments. The design approach utilized allows capital investment to be minimized and still provides radwaste management flexibility in anticipation of delays in resolution of the nationwide long term radwaste disposal situation. The facility provides storage and material accountability for all low level radwastes generated by the plant. Wastes are segregated by radioactivity level and are stored in two separate storage areas located within one facility. Lower activity wastes are stored in a lightly shielded structure and handled by lift trucks, while the higher activity wastes are stored in a highly shielded structure and handled remotely by manual bridge crane. The layout of the structure provides for economy of operation and minimizes personnel radiation exposure. Design philosophy and criteria, building layout and systems, estimated costs and construction schedule are discussed

  11. Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) monitoring techniques in the Sacramento--San Joaquin Estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    Various methods have been used to monitor the striped bass population in the Sacramento--San Joaquin Estuary. Sampling in the spring with towed plankton nets has provided an adequate description of spawning time and area, but this sampling has not adequately measured egg standing crops and larva and post-larva mortality rates. Tow-net sampling effectively measures the abundance of young in midsummer. A midwater-trawl survey is satisfactory for measuring the abundance of young in the fall but not in the winter. Techniques have not been fully evaluated for monitoring one-year-old bass. Catch-per-unit-effort data from sportfishing party boats were useful for monitoring two-year-olds, until a change in angling regulations increased recruitment age. The Petersen method and indices developed from party-boat catches are the best methods for monitoring bass that are three years old and older. Long-term trends in catch can be monitored through postcard surveys and party-boat catches

  12. Factors influencing the biogeochemistry of sedimentary carbon and phosphorus in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, E.B.; Delaney, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    This study characterizes organic carbon (Corganic) and phosphorus (P) geochemistry in surface sediments of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California. Sediment cores were collected from five sites on a sample transect from the edge of the San Francisco Bay eastward to the freshwater Consumnes River. The top 8 cm of each core were analyzed (in 1-cm intervals) for Corganic, four P fractions, and redox-sensitive trace metals (uranium and manganese). Sedimentary Corganic concentrations and Corganic:P ratios decreased, while reactive P concentrations increased moving inland in the Delta. The fraction of total P represented by organic P increased inland, while that of authigenic P was higher bayward than inland reflecting increased diagenetic alteration of organic matter toward the bayward end of the transect. The redox indicator metals are consistent with decreasing sedimentary suboxia inland. The distribution of P fractions and C:P ratios reflect the presence of relatively labile organic matter in upstream surface sediments. Sediment C and P geochemistry is influenced by site-specific particulate organic matter sources, the sorptive power of the sedimentary material present, physical forcing, and early diagenetic transformations presumably driven by Corganic oxidation. ?? 2005 Estuarine Research Federation.

  13. Characterization of subsurface stratigraphy along the lower American River floodplain using electrical resistivity, Sacramento, California, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Bethany L.; Powers, Michael H.; Ball, Lyndsay B.

    2014-01-01

    In July 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, completed a geophysical survey using electrical resistivity along an approximately 6-mile reach of the lower American River in Sacramento, California, to map near-surface lithological variations. This survey is a part of a manifold and comprehensive study of river-flow dynamics and geologic boundary-property knowledge necessary to estimate scour potential and levee erosion risk. Data were acquired on the left (south or west) bank between river mile 5 and 10.7 as well as a short section on the right bank from river mile 5.4 to 6. Thirteen direct-current resistivity profiles and approximately 8.3 miles of capacitively coupled resisistivity data were acquired along accessible areas of the floodplain between the levee and river bank. Capacitively coupled resistivity was used as a reconnaissance tool, because it allowed for greater spatial coverage of data but with lower resolution and depth of investigation than the DC resistivity method. The study area contains Pleistocene-age alluvial deposits, dominated by gravels, sands, silts, and clays, that vary in both lateral extent and depth. Several generations of lithologic logs were used to help interpret resistivity variations observed in the resistivity models.

  14. HCMM: Soil moisture in relation to geologic structure and lithology, northern California. [Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Empirical observations on the ground and examination of aerial color IR photographs indicate that in grassland terrain, the vegetation overlying sandstone tends to become less vigorous sooner in the late spring season than does the area overlain by an adjacent shale unit. The reverse relationship obtains in the fall. These relationships are thought to be a reflection of the relative porosity of each of the units and hence of their ability to retain or lose soil moisture. A comparison of the optically enlarged day and nite IR imagery of the Late Mesozoic interbedded sandstone and shale units along the western margin of the Sacramento Valley, California, taken at seasonally critical times of the year (late spring/early summer and late fall/early winter) reveals subtle seasonal variations of graytone which tend to support the empirical observations after consideration of Sun angle and azimuth, and the internal consistency of the data on each set of satellite imagery.

  15. Digital Mapping Techniques '10-Workshop Proceedings, Sacramento, California, May 16-19, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, David R.; Soller, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The Digital Mapping Techniques '10 (DMT'10) workshop was attended by 110 technical experts from 40 agencies, universities, and private companies, including representatives from 19 State geological surveys (see Appendix A). This workshop, hosted by the California Geological Survey, May 16-19, 2010, in Sacramento, California, was similar in nature to the previous 13 meetings (see Appendix B). The meeting was coordinated by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Geologic Map Database project. As in the previous meetings, the objective was to foster informal discussion and exchange of technical information. It is with great pleasure that I note that the objective was again successfully met, as attendees continued to share and exchange knowledge and information, and renew friendships and collegial work begun at past DMT workshops. At this meeting, oral and poster presentations and special discussion sessions emphasized (1) methods for creating and publishing map products ("publishing" includes Web-based release); (2) field data capture software and techniques, including the use of LiDAR; (3) digital cartographic techniques; (4) migration of digital maps into ArcGIS Geodatabase format; (5) analytical GIS techniques; and (6) continued development of the National Geologic Map Database.

  16. Blood-feeding patterns of the Culex pipiens complex in Sacramento and Yolo Counties, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Matthew J; Thiemann, Tara; Macedo, Paula; Brown, David A; Scott, Thomas W

    2011-03-01

    Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex are competent vectors of West Nile virus (WNV; family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus) in the laboratory, and field-collected mosquitoes have tested positive for the virus in California and elsewhere. A better understanding of Cx. pipiens complex blood-feeding patterns will help define the threat that these mosquitoes pose to human health and their role in WNV amplification in northern California. We collected blood-engorged Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes from resting sites near and away from human habitation in Sacramento and Yolo Counties. Cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene sequences were used to identify the vertebrate species from which blood meals were taken. Of 330 engorged mosquitoes collected at 28 sites from June through August 2007 and May through August 2008, >99% fed on an avian host. Three mosquitoes contained bovine blood and none had fed on a human. American Robins (Turdus migratorius) were bitten most often, and the proportion of American Robin blood meals increased significantly over the summer. Other important avian hosts included House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus), Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica), Western Meadowlarks (Sturnella neglecta), and Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura). In rural areas, Barn Swallows, Brewer's Blackbirds (Euphagus cyanocephalus), and House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) were frequent hosts. In settings near human habitation, Mourning Doves and Western Meadowlarks were common hosts. Our data indicate that in north central California mosquitoes in the Cx. pipiens complex may be more important as epiornitic than epidemic vectors of WNV.

  17. Improving Aquatic Plant Management in the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Potter, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Management of aquatic weeds in complex watersheds and river systems present many challenges to assessment, planning and implementation of management practices for floating and submerged aquatic invasive plants. The Delta Region Areawide Aquatic Weed Project (DRAAWP), a USDA sponsored area-wide project, is working to enhance planning, decision-making and operational efficiency in the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Satellite and airborne remote sensing are used map (area coverage and biomass), direct operations, and assess management impacts on plant communities. Archived satellite records going are used to review results from previous climate and management events and aide in developing long-term strategies. Modeling at local and watershed scales provides insight into land-use effects on water quality. Plant growth models informed by remote sensing are being applied spatially across the Delta to balance location and type of aquatic plant, growth response to altered environments, phenology, environmental regulations, and economics in selection of management practices. Initial utilization of remote sensing tools developed for mapping of aquatic invasive weeds improved operational efficiency by focusing limited chemical use to strategic areas with high plant-control impact and incorporating mechanical harvesting when chemical use is restricted. These assessment methods provide a comprehensive and quantitative view of aquatic invasive plants communities in the California Delta, both spatial and temporal, informed by ecological understanding with the objective of improving management and assessment effectiveness.

  18. Associations between water quality, Pasteurella multocida, and avian cholera at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, M.A.; Botzler, R.G.; Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied patterns in avian cholera mortality, the presence of Pasteurella multocida in the water or sediment, and water chemistry characteristics in 10 wetlands at the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex (California, USA), an area of recurrent avian cholera epizootics, during the winters of 1997 and 1998. Avian cholera outbreaks (a?Y50 dead birds) occurred on two wetlands during the winter of 1997, but no P. multocida were recovered from 390 water and 390 sediment samples from any of the 10 wetlands. No mortality events were observed on study wetlands during the winter of 1998; however, P. multocida was recovered from water and sediment samples in six of the 10 study wetlands. The pH levels were higher for wetlands experiencing outbreaks during the winter of 1997 than for nonoutbreak wetlands, and aluminum concentrations were higher in wetlands from which P. multocida were recovered during the winter of 1998. Water chemistry parameters (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and dissolved protein) previously linked with P. multocida and avian cholera mortality were not associated with the occurrence of avian cholera outbreaks or the presence of P. multocida in our study wetlands. Overall, we found no evidence to support the hypothesis that wetland characteristics facilitate the presence of P. multocida and, thereby, allow some wetlands to serve as long-term sources (reservoirs) for P. multocida.

  19. Occurrence and Transport of Diazinon in the Sacramento River and Selected Tributaries, California, during Two Winter Storms, January?February 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileanis, Peter D.; Brown, David L.; Knifong, Donna L.; Saleh, Dina

    2003-01-01

    Diazinon, an organophosphate insecticide, is applied as an orchard dormant spray in the Sacramento Valley during the winter months when the area receives most of its annual rainfall. During winter rainstorms that frequently follow dormant spray applications, some of the applied pesticide is transported in storm runoff to the Sacramento River and its tributaries. Diazinon is also used to control insect pests on residential and commercial properties in urban areas and is frequently detected in urban storm runoff draining into the Sacramento River system. Between January 24 and February 14, 2001, diazinon concentrations and loads were measured in the Sacramento River and selected tributaries during two winter storms that occurred after dormant spray applications were made to orchards in the Sacramento Valley. Water samples were collected at 21 sites that represented agricultural and urban inputs on a variety of scales, from small tributaries and drains representing local land use to main-stem river sites representing regional effects. Concentrations of diazinon ranged from below laboratory reporting levels to 1,380 nanograms per liter (ng/L), with a median of 55 ng/L during the first monitored storm and 26 ng/L during the second. The highest concentrations were observed in small channels draining predominantly agricultural land. About 26,000 pounds of diazinon were reported applied to agricultural land in the study area just before and during the monitoring period. About 0.2 percent of the applied insecticide appeared to be transported to the lower Sacramento River during that period. The source of about one third of the total load measured in the lower Sacramento River appears to be in the portion of the drainage basin upstream of the city of Colusa. About 12 percent of the diazinon load in the lower Sacramento River was transported from the Feather River Basin, which drains much of the mountainous eastern portions of the Sacramento River Basin. Diazinon use in the

  20. Monitoring Salmonella, Campylobacter, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in traditional free-range 'Label Rouge' broiler production: a 23-year survey programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvat, G; Guyot, M; Protino, J

    2017-01-01

    'Label Rouge' broiler free-range carcasses have been monitored since 1991, and broiler flocks since 2010, for contamination by the main foodborne zoonotic bacteria. Initially, the monitoring plan mainly focused on the surveillance of Salmonella, and on indicators of the overall microbiological quality of free-range broiler carcasses such as Staphylococcus aureus and coliforms, but was extended in 2007 to include Campylobacter enumeration on carcasses and in 2010, to Salmonella in the environment of live birds. Salmonella contamination of free-range broiler carcasses rose to a peak of 16% in 1994 but less than 1% of carcasses are now regularly found to be positive. Indicators of the overall microbiological quality of carcasses are also improving. These results correlate with the low prevalence of Salmonella in free-range broiler breeding and production flocks, and with the continuous improvement of hazard analysis and critical control points in slaughterhouses, the implementation of a good manufacturing practice guide since 1997 and the application of EU regulations on Salmonella since 1998 in France. Regarding Campylobacter counts on carcasses, the situation has been improving continuously over the last few years, even if 2·5% of the carcasses are still contaminated by more than 1000 Campylobacter per g of skin. Although the current control system focusing on Salmonella is based on firm epidemiologic data and offers effective means of control (e.g. slaughtering of positive breeder flocks), existing information on Campylobacter makes it more difficult to formulate an effective control plan for free-range broilers, due to their particular exposure to environmental contamination. This long-term surveillance programme provided an extended view of the evolution of the contamination of free-range broilers and a direct measurement of the impact of mandatory and profession-driven interventions on the microbiological quality of carcasses. © 2016 The Society for Applied

  1. Handing-over the baton

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    From left to right: M. Bühler-Broglin, A. Fucci, C. Roche, P. Troendle. After serving the Organisation for three decades, an emblematic figure of CERN, Manfred Bühler-Broglin, has just retired. At CERN he initially spent several years in experimental physics before becoming involved in the planning of CERN resources, first in the administration of research, and then in the administration of the two largest projects at CERN: LEP and the LHC. During the course of the past twenty years, he became the privileged and highly respected CERN linkman with the elected regional authorities. In this capacity he represented CERN during the delicate discussions prior to the construction of LEP and the LHC. In particular, he was Editor of the impressive Etude d'impact  (Impact study), crucial for the approval of the implementation of LHC in the Pays de Gex by the French authorities. Highly motivated by the protection of our wonderful environment, he also advised the Director-General in this fiel...

  2. Observations of the temperature dependent response of ozone to NOx reductions in the Sacramento, CA urban plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafranchi, B. W.; Goldstein, A. H.; Cohen, R. C.

    2011-07-01

    Observations of NOx in the Sacramento, CA region show that mixing ratios decreased by 30 % between 2001 and 2008. Here we use an observation-based method to quantify net ozone (O3) production rates in the outflow from the Sacramento metropolitan region and examine the O3 decrease resulting from reductions in NOx emissions. This observational method does not rely on assumptions about detailed chemistry of ozone production, rather it is an independent means to verify and test these assumptions. We use an instantaneous steady-state model as well as a detailed 1-D plume model to aid in interpretation of the ozone production inferred from observations. In agreement with the models, the observations show that early in the plume, the NOx dependence for Ox (Ox = O3 + NO2) production is strongly coupled with temperature, suggesting that temperature-dependent biogenic VOC emissions and other temperature-related effects can drive Ox production between NOx-limited and NOx-suppressed regimes. As a result, NOx reductions were found to be most effective at higher temperatures over the 7 year period. We show that violations of the California 1-h O3 standard (90 ppb) in the region have been decreasing linearly with decreases in NOx (at a given temperature) and predict that reductions of NOx concentrations (and presumably emissions) by an additional 30 % (relative to 2007 levels) will eliminate violations of the state 1 h standard in the region. If current trends continue, a 30 % decrease in NOx is expected by 2012, and an end to violations of the 1 h standard in the Sacramento region appears to be imminent.

  3. Quantifying Activated Floodplains on a Lowland Regulated River: Its Application to Floodplain Restoration in the Sacramento Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip B. Williams

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a process and methodology for quantifying the extent of a type of historically prevalent, but now relatively rare, ecologically-valuable floodplains in the Sacramento lowland river system: frequently-activated floodplains. We define a specific metric the “Floodplain Activation Flow” (FAF, which is the smallest flood pulse event that initiates substantial beneficial ecological processes when associated with floodplain inundation. The “Activated Floodplain” connected to the river is then determined by comparison of FAF stage with floodplain topography. This provides a simple definition of floodplain that can be used as a planning, goal setting, monitoring, and design tool by resource managers since the FAF event is the smallest flood and corresponding floodplain area with ecological functionality—and is necessarily also inundated in larger flood events, providing additional ecological functions. For the Sacramento River we selected a FAF definition to be the river stage that occurs in two out of three years for at least seven days in the mid-March to mid-May period and "Activated Floodplains" to be those lands inundated at that stage. We analyzed Activated Floodplain area for four representative reaches along the lower Sacramento River and the Yolo Bypass using stream gauge data. Three of the most significant conclusions are described: (1 The area of active functional floodplain is likely to be less than commonly assumed based on extent of riparian vegetation; (2 Levee setbacks may not increase the extent of this type of ecologically-productive floodplain without either hydrologic or topographic changes; (3 Within the Yolo Bypass, controlled releases through the Fremont Weir could maximize the benefits associated with Activated Floodplain without major reservoir re-operation or grading. This approach identifies a significant opportunity to integrate floodplain restoration with flood management by establishing a FAF stage

  4. Microenvironmental characteristics important for personal exposures to aldehydes in Sacramento, CA, and Milwaukee, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymer, J. H.; Akland, G.; Johnson, T. R.; Long, T.; Michael, L.; Cauble, L.; McCombs, M.

    Oxygenated additives in gasoline are designed to decrease the ozone-forming hydrocarbons and total air toxics, yet they can increase the emissions of aldehydes and thus increase human exposure to these toxic compounds. This paper describes a study conducted to characterize targeted aldehydes in microenvironments in Sacramento, CA, and Milwaukee, WI, and to improve our understanding of the impact of the urban environment on human exposure to air toxics. Data were obtained from microenvironmental concentration measurements, integrated, 24-h personal measurements, indoor and outdoor pollutant monitors at the participants' residences, from ambient pollutant monitors at fixed-site locations in each city, and from real-time diaries and questionnaires completed by the technicians and participants. As part of this study, a model to predict personal exposures based on individual time/activity data was developed for comparison to measured concentrations. Predicted concentrations were generally within 25% of the measured concentrations. The microenvironments that people encounter daily provide for widely varying exposures to aldehydes. The activities that occur in those microenvironments can modulate the aldehyde concentrations dramatically, especially for environments such as "indoor at home." By considering personal activity, location (microenvironment), duration in the microenvironment, and a knowledge of the general concentrations of aldehydes in the various microenvironments, a simple model can do a reasonably good job of predicting the time-averaged personal exposures to aldehydes, even in the absence of monitoring data. Although concentrations of aldehydes measured indoors at the participants' homes tracked well with personal exposure, there were instances where personal exposures and indoor concentrations differed significantly. Key to the ability to predict exposure based on time/activity data is the quality and completeness of the microenvironmental

  5. Education, bilingualism, and cognitive trajectories: Sacramento Area Latino Aging Study (SALSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Dan; Early, Dawnté R; Glymour, M Maria; Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Haan, Mary N

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the influence of education, country where education occurred, and monolingual-bilingual (English/Spanish) language usage on late life cognitive trajectories in the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (SALSA), an epidemiological study of health and cognition in Hispanics, mostly of Mexican origin, age 60 and over (N = 1,499). SALSA followed a large cohort of older Latinos for up to 7 assessment waves from 1998 to 2007. Global cognition was assessed by using the Modified Mini Mental State Examination, and the Spanish English Verbal Learning Test was used to measure episodic memory. Education, country of origin, and language usage patterns were collected at the baseline assessment and used as predictors of longitudinal trajectories of cognition. Parallel process mixed effects models were used to examine effects of education and language variables on baseline cognition and rate of cognitive decline. Mixed effects longitudinal models showed that education had strong effects on baseline global cognition and verbal memory but was not related to decline over up to 9 years of longitudinal follow-up. Differences in education effects between subgroups educated in Mexico and in the United States were minor. Monolingual-bilingual language usage was not related to cognitive decline, and bilinguals did not significantly differ from monolingual English speakers on baseline cognitive scores. Hypotheses that higher education and bilingualism protect against late life cognitive decline were not supported and education effects on late-life cognitive trajectories did not substantially differ across U.S.- and Mexico-educated groups. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Historic, Recent, and Future Subsidence, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Deverel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To estimate and understand recent subsidence, we collected elevation and soils data on Bacon and Sherman islands in 2006 at locations of previous elevation measurements. Measured subsidence rates on Sherman Island from 1988 to 2006 averaged 1.23 cm/year (0.5 in/yr and ranged from 0.7 to 1.7 cm/year (0.3 to 0.7 in/year. Subsidence rates on Bacon Island from 1978 to 2006 averaged 2.2 cm/year (0.9 in/yr and ranged from 1.5 to 3.7 cm/year (0.6 to 1.5 in/yr. Changing land-management practices and decreasing soil organic matter content have resulted in decreasing subsidence rates. On Sherman Island, rates from 1988 to 2006 were about 35% of 1910 to 1988 rates. For Bacon Island, rates from 1978 to 2006 were about 40% less than the 1926-1958 rates. To help understand causes and estimate future subsidence, we developed a subsidence model, SUBCALC, that simulates oxidation and carbon losses, consolidation, wind erosion, and burning and changing soil organic matter content. SUBCALC results agreed well with measured land-surface elevation changes. We predicted elevation decreases from 2007 to 2050 will range from a few centimeters to over 1.3 m (4.3 ft. The largest elevation declines will occur in the central Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. From 2007 to 2050, the most probable estimated increase in volume below sea level is 349,956,000 million cubic meters (281,300 acre-feet. Consequences of this continuing subsidence include increased drainage loads of water quality constituents of concern, seepage onto islands, and decreased arability.

  7. Simulation of tree shade impacts on residential energy use for space conditioning in Sacramento

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J. R.; McPherson, E. G.

    Tree shade reduces summer air conditioning demand and increases winter heating load by intercepting solar energy that would otherwise heat the shaded structure. We evaluate the magnitude of these effects here for 254 residential properties participating in a utility sponsored tree planting program in Sacramento, California. Tree and building characteristics and typical weather data are used to model hourly shading and energy used for space conditioning for each building for a period of one year. There were an average of 3.1 program trees per property which reduced annual and peak (8 h average from 1 to 9 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time) cooling energy use 153 kWh (7.1%) and 0.08 kW (2.3%) per tree, respectively. Annual heating load increased 0.85 GJ (0.80 MBtu, 1.9%) per tree. Changes in cooling load were smaller, but percentage changes larger, for newer buildings. Averaged over all homes, annual cooling savings of 15.25 per tree were reduced by a heating penalty of 5.25 per tree, for net savings of 10.00 per tree from shade. We estimate an annual cooling penalty of 2.80 per tree and heating savings of 6.80 per tree from reduced wind speed, for a net savings of 4.00 per tree, and total annual savings of 14.00 per tree (43.00 per property). Results are found to be consistent with previous simulations and the limited measurements available.

  8. Levee Vertical Land Motion Changes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, J. W.; Brooks, B. A.; Glennie, C. L.; Ericksen, T. L.; Knowles, N.

    2017-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is home to numerous islands that provide economically and agriculturally important land. However, the island interiors are sinking and most sit below sea level, making the levee roads that surround the islands vital for their continued health and productivity. Airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data over the islands was collected in 2007 by the California Department of Water Resources and mobile LiDAR data was collected along the levee roads on Bacon, Bouldin, Jersey, and Brannan-Andrus Islands in 2015 and 2016 by the USGS. These datasets provide high resolution topographic models with 8 year separation that can be used to examine topographic change along the levees. A cross-section of each dataset was output along the approximate centerline of the levee road, so that profiles of the 2007 and 2015/2016 LiDAR observations could be compared. Regions of levee road subsidence and of levee road construction and reinforcement on the order of 0-3 centimeters per year were evident in locations around the islands. There is a high degree of spatial variability of these rates even for individual islands. These results were compared to the levee road maps published by the CA Delta Stewardship Council and it was found that the regions of reinforcement and subsidence did not always align between the published maps and the LiDAR data. Additionally, the levee road heights and rates of change, in regions of road subsidence, were compared to sea level rise projections to evaluate the risk that rising sea level may pose to the islands in the future.

  9. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory H. Golet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale ecosystem restoration projects seldom undergo comprehensive evaluation to determine project effectiveness. Consequently, there are missed opportunities for learning and strategy refinement. Before our study, monitoring information from California’s middle Sacramento River had not been synthesized, despite restoration having been ongoing since 1989. Our assessment was based on the development and application of 36 quantitative ecological indicators. These indicators were used to characterize the status of terrestrial and floodplain resources (e.g., flora and fauna, channel dynamics (e.g., planform, geomorphology, and the flow regime. Indicators were also associated with specific goal statements of the CALFED Ecosystem Restoration Program. A collective weight of evidence approach was used to assess restoration success. Our synthesis demonstrates good progress in the restoration of riparian habitats, birds and other wildlife, but not in restoration of streamflows and geomorphic processes. For example, from 1999 to 2007, there was a > 600% increase in forest patch core size, and a 43% increase in the area of the river bordered by natural habitat > 500 m wide. Species richness of landbirds and beetles increased at restoration sites, as did detections of bats. However, degraded post-Shasta Dam streamflow conditions continued. Relative to pre-dam conditions, the average number of years that pass between flows that are sufficient to mobilize the bed, and those that are of sufficient magnitude to inundate the floodplain, increased by over 100%. Trends in geomorphic processes were strongly negative, with increases in the amount of bank hardened with riprap, and decreases in the area of floodplain reworked. Overall the channel simplified, becoming less sinuous with reduced overall channel length. Our progress assessment presents a compelling case for what needs to be done to further advance the ecological restoration of the river. The most

  10. Bathymetric survey and digital elevation model of Little Holland Tract, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Alexander G.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Stevens, Andrew W.; Carlson, Emily M.

    2016-06-10

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a bathymetric survey in Little Holland Tract, a flooded agricultural tract, in the northern Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the “Delta”) during the summer of 2015. The new bathymetric data were combined with existing data to generate a digital elevation model (DEM) at 1-meter resolution. Little Holland Tract (LHT) was historically diked off for agricultural uses and has been tidally inundated since an accidental levee breach in 1983. Shallow tidal regions such as LHT have the potential to improve habitat quality in the Delta. The DEM of LHT was developed to support ongoing studies of habitat quality in the area and to provide a baseline for evaluating future geomorphic change. The new data comprise 138,407 linear meters of real-time-kinematic (RTK) Global Positioning System (GPS) elevation data, including both bathymetric data collected from personal watercraft and topographic elevations collected on foot at low tide. A benchmark (LHT15_b1) was established for geodetic control of the survey. Data quality was evaluated both by comparing results among surveying platforms, which showed systematic offsets of 1.6 centimeters (cm) or less, and by error propagation, which yielded a mean vertical uncertainty of 6.7 cm. Based on the DEM and time-series measurements of water depth, the mean tidal prism of LHT was determined to be 2,826,000 cubic meters. The bathymetric data and DEM are available at http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7RX9954. 

  11. Characterizing Flow and Suspended Sediment Trends in the Sacramento River Basin, CA Using Hydrologic Simulation Program - FORTRAN (HSPF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, M. A.; Flint, L. E.; Flint, A. L.; Wright, S. A.; Minear, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    A watershed model of the Sacramento River Basin, CA was developed to simulate streamflow and suspended sediment transport to the San Francisco Bay Delta (SFBD) for fifty years (1958-2008) using the Hydrological Simulation Program - FORTRAN (HSPF). To compensate for the large model domain and sparse data, rigorous meteorological development and characterization of hydraulic geometry were employed to spatially distribute climate and hydrologic processes in unmeasured locations. Parameterization techniques sought to include known spatial information for tributaries such as soil information and slope, and then parameters were scaled up or down during calibration to retain the spatial characteristics of the land surface in un-gaged areas. Accuracy was assessed by comparing model calibration to measured streamflow. Calibration and validation of the Sacramento River ranged from "good" to "very good" performance based upon a "goodness-of-fit" statistical guideline. Model calibration to measured sediment loads were underestimated on average by 39% for the Sacramento River, and model calibration to suspended sediment concentrations were underestimated on average by 22% for the Sacramento River. Sediment loads showed a slight decreasing trend from 1958-2008 and was significant (p < 0.0025) in the lower 50% of stream flows. Hypothetical climate change scenarios were developed using the Climate Assessment Tool (CAT). Several wet and dry scenarios coupled with temperature increases were imposed on the historical base conditions to evaluate sensitivity of streamflow and sediment on potential changes in climate. Wet scenarios showed an increase of 9.7 - 17.5% in streamflow, a 7.6 - 17.5% increase in runoff, and a 30 - 93% increase in sediment loads. The dry scenarios showed a roughly 5% decrease in flow and runoff, and a 16 - 18% decrease in sediment loads. The base hydrology was most sensitive to a temperature increase of 1.5 degrees Celsius and an increase in storm intensity and

  12. Fog chemistry in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Suresh; Raghunathan, Ravikrishna; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Lee, Taehyoung; Chen, Jing; Kommalapati, Raghava R.; Murugesan, Karthik; Shen, Xinhua; Qingzhong, Yuan; Valsaraj, Kalliat T.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    Fog samples were collected in two population centers of the US Gulf Coast (Houston, Texas and Baton Rouge, Louisiana) using Caltech active strand cloud collectors. A total of 32 fogwater samples were collected in Baton Rouge (November 2004-February 2005) and Houston (February 2006). These samples were analyzed for pH, total and dissolved organic carbon, major inorganic ions, and a variety of organic compounds including organic acids, aromatics, carbonyls, and linear alkanes. Fogs in both environments were of moderate density, with typical fog liquid water contents <100 mg m -3. Fog samples collected in Houston reflect a clear influence of marine and anthropogenic inputs, while Baton Rouge samples also reflect agricultural inputs. The volume-weighted mean fog pH was somewhat more acidic (˜4.3) in Houston than in Baton Rouge (˜5.0). A wide pH range was observed in fog at both locations. Houston fog had higher concentrations of Cl -, NO 3-, Na +, Mg 2+, and Ca 2+. Sulfate to nitrate ratios were high in fogs at both locations, typical of many clouds in the eastern US. Total organic carbon concentrations were much higher in Houston fogs than in Baton Rouge fogs. Efforts to speciate dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reveal large contributions from organic acids and carbonyls, with smaller contributions from other organic compound families including aromatics, alkanes, amides, and alcohols. Approximately 40% of the fog DOC was unspeciated in samples from both study locations.

  13. Fine-scale habitat preference of green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris) within three spawning locations in the Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Megan T.; Thomas, Michael J.; McDonald, Richard R.; Hearn, Alexander R.; Battleson, Ryan D.; Chapman, Eric D.; Kinzel, Paul J.; Minear, J. Tobey; Mora, Ethan A.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; Pagel, Matthew D.; Klimley, A. Peter

    2018-01-01

    Vast sections of the Sacramento River have been listed as critical habitat by the National Marine Fisheries Service for green sturgeon spawning (Acipenser medirostris), yet spawning is known to occur at only a few specific locations. This study reveals the range of physical habitat variables selected by adult green sturgeon during their spawning period. We integrated fine-scale fish positions, physical habitat characteristics, discharge, bathymetry, and simulated velocity and depth using a 2-dimensional hydraulic model (FaSTMECH). The objective was to create habitat suitability curves for depth, velocity, and substrate type within three known spawning locations over two years. An overall cumulative habitat suitability score was calculated that averaged the depth, velocity, and substrate scores over all fish, sites, and years. A weighted usable area (WUA) index was calculated throughout the sampling periods for each of the three sites. Cumulative results indicate that the microhabitat characteristics most preferred by green sturgeon in these three spawning locations were velocities between 1.0-1.1 m/s, depths of 8-9 m, and gravel and sand substrate. This study provides guidance for those who may in the future want to increase spawning habitat for green sturgeon within the Sacramento River.

  14. Changes in the status of harvested rice fields in the Sacramento Valley, California: Implications for wintering waterfowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael R.; Garr, Jay D.; Coates, Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Harvested rice fields provide critical foraging habitat for wintering waterfowl in North America, but their value depends upon post-harvest treatments. We visited harvested ricefields in the Sacramento Valley, California, during the winters of 2007 and 2008 (recent period) and recorded their observed status as harvested (standing or mechanically modified stubble), burned, plowed, or flooded. We compared these data with those from identical studies conducted during the 1980s (early period). We documented substantial changes in field status between periods. First, the area of flooded rice increased 4-5-fold, from about 15% to >40% of fields, because of a 3-4-fold increase in the percentage of fields flooded coupled with a 37-41% increase in the area of rice produced. Concurrently, the area of plowed fields increased from 35% of fields, burned fields declined from about 40% to 1%, and fields categorized as harvested declined from 22-54% to rice field status survey in the Sacramento Valley and other North American rice growing regions as appropriate to support long-term monitoring programs and wetland habitat conservation planning for wintering waterfowl.

  15. Tuning the light in senior care: Evaluating a trial LED lighting system at the ACC Care Center in Sacramento, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert G.; Wilkerson, Andrea M.; Samla, Connie; Bisbee, Dave

    2016-08-31

    This report summarizes the results from a trial installation of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting systems in several spaces within the ACC Care Center in Sacramento, CA. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) coordinated the project and invited the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to document the performance of the LED lighting systems as part of a GATEWAY evaluation. DOE tasked the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct the investigation. SMUD and ACC staff coordinated and completed the design and installation of the LED systems, while PNNL and SMUD staff evaluated the photometric performance of the systems. ACC staff also track behavioral and health measures of the residents; some of those results are reported here, although PNNL staff were not directly involved in collecting or interpreting those data. The trial installation took place in a double resident room and a single resident room, and the corridor that connects those (and other) rooms to the central nurse station. Other spaces in the trial included the nurse station, a common room called the family room located near the nurse station, and the ACC administrator’s private office.

  16. Erratum dated 2014 June 25: Fate and Transport of Three Pharmaceuticals in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minta M. Schaefer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs are found in surface waters worldwide. Wastewater treatment plant effluent is a major source of these contaminants. The Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta (Delta is a unique aquatic ecosystem, a source of drinking water for over 25 million Californians, and a primary source of water for Central Valley agriculture. The sharp decline of four pelagic fish species in the Delta in the last decade is just one of several indicators that the ecosystem is severely impaired. Several wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs discharge into the Delta, directly or through tributaries. The presence of PPCPs in the Delta has received very little attention relative to the immense effort underway to rehabilitate the ecosystem. This study determined concentrations of PPCPs in the Sacramento River in the vicinity of the Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant using passive sampler monitoring. These data were used to estimate loads of three of the detected pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine, fluoxetine, and trimethoprim from nine other WWTPs that discharge to the Delta. The 2-D, finite element, Resource Management Associates (RMA Delta Model was then applied to determine the distribution that might result from these discharges. The model was run for the 2006, 2007, and 2009 water years. Results indicate that it is feasible that WWTP discharges could result in chronic presence of these pharmaceuticals at low ng L-1 levels at all 45 model output locations and, therefore, aquatic organisms within the Delta may be continually exposed to these contaminants.

  17. Ontogenetic behavior and dispersal of Sacramento River white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus, with a note on body color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynard, B.; Parker, E.

    2005-01-01

    We studied Sacramento River white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus, in the laboratory to develop a conceptual model of ontogenetic behavior and provide insight into probable behavior of wild sturgeon. After hatching, free embryos initiated a low intensity, brief downstream dispersal during which fish swam near the bottom and were photonegative. The weak, short dispersal style and behavior of white sturgeon free embryos contrasts greatly with the intense, long dispersal style and behavior (photopositive and swimming far above the bottom) of dispersing free embryos of other sturgeon species. If spawned eggs are concentrated within a few kilometers downstream of a spawning site, the adaptive significance of the free embryo dispersal is likely to move fish away from the egg deposition site to avoid predation and reduce fish density prior to feeding. Larvae foraged on the open bottom, swam innate fish dispersal and post-dispersal rearing habitat, which is now highly altered by damming and reservoirs. Sacramento River white sturgeon has a two-step downstream dispersal by the free embryo and juvenile life intervals. Diel activity of all life intervals peaked at night, whether fish were dispersing or foraging. Nocturnal behavior is likely a response to predation, which occurs during both activities. An intense black-tail body color was present on foraging larvae, but was weak or absent on the two life intervals that disperse. Black-tail color may be an adaptation for avoiding predation, signaling among aggregated larvae, or both, but not for dispersal. ?? Springer 2005.

  18. Geophysical surveying in the Sacramento Delta for earthquake hazard assessment and measurement of peat thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, M. S.; Kundariya, N.; Hayashi, K.; Srinivas, A.; Burnham, M.; Oikawa, P.

    2017-12-01

    Near surface geophysical surveys were conducted in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta for earthquake hazard assessment and to provide estimates of peat thickness for use in carbon models. Delta islands have experienced 3-8 meters of subsidence during the past century due to oxidation and compaction of peat. Projected sea level rise over the next century will contribute to an ongoing landward shift of the freshwater-saltwater interface, and increase the risk of flooding due to levee failure or overtopping. Seismic shear wave velocity (VS) was measured in the upper 30 meters to determine Uniform Building Code (UBC)/ National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) site class. Both seismic and ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods were employed to estimate peat thickness. Seismic surface wave surveys were conducted at eight sites on three islands and GPR surveys were conducted at two of the sites. Combined with sites surveyed in 2015, the new work brings the total number of sites surveyed in the Delta to twenty.Soil boreholes were made at several locations using a hand auger, and peat thickness ranged from 2.1 to 5.5 meters. Seismic surveys were conducted using the multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method and the microtremor array method (MAM). On Bouldin Island, VS of the surficial peat layer was 32 m/s at a site with pure peat and 63 m/s at a site peat with higher clay and silt content. Velocities at these sites reached a similar value, about 125 m/s, at a depth of 10 m. GPR surveys were performed at two sites on Sherman Island using 100 MHz antennas, and indicated the base of the peat layer at a depth of about 4 meters, consistent with nearby auger holes.The results of this work include VS depth profiles and UBC/NEHRP site classifications. Seismic and GPR methods may be used in a complementary fashion to estimate peat thickness. The seismic surface wave method is a relatively robust method and more effective than GPR in many areas with high clay

  19. Insights into controls on hexavalent chromium in groundwater provided by environmental tracers, Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Andrew H.; Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Ball, Lyndsay B.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental tracers are useful for determining groundwater age and recharge source, yet their application in studies of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater has been limited. Environmental tracer data from 166 wells located in the Sacramento Valley, northern California, were interpreted and compared to Cr concentrations to determine the origin and age of groundwater with elevated Cr(VI), and better understand where Cr(VI) becomes mobilized and how it evolves along flowpaths. In addition to major ion and trace element concentrations, the dataset includes δ18O, δ2H, 3H concentration, 14C activity (of dissolved inorganic C), δ13C, 3He/4He ratio, and noble gas concentrations (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe). Noble gas recharge temperatures (NGTs) were computed, and age-related tracers were interpreted in combination to constrain the age distribution in samples and sort them into six different age categories spanning from 10,000 yr old. Nearly all measured Cr is in the form of Cr(IV). Concentrations range from 3 mg L−1), and commonly have δ18O values enriched relative to local precipitation. These samples likely contain irrigation water and are elevated due to accelerated mobilization of Cr(VI) in the unsaturated zone (UZ) in irrigated areas. Group 2 samples are from throughout the valley and typically contain water 1000–10,000 yr old, have δ18O values consistent with local precipitation, and have unexpectedly warm NGTs. Chromium(VI) concentrations in Group 2 samples may be elevated for multiple reasons, but the hypothesis most consistent with all available data (notably, the warm NGTs) is a relatively long UZ residence time due to recharge through a deep UZ near the margin of the basin. A possible explanation for why Cr(VI) may be primarily mobilized in the UZ rather than farther along flowpaths in the oxic portion of the saturated zone is more dynamic cycling of Mn in the UZ due to transient moisture and redox conditions.

  20. Levee Seepage Detection in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Using Polarimetric SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, K.; Jones, C. E.; Bekaert, D. P.

    2017-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta's extensive levee system protects over 2,800 km2 of reclaimed lands and serves as the main irrigation and domestic water supply for the state of California. However, ongoing subsidence and disaster threats from floods and earthquakes make the Delta levee system highly vulnerable, endangering water supplies for 23 million California residents and 2.5 million acres of agricultural land. Levee failure in the Delta can cause saltwater intrusion from San Francisco Bay, reducing water quality and curtailing water exports to residents, commercial users, and farmers. To protect the Delta levee system, it is essential to search for signs of seepage in which water is piping through or beneath levees, which can be associated with deformation of the levees themselves. Until now, in-situ monitoring has largely been applied, however, this is a time-consuming and expensive approach. We use data acquired with NASA's UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar) airborne radar instrument to identify and characterize levee seepages and associated land subsidence through advanced remote sensing technologies. The high spatial resolution of UAVSAR can help to direct surveys to areas that are likely to be experiencing damage. UAVSAR is an L-band airborne sensor with high signal-to-noise ratio, repeat flight track accuracy, and spatial resolution of 7x7 m2 (for multi-looked products) that is necessary for detailed levee monitoring. The adaptability of radar instruments in their ability to see through smoke, haze, and clouds during the day or night, is especially relevant during disaster events, when cloud cover or lack of solar illumination inhibits traditional visual surveys of damage. We demonstrate the advantages of combining polarimetric radar imagery with geographic information systems (GIS) datasets in locating seepage features along critical levee infrastructure in the Delta for 2009-2016. The ability to efficiently locate potential

  1. Proceedings IEEE Visualization Conference and IEEE Information Visualization Conference (VIS'07 and INFOVIS'07, Sacramento CA, USA, October 28-November 1, 2007)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, M.; Hansen, C.; North, C.; Pang, A.; Wijk, van J.J.

    2007-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the IEEE Visualization Conference 2007 (Vis 2007) and the IEEE Information Visualization Conference 2007 (InfoVis 2007) held during October 28 to November 1, 2007 in Sacramento, California. The power of using computing technology to create useful, effective imagery for

  2. High School Graduate Participation Rates: Proportions of Sacramento Area High School Graduates Enrolled in Los Rios Community College District, Fall 1998-Fall 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los Rios Community Coll. District, Sacramento, CA. Office of Planning and Research.

    This report profiles the enrollment patterns of recent high school graduates of the Greater Sacramento Metropolitan Area who attend Los Rios colleges (California). This summary and the full data report provide the District and its colleges with research information on rates of participation by students who graduated from Los Rios Community College…

  3. An urban-forest control measure for ozone in the Sacramento, CA federal non-attainment area (SFNA) Sustainable Cities and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider Taha; James Wilkinson; Robert Bornstein; Qingfu Xiao; E. Gregory McPherson; Jim Simpson; Charles Anderson; Steven Lau; Janice Lam; Cindy Blain

    2015-01-01

    Urban forest strategies of gradually replacing high emitters of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) with low-emitting species are being considered as voluntary or emerging control measures for maintenance of the 8-h ozone standard in the Sacramento Federal Non-Attainment Area (SFNA). We describe a regulatory modeling study demonstrating the air-quality impacts...

  4. GATEWAY Demonstrations: Tuning the Light in Senior Care: Evaluating a Trial LED Lighting System at the ACC Care Center in Sacramento, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilkerson, Andrea M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Samla, Connie [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bisbee, Dave [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The GATEWAY program documented the performance of tunable-white LED lighting systems installed in several spaces within the ACC Care Center, a senior-care facility in Sacramento, CA. The project results included energy savings and improved lighting quality, as well as other possible health-related benefits that may have been attributable, at least in part, to the lighting changes.

  5. Chemical and Physical Properties of Individual Aerosol Particles Characterized in Sacramento, CA during CARES Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyuk, A.; Beranek, J.; Vaden, T.; Imre, D. G.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    We present results of measurements conducted by our Single Particle Mass Spectrometer, SPLAT II, in Sacramento, CA over the month of June 2010. SPLAT II measured the size of 195 million particles, and compositions of 10 million particles. In addition to size and composition, SPLAT II simultaneously measured size, density and composition of 121,000 individual particles. These measurements were conducted 2 - 3 times per day, depending on conditions. The data show that throughout the day particles were relatively small (<200 nm), and the vast majority were composed of oxygenated organics mixed with various amounts of sulfate. In addition, we characterized fresh and processed soot, biomass burning aerosol, organic amines, fresh and processed sea salt, and few dust particles. The data show a reproducible diurnal pattern in aerosol size distributions, number concentrations, and compositions. Early in the day, number concentrations were low, particles were very small, and the size distributions peaked at ~70 nm. At this time of the day, 80 nm particles had a density of 1.3 g cm-3; while the density of 200 nm particles was 1.6 g cm-3, consistent with our mass spectra showing that smaller particles were composed of organics mixed with ~10% sulfates, while larger particles were composed mostly of sulfate mixed with a small amount of organics. Later in the day, secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formation led to a number of nucleation events that significantly increased the number concentrations of very small particles. By mid-afternoon, as more SOA formed and condensed, particles increased in size the number concentrations of particles larger than 70 nm increased and the densities of particles 80 to 200 nm particles was ~1.3 g cm-3. The vast majority of these particles were composed of oxygenated organics mixed with a ~10% sulfate. In other words they were SOA particles mixed with a small amount of sulfate. The mass spectra of these particles shows that there were two types of

  6. Groundwater Quality Data for the Northern Sacramento Valley, 2007: Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Peter A.; Bennett, George L.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,180-square-mile Northern Sacramento Valley study unit (REDSAC) was investigated in October 2007 through January 2008 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of raw groundwater used for public water supplies within REDSAC and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of groundwater quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 66 wells in Shasta and Tehama Counties. Forty-three of the wells were selected using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area (grid wells), and 23 were selected to aid in evaluation of specific water-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOC], pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial constituents. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate, stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen of water), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the sources and ages of the sampled ground water. In total, over 275 constituents and field water-quality indicators were investigated. Three types of quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, and sampmatrix spikes) were collected at approximately 8

  7. Digital geospatial presentation of geoelectrical and geotechnical data for the lower American River and flood plain, east Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Burton, Bethany L.; Powers, Michael H.; Asch, Theodore H.

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the extent and thickness of lithologic units that may have differing scour potential, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, has performed several geoelectrical surveys of the lower American River channel and flood plain between Cal Expo and the Rio Americano High School in east Sacramento, California. Additional geotechnical data have been collected by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and its contractors. Data resulting from these surveys have been compiled into similar database formats and converted to uniform geospatial datums and projections. These data have been visualized in a digital three-dimensional framework project that can be viewed using freely available software. These data facilitate a comprehensive analysis of the resistivity structure underlying the lower American River corridor and assist in levee system management.

  8. A conceptual model for site-level ecology of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.; Hansen, Eric C.; Scherer, Rick D.; Patterson, Laura C.

    2015-08-14

    Giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) comprise a species of semi-aquatic snakes precinctive to marshes in the Central Valley of California (Hansen and Brode, 1980; Rossman and others, 1996). Because more than 90 percent of their historical wetland habitat has been converted to other uses (Frayer and others, 1989; Garone, 2007), giant gartersnakes have been listed as threatened by the State of California (California Department of Fish and Game Commission , 1971) and the United States (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1993). Giant gartersnakes currently occur in a highly modified landscape, with most extant populations occurring in the rice - growing regions of the Sacramento Valley, especially near areas that historically were tule marsh habitat (Halstead and others, 2010, 2014).

  9. Occurrence and transport of diazinon in the Sacramento River, California, and selected tributaries during three winter storms, January-February 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileanis, Peter D.; Bennett, Kevin P.; Domagalski, Joseph L.

    2002-01-01

    The organophosphate pesticide diazinon is applied as a dormant orchard spray in the Sacramento Valley, California, during the winter when the area receives a majority of its annual rainfall. Dormant spray pesticides, thus, have the potential to wash off the areas of application and migrate with storm runoff to streams in the Sacramento River Basin. Previous monitoring studies have shown that rain and associated runoff from winter storms plays an important role in the transport of diazinon from point of application to the Sacramento River and tributaries. Between January 30 and February 25, 2000, diazinon concentrations in the Sacramento River and selected tributaries were monitored on 5 consecutive days during each of three winter storms that moved through the Sacramento Valley after diazinon had been applied to orchards in the basin. Water samples were collected at 17 sites chosen to represent the effect of upstream land use at local and regional scales. Most samples were analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Analysis by gas chromatography with electron capture detector and thermionic specific detector (GC/ECD/TSD) and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was done on split replicates from over 30 percent of the samples to confirm ELISA results and to provide lower analytical reporting limits at selected sites [30 ng/L (nanogram per liter) for ELISA, 20 ng/L for GC/ECD/TSD, and 2 ng/L for GC/MS]. Concentrations determined from ELISA analyses were consistently higher than concentrations for split samples analyzed by gas chromatography methods. Because of bias between diazinon concentrations using ELISA and gas chromatography methods, results from ELISA analyses were not compared to water-quality criteria. Load calculations using the ELISA analyses are similarly biased. Because the bias was consistent, however, the ELISA data is useful in site-to-site comparisons used to rank the relative levels and contributions of diazinon from

  10. Trends in nutrient concentrations, loads, and yields in streams in the Sacramento, San Joaquin, and Santa Ana Basins, California, 1975-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzer, Charles R.; Kent, Robert; Seleh, Dina K.; Knifong, Donna L.; Dileanis, Peter D.; Orlando, James L.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive database was assembled for the Sacramento, San Joaquin, and Santa Ana Basins in California on nutrient concentrations, flows, and point and nonpoint sources of nutrients for 1975-2004. Most of the data on nutrient concentrations (nitrate, ammonia, total nitrogen, orthophosphate, and total phosphorus) were from the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Information System database (35.2 percent), the California Department of Water Resources (21.9 percent), the University of California at Davis (21.6 percent), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's STOrage and RETrieval database (20.0 percent). Point-source discharges accounted for less than 1 percent of river flows in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, but accounted for close to 80 percent of the nonstorm flow in the Santa Ana River. Point sources accounted for 4 and 7 percent of the total nitrogen and total phosphorus loads, respectively, in the Sacramento River at Freeport for 1985-2004. Point sources accounted for 8 and 17 percent of the total nitrogen and total phosphorus loads, respectively, in the San Joaquin River near Vernalis for 1985-2004. The volume of wastewater discharged into the Santa Ana River increased almost three-fold over the study period. However, due to improvements in wastewater treatment, the total nitrogen load to the Santa Ana River from point sources in 2004 was approximately the same as in 1975 and the total phosphorus load in 2004 was less than in 1975. Nonpoint sources of nutrients estimated in this study included atmospheric deposition, fertilizer application, manure production, and tile drainage. The estimated dry deposition of nitrogen exceeded wet deposition in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys and in the basin area of the Santa Ana Basin, with ratios of dry to wet deposition of 1.7, 2.8, and 9.8, respectively. Fertilizer application increased appreciably from 1987 to 2004 in all three California basins, although manure production increased in the

  11. PEAT ACCRETION HISTORIES DURING THE PAST 6000 YEARS IN MARSHES OF THE SACRAMENTO - SAN JOAQUIN DELTA, CALIFORNIA, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drexler, J Z; de Fontaine, C S; Brown, T A

    2009-07-20

    Peat cores were collected in 4 remnant marsh islands and 4 drained, farmed islands throughout the Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta of California in order to characterize the peat accretion history of this region. Radiocarbon age determination of marsh macrofossils at both marsh and farmed islands showed that marshes in the central and western Delta started forming between 6030 and 6790 cal yr BP. Age-depth models for three marshes were constructed using cubic smooth spline regression models. The resulting spline fit models were used to estimate peat accretion histories for the marshes. Estimated accretion rates range from 0.03 to 0.49 cm yr{sup -1} for the marsh sites. The highest accretion rates are at Browns Island, a marsh at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Porosity was examined in the peat core from Franks Wetland, one of the remnant marsh sites. Porosity was greater than 90% and changed little with depth indicating that autocompaction was not an important process in the peat column. The mean contribution of organic matter to soil volume at the marsh sites ranges from 6.15 to 9.25% with little variability. In contrast, the mean contribution of inorganic matter to soil volume ranges from 1.40 to 8.45% with much greater variability, especially in sites situated in main channels. These results suggest that marshes in the Delta can be viewed as largely autochthonous vs. allochthonous in character. Autochthonous sites are largely removed from watershed processes, such as sediment deposition and scour, and are dominated by organic production. Allochthonous sites have greater fluctuations in accretion rates due to the variability of inorganic inputs from the watershed. A comparison of estimated vertical accretion rates with 20th century rates of global sea-level rise shows that currently marshes are maintaining their positions in the tidal frame, yet this offers little assurance of sustainability under scenarios of increased sea-level rise in

  12. Inter-population differences in salinity tolerance and osmoregulation of juvenile wild and hatchery-born Sacramento splittail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhille, Christine E.; Dabruzzi, Theresa F.; Cocherell, Dennis E.; Mahardja, Brian; Feyrer, Frederick V.; Foin, Theodore C.; Baerwald, Melinda R.; Fangue, Nann A.

    2016-01-01

    The Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthys macrolepidotus) is a minnow endemic to the highly modified San Francisco Estuary of California, USA and its associated rivers and tributaries. This species is composed of two genetically distinct populations, which, according to field observations and otolith strontium signatures, show largely allopatric distribution patterns as recently hatched juveniles. Juvenile Central Valley splittail are found primarily in the nearly fresh waters of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers and their tributaries, whereas San Pablo juveniles are found in the typically higher-salinity waters (i.e. up to 10‰) of the Napa and Petaluma Rivers. As the large salinity differences between young-of-year habitats may indicate population-specific differences in salinity tolerance, we hypothesized that juvenile San Pablo and Central Valley splittail populations differ in their response to salinity. In hatchery-born and wild-caught juvenile San Pablo splittail, we found upper salinity tolerances, where mortalities occurred within 336 h of exposure to 16‰ or higher, which was higher than the upper salinity tolerance of 14‰ for wild-caught juvenile Central Valley splittail. This, in conjunction with slower recovery of plasma osmolality, but not ion levels, muscle moisture or gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity, in Central Valley relative to San Pablo splittail during osmoregulatory disturbance provides some support for our hypothesis of inter-population variation in salinity tolerance and osmoregulation. The modestly improved salinity tolerance of San Pablo splittail is consistent with its use of higher-salinity habitats. Although confirmation of the putative adaptive difference through further studies is recommended, this may highlight the need for population-specific management considerations.

  13. Contrôle et éléments de maîtrise de la contamination par la levure brettanomyces au cours du procédé de vinification en rouge

    OpenAIRE

    Barbin, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    Les levures du genre Dekkera/Brettanomyces sont reconnues comme les agents de contamination des vins rouges responsables des défauts phénolés et animaux. Une procédure complète de dépistage et d'isolement a été développée en associant plusieurs critères discriminants. Elle a permis de confirmer la présence du contaminant tout au long du procédé, de la matière première (raisins sur pieds), au produit fini (vin en bouteilles). Des études de terrain, en amont du procédé de vinification ont mis e...

  14. ETUDE DE L'EFFET DE QUELQUES FACTEURS SUR LA CYTOTOXICITE INDUITE PAR L'AMPHOTERICINE B ASSOCIEE AUX LIPOPROTEINES DU SERUM SANGUIN CHEZ DES CELLULES DE GLOBULES ROUGES HUMAINES

    OpenAIRE

    BOUCHERIT, ATMANI Zahia

    2014-01-01

    toxiques. Dans le cadre de l'élaboration d'une stratégie de développement de cette molécule visant à augmenter l'index thérapeutique tout en réduisant la toxicité, nous avons étudié l'effet de quelques facteurs sur la cytotoxicité induite par l'amphotéricine B associée à des lipoprotéines du sérum sanguin chez le globule rouge humain (modèle universel de cellules animales supérieures). Dans notre travail nous avons abordé d'une part, les effets des caractéristiques des lipoprot...

  15. Drainage water use from the railway Mont d'Or tunnel in Vallorbe, Switzerland; Centrale du Bief-Rouge. Recuperation des eaux du tunnel du Mont d'Or a Vallorbe - Rapport 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerodetti, M.

    2009-02-15

    The 6'097 m long Railway Tunnel under the Mont d'Or (western Switzerland, under the Jura mountains) was constructed at the beginning of the 20{sup th} century and inaugurated on 16 May 1915. During the construction there was an important break-in of water in the tunnel that flooded the whole construction area. Since the completion of the tunnel, the water incursion is drained and conveyed to the Swiss entrance. The flow rate coming from the tunnel is constant at about 120 l/s and didn't show any variation during all the past decades. The idea of using the tunnel water energy in a turbine is thought of since a long time. Considering the present situation on the energy sector, the 'Societe electrique du Chatelard' (the local electricity utility) with the support of the municipal authority, decided now to realize this concept and to turbine the water from the tunnel, also known as 'Bief Rouge', for power generation. The 'Bief Rouge' project consists in catching the flow at the Vallorbe entrance of the tunnel and conducting it into a new penstock down to the river Orbe situated some 65 m downhill where electricity will be produced in a new small-scale power plant. The planned scheme will have an electrical power of 54.5 kW and be located in a new building near the existing sewage pumping station of Vallorbe. The total investment cost is 1.3 million CHF and includes the construction of a new headwater basin, a penstock, a power plant and a tailrace channel as well as the electro-mechanical equipment for power production. Based on a mean annual power production of some 465,000 kWh, the retail price of the kWh has been evaluated to 21 Swiss cents/kWh. (author)

  16. Realignment of United States Forces in the Pacific: Why the U.S. Should Pursue Force Sustainment Training in the Republic of the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    solely towards domestic issues.39 However, shortly after coming to power, Marcos’ successor, President Corazon Aquino, found the readiness of the AFP...and Eileen Guerrero. Corazon Aquino and the Brushfire Revolution. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1995): p. 201. 46 De Castro. “The...Strategic Readjustment on Asia- Pacific Security, 2005. Reid, Robert and Eileen Guerrero. Corazon Aquino and the Brushfire Revolution. Baton

  17. O recrutamento militar na América Portuguesa: o esforço conjunto para a defesa da Colônia do Sacramento (1735-1737

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Possamai

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In their effort to defend the Colônia de Sacramento, besieged by the Spanish from October 1735 to September 1737, the Portuguese Crown ordered the mobilization of all human and material resources available in the State of Brazil. This article examines the compulsory recruitment that occurred on this occasion and discusses the living conditions of those men who were taken by force from their homes to be sent to the River Platte area, from where few would return.

  18. Measurements of erosion potential using Gust chamber in Yolo Bypass near Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Paul A.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2018-04-27

    This report describes work performed to quantify the erodibility of surface soils in the Yolo Bypass (Bypass) near Sacramento, California, for use in the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) Yolo Bypass D-MCM mercury model. The Bypass, when not serving as a floodway, is heavily utilized for agriculture. During flood events, surface water flows over the soil, resulting in the application of a shear stress to the soil. The shear stress is a function of flow speed and is often assumed to vary as the square of flow speed. Once the shear stress reaches a critical value, erosion commences, and the erosion rate typically increases with applied shear stress. The goal of the work described here was to quantify this process and how it varies throughout the major land uses found in the Yolo Bypass.Each of the major land uses found in the Bypass was targeted for sediment coring and two side-by-side cores, 10 centimeters in diameter, were extracted at each site for testing in a Gust erosion chamber. This device consists of a cylinder with a piston and cap installed to contain a sediment sample and overlying water. In most instances, coring was done with the cylinder, the piston and cap were installed, and testing commenced immediately. The cap at the top of the cylinder contains vanes to induce rotation of the flow and is driven by an electric motor, simulating the bed shear stress experienced by the soil in a flood event. Ambient water is introduced to the cylinder, passes through the device, and carries eroded sediment out of the chamber. The exiting water is tested for turbidity, and water samples obtained to relate turbidity to suspended sediment concentration are used to compute erosion rates for each of the applied shear stresses.The result for each sediment core is (1) definition of the critical shear stress required to initiate sediment erosion and (2) estimation of coefficients required to relate erosion rate to applied shear

  19. Tomographic Rayleigh wave group velocities in the Central Valley, California, centered on the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jon B.; Erdem, Jemile; Seats, Kevin; Lawrence, Jesse

    2016-04-01

    If shaking from a local or regional earthquake in the San Francisco Bay region were to rupture levees in the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta, then brackish water from San Francisco Bay would contaminate the water in the Delta: the source of freshwater for about half of California. As a prelude to a full shear-wave velocity model that can be used in computer simulations and further seismic hazard analysis, we report on the use of ambient noise tomography to build a fundamental mode, Rayleigh wave group velocity model for the region around the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta in the western Central Valley, California. Recordings from the vertical component of about 31 stations were processed to compute the spatial distribution of Rayleigh wave group velocities. Complex coherency between pairs of stations was stacked over 8 months to more than a year. Dispersion curves were determined from 4 to about 18 s. We calculated average group velocities for each period and inverted for deviations from the average for a matrix of cells that covered the study area. Smoothing using the first difference is applied. Cells of the model were about 5.6 km in either dimension. Checkerboard tests of resolution, which are dependent on station density, suggest that the resolving ability of the array is reasonably good within the middle of the array with resolution between 0.2 and 0.4°. Overall, low velocities in the middle of each image reflect the deeper sedimentary syncline in the Central Valley. In detail, the model shows several centers of low velocity that may be associated with gross geologic features such as faulting along the western margin of the Central Valley, oil and gas reservoirs, and large crosscutting features like the Stockton arch. At shorter periods around 5.5 s, the model's western boundary between low and high velocities closely follows regional fault geometry and the edge of a residual isostatic gravity low. In the eastern part of the valley, the boundaries of the low

  20. Tomographic Rayleigh-wave group velocities in the Central Valley, California centered on the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jon Peter B.; Erdem, Jemile; Seats, Kevin; Lawrence, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    If shaking from a local or regional earthquake in the San Francisco Bay region were to rupture levees in the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta then brackish water from San Francisco Bay would contaminate the water in the Delta: the source of fresh water for about half of California. As a prelude to a full shear-wave velocity model that can be used in computer simulations and further seismic hazard analysis, we report on the use of ambient noise tomography to build a fundamental-mode, Rayleigh-wave group velocity model for the region around the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta in the western Central Valley, California. Recordings from the vertical component of about 31 stations were processed to compute the spatial distribution of Rayleigh wave group velocities. Complex coherency between pairs of stations were stacked over 8 months to more than a year. Dispersion curves were determined from 4 to about 18 seconds. We calculated average group velocities for each period and inverted for deviations from the average for a matrix of cells that covered the study area. Smoothing using the first difference is applied. Cells of the model were about 5.6 km in either dimension. Checkerboard tests of resolution, which is dependent on station density, suggest that the resolving ability of the array is reasonably good within the middle of the array with resolution between 0.2 and 0.4 degrees. Overall, low velocities in the middle of each image reflect the deeper sedimentary syncline in the Central Valley. In detail, the model shows several centers of low velocity that may be associated with gross geologic features such as faulting along the western margin of the Central Valley, oil and gas reservoirs, and large cross cutting features like the Stockton arch. At shorter periods around 5.5s, the model’s western boundary between low and high velocities closely follows regional fault geometry and the edge of a residual isostatic gravity low. In the eastern part of the valley, the boundaries

  1. A Decision Support Information System for Urban Landscape Management Using Thermal Infrared Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Laymon, Charles A.; Howell, Burgess F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we describe efforts to use remote sensing data within the purview of an information support system, to assess urban thermal landscape characteristics as a means for developing more robust models of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect. We also present a rationale on how we have successfully translated the results from the study of urban thermal heating and cooling regimes as identified from remote sensing data, to decision-makers, planners, government officials, and the public at large in several US cities to facilitate better understanding of how the UHI affects air quality. Additionally, through the assessment of the spatial distribution of urban thermal landscape characteristics using remote sensing data, it is possible to develop strategies to mitigate the UHI that hopefully will in turn, drive down ozone levels and improve overall urban air quality. Four US cities have been the foci for intensive analysis as part of our studies: Atlanta, GA, Baton Rouge, LA, Salt Lake City, UT, and Sacramento, CA. The remote sensing data for each of these cities has been used to generate a number of products for use by "stakeholder" working groups to convey information on what the effects are of the UHI and what measures can be taken to mitigate it. In turn, these data products are used to both educate and inform policy-makers, planners, and the general public about what kinds of UHI mitigation strategies are available.

  2. Using Remote Sensing Data and Research Results for Urban Heat Island Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Maury; Luvall, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides information on the characteristics of the urban heat island, research designed to provide the data needed to develop effective urban heat island reduction strategies, and the development of local working groups to develop implementation plans. As background, an overview of research results on the urban heat island phenomenon and the resultant effect on energy usage and air quality will be explored. The use of more reflective roofing materials, paving materials, tree planting, and other initiatives will be explored as a basis for strategies to mitigate urban heat islands and improve the urban environment. Current efforts to use aircraft remote sensing data in Atlanta, Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City and our work with non-profit organizations designated to lead public education and strategic development efforts will be presented. Efforts to organize working groups comprised of key stakeholders, the process followed in communicating research results, and methodology for soliciting feedback and incorporating ideas into local plans, policies and decision-making will be discussed. Challenges in developing and transferring data products and research results to stakeholders will be presented. It is our ultimate goal that such efforts be integrated into plans and/or decision models that encourage sustainable development.

  3. Status of groundwater quality in the Southern, Middle, and Northern Sacramento Valley study units, 2005-08: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the Southern, Middle, and Northern Sacramento Valley study units was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study units are located in California's Central Valley and include parts of Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Placer, Sacramento, Shasta, Solano, Sutter, Tehama, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The three study units were designated to provide spatially-unbiased assessments of the quality of untreated groundwater in three parts of the Central Valley hydrogeologic province, as well as to provide a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality regionally and statewide. Samples were collected in 2005 (Southern Sacramento Valley), 2006 (Middle Sacramento Valley), and 2007-08 (Northern Sacramento Valley). The GAMA studies in the Southern, Middle, and Northern Sacramento Valley were designed to provide statistically robust assessments of the quality of untreated groundwater in the primary aquifer systems that are used for drinking-water supply. The assessments are based on water-quality data collected by the USGS from 235 wells in the three study units in 2005-08, and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, referred to as primary aquifers) assessed in this study are defined by the depth intervals of the wells in the CDPH database for each study unit. The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from quality of groundwater in the primary aquifers; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. The status of the current quality of the groundwater resource was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic

  4. Analysis of the value of battery storage with wind and photovoltaic generation to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaininger, H.W. [Zaininger Engineering Co., Inc., Roseville, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This report describes the results of an analysis to determine the economic and operational value of battery storage to wind and photovoltaic (PV) generation technologies to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) system. The analysis approach consisted of performing a benefit-cost economic assessment using established SMUD financial parameters, system expansion plans, and current system operating procedures. This report presents the results of the analysis. Section 2 describes expected wind and PV plant performance. Section 3 describes expected benefits to SMUD associated with employing battery storage. Section 4 presents preliminary benefit-cost results for battery storage added at the Solano wind plant and the Hedge PV plant. Section 5 presents conclusions and recommendations resulting from this analysis. The results of this analysis should be reviewed subject to the following caveat. The assumptions and data used in developing these results were based on reports available from and interaction with appropriate SMUD operating, planning, and design personnel in 1994 and early 1995 and are compatible with financial assumptions and system expansion plans as of that time. Assumptions and SMUD expansion plans have changed since then. In particular, SMUD did not install the additional 45 MW of wind that was planned for 1996. Current SMUD expansion plans and assumptions should be obtained from appropriate SMUD personnel.

  5. Neighborhood socioeconomic context and cognitive decline among older Mexican Americans: results from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Haan, Mary N; Osypuk, Theresa; Abdou, Cleopatra; Hinton, Ladson; Aiello, Allison E

    2011-08-15

    In 1 previous study, it was shown that neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with cognitive decline among Latinos. No studies have explored whether and to what extent individual-level socioeconomic factors account for the relation between neighborhood disadvantage and cognitive decline. The purpose of the present study was to assess the influence of neighborhood socioeconomic position (SEP) on cognitive decline and examine how individual-level SEP factors (educational level, annual income, and occupation) influenced neighborhood associations over the course of 10 years. Participants (n = 1,789) were community-dwelling older Mexican Americans from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging. Neighborhood SEP was derived by linking the participant's individual data to the 2000 decennial census. The authors assessed cognitive function with the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination. Analyses used 3-level hierarchical linear mixed models of time within individuals within neighborhoods. After adjustment for individual-level sociodemographic characteristics, higher neighborhood SEP was significantly associated with cognitive function (β = -0.033; P cognition but not with rates of decline. Differences in individual educational levels explained most of the intra- and interneighborhood variance. These results suggest that the effect of neighborhood SEP on cognitive decline among Latinos is primarily accounted for by education.

  6. The effect of submerged aquatic vegetation expansion on a declining turbidity trend in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestir, E.L.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Jonathan Greenberg,; Morgan-King, Tara L.; Ustin, S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) has well-documented effects on water clarity. SAV beds can slow water movement and reduce bed shear stress, promoting sedimentation and reducing suspension. However, estuaries have multiple controls on turbidity that make it difficult to determine the effect of SAV on water clarity. In this study, we investigated the effect of primarily invasive SAV expansion on a concomitant decline in turbidity in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The objective of this study was to separate the effects of decreasing sediment supply from the watershed from increasing SAV cover to determine the effect of SAV on the declining turbidity trend. SAV cover was determined by airborne hyperspectral remote sensing and turbidity data from long-term monitoring records. The turbidity trends were corrected for the declining sediment supply using suspended-sediment concentration data from a station immediately upstream of the Delta. We found a significant negative trend in turbidity from 1975 to 2008, and when we removed the sediment supply signal from the trend it was still significant and negative, indicating that a factor other than sediment supply was responsible for part of the turbidity decline. Turbidity monitoring stations with high rates of SAV expansion had steeper and more significant turbidity trends than those with low SAV cover. Our findings suggest that SAV is an important (but not sole) factor in the turbidity decline, and we estimate that 21–70 % of the total declining turbidity trend is due to SAV expansion.

  7. Abundance and sexual size dimorphism of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento valley of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, G.D.; Casazza, Michael L.; Gregory, C.J.; Halstead, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) is restricted to wetlands of the Central Valley of California. Because of wetland loss in this region, the Giant Gartersnake is both federally and state listed as threatened. We conducted markrecapture studies of four populations of the Giant Gartersnake in the Sacramento Valley (northern Central Valley), California, to obtain baseline data on abundance and density to assist in recovery planning for this species. We sampled habitats that ranged from natural, unmanaged marsh to constructed managed marshes and habitats associated with rice agriculture. Giant Gartersnake density in a natural wetland (1.90 individuals/ha) was an order of magnitude greater than in a managed wetland subject to active season drying (0.17 individuals/ha). Sex ratios at all sites were not different from 1 1, and females were longer and heavier than males. Females had greater body condition than males, and individuals at the least disturbed sites had significantly greater body condition than individuals at the managed wetland. The few remaining natural wetlands in the Central Valley are important, productive habitat for the Giant Gartersnake, and should be conserved and protected. Wetlands constructed and restored for the Giant Gartersnake should be modeled after the permanent, shallow wetlands representative of historic Giant Gartersnake habitat. ?? 2010 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  8. Weathering and transport of chromium and nickel from serpentinite in the Coast Range ophiolite to the Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher T.; Breit, George N.; Hooper, Robert L.; Holloway, JoAnn M.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Ranville, James F.

    2015-01-01

    A soil geochemical study in northern California was done to investigate the role that weathering and transport play in the regional distribution and mobility of geogenic Cr and Ni, which are both potentially toxic and carcinogenic. These elements are enriched in ultramafic rocks (primarily serpentinite) and the soils derived from them (1700–10,000 mg Cr per kg soil and 1300–3900 mg Ni per kg soil) in the Coast Range ophiolite. Chromium and Ni have been transported eastward from the Coast Range into the western Sacramento Valley and as a result, valley soil is enriched in Cr (80–1420 mg kg−1) and Ni (65–224 mg kg−1) compared to median values of U.S. soils of 50 and 15 mg kg−1, respectively. Nickel in ultramafic source rocks and soils is present in serpentine minerals (lizardite, antigorite, and chrysotile) and is more easily weathered compared to Cr, which primarily resides in highly refractory chromite ([Mg,Fe2+][Cr3+,Al,Fe3+]2O4). Although the majority of Cr and Ni in soils are in refractory chromite and serpentine minerals, the etching and dissolution of these minerals, presence of Cr- and Ni-enriched clay minerals and development of nanocrystalline Fe (hydr)oxides is evidence that a significant fractions of these elements have been transferred to potentially more labile phases.

  9. Adaptive Management Using Remote Sensing and Ecosystem Modeling in Response to Climate Variability and Invasive Aquatic Plants for the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Water Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David; Potter, Christopher; Zhang, Minghua; Madsen, John

    2017-01-01

    The California Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is the hub for California's water supply and supports important ecosystem services, agriculture, and communities in Northern to Southern California. Expansion of invasive aquatic plants in the Delta coupled with impacts of changing climate and long-term drought is detrimental to the San Francisco Bay/California Delta complex. NASA Ames Research Center and the USDA-ARS partnered with the State of California to develop science-based, adaptive-management strategies for invasive aquatic plant in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Specific mapping tools developed utilizing satellite and airborne platforms provide regular assessments of population dynamics on a landscape scale and support both strategic planning and operational decision making for resource managers. San Joaquin and Sacramento River watersheds water quality input to the Delta is modeled using the Soil-Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and a modified SWAT tool has been customized to account for unique landscape and management of agricultural water supply and drainage within the Delta. Environmental response models for growth of invasive aquatic weeds are being parameterized and coupled with spatial distribution/biomass density mapping and water quality to study ecosystem response to climate and aquatic plant management practices. On the water validation and operational utilization of these tools by management agencies and how they are improving decision making, management effectiveness and efficiency will be discussed. The project combines science, operations, and economics related to integrated management scenarios for aquatic weeds to help land and water resource managers make science-informed decisions regarding management and outcomes.

  10. Losses of Sacramento River Chinook Salmon and Delta Smelt to Entrainment in Water Diversions in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim J. Kimmerer

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Pumping at the water export facilities in the southern Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta kills fish at and near the associated fish-salvage facilities. Correlative analyses of salvage counts with population indices have failed to provide quantitative estimates of the magnitude of this mortality. I estimated the proportional losses of Sacramento River Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus to place these losses in a population context. The estimate for salmon was based on recoveries of tagged smolts released in the upper Sacramento River basin, and recovered at the fish-salvage facilities in the south Delta and in a trawling program in the western Delta. The proportion of fish salvaged increased with export flow, with a mean value around 10% at the highest export flows recorded. Mortality was around 10% if pre-salvage losses were about 80%, but this value is nearly unconstrained. Losses of adult delta smelt in winter and young delta smelt in spring were estimated from salvage data (adults corrected for estimated pre-salvage survival, or from trawl data in the southern Delta (young. These losses were divided by population size and accumulated over the respective seasons. Losses of adult delta smelt were 1–50% (median 15% although the highest value may have been biased upward. Daily losses of larvae and juveniles were 0–8%, and seasonal losses accumulated were 0–25% (median 13%. The effect of these losses on population abundance was obscured by subsequent 50-fold variability in survival from summer to fall.

  11. Identifying sources of dissolved organic carbon in agriculturally dominated rivers using radiocarbon age dating: Sacramento-San Joaquin River Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickman, James O.; DiGiorgio, Carol L.; Davisson, M. Lee; Lucero, Delores M.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    We used radiocarbon measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to resolve sources of riverine carbon within agriculturally dominated landscapes in California. During 2003 and 2004, average Δ14C for DOC was −254‰ in agricultural drains in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, −218‰ in the San Joaquin River, −175‰ in the California State Water Project and −152‰ in the Sacramento River. The age of bulk DOC transiting the rivers of California’s Central Valley is the oldest reported for large rivers and suggests wide-spread loss of soil organic matter caused by agriculture and urbanization. Using DAX 8 adsorbent, we isolated and measured 14C concentrations in hydrophobic acid fractions (HPOA); river samples showed evidence of bomb-pulse carbon with average Δ14C of 91 and 76‰ for the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers, respectively, with older HPOA, −204‰, observed in agricultural drains. An operationally defined non-HPOA fraction of DOC was observed in the San Joaquin River with seasonally computed Δ14C values of between −275 and −687‰; the source of this aged material was hypothesized to be physically protected organic-matter in high clay-content soils and agrochemicals (i.e., radiocarbon-dead material) applied to farmlands. Mixing models suggest that the Sacramento River contributes about 50% of the DOC load in the California State Water Project, and agricultural drains contribute approximately one-third of the load. In contrast to studies showing stabilization of soil carbon pools within one or two decades following land conversion, sustained loss of soil organic matter, occurring many decades after the initial agricultural-land conversion, was observed in California’s Central Valley.

  12. Adaptive Management Using Remote Sensing and Ecosystem Modeling in Response to Climate Variability and Invasive Aquatic Plants for the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Water Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, D.; Potter, C. S.; Zhang, M.; Madsen, J.

    2017-12-01

    The California Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is the hub for California's water supply and supports important ecosystem services, agriculture, and communities in Northern and Southern California. Expansion of invasive aquatic plants in the Delta coupled with impacts of changing climate and long-term drought is detrimental to the San Francisco Bay/California Delta complex. NASA Ames Research Center and the USDA-ARS partnered with the State of California to develop science-based, adaptive-management strategies for invasive aquatic plant management in the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Specific mapping tools developed utilizing satellite and airborne platforms provide regular assessments of population dynamics on a landscape scale and support both strategic planning and operational decision making for resource managers. San Joaquin and Sacramento River watersheds water quality input to the Delta is modeled using the Soil-Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and a modified SWAT tool has been customized to account for unique landscape and management of agricultural water supply and drainage within the Delta. Environmental response models for growth of invasive aquatic weeds are being parameterized and coupled with spatial distribution/biomass density mapping and water quality to study ecosystem response to climate and aquatic plant management practices. On the water validation and operational utilization of these tools by management agencies and how they improve decision making, management effectiveness and efficiency will be discussed. The project combines science, operations, and economics related to integrated management scenarios for aquatic weeds to help land and water resource managers make science-informed decisions regarding management and outcomes.

  13. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Southern Sacramento Valley, California, 2005 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milby Dawson, Barbara J.; Bennett, George L.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 2,100 square-mile Southern Sacramento Valley study unit (SSACV) was investigated from March to June 2005 as part of the Statewide Basin Assessment Project of Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. This study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within SSACV, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 83 wells in Placer, Sacramento, Solano, Sutter, and Yolo Counties. Sixty-seven of the wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study area. Sixteen of the wells were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry along ground-water flow paths. Four additional samples were collected at one of the wells to evaluate water-quality changes with depth. The GAMA Statewide Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of man-made organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, pharmaceutical compounds, and wastewater-indicator constituents), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, matrix spikes

  14. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Middle Sacramento Valley Study Unit, 2006 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Stephen J.; Fram, Miranda S.; Milby Dawson, Barbara J.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 3,340 square mile Middle Sacramento Valley study unit (MSACV) was investigated from June through September, 2006, as part of the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program. The GAMA Priority Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). The Middle Sacramento Valley study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality within MSACV, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 108 wells in Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Sutter, Tehama, Yolo, and Yuba Counties. Seventy-one wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), 15 wells were selected to evaluate changes in water chemistry along ground-water flow paths (flow-path wells), and 22 were shallow monitoring wells selected to assess the effects of rice agriculture, a major land use in the study unit, on ground-water chemistry (RICE wells). The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of synthetic organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], gasoline oxygenates and degradates, pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, and carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon), and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the sources and ages of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks

  15. In Situ Stoichiometry in a Large River: Continuous Measurement of Doc, NO3 and PO4 in the Sacramento River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, B. D.; Pellerin, B. A.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Saraceno, J.

    2011-12-01

    Studying controls on geochemical processes in rivers and streams is difficult because concentration and composition often changes rapidly in response to physical and biological forcings. Understanding biogeochemical dynamics in rivers will improve current understanding of the role of watershed sources to carbon cycling, river and stream ecology, and loads to estuaries and oceans. Continuous measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrate (NO3-) and soluble reactive phosphate (SRP) concentrations are now possible, along with some information about DOC composition. In situ sensors designed to measure these constituents provide high frequency, real-time data that can elucidate hydrologic and biogeochemical controls which are difficult to detect using more traditional sampling approaches. Here we present a coupled approach, using in situ optical instrumentation with discharge measurements to provide quantitative estimates of constituent loads to investigate C, NO3- and SRP sources and processing in the Sacramento River, CA, USA. Continuous measurement of DOC concentration was conducted by use of a miniature in situ fluorometer (Turner Designs Cyclops) designed to measure chromophoric dissolved organic matter fluorescence (FDOM) over the course of an entire year. Nitrate was measured concurrently using a Satlantic SUNA and phosphate was measured using a WETLabs model Cycle-P instrument for a two week period in July 2011. Continuous measurement from these instruments paired with continuous measurement of physical water quality variables such as temperature, pH, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity, were used to investigate physical and chemical dynamics of DOC, NO3-, SRP over varying time scales. Deploying these instruments at pre-existing USGS discharge gages allowed for calculation of instantaneous and integrated constituent fluxes, as well as filling in gaps in our understanding biogeochemical processes and transport. Results from the study

  16. Commuter exposure to PM2.5, BC, and UFP in six common transport microenvironments in Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Walter; Vijayan, Abhilash; Schulte, Nico; Herner, Jorn D.

    2017-10-01

    This study was designed to estimate and compare the air pollution exposures experienced by commuters in six common transportation modes utilized by California residents, and to evaluate the impact of practical exposure mitigation strategies in reducing commute exposures. We measured concentrations of fine particle matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), and ultrafine particles (UFP) for 161 commutes between April 2014 and November 2015 in Sacramento, CA. We collected measurements for six modes including single occupancy vehicles, high occupancy vehicles (multiple occupants), buses, light rail, train, and bicycling. The largest average concentrations for most pollutants were measured during train commutes and the lowest average concentrations were observed during light-rail commutes. Mitigation options were explored for personal vehicles, bicycling, and train commute modes. We found that ventilation settings of personal vehicles can reduce in-vehicle PM2.5, BC, and UFP concentrations by up to 75%. Similarly, bicycle route choice can reduce exposures by 15-75% with the lowest concentrations observed during commutes on dedicated bicycle paths away from traffic sources. Train commuters experienced UFP concentrations an order of magnitude greater when the locomotive engine was pulling the rail cars versus pushing the rail cars. We found that UFP concentrations during bus, bicycling, and train commutes were 1.6-5.3 times greater than personal vehicle commutes, while light rail commutes had 30% lower UFP concentrations than personal vehicle commutes. The largest exposure per mile occurred during bicycle commutes with PM2.5, BC, and UFP exposures of 1.312 μg/mile, 0.097 μg/mile, and 3.0 × 109 particles/mile, respectively. Train commutes experienced the largest exposure per mile of all of the combustion-derived transportation commute modes. BC accounted for 5-20% of total PM mass across all commute modes with an average fraction of ∼7% of PM2.5.

  17. Resource intensification and osteoarthritis patterns: changes in activity in the prehistoric Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheverko, Colleen M; Bartelink, Eric J

    2017-10-01

    Ethnohistoric accounts and archaeological research from Central California document a shift from the use of lower-cost, high-ranked resources (e.g., large game) toward the greater use of higher-cost, low-ranked resources (e.g., acorns and small seeds) during the Late Holocene (4500-200 BP). The subsistence transition from higher consumption of large game toward an increased reliance on acorns was likely associated with increases in levels of logistical mobility and physical activity. This study predicts that mobility and overall workload patterns changed during this transition to accommodate new food procurement strategies and incorporate new dietary resources during the Late Holocene in Central California. Osteoarthritis prevalence was scored in the shoulder, elbow, hip, and knee of adult individuals (n = 256) from seven archaeological sites in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region. Comparisons were made between osteoarthritis prevalence, sex, age-at-death, and time period using ANCOVAs. The results of this study indicate significant increases in osteoarthritis prevalence in the hip of adult males and females during the Late Period (1200-200 BP), even after correcting for the cumulative effects of age. No differences were observed between the sexes or between time periods for the shoulder, elbow, and knee joints. The temporal increase in hip osteoarthritis supports the hypothesis that there was an increasing need for greater logistical mobility over time to procure key resources away from the village sites. Additionally, the lack of sex differences in osteoarthritis prevalence may suggest that females and males likely performed similar levels of activity during these periods. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The Effect of Increasing Surface Albedo on Urban Climate and Air Quality: A Detailed Study for Sacramento, Houston, and Chicago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jandaghian

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing surface reflectivity in urban areas can decrease ambient temperature, resulting in reducing photochemical reaction rates, reducing cooling energy demands and thus improving air quality and human health. The weather research and forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem is coupled with the multi-layer of the urban canopy model (ML-UCM to investigate the effects of surface modification on urban climate in a two-way nested approach over North America focusing on Sacramento, Houston, and Chicago during the 2011 heat wave period. This approach decreases the uncertainties associated with scale separation and grid resolution and equip us with an integrated simulation setup to capture the full impacts of meteorological and photochemical reactions. WRF-ChemV3.6.1 simulated the diurnal variation of air temperature reasonably well, overpredicted wind speed and dew point temperature, underpredicted relative humidity, overpredicted ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations, and underpredicted fine particular matters (PM2.5. The performance of PM2.5 is a combination of overprediction of particulate sulfate and underprediction of particulate nitrate and organic carbon. Increasing the surface albedo of roofs, walls, and pavements from 0.2 to 0.65, 0.60, and 0.45, respectively, resulted in a decrease in air temperature by 2.3 °C in urban areas and 0.7 °C in suburban areas; a slight increase in wind speed; an increase in relative humidity (3% and dew point temperature (0.3 °C; a decrease of PM2.5 and O3 concentrations by 2.7 µg/m3 and 6.3 ppb in urban areas and 1.4 µg/m3 and 2.5 ppb in suburban areas, respectively; minimal changes in PM2.5 subspecies; and a decrease of nitrogen dioxide (1 ppb in urban areas.

  19. Modeling pesticide loadings from the San Joaquin watershed into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Zhang, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is an ecologically rich, hydrologically complex area that serves as the hub of California's water supply. However, pesticides have been routinely detected in the Delta waterways, with concentrations exceeding the benchmark for the protection of aquatic life. Pesticide loadings into the Delta are partially attributed to the San Joaquin watershed, a highly productive agricultural watershed located upstream. Therefore, this study aims to simulate pesticide loadings to the Delta by applying the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model to the San Joaquin watershed, under the support of the USDA-ARS Delta Area-Wide Pest Management Program. Pesticide use patterns in the San Joaquin watershed were characterized by combining the California Pesticide Use Reporting (PUR) database and GIS analysis. Sensitivity/uncertainty analyses and multi-site calibration were performed in the simulation of stream flow, sediment, and pesticide loads along the San Joaquin River. Model performance was evaluated using a combination of graphic and quantitative measures. Preliminary results indicated that stream flow was satisfactorily simulated along the San Joaquin River and the major eastern tributaries, whereas stream flow was less accurately simulated in the western tributaries, which are ephemeral small streams that peak during winter storm events and are mainly fed by irrigation return flow during the growing season. The most sensitive parameters to stream flow were CN2, SOL_AWC, HRU_SLP, SLSUBBSN, SLSOIL, GWQMN and GW_REVAP. Regionalization of parameters is important as the sensitivity of parameters vary significantly spatially. In terms of evaluation metric, NSE tended to overrate model performance when compared to PBIAS. Anticipated results will include (1) pesticide use pattern analysis, (2) calibration and validation of stream flow, sediment, and pesticide loads, and (3) characterization of spatial patterns and temporal trends of pesticide yield.

  20. Determining Water Quality Trends in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Watershed in the Face of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynett, K.; Azimi-Gaylon, S.; Doidic, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Suisun Marsh (Delta) is the largest estuary on the West Coast of the Americas and is a resource of local, State, and national significance. The Delta is simultaneously the most critical component of California's water supply, a primary focus of the state's ecological conservation measures, and a vital resource deeply imperiled by degraded water quality. Delta waterbodies are identified as impaired by salinity, excess nutrients, low dissolved oxygen, pathogens, pesticides, heavy metals, and other contaminants. Climate change is expected to exacerbate the impacts of existing stressors in the Delta and magnify the challenges of managing this natural resource. A clear understanding of the current state of the watershed is needed to better inform scientists, decision makers, and the public about potential impacts from climate change. The Delta Watershed Initiative Network (Delta WIN) leverages the ecological benefits of healthy watersheds, and enhances, expands and creates opportunities for greater watershed health by coordinating with agencies, established programs, and local organizations. At this critical junction, Delta WIN is coordinating data integration and analysis to develop better understanding of the existing and emerging water quality concerns. As first steps, Delta WIN is integrating existing water quality data, analyzing trends, and monitoring to fill data gaps and to evaluate indicators of climate change impacts. Available data will be used for trend analysis; Delta WIN will continue to monitor where data is incomplete and new questions arise. Understanding how climate change conditions may affect water quality will be used to inform efforts to build resilience and maintain water quality levels which sustain aquatic life and human needs. Assessments of historical and new data will aid in recognition of potential climate change impacts and in initiating implementation of best management practices in collaboration with

  1. Modeling pesticide diuron loading from the San Joaquin watershed into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta using SWAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huajin; Luo, Yuzhou; Potter, Christopher; Moran, Patrick J; Grieneisen, Michael L; Zhang, Minghua

    2017-09-15

    Quantifying pesticide loading into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of northern California is critical for water quality management in the region, and potentially useful for biological weed control planning. In this study, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was applied to model streamflow, sediment, and pesticide diuron loading in the San Joaquin watershed, a major contributing area to the elevated pesticide levels in the downstream Delta. The Sequential Uncertainty Fitting version 2 (SUFI-2) algorithm was employed to perform calibration and uncertainty analysis. A combination of performance measures (PMs) and standardized performance evaluation criteria (PEC) was applied to evaluate model performance, while prediction uncertainty was quantified by 95% prediction uncertainty band (95PPU). Results showed that streamflow simulation was at least "satisfactory" at most stations, with more than 50% of the observed data bracketed by the 95PPU. Sediment simulation was rated as at least "satisfactory" based on two PMs, and diuron simulation was judged as "good" by all PMs. The 95PPU of sediment and diuron bracketed about 40% and 30% of the observed data, respectively. Significant correlations were observed between the diuron loads, and precipitation, streamflow, and the current and antecedent pesticide use. Results also showed that the majority (>70%) of agricultural diuron was transported during winter months, when direct exposure of biocontrol agents to diuron runoff is limited. However, exposure in the dry season could be a concern because diuron is relatively persistent in aquatic system. This study not only provides valuable information for the development of biological weed control plan in the Delta, but also serves as a foundation for the continued research on calibration, evaluation, and uncertainty analysis of spatially distributed, physically based hydrologic models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mapping Evapotranspiration in the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta using simulated ECOSTRESS Thermal Data: Validation and Inter-comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, A.; Jin, Y.; He, R.; Hulley, G.; Fisher, J.; Lee, C. M.; Rivera, G.; Hook, S. J.; Medellin-Azuara, J.; Kent, E. R.; Paw U, K. T.; Gao, F.; Lund, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Irrigation accounts for 80% of human freshwater consumption, and most of it return to the atmosphere through evapotranspiration (ET). In California, where our water resources are limited and heavily utilized, the need for a cost-effective, timely, and consistent spatial estimate of crop ET, from the farm to watershed level, is becoming increasingly important. The ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS), to be launched in mid-2018, will provide the most detailed and accurate temperature measurements ever acquired from space and thus unique opportunities for estimating ET at the farm scale. We simulated the ECOSTRESS thermal data at a 70 m resolution using VIIRS thermal observations and ASTER emissivity data in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region for the 2016 water year. Three remote sensing based ET methods were then applied to estimate ET using simulated ECOSTRESS data and optical data from Landsat and VIIRS, including Priestley-Taylor approaches developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) and by UC Davis (PT-UCD), and the Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) model. We compared these three sets of ET estimates with field measurements at sixteen sites over five crop types (Alfalfa, Corn, Pasture, Tomato, and Beardless Wheat). Good agreement was found between satellite-based estimates and field measurements. Our results demonstrate that thermal data from the upcoming ECOSTRESS mission will reduce the uncertainty in ET estimates. A continuous monitoring of the dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of consumptive water use at a field scale will help prepare and inform to adaptively manage water, canopy, and planting density to maximize yield with least amount of water.

  3. Plant community, primary productivity, and environmental conditions following wetland re-establishment in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R.L.; Fujii, R.

    2010-01-01

    Wetland restoration can mitigate aerobic decomposition of subsided organic soils, as well as re-establish conditions favorable for carbon storage. Rates of carbon storage result from the balance of inputs and losses, both of which are affected by wetland hydrology. We followed the effect of water depth (25 and 55 cm) on the plant community, primary production, and changes in two re-established wetlands in the Sacramento San-Joaquin River Delta, California for 9 years after flooding to determine how relatively small differences in water depth affect carbon storage rates over time. To estimate annual carbon inputs, plant species cover, standing above- and below-ground plant biomass, and annual biomass turnover rates were measured, and allometric biomass models for Schoenoplectus (Scirpus) acutus and Typha spp., the emergent marsh dominants, were developed. As the wetlands developed, environmental factors, including water temperature, depth, and pH were measured. Emergent marsh vegetation colonized the shallow wetland more rapidly than the deeper wetland. This is important to potential carbon storage because emergent marsh vegetation is more productive, and less labile, than submerged and floating vegetation. Primary production of emergent marsh vegetation ranged from 1.3 to 3.2 kg of carbon per square meter annually; and, mid-season standing live biomass represented about half of the annual primary production. Changes in species composition occurred in both submerged and emergent plant communities as the wetlands matured. Water depth, temperature, and pH were lower in areas with emergent marsh vegetation compared to submerged vegetation, all of which, in turn, can affect carbon cycling and storage rates. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  4. Ms. Mentor Unmasked

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Paula

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Emily Toth, who writes the monthly "Ms. Mentor" academic advice column in the "Chronicle of Higher Education" and teaches in the English department at Louisiana State University, in Baton Rouge. She is the author of "Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia" (1997), "Inside Peyton Place: The Life…

  5. 76 FR 40359 - Product Cancellation Order for Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ....... Malathion. 048273-00026 Marman Malathion 56 Malathion. EC. 062719-00308 Vista Fluroxypyr 1- methylheptyl...%C12). 047371-00157 Formulation RTU- Alkyl* dimethyl 6075(la). ethylbenzyl ammonium chloride *(50%C12... Corporation, 451 Florida Street, Baton Rouge, LA 70801-1765. 5481 Amvac Chemical Corporation, 4695 MacArthur...

  6. 40 CFR 52.970 - Identification of plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Revision of Bubble Permit. Issued 10/17/84, amended 07/20/89. Ref 52.999(c)(53) Vista Chemical Company... Submitted as part of the Baton Rouge, LA Post-1996 ROP Plan (e) EPA approved nonregulatory provisions and.../subject State approval/effective date EPA approval date Comments LA. R.S. of 1950. Title 40, Chapter 12...

  7. Measuring and analyzing urban tree cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Rowan A. Rowntree; E. Gregory McPherson; Susan M. Sisinni; Esther R. Kirkmann; Jack C. Stevens

    1996-01-01

    Measurement of city tree cover can aid in urban vegetation planning, management, and research by revealing characteristics of vegetation across a city. Urban tree cover in the United States ranges from 0.4% in Lancaster, California, to 55% in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Two important factors that affect the amount of urban tree cover are the natural environment and land...

  8. Evaluating the Measurement Structure of the Abbreviated HIV Stigma Scale in a Sample of African Americans Living with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eboneé T.; Yaghmaian, Rana A.; Best, Andrew; Chan, Fong; Burrell, Reginald, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to validate the 10-item version of the HIV Stigma Scale (HSS-10) in a sample of African Americans with HIV/AIDS. Method: One hundred and ten African Americans living with HIV/AIDS were recruited from 3 case management agencies in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Measurement structure of the HSS-10 was evaluated using…

  9. 76 FR 23528 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... Kill Approximately 1.15 None +276 Town of Princetown. miles downstream of Giffords Church Road. Approximately 1.16 None +292 miles upstream of Giffords Church Road. Poentic Kill At the Mohawk River None +231... Plank Unincorporated Areas Road. of East Baton Rouge Parish. Approximately 500 feet None +101 upstream...

  10. 77 FR 65656 - Determination of Attainment for the Nogales Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine Particle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ...) (Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 1-hour ozone); 75 FR 27944 (May 19, 2010) (Coso Junction, California, PM 10... regulatory action'' subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58... economically significant regulatory action based on health or safety risks subject to Executive Order 13045 (62...

  11. West Indian Sojourners in Guatemala and Honduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald N. Harpelle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Race, Nation, and West Indian Immigration to Honduras, 1890-1940. Glenn A. Chambers. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2010. xii +202 pp. (Cloth US$ 35.00Black Labor Migration in Caribbean Guatemala, 1882-1923. Frederick Douglass Opie. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2009. 145 pp. (Cloth US$ 65.00

  12. Annual Report on Awards (1982). Graduate and Postdoctoral Fellowships, Postdoctoral Research Associateships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    Sociolinguistics Gloria Jennien Bruston, Southern University. Baton Rouge Ahmdu Bello University, Nigeria Development Politics/African Politics...Eastern Illinois University University of Alabama. Tuscaloosa America History Mario Trinidad Garcia, University of California. Santa Barbara University of...Limon. University of Texas, Austin University of California, Berkeley Anthropology- Sociolinguistics Coramue R. Mann, Florida State University Cornell

  13. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ata Allah Nadiri1 2 Asghar Asghari Moghaddam1 Frank T-C Tsai2 Elham Fijani1 2. Department of Geology, University of Tabriz, 29 Bahman Boulevard, Tabriz, East Azerbaijan, Iran. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Louisiana State University, 3418G Patrick F. Taylor Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA.

  14. The Heritage Fallacy: Race, Loyalty, and the First Grambling-Southern Football Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    On Armistice Day 1932, the Southern University Bushmen football team left Baton Rouge and traveled to Monroe, Louisiana to play the Tigers of Louisiana Negro Normal and Industrial Institute for the first time. Normal was far younger than Southern. It was a two-year junior college in the northeast cotton town of Grambling, and its football team was…

  15. 75 FR 62109 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (GMFMC) will convene public meetings... Embassy Suites Hotel, 4914 Constitution Ave., Baton Rouge, LA 70808. Council address: Gulf of Mexico... CONTACT: Dr. Stephen Bortone, Executive Director, Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; telephone...

  16. Phase I Cultural Resources Survey and Archeological Inventory of a Proposed 1.12 ha (2.87 ac) Borrow Pit and an Associated Access Road, Ascension Parish, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    few cally grown sugar cane into molasses (Fossier sugar plantations are formed in the parish of 1957:47). Solis, and later Mendez , who pur...Recreation and Tourism, Office of Cultural Development, Division of Ar- chaeology, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Speaker, John Stuart, Joanna Chase, Carol

  17. Role of Receptor Sialylation in the Ovarian Tumor Cell Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Chemical Society meeting, Baton Rouge, LA, Nov 2012; (3) 19th World Congress on Advances in Oncology conference, Athens, Greece, scheduled for Oct, 2014...dehydrogenase 1 is a marker for normal and malignant human colonic stem cells (SC) and tracks SC overpopulation during colon tumorigenesis. Cancer Res 2009;69

  18. A Service-Learning Project on Volcanoes to Promote Critical Thinking and the Earth Science Literacy Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Jeffrey A.; Braud, Janie

    2013-01-01

    Students in Honors Physical Geology at Louisiana State University (LSU) participated in instruction in eighth- to ninth-grade geology and geography classes in East Baton Rouge Parish Schools (EBRPS) to help meet community needs. LSU students created instructional materials and reflected on the service activity to gain a deeper understanding of…

  19. Commander’s Impact on Preventing Disease During Military Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-05

    Since the Eighteenth Century (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1984), pp. 60-62. 3Eric A. Hanushek and John E. Jackson, Statistical Methods...Doctors in Gray. Baton Rouge, Louisiana State University Press, 1958. Hanushek , Eric A. and John E. Jackson. Statistical Methods for Social Scientist. New

  20. Geology, geochemistry and petrology of basalts from Paraná Continental Magmatic Province in the Araguari, Uberlândia, Uberaba and Sacramento regions, Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Castanheira de Moraes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study covers the region between the cities of Sacramento and Araguari/Uberlândia (Minas Gerais State, Brazil, where basalt flows from the Paraná Continental Magmatic Province outcrop. The investigated rocks present tholeiitic signature, with high titanium content, and are classified as Pitanga magma-type. The preserved basalt thickness is between 10 and 200 meters and individual flows do not exceed 15 meters thick. Flows were identified as sheet lobes, smaller and thinner flows units - stacked laterally and vertically forming compound lavas -, or frontal, centimetric lobes. The basalt flows show decimetric to metric intercalations of clastic sedimentary rock, with depositional characteristics that can vary from aeolian to lacustrine, and are important markers on prevailing environmental conditions. The plagioclases are dominantly labradorite and pyroxene is augite, whereas olivine can be hyalosiderite or hortonolite/ferrohortonolite. The behavior of the major, minor and trace elements is compatible with the presence of at least two parental magmas, which were subjected to fractional crystallization mainly of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, ilmenite and magnetite. There is a chemistry distinction between basalts from Sacramento to those from Araguari/Uberlândia region, the former one showing more evolved than the last one. The high (La/LuN values are indicative of partial melting of a garnet peridotite, while the Rare Earth Elements (REE values are indicative of fractional crystallization.

  1. Magnetic Field-Vector Measurements in Quiescent Prominences via the Hanle Effect: Analysis of Prominences Observed at Pic-Du-Midi and at Sacramento Peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommier, V.; Leroy, J. L.; Sahal-Brechot, S.

    1985-01-01

    The Hanle effect method for magnetic field vector diagnostics has now provided results on the magnetic field strength and direction in quiescent prominences, from linear polarization measurements in the He I E sub 3 line, performed at the Pic-du-Midi and at Sacramento Peak. However, there is an inescapable ambiguity in the field vector determination: each polarization measurement provides two field vector solutions symmetrical with respect to the line-of-sight. A statistical analysis capable of solving this ambiguity was applied to the large sample of prominences observed at the Pic-du-Midi (Leroy, et al., 1984); the same method of analysis applied to the prominences observed at Sacramento Peak (Athay, et al., 1983) provides results in agreement on the most probable magnetic structure of prominences; these results are detailed. The statistical results were confirmed on favorable individual cases: for 15 prominences observed at Pic-du-Midi, the two-field vectors are pointing on the same side of the prominence, and the alpha angles are large enough with respect to the measurements and interpretation inaccuracies, so that the field polarity is derived without any ambiguity.

  2. Changes in sediment and organic carbon accumulation in a highly-disturbed ecosystem: The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (California, USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Lerberg, Elizabeth J.; Dickhut, Rebecca M.; Kuehl, Steven A.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Wakeham, Stuart G.

    2009-01-01

    We used the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta CA (Delta, hereafter) as a model system for understanding how human activities influence the delivery of sediment and total organic carbon (TOC) over the past 50-60 years. Sediment cores were collected from sites within the Delta representing the Sacramento River (SAC), the San Joaquin River (SJR), and Franks Tract (FT), a flooded agricultural tract. A variety of anthropogenic tracers including 137 Cs, total DDE (ΣDDE) and brominated diphenyl ether (BDE) congeners were used to quantify sediment accumulation rates. This information was combined with total organic carbon (TOC) profiles to quantify rates of TOC accumulation. Across the three sites, sediment and TOC accumulation rates were four to eight-fold higher prior to 1972. Changes in sediment and TOC accumulation were coincident with completion of several large reservoirs and increased agriculture and urbanization in the Delta watershed. Radiocarbon content of TOC indicated that much of the carbon delivered to the Delta is 'pre-aged' reflecting processing in the Delta watershed or during transport to the sites rather than an input of predominantly contemporary carbon (e.g., 900-1400 years BP in surface sediments and 2200 yrs BP and 3610 yrs BP at the base of the SJR and FT cores, respectively). Together, these data suggest that human activities have altered the amount and age of TOC accumulating in the Delta since the 1940s.

  3. Estimation of reservoir inflow in data scarce region by using Sacramento rainfall runoff model - A case study for Sittaung River Basin, Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myo Lin, Nay; Rutten, Martine

    2017-04-01

    The Sittaung River is one of four major rivers in Myanmar. This river basin is developing fast and facing problems with flood, sedimentation, river bank erosion and salt intrusion. At present, more than 20 numbers of reservoirs have already been constructed for multiple purposes such as irrigation, domestic water supply, hydro-power generation, and flood control. The rainfall runoff models are required for the operational management of this reservoir system. In this study, the river basin is divided into (64) sub-catchments and the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) models are developed by using satellite rainfall and Geographic Information System (GIS) data. The SAC-SMA model has sixteen calibration parameters, and also uses a unit hydrograph for surface flow routing. The Sobek software package is used for SAC-SMA modelling and simulation of river system. The models are calibrated and tested by using observed discharge and water level data. The statistical results show that the model is applicable to use for data scarce region. Keywords: Sacramento, Sobek, rainfall runoff, reservoir

  4. La historia sacra del Santísimo Sacramento contra las heregias destos tiempos"An iconographic study of the engravings illustrating the work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvo Portela, Juan Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se hace un estudio iconográfico de las dos estampas que ilustran el libro del dominico fray Alonso de Ribera, La Historia Sacra del Santissimo Sacramento contra las heregias destos tiempos, editado por Luis Sánchez en Madrid en 1626. En dichas estampas se plasman dos aspectos que van a ser fundamentales de la religiosidad contrarreformista española del siglo XVII, la defensa a ultranza de la Eucaristía y la lucha contra la herejía. In this article is made an iconographic study of the two prints that illustrate the book of the Dominican Fray Alonso de Ribera, La Historia Sacra del Santissimo Sacramento contra las heregias destos tiempos, edited by Luis Sanchez in Madrid in 1626. In these prints are reflected two aspects that are going to be essential on the religiosity Spanish Counterreform of the seventeenth century, the stubborn defense of the Eucharist and the fight against heresy.

  5. Greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration potential in restored freshwater marshes in the Sacramento San-Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, S. H.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Oikawa, P. Y.; Matthes, J. H.; Dronova, I.; Anderson, F. E.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    Wetlands can be effective carbon sinks due to limited decomposition rates in anaerobic soil. As such there is a growing interest in the use of restored wetlands as biological carbon sequestration projects for greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction programs. However, using wetlands to offset emissions requires accurate accounting of both carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) exchange since wetlands are also sources of CH4. To date few studies have quantified CO2 and CH4 exchange from restored wetlands or assessed how these fluxes vary during ecosystem development. In this study, we report on multiple years of eddy covariance measurements of CO2 and CH4 fluxes from two restored freshwater marshes of differing ages (one restored in 1997 and the other in 2010) in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, CA. Measurements at the younger restored wetland started in October 2010 and began in April 2011 at the older site. The younger restored wetland showed considerable year-to-year variability in the first 4 years following restoration, with CO2 uptake ranging from 12 to 420 g C-CO2 m-2 yr-1. Net CO2 uptake at the older wetland was overall greater than at the younger site, ranging from 292 to 585 g C-CO2 m-2 yr-1. Methane emissions were on average higher at the younger wetland (46 g C-CH4 m-2 yr-1) relative to the older one (33 g C-CH4 m-2 yr-1). In terms of the GHG budgets (assuming a global warming potential of 34), the younger wetland was consistently a GHG source, emitting on average 1439 g CO2 eq m-2 yr-1, while the older wetland was a GHG sink in two of the years of measurement (sequestering 651 and 780 g CO2 eq m-2 yr-1 in 2012 and 2013, respectively) and a source of 750 g CO2 eq m-2 yr-1 in 2014. This study highlights how dynamic CO2 and CH4 fluxes are in the first years following wetland restoration and suggests that restored wetlands have the potential to act as GHG sinks but this may depend on time since restoration.

  6. Implications for sustainability of a changing agricultural mosaic in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, C. E.; Deverel, S. J.; Jacobs, P.; Kelsey, R.

    2015-12-01

    Transformed from the largest wetland system on the west coast of the United States to agriculture, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is an extreme teaching example of anthropogenic threats to sustainability. For over 6,000 years, over 280,000 ha of intertidal freshwater marsh accreted due to seal level rise and sediment deposition. Farming of organic soils since 1850 resulted in land subsidence caused primarily by oxidation. Over 2 billion cubic meters of soil were lost resulting in elevations on Delta islands ranging from -1 to -8 m and increased risk of levee failures and water supply disruption. Alteration of water flows and habitat caused dramatic declines in aquatic species. A cycle in which oxidation of organic soils leads to deepening of drainage ditches to maintain an aerated root zone which in turn results in sustained oxidation and subsidence is perpetuated by the momentum of the status quo despite evidence that agricultural practices are increasingly unsustainable. Flooding of the soils breaks the oxidation/subsidence cycle. We assessed alternate land uses and the carbon market as a potential impetus for change. Using the peer-reviewed and locally calibrated SUBCALC model, we estimated net global warming potential for a range of scenarios for a representative island, from status quo to incorporating significant proportions of subsidence-mitigating land use. We analyzed economic implications by determining profit losses or gains when a simulated GHG offset market is available for wetlands using a regional agricultural production and economic optimization model, We estimated baseline GHG emissions at about 60,000 tons CO2-e per year. In contrast, modeled implementation of rice and wetlands resulted in substantial emissions reductions to the island being a net GHG sink. Subsidence would be arrested or reversed where these land uses are implemented. Results of economic modeling reveal that conversion to wetlands can have significant negative farm financial

  7. Civilizing the Conversation? Using Surveys to Inform Water Management and Science in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanak, E.; Phillips Chappelle, C.

    2013-12-01

    Improving ecosystem outcomes in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is a complex, high-stakes water resource management challenge. The Delta is a major hub for water supply conveyance and a valued ecological resource. Yet long-term declines in native fish populations have resulted in severe legal constraints on water exports and fueled growing public debates about the roles and responsibilities of flow modification and other sources of ecosystem stress. Meanwhile, scientific uncertainty, and the inability of the scientific community to effectively communicate what *is* known, has frustrated policymakers and encouraged 'combat science' - the commissioning and use of competing scientific opinions in the courtroom. This paper summarizes results from a study designed to inform the policy process through the use of confidential surveys of scientific researchers (those publishing in peer-reviewed journals, n=122) and engaged stakeholders and policymakers (n=240). The surveys, conducted in mid-2012, sought respondents' views on the sources of ecosystem stress and priority ecosystem management actions. The scientist survey is an example of the growing use of expert elicitation to address gaps in the scientific literature, particularly where there is uncertainty about priorities for decisionmaking (e.g., Cvitanovic et al. 2013, J. of Env. Mgmt; McDaniels et al. 2012, Risk Analysis). The stakeholder survey is a useful complement, enabling the identification of areas of consensus and divergence among stakeholder groups and between these groups and scientific experts. The results suggest such surveys are a promising tool for addressing complex water management problems. We found surprisingly high agreement among scientists on the relative roles of stressors and the most promising management actions; they emphasized restoring more natural processes through habitat and flow actions within the watershed, consistent with 'reconciliation ecology' approaches (Rosenzweig 2003

  8. The effectiveness of courses developed to recruit and retain minority students in the geology major at California State University, Sacramento

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammersley, L. C.

    2014-12-01

    The lack of diversity in the geosciences has long been recognized as a problem. While improvements have been made, the proportion of Bachelor's degrees in the earth sciences awarded to Hispanic students in 2012 was only 5.6%, a huge disparity with the 17% of the U.S. population that is Hispanic. At California State University, Sacramento, 19% of the student population is Hispanic but, of the 61 students that earned an undergraduate degree in geology between 2005 and 2010, only four were Hispanic. In response to the lack of diversity in the geology major, we developed a new Geology of Mexico course with the goal of recruiting Hispanic students to the major. We present a quantitative evaluation of the effectiveness of this course in attracting Hispanic students, encouraging them to take more geology courses, and recruiting them to the major. Data was collected in the Geology of Mexico course and in the equivalent Physical Geology course. During the period evaluated, 93% of enrollment in Geology of Mexico was Hispanic compared with 18.5% in Physical Geology. We found that Hispanic students in Physical Geology earned lower grades than did nonminority students, while Hispanic students in Geology of Mexico earned grades comparable with nonminority students in Physical Geology. Overall, Geology of Mexico students also showed more positive attitude changes to the geosciences and were more likely to take another geology course. The recruitment rate into the major for Hispanic students in Geology of Mexico was comparable to the recruitment rate for nonminority students in Physical Geology. Since 2008, the proportion of Hispanic geology majors has risen from 4.5% to 14.1% and, notably, the proportion of underrepresented minorities has increased from 4.5% to 22.2%, reflecting a significant overall increase in diversity of the major. In order to increase retention of minority students, we developed a field course for new majors who were not yet ready for upper division courses

  9. Subsidence Reversal in a Re-established Wetland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin L. Miller

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The stability of levees in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is threatened by continued subsidence of Delta peat islands. Up to 6 meters of land-surface elevation has been lost in the 150 years since Delta marshes were leveed and drained, primarily from oxidation of peat soils. Flooding subsided peat islands halts peat oxidation by creating anoxic soils, but net accumulation of new material in restored wetlands is required to recover land-surface elevations. We investigated the subsidence reversal potential of two 3 hectare, permanently flooded, impounded wetlands re-established on a deeply subsided field on Twitchell Island. The shallower wetland (design water depth 25 cm was almost completely colonized by dense emergent marsh vegetation within two years; whereas, the deeper wetland (design water depth 55 cm which developed spatially variable depths as a result of heterogeneous colonization by emergent vegetation, still had some areas remaining as open water after nine years. Changes in land-surface elevation were quantified using repeated sedimentation-erosion table measurements. New material accumulating in the wetlands was sampled by coring. Land-surface elevations increased by an average of 4 cm/yr in both wetlands from 1997 to 2006; however, the rates at different sites in the wetlands ranged from -0.5 to +9.2 cm/yr. Open water areas of the deeper wetland without emergent vegetation had the lowest rates of land-surface elevation gain. The greatest rates occurred in areas of the deeper wetland most isolated from the river water inlets, with dense stands of emergent marsh vegetation (tules and cattails. Vegetated areas of the deeper wetland in the transition zones between open water and mature emergent stands had intermediate rates of land-surface gain, as did the entire shallower wetland. These results suggest that the dominant component contributing to land-surface elevation gain in these wetlands was accumulation of organic matter, rather

  10. Riverine Nutrient Trends in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Basins, California: A Comparison to State and Regional Water Quality Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Schlegel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available doi: http://dx.doi.org/1015447/sfews.2015v13iss4art2Non-point source (NPS contaminant control strategies were initiated in California in the late 1980s under the authority of the State Porter–Cologne Act and eventually for the development of total maximum daily load (TMDL plans, under the federal Clean Water Act. Most of the NPS TMDLs developed for California’s Central Valley (CV region were related to pesticides, but not nutrients. Efforts to reduce pesticide loads and concentrations began in earnest around 1990. The NPS control strategies either encouraged or mandated the use of management practices (MPs. Although TMDLs were largely developed for pesticides, the resultant MPs might have affected the runoff of other potential contaminants (such as nutrients. This study evaluates the effect of agricultural NPS control strategies implemented in California’s CV before and between 1990 and 2013, on nutrients, by comparing trends in surface-water concentrations and loads. In general, use of MPs was encouraged during a “voluntary” period (1990 to 2004 and mandated during an “enforcement” period (2004 to 2013. Nutrient concentrations, loads, and trends were estimated by using a recently developed Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season (WRTDS model. Sufficient total phosphorus (TP, total nitrogen (TN, and nitrate (NO3 data were available to compare the voluntary and enforcement periods for twelve sites within the lower Sacramento and San Joaquin basins. Ammonia concentrations and fluxes were evaluated at a subset of these sites. For six of these sites, flow-normalized mean annual concentrations of TP or NO3 decreased at a faster rate during the enforcement period than during the voluntary period. Concentration changes during similar years and ranges of flow conditions suggest that MPs designed for pesticides may also have reduced nutrient loads. Results show that enforceable NPS policies, and accelerated MP implementation

  11. Recent research on the hydrodynamics of the Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta and north San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burau, J.R.; Monismith, S.G.; Stacey, M.T.; Oltmann, R.N.; Lacy, J.R.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    This article presents an overview of recent findings from hydrodynamic research on circulation and mixing in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) (Figure 1) and North San Francisco Bay (North Bay) (Figure 2). For the purposes of this article, North Bay includes San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, and Suisun Bay. The findings presented are those gained from field studies carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Interagency Ecological Program (IEP), and Stanford University beginning about 1993. The premise behind these studies was that a basic understanding of circulation and mixing patterns in the Bay and Delta is an essential part of understanding how biota and water quality are affected by natural hydrologic variability, water appropriation, and development activities. Data collected for the field studies described in this article have significantly improved our understanding of Bay and Delta hydrodynamics. Measured flows ,in the Delta have provided valuable information on how water moves through the Delta's network of channels and how export pumping affects flows. Studies of the shallows and shallow-channel exchange processes conducted in Honker Bay have shown that the water residence time in Honker Bay is much shorter than previously reported (on the order of hours to several tidal cycles instead ofweeks). Suisun Bay studies have provided data on hydrodynamic transport and accumulation mechanisms that operate primarily in the channels. The Suisun Bay studies have caused us to revise our understanding of residual circulation in the channels of North Bay and of "entrapment" mechanisms in the low salinity zone. Finally, detailed tidal and residual (tidally averaged) time-scale studies of the mechanisms that control gravitational circulation in the estuary show that density-driven transport in the channels is governed by turbulence time-scale (seconds) interactions between the mean flow and stratification. The hydrodynamic research

  12. Erosion characteristics and horizontal variability for small erosion depths in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoellhamer, David H.; Manning, Andrew J.; Work, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Erodibility of cohesive sediment in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (Delta) was investigated with an erosion microcosm. Erosion depths in the Delta and in the microcosm were estimated to be about one floc diameter over a range of shear stresses and times comparable to half of a typical tidal cycle. Using the conventional assumption of horizontally homogeneous bed sediment, data from 27 of 34 microcosm experiments indicate that the erosion rate coefficient increased as eroded mass increased, contrary to theory. We believe that small erosion depths, erosion rate coefficient deviation from theory, and visual observation of horizontally varying biota and texture at the sediment surface indicate that erosion cannot solely be a function of depth but must also vary horizontally. We test this hypothesis by developing a simple numerical model that includes horizontal heterogeneity, use it to develop an artificial time series of suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) in an erosion microcosm, then analyze that time series assuming horizontal homogeneity. A shear vane was used to estimate that the horizontal standard deviation of critical shear stress was about 30% of the mean value at a site in the Delta. The numerical model of the erosion microcosm included a normal distribution of initial critical shear stress, a linear increase in critical shear stress with eroded mass, an exponential decrease of erosion rate coefficient with eroded mass, and a stepped increase in applied shear stress. The maximum SSC for each step increased gradually, thus confounding identification of a single well-defined critical shear stress as encountered with the empirical data. Analysis of the artificial SSC time series with the assumption of a homogeneous bed reproduced the original profile of critical shear stress, but the erosion rate coefficient increased with eroded mass, similar to the empirical data. Thus, the numerical experiment confirms the small-depth erosion hypothesis. A linear

  13. 234U/238U and δ87Sr in peat as tracers of paleosalinity in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, J.Z.; Paces, J.B.; Alpers, C.N.; Windham-Myers, L.; Neymark, L.A.; Bullen, T.D.; Taylor, H.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Concentrations and isotopic values of Sr and U in peat were used to trace paleosalinity. • A three-end-member mixing model was constructed using values from water sources. • Paleosalinity of peat samples was determined relative to that of end members. • δ 87 Sr values were altered during and after the California Gold Rush period. • Oligohaline and freshwater marshes have long existed in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the history of paleosalinity over the past 6000+ years in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the Delta), which is the innermost part of the San Francisco Estuary. We used a combination of Sr and U concentrations, δ 87 Sr values, and 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios (AR) in peat as proxies for tracking paleosalinity. Peat cores were collected in marshes on Browns Island, Franks Wetland, and Bacon Channel Island in the Delta. Cores were dated using 137 Cs, the onset of Pb and Hg contamination from hydraulic gold mining, and 14 C. A proof of concept study showed that the dominant emergent macrophyte and major component of peat in the Delta, Schoenoplectus spp., incorporates Sr and U and that the isotopic composition of these elements tracks the ambient water salinity across the Estuary. Concentrations and isotopic compositions of Sr and U in the three main water sources contributing to the Delta (seawater, Sacramento River water, and San Joaquin River water) were used to construct a three-end-member mixing model. Delta paleosalinity was determined by examining variations in the distribution of peat samples through time within the area delineated by the mixing model. The Delta has long been considered a tidal freshwater marsh region, but only peat samples from Franks Wetland and Bacon Channel Island have shown a consistently fresh signal (<0.5 ppt) through time. Therefore, the eastern Delta, which occurs upstream from Bacon Channel Island along the San Joaquin River and its

  14. Sacramento County, CA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  15. The Diurnal Cycle of Particle Sizes, Compositions, and Densities observed in Sacramento, CA during CARES Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beránek, J.; Vaden, T.; Imre, D. G.; Zelenyuk, A.

    2010-12-01

    A central objective of the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was to characterize unequivocally all aspects related to organics in aerosols. To this end, a range of instruments measured loadings, size distributions, compositions, densities, CCN activities, and optical properties of aerosol sampled in Sacramento, CA over the month of June 2010. We present the results of measurements conducted by our single particle mass spectrometer, SPLAT. SPLAT was used to measure the size, composition, and density of individual particles with diameters between 50 to 2000 nm. SPLAT measured the vacuum aerodynamic diameters (dva) of more than 2 million particles and the compositions of ~350,000 particles, each day. In addition, SPLAT was used in combination with a differential mobility analyzer to measure the density, or effective density of individual particles. These measurements were typically conducted twice per day: in the morning, and mid-afternoon. Preliminary analysis of the data shows that under most conditions, the particles were relatively small (below 200 nm), and the vast majority of them were composed of oxygenated organics mixed with various amounts of sulfates. Analysis of the mass spectra shows that the oxygenated organics in these particles are the oxidized products of biogenic volatile organic precursors. In addition to particles composed of SOA mixed with sulfates, we detected and characterized fresh and processed soot particles, biomass burning aerosol, organic amines, sea salt - fresh and processed - and a small number of dust and other inorganic particles, commonly found in urban environment. SOA mixed with sulfates were the vast majority of particles at all times, while the other particle types exhibited episodic behavior. The data shows a reproducible diurnal pattern in SOA size distributions, number concentrations, and compositions. Early in the morning the particle number concentrations are relatively low, and the particle size

  16. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenic–biogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento plume during CARES?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kleinman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES the US Department of Energy (DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA, plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrations are enhanced by the simultaneous presence of high concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO and either isoprene, MVK + MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, respectively. Linear and bilinear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, “Bio”, for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short timescales and distance scales can be explained by CO. For each transect and species a plume perturbation, (i.e., ΔOA, defined as the difference between 90th and 10th percentiles was defined and regressions done amongst Δ values in order to probe day-to-day and location-dependent variability. Species that predicted the largest fraction of the variance in ΔOA were ΔO3 and ΔCO. Background OA was highly correlated with background methanol and poorly correlated with other tracers. Because background OA was  ∼  60 % of peak OA in the urban plume, peak OA should be primarily biogenic and therefore non-fossil, even though the day-to-day and spatial variability of plume OA is best described by an anthropogenic tracer, CO. Transects were split into subsets according to the percentile rankings of ΔCO and ΔBio, similar to an approach used by Setyan

  17. An investigation of several aspects of LANDSAT-5 data quality. [Palmer County, Shelby, mt; White sands, NM; Great Salt Lake, UT; San Matted Bridge and Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, R. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Band-to-band registration, geodetic registration, interdector noise, and the modulation transfer function (MTE) are discussed for the Palmer County; TX scene. Band combinations for several LANDSAT 4 and LANDSAT 5 scenes; the geodetic registration test for the Sacramento, CA area; periodic noise components in TM band 5; and grey level measurements by detector for Great Salt Lake (UT) dark water forescans and backscans are considered. Results of MTF analyses of the San Mateo Bridge and of TM high resolution and aerial Daedalus scanner imagery are consistent and appear to be repeatable. An oil-on-sand target was constructed on the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The two-image analysis procedure used is summarized.

  18. Yolo Bypass Juvenile Salmon Utilization Study 2016—Summary of acoustically tagged juvenile salmon and study fish release, Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Theresa L.; Hurst, William R.

    2017-09-12

    The Yolo Bypass is a flood control bypass in Sacramento Valley, California. Flood plain habitats may be used for juvenile salmon rearing, however, the potential value of such habitats can be difficult to evaluate because of the intermittent nature of inundation events. The Yolo Bypass Juvenile Salmon Utilization Study (YBUS) used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the movements and survival of juvenile salmon adjacent to and within the Yolo Bypass during the winter of 2016. This report presents numbers, size data, and release data (times, dates, and locations) for the 1,197 acoustically tagged juvenile salmon released for the YBUS from February 21 to March 18, 2016. Detailed descriptions of the surgical implantation of transmitters are also presented. These data are presented to support the collaborative, interagency analysis and reporting of the study findings.

  19. Science advancements key to increasing management value of life stage monitoring networks for endangered Sacramento River winter-run Chinook salmon in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rachel C.; Windell, Sean; Brandes, Patricia L.; Conrad, J. Louise; Ferguson, John; Goertler, Pascale A. L.; Harvey, Brett N.; Heublein, Joseph; Isreal, Joshua A.; Kratville, Daniel W.; Kirsch, Joseph E.; Perry, Russell W.; Pisciotto, Joseph; Poytress, William R.; Reece, Kevin; Swart, Brycen G.

    2017-01-01

    A robust monitoring network that provides quantitative information about the status of imperiled species at key life stages and geographic locations over time is fundamental for sustainable management of fisheries resources. For anadromous species, management actions in one geographic domain can substantially affect abundance of subsequent life stages that span broad geographic regions. Quantitative metrics (e.g., abundance, movement, survival, life history diversity, and condition) at multiple life stages are needed to inform how management actions (e.g., hatcheries, harvest, hydrology, and habitat restoration) influence salmon population dynamics. The existing monitoring network for endangered Sacramento River winterrun Chinook Salmon (SRWRC, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in California’s Central Valley was compared to conceptual models developed for each life stage and geographic region of the life cycle to identify relevant SRWRC metrics. We concluded that the current monitoring network was insufficient to diagnose when (life stage) and where (geographic domain) chronic or episodic reductions in SRWRC cohorts occur, precluding within- and among-year comparisons. The strongest quantitative data exist in the Upper Sacramento River, where abundance estimates are generated for adult spawners and emigrating juveniles. However, once SRWRC leave the upper river, our knowledge of their identity, abundance, and condition diminishes, despite the juvenile monitoring enterprise. We identified six system-wide recommended actions to strengthen the value of data generated from the existing monitoring network to assess resource management actions: (1) incorporate genetic run identification; (2) develop juvenile abundance estimates; (3) collect data for life history diversity metrics at multiple life stages; (4) expand and enhance real-time fish survival and movement monitoring; (5) collect fish condition data; and (6) provide timely public access to monitoring data in open data

  20. Effects of the proposed California WaterFix North Delta Diversion on survival of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Russell W.; Pope, Adam C.

    2018-05-11

    The California Department of Water Resources and Bureau of Reclamation propose new water intake facilities on the Sacramento River in northern California that would convey some of the water for export to areas south of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (hereinafter referred to as the Delta) through tunnels rather than through the Delta. The collection of water intakes, tunnels, pumping facilities, associated structures, and proposed operations are collectively referred to as California WaterFix. The water intake facilities, hereinafter referred to as the North Delta Diversion (NDD), are proposed to be located on the Sacramento River downstream of the city of Sacramento and upstream of the first major river junction where Sutter Slough branches from the Sacramento River. The NDD can divert a maximum discharge of 9,000 cubic feet per second (ft3 /s) from the Sacramento River, which reduces the amount of Sacramento River inflow into the Delta. In this report, we conduct four analyses to investigate the effect of the NDD and its proposed operation on survival of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). All analyses used the results of a Bayesian survival model that allowed us to simulate travel time, migration routing, and survival of juvenile Chinook salmon migrating through the Delta in response to NDD operations, which affected both inflows to the Delta and operation of the Delta Cross Channel (DCC). For the first analysis, we evaluated the effect of the NDD bypass rules on salmon survival. The NDD bypass rules are a set of operational rule curves designed to provide adaptive levels of fish protection by defining allowable diversion rates as a function of (1) Sacramento River discharge as measured at Freeport, and (2) time of year when endangered runs requiring the most protection are present. We determined that all bypass rule curves except constant low-level pumping (maximum diversion of 900 ft3 /s) could cause a sizeable decrease in survival by as

  1. Chromium(VI) generation in vadose zone soils and alluvial sediments of the southwestern Sacramento Valley, California: A potential source of geogenic Cr(VI) to groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Southern Sacramento Valley soil and sediment has abundant naturally-occurring Cr(III). → Cr(III) resides mainly in chromite but some is associated with clays and Fe oxides. → Cr(VI) is mostly absent in surface soil but ubiquitous in deeper soil and sediment. → Cr(VI) increased linearly with time during lab soil incubations with no additions. → Cation exchange processes resulted in greater Cr(VI) generation rates. - Abstract: Concentrations of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater that exceed the World Health Organization's maximum contaminant level for drinking water (50 μg L -1 ) occur in several locations globally. The major mechanism for mobilization of this Cr(VI) at these sites is the weathering of Cr(III) from ultramafic rocks and its subsequent oxidation on Mn oxides. This process may be occurring in the southern Sacramento Valley of California where Cr(VI) concentrations in groundwater can approach or exceed 50 μg L -1 . To characterize Cr geochemistry in the area, samples from several soil auger cores (approximately 4 m deep) and drill cores (approximately 25 m deep) were analyzed for total concentrations of 44 major, minor and trace elements, Cr associated with labile Mn and Fe oxides, and Cr(VI). Total concentrations of Cr in these samples ranged from 140 to 2220 mg per kg soil. Between 9 and 70 mg per kg soil was released by selective extractions that target Fe oxides, but essentially no Cr was associated with the abundant reactive Mn oxides (up to ∼1000 mg hydroxylamine-reducible Mn per kg soil was present). Both borehole magnetic susceptibility surveys performed at some of the drill core sites and relative differences between Cr released in a 4-acid digestion versus total Cr (lithium metaborate fusion digestion) suggest that the majority of total Cr in the samples is present in refractory chromite minerals transported from ultramafic exposures in the Coast Range Mountains. Chromium(VI) in the samples studied ranged from 0 to 42

  2. Chromium(VI) generation in vadose zone soils and alluvial sediments of the southwestern Sacramento Valley, California: A potential source of geogenic Cr(VI) to groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Christopher T., E-mail: cmills@usgs.gov [United States Geological Survey, Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center, Denver Federal Center, MS 964D, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Ellefsen, Karl J. [United States Geological Survey, Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center, Denver Federal Center, MS 964D, Denver, CO 80225 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Southern Sacramento Valley soil and sediment has abundant naturally-occurring Cr(III). > Cr(III) resides mainly in chromite but some is associated with clays and Fe oxides. > Cr(VI) is mostly absent in surface soil but ubiquitous in deeper soil and sediment. > Cr(VI) increased linearly with time during lab soil incubations with no additions. > Cation exchange processes resulted in greater Cr(VI) generation rates. - Abstract: Concentrations of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater that exceed the World Health Organization's maximum contaminant level for drinking water (50 {mu}g L{sup -1}) occur in several locations globally. The major mechanism for mobilization of this Cr(VI) at these sites is the weathering of Cr(III) from ultramafic rocks and its subsequent oxidation on Mn oxides. This process may be occurring in the southern Sacramento Valley of California where Cr(VI) concentrations in groundwater can approach or exceed 50 {mu}g L{sup -1}. To characterize Cr geochemistry in the area, samples from several soil auger cores (approximately 4 m deep) and drill cores (approximately 25 m deep) were analyzed for total concentrations of 44 major, minor and trace elements, Cr associated with labile Mn and Fe oxides, and Cr(VI). Total concentrations of Cr in these samples ranged from 140 to 2220 mg per kg soil. Between 9 and 70 mg per kg soil was released by selective extractions that target Fe oxides, but essentially no Cr was associated with the abundant reactive Mn oxides (up to {approx}1000 mg hydroxylamine-reducible Mn per kg soil was present). Both borehole magnetic susceptibility surveys performed at some of the drill core sites and relative differences between Cr released in a 4-acid digestion versus total Cr (lithium metaborate fusion digestion) suggest that the majority of total Cr in the samples is present in refractory chromite minerals transported from ultramafic exposures in the Coast Range Mountains. Chromium(VI) in the samples studied ranged

  3. Genèse des magmas associés à l'ouverture d'un domaine océanique : Géochimie des laves du Nord-Est de l'Afrique (Mer Rouge-Afar) et d'Arabie

    OpenAIRE

    Barrat , Jean-Alix ,

    1991-01-01

    Mémoires et Documents du CAESS, n°48; L'existence d'un point chaud localisé en Afar est confirmée. Principalement deux composants mantelliques interviennent dans la genèse des laves du Sud de la Mer Rouge et d'Afar: un manteau appauvri en LREE et une source présentant des caractéristiques du pôle HIMU. Certains basaltes des plateaux éthiopiens et d'Afar (en particulier ceux émis avant l'ouverture du Golfe de Tadjoura) sont contaminés par la croûte continentale. Les résultats analytiques prése...

  4. El entorno local como objeto de estudio y de aplicación del saber geoambiental. Una experiencia práctica en Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ethel Benítez Martínez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este texto presenta la importancia de los métodos de aprendizaje, tanto para la enseñanza de la geografía, como para la prevención y atención de problemas socioambientales concretos. Para este propósito, se expondrá el análisis de una experiencia pedagógica llevada a cabo con estudiantes de secundaria, en torno al impacto de las acciones humanas avaladas, en forma directa e indirecta, por las autoridades gubernamentales locales y nacionales sobre el sistema de humedales que forman parte de la franja costera de la ciudad de Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay. Se espera demostrar cómo la enseñanza de la geografía en la secundaria, desde una postura reflexiva, crítica y activa, favorece el desarrollo de capacidades cognitivas en los educandos que redundan en la formación de individuos responsables, autónomos y con capacidad crítica, capaces de dar soluciones y tomar decisiones con respecto a problemas concretos como el arriba enunciado.

  5. Strategies to prevent and reduce diabetes and obesity in Sacramento, California: the African American Leadership Coalition and University of California, Davis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegahn, Linda; Styne, Dennis; Askia, Joyce; Roberts, Tina; Lewis, Edward T; Edwards, Whitney

    2013-11-14

    Diabetes is one of the leading causes of illness and death for African Americans and people of African descent throughout the United States and in the city and county of Sacramento, California. The involvement of families and communities in developing prevention strategies can increase the likelihood that behavioral changes will be sustained. Three member organizations of the African American Leadership Coalition (AALC) entered into a partnership with the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) to engage families in developing a process to identify barriers to diabetes and obesity prevention and reduction, exchange strategies, and create action plans for prevention. The intervention comprised 3 phases: 1) coalition formation and training; 2) data collection, analysis, and dissemination of results; and 3) development of family and community action plans. Academic and community partners planned and implemented all project phases together. Sources of information about diabetes and obesity were primarily doctors and the Internet; barriers were related to lack of time needed to prepare healthy meals, high food costs, transportation to fresh markets, motivation around healthy habits, and unsafe environments. Action plans addressed behavioral change and family cohesion. The group discussion format encouraged mutual support and suggestions for better eating and physical exercise habits. This collaborative partnership model can strengthen existing group relationships or promote new affiliations that form the basis for future action coalitions. Participants worked both within and across groups to exchange information, stories of success and challenges, and specific health improvement strategies.

  6. Effect of Climate Extremes, Seasonal Change, and Agronomic Practices on Measured Evapotranspiration and CO2 Exchange in Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta Alfalfa Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, J.; Kent, E. R.; Leinfelder-Miles, M.; Paw U, K. T.; Little, C.; Lambert, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    Evapotranspiration and CO2 exchange was measured in five alfalfa fields in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta region from 2016 to 2017 using eddy covariance and surface renewal methods. Seasonal changes of evapotranspiration and CO2 fluxes were compared between 2016, a drought year, and 2017, a high rainfall year. Additionally, changes in evapotranspiration and CO2 flux were investigated across various agronomic considerations, such as irrigation methods (border-check flood and sub-surface), stand life, and herbicide programs. Components of the energy balance, including net radiation, latent heat, ground heat flux, and sensible heat, were evaluated considering correlations to wind speed measured by three sonic anemometers, irrigation frequency, and crop cutting cycle. Comparisons between two different types of radiometers were also carried out. Under drought conditions, we observed higher amounts of evapotranspiration in a field having a stand life of less than two years of age compared to older stands, and in a sub-surface irrigated field compared to flood irrigated fields.

  7. The Urban Fabric of the City as Its Affects Thermal Energy Responses Derived from Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The physical geography of the city affects numerous aspects of its interlinked biophysical, social, and land-atmosphere characteristics - those attributes that come together to form the total urban environment. One approach to studying the multitude of interactions that occur as a result of urbanization is to view the city from a systems ecology perspective, where energy and material cycle into and out of the urban milieu. Thus, the urban ecosystem is synergistic in linking land, air, water, and living organisms in a vast network of interrelated physical, human, and biological process. Given the number and the shear complexity of the exchanges and, ultimately, their effects, that occur within the urban environment, we are focusing our research on looking at how the morphology or urban fabric of the city, drives thermal energy exchanges across the urban landscape. The study of thermal energy attributes for different cities provides insight into how thermal fluxes and characteristics are partitioned across the city landscape in response to each city's morphology. We are using thermal infrared remote sensing data obtained at a high spatial resolution from aircraft, along with satellite data, to identify and quantify thermal energy characteristics for 4 U.S. cities: Atlanta, GA, Baton Rouge, LA, Salt Lake City, UT, and Sacramento, CA. Analysis of how thermal energy is spatially distributed across the urban landscapes for these cities provides a unique perspective for understanding how the differing morphology of cities forces land-atmosphere exchanges, such as the urban heat island effect, as well as related meteorological and air quality interactions. Keyword: urban ecosystems, remote sensing, urban heat island

  8. Chromium(VI) generation in vadose zone soils and alluvial sediments of the southwestern Sacramento Valley, California: a potential source of geogenic Cr(VI) to groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater that exceed the World Health Organization’s maximum contaminant level for drinking water (50 μg L−1) occur in several locations globally. The major mechanism for mobilization of this Cr(VI) at these sites is the weathering of Cr(III) from ultramafic rocks and its subsequent oxidation on Mn oxides. This process may be occurring in the southern Sacramento Valley of California where Cr(VI) concentrations in groundwater can approach or exceed 50 μg L−1. To characterize Cr geochemistry in the area, samples from several soil auger cores (approximately 4 m deep) and drill cores (approximately 25 m deep) were analyzed for total concentrations of 44 major, minor and trace elements, Cr associated with labile Mn and Fe oxides, and Cr(VI). Total concentrations of Cr in these samples ranged from 140 to 2220 mg per kg soil. Between 9 and 70 mg per kg soil was released by selective extractions that target Fe oxides, but essentially no Cr was associated with the abundant reactive Mn oxides (up to ~1000 mg hydroxylamine-reducible Mn per kg soil was present). Both borehole magnetic susceptibility surveys performed at some of the drill core sites and relative differences between Cr released in a 4-acid digestion versus total Cr (lithium metaborate fusion digestion) suggest that the majority of total Cr in the samples is present in refractory chromite minerals transported from ultramafic exposures in the Coast Range Mountains. Chromium(VI) in the samples studied ranged from 0 to 42 μg kg−1, representing a minute fraction of total Cr. Chromium(VI) content was typically below detection in surface soils (top 10 cm) where soil organic matter was high, and increased with increasing depth in the soil auger cores as organic matter decreased. Maximum concentrations of Cr(VI) were up to 3 times greater in the deeper drill core samples than the shallow auger cores. Although Cr(VI) in these vadose zone soils and sediments was only a

  9. Use of dissolved inorganic carbon isotopes to track photosynthesis, respiration, and nitrification along a 56 mile transect in the Sacramento River and San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Peek, S.; Young, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    A decline in phytoplankton stocks in the San Francisco Bay and Delta is thought to contribute to the pelagic organism decline observed over the past two decades. One factor controlling phytoplankton growth rate is the availability of nutrients. Although there is an excess of nutrients in the Bay and Delta, the type and relative abundance of nutrients is critical to phytoplankton growth. To evaluate the response of phytoplankton to nutrient sources and to better understand phytoplankton dynamics downstream, we tested the hypothesis that the δ13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) along with conventional water chemistry analyses will record events such as increased nitrification (related to the Sacramento River Wastewater Treatment Plant ammonium input) and algal blooms, and reflect the balance between photosynthesis and bacterial respiration. Multiple parameters affect [DIC] and its δ13C, including DIC sources, pH, and biological processes. Consumption of CO2 by phytoplankton during photosynthesis and by autotrophic bacteria during nitrification both result in increases in δ13C-DIC. However, photosynthesis and nitrification have very different relationships to chlorophyll and nutrient concentrations. The balance between heterotrophic bacterial respiration and photosynthesis should be reflected in trends in DIC, nutrient, and chlorophyll concentration, and δ13C-DIC. The δ13C of DIC should also be reflected in the δ13C of phytoplankton with approximately a 20 per mil fractionation. Significant deviation in the fractionation factor may indicate local variations in growth rate, nutrient availability, or speciation. Combined, these parameters should provide a gauge of the relative importance of the above mentioned processes. To test this hypothesis, we collected 19 water samples per cruise between July 2012 and July 2013 along a 56 mile transect between Rio Vista on the Sacramento River and San Francisco Bay near Angel Island during 8 cruises on the USGS RV

  10. Characterization of major lithologic units underlying the lower American River using water-borne continuous resistivity profiling, Sacramento, California, June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Teeple, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The levee system of the lower American River in Sacramento, California, is situated above a mixed lithology of alluvial deposits that range from clay to gravel. In addition, sand deposits related to hydraulic mining activities underlie the floodplain and are preferentially prone to scour during high-flow events. In contrast, sections of the American River channel have been observed to be scour resistant. In this study, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, explores the resistivity structure of the American River channel to characterize the extent and thickness of lithologic units that may impact the scour potential of the area. Likely lithologic structures are interpreted, but these interpretations are non-unique and cannot be directly related to scour potential. Additional geotechnical data would provide insightful data on the scour potential of certain lithologic units. Additional interpretation of the resistivity data with respect to these results may improve interpretations of lithology and scour potential throughout the American River channel and floodplain. Resistivity data were collected in three profiles along the American River using a water-borne continuous resistivity profiling technique. After processing and modeling these data, inverted resistivity profiles were used to make interpretations about the extent and thickness of possible lithologic units. In general, an intermittent high-resistivity layer likely indicative of sand or gravel deposits extends to a depth of around 30 feet (9 meters) and is underlain by a consistent low-resistivity layer that likely indicates a high-clay content unit that extends below the depth of investigation (60 feet or 18 meters). Immediately upstream of the Watt Avenue Bridge, the high-resistivity layer is absent, and the low-resistivity layer extends to the surface where a scour-resistant layer has been previously observed in the river bed.

  11. Using remote sensing to monitor past changes and assess future scenarios for the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta waterways, California USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria J.; Hestir, Erin; Khanna, Shruti; Ustin, Susan L.

    2017-04-01

    Historically, deltas have been extensively affected both by natural processes and human intervention. Thus, understanding drivers, predicting impacts and optimizing solutions to delta problems requires a holistic approach spanning many sectors, disciplines and fields of expertise. Deltas are ideal model systems to understand the effects of the interaction between social and ecological domains, as they face unprecedented disturbances and threats to their biological and ecological sustainability. The challenge for deltas is to meet the goals of supporting biodiversity and ecosystem processes while also provisioning fresh water resources for human use. We provide an overview of the last 150 years of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River delta, where we illustrate the parallel process of an increase in disturbances, by particularly zooming in on the current cascading effects of invasive species on geophysical and biological processes. Using remote sensing data coupled with in situ measurements of water quality, turbidity, and species presence we show how the spread and persistence of aquatic invasive species affects sedimentation processes and ecosystem functioning. Our results show that the interactions between the biological and physical conditions in the Delta affect the trajectory of dominance by native and invasive aquatic plant species. Trends in growth and community characteristics associated with predicted impacts of climate change (sea level rise, warmer temperatures, changes in the hydrograph with high winter and low summer outflows) do not provide simple predictions. Individually, the impact of specific environmental changes on the biological components can be predicted, however it is the complex interactions of biological communities with the suite of physical changes that make predictions uncertain. Systematic monitoring is critical to provide the data needed to document and understand change of these delta systems, and to identify successful adaptation

  12. Multi-year coupled biogeochemical and biophysical impacts of restoring drained agricultural peatlands to wetlands across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemes, K. S.; Eichelmann, E.; Chamberlain, S.; Knox, S. H.; Oikawa, P.; Sturtevant, C.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    Globally, delta ecosystems are critical for human livelihoods, but are at increasingly greater risk of degradation. The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (`Delta') has been subsiding dramatically, losing close to 100 Tg of carbon since the mid 19th century due in large part to agriculture-induced oxidation of the peat soils through drainage and cultivation. Efforts to re-wet the peat soils through wetland restoration are attractive as climate mitigation activities. While flooded wetland systems have the potential to sequester significant amounts of carbon as photosynthesis outpaces aerobic respiration, the highly-reduced conditions can result in significant methane emissions. This study will utilize three years (2014-2016) of continuous, gap-filled, CO2 and CH4 flux data from a mesonetwork of seven eddy covariance towers in the Delta to compute GHG budgets for the restored wetlands and agricultural baseline sites measured. Along with biogeochemical impacts of wetland restoration, biophysical impacts such as changes in reflectance, energy partitioning, and surface roughness, can have significant local to regional impacts on air temperature and heat fluxes. We hypothesize that despite flooded wetlands reducing albedo, wetland land cover will cool the near-surface air temperature due to increased net radiation being preferentially partitioned into latent heat flux and rougher canopy conditions allowing for more turbulent mixing with the atmosphere. This study will investigate the seasonal and diurnal patterns of turbulent energy fluxes and the surface properties that drive them. With nascent policy mechanisms set to compensate landowners and farmers for low emission land use practices beyond reforestation, it is essential that policy mechanisms take into consideration how the biophysical impacts of land use change could drive local to regional-scale climatic perturbations, enhancing or attenuating the biogeochemical impacts.

  13. A millennial-scale record of Pb and Hg contamination in peatlands of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith Z; Alpers, Charles N; Neymark, Leonid A; Paces, James B; Taylor, Howard E; Fuller, Christopher C

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we provide the first record of millennial patterns of Pb and Hg concentrations on the west coast of the United States. Peat cores were collected from two micro-tidal marshes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Core samples were analyzed for Pb, Hg, and Ti concentrations and dated using radiocarbon and (210)Pb. Pre-anthropogenic concentrations of Pb and Hg in peat ranged from 0.60 to 13.0μgg(-1)and from 6.9 to 71ngg(-1), respectively. For much of the past 6000+ years, the Delta was free from anthropogenic pollution, however, beginning in ~1425CE, Hg and Pb concentrations, Pb/Ti ratios, Pb enrichment factors (EFs), and HgEFs all increased. Pb isotope compositions of the peat suggest that this uptick was likely caused by smelting activities originating in Asia. The next increases in Pb and Hg contamination occurred during the California Gold Rush (beginning ~1850CE), when concentrations reached their highest levels (74μgg(-1) Pb, 990ngg(-1) Hg; PbEF=12 and HgEF=28). Lead concentrations increased again beginning in the ~1920s with the incorporation of Pb additives in gasoline. The phase-out of lead additives in the late 1980s was reflected in changes in Pb isotope ratios and reductions in Pb concentrations in the surface layers of the peat. The rise and subsequent fall of Hg contamination was also tracked by the peat archive, with the highest Hg concentrations occurring just before 1963CE and then decreasing during the post-1963 period. Overall, the results show that the Delta was a pristine region for most of its ~6700-year existence; however, since ~1425CE, it has received Pb and Hg contamination from both global and regional sources. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Influência da queima controlada no pH do solo em povoamentos de Pinus spp, na região de Sacramento, MG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gomes Neto

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 O objetivo do presente trabalho foi estudar a influência da queima na variação do pH em solo com povoamento de Pinus caribaea Morolet var. hondurensis e Pinus oocarpa Schiedler. A pesquisa desenvolveu-se na região de Sacramento, Minas Gerais, em latossolo vermelho-amarelo, fase argilosa. Foram selecionados 2 talhões (250 x 600 m para cada espécie, demarcados por aceiros e queimados em dois períodos, às 10 e 16 horas, segundo a técnica de queima contra o vento. As áreas experimentais foram divididas em 8 parcelas, por espécie, em um delineamento completamente ao acaso. A coleta dos dados foi feita antes, imediatamente após, 7 meses e 14 meses após a queima em perfis de solo de 0-50 cm, abertos na interseção entre linhas e filas das árvores. Foram coletadas amostras da serrapilheira e de solo a várias profundidades. Verificou-se que após a queima, o pH em cloreto de potássio teve uma ligeira elevação, estabilizando-se até o final do período, em ambas as espécies estudadas. Para o pH em água, houve também uma ligeira elevação após a queima no Pinus oocarpa e um aumento significativo no final do período, para ambas espécies estudadas.

  15. A millennial-scale record of Pb and Hg contamination in peatlands of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith; Alpers, Charles N.; Neymark, Leonid; Paces, James B.; Taylor, Howard E.; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we provide the first record of millennial patterns of Pb and Hg concentrations on the west coast of the United States. Peat cores were collected from two micro-tidal marshes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Core samples were analyzed for Pb, Hg, and Ti concentrations and dated using radiocarbon, 210Pb, and 137Cs. Pre-anthropogenic concentrations of Pb and Hg in peat ranged from 0.60 to 13.0 µg g-1and from 6.9 to 71 ng g-1, respectively. For much of the past 6000+ years, the Delta was free from anthropogenic pollution, however, beginning in ~1425 CE, Hg and Pb concentrations, Pb/Ti ratios, Pb enrichment factors (EFs), and HgEFs all increased. Pb isotope compositions of the peat suggest that this uptick was likely caused by smelting activities originating in Asia. The next increases in Pb and Hg contamination occurred during the California Gold Rush (beginning ~1850 CE), when concentrations reached their highest levels (74 µg g-1 Pb, 990 ng g-1 Hg; PbEF = 12 and HgEF = 28). Lead concentrations increased again beginning in the ~1920s with the incorporation of Pb additives in gasoline. The phase-out of lead additives in the late 1980s was reflected in Pb isotope ratios and reductions in Pb concentrations in the surface layers of the peat. The rise and fall of Hg contamination was also tracked by the peat archive, with the highest Hg concentrations occurring just before 1963 CE and then decreasing during the post-1963 period. Overall, the results show that the Delta was a pristine region for most of its ~6700-year existence; however, since ~1425 CE, it has received Pb and Hg contamination from both global and regional sources.

  16. Copper, cadmium, and zinc concentrations in juvenile Chinook salmon and selected fish-forage organisms (aquatic insects) in the upper Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.; Thompson, Larry D.; Walsh, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    This study assessed the downstream extent andseverity of copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn)contamination from acid mine drainage on juvenile chinook salmon(Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and aquatic insects over aroughly 270-km reach of the Sacramento River below KeswickReservoir. During April–May 1998, salmon were collected fromfour sites in the river and from a fish hatchery that receiveswater from Battle Creek. Salmon from river sites were examinedfor gut contents to document their consumption of variousinvertebrate taxa, whereas salmon from river sites and thehatchery were used for metal determinations. Midge(Chironomidae) and caddisfly (Trichoptera) larvae and mayfly(Ephemeroptera) nymphs were collected for metal determinationsduring April–June from river sites and from Battle and Buttecreeks. The fish hatchery and Battle and Butte creeks served asreference sites because they had no history of receiving minedrainage. Salmon consumed mostly midge larvae and pupae (44.0%,damp-dry biomass), caddisfly larvae (18.9%), Cladocera (5.8%),and mayfly nymphs (5.7%). These results demonstrated thatinsects selected for metal determinations were important as fishforage. Dry-weight concentrations of Cu, Cd, and Zn weregenerally far higher in salmon and insects from the river thanfrom reference sites. Within the river, high metalconcentrations persisted as far downstream as South Meridian (thelowermost sampling site). Maximum concentrations of Cd (30.7 μg g-1) and Zn (1230 μg g-1),but not Cu (87.4 μg g-1), in insects exceeded amounts that other investigators reported as toxic when fed for prolonged periods to juvenile salmonids.

  17. Storeria occipitomaculata obscura (Florida red-bellied snake)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muse, Lindy J.; Glorioso, Brad M.; Eaglestone, Chandler A. R.

    2016-01-01

    USA: LOUISIANA: Vermilion Parish: Palmetto Island State Park (29.86335°N, 92.14848°W; WGS 84). 19 February 2016. Lindy J. Muse. Verified by Jeff Boundy. Florida Museum of Natural History (UF 177730, photo voucher). New parish record (Dundee and Rossman 1989. The Amphibians and Reptiles of Louisiana. Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 300 pp.). Storeria occipitomaculata obscura has not been documented in any of the coastal parishes of Louisiana (Boundy. 2006. Snakes of Louisiana. Louisiana Department of Wildlife & Fisheries, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 40 pp.). However, this species can be difficult to find in southern Louisiana and other populations in coastal parishes may eventually be discovered. This adult individual (SVL = 292 mm; TL = 70 mm) was found under a log in a wet bottomland forest dominated by Dwarf Palmetto and Bald Cypress.

  18. Utilization of a commercially supplied synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craft, B.C.; Saile, V.; Scott, J.D.; Morikawa, E.

    1991-01-01

    Louisiana State University (LSU) is developing the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The centerpiece of CAMD will be a 1.2 GeV electron storage ring purchased from Maxwell Laboratories, Inc. The high-tech building for CAMD has been designed by TECH-IV of Baton Rouge with engineering support from Lester B. Knight and Associates of Chicago. The storage ring has been optimized for X-ray lithography. The procedures developed at CAMD for printing integrated circuits may well be of significant importance to US competitiveness in semiconductor and related industries. However, the spectral range of the ring also supports scientific and engineering activities in several other areas. (orig.)

  19. Mission Command: The Historical Roots of Mission Command in the US Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    Bauer, Zachary Taylor: Soldier, Planter, Statesman, of the Old Southwest (Baton Rouge, LA : Louisiana State University Press, 1985), 1. General...Battle of Buena Vista , he observed the battle from so close that his coat ended up riddled with holes from grape shot.25 General Taylor created a...1846 report to Colonel Joseph Totten he describes his observations of the battle of Palo Alto and Resaca De La Palma. Scarritt served temporarily

  20. United States Air Force Summer Research Program 1991. Volume 1. Program Management Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-09

    Engineering 4 4 Aerospace Engineering 3 16 19 Aerospace Mechanics 2 2 Astronomy 1 1 Astrophysics 2 2 Biochemistry 1 I Bioengineering 1 1 Biological...27706 C-1 NAME/ADDRESS DEGREE, SPECIALTY, LAB ASSIGNMENT David W. Barnett DEGREE: PhD Asst Professor SPECIALTY: Physical Sciences Dept of KinesioLogy LAB...SPECIALTY: Exercise Physiology Dept of KinesioLogy LAB ASSIGNMENT: SAN Baton Rouge, LA 70803 Amie L. edLtey-Goode DEGREE: NS Texas ALM University

  1. Conjunctive Management of Multi-Aquifer System for Saltwater Intrusion Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, F. T. C.; Pham, H. V.

    2015-12-01

    Due to excessive groundwater withdrawals, many water wells in Baton Rouge, Louisiana experience undesirable chloride concentration because of saltwater intrusion. The study goal is to develop a conjunctive management framework that takes advantage of the Baton Rouge multi-aquifer system to mitigate saltwater intrusion. The conjunctive management framework utilizes several hydraulic control techniques to mitigate saltwater encroachment. These hydraulic control approaches include pumping well relocation, freshwater injection, saltwater scavenging, and their combinations. Specific objectives of the study are: (1) constructing scientific geologic architectures of the "800-foot" sand, the "1,000-foot" sand, the "1,200-foot" sand, the "1,500-foot" sand, the "1,700-foot" sand, and the "2,000-foot" sand, (2) developing scientific saltwater intrusion models for these sands. (3) using connector wells to draw native groundwater from one sand and inject to another sand to create hydraulic barriers to halt saltwater intrusion, (4) using scavenger wells or well couples to impede saltwater intrusion progress and reduce chloride concentration in pumping wells, and (5) reducing cones of depression by relocating and dispersing pumping wells to different sands. The study utilizes optimization techniques and newest LSU high performance computing (HPC) facilities to derive solutions. The conjunctive management framework serves as a scientific tool to assist policy makers to solve the urgent saltwater encroachment issue in the Baton Rouge area. The research results will help water companies as well as industries in East Baton Rouge Parish and neighboring parishes by reducing their saltwater intrusion threats, which in turn would sustain Capital Area economic development.

  2. Development of a Tabletop Model for the Generation of Amorphous/ Microcrystalline Metal Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-30

    found to be Among the previous investigators of electron negative although generated from a nozzle main- capture by small particles, only Anestos and...speeds, and the droplets can be considered to be Recently Anestos and hendricks 3 have studied at rest in the electron gas. As such, they are the charge...Processing Principles and Tech- nologies" (Claitor’s Publishing Division, Baton Rouge, 1978), p. 258. 3. T. C. Anestos and C. 0. Rendricks, J. Appl. Phys. 45

  3. Remote Sensing Survey for the Grand Isle Re-Evaluation Study and the Dredging of the Bayou Rigaud and Marsh Creation Areas, Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    the publication, A History of the Amistad Captives, New Haven Colony Historical Society, available online at http://www .pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part 1/1h310...from the publication, A History of the Amistad Captives, New Haven Col- ony Historical Society, available online at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part1...Archaeology. Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge. New Haven Colony Historical Society 2002 A History of the Amistad Captives, available

  4. Lower Mississippi River Environmental Program. Report 11. Forest Vegetation of the Leveed Floodplain of the Lower Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    styraciflua, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, Carya illinoensis and Quercus CC .-. sp. may occur but are rare and were not sampled in this study. 88. The subtype... illinoensis (Wang.) K. Koch Carya laciniosa (Michaux f.) Loudon Juglans nigra L. BETULACEAE Carpinus caroliniana Walter Ostrya virginiana (Miller) K. Koch...between Baton Rouge and Memphis include Quercus nuttallii and Ulmus crassifolia. Acer saccharinum, Carya cordiformis, Carya laciniosa, and Juglans nigra

  5. Cultural Resources Investigations of the East and West Bayou Sale Tie-In Levee, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Mendez , and Tara Bond 1994 Archaeological Data Recovery at Ashland-Belle Helene Plantation (16AN26), Ascension Parish, Louisiana, Volume III... Caro - lina. Miller, Daniel 1987 Material Culture and Mass Consumption. Basil Blackwell, Oxford, UK. Miller, Daniel and Christopher Tilley 1984...Jones, R. Mendez , H. Franks, and T. Bond. Volume 1, pp. II- I - 1 1-40. Submitted to the Louisiana Division of Archaeology, Baton Rouge. Weinstein

  6. Archeological Data Recovery at Site 16SJB29, Near Willow Bend, St. John The Baptist Parish, Louisiana with a Discussion of Regional Archeological Expectations and Priorities Along the Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    later Mendez who purchased the Solis plantation, grew the cane and produced the tafia to distill rum. It was Mendez’s sugar maker, chemist Antoine Morin...Baton Rouge. Goodwin, R. Christopher, Paul C. Armstrong, Eric C. Poplin, David Moore, and Carol J. Poplin 1987 New Orleans Looking Forward to Its Past...Jill-Karen Yakubik, Herschel A. Franks, and Carol J. Poplin 1987 Cultural Resources Surev of the White Castle Revetment Item, lberville Parish, Louisiana

  7. Cultural Resources Survey of Greenwood Bend and Iowa Point Revetment, Mississippi River M-293.1 to 280-L

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Clinton, in East Feliciana Parish. The Confederate Army recognized the importance of controlling this area, and constructed a bastion at Port Hudson in...past 20 years. This was especially true near where a small wooden bridge crossed the bayou. It would appear that Bayou Como served as a trash dump...Louisiana. Translated by Joseph G. Treagle. Louisiana American Revolution Bicentennial Commission, LSU Press, Baton Rouge, La. Originally published in 1774

  8. Organic composition of fogwater in the Texas-Louisiana gulf coast corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Suresh; Raghunathan, Ravikrishna; Kommalapati, Raghava R.; Shen, Xinhua; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Valsaraj, Kalliat T.

    Fogwater and air samples were collected in Baton Rouge between November 2004-February 2005 and during February 2006 at Houston. Organic compounds present in the fog samples were detected, quantified and then grouped into different compound classes based on molecular size, solubility and polarity using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and ion chromatography. Organic compounds were grouped as n-alkanes, aromatics and polycyclic aromatics, carbonyls, alcohols, amides and esters. Organic compounds in fog and air samples in Houston indicated clear urban/industrial anthropogenic origin, while compounds detected in Baton Rouge fog and air samples showed a mix of both agricultural and urban/industrial anthropogenic inputs. Among the various polycyclic aromatic compounds detected, the total concentration of naphthalene and its derivatives was 2.8 μg m -3 in Houston and 0.08 μg m -3 in Baton Rouge air. Analysis of concentrations of organic compounds pre- and post- fog revealed that compounds with low vapor pressure had higher scavenging efficiency in fog sampled at the two locations. Concentrations of organic compounds in fog samples were higher than those predicted by conventional air-water Henry's law equilibrium. Observed higher concentrations in the aqueous phase were modeled accounting for surface adsorption and accumulation of gas phase species and the presence of humic-like substances in fogwater.

  9. Fogwater Chemistry and Air Quality in the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast Corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommalapati, R. R.; Raja, S.; Ravikrishna, R.; Murugesan, K.; Collett, J. L.; Valsaraj, K.

    2007-05-01

    The presence of fog water in polluted atmosphere can influence atmospheric chemistry and air quality. The study of interactions between fog water and atmospheric gases and aerosols are very important in understanding the atmospheric fate of the pollutants. In this Study several air samples and fogwater samples were collected in the heavily industrialized area of Gulf Coast corridor( Houston, TX and Baton Rouge, LA). A total of 32 fogwater samples were collected, comprising of nine fog events in Baton Rouge (Nov 2004 to Feb 2005) and two fog events in Houston (Feb, 2006), during the fog sampling campaigns. These samples were analyzed for pH, total and dissolved carbon, major inorganic ions, organic acids, and aromatics, aldehydes, VOCs, and linear alkanes organic compounds. Fogwater samples collected in Houston show clear influence of marine and anthropogenic environment, while Baton Rouge samples reveal a relatively less polluted environment. Also, a time series observation of air samples indicated that fog event at the monitoring site impacted the air concentrations of the pollutants. This is attributed to presence of surface active organic matter in fog water.

  10. High Frequency Monitoring of Isotopic Signatures Elucidates Potential Effects of Restoring Floodplain Habitat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, B. J.; Fogel, M. L.; Jeffres, C.; Viers, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Increasing the quality and quantity of habitat for native species in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is a high priority for California water managers. The McCormack-Williamson Tract (MWT) is a subsided island (38.253° N -121.284° W) situated at the confluence of the Cosumnes and Mokelumne rivers, near the inland extent of tidal influence. MWT experienced unexpected levee failure on February 11, 2017, during the wettest year of record for the Mokelumne-Cosumnes river system, which provided a unique opportunity to examine the potential trajectory of future restoration actions within the Delta. We carried out high frequency sampling (n=32, 13% of days) of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM) and waters in the Mokelumne and Cosumnes river systems, including nearby sloughs, and the post-failure, flooded interior of MWT. Carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes in SPOM and δ2H and δ18O of waters were analyzed and in situ water quality data were collected in tandem, thus contextualizing isotopic data. Sampling was confined to an 8 km2 region surrounding MWT (6.7 km2 interior). This unintentional flooding provided a natural before-after-control-impact experiment to study the effect that sudden inundation of a Delta island can have on food web development and ecosystem function. Source waters were isotopically distinct (p0.9), providing a semi-conservative tracer of mixing. The δ13C values of SPOM varied between -37.3 and -23.9‰ and were significantly more negative on the flooded island by 1.2‰ (porganic carbon concomitant with accelerated ecosystem metabolism. Concurrently, δ15N values varied between 1.0 and 12.4‰ and were not significantly different between riverine and flooded island sites. Our data indicate that this river system is highly dynamic over short periods of flood inundation (13 weeks) with new freshwater habitats exhibiting higher productivity than their riverine counterparts and could therefore increase autochthonous subsidies to

  11. Agricultural peatland restoration: effects of land-use change on greenhouse gas (CO2 and CH4) fluxes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Sara Helen; Sturtevant, Cove; Matthes, Jaclyn Hatala; Koteen, Laurie; Verfaillie, Joseph; Baldocchi, Dennis

    2015-02-01

    Agricultural drainage of organic soils has resulted in vast soil subsidence and contributed to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in California was drained over a century ago for agriculture and human settlement and has since experienced subsidence rates that are among the highest in the world. It is recognized that drained agriculture in the Delta is unsustainable in the long-term, and to help reverse subsidence and capture carbon (C) there is an interest in restoring drained agricultural land-use types to flooded conditions. However, flooding may increase methane (CH4) emissions. We conducted a full year of simultaneous eddy covariance measurements at two conventional drained agricultural peatlands (a pasture and a corn field) and three flooded land-use types (a rice paddy and two restored wetlands) to assess the impact of drained to flooded land-use change on CO2 and CH4 fluxes in the Delta. We found that the drained sites were net C and greenhouse gas (GHG) sources, releasing up to 341 g C m(-2) yr(-1) as CO2 and 11.4 g C m(-2) yr(-1) as CH4. Conversely, the restored wetlands were net sinks of atmospheric CO2, sequestering up to 397 g C m(-2) yr(-1). However, they were large sources of CH4, with emissions ranging from 39 to 53 g C m(-2) yr(-1). In terms of the full GHG budget, the restored wetlands could be either GHG sources or sinks. Although the rice paddy was a small atmospheric CO2 sink, when considering harvest and CH4 emissions, it acted as both a C and GHG source. Annual photosynthesis was similar between sites, but flooding at the restored sites inhibited ecosystem respiration, making them net CO2 sinks. This study suggests that converting drained agricultural peat soils to flooded land-use types can help reduce or reverse soil subsidence and reduce GHG emissions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Association between chronic kidney disease detected using creatinine and cystatin C and death and cardiovascular events in elderly Mexican Americans: the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Carmen A; Lee, Anne; Odden, Michelle C; Lopez, Lenny; Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Neuhaus, John; Haan, Mary N

    2013-01-01

    Creatinine, the current clinical standard to detect chronic kidney disease (CKD), is biased by muscle mass, age and race. The authors sought to determine whether cystatin C, an alternative marker of kidney function less biased by these factors, can identify elderly Mexican Americans with CKD who are at high risk for death and cardiovascular disease. Longitudinal, with mean follow-up of 6.8 years. Sacramento Area Latino Study of Aging (SALSA). One thousand four hundred and thirty five Mexican Americans aged 60 to 101. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, mL/min per 1.73 m(2)) was determined according to creatinine (eGFRcreat) and cystatin C (eGFRcys), and participants were classified into four mutually exclusive categories: CKD neither (eGFRcreat ≥60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2); eGFRcys ≥60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2)), CKD creatinine only (eGFRcreat cause death and cardiovascular (CV) death were studied using Cox regression. At baseline, mean age was 71 ± 7; 481 (34%) had diabetes mellitus, and 980 (68%) had hypertension. Persons with CKD both had higher risk for all-cause (HR = 2.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.78-2.98) and CV disease (CVD) (HR = 2.75, 95% CI = 1.96-3.86) death than CKD neither after full adjustment. Persons with CKD cystatin C only were also at greater risk of all-cause (HR = 1.91, 95% CI = 1.37-2.67) and CV (HR = 2.56, 95% CI = 1.64-3.99) death than CKD neither. In contrast, persons with CKD creatinine only were not at greater risk for CV death (HR = 1.39, 95% CI = 0.71-2.72) but were at higher risk for all-cause death (HR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.27-2.98). Cystatin C may be a useful alternative to creatinine for detecting high risk of death and CVD in elderly Mexican Americans with CKD. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Using 10Be erosion rates and fluvial channel morphology to constrain fault throw rates in the southwestern Sacramento River Valley, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta, California, USA, is a critical region for California water resources, agriculture, and threatened or endangered species. This landscape is affected by an extensive set of levees that enclose artificial islands created for agricultural use. In addition to their importance for sustaining agriculture, this levee system also supports extensive transport and power transmission infrastructure and urban/suburban development. These levees are susceptible to damage from even moderate ground shaking by either a large earthquake on one of the high-activity faults in the nearby San Francisco Bay region, or even a moderate earthquake on one of the low-activity faults in the Delta region itself. However, despite this danger the earthquake hazards in this region are poorly constrained due to our lack of understanding of faults in and near the Delta region. As part of an effort to better constrain the seismic hazard associated with known, but poorly constrained, faults in the region, a geomorphic analysis of the Dunnigan Hills, northwest of Woodland, CA, is being combined with cosmogenic 10Be catchment-averaged erosion rates. The Dunnigan Hills are a low-relief (maximum elevation 87 m) landscape generated by fault-bend folding above the west-vergent Sweitzer reverse fault that soles into a blind east-vergent reverse fault. These faults have been imaged by seismic reflection data, and local microseismicity indicates that this system is actively propagating to the east. However, the throw rates on the faults in this system remain unconstrained, despite the potential for significant shaking such as that experienced in the nearby April, 1892 earthquake sequence between Winters and Vacaville, Ca, ~25 km to the south, which has been estimated at magnitude 6.0 or greater. Geomorphic and cosmogenic 10Be analyses from 12 catchments draining the eastern flank of the Dunnigan Hills will be used to infer vertical rock uplift rates to better constrain

  14. Re-establishing marshes can return carbon sink functions to a current carbon source in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robin L.; Fujii, Roger; Schmidt, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in California was an historic, vast inland freshwater wetland, where organic soils almost 20 meters deep formed over the last several millennia as the land surface elevation of marshes kept pace with sea level rise. A system of levees and pumps were installed in the late 1800s and early 1900s to drain the land for agricultural use. Since then, land surface has subsided more than 7 meters below sea level in some areas as organic soils have been lost to aerobic decomposition. As land surface elevations decrease, costs for levee maintenance and repair increase, as do the risks of flooding. Wetland restoration can be a way to mitigate subsidence by re-creating the environment in which the organic soils developed. A preliminary study of the effect of hydrologic regime on carbon cycling conducted on Twitchell Island during the mid-1990s showed that continuous, shallow flooding allowing for the growth of emergent marsh vegetation re-created a wetland environment where carbon preservation occurred. Under these conditions annual plant biomass carbon inputs were high, and microbial decomposition was reduced. Based on this preliminary study, the U.S. Geological Survey re-established permanently flooded wetlands in fall 1997, with shallow water depths of 25 and 55 centimeters, to investigate the potential to reverse subsidence of delta islands by preserving and accumulating organic substrates over time. Ten years after flooding, elevation gains from organic matter accumulation in areas of emergent marsh vegetation ranged from almost 30 to 60 centimeters, with average annual carbon storage rates approximating 1 kg/m2, while areas without emergent vegetation cover showed no significant change in elevation. Differences in accretion rates within areas of emergent marsh vegetation appeared to result from temporal and spatial variability in hydrologic factors and decomposition rates in the wetlands rather than variability in primary production

  15. Mercury in the mix: An in situ mesocosm approach to assess relative contributions of mercury sources to methylmercury production and bioaccumulation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Kraus, T. E. C.; Ackerman, J.; Stumpner, E. B.; DeWild, J.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Tate, M.; Ogorek, J.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination is considered one of the greatest threats to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the San Francisco Estuary ecosystems. This threat is driven by the transformation of Hg, deposited in the Delta from erosion of upstream historic mining debris and atmospheric deposition, by native bacteria into the more toxic and biologically available form, methylmercury (MeHg), in the wetlands and sediment of the Delta. To effectively manage this threat, a quantitative understanding of the relative contribution of the different Hg sources to MeHg formation is needed. Mass balance estimates indicate as much as 99% of the Hg entering the Delta arrives via tributary inputs. Of the tributary Hg load, approximately 90% is adsorbed to suspended particles from tributary discharge and 10% is in the dissolved fraction, potentially of atmospheric origin. In comparison, the remaining 1-2% of the Hg entering the Delta arrives through direct atmospheric deposition (wet and dry). The relative importance of these sources to MeHg production within the Delta is not linearly related to the mass inputs because atmospherically-derived Hg is believed to be more reactive than sediment-bound Hg with respect to MeHg formation. We conducted an in situ mesocosm dosing experiment where different Hg sources to the Delta (direct atmospheric, dissolved riverine and suspended sediment) were "labeled" with different stable Hg isotopes and added to mesocosms within four different wetlands. Mercury isotopes added with the streambed sediments were equilibrated in sealed containers for six months; while the Hg isotopes associated with the precipitation and river water were equilibrated for 24 hours prior to use. After adding the isotopes, we sampled the water column, overlying air, bottom sediments and fish (Gambusia) at time intervals up to 30 days. Preliminary results from this experiment suggest that aqueous Hg sources (Hg introduced with precipitation and filtered river water) are 10

  16. Distribution and Joint Fish-Tag Survival of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Migrating through the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Christopher M.; Perry, Russell W.; Adams, Noah S.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry was used to obtain the movement histories of 915 juvenile fall-run Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) through the lower San Joaquin River and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, in 2008. Data were analyzed within a release-recapture framework to estimate survival, route distribution, and detection probabilities among three migration pathways through the Delta. The pathways included the primary route through the San Joaquin River and two less direct routes (Old River and Turner Cut). Strong inferences about survival were limited by premature tag failure, but estimates of fish distribution among migration routes should be unaffected by tag failure. Based on tag failure tests (N = 66 tags), we estimated that only 55-78 percent of the tags used in this study were still functioning when the last fish was detected exiting the study area 15 days after release. Due to premature tag failure, our 'survival' estimates represent the joint probability that both the tag and fish survived, not just survival of fish. Low estimates of fish-tag survival could have been caused by fish mortality or fish travel times that exceeded the life of the tag, but we were unable to differentiate between the two. Fish-tag survival through the Delta (from Durham Ferry to Chipps Island by all routes) ranged from 0.05 +or- 0.01 (SE) to 0.06 +or- 0.01 between the two weekly release groups. Among the three migration routes, fish that remained in the San Joaquin River exhibited the highest joint fish-tag survival (0.09 +or- 0.02) in both weeks, but only 22-33 percent of tagged fish used this route, depending on the week of release. Only 4-10 percent (depending on week) of tagged fish traveled through Turner Cut, but no tagged fish that used this route were detected exiting the Delta. Most fish (63-68 percent, depending on week of release) migrated through Old River, but fish-tag survival through this route (0.05 +or- 0.01) was only about one-half that of fish that

  17. Co-creating Understanding in Water Use & Agricultural Resilience in a Multi-scale Natural-human System: Sacramento River Valley--California's Water Heartland in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, D. H.; Brimlowe, J.; Chaudry, A.; Gray, K.; Greene, T.; Guzley, R.; Hatfield, C.; Houk, E.; Le Page, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Sacramento River Valley (SRV), valued for its $2.5 billion agricultural production and its biodiversity, is the main supplier of California's water, servicing 25 million people. . Despite rapid changes to the region, little is known about the collective motivations and consequences of land and water use decisions, or the social and environmental vulnerability and resilience of the SRV. The overarching research goal is to examine whether the SRV can continue to supply clean water for California and accommodate agricultural production and biodiversity while coping with climate change and population growth. Without understanding these issues, the resources of the SRV face an uncertain future. The defining goal is to construct a framework that integrates cross-disciplinary and diverse stakeholder perspectives in order to develop a comprehensive understanding of how SRV stakeholders make land and water use decisions. Traditional approaches for modeling have failed to take into consideration multi-scale stakeholder input. Currently there is no effective method to facilitate producers and government agencies in developing a shared representation to address the issues that face the region. To address this gap, researchers and stakeholders are working together to collect and consolidate disconnected knowledge held by stakeholder groups (agencies, irrigation districts, and producers) into a holistic conceptual model of how stakeholders view and make decisions with land and water use under various management systems. Our approach integrates a top-down approach (agency stakeholders) for larger scale management decisions with a conceptual co-creation and data gathering bottom-up approach with local agricultural producer stakeholders for input water and landuse decisions. Land use change models that combine a top-down approach with a bottom-up stakeholder approach are rare and yet essential to understanding how the social process of land use change and ecosystem function are

  18. Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water: preliminary design and performance report. Volume I. Technical report. Aerotherm report TR-76-219. [For can washing at Campbell Soup Plant in Sacramento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-10-14

    The design and performance of a solar hot water system for can washing at the Campbell Soup Plant in Sacramento, California, are presented. The collector field is located on the roof of the finished products warehouse of the Campbell Soup Sacramento plant. Water is supplied from a 3.8 cm (1/sup 1///sub 2/ in.) supply line which is located directly below an existing roof access hatch. A supply pipe will be brought up through that hatch. The water flow will then be split into two manifold lines which supply the dual rows of flat plate collectors. The preheated water from the flat plates is then passed into six sets of parallel connected concentrators. Each set consist of eight 1.83 x 3.05 m (6 x 10 foot) modules connected in series. The water from these units is gathered in a 3.8 cm (1/sup 1///sub 2/ in.) insulated pipe which transports it to the storage tank. This pipe will be attached to an existing pipe run until it reaches the can washing building. From there the pipe will follow the can washing building around to the storage tank. The storage tank is a 75,200 1 (20,000 gal) steel tank which is coated internally with a USDA approved phenolic liner. The outside of the tank is insulated. A 2.2 kw (3 hp) motor is used to pump the stored water for the tank into the can washing line. Detail drawings and descriptions of the collector field, installation, piping, controls, data acquisition equipment, and roof structure are included. Furthermore, a program schedule with equipment and manpower costs for successfully completing Phase II of this contract is included. Also included is an organization chart of the Phase II program personnel. (WHK)

  19. Passing the Baton: An Experimental Study of Shift Handover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Bonny; Hobbs, Alan; Kanki, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Shift handovers occur in many safety-critical environments, including aviation maintenance, medicine, air traffic control, and mission control for space shuttle and space station operations. Shift handovers are associated with increased risk of communication failures and human error. In dynamic industries, errors and accidents occur disproportionately after shift handover. Typical shift handovers involve transferring information from an outgoing shift to an incoming shift via written logs, or in some cases, face-to-face briefings. The current study explores the possibility of improving written communication with the support modalities of audio and video recordings, as well as face-to-face briefings. Fifty participants participated in an experimental task which mimicked some of the critical challenges involved in transferring information between shifts in industrial settings. All three support modalities, face-to-face, video, and audio recordings, reduced task errors significantly over written communication alone. The support modality most preferred by participants was face-to-face communication; the least preferred was written communication alone.

  20. Metapopulations and the Sinai Baton Blue (Pseudophilotes sinaicus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Francis

    and may also cause large changes in the physical environment (Saunders et al. 1991). ..... Beier P (1993) Determining minimum habitat areas and habitat corridors for cougars. Conserv. .... of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  1. seasonal dynamics of the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BioMAP

    young thyme buds and the developing larvae feed on buds and flowers of the ... Predation is probably the main source of adult mortality: spiders, praying mantids, ... birds, and particularly lizards (family Agamidae) have all been seen .... population size in Farsh Shoeib in 2002 using the Jolly-Seber model (James, 2006c).

  2. The Baton blue (Pseudophilotes baton) (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) in south-western Bohemia: iron curtain, military ranges and endangered butterfly

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvička, Martin; Dvořák, L.; Hanč, Z.; Pavlíčko, A.; Fric, Zdeněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 3 (2008), s. 187-198 ISSN 1211-7420 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600070601; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : butterfly * insect conservation * disturbance Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  3. High Spatial Resolution Airborne Multispectral Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of Urban Landscape Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have used airborne multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data collected at a high spatial resolution (i.e., 10m) over several cities in the United States to study thermal energy characteristics of the urban landscape. These TIR data provide a unique opportunity to quantify thermal responses from discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape and to identify both the spatial arrangement and patterns of thermal processes across the city. The information obtained from these data is critical to understanding how urban surfaces drive or force development of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, which exists as a dome of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities in contrast to surrounding non-urbanized areas. The UHI is most pronounced in the summertime where urban surfaces, such as rooftops and pavement, store solar radiation throughout the day, and release this stored energy slowly after sunset creating air temperatures over the city that are in excess of 2-4'C warmer in contrast with non-urban or rural air temperatures. The UHI can also exist as a daytime phenomenon with surface temperatures in downtown areas of cities exceeding 38'C. The implications of the UHI are significant, particularly as an additive source of thermal energy input that exacerbates the overall production of ground level ozone over cities. We have used the Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS), flown onboard a Lear 23 jet aircraft from the NASA Stennis Space Center, to acquire high spatial resolution multispectral TIR data (i.e., 6 bandwidths between 8.2-12.2 (um) over Huntsville, Alabama, Atlanta, Georgia, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Sacramento, California. These TIR data have been used to produce maps and other products, showing the spatial distribution of heating and cooling patterns over these cities to better understand how the morphology of the urban landscape affects development of the UHI. In turn, these data have been used

  4. Importance socio-économique de la prune rouge ( Haematostaphis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L'importance socio-économique de H. barteri a été étudiée au Nord-Ouest du Bénin sur la base d'enquêtes ethnobotanique et socio-économique administrées respectivement sur 230 et 100 personnes des deux sexes et choisies au hasard dans les trois groupes socioculturels majoritaires du milieu d'étude à savoir les ...

  5. 76 FR 50808 - Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ...), and Delegation of Authority 245-1, I hereby certify that the United Nations and Government of Cambodia are taking credible steps to address allegations of corruption and mismanagement within the...

  6. 77 FR 51604 - Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ...-governmental organizations (NGOs) monitoring the ECCC agree that proceedings throughout met international... received widespread attention from U.S. and international media, and concerns about corruption led many to... of Cambodians have confidence in the court. A recent poll by the International Republican Institute...

  7. Data Evaluation Report for the Lower Rouge River Sediment Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes a study of contaminated sediment, analyzes results, and makes recommendations for sediment remediation. Includes aerial views of study locations, photo log, data tables of sediment analysis.

  8. Distribution spatiale du singe à ventre rouge, Cercopithecus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    danger et endémique du Dahomey Gap est très peu documenté au Togo. Pour connaître sa ..... chaque secteur prospecté ainsi que celui du complexe en entier. ..... 2008-009 portant loi-cadre sur l'environnement au Togo. JO du 06 juin. 2008.

  9. DRAGON ROUGE: The Rescue of Hostages in the Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Bujumbura, knew the elderly ICRC representative there, a Swiss named Senn Mr. Senn had a good reputation with Africans and was also known in Stanleyville...34 Godley gave Tshombe’s Belgian secretary a note containing the essence of Washington’s demands, assuming she would relay it to Tshombe, bedridden or not.55

  10. Composição proximal e qualidade da carne de frangos das linhagens Paraíso Pedrês e Pescoço Pelado Physical-chemical characteristics of meat in chickens of the Paraíso Pedrês and Label Rouge lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bitencourt Faria

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foram avaliadas as características físico-químicas da carne de frangos de duas linhagens (Paraíso Pedrês e Pescoço Pelado criados em sistema semiextensivo, machos e fêmeas, abatidos aos 65, 75, 85 e 95 dias. As características analisadas nos cortes peito e coxa foram umidade, proteína, extrato etéreo, cinzas, cor (CIEL*a*b*, pH final e perda de peso por cocção. As fêmeas da linhagem Paraíso Pedrês apresentaram no peito mais gordura (0,86% em comparação aos machos das linhagens Paraíso Pedrês (0,63% e Pescoço Pelado (0,57%. A coxa das aves da linhagem Pescoço Pelado aos 85 dias apresentou maior umidade e menor porcentagem de gordura em comparação à linhagem Paraíso Pedrês, e aos 95 dias, as fêmeas Paraíso Pedrês apresentaram mais gordura que os machos. A cor amarela (b* no peito foi mais intensa nas aves Pescoço Pelado (6,24 que nas aves Paraíso Pedrês (5,41. Também foi mais intensa nas fêmeas (6,47 que nos machos (5,18. A cor da coxa nas aves Pescoço Pelado foi mais amarelada aos 95 dias (6,87 que aos 85 dias (5,90. Aves da linhagem Pescoço Pelado podem fornecer cortes mais magros, no caso dos machos, e com coloração mais amarelada, no caso das fêmeas, que aves da linhagem Pescoço Pelado.The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical and chemical characteristics of chicken meat from two lines (Paraíso Pedrês or Label Rouge and Pescoço Pelado, raised in a semi-extensive system, and slaughtered at 65, 75, 85 and 95 days of age. The variables assessed in the breast and leg of experimental animals were moisture, protein, fat, ashes, objective colour (CIEL*a*b* system, final pH and cooking loss. The breast of Paraíso Pedrês females showed a higher fat content (0.86% than in males of the Paraíso Pedrês (0.63% or Pescoço Pelado (0.57% lines. In the leg, Pescoço Pelado chicken slaughtered at 85 days showed higher moisture and lower fat than the Paraíso Pedrês line, while Para

  11. Space science public outreach at Louisiana State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzik, T.; Babin, E.; Cooney, W.; Giammanco, J.; Hartman, D.; McNeil, R.; Slovak, M.; Stacy, J.

    Over the last seven years the Astronomy / Astrophysics group in the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Louisiana State University has developed an exten- sive Space Science education and public outreach program. This program includes the local park district (the Recreation and Park Commission for the Parish of East Baton Rouge, BREC), the local amateur astronomer group (the Baton Rouge As- tronomical Society, BRAS), the Louisiana Arts and Science Museum (LASM), and Southern University (SU, part of the largest HBCU system in the nation). Our effort has directly led to the development of the Highland Road Park Observatory (HRPO, http://www.bro.lsu.edu/hrpo) that supports student astronomy training at LSU and SU, amateur observations and a public program for adults and children, establishment of a series of teacher professional development workshops in astronomy and physics, and the "Robots for Internet Experiences (ROBIE)" project (http://www.bro.lsu.edu/) where we have several instruments (e.g. HAM radio, radio telescope, optical tele- scopes) that can be controlled over the internet by students and teachers in the class- room along with associated lessons developed by a teacher group. In addition, this year the LASM, will be opening a new planetarium / space theater in downtown Baton Rouge, Louisiana. We are currently working to bring live views of the heavens from the HRPO telescope to audiences attending planetarium shows and will be working closely with planetarium staff to develop shows that highlight LSU astronomy / space science research. During the presentation we will provide some details about our in- dividual projects, the overall structure of our program, establishing community links and some of the lessons we learned along the way. Finally, we would like to acknowl- edge NASA, Louisiana State University, the Louisiana Systemic Initiatives Program and the Louisiana Technology Innovation Fund for their support.

  12. Stochastic background search correlating ALLEGRO with LIGO engineering data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, John T [Department of Physics, Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Daw, Edward [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Heng, Ik Siong [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Aussenstelle Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); McHugh, Martin P [Department of Physics, Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Lazzarini, Albert [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2003-09-07

    We describe the role of correlation measurements between the LIGO interferometer in Livingston, LA, and the ALLEGRO resonant bar detector in Baton Rouge, LA, in searches for a stochastic background of gravitational waves. Such measurements provide a valuable complement to correlations between interferometers at the two LIGO sites, since they are sensitive in a different, higher, frequency band. Additionally, the variable orientation of the ALLEGRO detector provides a means to distinguish gravitational wave correlations from correlated environmental noise. We describe the analysis underway to set a limit on the strength of a stochastic background at frequencies near 900 Hz using ALLEGRO data and data from LIGO's E7 Engineering Run.

  13. Stochastic background search correlating ALLEGRO with LIGO engineering data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, John T; Daw, Edward; Heng, Ik Siong; McHugh, Martin P; Lazzarini, Albert

    2003-01-01

    We describe the role of correlation measurements between the LIGO interferometer in Livingston, LA, and the ALLEGRO resonant bar detector in Baton Rouge, LA, in searches for a stochastic background of gravitational waves. Such measurements provide a valuable complement to correlations between interferometers at the two LIGO sites, since they are sensitive in a different, higher, frequency band. Additionally, the variable orientation of the ALLEGRO detector provides a means to distinguish gravitational wave correlations from correlated environmental noise. We describe the analysis underway to set a limit on the strength of a stochastic background at frequencies near 900 Hz using ALLEGRO data and data from LIGO's E7 Engineering Run

  14. Quantitative methods and socio-economic applications in GIS

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fahui

    2014-01-01

    GIS AND BASIC SPATIAL ANALYSIS TASKSGetting Started with ArcGIS: Data Management and Basic Spatial Analysis ToolsSpatial and Attribute Data Management in ArcGISSpatial Analysis Tools in ArcGIS: Queries, Spatial Joins, and Map OverlaysCase Study 1: Mapping and Analyzing Population Density Pattern in Baton Rouge, LouisianaSummaryIdentifying Contiguous Polygons by Spatial Analysis ToolsMeasuring Distance and TimeMeasures of DistanceComputing Network Distance and TimeThe Distance Decay RuleCase Study 2: Computing Distances and Tra

  15. Oyster Shell Dredging in Atchafalaya Bay and Adjacent Waters, Louisiana. Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Appendixes,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    importance with the development of the Atchafalaya Delta region (Thompson and Deegan , 1980). Although several works have been prepared which dealt with the...47:189-228. Craig , N.J., R.E. Turner, and J.W. Day, Jr. 1979. Land loss in coastal Louisiana (USA). J. Environ. Management 3(1): 133-144. Cratsley, D.W...University, Baton Rouge. 285 pp. EI-114 Thompson, B.A and L.A. Deegan . 1983. The Atchafalaya River delta: a "new" fishery nursery with recommendations for

  16. Post-emergency response resources guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, Gulf States Utilities, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One of the products developed from that experience is this guide for understanding the responsibilities and obtaining resources for specific needs from the various participants, particularly those organizations within the federal government. This guide should assist state and local government organizations with identifying and obtaining those resources for the post-emergency response when theirs have been exhausted

  17. Diagnoses of hybrid hummingbirds (Aves: Trochilidae). 17. Documentation of the intrageneric hybrid (Archilochus colubris × Archilochus alexandri)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Gary R.; Dittmann, Donna L.; Cardiff, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Although the breeding ranges of Archilochus alexandri (Black-chinned Hummingbird) and Archilochus colubris (Ruby throated Hummingbird) are narrowly parapatric in central Texas and central and southern Oklahoma, there have been few reports of hybridization in the literature and no well......-documented hybrid specimens. Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of two male hybrids collected, respectively, in Grayson County, Texas, and East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana. As has been the pattern in other hummingbird hybrids, both specimens exhibit a blended mosaic of plumage characters of the parental...

  18. CROSERF: Toward a standardization of oil spill cleanup agent ecological effects research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, M.; Tjeerdema, R.; Aurand, D.; Clark, J.; Sergy, G.

    1995-01-01

    The establishment in 1994 of the Chemical Response to Oil Spills Ecological Effects Research Forum (CROSERF) for the development of standardization of protocols used in ecological research of oil spills and remediation efforts was described. Background and the need for such an organization was discussed. Discussions at the two meetings of the forum to date (generation of scientific data for decision making in August 1994 at the University of California at Santa Cruz, and toxicity testing of the water-accommodated fraction of the oil in March 1995 at the Louisiana Oil Spill Coordinator's Office in Baton Rouge) were summarized. A list of the organizations represented at the meetings was given. 5 refs

  19. Is it restoration or reconciliation? California's experience restoring the Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta provides lessons learned and pathways forward to sustain critical ecosystem functions and services in a highly managed riverine delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viers, J. H.; Kelsey, R.

    2014-12-01

    Reconciling the needs of nature and people in California's Sacramento - San Joaquin River Delta represents one of the most critical ecosystem management imperatives in western North America. Over 150 years the Delta has been managed for near-term human benefits and in the process 95% of riverine and deltaic wetlands have been lost throughout the region. Despite extensive land conversion and alteration of hydrological and physical processes, the Delta remains important habitat for migratory birds and is home to over 60% of California's native fish species. It is also the waterwheel for the state's vast water distribution network and is maintained by a system of constructed levees that are at risk from catastrophic failure due to sea level rise, floods, and/or seismic activity. Such a collapse would have dire consequences for > 25M humans and world's 10th largest economy that depend on its freshwater. Thus, the ultimate cost of this ecosystem alteration and simplification is a riverscape that is no longer reliable for nature or people. For 30 years, attempts to 'restore' Delta ecosystems and improve reliability have met with mixed results. For example, reconnection of floodplains to floodwaters has resulted in improved ecological health for native fishes and recharge to localized aquifers. Uncoordinated releases of discharges below dams, however, have resulted in diminished water quality and populations of indicator species. Attempts to create wildlife friendly farms have been countered by an increase in perennial agriculture and commensurate increases in irrigation water demand. From these lessons learned, we demonstrate three key components of a reconciled Delta that will be necessary in the future: 1) full restoration of critical habitats, reconnecting land and water to rebuild ecosystem function; 2) landscape redesign, incorporating natural and engineered infrastructure to create a biologically diverse, resilient landscape to support both agriculture and natural

  20. Profiles of Asians in Sacramento. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ivy

    This project was undertaken to provide more information on the condition of Asians. More specifically, it sought to: (1) obtain descriptive and demographic data on Asians; (2) determine the extent of usage of existing social services. Structural and attitudinal factors which facilitate or inhibit usage were examined; (3) identify what Asians…

  1. Riparian Habitat - Sacramento River [ds343

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This layer was obtained for inclusion in BIOS from the Chico State Geographic Information Center (GIC) Website. Permission to post these data in BIOS was provided to...

  2. Clinical Macrosystem Simulation Translates Between Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, G Jesse; Maryman, James A

    2018-04-01

    Simulation has become an integral tool in healthcare facility redesign. Immersing clinical experts into their future environment has demonstrated benefits for transition planning. This study evaluates translation of a proven macrosystems testing protocol, TESTPILOT, to an organization with limited simulation experience. An experienced TESTPILOT team guided Woman's Hospital Baton Rouge's simulation preparation for their new neonatal intensive care unit. Metrics included participant evaluations, latent safety threats (LST), and clinician surveys. Latent safety threats recorded during debriefings were addressed by workflow committees. Clinicians were surveyed at four time points for readiness and preparedness on 24 key processes. The local team invested nearly 750 hours into learning and implementing seven simulations that participants rated positively. Most of the 305 LST were minor issues. Surveys at baseline (42% of staff), postsim (18%), pretransition (26%), and postmove (29%) demonstrated strong internal consistency. System readiness lagged behind staff preparedness (P structure, team coverage, and feedback were still evolving as of move day (P organizations with limited prior exposure. Woman's Hospital Baton Rouge accrued essential skills to model and orchestrate an immersive neonatal intensive care unit and then drive effective multidisciplinary debriefings. Staff immersed in the new environment began to articulate their jobs before moving in. The trajectory of system readiness improvement corroborated LST correction. Future research is needed to determine the extent of simulation required for different organizational structures.

  3. Base Closure and Realignment Act (BRAC) Cleanup Plan, Sacramento Army Depot, Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Treatment System. April 5. Levy, R. 1978. Eastern Miwok. In Handbook of North American Indians. Volume 8: California, (R.F. Heizer , ed.) pp. 398-413... Heizer , pp. 389-387. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Wirth Environmental Services. 1983. An archaeological overview and management plan for the...water quality which, if reached, are expected to render a body of water suitable for its designated use. The criteria are based on specific levels of

  4. 75 FR 80717 - Safety Zone; Sacramento New Year's Eve, Fireworks Display, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... displays are for entertainment purposes. A safety zone is necessary to protect spectators, vessels, and... under Executive Order 13211. Technical Standards The National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act... involves establishing, disestablishing, or changing Regulated Navigation Areas and security or safety zones...

  5. Generational Change in Australian School Leadership: Collision Path or Smooth Baton Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Phil; Marks, Warren; Elliott, Virginia; Johnston-Anderson, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study examining the existence and perceived influence of "generational collide" for teachers and leaders across three generations--Baby Boomers, Generation X (Gen X) and Generation Y (Gen Y). The study sought to further determine if a teacher's generation, gender, school level or…

  6. Metabolic profile testing for Jersey cows in Louisiana: reference values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, J D; Seybt, S H; Toups, G

    1982-06-01

    One hundred twenty-seven Jersey cows (1 to 6 years of age) within a 160.93-km radius of Baton Rouge, La, were selected at random over a 3-year period to determine serum values for total creatine kinase, aspartate transaminase, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, cholesterol, total protein, globulin, urea nitrogen, and glucose. Breed and age were partitioned as possible sources of variation. Seasonal temperature and management influences were taken into account by restricting the sampling area. Seasonal temperature and management influences along with reproductive status and stage of lactation, were randomized by sampling over the 3-year period. All serum values, except aspartate transaminase, urea nitrogen, and glucose were influenced by age. Serum cholesterol, total protein, and glucose were influenced by age. serum cholesterol, total protein, and globulin tended to increase with age, whereas creatine kinase, calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase generally decreased with age.

  7. AC and DC electrical properties of graphene nanoplatelets reinforced epoxy syntactic foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, Ephraim; Wicker, Scott; Woldesenbet, Eyassu

    2018-04-01

    Benefits of employing graphene nanopletlates (GNPLs) in composite structures include mechanical as well as multifunctional properties. Understanding the impedance behavior of GNPLs reinforced syntactic foams may open new applications for syntactic foam composites. In this work, GNPLs reinforced syntactic foams were fabricated and tested for DC and AC electrical properties. Four sets of syntactic foam samples containing 0, 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 vol% of GNPLs were fabricated and tested. Significant increase in conductivity of syntactic foams due to the addition of GNPLs was noted. AC impedance measurements indicated that the GNPLs syntactic foams become frequency dependent as the volume fraction of GNPLs increases. With addition of GNPLs, the characteristic of the syntactic foams are also observed to transition from dominant capacitive to dominant resistive behavior. This work was carried out at Southern University, Mechanical Engineering Department, Baton Rouge, LA 70802, United States of America.

  8. Carbon nanotube and graphene nanoribbon interconnects

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Debaprasad

    2014-01-01

    "The book, Caron Nanotube and Graphene Nanoribbon Interconnects, authored by Drs. Debapraad Das and Hafizur Rahaman serves as a good source of material on CNT and GNR interconnects for readers who wish to get into this area and also for practicing engineers who would like to be updated in advances of this field."-Prof. Ashok Srivastava, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA"Mathematical analysis included in each and every chapter is the main strength of the materials. ... The book is very precise and useful for those who are working in this area. ... highly focused, very compact, and easy to apply. ... This book depicts a detailed analysis and modelling of carbon nanotube and graphene nanoribbon interconnects. The book also covers the electrical circuit modelling of carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons."-Prof. Chandan Kumar Sarkar, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India.

  9. Fishes in paleochannels of the Lower Mississippi River alluvial valley: A national treasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Leandro E.

    2016-01-01

    Fluvial geomorphology of the alluvial valley of the Lower Mississippi River reveals a fascinating history. A prominent occupant of the valley was the Ohio River, estimated to have flowed 25,000 years ago over western Tennessee and Mississippi to join the Mississippi River north of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 750–800 km south of the present confluence. Over time, shifts in the Mississippi and Ohio rivers toward their contemporary positions have left a legacy of abandoned paleochannels supportive of unique fish assemblages. Relative to channels abandoned in the last 500 years, paleochannels exhibit harsher environmental conditions characteristic of hypereutrophic lakes and support tolerant fish assemblages. Considering their ecological, geological, and historical importance, coupled with their primordial scenery, the hundreds of paleochannels in the valley represent a national treasure. Altogether, these waterscapes are endangered by human activities and would benefit from the conservation attention afforded to our national parks and wildlife refuges.

  10. Emergency Response Resources guide for nuclear power plant emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    On August 28 and September 18, 1990, the States of Louisiana and Mississippi, Gulf States Utilities, five local parishes, six Federal agencies, and the American Nuclear Insurers participated in a post-emergency TABLETOP exercise in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. One of the products developed from that experience was this guide for understanding the responsibilities and obtaining resources for specific needs from the various participants, particularly from those organizations within the Federal Government. This first revision of that guide broadens the focus of the original document. Also, new information defines the major Federal response facilities. This guide should assist State and local government organizations with identifying and obtaining those resources for the post-emergency response when their resources have been exhausted

  11. Cultural resources survey and assessment of the proposed Department of Energy Freeport to Texas City pipeline, Brazoria and Galveston Counties, Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castille, G.J.; Whelan, J.P. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An intensive survey and testing program of selected segments of a proposed Department of Energy pipeline were conducted by Coastal Environments, Inc., Baton Rouge, Louisiana, during December 1985 and January 1986. The proposed pipeline runs from Texas City, Galveston County to Bryan Mound, Brazoria County. The pedestrian survey was preceded by historical records survey to locate possible historic sites within the DOE righ-of-way. Four prehistoric sites within the ROW (41BO159, 160, 161, 162) and one outside the ROW (41BO163) were located. All are Rangia cuneata middens. The survey results are discussed with particular reference to the environmental settings of the sites and the effectiveness of the survey procedure. Two of the sites located within the ROW were subjected to additional testing. The results of the backhoe testing program are included in the site descriptions, and the scientific value of the sites are presented. 52 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Perfluoroalkyl substances and changes in body weight and resting metabolic rate in response to weight-loss diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Gang; Dhana, Klodian; Furtado, Jeremy D

    2018-01-01

    in body weight and resting metabolic rate (RMR) in a diet-induced weight-loss setting. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the 2-year POUNDS Lost randomized clinical trial based in Boston, Massachusetts, and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, that examined the effects of energy-restricted diets on weight changes, baseline...... and 24 months. Participants lost an average of 6.4 kg of body weight during the first 6 months (weight-loss period) and subsequently regained an average of 2.7 kg of body weight during the period of 6-24 months (weight regain period). After multivariate adjustment, baseline PFAS concentrations were...... not significantly associated with concurrent body weight or weight loss during the first 6 months. In contrast, higher baseline levels of PFASs were significantly associated with a greater weight regain, primarily in women. In women, comparing the highest to the lowest tertiles of PFAS concentrations...

  13. South Louisiana Enhanced Oil Recovery/Sequestration R&D Project Small Scale Field Tests of Geologic Reservoir Classes for Geologic Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hite, Roger [Blackhorse Energy LLC, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The project site is located in Livingston Parish, Louisiana, approximately 26 miles due east of Baton Rouge. This project proposed to evaluate an early Eocene-aged Wilcox oil reservoir for permanent storage of CO2. Blackhorse Energy, LLC planned to conduct a parallel CO2 oil recovery project in the First Wilcox Sand. The primary focus of this project was to examine and prove the suitability of South Louisiana geologic formations for large-scale geologic sequestration of CO2 in association with enhanced oil recovery applications. This was to be accomplished through the focused demonstration of small-scale, permanent storage of CO2 in the First Wilcox Sand. The project was terminated at the request of Blackhorse Energy LLC on October 22, 2014.

  14. Cogeneration feasibility study in the Gulf States Utilities service area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Sites in the Gulf States Utilities service are considered for cogeneration feasibility studies. The sources of steam considered for the Orange, Texas and Geismar, Lake Charles, and North Baton Rouge, Louisiana sites include oil, coal, HTGR steamers, consolidated nuclear steam system, atmospheric fluidized-bed coal combustion, and coal gasification. Concepts concerning cogeneration fuel systems were categorized by technical applicability as: current technology (pulverized coal-fired boilers and fuel oil-fired boilers), advanced technology under development (HTGR steamers and the CNSS), and advanced technology for future development (atmospheric fluidized-bed boilers and coal gasification). In addition to providing data on cogeneration plant generally useful in the US, the study determined the technical and economic feasibility of steam and electric power cogeneration using coal and nuclear fuels for localized industrial complexes. Details on site selection, plant descriptions, cost estimates, economic analysis, and plant schedule and implementation. (MCW)

  15. ‘When we are tired we shall rest’: bus boycotts in the United States of America and South Africa and prospects for comparative history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Charles Catsam

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at some of the practical, methodological, and disciplinary issues connected to comparative and transnational history through the lens of bus boycotts in South Africa and the United States in the 1950s. Comparative history by its very nature requires historians to transcend both the restrictive boundaries that the profession sometimes imposes as well as a fundamentally interdisciplinary approach to scholarship. Yet as the suggestive comparisons between boycotts in Montgomery, Alabama, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and the Transvaal in the mid-1950s show, such work can be rewarding in providing a transnational framework for understanding protest movements that transcend national borders. Catsam argues in the end of his article that “a deeper understanding of both [the American and South African] struggles together may well help us better to grasp the significance of each separately.”

  16. Overview 2004 of NASA Stirling-Convertor CFD-Model Development and Regenerator R&D Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Roy C.; Dyson, Rodger W.; Wilson, Scott D.; Demko, Rikako

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on accomplishments in 2004 in development of Stirling-convertor CFD model at NASA GRC and via a NASA grant, a Stirling regenerator-research effort being conducted via a NASA grant (a follow-on effort to an earlier DOE contract), and a regenerator-microfabrication contract for development of a "next-generation Stirling regenerator." Cleveland State University is the lead organization for all three grant/contractual efforts, with the University of Minnesota and Gedeor Associates as subcontractors. Also, the Stirling Technology Co. and Sunpower, Inc. are both involved in all three efforts, either as funded or unfunded participants. International Mezzo Technologies of Baton Rouge, LA is the regenerator fabricator for the regenerator-microfabrication contract. Results of the efforts in these three areas are summarized.

  17. Las generaciones de inmigrantes y sus descendientes y el riesgo de diabetes en la población de los Estados Unidos de origen o ascendencia mexicana: el Estudio sobre Envejecimiento en Latinos del Área de Sacramento (estudio SALSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee Afable-Munsuz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Se investigó si la aculturación de los inmigrantes y sus descendientes y la generación a la que pertenecen, un marcador de la asimilación, se relacionan con el riesgo de diabetes en una población de adultos mayores de ascendencia u origen mexicano. MÉTODOS: Se analizaron los datos sobre 1 789 adultos de 60 a 101 años de edad del Estudio sobre Envejecimiento en Latinos del Área de Sacramento (estudio SALSA. Se determinó la presencia de diabetes tipo 2 con base en el uso de medicamentos antidiabéticos, la mención por el paciente del diagnóstico de un médico, o una glucosa en ayunas de 126 mg/dl o mayor. Se aplicó un modelo de regresión logística para la prevalencia de diabetes. RESULTADOS: Tras ajustar por edad y sexo, se observaron asociaciones significativas pero divergentes entre las generaciones de inmigrantes y sus descendientes, la aculturación y el riesgo de diabetes. En relación con los adultos de la primera generación, los de la segunda tuvieron una razón de posibilidades (odds ratio, OR de padecer diabetes de 1,8 (intervalo de confianza [IC] de 95% = 1,4, 2,4 y los adultos de la tercera generación tuvieron una OR de 2,1 (IC de 95% = 1,4, 3,1. Sin embargo, una mayor aculturación a los Estados Unidos se relacionó con una tasa ligeramente menor de diabetes. En el modelo completo, tras la incorporación de ajustes para tener en cuenta los factores socioeconómicos y del modo de vida, la relación entre la generación y la diabetes seguía siendo significativa, no así la relación de esta última con la aculturación. CONCLUSIONES: El presente estudio respalda la idea, anteriormente cuestionada, de que la asimilación se relaciona con un mayor riesgo de diabetes entre los inmigrantes de origen mexicano. Los investigadores deben analizar más detalladamente la presencia de una relación causal entre la asimilación y la salud.

  18. Biological fate, transport, and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelghani, A.; Hartley, W.; Bart, H.; Ide, C.; Ellgaard, E.; Sherry, T.; Devall, M.; Thien, L.; Horner, E.; Mizell, M.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the cluster investigators is to develop a dynamic model for the evaluation of the biological fate, transport, and ecotoxicity from multiple chemical contamination of the Mississippi River Basin. To develop this environmental model, FY 93-94 most of cluster investigators focused on Devil's Swamp Site (DSS), a cypress swamp which lies just Northwest of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, adjacent to the Mississippi River. The DSS which includes a man-made lake has contaminated sediment, water and biota. The DSS receives flood water from the Mississippi River during high flow periods and the Baton Rouge Bayou drains through the DSS. The DSS receives toxic substances and hazardous waste from a wide variety of surrounding industrial operations including an abandoned hazardous waste disposal facility. In addition, some investigators studied Bayou Trepangnier. This research cluster will continue studying Devil Swamp. The large number of investigators in this cluster resulted from incorporating related research proposals based on reviewer recommendations. The specific aims of the cluster for the first year were to conduct a physical, chemical, ecological survey and baseline toxicological characterization of the DSS from existing databases maintained by State and federal agencies, field studies (assessment) of sediment, air, water and biota, and laboratory screening studios. This assessment will provide critical information and focus for the next two years in-depth studies of critical transport and fate processes, ecotoxicity, biomarkers of effect, and uptake, metabolism and distribution of toxicants. The primary significant outcome of the cluster researchers will be the development of an ecological risk assessment model combining biotic and physical/chemical variables for DSS with a projection of model reliability and accuracy for use at other typical Mississippi River Basin sites

  19. Disaster preparedness of dialysis patients for Hurricanes Gustav and Ike 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinpeter, Myra A

    2009-01-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita resulted in massive devastation of the Gulf Coast at Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas during 2005. Because of those disasters, dialysis providers, nephrologists, and dialysis patients used disaster planning activities to work to mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with the 2005 hurricane season for future events affecting dialysis patients. As Hurricane Gustav approached, anniversary events for Hurricane Katrina were postponed because of evacuation orders for nearly the entire Louisiana Gulf Coast. As part of the hurricane preparation, dialysis units reviewed the disaster plans of patients, and patients made preparation for evacuation. Upon evacuation, many patients returned to the dialysis units that had provided services during their exile from Hurricane Katrina; other patients went to other locations as part of their evacuation plan. Patients uniformly reported positive experiences with dialysis providers in their temporary evacuation communities, provided that those communities did not experience the effects of Hurricane Gustav. With the exception of evacuees to Baton Rouge, patients continued to receive their treatments uninterrupted. Because of extensive damage in the Baton Rouge area, resulting in widespread power losses and delayed restoration of power to hospitals and other health care facilities, some patients missed one treatment. However, as a result of compliance with disaster fluid and dietary recommendations, no adverse outcomes occurred. In most instances, patients were able to return to their home dialysis unit or a nearby unit to continue dialysis treatments within 4 - 5 days of Hurricane Gustav. Hurricane Ike struck the Texas Gulf Coast near Galveston, resulting in devastation of that area similar to the devastation seen in New Orleans after Katrina. The storm surge along the Louisiana Gulf Coast resulted in flooding that temporarily closed coastal dialysis units. Patients were prepared and experienced

  20. How Natural is the Dissolved Inorganic Composition of Mississippi River Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Johnson, S. T.; Meaux, S. J.; Brown, K.; Blum, M. J.; Allison, M. A.; Halder, J.; Wassenaar, L. I.; Cuesta, A. M.; Norris, E. S.; Wang, R. S.

    2017-12-01

    The dissolved inorganic composition of rivers provides insights into natural interactions between the hydrologic cycle and the "critical zone" of watersheds, and anthropogenic modifications thereof. For instance, major ion compositions allow us to infer how effectively weathering processes counteract increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Prerequisite to such assessments is the ability to detect and correct for anthropogenic modifications of river chemistry. An observatory campaign of the Mississippi River in New Orleans from July 2015 to October 2016 with an in-situ sensor system (LOBO-SUNA) and 161 discrete water sampling events reveals systematic changes in the dissolved ion and water stable isotope compositions, nutrient loading, and physical parameters of the Mississippi River. Monthly sampling has continued since as part of the Global Rivers Observatory. We compare this high-resolution data set to long-term data generated by the USGS at St. Francisville upstream of Baton Rouge, data from the USGS Baton Rouge gaging station and in-situ sensor system, as well as other historic data. Results reveal systematic changes in major ion composition in response to hydrologic conditions. In addition to annual and interannual changes, decadal trends in concentrations of certain major ions (Na, Mg, Ca) are consistent with anthropogenic activities in the drainage basin that are reminiscent of well-known, long-term changes in nutrient fluxes that affect the northern Gulf of Mexico. Our current working hypotheses to explain observed increases in Mg and Na concentrations, for example, are contaminations from road salt, from additives used in drinking and waste water treatment, as well as from groundwater pumping, particularly in the western part of the Mississippi River basin. Uncorrected, these changes impede our abilitiy to use the current chemical composition of Mississippi River water as a quantitative indicator of natural processes in the watershed.

  1. Draft environmental impact statement. River Bend Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Federal financing of an undivided ownership interest of River Bend Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 on a 3293-acre site near St. Francisville, Louisiana is proposed in a supplement to the final environmental impact statement of September 1974. The facility would consist of a boiling-water reactor that would produce a maximum of 2894 megawatts (MW) of electrical power. A design level of 3015 MW of electric power could be realized at some time in the future. Exhaust steam would be cooled by mechanical cooling towers using makeup water obtained from and discharged to the Mississippi River. Power generated by the unit would be transmitted via three lines totaling 140 circuit miles traversing portions of the parishes of West Feliciana, East Feliciana, East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge, Pointe Coupee, and Iberville. The unit would help the applicant meet the power needs of rural electric consumers in the region, and the applicant would contribute significanlty to area tax base and employment rolls during the life of the unit. Construction related activities would disturb 700 forested acres on the site and 1156 acres along the transmission routes. Of the 60 cubic feet per second (cfs) taken from the river, 48 cfs would evaporate during the cooling process and 12 cfs would return to the river with dissolved solids concentrations increased by 500%. The terrace aquifer would be dewatered for 16 months in order to lower the water table at the building site, and Grants Bayou would be transformed from a lentic to a lotic habitat during this period. Fogging and icing due to evaporation and drift from the cooling towers would increase slightly. During the construction period, farming, hunting, and fishing on the site would be suspended, and the social infractructure would be stressed due to the influx of a maximum of 2200 workers

  2. What Role do Hurricanes Play in Sediment Delivery to Subsiding River Deltas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. E., IV

    2016-02-01

    James E. Smith IV1, Samuel J. Bentley, Sr.1, Gregg A. Snedden2, Crawford White1 Department of Geology and Geophysics and Coastal Studies Institute, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 USA United States Geological Survey, National Wetlands Research Center, Baton Rouge LA 70803 USA The Mississippi River Delta has undergone tremendous land loss over the past century due to natural and anthropogenic influences, a fate shared by many river deltas globally. A globally unprecedented effort to restore and sustain the remaining subaerial portions of the delta is now underway, an endeavor that is expected to cost $50-100B over the next 50 yr. Success of this effort requires a thorough understanding of natural and anthropogenic controls on sediment supply, accumulation, and delta geomorphology. In the Mississippi River Delta, hurricanes have been paradoxically identified as both agents of widespread land loss, and positive influences for marsh vertical sediment accretion. We present the first multi-decadal chronostratigraphic assessment of sediment supply for a major coastal basin of the Mississippi River Delta that assesses both fluvial and hurricane-induced contributions to sediment accumulation in deltaic wetlands. Twenty seven cores have been analyzed for radioisotope geochronology and organic content to establish the chronology of mineral sediment supply to the wetlands over the past 70 years. Our findings indicate that over multidecadal timescales, hurricane-induced sediment delivery may be an important contributor for deltaic wetland vertical accretion, but the contribution from hurricanes to long-term sediment accumulation is substantially less than sediment delivery supplied by existing and planned river-sediment diversions at present-day river-sediment loads.

  3. La stratégie de la boîte rouge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Dury

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fréquemment, villes et pays se sont dotés d’emblèmes. Les associations sont immédiates et connues de tous : la chouette frappée sur la monnaie d’Athènes, le Quetzal du Guatemala... Parfois des légendes sont venues appuyer les mythes fondateurs de la puissance urbaine (Romulus et Remus. Loin d’être anecdotique ou simplement folklorique, la recherche d’un emblème représente la première forme de ce qui s’avère être aujourd’hui l’objet d’une âpre lutte, à savoir la ...

  4. Methylmercury in water, sediment, and invertebrates in created wetlands of Rouge Park, Toronto, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, Kathleen A.; Xie Qun; Mitchell, Carl P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of hectares of wetlands are created annually because wetlands provide beneficial ecosystem services. Wetlands are also key sites for production of the bioaccumulative neurotoxin methylmercury (MeHg), but little is known about MeHg production in created systems. Here, we studied methylmercury in sediment, water, and invertebrates in created wetlands of various ages. Sediment MeHg reached 8 ng g −1 in the newest wetland, which was significantly greater than in natural, control wetlands. This trend was mirrored in several invertebrate taxa, whose concentrations reached as high as 1.6 μg g −1 in the newest wetland, above levels thought to affect reproduction in birds. The MeHg concentrations in created wetland invertebrate taxa generally decreased with increasing wetland age, possibly due to a combination of deeper anoxia and less organic matter accumulation in younger wetlands. A short-term management intervention and/or improved engineering design may be necessary to reduce the mercury-associated risk in newly created wetlands. - Highlights: ► Investigated methylmercury accumulation in created wetland ecosystems. ► Concentrations and bioaccumulation significantly elevated in new created wetlands. ► Short-term effect may be due to deeper anoxia, less organic matter in new wetlands. ► Intervention or improved design required to reduce short-term ecological risk. - Sediment methylmercury concentrations and bioaccumulation in many invertebrate taxa are significantly elevated in newly created wetlands.

  5. 75 FR 27641 - Safety Zone; Marathon Oil Refinery Construction, Rouge River, Detroit, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... protect mariners and construction personnel from the hazards associated with moving large pieces of... being available in the docket are part of docket USCG-2010-0333 and are available online by going to..., and movement of large pieces of equipment could easily result in serious injuries or fatalities...

  6. 78 FR 78463 - Summary of the Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... the use of a common television in a private office and the use of a vehicle for a single employee when... this disagreement in the Pre-Trial Chamber. Certification and United States Policy Objectives This...

  7. Confined Disposal Facility at Pointe Mouillee for Detroit and Rouge Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-03-01

    overflow pipe met effluent recommendations set by the Public Health Service and the Michigan State Water Resources Commission for discharges to the...p’crmit addit!ional 7ubiic hearings to discuss extent of mercury pollution and danger to public health ,. value of fish and wildlife in area, and...raspberries (Rubus, sp) none Red osier dogwood (Cornus stolonifera) Elderberry (Sambucus) Grape (Vitus) Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus) Hibiscus or mallow

  8. Suite a une restructuration couteuse, Cicorel a plonge dans le rouge en 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    Bruggmann, A

    2003-01-01

    "Le fabricant de circuits imprimes de tres haute densite, sur materiaux parfois imprevus, a vu son revenu operationnel decroitre de 17,6% a 27,13 millions de francs, et son cash-flow avant postes exceptionnels a fondu a 453 millions" (1 page).

  9. PHOTOLYSE DIRECTE DU COLORANT ROUGE CIBACRON FB 184 PAR IRRADIATION SOLAIRE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A ALOUI

    2013-06-01

    Les résultats ont montré que la solution de plus faible concentration présentait le taux de décoloration le plus élevé. Des expériences semblables ont été réalisées durant les quatre saisons de l’année. La dégradation a été la plus rapide en été. Des essais ont été effectués en mars 2010 sur des solutions de même concentration mais de pH différents. La disparition du colorant a été la plus rapide dans la solution la plus acide. Ceci indique une plus grande réactivité de la forme moléculaire.

  10. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, SACRAMENTO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  11. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, CITY OF SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  12. Does tree planting pay us back? Lessons from Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekang Ko; Lara A. Roman; E. Gregory McPherson; Junhak. Lee

    2016-01-01

    The past decade could be called a renaissance of urban forestry, driven by mayoral tree planting initiatives and increased attention on city trees as green infrastructure. The political support for urban greening has been fueled by research that quantifies and projects the ecosystem services of planting initiatives (Young and McPherson 2013). Major cities have been...

  13. 78 FR 4785 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    .... Federalism F. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act G. Taking of Private Property H. Civil Justice Reform I...-3520). E. Federalism A rule has implications for federalism under Executive Order 13132, Federalism, if... implications for federalism. F. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act The Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C...

  14. 77 FR 74775 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Sacramento River, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... held. B. Basis and Purpose The Freeport Drawbridge is a swing span style drawbridge at mile 46.0, over.... The authority citation for part 117 continues to read as follows: Authority: 33 U.S.C. 499; 33 CFR 1...

  15. Sacramento State Solar Decathlon 2015: Research Performance Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Mikael [California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States). Dept. of Construction Management

    2017-03-14

    Our primary objective is to design and build a 600-1000sf home that produces more energy than it consumes and to showcase this home at the 2015 Solar Decathlon in Irvine, CA. Further objectives are to educate consumers and home builders, alike (including K-12 students – the industry’s future consumers), inspire a shift towards the adoption of net-zero energy solutions in residential building, and to be a leader in the transformation of the California residential marketplace to a net-zero standard. Our specific mission statement for this project is as follows: Solar NEST strives to discover the future of sustainable, energy-efficient housing and deliver these innovations to home buyers at an affordable price. To make substantial improvements to conventional building methods with regard to aesthetics, performance, and affordability. Through our efforts, we aspire to bridge the gap between ‘what is’ and ‘what is possible’ by providing unique, elegant simplicity.

  16. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, SACRAMENTO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  17. A DIMENSÃO ECLESIAL DOS SACRAMENTOS SEGUNDO KARL RAHNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Francisco Taborda

    1976-01-01

    Full Text Available Escrever sobre Karl Rahner já deixou de ser moda. Por isso mesmo vale a pena tentá-lo. Ultrapassados o entusiasmo novidadeiro e o ardor sectário, o estudo do teólogo alemão pode ser muito mais frutuo-so à reflexão teológica. Indubitavelmente — tenha-se sobre ele a opinião que for — Karl Rahner marcou profundamente a teologia católica, de cuja renovação entre os anos 50 e 70 de nosso século foi u m dos mais importantes fautores.

  18. Passing the baton to heiressees: The case of a company ABC Paulo in phase preparation for succession family

    OpenAIRE

    Eloi, Cristiany Bim Gurati

    2014-01-01

    Este estudo tem como finalidade primeira contribuir com o debate especializado que enfrenta o desafio de apontar caminhos que auxiliem as empresas familiares a garantirem a própria continuidade a partir da segunda geração de dirigentes. Embora imprecisas e desatualizadas, as estatísticas mostram que 70% dos negócios familiares sucumbem ao alcançarem a segunda geração e, em média, apenas 15% conseguem sobreviver até a terceira geração. A sucessão constitui o tema de maior atenção dos especiali...

  19. Passing the baton: Mentoring for adoption of active-learning pedagogies by research-active junior faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Catherine Leimkuhler; White, Harold B

    2015-01-01

    There are barriers to adoption of research-based teaching methods. Professional development workshops may inform faculty of these methods, but effective adoption often does not follow. In addition, newly-minted research-active faculty are often overwhelmed by the many new responsibilities (grant writing, group management, laboratory setup, teaching) that accompany the position and normally do not have the time to consider novel teaching approaches. This case study documents how over a three-year period, the responsibility for teaching a nontraditional "Introduction to Biochemistry" course in a problem-based learning format was successfully transferred from a senior faculty member nearing retirement (HBW) to a newly-hired research-active assistant professor (CLG). We describe our apprenticeship project involving modeling, scaffolding, fading, and coaching. We suggest that involving faculty in active-learning pedagogy early in their career with mentoring by senior faculty overcomes barriers to adopting these methods. This case describes a specific example from which potentially useful elements can be adopted and adapted wherever biochemistry is taught. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  20. 36 Etude de l'effet de l'amodiaquine sur les globules rouges infectés ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BAGUI

    techniques d'analyse multivariée telles que la classification hiérarchique, la méthode des k-moyennes et l'analyse en ... techniques such as hierarchical classification, k-means method and principal component analysis techniques. The ..... [7] - ERIC W. WEISSTEIN,''K-means Clustering Algorithm'' from Wolfram Mathworld.

  1. L’écriture rouge de Sherman Alexie : l’exemple de "The Sin Eaters"

    OpenAIRE

    Sabatier, Diane

    2005-01-01

    If the bodies of Native American individuals seem perpetually tormented and exploited, they constitute means of rebellion when they are transformed into the testimony of a witness – into the body of work of the writer. One can read Sherman Alexie’s collection of short-stories, The Toughest Indian In The World (2001), as scattered bodies regaining shape on paper and forces through his angry red ink. The short-story “The Sin Eaters” constitutes its central nerve with a macabre allegory which li...

  2. 75 FR 17197 - Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal Under Section 7071(c) of the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... diplomatic community to further explain his role and highlight his commitment to protecting the identities of... shifting the pre-trial Chamber to sit on a full-time basis in order to improve the efficiency of the court...

  3. Laser-Driven Ultra-Relativistic Plasmas - Nuclear Fusion in Coulomb Shock Waves, Rouge Waves, and Background Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-05

    the time-scale of Big Bang , and the most significant time scale posts on the road to it. In his work [2], this PI also proposed specific mechanisms and...recently: (1) fully QED/relativistic theory of light pressure of 15.  SUBJECT TERMS plasmas Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18...large moving man-made objects in the ocean. A 2D and 3D expansion of the theory may need to be developed for other potential appli- cations of G

  4. Duch is dead. [Review of: Laban Hinton Man or Monster? The Trial of a Khmer Rouge Torturer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwknegt, Thijs Bastiaan

    2017-01-01

    In his stimulating new book, the psychological anthropologist Alexander Laban Hinton chronicles the trial against the confessant Cambodian tormenter Kaing Guek Eav (f.k.a. Comrade Duch). In exploring Kaing Guek Eav’s state of mind, the book provokes the reader to think about why we feel the need to

  5. Novel anterior cruciate ligament graft fixation device reduces slippage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez MJ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mandi J Lopez,1 Allen Borne,2 W Todd Monroe,3 Prakash Bommala,1 Laura Kelly,1 Nan Zhang11Laboratory for Equine and Comparative Orthopedic Research, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, 2Louisiana State University, New Orleans Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, New Orleans, 3Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USAAbstract: Clinically significant laxity occurs in 10%–30% of knees after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Graft slippage and tension loss at the hamstring graft tibial fixation site during and after reconstruction surgery contribute to postoperative joint laxity and are detrimental to long-term knee stability and graft properties. Limiting graft slippage will reduce associated complications. We sought to compare the in vitro mechanical properties and in vivo joint stabilization, postoperative limb use, and graft incorporation of the novel GraftGrab™ (GG device designed to reduce hamstring graft tibial fixation slippage with the commercially available bioabsorbable Bio-Post™ and spiked washer (BP. Mechanical testing was performed on canine tibia-hamstring graft constructs to quantify initial fixation properties. In vivo joint stabilization, postoperative limb use and graft incorporation of hamstring graft reconstructions were determined in a canine model. Outcomes included tibial translation and ground reaction forces preoperatively and 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, three-dimensional graft and bone tunnel dimensions at the latter two time points, and graft-bone microstructure, as well as mechanical properties 8 weeks after implantation. Immediately after fixation, all grafts slipped from the BP constructs versus about 30% of GG constructs. In vivo limb use remained low, and tibial translation increased with time in the BP cohort. These results together

  6. Isolation of novel bacteria within the Chloroflexi capable of reductive dechlorination of 1,2,3-trichloropropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, J; Rash, B A; Rainey, F A; Moe, W M

    2009-04-01

    Two strictly anaerobic bacterial strains were isolated from contaminated groundwater at a Superfund site located near Baton Rouge, LA, USA. These strains represent the first isolates reported to reductively dehalogenate 1,2,3-trichloropropane. Allyl chloride (3-chloro-1-propene), which is chemically unstable, was produced from 1,2,3-trichloropropane, and it was hydrolysed abiotically to allyl alcohol and also reacted with the sulfide- and cysteine-reducing agents in the medium to form various allyl sulfides. Both isolates also dehalogenated a variety of other vicinally chlorinated alkanes (1,2-dichloropropane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,1,2,2- tetrachloroethane) via dichloroelimination reactions. A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) approach targeting 16S rRNA genes indicated that both strains couple reductive dechlorination to cell growth. Growth was not observed in the absence of hydrogen (H2) as an electron donor and a polychlorinated alkane as an electron acceptor. Alkanes containing only a single chlorine substituent (1-chloropropane, 2-chloropropane), chlorinated alkenes (tetrachlorothene, trichlorothene, cisdichloroethene, trans-dichloroethene, vinyl chloride) and chlorinated benzenes (1-chlorobenzene and 1,2- dichlorobenzene) were not dechlorinated. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence data showed these isolates to represent a new lineage within the Chloroflexi. Their closest previously cultured relatives are 'Dehalococcoides' strains, with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of only 90%.

  7. Somatic experiencing treatment with social service workers following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, M Laurie; Vanslyke, Jan; Allen, Marisa

    2009-01-01

    In a disaster, social service workers are often survivors themselves.This study examines whether somatic intervention using a brief (one to two session) stabilization model now called the Trauma Resiliency Model (TRM), which uses the skills of Somatic Experiencing (SE), can reduce the postdisaster symptoms of social service workers involved in postdisaster service delivery.The study was implemented with a nonrandom sample of 142 social service workers who were survivors of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, two to three months after the disasters. Ninety-one participants received SE/TRM and were compared with a matched comparison group of 51 participants through the use of propensity score matching. All participants first received group psychoeducation. Results support the benefits of the brief intervention inspired by SE. The treatment group showed statistically significant gains in resiliency indicators and decreases in posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. Although psychological symptoms increased in both groups at the three to four month follow-up, the treatment group's psychological symptoms were statistically lower than those of the comparison group.

  8. Cooling tower water ozonation at Southern University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.C.; Knecht, A.T.; Trahan, D.B.; Yaghi, H.M.; Jackson, G.H.; Coppenger, G.D.

    1990-01-01

    Cooling-tower water is a critical utility for many industries. In the past, inexpensive water coupled with moderate regulation of discharge water led to the neglect of the cooling tower as an energy resource. Now, with the increased cost of chemical treatment and tough EPA rules and regulations, this situation is rapidly changing. The operator of the DOE Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge as well as many other industries are forced to develop an alternate method of water treatment. The cooling tower is one of the major elements in large energy systems. The savings accrued from a well engineered cooling tower can be a significant part of the overall energy conservation plan. During a short-term ozonation study between 1987-1988, the Y-12 Plant has been successful in eliminating the need for cooling tower treatment chemicals. However, the long-term impact was not available. Since April 1988, the ozone cooling water treatment study at the Y-12 Plant has been moved to the site at Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The purpose of this continued study is to determine whether the use of ozonation on cooling towers is practical from an economic, technical and environmental standpoint. This paper discusses system design, operating parameter and performance testing of the ozonation system at Southern University

  9. Pregnant Women in Louisiana Are Not Meeting Dietary Seafood Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Drewery

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that pregnant women and women of childbearing ages consume 8–12 oz. of seafood per week. Fish are the major dietary source of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which have benefits for the mother and fetus. Methods. In this observational study, we investigated dietary habits of pregnant women in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA, to determine if they achieve recommended seafood intake. A print survey, which included commonly consumed foods from protein sources (beef, chicken, pork, and fish, was completed by pregnant women at a single-day hospital convention for expecting families in October 2015. Women (n=221 chose from six predefined responses to answer how frequently they were consuming each food. Results. Chicken was consumed most frequently (75% of women, followed by beef (71%, pork (65%, and fish (22%, respectively. Consumption frequency for the most consumed fish (catfish, once per month was similar to or lower than that of the least consumed beef, chicken, and pork foods. Consumption frequency for the most consumed chicken and beef foods was at least once per week. Conclusion. Our data indicate that pregnant women in Louisiana often consume protein sources other than fish and likely fail to meet dietary seafood recommendations.

  10. Fluorescence imaging spectroscopy (FIS) for comparing spectra from corn ears naturally and artificially infected with aflatoxin producing fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Zuzana; Yao, Haibo; Kincaid, Russell; Darlington, Dawn; Brown, Robert L; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E

    2013-08-01

    In an effort to address the problem of rapid detection of aflatoxin in grain, particularly oilseeds, the current study assessed the spectral differences of aflatoxin production in kernels from a cornfield inoculated with spores from 2 different strains of toxigenic Aspergillus flavus. Aflatoxin production in corn from the same field due to natural infestation was also assessed. A small corn plot in Baton Rouge, La., U.S.A., was used during the 2008-growing season. Two groups of 400 plants were inoculated with 2 different inocula and 1 group of 400 plants was designated as controls. Any contamination detected in the controls was attributed to natural infestation. A subset of each group was imaged with a visible near infra red (VNIR) hyperspectral system under ultra violet (UV) excitation and subsequently analyzed for aflatoxin using affinity column fluorometry. Group differences were statistically analyzed. Results indicate that when all the spectral data across all groups were averaged, any potential differences between groups (treated and untreated) were obscured. However, spectral analysis based on contaminated "hot" pixel classification showed a distinct spectral shift/separation between contaminated and clean ears with fluorescence peaks at 501 and 478 nm, respectively. All inoculated and naturally infected control ears had fluorescence peaks at 501 nm that differed from uninfected corn ears. Results from this study may be useful in evaluating rapid, noninvasive instrumentation and/or methodology for aflatoxin detection in grain. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. The TETRA-II Experiment to Observe Terrestrial Gamma Flashes at Ground Level - Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.; Adams, C.; Al-Nussirat, S.; Bai, S.; Banadaki, Y.; Bitzer, P. M.; Hoffmann, J.; Khosravi, E.; Legault, M.; Orang, M.; Pleshinger, D. J.; Rodriguez, R.; Smith, D.; Trepanier, J. C.; Sunda-Meya, A.; Zimmer, N.

    2017-12-01

    An upgraded version of the TGF and Energetic Thunderstorm Rooftop Array (TETRA-II) consists of an array of BGO scintillators to detect bursts of gamma rays from thunderstorms at ground level in four separate locations: the campus of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana; the campus of the University of Puerto Rico at Utuado, Puerto Rico; the Centro Nacional de Metrologia de Panama (CENAMEP) in Panama City, Panama; and the Severe Weather Institute and Radar & Lightning Laboratories in Huntsville, Alabama. The original TETRA-I array of NaI scintillators at Louisiana State University detected 37 millisecond-scale bursts of gamma rays at energies 50 keV-2 MeV associated with nearby (brief description of the TETRA-I observations, a description of TETRA-II, and preliminary results of the first events observed by TETRA-II will be presented including frequency and time history of events, spectral information, and correlation with local radar and radio data.

  12. Impact of Spatial Pumping Patterns on Groundwater Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J.; Tsai, F. T. C.

    2017-12-01

    Challenges exist to manage groundwater resources while maintaining a balance between groundwater quantity and quality because of anthropogenic pumping activities as well as complex subsurface environment. In this study, to address the impact of spatial pumping pattern on groundwater management, a mixed integer nonlinear multi-objective model is formulated by integrating three objectives within a management framework to: (i) maximize total groundwater withdrawal from potential wells; (ii) minimize total electricity cost for well pumps; and (iii) attain groundwater level at selected monitoring locations as close as possible to the target level. Binary variables are used in the groundwater management model to control the operative status of pumping wells. The NSGA-II is linked with MODFLOW to solve the multi-objective problem. The proposed method is applied to a groundwater management problem in the complex Baton Rouge aquifer system, southeastern Louisiana. Results show that (a) non-dominated trade-off solutions under various spatial distributions of active pumping wells can be achieved. Each solution is optimal with regard to its corresponding objectives; (b) operative status, locations and pumping rates of pumping wells are significant to influence the distribution of hydraulic head, which in turn influence the optimization results; (c) A wide range of optimal solutions is obtained such that decision makers can select the most appropriate solution through negotiation with different stakeholders. This technique is beneficial to finding out the optimal extent to which three objectives including water supply concern, energy concern and subsidence concern can be balanced.

  13. Change of periodontal disease status during and after pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yiqiong; Xiong, Xu; Elkind-Hirsch, Karen E; Pridjian, Gabriella; Maney, Pooja; Delarosa, Robert L; Buekens, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    This study explored whether there is any change of periodontal disease status during and after pregnancy. We also examined whether the change is different between females with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and females without GDM during pregnancy. A follow-up study was conducted at Woman's Hospital, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Thirty-nine females who were previously enrolled in a case-control study during pregnancy were followed an average of 22 months postpartum. Periodontal status was assessed through dental examinations performed both during and after pregnancy. Clinical periodontal parameters included bleeding on probing (BOP), mean probing depth (PD), and mean clinical attachment level (CAL). Periodontitis was defined as the presence of ≥1 sites exhibiting PD ≥4 mm or CAL ≥4 mm. We used generalized estimating equation analysis to examine the change of periodontal status. Mean number and percentage of sites with BOP decreased from 10.7 ± 11.6 (mean ± SD) and 6.5% ± 7.0% during pregnancy to 7.1 ± 8.8 and 4.3% ± 5.3% at 22 months postpartum (P periodontitis decreased from 66.7% to 33.3% (P periodontal status between females with GDM and females without GDM during pregnancy. Pregnancy may be associated with an increased risk of periodontal disease. The association is not different between females with GDM and females without GDM during pregnancy.

  14. Bayesian Chance-Constrained Hydraulic Barrier Design under Geological Structure Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitsazan, Nima; Pham, Hai V; Tsai, Frank T-C

    2015-01-01

    The groundwater community has widely recognized geological structure uncertainty as a major source of model structure uncertainty. Previous studies in aquifer remediation design, however, rarely discuss the impact of geological structure uncertainty. This study combines chance-constrained (CC) programming with Bayesian model averaging (BMA) as a BMA-CC framework to assess the impact of geological structure uncertainty in remediation design. To pursue this goal, the BMA-CC method is compared with traditional CC programming that only considers model parameter uncertainty. The BMA-CC method is employed to design a hydraulic barrier to protect public supply wells of the Government St. pump station from salt water intrusion in the "1500-foot" sand and the "1700-foot" sand of the Baton Rouge area, southeastern Louisiana. To address geological structure uncertainty, three groundwater models based on three different hydrostratigraphic architectures are developed. The results show that using traditional CC programming overestimates design reliability. The results also show that at least five additional connector wells are needed to achieve more than 90% design reliability level. The total amount of injected water from the connector wells is higher than the total pumpage of the protected public supply wells. While reducing the injection rate can be achieved by reducing the reliability level, the study finds that the hydraulic barrier design to protect the Government St. pump station may not be economically attractive. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  15. IDENTITY OF THE PINK-PIGMENTED METHANOL-OXIDIZING BACTERIA AS VIBRIO EXTORQUENS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    STOCKS, P K; MCCLESKEY, C S

    1964-10-01

    Stocks, Peter K. (Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge), and C. S. McCleskey. Identity of the pink-pigmented methanol-oxidizing bacteria as Vibrio extorquens. J. Bacteriol. 88:1065-1070. 1964.-Pink-pigmented bacteria isolated from enrichment cultures of methane oxidizers were found to possess similar morphological, cultural, and physiological characteristics. All the strains utilized methanol, formate, oxalate, succinate, glycerol, and benzene as sole carbon sources; methanol, formate, and glycerol afforded best growth. Most strains utilized fructose and ribose; other carbohydrates tested were not available as carbon and energy sources. There was strain variation in the use of hexane, heptane, n-propanol, n-butanol, acetate, and propionate. Methane, ethane, n-propane, and n-butane were not utilized. Our isolates, and Pseudomonas methanica of Harrington and Kallio (not the methane-dependent P. methanica of Dworkin and Foster), Pseudomonas AM1 of Peele and Quayle, Pseudomonas PRL-W4 of Kaneda and Roxburgh, and Protaminobacter ruber den Dooren de Jong are nearly identical with Vibrio extorquens (Bassalik) Bhat and Barker, and should be considered the same species.

  16. State health agency workforce shortages and implications for public health: a case study of restaurant inspections in Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realmuto, Lindsey; Hunting, Katherine L; Parkin, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    The study described in this article evaluated the effects of public health workforce cuts on routine food safety inspections and the occurrence of critical violations. Routine inspection information was collected from two Louisiana databases for permanent food establishments categorized as risk category 3 or 4 in East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, for the years 2005, 2007, and 2009. The length of time between routine inspections nearly quadrupled from 2005 to 2009. For risk category 4 establishments, a significant increase occurred in the proportion of inspections that resulted in a critical violation between the three years. The amount of time between routine inspections was significantly higher for inspections that resulted in a critical violation versus those that did not. Lastly, the amount of time between routine inspections, an establishment's risk category, and history of complaint were found to have significant predictive effects on the incidence of a critical violation during a routine inspection, although results varied by year. Study results indicate that decreased workforce capacity in Louisiana may negatively affect the outcomes of routine food safety inspections.

  17. USGS environmental characterization of flood sediments left in the New Orleans area after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, 2005--Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Lovelace, John K.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Furlong, Edward T.; Demas, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The flooding in the greater New Orleans area that resulted from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in September, 2005, left behind accumulations of sediments up to many centimeters thick on streets, lawns, parking lots, and other flat surfaces. These flood sediment deposits have been the focus of extensive study by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) due to concerns that the sediments may contain elevated levels of heavy metals, organic contaminants, and microbes. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is characterizing a limited number of flood sediment samples that were collected on September 15-16 and October 6-7, 2005, from the greater New Orleans area by personnel from the USGS Louisiana Water Science Center in Baton Rouge. Small samples (< 3 pints each) of wet to dry flood sediment were collected from 11 localities around downtown New Orleans on September 15, 2005, and two large samples (40 pints each) of wet flood sediment were collected from the Chalmette area on September 16. Twelve additional samples (8-10 pints each) were collected from New Orleans, Slidell, Rigolets, and Violet on October 6 and 7. The USGS characterization studies of these flood sediments are designed to produce data and interpretations regarding how the sediments and any contained contaminants may respond to environmental processes. This information will be of use to cleanup managers and DoI/USGS scientists assessing environmental impacts of the hurricanes and subsequent cleanup activities.

  18. The LSU Electron Storage Ring, the first commercially-built storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, R.

    1990-01-01

    The Brobeck Division of Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., is building the first industrially-produced storage ring. It will be located at Louisiana State University (LSU) at the Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) in Baton Rouge. The purpose of this electron storage ring is to provide intense beams of x-rays to advance the state-of-the-art in lithography and to permit research in a broad area. This facility consists of a 1.2 GeV, 400 mA electron storage ring with a 200 MeV linac injector. The magnet lattice is a Chasman-Green design (double-bend achromat), and the ring circumference is 55.2 meters. There are four 3.0 meter, dispersion-free straight sections, one for injection, one for the 500 MHz RF cavity, and two for possible future insertion devices. The storge ring construction project is in the detailed-design stage, and many systems are in the initial stages of fabrication. 4 figs., 1 tab

  19. Bioremediation of selected contaminants in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Bennett, J.; Englande, A.J.; Law, V.; Mullin, D.; Mielke, H.; Eckert, J.; Fulginiti, R.; Kamath, B.; Ross, J.

    1993-01-01

    Bioremediation is generally accepted as a long-term and economic treatment option. However, quantitative information on bioremediation and biosorption is required before this option can be adopted successfully. The primary goal of this on-going project is to determine the extent of natural biodegradation of hazardous organics and biosorption of hazardous organics and heavy metals by the consortia of bacteria, fungi, and plants. Methods to enhance the biodegradation process will be studied during the second and third years of this 3-year proposed project. The Devil's Swamp area near Baton Rouge and Bayou St. John in New Orleans have been selected as the first set of test sites. Some samples from Lake Pontchartrain, bordering New Orleans on the north, have also been analyzed. It is expected that many of the contaminants found at the test site(s) are present at other sites of DOE's interest. Further, technology resulting from the proposed research involving enhanced natural biodegradation processes should be transferable to other DOE sites

  20. Morphometric and molecular analyses of the sand fly species Lutzomyia shannoni (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) collected from seven different geographical areas in the southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, David A; Davies, Stephen J; Olsen, Cara; Lawyer, Phillip; Lipnick, Robert; Schultz, George; Rowton, Edgar; Wilkerson, Richard; Keep, Lisa

    2011-03-01

    A morphometric and molecular study of adult male and female Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar 1929) collected at seven different locations within the southeastern United States was conducted to assess the degree of divergence between the grouped specimens from each location. The collection locations were as follows: Fort Bragg, NC; Fort Campbell, KY; Fort Rucker, AL; Ossabaw Island, GA; Patuxent National Wildlife Research Refuge, MD; Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge, FL; and Baton Rouge, LA. Forty males and forty females from each location were analyzed morphometrically from 54 and 49 character measurements, respectively. In addition, the molecular markers consisting of the partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (from 105 sand flies: 15 specimens/collection site) and the partial internal transcribed spacer 2 (from 42 sand flies: six specimens/collection site) were compared. Multivariate analyses indicate that the low degree of variation between the grouped specimens from each collection site prevents the separation of any collection site into an entity that could be interpreted as a distinct population. The molecular analyses were in concordance with the morphometric study as no collection location grouped into a separate population based on the two partial markers. The grouped specimens from each collection site appear to be within the normal variance of the species, indicating a single population in the southeast United States. It is recommended that additional character analyses of L. shannoni based on more molecular markers, behavioral, ecological, and physiological characteristics, be conducted before ruling out the possibility of populations or a cryptic species complex within the southeastern United States.

  1. Generation Y and surgical residency – Passing the baton or the end of the world as we know it? Results from a survey among medical students in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romotzky, Vanessa; Knepper, Laura; Wasilewski, Marie-Luise; Schröder, Wolfgang; Bruns, Christiane; Woopen, Christiane; Leers, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The current student generation have their own expectations toward professional life and pay particular attention to their work-life balance. Less interest in work-intensive specialties leads to a shortage of skilled candidates especially in surgery. In order to motivate students into a surgical residency, new priorities become important. A deeper understanding of the underlying arguments and students’ expectations towards a surgical training are necessary to counteract a future shortage of specialized surgeons. Methods We conducted an internet-based survey among medical students at two representative German university hospitals to gain more information about the underlying mechanisms that lead to opting for and against a surgical career. We particularly paid attention to gender differences and differences between students of different academic years. Results A total of 1098 students participated in the survey. Sixty-four percent were female. The majority of the students were of the opinion that surgery is an interesting and meaningful profession. In contrast, when it comes to their own career choice, most students (89% female and 81% male) are not willing to choose a surgical specialty. While students are certainly willing to spend a large amount of time on their professional lives, at the same time they demand planning reliability and a sufficient work-life balance. Flexibility in working hours and an existing childcare program were identified as predominant factors for all students and in particular for female students. The same applies to a respectful conversional tone and appreciation of the individual work. Factors like prestige and salary were less relevant than “self-fulfillment” in terms of respectful interaction and balancing their working and private lives. There was significant difference in female and male students as female students have clearer ideas concerning career planning but at the same time are less self-confident than their male colleagues. Moreover, there was a significant difference between junior and senior students regarding career planning with a shift to less work-intensive specialties and especially away from a surgical residency in older students. Adjustments to working hours models, working environment, clinical curriculum and a respectful interaction are factors that might increase the willingness of young students to choose a surgical career. PMID:29176812

  2. Generation Y and surgical residency - Passing the baton or the end of the world as we know it? Results from a survey among medical students in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Robert; Fuchs, Claudia; Romotzky, Vanessa; Knepper, Laura; Wasilewski, Marie-Luise; Schröder, Wolfgang; Bruns, Christiane; Woopen, Christiane; Leers, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    The current student generation have their own expectations toward professional life and pay particular attention to their work-life balance. Less interest in work-intensive specialties leads to a shortage of skilled candidates especially in surgery. In order to motivate students into a surgical residency, new priorities become important. A deeper understanding of the underlying arguments and students' expectations towards a surgical training are necessary to counteract a future shortage of specialized surgeons. We conducted an internet-based survey among medical students at two representative German university hospitals to gain more information about the underlying mechanisms that lead to opting for and against a surgical career. We particularly paid attention to gender differences and differences between students of different academic years. A total of 1098 students participated in the survey. Sixty-four percent were female. The majority of the students were of the opinion that surgery is an interesting and meaningful profession. In contrast, when it comes to their own career choice, most students (89% female and 81% male) are not willing to choose a surgical specialty. While students are certainly willing to spend a large amount of time on their professional lives, at the same time they demand planning reliability and a sufficient work-life balance. Flexibility in working hours and an existing childcare program were identified as predominant factors for all students and in particular for female students. The same applies to a respectful conversional tone and appreciation of the individual work. Factors like prestige and salary were less relevant than "self-fulfillment" in terms of respectful interaction and balancing their working and private lives. There was significant difference in female and male students as female students have clearer ideas concerning career planning but at the same time are less self-confident than their male colleagues. Moreover, there was a significant difference between junior and senior students regarding career planning with a shift to less work-intensive specialties and especially away from a surgical residency in older students. Adjustments to working hours models, working environment, clinical curriculum and a respectful interaction are factors that might increase the willingness of young students to choose a surgical career.

  3. Generation Y and surgical residency - Passing the baton or the end of the world as we know it? Results from a survey among medical students in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kleinert

    Full Text Available The current student generation have their own expectations toward professional life and pay particular attention to their work-life balance. Less interest in work-intensive specialties leads to a shortage of skilled candidates especially in surgery. In order to motivate students into a surgical residency, new priorities become important. A deeper understanding of the underlying arguments and students' expectations towards a surgical training are necessary to counteract a future shortage of specialized surgeons.We conducted an internet-based survey among medical students at two representative German university hospitals to gain more information about the underlying mechanisms that lead to opting for and against a surgical career. We particularly paid attention to gender differences and differences between students of different academic years.A total of 1098 students participated in the survey. Sixty-four percent were female. The majority of the students were of the opinion that surgery is an interesting and meaningful profession. In contrast, when it comes to their own career choice, most students (89% female and 81% male are not willing to choose a surgical specialty. While students are certainly willing to spend a large amount of time on their professional lives, at the same time they demand planning reliability and a sufficient work-life balance. Flexibility in working hours and an existing childcare program were identified as predominant factors for all students and in particular for female students. The same applies to a respectful conversional tone and appreciation of the individual work. Factors like prestige and salary were less relevant than "self-fulfillment" in terms of respectful interaction and balancing their working and private lives. There was significant difference in female and male students as female students have clearer ideas concerning career planning but at the same time are less self-confident than their male colleagues. Moreover, there was a significant difference between junior and senior students regarding career planning with a shift to less work-intensive specialties and especially away from a surgical residency in older students. Adjustments to working hours models, working environment, clinical curriculum and a respectful interaction are factors that might increase the willingness of young students to choose a surgical career.

  4. Entre a batuta e o tubo de ensaio: a carreira admirável de Alexandre Borodin Between baton and test tube: the admirable career of Alexander Borodin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. L. Filgueiras

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Alexander Borodin (1833-1887 is a singularity in the history of science. Whereas other scientists may have kept lifelong interests in some artistic field, he was unique in pursuing with great success two parallel careers in both chemistry and music, managing to excell in both to the end of his life. Although he considered himself primarily a chemist, present-day appreciation of his powerful music has greatly surpassed interest for his chemistry. This article treats the life and the unusual double career of the Russian chemist-musician.

  5. Passing the Baton: A Collaborative Approach to Development and Implementation of Context-Specific Modules for Graduate Teaching Assistants in Cognate Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Geraldine; McNamara, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A systematic approach to the training of graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) is required to meet the challenges posed by growing numbers of undergraduate and graduate students. At University College Dublin, educational developers and academic staff across six schools collaborated on the design and phased implementation of context-specific GTA…

  6. Guido Beck and the night of the long police batons: some observations about the relationship between physics and politics in the Argentinean context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Augusto Passos Videira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper consists in presenting the reaction of the physicist Guido Beck (1903-1988 towards the political events that occurred in the University of Buenos Aires (UBA, during the second term of 1966. It is not our intention to write a deep treatise on the problem, but to outline some of the ideas that Guido Beck had on the relation between science, State and society in South-American context. That will be done by describing his reaction to the well-known ‘night of the long police batons’. Beck had always been sensitive to the political instability in Argentinean academic system, once that political and ideological disputes could jeopardize the work towards the establishment of a scientific community in that country. As a conclusion, I defend the thesis that in Beck’s point of view the physicists at UBA had misunderstood the importance they had to Argentinean government and to part of the population in that same country.

  7. Generation Y and surgical residency – Passing the baton or the end of the world as we know it? Results from a survey among medical students in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinert, Robert; Fuchs, Claudia; Romotzky, Vanessa; Knepper, Laura; Wasilewski, Marie-Luise; Schröder, Wolfgang; Bruns, Christiane; Woopen, Christiane; Leers, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The current student generation have their own expectations toward professional life and pay particular attention to their work-life balance. Less interest in work-intensive specialties leads to a shortage of skilled candidates especially in surgery. In order to motivate students into a surgical residency, new priorities become important. A deeper understanding of the underlying arguments and students’ expectations towards a surgical training are necessary to counteract a future s...

  8. Community College Transfer. Presentation to the Little Hoover Commission (Sacramento, CA, March 25, 1999).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Fred

    This presentation discusses community college transfer and the Cerritos College (California) President's Emphasis on Transfer (PET) Task Force, a project committed to making Cerritos College a transfer-oriented institution. Among the goals PET has accomplished are: (1) creating the Scholars Honors Program, which sent three of its first six…

  9. Standing with People in Support, Not Control: Training toward Self-Reliance, Inc. Sacramento, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Pam

    This report describes a program designed to increase opportunities for people with developmental disabilities to lead good lives in places of their own, strengthen their communities, and enjoy a genuine sense of self-worth. In addition to offering independent services, the Training Toward Self-Reliance (TTSR) program staff have increased their…

  10. Comparison of methods for estimating carbon dioxide storage by Sacramento's urban forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena Aguaron; E. Gregory McPherson

    2012-01-01

    Limited open-grown urban tree species biomass equations have necessitated use of forest-derived equations with diverse conclusions on the accuracy of these equations to estimate urban biomass and carbon storage. Our goal was to determine and explain variability among estimates of CO2 storage from four sets of allometric equations for the same...

  11. Central obesity, leptin and cognitive decline: the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeki Al Hazzouri, Adina; Haan, Mary N; Whitmer, Rachel A; Yaffe, Kristine; Neuhaus, John

    2012-01-01

    Central obesity is a risk factor for cognitive decline. Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue and has been associated with better cognitive function. Aging Mexican Americans have higher levels of obesity than non-Hispanic Whites, but no investigations examined the relationship between leptin and cognitive decline among them or the role of central obesity in this association. We analyzed 1,480 dementia-free older Mexican Americans who were followed over 10 years. Cognitive function was assessed every 12-15 months with the Modified Mini Mental State Exam (3MSE) and the Spanish and English Verbal Learning Test (SEVLT). For females with a small waist circumference (≤35 inches), an interquartile range difference in leptin was associated with 35% less 3MSE errors and 22% less decline in the SEVLT score over 10 years. For males with a small waist circumference (≤40 inches), an interquartile range difference in leptin was associated with 44% less 3MSE errors and 30% less decline in the SEVLT score over 10 years. There was no association between leptin and cognitive decline among females or males with a large waist circumference. Leptin interacts with central obesity in shaping cognitive decline. Our findings provide valuable information about the effects of metabolic risk factors on cognitive function. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. 76 FR 43183 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... governments, or to the private sector, result from this action. E. Executive Order 13132, Federalism Federalism (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999) revokes and replaces Executive Orders 12612 (Federalism) and 12875... regulatory policies that have federalism implications.'' ``Policies that have federalism implications'' is...

  13. North American montane red foxes: expansion, fragmentation, and the origin of the Sacramento Valley red fox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin N. Sacks; Mark J. Statham; John D. Perrine; Samantha M. Wisely; Keith B. Aubry

    2010-01-01

    Most native red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in the western contiguous United States appear to be climatically restricted to colder regions in the major mountain ranges and, in some areas, have suffered precipitous declines in abundance that may be linked to warming trends. However, another population of unknown origin has occurred in arid habitats in the...

  14. [Aria con violines al Santísimo Sacramento. Ay, Dueño enamorado

    OpenAIRE

    Anónimo

    2010-01-01

    Tabla de contenido: 1. Violín primero; 2. Violín segundo; 3. Violón; 4. Órgano; 5. Recitado y aria.Folio 1. Violín primero.Folio 3. Violín segundo.Folio 5. Violón.Folio 7. Órgano.Folio 9. Recitado y aria.Folio 9-10. Letra.

  15. Edificio de oficinas para el Sacramento Municipal Utility District – Smud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreyfuss & Blackford, Arquitectos

    1963-03-01

    Full Text Available This building takes advantage of the uneveness of the ground, and seeks to enhance the attractiveness of the landscape. It includes a cafeteria, an auditorium for 190 persons, exhibition hall, space for the various departments, and other facilities. Allowance has been made for a 30% increase in the staff. One floor level has been constructed, but is not fully completed, and there is the possibility of adding another one. There is parking space for 720 automobiles. The glass walls are specially fitted with a protection, whereby the sun does not shine on the office tables. The external colour of the building changes continuously, for the aluminium reflects or absorbs the sun, depending on the time of day and the season of the year: this colour changes from bronze to quartz tone, under the effect of the sun, and from white to grey in the shade. The green turf emphasizes the delicate tones of the building. The basic requirements have been satisfied by means of a beautiful and harmonious design, which constitutes an altogether important architectural unit.Ha sido construido aprovechando los desniveles del ter reno para crear un paisaje interesante. Dispone de: cafetería, auditorio para 190 personas, sala de exposición, espacios para los distintos departamentos, etc. Se ha previsto pueda servir para un aumento de un 30% de empleados, existiendo una planta construida, pero no acabada, y la posibilidad de construir otra. Estacionamiento con capacidad para 720 coches. Toda la zona acristalada está protegida mediante dispositivos que impiden a los rayos solares incidir sobre las mesas de trabajo. El color exterior del edificio cambia continuamente, ya que el aluminio refleja o absorbe el sol, según las horas del día o la época del año, pasando de un tono bronceado a un blanco cuarcífero. En la sombra, del blanco al gris. Las fajas verdes de césped destacan la brillante delicadeza de las paredes. En forma bella y armoniosa han sido satisfechas las necesidades previstas, y el edificio constituye un conjunto orgánico importante.

  16. 33 CFR 162.205 - Suisun Bay, San Joaquin River, Sacramento River, and connecting waters, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Commander or his authorized representative. (5) Wrecks. In no case following accidents of fire or collision...); a wharf or other structure; work under construction; plant engaged in river and harbor improvement... navigable channels, when within a reasonable distance therefrom and not in any case over a mile, shall...

  17. Jesuit Neo-Scholasticism and "Criollo" Consciousness in Sor Juana's "El martir del sacramento, San Hermenegildo"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Much of the limited scholarship dedicated to Sor Juana's "autos sacramentales" tends to separate them from the "loas" that were meant to introduce them. Critics often exalt the "loas" for the sympathy that they express for indigenous beliefs, while neglecting the "autos" or viewing them as masterful…

  18. 76 FR 61069 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... from organic chemical manufacturing, soil decontamination, and polyester resin operations. We are... Rule 464 (Organic Chemical Manufacturing Operations), VCAPCD Rule 74.29 (Soil Decontamination), and...

  19. 76 FR 61057 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... compound (VOC) emissions from organic chemical manufacturing, soil decontamination, and polyester resin... 74.29 Soil Decontamination Operations 04/08/08 01/10/10 PCAPCD 243 Polyester Resin Operations..... 04....29 establishes procedures for the treatment of soil contaminated with gasoline, diesel fuel or jet...

  20. CS-10 Verification Survey at Former McClellan AFB, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    8217!11C’D ./ -k~>olY 3ə ’-Af" 4 \\I Olt te’o Q__li~\\ (G"d.07y r ,~ ’illi’ 󈧏󈧓 ’>, - c;;¥a’f’’i c""" I 16 Distribution A: Approved for public release

  1. Uranium in the Surrounding of San Marcos-Sacramento River Environment (Chihuahua, Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentería-Villalobos, Marusia; Cortés, Manuel Reyes; Mantero, Juan; Manjón, Guillermo; García-Tenorio, Rafael; Herrera, Eduardo; Montero-Cabrera, Maria Elena

    2012-01-01

    The main interest of this study is to assess whether uranium deposits located in the San Marcos outcrops (NW of Chihuahua City, Mexico) could be considered as a source of U-isotopes in its surrounding environment. Uranium activity concentrations were determined in biota, ground, and surface water by either alpha or liquid scintillation spectrometries. Major ions were analyzed by ICP-OES in surface water and its suspended matter. For determining uranium activity in biota, samples were divided in parts. The results have shown a possible lixiviation and infiltration of uranium from geological substrate into the ground and surface water, and consequently, a transfer to biota. Calculated annual effective doses by ingestion suggest that U-isotopes in biota could not negligibly contribute to the neighboring population dose. By all these considerations, it is concluded that in this zone there is natural enhancement of uranium in all environmental samples analyzed in the present work. PMID:22536148

  2. Sacramento River Flood Control Project, California Mid-Valley Area, Phase 3. Design Memorandum Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    in the study area. Plants that are candidates for Federal listing are the Suisun aster, heart-scale, California hibiscus , delta tule-pea. Mason’s...agricultural chemicals. According to Sutter County Environmental Health , the State Water Resources Control Board tested a sediment sample taken under the

  3. 77 FR 59647 - Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    .... Reportedly, one of the Sioux fired a shot and the soldiers began firing, indiscriminately killing women and..., Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2012-23921 Filed 9-27-12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312-50-P ...

  4. Conceptual model of sedimentation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoellhamer, David H.; Wright, Scott A.; Drexler, Judith Z.

    2012-01-01

    Sedimentation in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta builds the Delta landscape, creates benthic and pelagic habitat, and transports sediment-associated contaminants. Here we present a conceptual model of sedimentation that includes submodels for river supply from the watershed to the Delta, regional transport within the Delta and seaward exchange, and local sedimentation in open water and marsh habitats. The model demonstrates feedback loops that affect the Delta ecosystem. Submerged and emergent marsh vegetation act as ecosystem engineers that can create a positive feedback loop by decreasing suspended sediment, increasing water column light, which in turn enables more vegetation. Sea-level rise in open water is partially countered by a negative feedback loop that increases deposition if there is a net decrease in hydrodynamic energy. Manipulation of regional sediment transport is probably the most feasible method to control suspended sediment and thus turbidity. The conceptual model is used to identify information gaps that need to be filled to develop an accurate sediment transport model.

  5. Winning with Green Remediation Practices at the Former McClellan AFB, Sacramento CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    PCE)  Metals (lead, cadmium, chromium)  Fuels (gas and diesel )  Radiological (Radium 226)  Largest cleanup effort in the Air Force  318 sites...Existing pump and treat system replaced with sustainable in-situ bioremediation (passive vegetable oil injection)  Cost to complete reduced by $15,000,000

  6. Factors affecting long-term mortality of residential shade trees: evidence from Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekang Ko; Jun-Hak Lee; E. Gregory McPherson; Lara A. Roman

    2015-01-01

    Urban tree survival is essential to sustain the ecosystem services of urban forests and monitoring is needed to accurately assess benefits. While some urban forestry studies have reported street tree survival, little is known about the factors influencing residential yard tree survival, especially over the long-term. We assessed residential shade tree survival in...

  7. 78 FR 42018 - Determination of Attainment for the Sacramento Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine Particle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... publicly available only at the hard copy location (e.g., copyrighted material, large maps, multi-volume reports), and some may not be publicly available in either location (e.g., Confidential Business... and 08-71238 (9th Cir.), Memorandum Opinion, March 2, 2009. In rejecting petitioner's challenge to the...

  8. Ecological responses by Mexican spotted owls to environmental variation in the Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Ward

    2001-01-01

    Understanding the influence of environmental variation on population processes is a fundamental requisite for devising strategies that conserve species. A common tactic for conserving raptor populations is to maintain or manipulate habitat conditions that maintain or increase availability of prey species. A primary purpose of this investigation was to...

  9. Habitat capacity for Sacramento delta - Life Cycle Modeling of Life History Diversity and Habitat Relationships

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goals of this project are to examine 1) the relative importance of multiple aquatic habitats (streams, estuaries, and nearshore areas, for example) used by...

  10. Sacramento Municipal Utility District Geothermal Power Plant, SMUDGEO No. 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-01

    The proposed construction of 72-MW geothermal power plant is discussed. The following aspects are covered: the project as proposed by the utility; the environmental setting; the adverse consequences of the project, any significant environmental effects which cannot be avoided, and any mitigation measures to minimize significant effects; the potential feasible alternatives to the proposed project; the significant unavoidable, irreversible, and long-term environmental impacts; and the Growth Inducing Impacts. (MHR)

  11. Two-Dimensional (2-D) Acoustic Fish Tracking at River Mile 85, Sacramento River, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    on fish become known (USACE 2004). Levee repair and constructed habitat features included (1) protection of the toe and upper slopes of the bank...be recovered rather than being lost due to sediment dunes , large woody material floating downstream, and vandalism. The RM 85 site was a relatively...into the river channel. The addition of this material narrowed the channel and created a scour feature along the toe of the repair site. VPS array

  12. The Social-Cost Calculator (SCC): Documentation of Methods and Data, and Case Study of Sacramento

    OpenAIRE

    Delucchi, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Planning agencies, analysts, non-profit organizations, regulatory and legislative bodies, and other organizations develop long-range local, state, regional, and national transportation plans. These plans typically comprise two or more alternatives, or scenarios. These alternatives have different financial costs and different impacts on travel, air quality, noise, safety, and so on. To evaluate and compare these alternatives with their different impacts, planners and analysts often use social ...

  13. Sacramento Municipal Utility District PV and Smart Grid Pilot at Anatolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawson, Mark; Sanchez, Eddie Paul

    2013-12-30

    Under DE-FOA-0000085 High Penetration Solar Deployment, the U. S. Department of Energy funded agreements with SMUD and Navigant Consulting, SunPower, GridPoint, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the California Energy Commission for this pilot demonstration project. Funding was $5,962,409.00. Cost share of $500,000 was also provided by the California Energy Commission. The project has strategic implications for SMUD, other utilities and the PV and energy-storage industries in business and resource planning, technology deployment and asset management. These implications include: -At this point, no dominant business models have emerged and the industry is open for new ideas. -Demonstrated two business models for using distributed PV and energy storage, and brainstormed several dozen more, each with different pros and cons for SMUD, its customers and the industry. -Energy storage can be used to manage high penetrations of PV and mitigate potential issues such as reverse power flow, voltage control violations, power quality issues, increased wear and tear on utility equipment, and system wide power supply issues. - Smart meters are another tool utilities can use to manage high penetrations of PV. The necessary equipment and protocols exist, and the next step is to determine how to integrate the functionality with utility programs and what level of utility control is required. - Time-of-use rates for the residential customers who hosted energy storage systems did not cause a significant change in energy usage patterns. However, the rates we used were not optimized for PV and energy storage. Opportunities exist for utilities to develop new structures.

  14. A Critical Analysis of Management Indicators for the Director of Materiel Management, Sacramento ALC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Dist. AVAIL, and/or SP A Re aw rade tostt.on Organizatin iL.cti *~ NO OSTAGI PtN*V FORn PffVA13 Ut.SIL $3- -. dil -- T I BUSINESS REPLY MAIL... Leadership Qualities Provide Quality Training Programs Establish Realistic Project and Task Priorities Minimize Not Mission Capable Supply (NMCS) 47 zz

  15. H10373: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Sacramento River, California, 1991-07-03

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  16. H10435: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Sacramento River, California, 1992-09-15

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  17. 76 FR 14049 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: California State University, Sacramento...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... of shifting among populations, especially among the Miwok and Nisenan, who were impacted by disease..., have determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), that there is a relationship of shared group identity...

  18. 75 FR 24965 - Mormon Island Auxiliary Dam (MIAD) Modification Project, Sacramento and El Dorado Counties, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... Folsom DS/FDR EIS/EIR considered several methods to modify MIAD to achieve Reclamation's risk standards... availability of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR). SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act and the California Environmental Quality Act...

  19. Reactor control system upgrade for the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center Sacramento, CA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is currently developing a new reactor control system for the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Facility. This new control system not only provides the same functionality as the existing control system in terms of graphic displays of reactor process variables, data archival capability, and manual, automatic, pulse and square-wave modes of operation, but adds to the functionality of the previous control system by incorporating signal processing algorithms for the validation of sensors and automatic calibration and verification of control rod worth curves. With the inclusion of these automated features, the intent of this control system is not to replace the operator but to make the process of controlling the reactor easier and safer for the operator. For instance, an automatic control rod calibration method reduces the amount of time to calibrate control rods from days to minutes, increasing overall reactor utilization. The control rod calibration curve, determined using the automatic calibration system, can be validated anytime after the calibration, as long as the reactor power is between 50W and 500W. This is done by banking all of the rods simultaneously and comparing the tabulated rod worth curves with a reactivity computer estimate. As long as the deviation between the tabulated values and the reactivity estimate is within a prescribed error band, then the system is in calibration. In order to minimize the amount of information displayed, only the essential flux-related data are displayed in graphical format on the control screen. Information from the sensor validation methods is communicated to the operators via messages, which appear in a message window. The messages inform the operators that the actual process variables do not correlate within the allowed uncertainty in the reactor system. These warnings, however, cannot cause the reactor to shutdown automatically. The reactor operator has the ultimate responsibility of using this information to either keep the reactor operating or to shut the reactor down. In addition to new developments in the signal processing realm, the new control system will be migrating from a PC-based computer platform to a Sun Solaris-based computer platform. The proven history of stability and performance of the Sun Sohuis operating system are the main advantages to this change. The I/O system will also be migrating from a PC-based data collection system, which communicates plant data to the control computer using RS-232 connections, to an Ethernet-based I/O system. The Ethernet Data Acquisition System (EDAS) modules from Intelligent Instrumentation, Inc. provide an excellent solution for embedded control of a system using the more universally-accepted data transmission standard of TCP/IP. The modules contain a PROM, which operates all of the functionality of the I/O module, including the TCP/IP network access. Thus the module does not have an internal, sophisticated operating system to provide functionality but rather a small set hard-coded of instructions, which almost eliminates the possibility of the module failing due to software problems. An internal EEPROM can be modified over the Internet to change module configurations. Once configured, the module is contacted just like any other Internet host using TCP/IP socket calls. The main advantage to this architecture is its flexibility, expandability, and high throughput

  20. 78 FR 75939 - Bay Delta Habitat Conservation Plan and Natural Community Conservation Plan, Sacramento, CA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... Report/Environmental Impact Statement (EIR/EIS) for public review and comment. In response to receipt of... blackbird (Agelaius tricolor); western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea); western yellow[hyphen... agencies and the public an opportunity to review and comment on these documents. All comments received will...

  1. Pleistocene coastal sedimentation in the north cliffs of Colonia del Sacramento

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goso, C.; Perea, D.; Corona, A.; Mesa, V.

    2012-01-01

    This work is about the cliffs and the sucession of sandy and gravelly sediments in the north of Colonia city. The results obtained by thermoluminescence dating in sandy samples belong to the Quaternary period

  2. 77 FR 23130 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Northern Sierra and Sacramento...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    .../08 08/14/08 NSAQMD Large Appliance Coatings 05/19/08 08/14/08 NSAQMD Metal Furniture Coatings 05/19... consistent with Clean Air Act requirements for Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT) (see section... requirements of Section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (15 U.S.C. 272...

  3. 2012 NOAA Ortho-rectified Color Mosaic of Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles, created as a product from the NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative. The source imagery...

  4. Laboratory Jet Erosion Tests on the Lower American River Soil Samples, Sacramento, CA- Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Bridge, Guy West Bridge, H Street Bridge, and Paradise Beach/Glenn Hall Park. 1.1 Purpose The purpose of this study was to perform Jet Erosion...American Society of Agricultural Engineers Paper No. 992133. In Proceedings, Mini-Conference on Advances in Water Quality Modeling, 18-21 July, Toronto

  5. Properly placed shade trees reduce summertime electricity bills in Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffery H. Donovan; David R. Butry

    2009-01-01

    The discovery that shade trees can reduce home cooling costs is hardly surprising. Anybody who has sat under a tree on a warm summer day understands the shade benefit of trees. However, quantifying the effect a shade tree has on home energy use and carbon footprint, and identifying the optimal location for a shade tree, is less straightforward. Past studies that have...

  6. Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Market Test Development Project: Sacramento Electric Transportation Consortium RA 93-23 Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    than the outer wheel. The use of a differential is mandatory for the good handling needed for safety. 6.6 A note about permanent magnet motors : Permanent ...advantage over permanent magnet motors . Julian Styles of Wavedriver told us this is the reason the Wave Driver controller was designed with asynchronous...as opposed to synchronous (fixed field- permanent magnet ) motors . 7.0 Drive System Design, Motor-Controller System After selection of the motor and

  7. 75 FR 20547 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Initiation of Status Review for Sacramento...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... Comments Processing, Attn: FWS-R8-ES-2010-0013; Division of Policy and Directives Management; U.S. Fish and... distribution patterns; (d) Historical and current population levels, and current and projected trends; and (e... determination and alleging improper political influence of the former Department of Interior, Deputy Assistant...

  8. 77 FR 31830 - Opportunity for Designation in the West Sacramento, CA; Frankfort, IN; Indianapolis, IN; and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... eastern California State line; Bounded on the East by the eastern California State line south to the... lines west to the western California State line; and Bounded on the West by the western California State...; Bounded on the East by the eastern Fulton County line south to State Route 19; State Route 19 south to...

  9. Consolidated Site (CS) 024 Verification Survey at Former McClellan AFB, Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-31

    than 26981 counts per minute ( cpm )]. Yellow dots correspond to data points between 2 and 3 SD above the mean (between 26988 and 28649 cpm ). Red...dots represent all data points above 3 SD (greater than 28650 cpm ). Survey personnel expect higher concentrations in areas marked in red. The color...collected for the trench was dirt. Consequently, the background counts observed in this location are different from the trench, approximately 6100 cpm

  10. Consolidated Site (CS) 022 Verification Survey at Former McClellan AFB, Sacramento, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-31

    green dots represent all measured activity points below 1.5 standard deviations (SD) above the mean value [less than 26568 counts per minute ( cpm ...Yellow dots correspond to data points between 0.5 and 1.5 SD above the mean (between 26569 and 29972 cpm ). Orange dots correspond to data points...between 1.5 and 2.5 SD above the mean (between 29973 and 33377 cpm ). Red dots represent all data points above 2.5 SD (greater than 33378 cpm

  11. 77 FR 65346 - Determination of Attainment for the Sacramento Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine Particle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... docket are listed in the index, some information may be publicly available only at the hard copy location (e.g., copyrighted material), and some may not be publicly available at either location (e.g., CBI...-assured data gathered at established State and Local Air Monitoring Stations (SLAMS) in a nonattainment...

  12. Development and Application of an Integrated Health Impacts Assessment Tool for the Sacramento Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Plans crafted by metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) lay out how billions of dollars in transportation investments will be made over a 20 to 30-year time horizon. Federal transportation authorizations require MPOs to identify and track key ind...

  13. « Quelque chose de rouge » : l’esthétique des tableaux vivants dans Salammbô

    OpenAIRE

    Jullien, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    L’écriture de Flaubert dans Salammbô est gouvernée par un principe analogue au tableau vivant, qui tire le roman vers les arts visuels et les arts du spectacle. Le tableau vivant, pratique culturelle qui atteint sa plus grande popularité au cours du Second Empire, traverse à la fois le théâtre, la peinture, la photographie et la sculpture, arts avec lesquels l’écriture de Flaubert entretient une relation d’imitation ou de rivalité. La question du tableau vivant permet de renouveler la réflexi...

  14. Etude du risque d'inondation en aval du delta du fleuve rouge en utilisant la teledetection et les sig: Le cas du district de Bac Hung Hai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Duc Viet

    The Bac Hung Hai zone is the greatest basin in the Red River Delta in Vietnam and also one of the most densely populated regions of the planet. It is mainly a rural region and its economy is dominated by agriculture. In the context of frequent and larger floods in the Bac Hung Hai zone, causing deep socio-economical consequences, the focus of this study is to establish cartography of the high risk areas for flooding in the Bac Hung Hai region using remote sensing and GIS to assist land management. The preparation of a map describing land management in this region is more complicated because parcels for farming are very small and not homogeneous. A consistent and precise map of land use is essential for studies of flooding. The secondary objective is to improve the land use map. To this effect, a classification has been applied to the combination of the spectral bands and textures (TM and ETM+) of Landsat and a radar image (ERS). The addition of this information to the spectral bands increases the accuracy of classification by 1% to 4%, according to the dates selected. Additionally, in the study zone where there are few days without clouds, a problem related to the optical satellite image is the cloud cover. Then, the use of radar images will provide ground information for areas hidden by clouds where spectral images are not sufficient. To reach these goals, we have determined the main biophysical considerations that influence flooding. Then, these considerations have been combined in a multi-criteria analysis to evaluate the risks of flooding in the entire basin area. The results show that high to very high risks affect 47% of the area studied and that the south-east region, center, and north-east present the greatest risk. Keywords. Flood risks, remote sensing, GIS, land use, multicriteria analysis, Red river delta, Vietnam.

  15. L'érosion et le ruissellement des sols rouges dans les monts de Zariffet-Algérie : utilisation de simulation de pluies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAHMANI ABDELMADJID

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Red - soil erosion and runoff in Zariffet - Algérie Mountains: utilising rain simulation. Soil is slowly renewable resource and once lost, gives a field that will not be as productive for many years. Over time, even small soil losses accumulate to reduced returns. The results obtained by rain simulation tests show that there are relationships between the solid filler (C and runoff (Kr especially when the soil is dry. All the results obtained have shown that the intensity of runoff and erosion is c losely related to the surface states, they even related to land use, slope and rainfall. The interaction of all these parameters is the origin of the genesis of runoff inducing soil loss. In parallel to these factors studied, other factors seem to increase the soil's susceptibility to erosion in the area Zariffet: increasingly extended water deficit, management practices that no longer follow bioclimatic changing environment and especially natural fire frequency. The simulation method, very useful approach, enabled to have significant results on the behavior of the soil and the factors involved on short notice

  16. L'effet Doppler et le décalage vers le rouge en mécanique rationnelle: applications et verifications experimentales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseaus, J

    1968-07-01

    Shifts z and z' toward the red of the galaxy NGC 5668 for a beam of 21 cm, z measured in radioastronomy with a frequency meter and z' measured in optics with a spectrograph, not being equal, it follows that the speed of light from a galaxy c ' is not equal to that of a galaxy c which is measured on earth from stationary source. The Doppler empirical formula cannot be explained in classical mechanics since it is in contradiction with it. As for the theory of relativity c ' = c from a postulate and z' = z. If we consider the universe represented on a three-dimensional space (H), non-Euclidian, with Euclidian connection plunged in a Riemannine four-dimension space (E), a certain universal time, like that of an astronomer, can be defined and its course calculated in relation to this time: it will necessarily be confounded with the atomic clock time, but c ' not equal c and z' not equal z: the Doppler formula is not accurate. However, c ' and c as well as z' and z are so close in all the experiments carried out on earth, even when an artificial satellite is used, that the errors made in using the Doppler formula are clearly inferior to experimental errors.

  17. Intervention du bois de chêne dans l'évolution des vins rouges élevés en barriques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Pontallier

    1982-03-01

    A complete analysis shows to a significant degree, the superiority of Allier oak; natural open air drying develops a finer and stronger vanilla wood character than that given by artificial oven drying. Limousin oak doesn't give as intense nor as nice a woody character; it is less sensitive to the drying method. Organoleptic test results are confirmed by phenol acid measurements in wines. The method to form barrels (by flame or steam and the conditions for soaking out (by cold water, hot water, steam don't have as preponderant an influence.

  18. "I'm* Two Rabbits" / "J'ai un Rouge Pullover*". How Corrective Feedback Is Handled in Collaborative Exchange Programmes between Early Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choffat-Durr, Anne; Macaire, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    This article presents how, in the social dynamics of two classrooms involved in an exchange programme, young learners provide their peers with asynchronous feedback taking place in the digital medium. Within two Call Triangles that interact thanks to Computer Mediated Communication tools, teachers sharing the same methodological precept on…

  19. Micromachining. CERN Courier, Jul-Aug 1995, v. 35(5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Martin

    1995-01-01

    Full text: As well as making microcircuit components, X-ray lithography can also be used to make very small mechanical parts, either by using directly the exposed and developed photoresist, or as a mould to produce the component in another material such as ceramic or metal. In this revolutionary technology, metal components are made via the LIGA (Lithographic Galvanoformung und Abformung) technique in which the exposed and developed photoresist is coated with a conducting material and then electroplated, after which the resist is stripped away. In addition to fine size and precision resolution, X-rays offer the advantage of deep penetration and small scattering through the resist, so that patterns may be up to a millimetre deep, with very accurate straightness in directions parallel to the beam. Micromachining via LIGA was developed at KfK Karlsruhe; commercialization and further development is being vigorously pursued by the Institut fur Mikrotechnik in Mainz and by Microparts GmbH in Karlsruhe. Significant developments have been made at the Synchrotron Radiation Centre in Madison, Wisconsin, with new programmes start-ing at SRRC (Taiwan), CAMD (Baton Rouge, Louisiana), and LURE (Paris). There is now an active European Special Interest Group for LIGA. Commercially manufactured micromachines are starting to be used in sensors and connectors. The ability to integrate microdevices with microelectronics raises many interesting possibilities for the future, notably in medicine and for intelligent sensors. In all cases, however, widespread adoption will be governed by the ability to mass-produce cheaply, requiring high volume production. The high intensities of synchrotron radiation will assist in achieving these large throughputs

  20. Artificial intelligence modeling to evaluate field performance of photocatalytic asphalt pavement for ambient air purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Somayeh; Hassan, Marwa; Nadiri, Ataallah; Dylla, Heather

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the application of titanium dioxide (TiO₂) as a photocatalyst in asphalt pavement has received considerable attention for purifying ambient air from traffic-emitted pollutants via photocatalytic processes. In order to control the increasing deterioration of ambient air quality, urgent and proper risk assessment tools are deemed necessary. However, in practice, monitoring all process parameters for various operating conditions is difficult due to the complex and non-linear nature of air pollution-based problems. Therefore, the development of models to predict air pollutant concentrations is very useful because it can provide early warnings to the population and also reduce the number of measuring sites. This study used artificial neural network (ANN) and neuro-fuzzy (NF) models to predict NOx concentration in the air as a function of traffic count (Tr) and climatic conditions including humidity (H), temperature (T), solar radiation (S), and wind speed (W) before and after the application of TiO₂ on the pavement surface. These models are useful for modeling because of their ability to be trained using historical data and because of their capability for modeling highly non-linear relationships. To build these models, data were collected from a field study where an aqueous nano TiO₂ solution was sprayed on a 0.2-mile of asphalt pavement in Baton Rouge, LA. Results of this study showed that the NF model provided a better fitting to NOx measurements than the ANN model in the training, validation, and test steps. Results of a parametric study indicated that traffic level, relative humidity, and solar radiation had the most influence on photocatalytic efficiency.

  1. Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens sp. nov., a chlorinated-alkane-dehalogenating bacterium isolated from groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Kimberly S; Nobre, M Fernanda; da Costa, Milton S; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2013-04-01

    Two strictly anaerobic bacterial strains, designated IP3-3(T) and SBP-1, were isolated from groundwater contaminated by chlorinated alkanes and alkenes at a Superfund Site located near Baton Rouge, Louisiana (USA). Both strains reductively dehalogenate a variety of polychlorinated aliphatic alkanes, including 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane and 1,2,3-trichloropropane, when provided with hydrogen as the electron donor. To clarify their taxonomic position, strains IP3-3(T) and SBP-1 were characterized using a polyphasic approach. Both IP3-3(T) and SBP-1 are mesophilic, non-spore-forming, non-motile and Gram-stain-negative. Cells of both strains are irregular cocci with diameters of 0.4-1.1 µm. Both are resistant to ampicillin and vancomycin. The genomic DNA G+C contents of strains IP3-3(T) and SBP-1 are 55.5±0.4 and 56.2±0.2 mol% (HPLC), respectively. Major cellular fatty acids include C18 : 1ω9c, C16 : 0, C14 : 0 and C16 : 1ω9c. 16S rRNA gene sequence based phylogenetic analyses indicated that the strains cluster within the phylum Chloroflexi most closely related to but distinct from the species Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens (96.2 % pairwise similarity) and Dehalococcoides mccartyi (90.6 % pairwise similarity). Physiological and chemotaxonomic traits as well as phylogenetic analysis support the conclusion that these strains represent a novel species within the genus Dehalogenimonas for which the name Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IP3-3(T) ( = JCM 17062(T) = NRRL B-59545(T)).

  2. An Artist's Journey Through Endangered Lands; conveying hydrological changes and land loss informed and inspired by Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varisco, M. M.

    2017-12-01

    How do we live with nature? This simple question began a 10 year art-science journey into the dynamic and endangered wetlands of southeast Louisiana and its accelerated coastal decline. Since the 1930s, nearly 1,900 square miles of Louisiana's coast have been lost. How might artworks, informed by science, convey the seriousness and urgency of this loss to a wider public? Artist Michel Varisco engaged in dialogue with environmental scientist Doug Meffert and Dan Etheridge (of Meffert + Etheridge and The Center for Bioenvironmental Research at Tulane and Xavier) about the hydrological changes which have accelerated or mitigated Louisiana's land losses. She was also inspired by the unique underwater studies of biologist Suzanne Fredericq on pollutants in the Gulf from the BP oil spill and of marine ecologist Nancy Rabalais who assesses hypoxia dynamics and their impact on "dead zones." The art work that emerged includes Shifting and Fluid States, as well as current projects Below Sea Level and Turning: prayer wheels for the Mississippi River, an art commission awarded by the City of New Orleans on view during Prospect.4 Art Biennial and AGU. Shifting is a series of large-scale photos shot from the air and water that observe the dynamic movement of the Louisiana coastline over the course of a short but powerful geologic timeline and explores the consequences of human altercations to those lands and waters via land loss and sea level rise. Turning is based on the work of Kate Orff's maps from Petrochemical America and the 1944 maps of Harold Fisk. Fisk pioneered an understanding of alluvial and sedimentological processes of the Mississippi Valley, while Orff's maps describe the Mississippi River from Baton Rouge to New Orleans during three different eras: the wild un-leveed land building era; the plantation, slavery era; and the petrochemical era of present day land loss. Shifting has been exhibited around the world and Turning has already been seen by 50,000 people.

  3. Teaching the Next Generation of Scientists and Engineers the NASA Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Pamela W.; Benfield, Michael P. J.; Justice, Stefanie H.

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated Product Team (IPT) program, led by The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), is a multidisciplinary, multi-university, multi-level program whose goal is to provide opportunities for high school and undergraduate scientists and engineers to translate stakeholder needs and requirements into viable engineering design solutions via a distributed multidisciplinary team environment. The current program supports three projects. The core of the program is the two-semester senior design experience where science, engineering, and liberal arts undergraduate students from UAH, the College of Charleston, Southern University at Baton Rouge, and Ecole Suprieure des Techniques Aronautiques et de Construction Automobile (ESTACA) in Paris, France form multidisciplinary competitive teams to develop system concepts of interest to the local aerospace community. External review boards form to provide guidance and feedback throughout the semester and to ultimately choose a winner from the competing teams. The other two projects, the Innovative Student Project for the Increased Recruitment of Engineering and Science Students (InSPIRESS) Level I and Level II focus exclusively on high school students. InSPIRESS Level I allows high schools to develop a payload to be accommodated on the system being developed by senior design experience teams. InSPIRESS Level II provides local high school students first-hand experience in the senior design experience by allowing them to develop a subsystem or component of the UAH-led system over the two semesters. This program provides a model for NASA centers to engage the local community to become more involved in design projects.

  4. Geophysicists

    Science.gov (United States)

    William W. Fox, Jr., has been appointed director of the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS). He had been director of the Southeast Fisheries Center of the National Marine Fisheries Service since 1978. CIMAS was established in 1977 by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Miami.Seven of the 689 U.S. Fulbright Scholars for 1982-1983 are lecturing and conducting advanced research in geology in universities abroad. Brian Francis Farrell, a research assistant in planetary studies at Harvard University, is lecturing in oceanography at the University of Cambridge in England through June. William B. Fergusson, associate professor of civil engineering at Villanova University, will lecture in geology at the Kangwon National University in Korea until July. Ray Edward Ferrell, Jr., geology chairman at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, lectured and conducted research in marine geology at the University of Oslo in Norway. M. Allan Kays, professor of geology at the University of Oregon in Eugene, will conduct research in geology at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark through April. Richard Vernon McGehee, associate professor of health education at Southeastern Louisiana University (University Station campus), will be lecturing in geology at the University of Monrovia in Liberia through July. Bruce Warren Nelson, a professor of environmental studies at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, will be lecturing in geology at the Universiti Malaya in Malaysia through April. Ronald Porter Willis, professor of geology at the University of Wisconsin—Eau Claire, will be lecturing in geology at the Seoul National University in Korea through July.

  5. A new method for estimating carbon dioxide emissions from transportation at fine spatial scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu Yuqin [School of Geographical Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Lam, Nina S N; Reams, Margaret, E-mail: gis_syq@126.com, E-mail: nlam@lsu.edu, E-mail: mreams@lsu.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, 70803 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Detailed estimates of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions at fine spatial scales are useful to both modelers and decision makers who are faced with the problem of global warming and climate change. Globally, transport related emissions of carbon dioxide are growing. This letter presents a new method based on the volume-preserving principle in the areal interpolation literature to disaggregate transportation-related CO{sub 2} emission estimates from the county-level scale to a 1 km{sup 2} grid scale. The proposed volume-preserving interpolation (VPI) method, together with the distance-decay principle, were used to derive emission weights for each grid based on its proximity to highways, roads, railroads, waterways, and airports. The total CO{sub 2} emission value summed from the grids within a county is made to be equal to the original county-level estimate, thus enforcing the volume-preserving property. The method was applied to downscale the transportation-related CO{sub 2} emission values by county (i.e. parish) for the state of Louisiana into 1 km{sup 2} grids. The results reveal a more realistic spatial pattern of CO{sub 2} emission from transportation, which can be used to identify the emission 'hot spots'. Of the four highest transportation-related CO{sub 2} emission hotspots in Louisiana, high-emission grids literally covered the entire East Baton Rouge Parish and Orleans Parish, whereas CO{sub 2} emission in Jefferson Parish (New Orleans suburb) and Caddo Parish (city of Shreveport) were more unevenly distributed. We argue that the new method is sound in principle, flexible in practice, and the resultant estimates are more accurate than previous gridding approaches.

  6. Systemic Mentoring for Competitiveness: The Model of the Timbuktu Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagayoko, Diola

    2010-02-01

    The Timbuktu Academy is a comprehensive, systemic mentoring program at Southern University and A&M College in Baton Rouge (SUBR), Louisiana. We define systemic mentoring as one that is woven into the core functions of an organization. For most universities, those functions include instruction, research, and service. While the Academy has programs for pre-college and graduate students, its Ten-Strand Systemic Mentoring Model was specifically tailored to undergraduate education. We discuss basic considerations that led to the paradigm, programs, activities, and results of the Timbuktu Academy. The proper implementation of the Ten-Strand Systemic Mentoring Model couples teaching and superior learning, on the one hand, and integrates research and education, on the other hand. For undergraduate education, key strands include support (financially or otherwise), scientific advisement, research participation (academic year or summer), immersion in a professional culture, monitoring, and guidance to graduate school. From the summer of 1994 to 2009, the Academy has engaged 2,093 pre-college scholars in its summer programs. To date, the Academy has assisted in the production of one hundred seventy (170) minority undergraduate scholars who have earned a Bachelor of Science degree. Seventy (70) of 83 physics graduates, twenty (20) of 29 chemistry graduates, and twenty-two (22) of 49 engineering graduates have earned graduate degrees or are successfully enrolled in graduate school, with emphasis on the pursuit of the Ph.D. For the above model and results, the Timbuktu Academy received the 2002 U.S. Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring. Its director was among the first individual recipients of this award in 1996. The handouts accompanying this presentation are intended to facilitate the adaptive replication of the Timbuktu Academy by individuals, departments, colleges and universities, and other organizations. )

  7. Diagnosis, prevention, and management of canine hip dysplasia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schachner ER

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Emma R Schachner, Mandi J Lopez Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA Abstract: Canine hip dysplasia (CHD is a polygenic and multifactorial developmental disorder characterized by coxofemoral (hip joint laxity, degeneration, and osteoarthritis (OA. Current diagnostic techniques are largely subjective measures of joint conformation performed at different stages of development. Recently, measures on three-dimensional images generated from computed tomography scans predicted the development of OA associated with CHD. Continued refinement of similar imaging methods may improve diagnostic imaging techniques to identify dogs predisposed to degenerative hip joint changes. By current consensus, joint changes consistent with CHD are influenced by genetic predisposition as well as environmental and biomechanical factors; however, despite decades of work, the relative contributions of each to the development and extent of CHD signs remain elusive. Similarly, despite considerable effort to decipher the genetic underpinnings of CHD for selective breeding programs, relevant genetic loci remain equivocal. As such, prevention of CHD within domestic canine populations is marginally successful. Conservative management is often employed to manage signs of CHD, with lifelong maintenance of body mass as one of the most promising methods. Surgical intervention is often employed to prevent joint changes or restore joint function, but there are no gold standards for either goal. To date, all CHD phenotypes are considered as a single entity in spite of recognized differences in expression and response to environmental conditions and treatment. Identification of distinct CHD phenotypes and targeting evidence-based conservative and invasive treatments for each may significantly advance prevention and management of a prevalent, debilitating condition in canine companions. Keywords: canine

  8. Transient Flow through an Unsaturated Levee Embankment during the 2011 Mississippi River Flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, N.; Stark, T.; Vahedifard, F.; Cadigan, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Mississippi River and corresponding tributaries drain approximately 3.23 million km2 (1.25 million mi2) or the equivalent of 41% of the contiguous United States. Approximately 2,600 km ( 1,600 miles) of earthen levees presently protect major urban cities and agricultural land against the periodic Mississippi River floods within the Lower Mississippi River Valley. The 2011 flood also severely stressed the levees and highlighted the need to evaluate the behavior of levee embankments during high water levels. The performance of earthen levees is complex because of the uncertainties in construction materials, antecedent moisture contents, hydraulic properties, and lack of field monitoring. In particular, calibration of unsaturated and saturated soil properties of levee embankment and foundation layers along with the evaluation of phreatic surface during high river stage is lacking. Due to the formation of sand boils at the Duncan Point Levee in Baton Rouge, LA during the 2011 flood event, a reconnaissance survey was conducted to collect pore-water pressures in the sand foundation using piezometers and identifying the phreatic surface at the peak river level. Transient seepage analyses were performed to calibrate the foundation and levee embankment material properties using field data collected. With this calibrated levee model, numerical experiments were conducted to characterize the effects of rainfall intensity and duration, progression of phreatic surface, and seasonal climate variability prior to floods on the performance of the levee embankment. For example, elevated phreatic surface from river floods are maintained for several months and can be compounded with rainfall to lead to slope instability.

  9. Dissolved Carbon Fluxes During the 2017 Mississippi River Flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, J. H.; Xu, Y. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Mississippi River drains approximately 3.2 million square kilometres of land and discharges about 680 cubic kilometres of water into the Northern Gulf of Mexico annually, acting as a significant medium for carbon transport from land to the ocean. A few studies have documented annual carbon fluxes in the river, however it is unclear whether floods can create riverine carbon pulses. Such information is critical in understanding the effects that extreme precipitation events may have on carbon transport under the changing climate. We hypothesize that carbon concentration and mass loading will increase in response to an increase in river discharge, creating a carbon pulse, and that the source of carbon varies from river rising to falling due to terrestrial runoff processes. This study investigated dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) loadings during the 2017 Mississippi River early-summer flood. Water samples were taken from the Mississippi River at Baton Rouge on the rising limb, crest, and falling limb of the flood. All samples were analysed for concentrations of DOC, DIC, and their respective isotopic signature (δ13C). Partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) was also recorded in the field at each sampling trip. Additionally, the water samples were analysed for nutrients, dissolved metals, and suspended solids, and in-situ measurements were made on water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and specific conductance. The preliminary findings suggest that carbon species responded differently to the flood event and that δ13C values were dependent on river flood stage. This single flood event transported a large quantity of carbon, indicating that frequent large pulses of riverine carbon should be expected in the future as climate change progresses.

  10. Smartphone applications to aid weight loss and management: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutton EF

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth F Sutton, Leanne M Redman Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA Abstract: The development and dissemination of smart devices has cultivated a global environment of hyperconnectivity and increased our access to information. The paralleled launch and success of the Mobile Health industry has created a market of commercially available applications or “apps” along with tools or sensors, which allow the user to receive and collect personal health information. Apps and accompanying tools now allow an individual to “self-digitize” and, pertaining to weight management, monitor their body weight, caloric intake, physical activity, and more. These products possess the ability to improve the scalability of traditional in-person weight management services considering their near ubiquity, affordability, and capability to deliver information directly and personally to the user. However, similar to the dietary supplement market, the anecdotal value of these products has driven their popularity and acceptance by the general public without requirement of scientific validation or, in the area of weight management or diet/exercise, validation of the safety and efficacy by the Food and Drug Administration prior to market launch. By conducting a literature and clinical trial search, we found remarkably few active, completed, or published studies testing the efficacy of smart device applications using randomized controlled trials. Research efforts must be focused on illuminating the efficacy of behavioral interventions and remote self-monitoring for weight loss/maintenance treatment with true, randomized controlled trials. Keywords: smartphone, mobile phone, application, app, weight, weight loss, weight maintenance

  11. Fate of phosphorus fractions in an adsorptive-filter subject to intra- and inter-event runoff phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Christian; Sansalone, John

    2012-07-30

    In-situ filtration of phosphorus (P) and particulate matter (PM) transported in runoff is increasingly implemented for urban source areas. While monitoring of filter response is commonly based on an event mean of total phosphorus (TP), this study examines the fate of specific P fractions through intra- and inter-event phenomena. This continuous filter monitoring program includes 15 wet weather loadings and the dry weather periods between these events. Aqueous P adsorption and PM-bound P (suspended, settleable and sediment) filtration phenomena are examined for runoff events from a landscaped carpark with biogenic loads in Gainesville (GNV), FL. Filter response is compared to a similar aluminum oxide Al-Ox modified media filter subject to anthropogenic loads from an urban paved source area in Baton Rouge (BTR), LA. Results for the GNV filter indicate that while intra-event settleable, sediment and dissolved P fractions are controlled by the filter, the suspended P fraction remained relatively mobile compared to the other P fractions. P adsorption is primarily influenced by intra-event flow rates, contact times, runoff volume, pH and by the inter-event chemistry of runoff stored in the filter. P effluent partitioning is dominated by the suspended PM as a consequence of effective adsorption by the filter. Inter-event phenomena generate decreasing redox with commensurate increases in alkalinity, conductivity as well as dissolved P as a consequence of re-partitioning. Dissolved P fate suggests that filters should be designed and managed to remain aerobic between wet weather events. For effective separation of suspended P and PM fractions by passive filters with low driving head, sustainability of performance, including head loss {<3 kPa}, requires upstream volumetric attenuation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The influence of model resolution on ozone in industrial volatile organic compound plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Barron H; Jeffries, Harvey E; Kim, Byeong-Uk; Vizuete, William G

    2010-09-01

    Regions with concentrated petrochemical industrial activity (e.g., Houston or Baton Rouge) frequently experience large, localized releases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Aircraft measurements suggest these released VOCs create plumes with ozone (O3) production rates 2-5 times higher than typical urban conditions. Modeling studies found that simulating high O3 productions requires superfine (1-km) horizontal grid cell size. Compared with fine modeling (4-kmin), the superfine resolution increases the peak O3 concentration by as much as 46%. To understand this drastic O3 change, this study quantifies model processes for O3 and "odd oxygen" (Ox) in both resolutions. For the entire plume, the superfine resolution increases the maximum O3 concentration 3% but only decreases the maximum Ox concentration 0.2%. The two grid sizes produce approximately equal Ox mass but by different reaction pathways. Derived sensitivity to oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and VOC emissions suggests resolution-specific sensitivity to NOx and VOC emissions. Different sensitivity to emissions will result in different O3 responses to subsequently encountered emissions (within the city or downwind). Sensitivity of O3 to emission changes also results in different simulated O3 responses to the same control strategies. Sensitivity of O3 to NOx and VOC emission changes is attributed to finer resolved Eulerian grid and finer resolved NOx emissions. Urban NOx concentration gradients are often caused by roadway mobile sources that would not typically be addressed with Plume-in-Grid models. This study shows that grid cell size (an artifact of modeling) influences simulated control strategies and could bias regulatory decisions. Understanding the dynamics of VOC plume dependence on grid size is the first step toward providing more detailed guidance for resolution. These results underscore VOC and NOx resolution interdependencies best addressed by finer resolution. On the basis of these results, the

  13. The Louisiana State University waste-to-energy incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This proposed action is for cost-shared construction of an incinerator/steam-generation facility at Louisiana State University under the State Energy Conservation Program (SECP). The SECP, created by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, calls upon DOE to encourage energy conservation, renewable energy, and energy efficiency by providing Federal technical and financial assistance in developing and implementing comprehensive state energy conservation plans and projects. Currently, LSU runs a campus-wide recycling program in order to reduce the quantity of solid waste requiring disposal. This program has removed recyclable paper from the waste stream; however, a considerable quantity of other non-recyclable combustible wastes are produced on campus. Until recently, these wastes were disposed of in the Devil's Swamp landfill (also known as the East Baton Rouge Parish landfill). When this facility reached its capacity, a new landfill was opened a short distance away, and this new site is now used for disposal of the University's non-recyclable wastes. While this new landfill has enough capacity to last for at least 20 years (from 1994), the University has identified the need for a more efficient and effective manner of waste disposal than landfilling. The University also has non-renderable biological and potentially infectious waste materials from the School of Veterinary Medicine and the Student Health Center, primarily the former, whose wastes include animal carcasses and bedding materials. Renderable animal wastes from the School of Veterinary Medicine are sent to a rendering plant. Non-renderable, non-infectious animal wastes currently are disposed of in an existing on-campus incinerator near the School of Veterinary Medicine building

  14. St. James marine terminal facility description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns and operates a marine terminal on the west bank of the Mississippi River at St. James, Louisiana. The St. James facility was constructed by the Department to provide marine services associated with the fill and drawdown of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) crude oil storage facilities located at Bayou Choctaw and Weeks Island, Louisiana. Although strategic to the mission of the SPR in the event of a national emergency, the St. James terminal is situated such that it has a high potential to also serve the commercial industry`s needs for crude oil terminalling and storage. The St. James terminal is located approximately 45 miles west of New Orleans and 30 miles southeast of Baton Rouge, and approximately 160 miles upstream from the mouth of the Mississippi River. Construction of the St. James terminal was initiated in 1978 and was completed in 1980. Since then, the terminal has received and transferred over 125 million barrels of crude oil to the SPR sites for storage. For crude oil distribution, the St. James terminal was connected to the neighboring LOCAP terminal by a 0.1 mile 36-inch pipeline in 1981 and to the Capline terminal by a 0.5 mile 30-inch pipeline in 1988. The terminal also has a 30-inch pipeline connection to the Koch oil terminal which was used for initial fill purposes; however, this pipeline has been disconnected and is currently inactive. A complete description of the St. James terminal facilities, operational capabilities, operational certifications, and future Government requirements are presented in Sections 2, 3, 4, and 5 respectively.

  15. Icosapent ethyl for the treatment of severe hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares H

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hassan Fares,1 Carl J Lavie,2,3 James J DiNicolantonio,4 James H O'Keefe,5 Richard V Milani2 1Department of Hospital Medicine, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA, 2Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Clinical School, University of Queensland School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 3Department of Preventive Medicine, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge, LA, 4Mid America Heart Institute at Saint Luke's Hospital, Kansas City, MO, 5Mid America Heart Institute, University of Missouri–Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA Abstract: Hypertriglyceridemia is a highly prevalent lipid abnormality and it is associated with atherosclerosis, with a growing body of evidence linking elevated triglycerides (TGs with cardiovascular disease. The current major omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA/docosahexaenoic acid (DHA combination, lowers serum TGs while often increasing levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Icosapent ethyl is an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid with a 96% pure ethyl ester of EPA that has been recently approved for lowering TG levels in patients with very high TGs (≥500 mg/dL, and it does so without significantly affecting serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The potential benefits of omega-3 fatty acid therapy for dyslipidemias will be discussed, including the potential pros and cons of EPA alone versus the more common and readily available EPA/DHA combination therapy. Keywords: triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid

  16. Looking for the Silver Lining: Benefit Finding after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in Middle-Aged, Older, and Oldest-Old Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanko, Katie E; Cherry, Katie E; Ryker, Kyle S; Mughal, Farra; Marks, Loren D; Brown, Jennifer Silva; Gendusa, Patricia F; Sullivan, Marisa C; Bruner, John; Welsh, David A; Su, L Joseph; Jazwinski, S Michal

    2015-09-01

    Looking for potentially positive outcomes is one way that people cope with stressful events. In two studies, we examined perceived "silver linings" after the 2005 Hurricanes Katrina and Rita among indirectly affected adults. In Study 1, middle-aged (ages 47-64 years), older (ages 65-89 years), and oldest-old (ages 90-95 years) adults in the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS) responded to an open-ended question on perceived silver linings in a longitudinal assessment carried out during the immediate impact (1 to 4 months after landfall) and post-disaster recovery phase (6 to 14 months post-storm). Qualitative grounded theory methods were employed to analyze these narrative data. Team-based coding yielded three core themes: (1) learning experience and better preparedness for future disasters, (2) having improved cities (Baton Rouge and New Orleans), and (3) an increase in "Good Samaritan" acts such as strangers helping one another. Responses were similar across age groups, although older adults were the least likely to report positive outcomes. Study 2 was a conceptual replication using a different sample of adults (ages 31 to 82 years) tested at least five years after the storms. A learning experience and preparedness core theme replicated Study 1's findings while improved social cohesion amongst family and friends emerged as a new core theme in Study 2. These data indicate that identifying lessons learned and potentially positive outcomes are psychological reactions that may facilitate post-disaster coping and foster resilience for indirectly affected adults in the years after disaster.

  17. Public Talks and Science Listens: A Community-Based Participatory Approach to Characterizing Environmental Health Risk Perceptions and Assessing Recovery Needs in the Wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J.; Parras, B.; St. Marie, R.; Subra, W.; Petronella, S.; Gorenstein, J.; Fuchs-Young, R.; Santa, R.K.; Chavarria, A.; Ward, J.; Diamond, P.

    2009-01-01

    In response to the human health threats stemming from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, inter-disciplinary working groups representing P30-funded Centers of the National Institute Environmental Health Sciences were created to assess threats posed by mold, harmful alga blooms, chemical toxicants, and various infectious agents at selected sites throughout the hurricane impact zone. Because of proximity to impacted areas, UTMB NIEHS Center in Environmental Toxicology was charged with coordinating direct community outreach efforts, primarily in south Louisiana. In early October 2005, UTMB/NIEHS Center Community Outreach and Education Core, in collaboration with outreach counterparts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center @ Smithville TX/Center for Research in Environmental Disease sent two groups into southern Louisiana. One group used Lafourche Parish as a base to deliver humanitarian aid and assess local needs for additional supplies during local recovery/reclamation. A second group, ranging through New Iberia, New Orleans, Chalmette, rural Terrebonne, Lafourche and Jefferson Parishes and Baton Rouge met with community environmental leaders, emergency personnel and local citizens to 1) sample public risk perceptions, 2) evaluate the scope and reach of ongoing risk communication efforts, and 3) determine how the NIEHS could best collaborate with local groups in environmental health research and local capacity building efforts. This scoping survey identified specific information gaps limiting efficacy of risk communication, produced a community “wish list” of potential collaborative research projects. The project provided useful heuristics for disaster response and management planning and a platform for future collaborative efforts in environmental health assessment and risk communication with local advocacy groups in south Terrebonne-Lafourche parishes. PMID:20508756

  18. Public Talks and Science Listens: A Community-Based Participatory Approach to Characterizing Environmental Health Risk Perceptions and Assessing Recovery needs in the Wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sullivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to the human health threats stemming from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, inter-disciplinary working groups representing P30-funded Centers of the National Institute Environmental Health Sciences were created to assess threats posed by mold, harmful alga blooms, chemical toxicants, and various infectious agents at selected sites throughout the hurricane impact zone. Because of proximity to impacted areas, UTMB NIEHS Center in Environmental Toxicology was charged with coordinating direct community outreach efforts, primarily in south Louisiana. In early October 2005, UTMB/NIEHS Center Community Outreach and Education Core, in collaboration with outreach counterparts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center @ Smithville TX/Center for Research in Environmental Disease sent two groups into southern Louisiana. One group used Lafourche Parish as a base to deliver humanitarian aid and assess local needs for additional supplies during local recovery/reclamation. A second group, ranging through New Iberia, New Orleans, Chalmette, rural Terrebonne, Lafourche and Jefferson Parishes and Baton Rouge met with community environmental leaders, emergency personnel and local citizens to 1 sample public risk perceptions, 2 evaluate the scope and reach of ongoing risk communication efforts, and 3 determine how the NIEHS could best collaborate with local groups in environmental health research and local capacity building efforts. This scoping survey identified specific information gaps limiting efficacy of risk communication, produced a community “wish list” of potential collaborative research projects. The project provided useful heuristics for disaster response and management planning and a platform for future collaborative efforts in environmental health assessment and risk communication with local advocacy groups in south Terrebonne-Lafourche parishes.

  19. Spatial confidentiality and GIS: re-engineering mortality locations from published maps about Hurricane Katrina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitner Michael

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographic Information Systems (GIS can provide valuable insight into patterns of human activity. Online spatial display applications, such as Google Earth, can democratise this information by disseminating it to the general public. Although this is a generally positive advance for society, there is a legitimate concern involving the disclosure of confidential information through spatial display. Although guidelines exist for aggregated data, little has been written concerning the display of point level information. The concern is that a map containing points representing cases of cancer or an infectious disease, could be re-engineered back to identify an actual residence. This risk is investigated using point mortality locations from Hurricane Katrina re-engineered from a map published in the Baton Rouge Advocate newspaper, and a field team validating these residences using search and rescue building markings. Results We show that the residence of an individual, visualized as a generalized point covering approximately one and half city blocks on a map, can be re-engineered back to identify the actual house location, or at least a close neighbour, even if the map contains little spatial reference information. The degree of re-engineering success is also shown to depend on the urban characteristic of the neighborhood. Conclusion The results in this paper suggest a need to re-evaluate current guidelines for the display of point (address level data. Examples of other point maps displaying health data extracted from the academic literature are presented where a similar re-engineering approach might cause concern with respect to violating confidentiality. More research is also needed into the role urban structure plays in the accuracy of re-engineering. We suggest that health and spatial scientists should be proactive and suggest a series of point level spatial confidentiality guidelines before governmental decisions are made

  20. Spatial confidentiality and GIS: re-engineering mortality locations from published maps about Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Andrew J; Mills, Jacqueline W; Leitner, Michael

    2006-10-10

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can provide valuable insight into patterns of human activity. Online spatial display applications, such as Google Earth, can democratise this information by disseminating it to the general public. Although this is a generally positive advance for society, there is a legitimate concern involving the disclosure of confidential information through spatial display. Although guidelines exist for aggregated data, little has been written concerning the display of point level information. The concern is that a map containing points representing cases of cancer or an infectious disease, could be re-engineered back to identify an actual residence. This risk is investigated using point mortality locations from Hurricane Katrina re-engineered from a map published in the Baton Rouge Advocate newspaper, and a field team validating these residences using search and rescue building markings. We show that the residence of an individual, visualized as a generalized point covering approximately one and half city blocks on a map, can be re-engineered back to identify the actual house location, or at least a close neighbour, even if the map contains little spatial reference information. The degree of re-engineering success is also shown to depend on the urban characteristic of the neighborhood. The results in this paper suggest a need to re-evaluate current guidelines for the display of point (address level) data. Examples of other point maps displaying health data extracted from the academic literature are presented where a similar re-engineering approach might cause concern with respect to violating confidentiality. More research is also needed into the role urban structure plays in the accuracy of re-engineering. We suggest that health and spatial scientists should be proactive and suggest a series of point level spatial confidentiality guidelines before governmental decisions are made which may be reactionary toward the threat of revealing