WorldWideScience

Sample records for bathymetry

  1. Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Southeast Alaska Bathymetry for Analytical Purposes Only, Compilation dataset with significant data cleaning that uses the best available data. When zooming into...

  2. Bathymetry of Lake Ontario

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Ontario has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  3. Bathymetry of Lake Superior

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Superior has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  4. Great Lakes Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lakes Michigan, Erie, Saint Clair, Ontario and Huron has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological...

  5. Bathymetry of Lake Michigan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Michigan has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  6. Bathymetry of Lake Huron

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Huron has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and make it more...

  7. Bathymetry--Offshore Bolinas, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Bolinas, California (raster data file is included in...

  8. Bathymetry--Offshore Pacifica, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Pacifica, California. The raster data file is included in...

  9. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry, gridded LiDAR bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Tinian Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with gridded LiDAR bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size)...

  10. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry, LiDAR bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Saipan Island, Commonwealth of Northern Maraina Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with gridded LiDAR bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size)...

  11. Gridded bathymetry of Penguin Bank, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (5 m cell size) of Penguin Bank, Hawaii, USA. The netCDF grid and ArcGIS ASCII file include multibeam bathymetry from the Simrad EM3002d, and...

  12. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry collected...

  13. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Rose Atoll, American Samoa, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry were...

  14. Bathymetry Hillshade--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Pigeon Point, California. The raster data file is included in...

  15. Bathymetry--Offshore Pigeon Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Pigeon Point, California. The raster data file is included in...

  16. Bathymetry of North America - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Bathymetry of North America map layer shows depth ranges using colors. The image was derived from the National Geophysical Data Center?s ETOPO2 elevation data,...

  17. Multibeam swath bathymetry signal processing techniques

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ranade, G.; Sudhakar, T.

    Mathematical advances and the advances in the real time signal processing techniques in the recent times, have considerably improved the state of art in the bathymetry systems. These improvements have helped in developing high resolution swath...

  18. Bathymetry Hillshade--Offshore of Ventura, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3254 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps (see sheets 1, 2, SIM 3254) of the Offshore of Ventura map area, California. The...

  19. Bathymetry--Offshore of Bodega Head, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Bodega Head map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  20. Bathymetry--Offshore of Tomales Point, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Tomales Point map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  1. Bathymetry--Offshore of Carpinteria, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3261 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps (see sheets 1, 2, SIM 3261) of the Offshore of Carpinteria map area, California. The...

  2. Estimated Bathymetry of the Puerto Rico shelf

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This classification of estimated depth represents the relative bathymetry of Puerto Rico's shallow waters based on Landsat imagery for NOAA's Coastal Centers for...

  3. Bathymetry--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of San Francisco, California (raster data file is included in...

  4. Bathymetry--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  5. Bathymetry--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Santa Cruz, California. The raster data file is included in...

  6. NEPR Bathymetry Model - NOAA TIFF Image

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GeoTiff is a bathymetry model of the seafloor of Northeast Puerto Rico that contains the shallow water area (0-35m deep) of the Northeast Ecological Reserve:...

  7. Gridded multibeam bathymetry and SHOALS LIDAR bathymetry of Penguin Bank, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (5 m cell size) of Penguin Bank, Hawaii, USA. The netCDF grid and ArcGIS ASCII file include multibeam bathymetry from the Simrad EM3002d, and...

  8. BathymetryA [USGS]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Bathymetry data are provided as two separate...

  9. BathymetryB [CSUMB]--Offshore Aptos, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Aptos map area, California. Bathymetry data are provided as two separate...

  10. Bathymetry for Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, LOSCO (1994) [bathymetry_NOAA_1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a line data depicting the offshore bathymetry_NOAA_1994 for Louisiana. The contour interval is 2 meters. These data were derived from point depths depicted...

  11. Bathymetry from 2013 Interferometric Swath Bathymetry Systems Survey of Columbia River Mouth, Oregon and Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the USGS Data Release presents bathymetry data for the Columbia River Mouth, Oregon and Washington. The GeoTIFF raster data file is included in...

  12. Bathymetry--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps (see sheets 1, 2, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  13. Bathymetry--Offshore San Gregorio, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3306 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps (see sheet 1 and 2, SIM 3306) of the Offshore of San Gregorio map area, California....

  14. Mosaic of 5 m gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Alamagan Island, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry collected...

  15. Mosaic of 5 m gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Asuncion Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multpectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry collected...

  16. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Tau Island, Territory of American Samoa, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry collected...

  17. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral World View-2 satellite imagery of Rota Island, Territory of Mariana, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multpectral World View-2 satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry...

  18. Mosaic of 5m gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral World View-2 satellite imagery of Swains Island, Territory of American Samoa, South Pacific, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multpectral World View-2 satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry...

  19. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral World View-2 satellite imagery of Ni'ihau Island, Territory of Main Hawaiian Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multpectral World View-2 satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry...

  20. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral World View-2 satellite imagery of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multpectral World View-2 satellite data. Gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry...

  1. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral World View-2 satellite imagery of Sarigan Island, Territory of Mariana, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multpectral World View-2 satellite data. Gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry...

  2. Mosaic of 5 m gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Maug Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multpectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5m and 10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry...

  3. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Ofu and Olosega Islands, Territory of American Samoa, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multipectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry collected...

  4. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Area, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry collected...

  5. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Area, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry collected...

  6. Mosaic of 10 m gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Maug Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multpectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5m and 10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry...

  7. Mosaic of gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Area, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry collected...

  8. Mosaic of 10 m gridded multibeam bathymetry and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery of Asuncion Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with bathymetry derived from multpectral IKONOS satellite data. Gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry collected...

  9. Deriving Bathymetry from Multispectral Remote Sensing Data

    OpenAIRE

    William J. Hernandez; Roy A. Armstrong

    2016-01-01

    The use of passive satellite sensor data in shallow waters is complicated by the combined atmospheric, water, and bottom signals. Accurate determination of water depth is important for monitoring underwater topography and detection of moved sediments and in support of navigation. A Worldview 2 (WV2) image was used to develop high-resolution bathymetric maps (four meters) that were validated using bathymetry from an active sensor Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR). The influence of atmospheri...

  10. Bathymetry estimations using vicariously calibrated HICO data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, David; Gould, Richard W.; Weidemann, Alan; Ladner, Sherwin; Lee, Zhongping

    2013-06-01

    The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) is a prototype sensor installed on the International Space Station (ISS) designed to explore the management and capability of a space-borne hyperspectral sensor. The Office of Naval Research (ONR) funded the development and management of HICO. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) built and is involved in management of the HICO sensor. Bathymetry information is essential for naval operations in coastal regions. However, bathymetry may not be available in denied areas. HICO has a 100 meter spatial resolution, which makes it more capable for providing information within bays and estuaries than other sensors with coarser resolutions. Furthermore, its contiguous hyperspectral range is well suited to be used as input to the Hyperspectral Optimization Process Exemplar (HOPE) algorithm, which along with other absorption and backscattering values, estimates bottom albedo and water depth. Vicarious calibration uses in situ data to generate new gains and offsets that when applied to the top-of-atmosphere radiance values improves atmospheric correction results and the measurement of normalized water-leaving radiances. In situ remote sensing reflectance data collected in St. Andrews Bay were used to vicariously calibrate a coincident HICO scene. NRL's Automated Processing System (APS) was used to perform atmospheric correction and estimation of remote sensing reflectance (Rrs). The HOPE algorithm used the vicariously calibrated HICO Rrs values to estimate water depth. The results were validated with bathymetry maps from the NOAA National Ocean Service (NOS).

  11. Mosaic of gridded multibeam and lidar bathymetry of the US Territory of Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with gridded lidar bathymetry. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry were collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i...

  12. Coverage map of gridded multibeam and lidar bathymetry of the US Territory of Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with gridded lidar bathymetry. Gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry were collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i...

  13. Deriving Bathymetry from Multispectral Remote Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Hernandez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of passive satellite sensor data in shallow waters is complicated by the combined atmospheric, water, and bottom signals. Accurate determination of water depth is important for monitoring underwater topography and detection of moved sediments and in support of navigation. A Worldview 2 (WV2 image was used to develop high-resolution bathymetric maps (four meters that were validated using bathymetry from an active sensor Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR. The influence of atmospheric corrections in depth retrievals was evaluated using the Dark Substract, Fast Line-of-Sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercubes (FLAASH and the Cloud Shadow Approach (CSA atmospheric corrections. The CSA combined with a simple band ratio (Band2/Band3 provided the best performance, where it explained 82% of model values. The WV2 depth model was validated at another site within the image, where it successfully retrieved depth values with a coefficient of determination (r2 of 0.90 for all the depth values sampled, and an r2 of 0.70, for a depth range to 20 m. The WV2 bands in the visible region were useful for testing different band combinations to derive bathymetry that, when combined with a robust atmospheric correction, provided depth retrievals even in areas with variable bottom composition and near the limits of detection.

  14. EMODNet Bathymetry - building and providing a high resolution digital bathymetry for European seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Dick M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Access to marine data is a key issue for the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive and the EU Marine Knowledge 2020 agenda and includes the European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNet) initiative. EMODNet aims at assembling European marine data, data products and metadata from diverse sources in a uniform way. The EMODNet data infrastructure is developed through a stepwise approach in three major phases. Currently EMODNet is entering its 3rd phase with operational portals providing access to marine data for bathymetry, geology, physics, chemistry, biology, seabed habitats and human activities, complemented by checkpoint projects, analyzing the fitness for purpose of data provision. The EMODNet Bathymetry project develops and publishes Digital Terrain Models (DTM) for the European seas. These are produced from survey and aggregated data sets that are indexed with metadata by adopting from SeaDataNet the Common Data Index (CDI) data discovery and access service and the Sextant data products catalogue service. SeaDataNet is a network of major oceanographic data centers around the European seas that manage, operate and further develop a pan-European infrastructure for marine and ocean data management. SeaDataNet is also setting and governing marine data standards, and exploring and establishing interoperability solutions to connect to other e-infrastructures on the basis of standards such as ISO and OGC. The SeaDataNet portal provides users a number of interrelated meta directories, an extensive range of controlled vocabularies, and the various SeaDataNet standards and tools. SeaDataNet at present gives overview and access to more than 1.8 million data sets for physical oceanography, chemistry, geology, geophysics, bathymetry and biology from more than 100 connected data centers from 34 countries riparian to European seas. The latest EMODNet Bathymetry DTM has a resolution of 1/8 arc minute * 1/8 arc minute and covers all European sea regions. Use is made of

  15. Bathymetry and absorbitivity of Titan's Ontario Lacus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A.G.; Wolf, A.S.; Aharonson, O.; Zebker, H.; Lorenz, R.; Kirk, R.L.; Paillou, P.; Lunine, J.; Wye, L.; Callahan, P.; Wall, S.; Elachi, C.

    2010-01-01

    Ontario Lacus is the largest and best characterized lake in Titan's south polar region. In June and July 2009, the Cassini RADAR acquired its first Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of the area. Together with closest approach altimetry acquired in December 2008, these observations provide a unique opportunity to study the lake's nearshore bathymetry and complex refractive properties. Average radar backscatter is observed to decrease exponentially with distance from the local shoreline. This behavior is consistent with attenuation through a deepening layer of liquid and, if local topography is known, can be used to derive absorptive dielectric properties. Accordingly, we estimate nearshore topography from a radar altimetry profile that intersects the shoreline on the East and West sides of the lake. We then analyze SAR backscatter in these regions to determine the imaginary component of the liquid's complex index of refraction (Kappa). The derived value, Kappa = (6.1-1.3+1.7) x 10-4, corresponds to a loss tangent of tan Delta = (9.2-2.0+2.5) x 10-4 and is consistent with a composition dominated by liquid hydrocarbons. This value can be used to test compositional models once the microwave optical properties of candidate materials have been measured. In areas that do not intersect altimetry profiles, relative slopes can be calculated assuming the index of refraction is constant throughout the liquid. Accordingly, we construct a coarse bathymetry map for the nearshore region by measuring bathymetric slopes for eleven additional areas around the lake. These slopes vary by a factor of ~5 and correlate well with observed shoreline morphologies.

  16. A Review About SAR Technique for Shallow Water Bathymetry Surveys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has become one of the important tools for shallow water bathymetry surveys. This has significant economic efficiency compared with the traditional bathymetry surveys. Numerical models have been developed to simulate shallow water bathymetry SAR images. Inversion of these models makes it possible to assess the water depths from SAR images. In this paper, these numerical models of SAR technique are reviewed, and examples are illustrated including in the coastal areas of China. Some issues about SAR technique available and the research orientation in future are also discussed.

  17. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report presents bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data collected in July 2008 in the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, using a bathymetric sidescan...

  18. Gridded bathymetry of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, South Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, South Pacific. Almost complete bottom coverage was...

  19. Bathymetry Hillshade-Oregon OCS Floating Wind Farm Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This Data Release contains data from the USGS survey of the Oregon OCS Floating Wind Farm Site in 2014. The shaded-relief raster was generated from bathymetry data...

  20. Gridded bathymetry of Kohala, Hawaii, Main Hawaiian Islands, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 5-m grid of bathymetric data of Kohala coast of Hawaii, Main Hawaiian Islands, USA. The ASCII grids include multibeam bathymetry from the Reson 8101 multibeam sonar...

  1. Bathymetry Hillshade--Offshore of San Francisco, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of San Francisco, California (raster data file is included in...

  2. Bathymetry Hillshade--Offshore of Fort Ross, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Fort Ross map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  3. Estimated Bathymetry of the U.S. Virgin Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This classification of estimated depth represents the relative bathymetry of the U.S. Virgin Islands shallow waters based on Landsat imagery for NOAA's Coastal...

  4. Bathymetry of Lake Erie and Lake Saint Clair

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Erie and Lake Saint Clair has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and...

  5. Bathymetry--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  6. Bathymetry Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  7. Bathymetry Hillshade Offshore of Point Reyes Map Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Point Reyes map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  8. Bathymetry Hillshade--Offshore of Salt Point Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of the Offshore of Salt Point map area, California. Raster data file is included in...

  9. EMODNet Bathymetry - building and providing a high resolution digital bathymetry for European seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Dick M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Access to marine data is a key issue for the implementation of the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). The EU communication 'Marine Knowledge 2020' underpins the importance of data availability and harmonising access to marine data from different sources. The European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODnet) is a long term marine data initiative from the European Commission Directorate-General for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (DG MARE) underpinning the Marine Knowledge 2020 strategy. EMODnet is a consortium of organisations assembling European marine data, data products and metadata from diverse sources in a uniform way. The main purpose of EMODnet is to unlock fragmented and hidden marine data resources and to make these available to individuals and organisations (public and private), and to facilitate investment in sustainable coastal and offshore activities through improved access to quality-assured, standardised and harmonised marine data which are interoperable and free of restrictions on use. The EMODnet data infrastructure is developed through a stepwise approach in three major phases. Currently EMODnet is in the 2nd phase of development with seven sub-portals in operation that provide access to marine data from the following themes: bathymetry, geology, physics, chemistry, biology, seabed habitats and human activities. EMODnet development is a dynamic process so new data, products and functionality are added regularly while portals are continuesly improved to make the service more fit for purpose and user friendly with the help of users and stakeholders. The EMODnet Bathymetry project develops and publishes Digital Terrain Models (DTM) for the European seas. These are produced from survey and aggregated data sets, that are indexed with metadata by adopting the SeaDataNet Common Data Index (CDI) data discovery and access service and the SeaDataNet Sextant data products catalogue service. The new EMODnet DTM will have a resolution of 1

  10. Passive optical remote sensing of Congo River bathymetry using Landsat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ache Rocha Lopes, V.; Trigg, M. A.; O'Loughlin, F.; Laraque, A.

    2014-12-01

    While there have been notable advances in deriving river characteristics such as width, using satellite remote sensing datasets, deriving river bathymetry remains a significant challenge. Bathymetry is fundamental to hydrodynamic modelling of river systems and being able to estimate this parameter remotely would be of great benefit, especially when attempting to model hard to access areas where the collection of field data is difficult. One such region is the Congo Basin, where due to past political instability and large scale there are few studies that characterise river bathymetry. In this study we test whether it is possible to use passive optical remote sensing to estimate the depth of the Congo River using Landsat 8 imagery in the region around Malebo Pool, located just upstream of the Kinshasa gauging station. Methods of estimating bathymetry using remotely sensed datasets have been used extensively for coastal regions and now more recently have been demonstrated as feasible for optically shallow rivers. Previous river bathymetry studies have focused on shallow rivers and have generally used aerial imagery with a finer spatial resolution than Landsat. While the Congo River has relatively low suspended sediment concentration values the application of passive bathymetry estimation to a river of this scale has not been attempted before. Three different analysis methods are tested in this study: 1) a single band algorithm; 2) a log ratio method; and 3) a linear transform method. All three methods require depth data for calibration and in this study area bathymetry measurements are available for three cross-sections resulting in approximately 300 in-situ measurements of depth, which are used in the calibration and validation. The performance of each method is assessed, allowing the feasibility of passive depth measurement in the Congo River to be determined. Considering the scarcity of in-situ bathymetry measurements on the Congo River, even an approximate

  11. High resolution bathymetry of China seas and their surroundings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the oceanic lithospheric flexure and the worldwide bathymetric data ETOPO5, the high resolu tion bathymetry of the China seas and their surroundings is computed from altimeter derived gravity anomalies. The new bathymetry obtained by this study is higher resolution and accuracy than the widely used ETOPO5 data, mean while it shows clearly the seafioor, the tectonic characteristics and the geodynamical processes in the China seas.

  12. Bathymetry of southern Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, William W.; Moore, James G.; Garcia, Michael O.; Fox, Christopher G.

    1993-01-01

    Manua Loa, the largest volcano on Earth, lies largely beneath the sea, and until recently only generalized bathymetry of this giant volcano was available. However, within the last two decades, the development of multibeam sonar and the improvement of satellite systems (Global Positioning System) have increased the availability of precise bathymetric mapping. This map combines topography of the subaerial southern part of the volcano with modern multibeam bathymetric data from the south submarine flank. The map includes the summit caldera of Mauna Loa Volcano and the entire length of the 100-km-long southwest rift zone that is marked by a much more pronounced ridge below sea level than above. The 60-km-long segment of the rift zone abruptly changes trend from southwest to south 30 km from the summit. It extends from this bend out to sea at the south cape of the island (Kalae) to 4 to 4.5 km depth where it impinges on the elongate west ridge of Apuupuu Seamount. The west submarine flank of the rift-zone ridge connects with the Kahuku fault on land and both are part of the ampitheater head of a major submarine landslide (Lipman and others, 1990; Moore and Clague, 1992). Two pre-Hawaiian volcanic seamounts in the map area, Apuupuu and Dana Seamounts, are apparently Cretaceous in age and are somewhat younger than the Cretaceous oceanic crust on which they are built.

  13. Estimating river bathymetry from data assimilation of synthetic SWOT measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeosang; Durand, Michael; Merry, Carolyn J.; Clark, Elizabeth A.; Andreadis, Konstantinos M.; Alsdorf, Douglas E.

    2012-09-01

    SummaryThis paper focuses on estimating river bathymetry for retrieving river discharge from the upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission using a data assimilation algorithm coupled with a hydrodynamic model. The SWOT observations will include water surface elevation (WSE), its spatial and temporal derivatives, and inundated area. We assimilated synthetic SWOT observations into the LISFLOOD-FP hydrodynamic model using a local ensemble batch smoother (LEnBS), simultaneously estimating river bathymetry and flow depth. SWOT observations were obtained by sampling a “true” LISFLOOD-FP simulation based on the SWOT instrument design; the “true” discharge boundary condition was derived from USGS gages. The first-guess discharge boundary conditions were produced by the Variable Infiltration Capacity model, with discharge uncertainty controlled via precipitation uncertainty. First-guess estimates of bathymetry were derived from SWOT observations assuming a uniform spatial depth; bathymetric variability was modeled using an exponential correlation function. Thus, discharge and bathymetry errors were modeled realistically. The LEnBS recovered the bathymetry from SWOT observations with 0.52 m reach-average root mean square error (RMSE), which was 67.8% less than the first-guess RMSE. The RMSE of bathymetry estimates decreased sequentially as more SWOT observations were used in the estimate; we illustrate sequential processing of 6 months of SWOT observations. The better estimates of bathymetry lead to improved discharge estimates. The normalized RMSE of the river discharge estimates was 10.5%, 71.2% less than the first-guess error.

  14. Quantification of Tsunami Bathymetry Effect on Finite Fault Slip Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bletery, Quentin; Sladen, Anthony; Delouis, Bertrand; Mattéo, Lionel

    2015-12-01

    The strong development of tsunami instrumentation in the past decade now provides observations of tsunami wave propagation in most ocean basins. This evolution has led to the wide use of tsunami data to image the complexity of earthquake sources. In particular, the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake is the first mega-event for which such a tsunami instrumentation network was available with an almost complete azimuthal coverage. Source inversion studies have taken advantage of these observations which add a lot of constrain on the solutions, especially in the shallow part of the fault models where other standard data sets tend to lack resolution: while on-land data are quite insensitive to slip on the often-distant shallow part of a subduction fault interface, tsunami observations are directly sensitive to the shallowest slip. And it is in this shallow portion that steep bathymetry combined with horizontal motion, the so-called bathymetry effect, can contribute to the tsunami excitation, in addition to the direct vertical sea-bottom deformation. In this study, we carefully investigate the different steps involved in the calculation of this bathymetry effect, from the initial sea-floor deformation to the prediction of the tsunami records, and evaluate its contribution across the main subduction zones of the world. We find that the bathymetry effect locally exceeds 10 % of the tsunami excitation in all subduction zones and 25 % in those known to produce the largest tsunami, either from mega- or tsunami- earthquakes. We then show how the bathymetry effect can modify the tsunami wave predictions, with time shifts of the wavefront and amplitudes sometimes varying by a factor of two. If the bathymetry effect can have a strong impact on the simulated tsunami, it will also affect the solution of the finite-fault slip inversion. We illustrate this later aspect in the case of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. We find that not accounting for the bathymetry effect will not necessarily

  15. Local Bathymetry Estimation Using Variational Inverse Modeling: A Nested Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, T. G.; Walker, D. T.; Farquharson, G.

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of subreach river bathymetry from remotely-sensed surface velocity data is presented using variational inverse modeling applied to the 2D depth-averaged, shallow-water equations (SWEs). A nested approach is adopted to focus on obtaining an accurate estimate of bathymetry over a small region of interest within a larger complex hydrodynamic system. This approach reduces computational cost significantly. We begin by constructing a minimization problem with a cost function defined by the error between observed and estimated surface velocities, and then apply the SWEs as a constraint on the velocity field. An adjoint SWE model is developed through the use of Lagrange multipliers, converting the unconstrained minimization problem into a constrained one. The adjoint model solution is used to calculate the gradient of the cost function with respect to bathymetry. The gradient is used in a descent algorithm to determine the bathymetry that yields a surface velocity field that is a best-fit to the observational data. In this application of the algorithm, the 2D depth-averaged flow is computed within a nested framework using Delft3D-FLOW as the forward computational model. First, an outer simulation is generated using discharge rate and other measurements from USGS and NOAA, assuming a uniform bottom-friction coefficient. Then a nested, higher resolution inner model is constructed using open boundary condition data interpolated from the outer model (see figure). Riemann boundary conditions with specified tangential velocities are utilized to ensure a near seamless transition between outer and inner model results. The initial guess bathymetry matches the outer model bathymetry, and the iterative assimilation procedure is used to adjust the bathymetry only for the inner model. The observation data was collected during the ONR Rivet II field exercise for the mouth of the Columbia River near Hammond, OR. A dual beam squinted along-track-interferometric, synthetic

  16. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of the US Territory of Guam.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The bathymetry grid (5 m cell size) is derived from bathymetry from four sources:...

  17. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of the US Territory of Guam.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The bathymetry grid (5 m cell size) is derived from bathymetry from four sources:...

  18. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 5m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Saipan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The bathymetry grid (5 m cell size) is derived from bathymetry from two sources: Multibeam...

  19. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Ta'u Island, Territory of American Samoa, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI, and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery....

  20. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Rose Atoll, Territory of American Samoa, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI, and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery....

  1. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Ofu and Olosega Islands, Territory of American Samoa, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI, and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery....

  2. Gridded multibeam bathymetry of Apra Harbor, Guam U.S. Territory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry from Apra Harbor, Guam U.S. Territory. The netCDF and Arc ASCII grids include multibeam bathymetry from the Reson SeaBat 8125 multibeam sonar...

  3. Rugosity grid (5 m) derived from gridded bathymetry of the US Territory of Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry from four sources: Multibeam bathymetry collected by Coral Reef Ecosystem Division aboard NOAA R/V AHI,...

  4. Slope grid (5 m) derived from gridded bathymetry of US Territory of Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry from four sources: Multibeam bathymetry collected by Coral Reef Ecosystem Division aboard NOAA R/V AHI, and...

  5. CRED 20m Gridded bathymetry of Necker Islands, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA (NetCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Necker Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Hawaii, USA. This netCDF includes multibeam bathymetry from...

  6. Resolving bathymetry from airborne gravity along Greenland fjords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghosian, Alexandra; Tinto, Kirsty; Cochran, James R.; Porter, David; Elieff, Stefan; Burton, Bethany L.; Bell, Robin E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent glacier mass loss in Greenland has been attributed to encroaching warming waters, but knowledge of fjord bathymetry is required to investigate this mechanism. The bathymetry in many Greenland fjords is unmapped and difficult to measure. From 2010 to 2012, National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Operation IceBridge collected a unique set of airborne gravity, magnetic, radar, and lidar data along the major outlet glaciers and fjords in Greenland. We applied a consistent technique using the IceBridge gravity data to create 90 bathymetric profiles along 54 Greenland fjords. We also used this technique to recover subice topography where warm or crevassed ice prevents the radar system from imaging the bed. Here we discuss our methodology, basic assumptions and error analysis. We present the new bathymetry data and discuss observations in six major regions of Greenland covered by IceBridge. The gravity models provide a total of 1950 line kilometers of bathymetry, 875 line kilometers of subice topography, and 12 new grounding line depths.

  7. Bathymetry--Offshore of Refugio Beach Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3319 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps (see sheets 1, 2, SIM 3319) of the Offshore of Refugio Beach map area, California. The...

  8. Bathymetry [2m]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The raster data file is included...

  9. Bathymetry [5m]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The raster data file is included...

  10. Adaptive beamforming for low frequency SAS imagery and bathymetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayes, M.P.; Hunter, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic aperture side-scan sonar (SAS) is a mature technology for high-resolution sea floor imaging [1]. Interferometric synthetic aperture sonars (InSAS) use additional hydrophones in a vertical array for bathymetric mapping [2]. This has created high-resolution bathymetry in deep water environme

  11. Radio-controlled boat for measuring water velocities and bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, Andrej; Bezak, Nejc; Sečnik, Matej

    2016-04-01

    Radio-controlled boat named "Hi3" was designed and developed in order to facilitate water velocity and bathymetry measurements. The boat is equipped with the SonTek RiverSurveyor M9 instrument that is designed for measuring open channel hydraulics (discharge and bathymetry). Usually channel cross sections measurements are performed either from a bridge or from a vessel. However, these approaches have some limitations such as performing bathymetry measurements close to the hydropower plant turbine or downstream from a hydropower plant gate where bathymetry changes are often the most extreme. Therefore, the radio-controlled boat was designed, built and tested in order overcome these limitations. The boat is made from a surf board and two additional small balance support floats. Additional floats are used to improve stability in fast flowing and turbulent parts of rivers. The boat is powered by two electric motors, steering is achieved with changing the power applied to left and right motor. Furthermore, remotely controlled boat "Hi3" can be powered in two ways, either by a gasoline electric generator or by lithium batteries. Lithium batteries are lighter, quieter, but they operation time is shorter compared to an electrical generator. With the radio-controlled boat "Hi3" we can perform measurements in potentially dangerous areas such as under the lock gates at hydroelectric power plant or near the turbine outflow. Until today, the boat "Hi3" has driven more than 200 km in lakes and rivers, performing various water speed and bathymetry measurements. Moreover, in future development the boat "Hi3" will be upgraded in order to be able to perform measurements automatically. The future plans are to develop and implement the autopilot. With this approach the user will define the route that has to be driven by the boat and the boat will drive the pre-defined route automatically. This will be possible because of the very accurate differential GPS from the Sontek River

  12. Bathymetry Inversion for Nearshore Applications Using Standoff Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, T.

    2015-12-01

    The bathymetry from the surfzone to the shoreline incurs active movement due to wave energy interacting with the seafloor. Measurement of the bathymetry is difficult without direct deployment of single-beam or multi-beam sonar mounted on a boat or jet ski. While these direct measurements are optimal, they are usually limited in space and time. Only a small section of a coastline can be measured during a collection, and it often can be years before another survey is conducted. In this work, we consider a framework for estimating bathymetry in the nearshore that combines model-based inversion with standoff measurement. Standoff measurements allow flexible deployment over large spatial ranges with longer look times than are available from satellite-based platforms, but often do not provide direct measurements of the seabed, necessitating an inverse model. The coupling of nearshore wave measurements with numerical models can provide continuously evolving bathymetry estimates with larger spatial coverage than is available with standard techniques. The considered framework incorporates a variety of sensors including X-band radar, LiDAR, and video imagery to provide measurements of wave height, wave speed, or energy dissipation in order to drive the inversion model. Here, we evaluate a test case at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility where we are able to constrain the inversion problem using a number of different data measurement methods. A methodology for handling both data sparse and data rich environments is examined to determine the impact on the resulting bathymetry. Additionally, reduced order modeling and sampling based frameworks are evaluated for potential performance improvements.

  13. Sea level Variability and Juan de Fuca Bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybers, P. J.; Boulahanis, B.; Proistosescu, C.; Langmuir, C. H.; Carbotte, S. M.; Katz, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    That deglaciation influences mid-ocean ridge volcanism is well established for Iceland, where depressurization associated with melting a ~2 km ice cap led to order of magnitude increases in volcanism during the last deglaciation. The case was also made that the more subtle ~100 m changes in sea level that accompany glacial cycles have identifiable implications for undersea mid-ocean ridge systems using both models and data from the Australian-Antarctic Ridge (Crowley et al., 2015). Sea level rising at ~1 cm/year during deglaciation leads to an expectation of ~10% decreases in melt production at ridges, given mantle upwelling rates of ˜3 cm/yr at intermediate spreading ridges and mantle density being ~3 times that of seawater. The implications of variations in melt production for bathymetry, however, involve numerous considerations, including whether melt signals are cancelled within the melt column, appreciably alter accretionary or fault processes, and have identifiable surface expressions. Further empirical assessment of bathymetry is thus useful for purposes of confirming patterns and constraining processes. Here we report on spectral analyses of bathymetry recently acquired from the Juan de Fuca ridge between 44°30'N and 45°15'N during the SeaVOICE expedition. Multibeam swath sonar data were acquired with an EM122 sonar insonfiying seafloor to crustal ages of ˜2 ma with 35 m spatial resolution. We examine (1.) the statistical significance of concentrations of bathymetric variability at the 100 ky, 41 ky, and 23 ky periods characteristic of late-Pleistocene sea level variability; (2.) whether sea level responses are primarily at 41 ky periods in crust accreted during the early Pleistocene, when global sea level variations were primarily at this period; and (3.) if sea level responses are superimposed on bathymetry variations or, instead, align with fault features. We also note that Juan de Fuca's proximity to the Cordilleran Ice Sheet implies that regional

  14. Multibeam bathymetry and selected perspective views offshore San Diego, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Peter; Normark, William R.; Driscoll, Neal W.; Babcock, Jeffrey M.; Gardner, James V.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Iampietro, Pat J.

    2007-01-01

    This set of two posters consists of a map on one sheet and a set of seven perspective views on the other. The ocean floor image was generated from multibeam-bathymetry data acquired by Federal and local agencies as well as academic institutions including: - U.S. Geological Survey mapped from the La Jolla Canyon south to the US-Mexico border using a Kongsberg Simrad multibeam echosounder system (MBES) (March - April 1998). Data and metadata available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2004/1221/. - Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and SCRIPPS Institution of Oceanography mapped the majority of the La Jolla Fan Valley including the sea floor to the north and south of the valley using a Seabeam 2100 MBES. Data available at http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/bathymetry/multibeam.html. Survey ID, AT07L09, Chief Scientists, Barrie Walden and Joseph Coburn (April 2002). - California State University, Monterey Bay, mapped Scripps Canyon and the head of La Jolla Canyon using a Reson 8101 MBES (October 2001). Data and metadata available at http://seafloor.csumb.edu/SFMLwebDATA.htm. This work was funded by the California Department of Fish and Game California Coastal Conservancy, San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), California Department of Fish and Game, and Fugro Pelagos mapped the nearshore region out to about 35-40 m. - The sea floor within this image that has not been mapped with MBES is filled in with interpreted bathymetry gridded from single-beam data available at http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/bathymetry/hydro.html. Depths are in meters below sea level, which is referenced to Mean Lower Low Water.

  15. Remote Sensing-Derived Bathymetry of Lake Poopó

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalbert Arsen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Located within the Altiplano at 3,686 m above sea level, Lake Poopó is remarkably shallow and very sensitive to hydrologic recharge. Progressive drying has been observed in the entire Titicaca-Poopó-Desaguadero-Salar de Coipasa (TPDS system during the last decade, causing dramatic changes to Lake Poopó’s surface and its regional water supplies. Our research aims to improve understanding of Lake Poopó water storage capacity. Thus, we propose a new method based on freely available remote sensing data to reproduce Lake Poopó bathymetry. Laser ranging altimeter ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite is used during the lake’s lowest stages to measure vertical heights with high precision over dry land. These heights are used to estimate elevations of water contours obtained with Landsat imagery. Contour points with assigned elevation are filtered and grouped in a points cloud. Mesh gridding and interpolation function are then applied to construct 3D bathymetry. Complementary analysis of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS surfaces from 2000 to 2012 combined with bathymetry gives water levels and storage evolution every 8 days.

  16. Updating river bathymetry with multiple data sources using kriging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, S. K.; Bailey, B.; Minsker, B. S.; Cash, R. W.; Best, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding of spatially-distributed bathymetry at a range of spatial scales is important to understanding river and sediment dynamics. Most river sand dunes are 10-100m long but man-made features such as pipes, groynes, and piers can be less than a meter wide. Therefore it is necessary to conduct high-resolution survey measurements to accurately capture the spatial variation in bed profile. With rapidly changing bathymetry in large rivers, detailed surveys must be done frequently to capture short and long term changes in the river bed, but this is challenging for manually-intensive and expensive high-resolution surveys. In this paper, we propose the use of geostatistical models to update measurements from a periodic detailed survey, which is used as a baseline morphology, with less dense data collected from routine boat traffic equipped with less expensive sensors. Our study area is a six-kilometer reach of the Mississippi River. We obtain measurements of depth at different spatial and temporal resolutions from two types of data sources: detailed surveys using a multi-beam echosounder (MBES) bed profiler and routine depth data from two sensors installed on a boat making a single pass down the Mississippi River. The MBES measurements consist of latitude, longitude, and depth at a spatial resolution of 0.5m*0.5m, collected during three surveys over a period of one year. These three surveys were conducted immediately after seasons when the river experiences large variations in bed bathymetry. While conducting Survey3 measurements, we also measured latitude, longitude, and depth once per minute (approximately every 140 m) along the boat route using two single-beam depth sensors. A four-step methodology was then developed to rapidly update the baseline morphology and provide a near-real-time estimate of the bathymetry: (i) use Survey 2 measurements to estimate the variance structure and develop a geostatistical model; (ii) use boat measurements during Survey 3 to

  17. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Tinian Island, Aguijan Island and Tatsumi Bank, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The bathymetry grid (5 m cell size) is derived from bathymetry from three sources:...

  18. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 5m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Tinian Island, Aguijan Island and Tatsumi Bank, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The bathymetry grid (5 m cell size) is derived from bathymetry from three sources:...

  19. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 60 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of the U.S. Territory of Guam.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (60 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  20. Rugosity grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Tinian Island, Aguijan Island and Tatsumi Bank, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry, from three sources: Multibeam bathymetry collected by Coral Reef Ecosystem Division aboard NOAA R/V...

  1. Rugosity grid derived from gridded bathymetry Ofu and Olosega Islands of the Manu'a Island group, American Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI, and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery...

  2. Rugosity grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Ta'u Island of the Manu'a Island group, American Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI, and bathymetry derived from multispectral IKONOS satellite imagery...

  3. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  4. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of French Frigate Shoals, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  5. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Tinian Island, Aguijan Island and Tatsumi Bank, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry, from three sources: Multibeam bathymetry collected by Coral Reef Ecosystem Division aboard NOAA R/V AHI,...

  6. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Rose Atoll, Territory of American Samoa, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  7. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  8. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 60 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (60 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  9. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Ni'ihau Island, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  10. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Brooks Banks, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  11. CRED Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, South Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA...

  12. Merged/integrated Bathymetric Data Derived from Multibeam Sonar, LiDAR, and Satellite-derived Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded multibeam bathymetry is integrated with derived bathymetry from alternate sources to provide a GIS layer with expanded spatial coverage. Integrated products...

  13. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Kure Atoll, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  14. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Kure Atoll, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V...

  15. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Brooks Banks, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA...

  16. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 60 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (60 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V...

  17. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V...

  18. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Tau Island, Territory of American Samoa, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V...

  19. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Ni'ihau Island, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA...

  20. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Brooks Banks, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA...

  1. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V...

  2. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of French Frigate Shoals, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA...

  3. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 60 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Rota Island, Mariana Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (60 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  4. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones Grid Derived from Gridded Bathymetry for Selected U.S. Locations in the Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded multibeam bathymetry, collected from various sources, and it...

  5. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Rose Atoll, Territory of American Samoa, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V...

  6. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Bathymetry of North America 200506 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Bathymetry of North America map layer shows depth ranges using colors. The image was derived from the National Geophysical Data Center's ETOPO2 elevation data,...

  7. OW Smith and Sandwell v8.2 - 1/30 Degree Bathymetry & Topography

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Global bathymetry and topography information at 1/30 degree resolution. Data collected by means of in-situ and satellite measurements.

  8. Rugosity grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. Cell values reflect the (surface area) /...

  9. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI, and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  10. Rugosity grid derived from gridded bathymetry of of Johnston Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. Cell values reflect the (surface area) /...

  11. Rugosity grid derived from gridded bathymetry of of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. Cell values reflect the (surface area) /...

  12. Massachusetts Bay - Internal Wave Packets Digitized from SAR Imagery and Intersected with Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This feature class contains internal wave packets digitized from SAR imagery and intersected with bathymetry for Massachusetts Bay. The internal wave packets were...

  13. CRED 10 m Gridded multibeam bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry shelf, bank and slope environments of Wake Island, West Central Pacific, under joint management of the United States Dept. of Interior and Air...

  14. CRED 60 m Gridded multibeam bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry shelf, bank and slope environments of Wake Island, West Central Pacific, under joint management of the United States Dept. of Interior and Air...

  15. CRED Acoustic Backscatter Tinian, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) 2003, Imagery Extracted from Gridded Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter extracted from gridded bathymetry of the banktops and shelf environments of the Tinian, of the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI).

  16. 10 m Rugosity grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA ship Hi'ialakai and R/V AHI using the Benthic Terrain Modeler with...

  17. CRED Rugosity grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Tutuila Island, American Samoa, South Pacific

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI, using the Benthic Terrain Modeler with...

  18. Slope 5m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Brooks Banks, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA ship Hi'ialakai and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  19. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Ni'ihau Island, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA ship Hi'ialakai and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  20. 40 m Gridded bathymetry of Swains Island, American Samoa (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (40 m cell size) of the slope environment of Swains Island, American Samoa. Almost complete bottom coverage was achieved in depths between 7 and...

  1. 10 m Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA ship Hi'ialakai and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  2. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of French Frigate Shoals, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  3. Rugosity grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI, and IKONOS derived depths using the...

  4. Rugosity 5m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Brooks Banks, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA ship Hi'ialakai and R/V AHI using the Benthic Terrain Modeler with...

  5. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI, and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  6. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Johnston Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI, and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  7. Rugosity grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Kure Atoll, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI, and IKONOS derived depths using the...

  8. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Kure Atoll, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI, and IKONOS derived depth values. Cell values...

  9. Bathymetry Mapping of the West Florida Shelf (Steamboat Lumps), Gulf of Mexico (NODC Accession 0001410)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XYZ ASCII format data generated from the 2001 multibeam sonar survey of the West Florida Shelf, Gulf of Mexico. The data include high-resolution bathymetry and...

  10. Bathymetry Mapping of the West Florida Shelf (Central Region), Gulf of Mexico (NODC Accession 0001410)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XYZ ASCII format data generated from the 2001 multibeam sonar survey of the West Florida Shelf, Gulf of Mexico. The data include high-resolution bathymetry and...

  11. Bathymetry Mapping of the West Florida Shelf (Northern Region), Gulf of Mexico (NODC Accession 0001410)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XYZ ASCII format data generated from the 2001 multibeam sonar survey of the West Florida Shelf, Gulf of Mexico. The data include high-resolution bathymetry and...

  12. Bathymetry Mapping of the West Florida Shelf (Southern Region), Gulf of Mexico (NODC Accession 0001410)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — XYZ ASCII format data generated from the 2001 multibeam sonar survey of the West Florida Shelf, Gulf of Mexico. The data include high-resolution bathymetry and...

  13. Rugosity grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Apra Harbor, Guam U.S. Territory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (1 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard the Survey Vessel Swamp Fox using the Terrain Modeler with rugosity methods...

  14. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Apra Harbor, Guam U.S. Territory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (1 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard the Survey Vessel Swamp Fox. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of change (in...

  15. Bathymetry 2M Grid, US Virgin Islands, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified ESRI Grid with 2 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of selected portions of seafloor around St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St....

  16. Bathymetry 1m GRID of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, 2004, UTM 20 WGS84

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Grid with 1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the south shore of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA...

  17. Shoreline and Bathymetry Approximation in Mesh Generation for Tidal Renewable Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Avdis, Alexandros; Hill, Jon; Piggott, Matthew D; Gorman, Gerard J

    2015-01-01

    Due to the fractal nature of the domain geometry in geophysical flow simulations, a completely accurate description of the domain in terms of a computational mesh is frequently deemed infeasible. Shoreline and bathymetry simplification methods are used to remove small scale details in the geometry, particularly in areas away from the region of interest. To that end, a novel method for shoreline and bathymetry simplification is presented. Existing shoreline simplification methods typically remove points if the resultant geometry satisfies particular geometric criteria. Bathymetry is usually simplified using traditional filtering techniques, that remove unwanted Fourier modes. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) has been used in other fields to isolate small-scale structures from larger scale coherent features in a robust way, underpinned by a rigorous but simple mathematical framework. Here we present a method based on principal component analysis aimed towards simplification of shorelines and bathymetry. We pr...

  18. Worldwide Database of Analog Marine Seismics, Bathymetry, Magnetics, and Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Analog Marine Geophysical Underway data file consists primarily of seismic data and some bathymetry, magnetics, and gravity data. Most of the data are released...

  19. NOAA ESRI Geotiff - 9m Multibeam Bathymetry, Puerto Rico (Tourmaline Bank) - UTM 19N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 9 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of selected portions of seafloor around Tourmaline Bank in Puerto Rico,...

  20. Slope 60 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Guam Island, Mariana Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (60 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  1. Slope 60 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Rota Island, Mariana Islands, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (60 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  2. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI, and IKONOS derived depth values. Cell values...

  3. ef_bathy: Multibeam Bathymetry of the East Flower Garden Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Bathymetry and seafloor backscatter data for the Flower Gardens National Marine Sanctuary are provided in Raster Grid format. This data set contains data, metadata,...

  4. Slope 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Brooks Banks, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA ship Hi'ialakai and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  5. Northeast Puerto Rico and Culebra Island Bathymetry Model - NOAA TIFF Image

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GeoTiff is a bathymetry model of the seafloor of Northeast Puerto Rico that contains the shallow water area (0-35m deep) of the Northeast Ecological Reserve:...

  6. Bathymetry of Lake Manatee, Manatee County, Florida, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellino, Jason C.; Pfeiffer, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Lake Manatee, located in central Manatee County, Florida, is the principal drinking-water source for Manatee and Sarasota Counties. The drainage basin of Lake Manatee encompasses about 120 square miles, and the reservoir covers a surface area of about 1,450 acres at an elevation of 38.8 feet above NAVD 88 or 39.7 feet above NGVD 29. The full pool water-surface elevation is 39.1 feet above NAVD 88 (40.0 feet above NGVD 29), and the estimated minimum usable elevation is 25.1 feet above NAVD 88 (26.0 feet above NGVD 29). The minimum usable elevation is based on the elevation of water intake structures. Manatee County has used the stage/volume relation that was developed from the original survey in the 1960s to estimate the volume of water available for consumption. Concerns about potential changes in storage capacity of the Lake Manatee reservoir, coupled with a recent drought, led to this bathymetry mapping effort.

  7. Dynamical controls on estuarine bathymetry: Assessment against UK database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandle, David

    2006-06-01

    New theories for estuarine bathymetry provide formulations for: (1) depth at the mouth, D versus river flow, Q; (2) tidal intrusion length L versus D and Z (tidal amplitude) and (3) a zone of morphological existence, delineated on a framework of Z versus D. Here, these theories are assessed against a database for 80 UK estuaries. Overall there is good agreement between theory and observations for the sizes and shapes of estuaries classified as either 'Coastal Plain' or 'Bar Built'. Likewise, most estuaries are shown to lie within the theoretical 'zone of bathymetric existence'. These encouraging agreements enable the theories to be used to: (1) enhance our understanding of existing morphologies, (2) identify anomalous estuaries and (3) make future predictions regarding likely impacts from global climate change and related management scenarios. Subsequent examination of regional historical patterns of morphological evolution, introducing detailed local knowledge, should help to explain these anomalies and refine the new theories. By 2100, we anticipate changes in UK estuaries due to ('precautionary') projected 25% changes in river flow of: Order (0.5-5 km) in lengths and Order (50-250 m) in breadths. Corresponding changes due to a projected sea level rise of 50 cm are increases in both lengths of Order (1-2.5 km) and breadths of Order (70-100 m). In both cases, the bigger changes will occur in larger estuaries.

  8. A MATLAB GEODETIC SOFTWARE FOR PROCESSING AIRBORNE LIDAR BATHYMETRY DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pepe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to build three-dimensional models through technologies based on satellite navigation systems GNSS and the continuous development of new sensors, as Airborne Laser Scanning Hydrography (ALH, data acquisition methods and 3D multi-resolution representations, have contributed significantly to the digital 3D documentation, mapping, preservation and representation of landscapes and heritage as well as to the growth of research in this fields. However, GNSS systems led to the use of the ellipsoidal height; to transform this height in orthometric is necessary to know a geoid undulation model. The latest and most accurate global geoid undulation model, available worldwide, is EGM2008 which has been publicly released by the U.S. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA EGM Development Team. Therefore, given the availability and accuracy of this geoid model, we can use it in geomatics applications that require the conversion of heights. Using this model, to correct the elevation of a point does not coincide with any node must interpolate elevation information of adjacent nodes. The purpose of this paper is produce a Matlab® geodetic software for processing airborne LIDAR bathymetry data. In particular we want to focus on the point clouds in ASPRS LAS format and convert the ellipsoidal height in orthometric. The algorithm, valid on the whole globe and operative for all UTM zones, allows the conversion of ellipsoidal heights using the EGM2008 model. Of this model we analyse the slopes which occur, in some critical areas, between the nodes of the undulations grid; we will focus our attention on the marine areas verifying the impact that the slopes have in the calculation of the orthometric height and, consequently, in the accuracy of the in the 3-D point clouds. This experiment will be carried out by analysing a LAS APRS file containing topographic and bathymetric data collected with LIDAR systems along the coasts of Oregon and Washington

  9. a Matlab Geodetic Software for Processing Airborne LIDAR Bathymetry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, M.; Prezioso, G.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to build three-dimensional models through technologies based on satellite navigation systems GNSS and the continuous development of new sensors, as Airborne Laser Scanning Hydrography (ALH), data acquisition methods and 3D multi-resolution representations, have contributed significantly to the digital 3D documentation, mapping, preservation and representation of landscapes and heritage as well as to the growth of research in this fields. However, GNSS systems led to the use of the ellipsoidal height; to transform this height in orthometric is necessary to know a geoid undulation model. The latest and most accurate global geoid undulation model, available worldwide, is EGM2008 which has been publicly released by the U.S. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) EGM Development Team. Therefore, given the availability and accuracy of this geoid model, we can use it in geomatics applications that require the conversion of heights. Using this model, to correct the elevation of a point does not coincide with any node must interpolate elevation information of adjacent nodes. The purpose of this paper is produce a Matlab® geodetic software for processing airborne LIDAR bathymetry data. In particular we want to focus on the point clouds in ASPRS LAS format and convert the ellipsoidal height in orthometric. The algorithm, valid on the whole globe and operative for all UTM zones, allows the conversion of ellipsoidal heights using the EGM2008 model. Of this model we analyse the slopes which occur, in some critical areas, between the nodes of the undulations grid; we will focus our attention on the marine areas verifying the impact that the slopes have in the calculation of the orthometric height and, consequently, in the accuracy of the in the 3-D point clouds. This experiment will be carried out by analysing a LAS APRS file containing topographic and bathymetric data collected with LIDAR systems along the coasts of Oregon and Washington (USA).

  10. Bathymetry Offshore Sumatra First Comprehensive map of International Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaedicke, C.; Ladage, S.; Soh, W.; Weinrebe, W.; Tappin, D. R.; Henstock, T.; McNeill, L.; Sibuet, J.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Singh, S.; Flueh, E.; Djajadihardja, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Knowledge of the bathymetry offshore Sumatra is of great importance for geohazard risk assessment, modelling of tsunami runup heights and development of tsunami early warning systems as well as for the general understanding of plate boundary processes and morphotectonic features. Since the devastating December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake and tsunami a number of marine expeditions, funded by Canada, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, United Kingdom and the United States have acquired bathymetric data over the southern part of the earthquake rupture zone but also along strike the whole Sunda trench. Here we present the first compilation of these bathymetric data sets as one bathymetric map. The bathymetric data acquired up to date covers a vast part of the trench, continental slope and in part also of the fore arc basins. The map incorporates the newest data sets from 2005 of the British high-resolution HMS SCOTT survey, the French Marion-Dufresene "Aftershocks" and the Japanese Natsushima cruises. While these surveys concentrated on the southern rupture zone of the Dec. 26th, 2004 earthquake, the German RV SONNE SeaCause and Sumatra cruises in 2005 and 2006 mapped the March 28th 2005 rupture area as well as large parts of the central Sunda trench and slope and in part the fore arc basins. Surveys reaching back to 1997 covering parts of the Sunda Strait and offshore southern Sumatra are also incorporated. A nearly complete coverage of the Sunda trench and slope area in the north is achieved. In the south data gaps on the slope still exist. This map compilation is a collaborative international effort initiated and partly funded by InterMARGINS. It is a major contribution to the Indonesian and international science community.

  11. cBathy: A robust algorithm for estimating nearshore bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holman, Rob; Holland, K. Todd

    2013-01-01

    A three-part algorithm is described and tested to provide robust bathymetry maps based solely on long time series observations of surface wave motions. The first phase consists of frequency-dependent characterization of the wave field in which dominant frequencies are estimated by Fourier transform while corresponding wave numbers are derived from spatial gradients in cross-spectral phase over analysis tiles that can be small, allowing high-spatial resolution. Coherent spatial structures at each frequency are extracted by frequency-dependent empirical orthogonal function (EOF). In phase two, depths are found that best fit weighted sets of frequency-wave number pairs. These are subsequently smoothed in time in phase 3 using a Kalman filter that fills gaps in coverage and objectively averages new estimates of variable quality with prior estimates. Objective confidence intervals are returned. Tests at Duck, NC, using 16 surveys collected over 2 years showed a bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of 0.19 and 0.51 m, respectively but were largest near the offshore limits of analysis (roughly 500 m from the camera) and near the steep shoreline where analysis tiles mix information from waves, swash and static dry sand. Performance was excellent for small waves but degraded somewhat with increasing wave height. Sand bars and their small-scale alongshore variability were well resolved. A single ground truth survey from a dissipative, low-sloping beach (Agate Beach, OR) showed similar errors over a region that extended several kilometers from the camera and reached depths of 14 m. Vector wave number estimates can also be incorporated into data assimilation models of nearshore dynamics.

  12. Analysis of MABEL Bathymetry in Keweenaw Bay and Implications for ICESat-2 ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A. Forfinski-Sarkozi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In 2018, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA is scheduled to launch the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2, with a new six-beam, green-wavelength, photon-counting lidar system, Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS. The primary objectives of the ICESat-2 mission are to measure ice-sheet elevations, sea-ice thickness, and global biomass. However, if bathymetry can be reliably retrieved from ATLAS data, this could assist in addressing a key data need in many coastal and inland water body areas, including areas that are poorly-mapped and/or difficult to access. Additionally, ATLAS-derived bathymetry could be used to constrain bathymetry derived from complementary data, such as passive, multispectral imagery and synthetic aperture radar (SAR. As an important first step in evaluating the ability to map bathymetry from ATLAS, this study involves a detailed assessment of bathymetry from the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL, NASA’s airborne ICESat-2 simulator, flown on the Earth Resources 2 (ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. An interactive, web interface, MABEL Viewer, was developed and used to identify bottom returns in Keweenaw Bay, Lake Superior. After applying corrections for refraction and channel-specific elevation biases, MABEL bathymetry was compared against National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA data acquired two years earlier. The results indicate that MABEL reliably detected bathymetry in depths of up to 8 m, with a root mean square (RMS difference of 0.7 m, with respect to the reference data. Additionally, a version of the lidar equation was developed for predicting bottom-return signal levels in MABEL and tested using the Keweenaw Bay data. Future work will entail extending these results to ATLAS, as the technical specifications of the sensor become available.

  13. An ensemble-based reanalysis approach for estimating river bathymetry from the upcoming SWOT mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Y.; Durand, M. T.; Merry, C. J.; Clark, E.; Alsdorf, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    In spite of the critical role of river discharge in land surface hydrology, global gauging networks are sparse and even have been in decline. Over the past decade, researchers have been trying to better estimate river discharge using remote sensing techniques to complement the existing in-situ gage networks. The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission will directly provide simultaneous spatial mapping of inundation area (A) and inland water surface elevation (WSE) data (i.e., river, lakes, wetlands, and reservoirs), both temporally (dh/dt) and spatially (dh/dx), with the Ka-band Radar INterferometer (KaRIN). With these observations, the SWOT mission will provide the measurements of water storage changes in terrestrial surface water bodies. However, because the SWOT will measure WSE, not the true depth to the river bottom, the cross section channel bathymetry will not be fully measured. Thus, estimating bathymetry is important in order to produce accurate estimates of river discharge from the SWOT data. In previous work, a local ensemble Kalman filter (LEnKF) was used to estimate the river bathymetry, given synthetic SWOT observations and WSE predictions by the LISFLOOD-FP hydrodynamic model. However, the accuracy of river bathymetry was highly affected by the severe bias of boundary inflows due to the mathematical relationship for the assimilation. The bias in model is not accounted for the data assimilation. Here, we focus on correcting the forecast bias for the LEnKF scheme to result in the improvement of river bathymetry estimates. To correct the forecast bias and improve the accuracy, we combined the LEnKF scheme with continuity and momentum equations. To evaluate the reanalysis approach, the error of bathymetry was evaluated by comparing with the true value and previous work. In addition, we examined the sensitivity to the bathymetry estimate for estimating the river discharge.

  14. Bathymetry of Walker Lake, West-Central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Thomas J.; Smith, J. LaRue

    2007-01-01

    Walker Lake lies within a topographically closed basin in west-central Nevada and is the terminus of the Walker River. Much of the streamflow in the Walker River is diverted for irrigation, which has contributed to a decline in lake-surface altitude of about 150 feet and an increase in dissolved solids from 2,500 to 16,000 milligrams per liter in Walker Lake since 1882. The increase in salinity threatens the fresh-water ecosystem and survival of the Lahontan cutthroat trout, a species listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accurately determining the bathymetry and relations between lake-surface altitude, surface area, and storage volume are part of a study to improve the water budget for Walker Lake. This report describes the updated bathymetry of Walker Lake, a comparison of results from this study and a study by Rush in 1970, and an estimate of the 1882 lake-surface altitude. Bathymetry was measured using a single-beam echosounder coupled to a differentially-corrected global positioning system. Lake depth was subtracted from the lake-surface altitude to calculate the altitude of the lake bottom. A Lidar (light detection and ranging) survey and high resolution aerial imagery were used to create digital elevation models around Walker Lake. The altitude of the lake bottom and digital elevation models were merged together to create a single map showing land-surface altitude contours delineating areas that are currently or that were submerged by Walker Lake. Surface area and storage volume for lake-surface altitudes of 3,851.5-4,120 feet were calculated with 3-D surface-analysis software. Walker Lake is oval shaped with a north-south trending long axis. On June 28, 2005, the lake-surface altitude was 3,935.6 feet, maximum depth was 86.3 feet, and the surface area was 32,190 acres. The minimum altitude of the lake bottom from discrete point depths is 3,849.3 feet near the center of Walker Lake. The lake bottom is remarkably smooth except for mounds near

  15. Mapping bathymetry in an active surf zone with the WorldView2 multispectral satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, S. M.; Houser, C.; Brander, R.; Chirico, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rip currents are strong, narrow seaward flows of water that originate in the surf zones of many global beaches. They are related to hundreds of international drownings each year, but exact numbers are difficult to calculate due to logistical difficulties in obtaining accurate incident reports. Annual average rip current fatalities are estimated to be ~100, 53 and 21 in the United States (US), Costa Rica, and Australia respectively. Current warning systems (e.g. National Weather Service) do not account for fine resolution nearshore bathymetry because it is difficult to capture. The method shown here could provide frequent, high resolution maps of nearshore bathymetry at a scale required for improved rip prediction and warning. This study demonstrates a method for mapping bathymetry in the surf zone (20m deep and less), specifically within rip channels, because rips form at topographically low spots in the bathymetry as a result of feedback amongst waves, substrate, and antecedent bathymetry. The methods employ the Digital Globe WorldView2 (WV2) multispectral satellite and field measurements of depth to generate maps of the changing bathymetry at two embayed, rip-prone beaches: Playa Cocles, Puerto Viejo de Talamanca, Costa Rica, and Bondi Beach, Sydney, Australia. WV2 has a 1.1 day pass-over rate with 1.84m ground pixel resolution of 8 bands, including 'yellow' (585-625 nm) and 'coastal blue' (400-450 nm). The data is used to classify bottom type and to map depth to the return in multiple bands. The methodology is tested at each site for algorithm consistency between dates, and again for applicability between sites.

  16. Multiple sub-array beamspace CAATI algorithm for multi-beam bathymetry system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zi-sheng; LI Hai-sen; ZHOU Tian; YUAN Yan-yi

    2007-01-01

    This paper extends CAATI (Computed Angle-of-Arrival Transient Imaging) technique of Multi-angle Swath Bathymetry Sidescan Sonar (MSBSS) into Multi-Beam Bathymetry Sonar (MBBS) and presents a new Multiple Sub-array Beamspace - CAATI (MSB-CAATI) algorithm. The method not only can achieve high resolution seafloor mapping in the whole wide swath, but also can work well in complex acoustic environments or geometries. Simulation results and processing results of sea-experiment data prove the validity and superiority of the algorithm.

  17. 3-D reconstruction of coastal bathymetry from AIRSAR/POLSAR data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maged MARGHANY; Mazlan HASHIM; Arthur P. CRACKNELL

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method for reconstructing three-dimensional (3D) coastal bathymetry changes from Airborne AIRSAR/POLSAR synthetic aperture data. The new method is based on integration between fuzzy B-spline and Volterra algorithm. Volterra algorithm is used to simulate the ocean surface current from AIRSAR/POLSAR data. Then, the ocean surface current information used as input for continuity equation to estimate the water depths from AIRSAR/POLSAR data. This study shows that 3D ocean bathymetry can be reconstructed from AIRSAR/POLSAR data with root mean square error of ±0.03 m.

  18. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Agrihan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA...

  19. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Ofu and Olosega Islands, Territory of American Samoa, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  20. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 40 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  1. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  2. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Johnston Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  3. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures derived from gridded bathymetry of Farallon de Medinilla (FDM), Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  4. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones derived from gridded bathymetry of Farallon de Medinilla (FDM), Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry and was created using the...

  5. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Alamagan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA...

  6. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Asuncion Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry collected aboard NOAA...

  7. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Farallon de Pajaros (Uracas) Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA...

  8. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of of Galvez Bank, South Galvez Bank, and 11-Mile Reef, Territory of Guam, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA...

  9. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Supply Reef, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA...

  10. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Sarigan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA...

  11. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Maug Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA...

  12. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Maug Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  13. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Pagan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA...

  14. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Ofu and Olosega Islands, Territory of American Samoa, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V...

  15. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Guguan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA...

  16. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Sarigan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  17. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Guguan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  18. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Alamagan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  19. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Agrihan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  20. Flow and bathymetry in sharp open-channel bends: Experiments and predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, J.; Constantinescu, G.; Blanckaert, K.; Weber, L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on experiments and simulations conducted in very sharp open-channel bends with flat and equilibrium bathymetry, corresponding to the initial and final phases of the erosion and deposition processes, respectively. The study of flow in curved open bends is relevant for flow in natur

  1. Gridded bathymetry of Galvez Bank, S. Galvez Bank, and 11-Mile Reef, Territory of Guam, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (5m) of the bank environment of Galvez Bank, and 2 small nearby banks S. Galvez Bank (~ 3 nmi south of Galvez) and 11-mile Reef (~ 5 nmi north of...

  2. Bathymetry Hillshade [2m]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The raster data file is included...

  3. Bathymetry Hillshade [5m]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The raster data file is included...

  4. Achieving comparable uncertainty estimates with Kalman filters or linear smoothers for bathymetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Brian S.; Elmore, Paul A.; Avera, William E.; Zambo, Samantha J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper examines and contrasts two estimation methods, Kalman filtering and linear smoothing, for creating interpolated data products from bathymetry measurements. Using targeted examples, we demonstrate previously obscured behavior showing the dependence of linear smoothers on the spatial arrangement of the measurements, yielding markedly different estimation results than the Kalman filter. For bathymetry data, we have modified the variance estimates from both the Kalman filter and linear smoothers to obtain comparable estimators for dense data. These comparable estimators produce uncertainty estimates that have statistically insignificant differences via hypothesis testing. Achieving comparable estimation is accomplished by applying the "propagated uncertainty" concept and a numerical realization of Tobler's principle to the measurement data prior to the computation of the estimate. We show new mathematical derivations for these modifications. In addition, we show test results with (a) synthetic data and (b) gridded bathymetry in the area of the Scripps and La Jolla Canyons. Our tenfold cross-validation for case (b) shows that the modified equations create comparable uncertainty for both gridding algorithms with null hypothesis acceptance rates of greater than 99.95% of the data points. In contrast, bilinear interpolation has 10 times the amount of rejection. We then discuss how the uncertainty estimators are, in principle, applicable to interpolate geophysical data other than bathymetry.

  5. An X-Band Radar System for Bathymetry and Wave Field Analysis in a Harbour Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ludeno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine X-band radar based systems are well tested to provide information about sea state and bathymetry. It is also well known that complex geometries and non-uniform bathymetries provide a much bigger challenge than offshore scenarios. In order to tackle this issue a retrieval method is proposed, based on spatial partitioning of the data and the application of the Normalized Scalar Product (NSP, which is an innovative procedure for the joint estimation of bathymetry and surface currents. The strategy is then applied to radar data acquired around a harbour entrance, and results show that the reconstructed bathymetry compares well with ground truth data obtained by an echo-sounder campaign, thus proving the reliability of the whole procedure. The spectrum thus retrieved is then analysed to show the evidence of reflected waves from the harbour jetties, as confirmed by chain of hydrodynamic models of the sea wave field. The possibility of using a land based radar to reveal sea wave reflection is entirely new and may open up new operational applications of the system.

  6. The influence of continental shelf bathymetry on Antarctic Ice Sheet response to climate forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, Philip J.; Mullally, Dan; Golledge, Nicholas R.

    2016-07-01

    We investigated whether shelf-depth changes would have influenced Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) response to climate forcing using the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM). The simulations confirm that this would have indeed been the case. For the last-glacial-cycle (LGC) type forcing we prescribed, a modern-like polar AIS surrounded by shallow and intermediate bathymetries experiences rapid grounding-line advance early during the transition from interglacial to glacial forcing. This is in contrast to our baseline simulation of AIS response on the currently overdeepened bathymetry, which showed the expected gradual advance of grounding lines to the same climatic forcing. In the simulation, the more-positive mass balance for the shallower bathymetry is primarily a result of significantly lower calving fluxes from smaller-area ice shelves. On the basis of these results, we suggest that shelf bathymetry is an important boundary condition that should be considered when reconstructing AIS behavior since at least the middle Miocene. We note that caution should be used when applying these concepts because the particular way in which AIS mass balance is altered by shelf depth depends on how the changes in accumulation and ablation at the marine terminations combine with accumulation and ablation on land.

  7. Integrating multibeam backscatter angular response, mosaic and bathymetry data for benthic habitat mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozaimi Che Hasan

    Full Text Available Multibeam echosounders (MBES are increasingly becoming the tool of choice for marine habitat mapping applications. In turn, the rapid expansion of habitat mapping studies has resulted in a need for automated classification techniques to efficiently map benthic habitats, assess confidence in model outputs, and evaluate the importance of variables driving the patterns observed. The benthic habitat characterisation process often involves the analysis of MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic or angular response with observation data providing ground truth. However, studies that make use of the full range of MBES outputs within a single classification process are limited. We present an approach that integrates backscatter angular response with MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic and their derivatives in a classification process using a Random Forests (RF machine-learning algorithm to predict the distribution of benthic biological habitats. This approach includes a method of deriving statistical features from backscatter angular response curves created from MBES data collated within homogeneous regions of a backscatter mosaic. Using the RF algorithm we assess the relative importance of each variable in order to optimise the classification process and simplify models applied. The results showed that the inclusion of the angular response features in the classification process improved the accuracy of the final habitat maps from 88.5% to 93.6%. The RF algorithm identified bathymetry and the angular response mean as the two most important predictors. However, the highest classification rates were only obtained after incorporating additional features derived from bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic. The angular response features were found to be more important to the classification process compared to the backscatter mosaic features. This analysis indicates that integrating angular response information with bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic, along with

  8. Integrating multibeam backscatter angular response, mosaic and bathymetry data for benthic habitat mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Hasan, Rozaimi; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Laurenson, Laurie; Schimel, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Multibeam echosounders (MBES) are increasingly becoming the tool of choice for marine habitat mapping applications. In turn, the rapid expansion of habitat mapping studies has resulted in a need for automated classification techniques to efficiently map benthic habitats, assess confidence in model outputs, and evaluate the importance of variables driving the patterns observed. The benthic habitat characterisation process often involves the analysis of MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic or angular response with observation data providing ground truth. However, studies that make use of the full range of MBES outputs within a single classification process are limited. We present an approach that integrates backscatter angular response with MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic and their derivatives in a classification process using a Random Forests (RF) machine-learning algorithm to predict the distribution of benthic biological habitats. This approach includes a method of deriving statistical features from backscatter angular response curves created from MBES data collated within homogeneous regions of a backscatter mosaic. Using the RF algorithm we assess the relative importance of each variable in order to optimise the classification process and simplify models applied. The results showed that the inclusion of the angular response features in the classification process improved the accuracy of the final habitat maps from 88.5% to 93.6%. The RF algorithm identified bathymetry and the angular response mean as the two most important predictors. However, the highest classification rates were only obtained after incorporating additional features derived from bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic. The angular response features were found to be more important to the classification process compared to the backscatter mosaic features. This analysis indicates that integrating angular response information with bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic, along with their derivatives

  9. Bathymetry Surface Layer used to identify, delineate and classify moderate-depth benthic habitats around St. John, USVI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 2x2 meter resolution bathymetry surface of the moderate-depth portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, south of St....

  10. Bathymetry 1M GRID of St. John (South Shore - Area 1), US Virgin Islands, 2004, UTM 20 WGS84

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Grid with 1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the south shore of St. John, US Virgin Islands. Due to the large file size...

  11. NOAA ESRI Geotiff- 1m Bathymetry of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, 2004, UTM 20 WGS84

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the south shore of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands.NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA...

  12. Single-Beam XYZ Point Bathymetry Data of the Hurricane Sandy Breach at Fire Island, New York, June 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset, 20130626_bathy_xyz.zip, consists of single-beam point data collected in June 2013 during a bathymetry survey of the Wilderness Breach and adjacent...

  13. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Galvez Bank, South Galvez Bank, and 11-Mile Reef, Territory of Guam, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Elton Sette. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of change (in...

  14. NOAA TIFF Image - 50m Multibeam Bathymetry, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Whiting - (2001), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 50x50 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight, derived from...

  15. 5 m Gridded bathymetry of the lagoon and slope environments of Rose Atoll, American Samoa (netCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (5 m cell size) of the inner lagoon and slope environments of Rose Atoll, American Samoa. This survey provides coverage between <10 and 300...

  16. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (20 m cell size) of the shelf and slope environments of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  17. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  18. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  19. CRED 40 m Gridded bathymetry of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (40 m cell size) bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf and slope environments of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete...

  20. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  1. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf and slope environments of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete...

  2. CRED 40 m Gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (40 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  3. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (5 m cell size) of the shelf and slope environments of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  4. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (20 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  5. CRED 40 m Gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (40 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  6. CRED 40 m Gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (40 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  7. 5 m Gridded bathymetry of the lagoon and slope environments of Rose Atoll, American Samoa (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (5 m cell size) of the inner lagoon and slope environments of Rose Atoll, American Samoa. This survey provides coverage between <10 and 300...

  8. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (20 m cell size) of the shelf and slope environments of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  9. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Isand Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom coverage...

  10. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  11. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Sun Illuminated Bathymetry for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Sun Illuminated Bathymetry GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  12. CRED Gridded 20m bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of Midway Atoll, Hawaii, USA (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of Midway Atoll, Hawaii, USA. Bottom coverage was achieved in depths between 0...

  13. CRED 60 m Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of UTM Zone 1, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA within UTM Zone 1. Bottom coverage was...

  14. CRED Gridded 20m bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of Midway Atoll, Hawaii, USA (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of Midway Atoll, Hawaii, USA. Bottom coverage was achieved in depths between 0...

  15. CRED Gridded 5m bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of Midway Atoll, Hawaii, USA (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of Midway Island, Hawaii, USA. Bottom coverage was achieved in depths between 0...

  16. CRED Gridded 5m bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of Midway Atoll, Hawaii, USA (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of Midway Atoll, Hawaii, USA. Bottom coverage was achieved in depths between 0...

  17. Single-Beam Bathymetry Point Data Shapefile of the Hurricane Sandy Breach at Fire Island, New York, June 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset, 20130626_bathy_points.zip, consists of single-beam point data collected in June 2013 during a bathymetry survey of the Wilderness Breach and adjacent...

  18. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones derived from gridded bathymetry of Swains Island,Territory of American Samoa, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. BPI Zones was created using the Benthic...

  19. NOAA ESRI Geotiff- 1m Bathymetry of St. Croix (Buck Island), US Virgin Islands, 2004, UTM 20 WGS84

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the north shore of Buck Island St. Croix, US Virgin Islands.NOAA's...

  20. Rugosity derived from gridded bathymetry of Farallon de Medinilla (FDM), Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Elton Sette. Cell values reflect the (surface area) / (planimetric...

  1. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  2. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (5 m cell size) of the shelf and slope environments of Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  3. CRED 40m Gridded bathymetry of the banktop and slope environments of Vailulu Seamount, American Samoa (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (40 m cell size) bathymetry of of Vailulu Seamount, an active volcano that lies between Ta'u Island and Rose Atoll, American Samoa, South Pacific. Almost...

  4. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (20 m cell size) bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf and slope environments of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete...

  5. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf and slope environments of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete...

  6. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf and slope environments of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  7. CRED 40 m Gridded bathymetry of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (40 m cell size) bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf and slope environments of Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete...

  8. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (20 m cell size) bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf and slope environments of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete...

  9. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the lagoon, shelf and slope environments of Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific. Almost complete bottom...

  10. Gridded multibeam bathymetry of Aguijan, Tinian, Farallon de Medinilla and Saipan Islands and Tatsumi and Marpi Banks, CNMI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry shelf, bank and slope environments of Aguijan, Tinian, Farallon de Medinilla and Saipan Islands and Tatsumi and Marpi Banks, CNMI. Bottom...

  11. Shaded Relief of the Bathymetry near Shorty's Island and Myrtle Bend, 2010, Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, ID

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The shaded relief raster data was created based on bathymetry obtained in the meander reach collected in about a one month period extending from 6/3/2010 -...

  12. NOAA TIFF Image - 3m Bathymetry, Florida Deep Coral Areas (Jacksonville) - Lost Coast Explorer - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 3x3 meter cell size representing bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the Atlantic Coast of Florida,...

  13. Slope 5 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Rota Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  14. Slope 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Guguan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  15. Slope grid derived from 10m gridded bathymetry of Alamagan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  16. Slope 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Agrihan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  17. Slope 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Asuncion Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  18. Slope 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Sarigan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  19. Slope 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Supply Reef, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  20. Slope 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Pagan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  1. Slope 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Maug Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  2. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of Lisianski Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA (NetCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of Lisianski Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Hawaii, USA. Bottom coverage...

  3. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Hawaii, USA (NetCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Hawaii, USA. Bottom coverage was achieved in depths...

  4. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of Lisianski Island, Hawaii, USA (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of Lisianski Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Hawaii, USA. Bottom coverage...

  5. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Hawaii, USA (NetCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Hawaii, USA. Bottom coverage was achieved in depths...

  6. CRED 60 m Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of UTM Zone 2, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA within UTM Zone 2. Bottom coverage was...

  7. Bathymetry 1M GRID of St. Croix (Buck Island), US Virgin Islands, 2004, UTM 20 WGS84

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Grid with 1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the north shore of Buck Island St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. NOAA's...

  8. CRED 20m Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of Kure Atoll, Hawaii, USA (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of Kure Atoll, Hawaii, USA. Bottom coverage was achieved in depths between 0 and...

  9. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Hawaii, USA (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Hawaii, USA. Bottom coverage was achieved in depths...

  10. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures derived from gridded bathymetry of Swains Island,Territory of American Samoa, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. BPI Zones was created using the...

  11. Bathymetry and digital elevation models of Coyote Creek and Alviso Slough, South San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxgrover, Amy C.; Finlayson, David P.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Fregoso, Theresa A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal and Marine Geology Program completed three cruises to map the bathymetry of the main channel and shallow intertidal mudflats in the southernmost part of south San Francisco Bay. The three surveys were merged to generate comprehensive maps of Coyote Creek (from Calaveras Point east to the railroad bridge) and Alviso Slough (from the bay to the town of Alviso) to establish baseline bathymetry prior to the breaching of levees adjacent to Alviso and Guadalupe Sloughs as part of the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project http://www.southbayrestoration.org. Since 2010 we have conducted four additional surveys to monitor bathymetric change in this region as restoration progresses.

  12. Combined High-Resolution LIDAR Topography and Multibeam Bathymetry for Northern Resurrection Bay, Seward, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labay, Keith A.; Haeussler, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    A new Digital Elevation Model was created using the best available high-resolution topography and multibeam bathymetry surrounding the area of Seward, Alaska. Datasets of (1) LIDAR topography collected for the Kenai Watershed Forum, (2) Seward harbor soundings from the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, and (3) multibeam bathymetry from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration contributed to the final combined product. These datasets were placed into a common coordinate system, horizontal datum, vertical datum, and data format prior to being combined. The projected coordinate system of Universal Transverse Mercator Zone 6 North American Datum of 1927 was used for the horizontal coordinates. Z-values in meters were referenced to the tidal datum of Mean High Water. Gaps between the datasets were interpolated to create the final seamless 5-meter grid covering the area of interest around Seward, Alaska.

  13. Performance Assessment of High Resolution Airborne Full Waveform LiDAR for Shallow River Bathymetry

    OpenAIRE

    Zhigang Pan; Craig Glennie; Preston Hartzell; Juan Carlos Fernandez-Diaz; Carl Legleiter; Brandon Overstreet

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate the performance of full waveform LiDAR decomposition algorithms with a high-resolution single band airborne LiDAR bathymetry system in shallow rivers. A continuous wavelet transformation (CWT) is proposed and applied in two fluvial environments, and the results are compared to existing echo retrieval methods. LiDAR water depths are also compared to independent field measurements. In both clear and turbid water, the CWT algorithm outperforms the other methods if only green LiDAR ob...

  14. COSTAL BATHYMETRY ESTIMATION FROM MULTISPECTRAL IMAGE WITH BACK PROPAGATION NEURAL NETWORK

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, S.Y.; Liu, C.L.; Ren, H.

    2016-01-01

    Bathymetric data in coastal area are important for marine sciences, hydrological applications and even for transportation and military purposes. Compare to traditional sonar and recent airborne bathymetry LIDAR systems, optical satellite images can provide information to survey a large area with single or multiple satellite images efficiently and economically. And it is especially suitable for coastal area because the penetration of visible light in water merely reaches 30 meters. In this stu...

  15. Bathymetry from space: Rationale and requirements for a new, high-resolution altimetric mission

    OpenAIRE

    Sandwell, David T.; Smith, Walter H.f.; Gille, Sarah; Kappel, Ellen; Jayne, Steven; Soofi, Khalid; Coakley, Bernard; Geli, Louis

    2006-01-01

    Bathymetry is foundational data, providing basic infrastructure for scientific, economic, educational, managerial, and political work. Applications as diverse as tsunami hazard assessment, communications cable and pipeline route planning, resource exploration, habitat management, and territorial claims under the Law of the Sea all require reliable bathymetric maps to be available on demand. Fundamental Earth science questions, such as what controls seafloor shape and how seafloor shape influe...

  16. RTOPO-1: A consistent dataset for Antarctic ice shelf topography and global ocean bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, Ralph

    2010-05-01

    Sub-ice shelf circulation and freezing/melting rates depend critically on an accurate and consistent representation of cavity geometry (i.e. ice-shelf draft and ocean bathymetry). Existing global or pan-Antarctic data sets have turned out to contain various inconsistencies and inaccuracies. The goal of this work is to compile independent regional fields into a global data set. We use the S-2004 global 1-minute bathymetry as the backbone and add an improved version of the BEDMAP topography for an area that roughly coincides with the Antarctic continental shelf. Locations of the merging line have been carefully adjusted in order to get the best out of each data set. High-resolution gridded data for the Amery, Fimbul, Filchner-Ronne, Larsen C and George VI Ice Shelves and for Pine Island Glacier have been carefully merged into the ambient ice and ocean topographies. Multibeam ship survey data for bathymetry in the former Larsen B cavity and the southeastern Bellingshausen Sea have been obtained from the data centers of Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI), British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO), gridded, and again carefully merged into the existing bathymetry map. The resulting global 1-minute data set contains consistent masks for open ocean, grounded ice, floating ice, and bare land surface. The Ice Shelf Cavern Geometry Team: Anne Le Brocq, Tara Deen, Eugene Domack, Pierre Dutrieux, Ben Galton-Fenzi, Dorothea Graffe, Hartmut Hellmer, Angelika Humbert, Daniela Jansen, Adrian Jenkins, Astrid Lambrecht, Keith Makinson, Fred Niederjasper, Frank Nitsche, Ole Anders Nøst, Lars Henrik Smedsrud, and Walter Smith

  17. Bottom Roughness and Bathymetry Estimation of 1-D Shallow Water Equations Model Using Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshyar, M.; Hagen, S. C.; Wang, D.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrodynamic models are widely applied to coastal areas in order to predict water levels and flood inundation and typically involve solving a form of the Shallow Water Equations (SWE). The SWE are routinely discretized by applying numerical methods, such as the finite element method. Like other numerical models, hydrodynamic models include uncertainty. Uncertainties are generated due to errors in the discrete approximation of coastal geometry, bathymetry, bottom friction and forcing functions such as tides and wind fields. Methods to counteract these uncertainties should always begin with improvements to physical characterization of: the geometric description through increased resolution, parameters that describe land cover variations in the natural and urban environment, parameters that enhance transfer of surface forcings to the water surface, open boundary forcings, and the wetting/drying brought upon by flood and ebb cycles. When the best possible physical representation is achieved, we are left with calibration and data assimilation to reduce model uncertainty. Data assimilation has been applied to coastal hydrodynamic models to better estimate system states and/or system parameters by incorporating observed data into the model. Kalman Filter is one of the most studied data assimilation methods that minimizes the mean square errors between model state estimations and the observed data in linear systems (Kalman , 1960). For nonlinear systems, as with hydrodynamic models, a variation of Kalman filter called Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), is applied to update the system state according to error statistics in the context of Monte Carlo simulations (Evensen , 2003) & (Hitoshi et. al, 2014). In this research, Kalman Filter is incorporated to simultaneously estimate an influential parameter used in the shallow water equations, bottom roughness, and to adjust the physical feature of bathymetry. Starting from an initial estimate of bottom roughness and bathymetry, and

  18. Direct inversion of shallow-water bathymetry from EO-1 hyperspectral remote sensing data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhishen Liu; Yan Zhou

    2011-01-01

    @@ Using the US National Aeronautics and space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing-1 Mission (EO-1)hyperion hyperspectral remote sensing data, we study the shallow-water bathymetry inversion in Smith Island Bay.The fast line-of-sight atmospheric analysis of spectral hypercubes module is applied for atmospheric correction, and principal component analysis method combined with scatter diagram and maximum likelihood classification is used for seabed classification.The diffuse attenuation coefficient Kd is derived using quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA), which performs well in optically deep water.Kd obtained from QAA requires correction, particularly those derived in some coastal areas with optically shallow water and calculated by direct inversion based on radiative transfer theory to obtain the bathymetry.The direct inversion method derives the water depth quickly, and matches the results from optimized algorithm.%Using the US National Aeronautics and space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing-1 Mission (EO-1) hyperion hyperspectral remote sensing data, we study the shallow-water bathymetry inversion in Smith Island Bay.The fast line-of-sight atmospheric analysis of spectral hypercubes module is applied for atmospheric correction, and principal component analysis method combined with scatter diagram and maximum likelihood classification is used for seabed classification.The diffuse attenuation coefficient Kd is derived using quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA), which performs well in optically deep water Kd obtained from QAA requires correction, particularly those derived in some coastal areas with optically shallow water and calculated by direct inversion based on radiative transfer theory to obtain the bathymetry.The direct inversion method derives the water depth quickly, and matches the results from optimized algorithm.

  19. Utilization of bathymetry data to examine lead sediment contamination distributions in Lake Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris H. Marvin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bathymetry data offer interesting opportunities for the analysis of contaminant distribution patterns. This research utilized lead surficial sediment sample data from Lake Ontario that were collected by the Canada Centre for Inland Waters in 1968 and 1998. Traditionally, two-dimensional analyses such as dot maps or proportional circle representation have been utilized to examine pollutant levels. Generating area estimates allows for expanded spatial analysis of contaminant distribution patterns. Lake-wide surfaces were derived using the ordinary kriging technique. These were then layered on bathymetry data to examine three-dimensional relationships between observed pollution patterns and lake-bottom features. Spatial variability was observed in both the 1968 and 1998 datasets. Contamination levels in 1998 dropped substantially, especially in areas that were previously the most heavily polluted and above the Probable Effect Level (4660.23 km2 or 26.72% of the common analysis area lake-bottom in 1998 versus 6189.07 km2 or 62.00% in 1968. Conversely, areas below the Threshold Effect Level increased from 922.09 km2 (5.29% in 1968 to 3484.22 km2 (19.98% in 1998. In both years, shallow and sill/ridge areas tended to have lower levels of contamination than deeper lake basins or contaminant inflow areas. The 1968 dataset likely provides a more detailed estimation surface as there were more points available for interpolation procedures. The kriging surfaces when combined with bathymetry, sedimentology information, and knowledge of physical processes provide a comprehensive illustration of the contaminant distributions whether they are high (1968 or when loadings are significantly reduced (1998. The results have implications for future sediment assessment programs and survey design on a lake-wide basis. The bathymetry data allowed for enhanced interpretation and an improved understanding of observed lead pollution patterns.

  20. Analysis of the Effect Ofwave Patterns on Refraction in Airborne LIDAR Bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfeld, P.; Richter, K.; Maas, H.-G.; Weiß, Robert

    2016-06-01

    This contribution investigates the effects of wave patterns on 3D point coordinate accuracy in LiDAR bathymetry. The finite diameter refracted laser pulse path passing the air/water interface is modelled differentially and in a strict manner. Typical wave patterns are simulated and their impact on the 3D coordinates at the bottom of the water body are analysed. It can be shown that the effects of waves within small LiDAR bathymetry footprints on the depth and planimetry coordinates is significant. Planimetric effects may reach several decimetres or even metres, and depth coordinate errors also reach several decimetres, even in case of horizontal water body bottom. The simplified assumption of averaging wave effects often made in many ALB applications is not only fulfilled in cases of a very large beam divergence under certain wave pattern conditions. Modern smaller beam divergence systems will mostly experience significant wave pattern dependent coordinate errors. The results presented here thus form a basis for a more strict coordinate correction if the wave pattern can be modelled from the LiDAR bathymetry water surface reflections or other observations. Moreover, it will be shown that the induced coordinate errors contain systematic parts in addition to the local wave surface dependent quasi-random part, which allows for the formulation of wave pattern type dependent correction terms.

  1. The Calibration Model and Simulation Analysis of Circular Scanning Airborne Laser Bathymetry System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHEN Erhua

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To improve the positioning accuracy of circular scanning airborne laser bathymetry system, a calibration method is presented in this paper. When the laser points are collected by the bathymetry system on the level area, they should be on the same plane. However, they are not coplanar because of systematic error and random error. So we try to fit the points to a plane, which may help to adjust the errors and then correct the point location.Firstly, the circular scanning airborne laser bathymetry positioning model is derived in the simple mode. The intersection of laser line and sea surface is simulated depending on the mathematical principles of line and plane intersection. Combined with the direction vector of laser line in the water got by the refraction principle, the sea floor plane mathematical equation is used to compute the location of the laser points. Then, the parameter weighted least squares adjustment model is derived with the prior variance introduced, which lays the foundation for the following computing of calibration model. Finally, the calibration adjustment mathematic model and the detailed computing process are derived. The simulation computing and analysis for the calibration process is presented, and some meaningful conclusions for the calibration are achieved.

  2. Improved Bathymetry Resolution in the Ross Sea from Aerogravity and Magnetics: Examples from Operation IceBridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, K. J.; Cochran, J. R.; Bell, R. E.; Charles, K.; Burton, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Ross Ice Shelf, located in the embayment between East and West Antarctica, is one of the largest underexplored patches of ocean on the planet. Sediment cores show that the Ross Ice Shelf can disintegrate during some interglacial periods. The conditions required for sudden collapse are not well constrained. A key to understanding the dynamics and long-term stability of the Ross Ice Shelf system is having high-resolution constraints on its boundary conditions, including sea floor bathymetry. The sea floor under the Ross Ice Shelf has developed in response to both the tectonic development of the West Antarctic Rift and the glacial signature of the waxing and waning Antarctic Ice Sheets. A mixture of fabrics and orientations in its bathymetry reflect this complex development. However, present oceanographic models of water circulation under the ice are based on low-resolution bathymetric maps drawn from stations spaced 55 km apart obtained during the RIGGS project in the 1970s. In contrast, most of the bathymetry of the world's oceans has been mapped to approximately 15 km resolution from satellite altimetry and much higher resolution from acoustic surveys. Improvement of Ross Ice Shelf bathymetry can be achieved from combined analysis and inversion of gravity and magnetic data acquired from airborne surveys over the Ross Ice Shelf. Survey lines flown in 2013 by Operation IceBridge, with the Sander Geophysics Ltd AIRGrav system over the central and northern Ross Embayment provide a tenfold increase, to 5 km, of the along track resolution of bathymetry. Newly resolved bathymetric highs and lows have amplitudes of up to 200 km. Combining the gravity and magnetic surveys also reveals the differing geology across the embayment. Results from these surveys, including comparison with ship-based bathymetry data from the Ross Sea, demonstrate the value of gravity and magnetic surveys for mapping the bathymetry of the Ross Ice Shelf and the need for more comprehensive

  3. Archive of single-beam bathymetry data collected from select areas in Weeks Bay and Weeks Bayou, southwest Louisiana, January 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Reich, Christopher D.; Smith, Christopher G.; Reynolds, Billy J.

    2014-01-01

    A team of scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, collected 92 line-kilometers of dual-frequency single-beam bathymetry data in the tidal creeks, bayous, and coastal areas near Weeks Bay, southwest Louisiana. Limited bathymetry data exist for these tidally and meteorologically influenced shallow-water estuarine environments. In order to reduce the present knowledge gap, the objectives of this study were to (1) develop methods for regional inland bathymetry mapping and monitoring, (2) test inland bathymetry mapping system in pilot locations for integrating multiple elevation (aerial and terrestrial lidar) and bathymetry datasets, (3) implement inland bathymetry mapping and monitoring in highly focused sites, and (4) evaluate changes in bathymetry and channel-fill sediment storage using these methods. This report contains single-beam bathymetric data collected between January 14 and 18, 2013. Data were collected from the RV Mako (5-meter vessel) in water depths that ranged from This report serves as an archive of processed bathymetry data. Geographic information system data provided in this document include a 10-meter cell-size interpolated gridded bathymetry surface, and trackline maps. Additional files include error analysis maps, Field Activity Collection System logs, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata. Do not use these data for navigational purposes.

  4. Gravity Anomaly Assessment Using Ggms and Airborne Gravity Data Towards Bathymetry Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugi, A.; Din, A. H. M.; Omar, K. M.; Mardi, A. S.; Som, Z. A. M.; Omar, A. H.; Yahaya, N. A. Z.; Yazid, N.

    2016-09-01

    The Earth's potential information is important for exploration of the Earth's gravity field. The techniques of measuring the Earth's gravity using the terrestrial and ship borne technique are time consuming and have limitation on the vast area. With the space-based measuring technique, these limitations can be overcome. The satellite gravity missions such as Challenging Mini-satellite Payload (CHAMP), Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), and Gravity-Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer Mission (GOCE) has introduced a better way in providing the information on the Earth's gravity field. From these satellite gravity missions, the Global Geopotential Models (GGMs) has been produced from the spherical harmonics coefficient data type. The information of the gravity anomaly can be used to predict the bathymetry because the gravity anomaly and bathymetry have relationships between each other. There are many GGMs that have been published and each of the models gives a different value of the Earth's gravity field information. Therefore, this study is conducted to assess the most reliable GGM for the Malaysian Seas. This study covered the area of the marine area on the South China Sea at Sabah extent. Seven GGMs have been selected from the three satellite gravity missions. The gravity anomalies derived from the GGMs are compared with the airborne gravity anomaly, in order to figure out the correlation (R2) and the root mean square error (RMSE) of the data. From these assessments, the most suitable GGMs for the study area is GOCE model, GO_CONS_GCF_2_TIMR4 with the R2 and RMSE value of 0.7899 and 9.886 mGal, respectively. This selected model will be used in the estimating the bathymetry for Malaysian Seas in future.

  5. Mapping bathymetry based on waterlines observed from low altitude Helikite remote sensing platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JO Young-Heon; SHA Jin; KWON Jae-Il; JUN Kicheon; PARK Jinku

    2015-01-01

    Mapping shoreline changes along coastal regions is critically important in monitoring continuously rising sea surface heights due to climate change and frequent severe storms. Thus, it is especially important if the region has very high tidal ranges over very gentle tidal flats, which is a very vulnerable region. Although the various remote sensing platforms can be used to map shoreline changes, the spatial and temporal resolutions are not enough to obtain it for a short time. Accordingly, in this study we introduce the newly developed low altitude Helikite remote sensing platform to achieve much better resolutions of shorelines and a bathymetry. The Helikite stands for Helium balloon and Kite, which is a kind of aerial platform that uses the advantages of both a Helium balloon and a kite. Field experiments were conducted in the Jaebu Island, off the coast of the west Korean Peninsula in January 29, 2011. In order to extract shorelines from the consecutive images taken by the low altitude Helikite remote sensing platform, active contours without edges (ACWE) is used. Edges or boundaries exist primarily on places between one type of objective and the other. Since the hydrodynamic pressure has an effect everywhere, the locations of the waterlines can be the isobath lines. We could map several waterlines, which would enable us to complete a local bathymetry map ranges from 35 to 60 cm depth. The error resulting from applying ACWE algorithm to the imagery to determine the waterline is approximately less than 1 m. Therefore, it is very unique way to obtain such high resolutions of bathymetry with high accuracy for the regions of extremely high tidal ranges for a short time.

  6. A consistent data set of Antarctic ice sheet topography, cavity geometry, and global bathymetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Timmermann

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sub-ice shelf circulation and freezing/melting rates in ocean general circulation models depend critically on an accurate and consistent representation of cavity geometry. Existing global or pan-Antarctic topography data sets have turned out to contain various inconsistencies and inaccuracies. The goal of this work is to compile independent regional surveys and maps into a global data set. We use the S-2004 global 1-min bathymetry as the backbone and add an improved version of the BEDMAP topography (ALBMAP bedrock topography for an area that roughly coincides with the Antarctic continental shelf. The position of the merging line is individually chosen in different sectors in order to capture the best of both data sets. High-resolution gridded data for ice shelf topography and cavity geometry of the Amery, Fimbul, Filchner-Ronne, Larsen C and George VI Ice Shelves, and for Pine Island Glacier are carefully merged into the ambient ice and ocean topographies. Multibeam survey data for bathymetry in the former Larsen B cavity and the southeastern Bellingshausen Sea have been obtained from the data centers of Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI, British Antarctic Survey (BAS and Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO, gridded, and blended into the existing bathymetry map. The resulting global 1-min Refined Topography data set (RTopo-1 contains self-consistent maps for upper and lower ice surface heights, bedrock topography, and surface type (open ocean, grounded ice, floating ice, bare land surface. The data set is available in NetCDF format from the PANGAEA database at doi:10.1594/pangaea.741917.

  7. Developing an Algorithm for Finding Deep-Sea Corals on Seamounts Using Bathymetry and Photographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, D. P.; Adkins, J. F.; Scheirer, D. P.

    2006-12-01

    Over the last three years we have conducted several cruises on seamounts in the North Atlantic to sample and characterize the distribution of deep-sea corals in space and time. Using the deep submergence vehicle Alvin and the ROV Hercules we have spent over 80 hours on the seafloor. With the autonomous vehicle ABE and a towed camera sled, we collected over 10,000 bottom photographs and over 60 hours of micro- bathymetry over 120 km of seafloor. While there are very few living scleractinia (Desmophyllum dianthus, Solenosmilia sp. and, Lophilia sp.), we recovered over 5,000 fossil D. dianthus and over 60 kg of fossil Solenosmilia sp. The large numbers of fossil corals mean that a perceived lack of material does not have to limit the use of this new archive of the deep ocean. However, we need a better strategy for finding and returning samples to the lab. Corals clearly prefer to grow on steep slopes and at the tops of scarps of all scales. They are preferentially found along ridges and on small knolls flanking a larger edifice. There is also a clear preference for D. dianthus to recruit onto carbonate substrate. Overall, our sample collection, bathymetry and bottom photographs allow us to create an algorithm for finding corals based only on knowledge of the seafloor topography. We can test this algorithm against known sampling locations and visual surveys of the seafloor. Similar to the way seismic data are used to locate ideal coring locations, we propose that high-resolution bathymetry can be used to predict the most likely locations for finding fossil deep-sea corals.

  8. Preliminary Studies Leading Toward the Development of a LIDAR Bathymetry Mapping Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, John M.; Krenek, Brendan D.; Kunz, Terry D.; Krabill, William; Stetina, Fran

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed a laser ranging device (LIDAR) which provides accurate and timely data of earth features. NASA/GSFC recently modified the sensor to include a scanning capability to produce LIDAR swaths. They have also integrated a Global Positioning System (GPS) and an Inertial Navigation System (INS) to accurately determine the absolute aircraft location and aircraft attitude (pitch, yaw, and roll), respectively. The sensor has been flown in research mode by NASA for many years. The LIDAR has been used in different configurations or modes to acquire such data as altimetry (topography), bathymetry (water depth), laser-induced fluorosensing (tracer dye movements, oil spills and oil thickness, chlorophyll and plant stress identification), forestry, and wetland discrimination studies. NASA and HARC are developing a commercial version of the instrument for topographic mapping applications. The next phase of the commercialization project will be to investigate other applications such as wetlands mapping and coastal bathymetry. In this paper we report on preliminary laboratory measurements to determine the feasibility of making accurate depth measurements in relatively shallow water (approximately 2 to 6 feet deep) using a LIDAR system. The LIDAR bathymetry measurements are relatively simple in theory. The water depth is determined by measuring the time interval between the water surface reflection and the bottom surface reflection signals. Depth is then calculated by dividing by the index of refraction of water. However, the measurements are somewhat complicated due to the convolution of the water surface return signal with the bottom surface return signal. Therefore in addition to the laboratory experiments, computer simulations of the data were made to show these convolution effects in the return pulse waveform due to: (1) water depth, and (2) changes in bottom surface

  9. Estimation of wave phase speed and nearshore bathymetry from video imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdon, H.F.; Holman, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    A new remote sensing technique based on video image processing has been developed for the estimation of nearshore bathymetry. The shoreward propagation of waves is measured using pixel intensity time series collected at a cross-shore array of locations using remotely operated video cameras. The incident band is identified, and the cross-spectral matrix is calculated for this band. The cross-shore component of wavenumber is found as the gradient in phase of the first complex empirical orthogonal function of this matrix. Water depth is then inferred from linear wave theory's dispersion relationship. Full bathymetry maps may be measured by collecting data in a large array composed of both cross-shore and longshore lines. Data are collected hourly throughout the day, and a stable, daily estimate of bathymetry is calculated from the median of the hourly estimates. The technique was tested using 30 days of hourly data collected at the SandyDuck experiment in Duck, North Carolina, in October 1997. Errors calculated as the difference between estimated depth and ground truth data show a mean bias of -35 cm (rms error = 91 cm). Expressed as a fraction of the true water depth, the mean percent error was 13% (rms error = 34%). Excluding the region of known wave nonlinearities over the bar crest, the accuracy of the technique improved, and the mean (rms) error was -20 cm (75 cm). Additionally, under low-amplitude swells (wave height H ???1 m), the performance of the technique across the entire profile improved to 6% (29%) of the true water depth with a mean (rms) error of -12 cm (71 cm). Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. GRAVITY ANOMALY ASSESSMENT USING GGMS AND AIRBORNE GRAVITY DATA TOWARDS BATHYMETRY ESTIMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tugi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Earth’s potential information is important for exploration of the Earth’s gravity field. The techniques of measuring the Earth’s gravity using the terrestrial and ship borne technique are time consuming and have limitation on the vast area. With the space-based measuring technique, these limitations can be overcome. The satellite gravity missions such as Challenging Mini-satellite Payload (CHAMP, Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE, and Gravity-Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer Mission (GOCE has introduced a better way in providing the information on the Earth’s gravity field. From these satellite gravity missions, the Global Geopotential Models (GGMs has been produced from the spherical harmonics coefficient data type. The information of the gravity anomaly can be used to predict the bathymetry because the gravity anomaly and bathymetry have relationships between each other. There are many GGMs that have been published and each of the models gives a different value of the Earth’s gravity field information. Therefore, this study is conducted to assess the most reliable GGM for the Malaysian Seas. This study covered the area of the marine area on the South China Sea at Sabah extent. Seven GGMs have been selected from the three satellite gravity missions. The gravity anomalies derived from the GGMs are compared with the airborne gravity anomaly, in order to figure out the correlation (R2 and the root mean square error (RMSE of the data. From these assessments, the most suitable GGMs for the study area is GOCE model, GO_CONS_GCF_2_TIMR4 with the R2 and RMSE value of 0.7899 and 9.886 mGal, respectively. This selected model will be used in the estimating the bathymetry for Malaysian Seas in future.

  11. Constraint on the recurrence of great outer-rise earthquakes from seafloor bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep, Norman H.

    2012-12-01

    Great outer rise earthquakes are a tsunami hazard as they occur on steeply dipping faults (Lay et al., 2009). The largest instrumentally recorded of these events are the 1933 Sanriku Japan earthquake ( M w = 8.4) and 1977 Sumba Indonesia earthquake ( M w = 8.3) (Lay et al., 2009). Seafloor bathymetry (Kobayashi et al., 1998) and plate kinematics indicate a great M w ≥ 8 outer rise earthquake on the zone of the great Tohoku M w 9 event can occur at most once in 7 megath-rust cycles.

  12. Volcanic evolution of the South Sandwich volcanic arc, South Atlantic, from multibeam bathymetry

    OpenAIRE

    Leat, Philip T; Day, Simon J; Tate, Alex J.; Martin, Tara J; Owen, Matthew J; Tappin, David R.

    2013-01-01

    New multibeam bathymetry data are presented for the South Sandwich intra-oceanic arc which occupies the small Sandwich plate in the South Atlantic, and is widely considered to be a simple end-member in the range of intra-oceanic arc types. The images show for the first time the distribution of submarine volcanic, tectonic and erosional-depositional features along the whole length of the 540 km long volcanic arc, allowing systematic investigation of along-arc variations. The data confirm that ...

  13. Recent advances in the applications of pulsed lasers in the hydrosphere. [considering airborne bathymetry system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, G. D.

    1975-01-01

    Laboratory and field measurements have been performed on the transmission/scattering characteristics of a pulsed neon laser as a function of water turbidity. These results have been used to establish the criteria for an airborne laser bathymetry system. Extensive measurements have been made of laser induced fluorescence using a pulsed tunable dye laser. Feasibility has been demonstrated for remote detection and possible identification of various types of algae and oils. Similar measurements made on a wide variety of organic dyes have shown this technique to have applications in remote measurements of subsurface currents, temperature and salinity.

  14. Altimetry, bathymetry and geoid variations at the Gavdos permanent Cal/Val facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertikas, Stelios P.; Daskalakis, Antonis; Tziavos, Ilias N.;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work has been to examine the relationship of steep bathymetry in the coastal areas around the permanent Cal/Val facility of Gavdos, and their influence on the produced calibration values for the Jason-2 satellite altimeter. The paper describes how changes in seafloor topography...... calibration data and careful data analysis, certain features and variations, with permanent signatures at some locations south of Gavdos, have been found in the altimeter bias values. Causes of these variations have been interpreted. Some of these features, for example, at 12km south of the Cal/Val site seem...

  15. Performance Assessment of High Resolution Airborne Full Waveform LiDAR for Shallow River Bathymetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Pan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the performance of full waveform LiDAR decomposition algorithms with a high-resolution single band airborne LiDAR bathymetry system in shallow rivers. A continuous wavelet transformation (CWT is proposed and applied in two fluvial environments, and the results are compared to existing echo retrieval methods. LiDAR water depths are also compared to independent field measurements. In both clear and turbid water, the CWT algorithm outperforms the other methods if only green LiDAR observations are available. However, both the definition of the water surface, and the turbidity of the water significantly influence the performance of the LiDAR bathymetry observations. The results suggest that there is no single best full waveform processing algorithm for all bathymetric situations. Overall, the optimal processing strategies resulted in a determination of water depths with a 6 cm mean at 14 cm standard deviation for clear water, and a 16 cm mean and 27 cm standard deviation in more turbid water.

  16. Neural networks for the generation of sea bed models using airborne lidar bathymetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Tomasz; Niemeyer, Joachim; Bujakiewicz, Aleksandra

    2016-06-01

    Various sectors of the economy such as transport and renewable energy have shown great interest in sea bed models. The required measurements are usually carried out by ship-based echo sounding, but this method is quite expensive. A relatively new alternative is data obtained by airborne lidar bathymetry. This study investigates the accuracy of these data, which was obtained in the context of the project `Investigation on the use of airborne laser bathymetry in hydrographic surveying'. A comparison to multi-beam echo sounding data shows only small differences in the depths values of the data sets. The IHO requirements of the total horizontal and vertical uncertainty for laser data are met. The second goal of this paper is to compare three spatial interpolation methods, namely Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Delaunay Triangulation (TIN), and supervised Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), for the generation of sea bed models. The focus of our investigation is on the amount of required sampling points. This is analyzed by manually reducing the data sets. We found that the three techniques have a similar performance almost independently of the amount of sampling data in our test area. However, ANN are more stable when using a very small subset of points.

  17. Neural networks for the generation of sea bed models using airborne lidar bathymetry data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogut Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Various sectors of the economy such as transport and renewable energy have shown great interest in sea bed models. The required measurements are usually carried out by ship-based echo sounding, but this method is quite expensive. A relatively new alternative is data obtained by airborne lidar bathymetry. This study investigates the accuracy of these data, which was obtained in the context of the project ‘Investigation on the use of airborne laser bathymetry in hydrographic surveying’. A comparison to multi-beam echo sounding data shows only small differences in the depths values of the data sets. The IHO requirements of the total horizontal and vertical uncertainty for laser data are met. The second goal of this paper is to compare three spatial interpolation methods, namely Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW, Delaunay Triangulation (TIN, and supervised Artificial Neural Networks (ANN, for the generation of sea bed models. The focus of our investigation is on the amount of required sampling points. This is analyzed by manually reducing the data sets. We found that the three techniques have a similar performance almost independently of the amount of sampling data in our test area. However, ANN are more stable when using a very small subset of points.

  18. COSTAL BATHYMETRY ESTIMATION FROM MULTISPECTRAL IMAGE WITH BACK PROPAGATION NEURAL NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Huang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bathymetric data in coastal area are important for marine sciences, hydrological applications and even for transportation and military purposes. Compare to traditional sonar and recent airborne bathymetry LIDAR systems, optical satellite images can provide information to survey a large area with single or multiple satellite images efficiently and economically. And it is especially suitable for coastal area because the penetration of visible light in water merely reaches 30 meters. In this study, a three-layer back propagation neural network is proposed to estimate bathymetry. In the learning stage, some training samples with known depth are adopted to train the weights of the neural network until the stopping criterion is satisfied. The spectral information is sent to the input layer and fits the true water depth with the output. The depths of training samples are manually measured from stereo images of the submerged reefs after water refraction correction. In the testing stage, all non-land pixels are processed. The experiments show the mean square errors are less than 3 meters.

  19. Costal Bathymetry Estimation from Multispectral Image with Back Propagation Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. Y.; Liu, C. L.; Ren, H.

    2016-06-01

    Bathymetric data in coastal area are important for marine sciences, hydrological applications and even for transportation and military purposes. Compare to traditional sonar and recent airborne bathymetry LIDAR systems, optical satellite images can provide information to survey a large area with single or multiple satellite images efficiently and economically. And it is especially suitable for coastal area because the penetration of visible light in water merely reaches 30 meters. In this study, a three-layer back propagation neural network is proposed to estimate bathymetry. In the learning stage, some training samples with known depth are adopted to train the weights of the neural network until the stopping criterion is satisfied. The spectral information is sent to the input layer and fits the true water depth with the output. The depths of training samples are manually measured from stereo images of the submerged reefs after water refraction correction. In the testing stage, all non-land pixels are processed. The experiments show the mean square errors are less than 3 meters.

  20. Composition, seasonal change, and bathymetry of Ligeia Mare, Titan, derived from its microwave thermal emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, A.; Malaska, M. J.; Lorenz, R. D.; Janssen, M. A.; Tokano, T.; Hayes, A. G.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Lunine, J. I.; Veyssière, G.; Encrenaz, P.; Karatekin, O.

    2016-02-01

    For the last decade, the passive radiometer incorporated in the Cassini RADAR has recorded the 2.2 cm wavelength thermal emission from Titan's seas. In this paper, we analyze the radiometry observations collected from February 2007 to January 2015 over one of these seas, Ligeia Mare, with the goal of providing constraints on its composition, bathymetry, and dynamics. In light of the depth profile obtained by Mastrogiuseppe et al. (2014) and of a two-layer model, we find that the dielectric constant of the sea liquid is Mare is primarily fed by methane-rich precipitation and/or ethane has been removed from it (e.g., by crustal interaction). Our result on the dielectric constant of the seafloor is less constraining (Mare is covered by a sludge of compacted and possibly nitrile-rich organic material formed by the deposition of photochemical haze or by rain washing of the nearby shores. We use these results to produce a low-resolution bathymetry map of the sea. We also estimate the temperature variation of the bulk sea between February 2007 and July 2013 to be explored in ocean circulation models. Lastly, we suggest a lag in the summer warming of the northern polar terrains.

  1. High-resolution bathymetry reveals contrasting landslide activity shaping the walls of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge axial valley

    OpenAIRE

    CANNAT, Mathilde; Mangeney, Anne; Ondreas, Helene; Fouquet, Yves; Normand, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Axial valleys are found along most slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges and are one of the most prominent topographic features on Earth. In this paper, we present the first deep-tow swath bathymetry for the axial valley walls of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These data allow us to analyze axial valley wall morphology with a very high resolution (0.5 to 1 m compared to 50 m for shipboard multibeam bathymetry), revealing the role played by landslides. Slow-spreading ridge axial valleys also commonly expos...

  2. Auv Multibeam Bathymetry and Sidescan Survey of the SS Montebello wreck Offshore Cambria CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H.; Conlin, D.; Thompson, D.; Paull, C. K.

    2010-12-01

    An MBARI Mapping AUV survey of the SS Montebello wreck offshore Cambria, CA collected high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and sidescan imagery of the vessel and the surrounding seafloor. The Montebello was an oil tanker that was torpedoed and sunk about 11 km offshore in 275 m water depth by a Japanese submarine on December 23, 1941. The Montebello was loaded with 3,000,000 gallons of crude oil, and there is no evidence that significant leakage of that cargo occurred at the time of the sinking or in the 69 years since. The California Department of Fish and Game’s Office of Spill Prevention and Response (OSPR) commissioned the AUV survey as part of a multi-agency Montebello Task Force effort to assess the potential pollution threat. The survey data will be used to determine the extent and general character of the wreckage for a pending Task Force report and to guide any future ROV dive or assessment activity . The AUV surveyed the wreck site from altitudes of 75 and 25 m; the low-altitude high-resolution survey consists of a grid with a 50 m line spacing both parallel and orthogonal to the ship. The 200 kHz multibeam bathymetry images the wreck from both above and from the sides with an 0.5 m lateral resolution. The combination of soundings from all of the survey lines results in a three-dimensional distribution of soundings that delineates the external morphology and some of the internal structure of the wreck. 410 kHz chirp sidescan sonar data also image the site from both directions. The bathymetry data indicate that the Montebello was pitched forward down when it impacted the bottom, crushing and breaking off the bow section. Both forward and aft deckhouses are largely intact, and in fact the multibeam images the individual decks within those structures. About half of the forward mast remains, both amidships masts and the smokestack are missing. A good deal of the deck piping and equipment appears intact, and aside from the bow, the ship’s sides appear

  3. Multibeam Bathymetry Data Value and Increased Efficiency Through Improved Data Access and Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, D. J.; Fischman, D.; Varner, J. D.; McLean, S. J.; Henderson, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    The costs associated with geophysical data collection are ever increasing, and efficiencies created by data reuse have never been more important. Multibeam sonar bathymetry, collected by specialized research vessels in challenging oceanic environments, is an example data type that has experienced steady increases in acquisition costs. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) in partnership with the Academic Fleet Rolling deck To Repository (R2R) program provides streamlined delivery of multibeam bathymetric data from ship to shore to user. By ensuring long term archive and easy access to these data, we foster the innovative reuse of data to produce additional products to serve multiple needs beyond the original intent of collection. Archived data are made widely accessible to the scientific community and the public via Web technologies that also support a "whole ocean" approach to management and planning, leveraging limited resources, and maximizing the benefit of the original investment in data collection. Currently, the public has access to more than 461,000 multibeam bathymetry files from the NGDC website through various Web based tools (ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/bathymetry/). Data are discoverable through geospatial maps and text search options. Once data are identified, users can download individual files, bundled data, or create custom grids. This paper takes a closer look at the multibeam data downloaded from the NGDC website and attempts to quantify the value of providing data for reuse. Using the number of surveys downloaded, an average cost to collect and steward multibeam data, and computing the ship hours required to acquire these data, we can estimate the value of the data freely available through R2R and NGDC. We will show that the value of long term stewardship, sharing, and reuse of these data provides a significant return on the initial investment. Proper data stewardship by NOAA's National Data

  4. Bathymetry mapping using a GPS-sonar equipped remote control boat: Application in waste stabilisation ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggins, Liah; Ghadouani, Anas; Ghisalberti, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, bathymetry mapping of ponds, lakes and rivers have used techniques which are low in spatial resolution, sometimes subjective in terms of precision and accuracy, labour intensive, and that require a high level of safety precautions. In waste stabilisation ponds (WSP) in particular, sludge heights, and thus sludge volume, are commonly measured using a sludge judge (a clear plastic pipe with length markings). A remote control boat fitted with a GPS-equipped sonar unit can improve the resolution of depth measurements, and reduce safety and labour requirements. Sonar devices equipped with GPS technology, also known as fish finders, are readily available and widely used by people in boating. Through the use of GPS technology in conjunction with sonar, the location and depth can be recorded electronically onto a memory card. However, despite its high applicability to the field, this technology has so far been underutilised. In the case of WSP, the sonar can measure the water depth to the top of the sludge layer, which can then be used to develop contour maps of sludge distribution and to determine sludge volume. The coupling of sonar technology with a remotely operative vehicle has several advantages of traditional measurement techniques, particularly in removing human subjectivity of readings, and the sonar being able to collect more data points in a shorter period of time, and continuously, with a much higher spatial resolution. The GPS-sonar equipped remote control boat has been tested on in excess of 50 WSP within Western Australia, and has shown a very strong correlation (R2 = 0.98) between spot readings taken with the sonar compared to a sludge judge. This has shown that the remote control boat with GPS-sonar device is capable of providing sludge bathymetry with greatly increased spatial resolution, while greatly reducing profiling time. Remotely operated vehicles, such as the one built in this study, are useful for not only determining sludge

  5. 3D movies for teaching seafloor bathymetry, plate tectonics, and ocean circulation in large undergraduate classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, C. D.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Gebbie, G.; Hamann, B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Kreylos, O.; Kronenberger, M.; Spero, H. J.; Streletz, G. J.; Weber, C.

    2015-12-01

    Geologic problems and datasets are often 3D or 4D in nature, yet projected onto a 2D surface such as a piece of paper or a projection screen. Reducing the dimensionality of data forces the reader to "fill in" that collapsed dimension in their minds, creating a cognitive challenge for the reader, especially new learners. Scientists and students can visualize and manipulate 3D datasets using the virtual reality software developed for the immersive, real-time interactive 3D environment at the KeckCAVES at UC Davis. The 3DVisualizer software (Billen et al., 2008) can also operate on a desktop machine to produce interactive 3D maps of earthquake epicenter locations and 3D bathymetric maps of the seafloor. With 3D projections of seafloor bathymetry and ocean circulation proxy datasets in a virtual reality environment, we can create visualizations of carbon isotope (δ13C) records for academic research and to aid in demonstrating thermohaline circulation in the classroom. Additionally, 3D visualization of seafloor bathymetry allows students to see features of seafloor most people cannot observe first-hand. To enhance lessons on mid-ocean ridges and ocean basin genesis, we have created movies of seafloor bathymetry for a large-enrollment undergraduate-level class, Introduction to Oceanography. In the past four quarters, students have enjoyed watching 3D movies, and in the fall quarter (2015), we will assess how well 3D movies enhance learning. The class will be split into two groups, one who learns about the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from diagrams and lecture, and the other who learns with a supplemental 3D visualization. Both groups will be asked "what does the seafloor look like?" before and after the Mid-Atlantic Ridge lesson. Then the whole class will watch the 3D movie and respond to an additional question, "did the 3D visualization enhance your understanding of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge?" with the opportunity to further elaborate on the effectiveness of the visualization.

  6. Systematic Analysis of Resolution and Uncertainties in Gravity Interpretation of Bathymetry Beneath Floating Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, J. R.; Tinto, K. J.; Elieff, S. H.; Bell, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Airborne geophysical surveys in West Antarctica and Greenland carried out during Operation IceBridge (OIB) utilized the Sander Geophysics AIRGrav gravimeter, which collects high quality data during low-altitude, draped flights. This data has been used to determine bathymetry beneath ice shelves and floating ice tongues (e.g., Tinto et al, 2010, Cochran et al, 2010). This paper systematically investigates uncertainties arising from survey, instrumental and geologic constraints in this type of study and the resulting resolution of the bathymetry model. Gravity line data is low-pass filtered with time-based filters to remove high frequency noise. The spatial filter length is dependent on aircraft speed. For parameters used in OIB (70-140 s filters and 270-290 knots), spatial filter half-wavelengths are ~5-10 km. The half-wavelength does not define a lower limit to the width of feature that can be detected, but shorter wavelength features may appear wider with a lower amplitude. Resolution can be improved either by using a shorter filter or by flying slower. Both involve tradeoffs; a shorter filter allows more noise and slower speeds result in less coverage. These filters are applied along tracks, rather than in a region surrounding a measurement. In areas of large gravity relief, tracks in different directions can sample a very different range of gravity values within the length of the filter. We show that this can lead to crossover mismatches of >5 mGal, complicating interpretation. For dense surveys, gridding the data and then sampling the grid at the measurement points can minimize this effect. Resolution is also affected by the elevation of survey flights. For a distributed mass, the gravity amplitude decreases with distance and short-wavelength components attenuate faster. This is not a serious issue for OIB, which flew draped flights Oldenburg inversion) and for forward modeling of individual lines. Uncertainty in the mean depth used in an inversion results in

  7. Elevation Contours of the Bathymetry near Shorty's Island and Myrtle Bend, Koootenai River near Bonners Ferry, ID, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The elevation contour data was created based on bathymetry obtained in the meander reach collected in about a one month period extending from 6/3/2010 - 6/19/2010....

  8. Prediction of bathymetry from satellite altimeter based gravity in the Arabian Sea: Mapping of two unnamed deep seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, B.; Kurian, P. J.; Swain, D.; Tyagi, A.; Ravindra, R.

    2012-06-01

    This work attempts to predict bathymetry from satellite altimeter based gravity in the Arabian Sea. A collocated match-up database (n = 17,016) was created on Multibeam Echosounder (MBES) bathymetry and satellite gravity values (˜1 min spatial resolution) derived from remote sensing satellites. A Radial Basis Function (RBF) based Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model was developed to predict bathymetry from satellite gravity values. The ANN model was trained with variable undersea features such as seamount, knoll, abyssal plain, hill, etc. to familiarize the network with all possible geomorphic features as inputs through learning and the corresponding target outputs. The performance of the predictive model was evaluated by comparing bathymetric values with MBES datasets that were not used during the training and verification steps of the ANN model formulation. The model was then compared with MBES surveyed seamount observations (those were not used during ANN analysis) and global model bathymetry products. Results demonstrate better performance of ANN model compared to global model products for mapping of two unnamed seamounts in the Arabian Sea. These two unnamed seamounts have been predicted, mapped and their morphology is reported for the first time through this work.

  9. Comment on “Sensitivity of seafloor bathymetry to climate-driven fluctuations in mid-ocean ridge magma supply”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoy, Maya

    2016-07-01

    Olive et al. (Reports, 16 October 2015, p. 310) and Goff (Technical Comment, 4 September 2015, p. 1065) raise important concerns with respect to recent findings of Milankovitch cycles in seafloor bathymetry. However, their results inherently support that the Southern East Pacific Rise is the optimum place to look for such signals and, in fact, models match those observations quite closely.

  10. Comment on "Sensitivity of seafloor bathymetry to climate-driven fluctuations in mid-ocean ridge magma supply".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoy, Maya

    2016-07-15

    Olive et al (Reports, 16 October 2015, p. 310) and Goff (Technical Comment, 4 September 2015, p. 1065) raise important concerns with respect to recent findings of Milankovitch cycles in seafloor bathymetry. However, their results inherently support that the Southern East Pacific Rise is the optimum place to look for such signals and, in fact, models match those observations quite closely.

  11. Mapping the bathymetry of shallow coastal water using single-frame fine-resolution optical remote sensing imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jiran; ZHANG Huaguo; HOU Pengfei; FU Bin; ZHENG Gang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a bathymetry inversion method using single-frame fine-resolution optical remote sensing imagery based on ocean-wave refraction and shallow-water wave theory. First, the relationship among water depth, wavelength and wave radian frequency in shallow water was deduced based on shallow-water wave theory. Considering the complex wave distribution in the optical remote sensing imagery, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and spatial profile measurements were applied for measuring the wavelengths. Then, the wave radian frequency was calculated by analyzing the long-distance fluctuation in the wavelength, which solved a key problem in obtaining the wave radian frequency in a single-frame image. A case study was conducted for Sanya Bay of Hainan Island, China. Single-frame fine-resolution optical remote sensing imagery from QuickBird satellite was used to invert the bathymetry without external input parameters. The result of the digital elevation model (DEM) was evaluated against a sea chart with a scale of 1:25 000. The root-mean-square error of the inverted bathymetry was 1.07 m, and the relative error was 16.2%. Therefore, the proposed method has the advantages including no requirement for true depths and environmental parameters, and is feasible for mapping the bathymetry of shallow coastal water.

  12. CRED Gridded Bathymetry of the 1955 Eruption Site and Seamount (100-022) in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — File 100-022b is a 60-m ASCII grid of depth data collected near 1955 Eruption Site multibeam bathymetry data from a SeaBeam 210 sonar aboard the R/V...

  13. CRED Gridded Bathymetry of Nihoa Island and transit to Kauai (100-026) in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — File 100-026b is a 60-m ASCII grid of depth data collected near Nihoa multibeam bathymetry data from a SeaBeam 210 sonar aboard the R/V Kai'imikai-O-Kanaloa...

  14. Observations of Bathymetry-Induced Ocean Roughness Modulation in In-situ Surface Slope Measurements and Coincident Airborne SAR Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gommenginger, C.P.; Robinson, I.S.; Willoughby, J.; Greidanus, H.S.F.; Taylor, V.

    1999-01-01

    Empirical results from a field experiment in the southern North Sea have demonstrated the possibility to detect bathymetry-induced sea surface roughness modulation in the coastal zone using high frequency in-situ slope measurements provided by the Towed Laser Slopemeter. A strong correlation between

  15. ROV seafloor surveys combining 5-cm lateral resolution multibeam bathymetry with color stereo photographic imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caress, D. W.; Hobson, B.; Thomas, H. J.; Henthorn, R.; Martin, E. J.; Bird, L.; Rock, S. M.; Risi, M.; Padial, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute is developing a low altitude, high-resolution seafloor mapping capability that combines multibeam sonar with stereo photographic imagery. The goal is to obtain spatially quantitative, repeatable renderings of the seafloor with fidelity at scales of 5 cm or better from altitudes of 2-3 m. The initial test surveys using this sensor system are being conducted from a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Ultimately we intend to field this survey system from an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). This presentation focuses on the current sensor configuration, methods for data processing, and results from recent test surveys. Bathymetry data are collected using a 400-kHz Reson 7125 multibeam sonar. This configuration produces 512 beams across a 135° wide swath; each beam has a 0.5° acrosstrack by 1.0° alongtrack angular width. At a 2-m altitude, the nadir beams have a 1.7-cm acrosstrack and 3.5 cm alongtrack footprint. Dual Allied Vision Technology GX1920 2.8 Mpixel color cameras provide color stereo photography of the seafloor. The camera housings have been fitted with corrective optics achieving a 90° field of view through a dome port. Illumination is provided by dual 100J xenon strobes. Position, depth, and attitude data are provided by a Kearfott SeaDevil Inertial Navigation System (INS) integrated with a 300 kHz RDI Doppler velocity log (DVL). A separate Paroscientific pressure sensor is mounted adjacent to the INS. The INS Kalman filter is aided by the DVL velocity and pressure data, achieving navigational drift rates less than 0.05% of the distance traveled during surveys. The sensors are mounted onto a toolsled fitted below MBARI's ROV Doc Ricketts with the sonars, cameras and strobes all pointed vertically down. During surveys the ROV flies at a 2-m altitude at speeds of 0.1-0.2 m/s. During a four-day R/V Western Flyer cruise in June 2013, we successfully collected multibeam and camera survey data from a 2-m altitude

  16. Multibeam Bathymetry Mapping for U.S. UNCLOS Concerns: A Gold Mine for Marine Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J. V.; Mayer, L. A.; Armstrong, A.

    2007-12-01

    Since 2003, the University of New Hampshire's Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping-Joint Hydrographic Center has conducted mapping of several U.S. continental margins in areas where a potential exists for an extended continental shelf as defined under Article 76 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. UNH was directed by Congress, through funding to NOAA, to map the bathymetry in areas in the Arctic Ocean, Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska, Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, Philippine Sea, and slopes of Kingman Reef and Palmyra Atoll. These new data can be used to accurately locate the 2500-m isobath and to determine the location of the maximum change in gradient at the base of the continental slopes. To achieve these objectives, the area between ~1000 m and ~5000 m isobaths are mapped. The program has mapped >900,000 km2 as of September 2007. The bathymetry data are collected with multibeam echosounders navigated with inertial-aided DGPS and are fully motion compensated. An integral part of the data collection is measurements of the sound-speed profile in the water column to correct for refraction. The data are fully processed at sea. Most cruises also collect 3.5-kHz high-resolution profiles and some have included gravity measurements. All processed bathymetry and associated acoustic backscatter data are immediately available one the web and the raw multibeam datagrams and processed gravity data are archived at NOAA/NGDC. The new data provide a wealth of new information on the geomorphology of the continental margins. The mapping discovered many new features on the U.S. margins, as well as better defined features known to exist but either poorly mapped or mapped with obsolete mapping technology. New features discovered during the surveys include an undiscovered seamount, christened Healy Seamount and a series of huge sediment ridges striking normal to the Barrow margin in the Arctic Ocean; a series of plateaus and ridges north of Bowers Ridge in the Bering Sea

  17. Bank Topography, Bathymetry, and Current Velocity of the Lower Elwha River, Clallam County, Washington, May 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Christopher A.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Dinehart, Randal L.; Moran, Edward H.

    2008-01-01

    The removal of two dams from the mainstem of the Elwha River is expected to cause a broad range of changes to the river and nearby coastal ecosystem. The U.S. Geological Survey has documented aspects of the condition of the river to allow analysis of ecological responses to dam removal. This report documents the bank topography, river bathymetry, and current velocity data collected along the lower 0.5 kilometer of the Elwha River, May 15-17, 2006. This information supplements nearshore and beach surveys done in 2006 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal Habitats in Puget Sound program near the Elwha River delta in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Washington.

  18. Effects of Mackenzie River Discharge and Bathymetry on Sea Ice in the Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Rigor, I. G; Li, P.; Neumann, G.

    2014-01-01

    Mackenzie River discharge and bathymetry effects on sea ice in the Beaufort Sea are examined in 2012 when Arctic sea ice extent hit a record low. Satellite-derived sea surface temperature revealed warmer waters closer to river mouths. By 5 July 2012, Mackenzie warm waters occupied most of an open water area about 316,000 sq km. Surface temperature in a common open water area increased by 6.5 C between 14 June and 5 July 2012, before and after the river waters broke through a recurrent landfast ice barrier formed over the shallow seafloor offshore the Mackenzie Delta. In 2012, melting by warm river waters was especially effective when the strong Beaufort Gyre fragmented sea ice into unconsolidated floes. The Mackenzie and other large rivers can transport an enormous amount of heat across immense continental watersheds into the Arctic Ocean, constituting a stark contrast to the Antarctic that has no such rivers to affect sea ice.

  19. Top predators in relation to bathymetry, ice and krill during austral winter in Marguerite Bay, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribic, C.A.; Chapman, E.; Fraser, William R.; Lawson, G.L.; Wiebe, P.H.

    2008-01-01

    A key hypothesis guiding the US Southern Ocean Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (US SO GLOBEC) program is that deep across-shelf troughs facilitate the transport of warm and nutrient-rich waters onto the continental shelf of the Western Antarctic Peninsula, resulting in enhanced winter production and prey availability to top predators. We tested aspects of this hypothesis during austral winter by assessing the distribution of the resident pack-ice top predators in relation to these deep across-shelf troughs and by investigating associations between top predators and their prey. Surveys were conducted July-August 2001 and August-September 2002 in Marguerite Bay, Antarctica, with a focus on the main across-shelf trough in the bay, Marguerite Trough. The common pack-ice seabird species were snow petrel (Pagodroma nivea, 1.2 individuals km-2), Antarctic petrel (Thalassoica antarctica, 0.3 individuals km-2), and Ade??lie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae, 0.5 individuals km-2). The most common pack-ice pinniped was crabeater seal (Lobodon carcinophagus). During both winters, snow and Antarctic petrels were associated with low sea-ice concentrations independent of Marguerite Trough, while Ade??lie penguins occurred in association with this trough. Krill concentrations, both shallow and deep, also were associated with Ade??lie penguin and snow petrel distributions. During both winters, crabeater seal occurrence was associated with deep krill concentrations and with regions of lower chlorophyll concentration. The area of lower chlorophyll concentrations occurred in an area with complex bathymetry close to land and heavy ice concentrations. Complex or unusual bathymetry via its influence on physical and biological processes appears to be one of the keys to understanding how top predators survive during the winter in this Antarctic region. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. River Discharge and Bathymetry Estimation from Hydraulic Inversion of Surface Currents and Water Surface Elevation Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, J.; Holland, K. T.

    2015-12-01

    We developed an inversion model for river bathymetry and discharge estimation based on measurements of surface currents, water surface elevation and shoreline coordinates. The model uses a simplification of the 2D depth-averaged steady shallow water equations based on a streamline following system of coordinates and assumes spatially uniform bed friction coefficient and eddy viscosity. The spatial resolution of the predicted bathymetry is related to the resolution of the surface currents measurements. The discharge is determined by minimizing the difference between the predicted and the measured streamwise variation of the total head. The inversion model was tested using in situ and remote sensing measurements of the Kootenai River east of Bonners Ferry, ID. The measurements were obtained in August 2010 when the discharge was about 223 m3/s and the maximum river depth was about 6.5 m. Surface currents covering a 10 km reach with 8 m spatial resolution were estimated from airborne infrared video and were converted to depth-averaged currents using acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements along eight cross-stream transects. The streamwise profile of the water surface elevation was measured using real-time kinematic GPS from a drifting platform. The value of the friction coefficient was obtained from forward calibration simulations that minimized the difference between the predicted and measured velocity and water level along the river thalweg. The predicted along/cross-channel water depth variation was compared to the depth measured with a multibeam echo sounder. The rms error between the measured and predicted depth along the thalweg was found to be about 60cm and the estimated discharge was 5% smaller than the discharge measured by the ADCP.

  1. Evaluating integration of inland bathymetry in the U.S. Geological Survey 3D Elevation Program, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Corbett, Cynthia

    2016-09-01

    Inland bathymetry survey collections, survey data types, features, sources, availability, and the effort required to integrate inland bathymetric data into the U.S. Geological Survey 3D Elevation Program are assessed to help determine the feasibility of integrating three-dimensional water feature elevation data into The National Map. Available data from wading, acoustic, light detection and ranging, and combined technique surveys are provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and other sources. Inland bathymetric data accessed through Web-hosted resources or contacts provide useful baseline parameters for evaluating survey types and techniques used for collection and processing, and serve as a basis for comparing survey methods and the quality of results. Historically, boat-mounted acoustic surveys have provided most inland bathymetry data. Light detection and ranging techniques that are beneficial in areas hard to reach by boat, that can collect dense data in shallow water to provide comprehensive coverage, and that can be cost effective for surveying large areas with good water clarity are becoming more common; however, optimal conditions and techniques for collecting and processing light detection and ranging inland bathymetry surveys are not yet well defined.Assessment of site condition parameters important for understanding inland bathymetry survey issues and results, and an evaluation of existing inland bathymetry survey coverage are proposed as steps to develop criteria for implementing a useful and successful inland bathymetry survey plan in the 3D Elevation Program. These survey parameters would also serve as input for an inland bathymetry survey data baseline. Integration and interpolation techniques are important factors to consider in developing a robust plan; however, available survey data are usually in a triangulated irregular network format or other format compatible with

  2. Evaluating integration of inland bathymetry in the U.S. Geological Survey 3D Elevation Program, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Corbett, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Inland bathymetry survey collections, survey data types, features, sources, availability, and the effort required to integrate inland bathymetric data into the U.S. Geological Survey 3D Elevation Program are assessed to help determine the feasibility of integrating three-dimensional water feature elevation data into The National Map. Available data from wading, acoustic, light detection and ranging, and combined technique surveys are provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and other sources. Inland bathymetric data accessed through Web-hosted resources or contacts provide useful baseline parameters for evaluating survey types and techniques used for collection and processing, and serve as a basis for comparing survey methods and the quality of results. Historically, boat-mounted acoustic surveys have provided most inland bathymetry data. Light detection and ranging techniques that are beneficial in areas hard to reach by boat, that can collect dense data in shallow water to provide comprehensive coverage, and that can be cost effective for surveying large areas with good water clarity are becoming more common; however, optimal conditions and techniques for collecting and processing light detection and ranging inland bathymetry surveys are not yet well defined.Assessment of site condition parameters important for understanding inland bathymetry survey issues and results, and an evaluation of existing inland bathymetry survey coverage are proposed as steps to develop criteria for implementing a useful and successful inland bathymetry survey plan in the 3D Elevation Program. These survey parameters would also serve as input for an inland bathymetry survey data baseline. Integration and interpolation techniques are important factors to consider in developing a robust plan; however, available survey data are usually in a triangulated irregular network format or other format compatible with

  3. Volcanic evolution of the South Sandwich volcanic arc, South Atlantic, from multibeam bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leat, Philip T.; Day, Simon J.; Tate, Alex J.; Martin, Tara J.; Owen, Matthew J.; Tappin, David R.

    2013-09-01

    New multibeam bathymetry data are presented for the South Sandwich intra-oceanic arc which occupies the small Sandwich plate in the South Atlantic, and is widely considered to be a simple end-member in the range of intra-oceanic arc types. The images show for the first time the distribution of submarine volcanic, tectonic and erosional-depositional features along the whole length of the 540 km long volcanic arc, allowing systematic investigation of along-arc variations. The data confirm that the volcanic arc has a simple structure composed of large volcanoes which form a well-defined volcanic front, but with three parallel cross-cutting seamount chains extending 38-60 km from near the volcanic front into the rear-arc. There is no evidence for intra-arc rifting or extinct volcanic lines. Topographic evidence for faulting is generally absent, except near the northern and southern plate boundaries. Most of the volcanic arc appears to be built on ocean crust formed at the associated back-arc spreading centre, as previously proposed from magnetic data, but the southern part of the arc appears to be underlain by older arc or continental crust whose west-facing rifted margin facing the back-arc basin is defined by the new bathymetry. The new survey shows nine main volcanic edifices along the volcanic front and ca. 20 main seamounts. The main volcanoes form largely glaciated islands with summits 3.0-3.5 km above base levels which are 2500-3000 m deep in the north and shallower at 2000-2500 m deep in the south. Some of the component seamounts are interpreted to have been active since the last glacial maximum, and so are approximately contemporaneous with the volcanic front volcanism. Seven calderas, all either submarine or ice-filled, have been identified: Adventure volcano, a newly discovered submarine volcanic front caldera volcano is described for the first time. All but one of the calderas are situated on summits of large volcanoes in the southern part of the arc, and

  4. Single-Beam Bathymetry of the Hurricane Sandy Breach at Fire Island, New York, June 2013 (1-Meter Digital Elevation Model)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset, 20130626_bathy_DEM.zip, contains a 1-meter (m) grid of June 2013 bathymetry of the breach channel, ebb shoal, and adjacent coast of the Fire Island...

  5. GeoTIFF image of shaded-relief bathymetry of the sea floor southwest of Montauk Point, New York, in 1998 (3-m resolution, Mercator, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Surveys of the bathymetry and backscatter intensity of the sea floor south of Long Island, New York, were carried out in November 1998 using a Simrad EM1000...

  6. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Thirty-Five Fathom Bank and Thirty-Seven Fathom Bank, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Elton Sette. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of change (in...

  7. Rugosity grid derived from gridded bathymetry of of Galvez Bank, South Galvez Bank, and 11-Mile Reef, Territory of Guam, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Rugosity is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, aboard NOAA Ship Oscar Elton Sette. Cell values reflect the (surface area) / (planimetric...

  8. CRED 20m Gridded bathymetry of the banktop and slope environments of Northeast Bank (sometimes called "Muli" Seamount), American Samoa (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (20 m cell size) bathymetry of the banktop and slope environments of Northeast Bank (sometimes called "Muli" Seamount), American Samoa, South Pacific....

  9. CRED 40m Gridded bathymetry of the banktop and slope environments of Vailulu'u Seamount, American Samoa (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (40 m cell size) bathymetry of of Vailul'u Seamount, an active volcano that lies between Ta'u Island and Rose Atoll, American Samoa, South Pacific. Almost...

  10. Preliminary hard and soft bottom seafloor substrate map derived from an unsupervised classification of gridded backscatter and bathymetry derivatives at Swains Island, Territory of American Samoa, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Preliminary hard and soft seafloor substrate map derived from an unsupervised classification of multibeam backscatter and bathymetry derivatives at Swains Island,...

  11. NOAA ESRI Geotiff - 3m Multibeam Bathymetry, Puerto Rico (Isla de Mona) - Project NF-08-04, , UTM 19N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 3 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of selected portions of seafloor around Isla de Mona in Puerto Rico,...

  12. NOAA TIFF Image - 50m Multibeam Bathymetry, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Little Hales - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight, derived from...

  13. Grid of the sea-floor bathymetry southwest of Montauk Point, New York, in 1998 (3-m resolution Esri binary grid, Mercator, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Surveys of the bathymetry and backscatter intensity of the sea floor south of Long Island, New York, were carried out in November 1998 using a Simrad EM1000...

  14. NOAA TIFF Image - 1m Multibeam Bathymetry, US Virgin Islands - Vieques Island (El Seco) - Project NF-09-01 - (2009), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131857)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified ESRI Grid with 1x1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of El Seco, a selected portion of seafloor east of Vieques Island,...

  15. GeoTIFF image of shaded-relief bathymetry of the sea floor offshore of Fire Island Inlet, New York, in 1998 (3-m resolution, Mercator, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Surveys of the bathymetry and backscatter intensity of the sea floor south of Long Island, New York, were carried out in November 1998 using a Simrad EM1000...

  16. Gridded bathymetry of the banktop and slope environments of Ta'u Island of the Manu'a Island group, American Samoa (netCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry of the banktop and slope environments of Ta'u Island of the Manu'a Island group, American Samoa. This survey provides almost complete coverage...

  17. CRED 60 m Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of UTM Zone 1, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA (NetCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA within UTM Zone 1. Bottom coverage was...

  18. NOAA ESRI Grid - 3m Multibeam Bathymetry, Puerto Rico (Isla de Mona) - Project NF-08-04, , UTM 19N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Grid with 3 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of selected portions of seafloor around Isla de Mona in Puerto Rico, derived...

  19. Bathymetry of NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument (Inshore), St. John, US Virgin Islands 2005, 1M Grid, UTM 20 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Grid with 1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of an inshore portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National...

  20. NOAA TIFF Image - 3m Multibeam Bathymetry, Miami, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Lost Coast Explorer - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 3x3 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the continental shelf off of Jacksonville, FL in the South Atlantic...

  1. Bathymetric Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Johnston Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. BPI Zones was created using the Benthic...

  2. Bathymetric Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. BPI Zones was created using the Benthic...

  3. Bathymetric Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 40 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. BPI Zones was created using the Benthic...

  4. NOAA ESRI Grid - 3m Multibeam Bathymetry, Puerto Rico (Tourmaline Bank) - Project NF-08-04, , UTM 19N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Grid with 3 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of selected portions of seafloor around Tourmaline Bank in Puerto Rico,...

  5. NOAA ESRI Geotiff - 3m Multibeam Bathymetry, Puerto Rico (Tourmaline Bank) - Project NF-08-04, , UTM 19N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 3 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of selected portions of seafloor around Tourmaline Bank in Puerto Rico,...

  6. NOAA TIFF Image - 1m Multibeam Bathymetry, US Virgin Islands - Vieques Island (El Seco) - Project NF-09-01 - (2009), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified ESRI Geotiff with 1x1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of El Seco, a selected portion of seafloor east of Vieques Island,...

  7. NOAA ESRI Geotiff- 1m Bathymetry of St. John (South Shore - Area 1), US Virgin Islands, 2004, UTM 20 WGS84

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the south shore of St. John, US Virgin Islands. Due to the large file...

  8. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2009), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  9. NOAA TIFF Image - 1m Multibeam Bathymetry, US Virgin Islands - Virgin Passage - Project NF-10-03 - (2010), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a GeoTIFF with 1x1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of a portion of the Virgin Passage, a selected area of seafloor southwest of...

  10. NOAA ESRI Geotiff- 2m Multibeam Bathymetry of Grammanik Bank, US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131860)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 2 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of Grammanik Bank south of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands.NOAA's...

  11. NOAA TIFF Image - 1m Multibeam Bathymetry, US Virgin Islands - St. John Shelf - Project NF-10-03 - (2010), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a GeoTIFF with 1x1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of St. John Shelf, a selected portion of seafloor south of St. John, USVI,...

  12. NOAA ESRI Grid - 6m Multibeam Bathymetry, Puerto Rico (Tourmaline Bank) - Project NF-08-04, , UTM 19N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Grid with 6 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of selected portions of seafloor around Tourmaline Bank in Puerto Rico,...

  13. NOAA ESRI Geotiff - 6m Multibeam Bathymetry, Puerto Rico (Isla de Mona) - Project NF-08-04, , UTM 19N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 6 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of selected portions of seafloor around Isla de Mona in Puerto Rico,...

  14. NOAA ESRI Grid - 9m Multibeam Bathymetry, Puerto Rico (Tourmaline Bank) - Project NF-08-04, , UTM 19N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Grid with 9 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of selected portions of seafloor around Tourmaline Bank in Puerto Rico,...

  15. NOAA ESRI Geotiff - 9m Multibeam Bathymetry, Puerto Rico (Isla de Mona) - Project NF-08-04, UTM 19N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 9 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of selected portions of seafloor around Isla de Mona in Puerto Rico,...

  16. CRED 60 m Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of UTM Zone 3, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA (netCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA within UTM Zone 3. Bottom coverage was...

  17. CRED 40m Gridded bathymetry of the banktop and slope environments of Two Percent Bank (also called Tulaga Seamount), American Samoa (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (40 m cell size) bathymetry of Two Percent Bank (also called Talaga Seamount) that lies between southeast of Tutuila, American Samoa, South Pacific. Almost...

  18. CRED 5m Gridded bathymetry of the banktop and slope environments of Northeast Bank (sometimes called "Muli" Seamount), American Samoa (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the banktop and slope environments of Northeast Bank (sometimes called "Muli" Seamount), American Samoa, South Pacific. Almost...

  19. CRED 5m Gridded bathymetry of the banktop and slope environments of Northeast Bank (sometimes called "Muli" Seamount), American Samoa (Arc ASCII Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the banktop and slope environments of Northeast Bank (sometimes called "Muli" seamount), American Samoa, South Pacific. Almost...

  20. NOAA ESRI Geotiff - 9m Multibeam Bathymetry, Puerto Rico (Tourmaline Bank) - Project NF-08-04, , UTM 19N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 9 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of selected portions of seafloor around Tourmaline Bank in Puerto Rico,...

  1. Slope 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Farallon de Pajaros (Uracas) Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard NOAA Ship Hiialaka'i and R/V AHI. Cell values reflect the maximum rate of...

  2. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  3. ArcInfo GRID format of the 2004 Multibeam Bathymetry Data in the Northeastern Channel Islands Region, Southern California [bathy.zip

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ArcInfo GRID format data generated from the 2004 multibeam sonar survey of the Northeastern Channel Islands, CA Region. The data include high- resolution bathymetry.

  4. Bathymetric Contours - LAKE_BATHYMETRY_IDNR_IN: Bathymetric Contours for Selected Lakes in Indiana (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — LAKE_BATHYMETRY_IDNR_IN.SHP provides bathymetric contours for the following 85 lakes in Indiana, with depths calculated from the average shoreline of each lake:...

  5. Grid of the sea-floor bathymetry offshore of Shinnecock Inlet, New York, in 1998 (3-m resolution Esri binary grid, Mercator, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Surveys of the bathymetry and backscatter intensity of the sea floor south of Long Island, New York, were carried out in November 1998 using a Simrad EM1000...

  6. Bathymetry 2M Grid of NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Reserve, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Grid with 2 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the a portion of the NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and...

  7. NOAA ESRI Geotiff- 1m Multibeam Bathymetry of Mid Shelf Reef, US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131860)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the Mid Shelf Reef south of St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands.NOAA's...

  8. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Navy Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  9. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Multibeam Bathymetry, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Thomas Jefferson - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight, derived from...

  10. NOAA TIFF Image - 1m Multibeam Bathymetry, US Virgin Islands - Virgin Passage - Project NF-10-03 - (2010), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131854)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a GeoTIFF with 1x1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of a portion of the Virgin Passage, a selected area of seafloor southwest of...

  11. Coastal bathymetry data collected in June 2014 from Fire Island, New York—The wilderness breach and shoreface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Timothy R.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Wilson, Kathleen E.; Henderson, Rachel E.; Brenner, Owen T.; Reynolds, Billy J.; Hansen, Mark E.

    2016-08-02

    Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center in St. Petersburg, Florida, collected bathymetric data along the upper shoreface and within the wilderness breach at Fire Island, New York, in June 2014. The U.S. Geological Survey is involved in a post-Hurricane Sandy effort to map and monitor the morphologic evolution of the shoreface along Fire Island and model the evolution of the wilderness breach as a part of the Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Project GS2-2B. During this study, bathymetry was collected with single-beam echo sounders and global positioning systems, mounted to personal watercraft, along the Fire Island shoreface and within the wilderness breach. Additional bathymetry was collected using backpack global positioning systems along the flood shoals and shallow channels within the wilderness breach.

  12. Detecting Trend and Seasonal Changes in Bathymetry Derived from HICO Imagery: A Case Study of Shark Bay, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rodrigo A.; Fearns, Peter R. C. S.; Mckinna, Lachlan I. W.

    2014-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) aboard the International Space Station has offered for the first time a dedicated space-borne hyperspectral sensor specifically designed for remote sensing of the coastal environment. However, several processing steps are required to convert calibrated top-of-atmosphere radiances to the desired geophysical parameter(s). These steps add various amounts of uncertainty that can cumulatively render the geophysical parameter imprecise and potentially unusable if the objective is to analyze trends and/or seasonal variability. This research presented here has focused on: (1) atmospheric correction of HICO imagery; (2) retrieval of bathymetry using an improved implementation of a shallow water inversion algorithm; (3) propagation of uncertainty due to environmental noise through the bathymetry retrieval process; (4) issues relating to consistent geo-location of HICO imagery necessary for time series analysis, and; (5) tide height corrections of the retrieved bathymetric dataset. The underlying question of whether a temporal change in depth is detectable above uncertainty is also addressed. To this end, nine HICO images spanning November 2011 to August 2012, over the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, Western Australia, were examined. The results presented indicate that precision of the bathymetric retrievals is dependent on the shallow water inversion algorithm used. Within this study, an average of 70% of pixels for the entire HICO-derived bathymetry dataset achieved a relative uncertainty of less than +/-20%. A per-pixel t-test analysis between derived bathymetry images at successive timestamps revealed observable changes in depth to as low as 0.4 m. However, the present geolocation accuracy of HICO is relatively poor and needs further improvements before extensive time series analysis can be performed.

  13. Comparison of three airborne laser bathymetry data sets for monitoring the German Baltic Sea Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yujin; Niemeyer, Joachim; Ellmer, Wilfried; Soergel, Uwe; Heipke, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Airborne laser bathymetry (ALB) can be used for hydrographic surveying with relative high resolution in shallow water. In this paper, we examine the applicability of this technique based on three flight campaigns. These were conducted between 2012 and 2014 close to the island of Poel in the German Baltic Sea. The first data set was acquired by a Riegl VQ-820-G sensor in November 2012. The second and third data sets were acquired by a Chiroptera sensor of Airborne Hydrography AB in September 2013 and May 2014, respectively. We examine the 3D points classified as seabed under different conditions during data acquisition, e.g. the turbidity level of the water and the flight altitude. The analysis comprises the point distribution, point density, and the area coverage in several depth levels. In addition, we determine the vertical accuracy of the 3D seabed points by computing differences to echo sounding data. Finally, the results of the three flight campaigns are compared to each other and analyzed with respect to the different conditions during data acquisition. For each campaign only small differences in elevation between the laser and the echo sounding data set are observed. The ALB results satisfy the requirements of IHO Standards for Hydrographic Surveys (S-44) Order 1b for several depth intervals.

  14. Geologic interpretation and multibeam bathymetry of the sea floor in southeastern Long Island Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Doran, Elizabeth F.; Moser, Marc S.; Stewart, Helen F.; Forfinski, Nicholas A.; Gardner, Uther L.; Keene, Jennifer A.

    2006-01-01

    Digital terrain models (DTMs) produced from multibeam echosounder (MBES) bathymetric data provide valuable base maps for marine geological interpretations (e.g. Todd and others, 1999; Mosher and Thomson, 2002; ten Brink and others, 2004; Poppe and others, 2006a,b). These maps help define the geological variability of the sea floor (one of the primary controls of benthic habitat diversity); improve our understanding of the processes that control the distribution and transport of bottom sediments, the distribution of benthic habitats and associated infaunal community structures; and provide a detailed framework for future research, monitoring, and management activities. The bathymetric survey interpreted herein (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) survey H11255) covers roughly 95 km? of sea floor in southeastern Long Island Sound (fig. 1). This bathymetry has been examined in relation to seismic reflection data collected concurrently, as well as archived seismic profiles acquired as part of a long-standing geologic mapping partnership between the State of Connecticut and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The objective of this work was to use these geophysical data sets to interpret geomorphological attributes of the sea floor in terms of the Quaternary geologic history and modern sedimentary processes within Long Island Sound.

  15. An Overview of the Bathymetry and Composition of Titan's Hydrocarbon Seas from the Cassini RADAR Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Hayes, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Poggiali, V.; Seu, R.; Hofgartner, J. D.; Lorenz, R. D.; Le Gall, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Cassini RADAR's altimetry mode has been successfully used for probing the depth and composition of Titan's hydrocarbons seas. In May 2013, during the spacecraft's 91stflyby of Titan (T91), the instrument demonstrates its capabilities as a radar sounder, presenting a unique opportunity to constrain direct measurements of the depth and composition of Titan's second largest sea, Ligeia Mare. Later, observations of Kraken Mare and Punga Mare were planned and executed in August 2014 (T104) and January 2015 (T108), respectively. While most of the seafloor was not detected at Kraken, suggesting the sea was either too deep or too absorptive in these areas to observe a return from the seafloor, shallow areas near Moray Sinus did return subsurface detections. At Punga Mare, a clear detection of the subsurface was observed with a maximum depth of 120 m along the interrogated track of the sea. We will present an analysis of all three altimetric observations of Titan's mare, as well a re-analysis of altimetry data acquired over southern Ontario Lacus. Depths measurements and liquid composition are obtained using a novel technique which makes use of radar simulations and Monte Carlo based inversions. Finally, we will show that the estimates obtained from the direct measurements described above can be used along with the RADAR's active (i.e. Synthetic Aperture Radar) and passive (Radiometry) modes to generate bathymetry maps of areas not observed by altimetry.

  16. Fish larvae retention linked to abrupt bathymetry at Mejillones Bay (northern Chile during coastal upwelling events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo M Rojas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of oceanic circulation and bathymetry on the fish larvae retention inside Mejillones Bay, northern Chile, was examined. Fish larvae were collected during two coastal upwelling events in November 1999 and January 2000. An elevated fish larvae accumulation was found near an oceanic front and a zone of low-speed currents. Three groups of fish larvae were identified: the coastal species (Engraulis ringens and Sardinops sagax, associated with high chlorophyll-a levels; larvae from the families Phosichthyidae (Vinciguerria lucetia and Myctophidae (Diogenichthys laternatus and Triphoturus oculeus, associated with the thermocline (12°C, and finally, larvae of the families Myctophidae (Diogenichthys atlanticus and Bathylagidae (Bathylagus nigrigenys, associated with high values of temperature and salinity. The presence of a seamount and submarine canyon inside Mejillones Bay appears to play an important role in the circulation during seasonal upwelling events. We propose a conceptual model of circulation and particles retention into Mejillones Bay. The assumption is that during strong upwelling conditions the flows that move along the canyon emerge in the centre of Mejillones Bay, producing a fish larvae retention zone. Understanding the biophysical interactions responsible to trap and/or concentrate particles is essential to protect these fragile upwelling ecosystems.

  17. Beyond bathymetry: probing the ocean subsurface using ship-based lidars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trees, Charles C.

    2014-05-01

    This document outlines a `proof-of-concept' for the maritime application of a ship-based LIDAR system for measuring the optical and physical properties in the water column. It is divided up into sections, documenting that there exists today the engineering, modeling and optical expertise to accomplish this task as well as a discussion of the reasons that LIDAR has not become the powerful observational platform that it should have been for horizontally and vertically monitoring optical and physical water column properties. Previous research on this approach has been limited because LIDAR systems have for most cases not been thoroughly calibrated, if at all, nor have LIDARs been focused on above-water, ship-based measurements. Efforts at developing derived product algorithms with uncertainties have been limited. This review concludes that there is a huge potential for the successful application of LIDAR measurements in the marine environment to estimate the vertical distribution of optical and physical properties and that measurement costs can be minimized by deployment of these automated systems on `ships-of-opportunity' and military vessels on a non-interfering basis. Although LIDAR measurements and research have been around since the 1960's, this approach has not really been investigated by any civilian or military agencies or laboratories even though providing `through-sensor performance matrixes' for existing bathymetry, target detection, underwater communication and imaging should be high on their list.

  18. Reach Scale Application of UAV+SFM Method in Shallow Rivers Hyperspatial Bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, O.; Ghodsian, M.; Saadatseresht, M.

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, rivers are impacted by different human activities and highly regulated. To rehabilitate these systems, spatial and process-based analyses of rivers are essential. Hydrodynamic models are sophisticated tools in this regard and instream topography is one of the most important input of these models. To represent hyperspatial topography and bathymetry in shallow rivers, UAV imagery and structure from motion may be an optimum method considering the extent of application, vegetation condition and flow quality. However, at the present there is no available workflow for applications of UAV+SfM method in riverine environments at extent of reach or higher scales. Therefore, in this study a new workflow has been presented and evaluated in Alarm River. The evaluation showed that the workflow provides 2 m/s speed for UAV while mapping flight lines with low illumination changes. Specific pattern of image acquisition in the proposed workflow leads to substantial decrease of process time. In addition, precise control of flight height and overlap of images may lead to consistent accurate results. The result of validation against rtkGNSS data points showed that the suggested workflow is capable of providing 0.01 m-resolution topographic data with an error less than 0.075 m and 95% level of confidence in clear shallow rivers.

  19. Assessing the Utility of Green LiDAR for Characterizing Forest Canopy Structure and Stream Bathymetry in Riparian Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskal, L. M.; Richardson, J.

    2014-12-01

    Forested riparian zones serve many ecosystem functions from species habitat through stream shading and large woody debris recruitment, to improvements in water quality. Moreover, stream depth and bathymetry in forested environments is difficult and costly to measure in the field, but critically important for stream-dwelling organisms. Green (bathymetric) LiDAR (G-L) can be used to characterize stream bathymetry, but little is known of its ability to accurately characterize stream bathymetry in narrow (width less than 5 m), heavily forested streams. Canopy characterization with green LiDAR is also poorly understood. We compared canopy and digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from green and near-infrared LiDAR (NIR-L) to field measurements in a narrow, forested stream in Oregon, USA, as well as comparing the two canopy models and DEMs to each other along the length of the stream and to estimates of leaf area index. We observed that the canopy models from the G-L are lower in accuracy compared to NIR-L canopy models. Canopy height models from the G-L were up to 26% less accurate in dense stands, compared to the NIR-L accuracy of 94%. We attribute these errors in part to the lower quality of DEMs generated from the G-L as compared to the NIR-L DEMs. As for bathymetry, the G-L DEM was 0.05 cm higher in elevation than the field measured stream elevation, while the NIR-L ground model was 0.17mm higher. The elevation difference tended to increase with stream depth for both types of LiDAR-derived DEMs, but stream depth only explained a small portion of the variability (coefficient of determination equals 0.09 for NIR-L DEM and 0.05 for G-L DEM). Our results suggest that G-L may be limited in accurately characterizing the bathymetry of narrow streams in heavily forested environments due to difficulty penetrating canopy and interactions with complex topography.

  20. EMODNet Hydrography - Seabed Mapping - Developing a higher resolution digital bathymetry for the European seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Dick M. A.; Moussat, Eric

    2013-04-01

    In December 2007 the European Parliament and Council adopted the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) which aims to achieve environmentally healthy marine waters by 2020. This Directive includes an initiative for an overarching European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNet). The EMODNet Hydrography - Seabed Mapping projects made good progress in developing the EMODNet Hydrography portal to provide overview and access to available bathymetric survey datasets and to generate an harmonised digital bathymetry for Europe's sea basins. Up till end 2012 more than 8400 bathymetric survey datasets, managed by 14 data centres from 9 countries and originated from 118 institutes, have been gathered and populated in the EMODNet Hydrography Data Discovery and Access service, adopting SeaDataNet standards. These datasets have been used as input for analysing and generating the EMODNet digital terrain model (DTM), so far for the following sea basins: • the Greater North Sea, including the Kattegat • the English Channel and Celtic Seas • Western and Central Mediterranean Sea and Ionian Sea • Bay of Biscay, Iberian coast and North-East Atlantic • Adriatic Sea • Aegean - Levantine Sea (Eastern Mediterranean). • Azores - Madeira EEZ The Hydrography Viewing service gives users wide functionality for viewing and downloading the EMODNet digital bathymetry: • water depth in gridded form on a DTM grid of a quarter a minute of longitude and latitude • option to view QC parameters of individual DTM cells and references to source data • option to download DTM tiles in different formats: ESRI ASCII, XYZ, CSV, NetCDF (CF), GeoTiff and SD for Fledermaus 3 D viewer software • option for users to create their Personal Layer and to upload multibeam survey ASCII datasets for automatic processing into personal DTMs following the EMODNet standards The NetCDF (CF) DTM files are fit for use in a special 3D Viewer software package which is based on the existing open

  1. High spatial resolution mapping of water quality and bathymetry with an autonomous underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampalone, Vincenzo; Milici, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    The drone Ecomapper AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) is a rare example of highly technological instrument in the environmental coastal monitoring field. The YSI EcoMapper is a one-man deployable, Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) designed to collect bathymetry and water quality data. The submarine-like vehicle follows a programmed course and employs sensors mounted in the nose to record pertinent information. Once the vehicle has started its mission, it operates independently of the user and utilizes GPS waypoints navigation to complete its programmed course. Throughout the course, the vehicle constantly steers toward the line drawn in the mission planning software (VectorMap), essentially following a more accurate road of coordinates instead of transversing waypoint-to-waypoint. It has been equipped with a Doppler Velocity Log (DVL) to increase its underwater navigation accuracy. Potential EcoMapper applications include baseline environmental mapping in freshwater, estuarine or near-coastal environments, bathymetric mapping, dissolved oxygen studies, event monitoring (algal blooms, storm impacts, low dissolved oxygen), non-point source studies, point-source dispersion mapping, security, search & rescue, inspection, shallow water mapping, thermal dissipation mapping of cooling outfalls, trace-dye studies. The AUV is used in the coastal area of the Augusta Bay (Italy), located in the eastern part of Sicily. Due to the heavy contamination generated by the several chemical and petrochemical industries active in the zone, the harbour was declared a Contaminated Site of National Interest. The ecomapper allows for a simultaneous data collection of water quality and bathymetric data providing a complete environmental mapping system of the Harbour.

  2. Complementing airborne laser bathymetry with UAV-based lidar for capturing alluvial landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandlburger, Gottfried; Pfennigbauer, Martin; Riegl, Ursula; Haring, Alexander; Wieser, Martin; Glira, Philipp; Winiwarter, Lukas

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we report on a flight experiment employing airborne laser bathymetry (ALB) and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) based laser scanning (ULS) for capturing very high resolution topography of shallow water areas and the surrounding littoral zone at the pre-alpine Pielach River in Austria. The aim of the research is to assess how information gained from non-bathymetric, ultra-high resolution ULS can support the ALB data. We focus first on the characterization of the water surface of a lowland river and provide validation results using the data of a topographic airborne laser scanning (ALS) sensor and a low flying ULS system. By repeat ULS survey of a the meandering river reach we are able to quantify short-term water level changes due to surface waves in high resolution. Based on a hydrodynamic-numerical (HN) model we assess the accuracy of the water surface derived from a water penetrating ALB sensor. In the second part of the paper we investigate the ability of ALB, ALS, and ULS to describe the complex topography and vegetation structure of the alluvial area. This is carried out by comparing the Digital Terrain Models (DTM) derived from different sensor configurations. Finally we demonstrate the potential of ULS for estimating single tree positions and stem diameters for detailed floodplain roughness characterization in HN simulations. The key findings are: (i) NIR scan data from ALS or ULS provide more precise water level height estimates (no bias, 1σ: 2 cm) compared to ALB (bias: 3 cm, 1σ: 4 cm), (ii) within the studied reach short-term water level dynamics irrelevant for ALB data acquisition considering a 60 cm footprint diameter, and (iii) stem diameters can be estimated based on ULS point clouds but not from ALS and ALB.

  3. Marine geology of the Hess Rise: 1. Bathymetry, surface sediment distribution, and environment of deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Kenji; Kroenke, Loren W.

    1981-11-01

    New charts of bathymetry, acoustic character, and sediment distribution describe the Hess Rise, a large oceanic plateau in the central north Pacific. Discrete physiographic provinces on the Hess Rise are the High Plateau, shallower than 3900 m, trending N30°W; the Northeastern Flank, a smooth, gentle slope gradually increasing in depth to the northeast; the Woollard Abyssal Plain, extending farther to the northeast; the Volcanic Province with its high peaks and ridges along the southern margin of the Hess Rise; the Mendocino Fracture Zone to the south, expressed by broad, planar seafloor regions bordered by ridges and scarps; the Western Steps, formed by structural benches on the western side of the Rise; and the Emperor Deep, between the rise and the Emperor Seamounts. Five types of acoustic units have been mapped and interpreted: a transparent layer, predominantly of biosiliceous pelagic clay; a stratified layer, predominantly of nannofossil ooze; a diffuse layer of debris flows that seem to have originated mostly in the Volcanic Province; an opaque horizon commonly formed of volcaniclastic sediments that are usually found on the seafloor of the Mendocino Fracture Zone; and a hyperbolic horizon, indicating outcrops of igneous rock. The pronounced effect of bottom currents on the present-day environment of deposition in the Hess Rise is evidenced by the presence of the opaque horizon, which is interpreted as an erosion surface, and by current moating, abrupt thinning of surface layers and truncation of subbottom reflectors. The widespread erosion on the seafloor of the Mendocino Fracture Zone is attributed to the flow of Antarctic bottom water.

  4. Interactions of Marine Hydrokinetic Devices in Complex Bathymetries: Numerical Simulations in the Chacao Channel in Southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, K. A.; Escauriaza, C. R.; Richter, D. H.

    2015-12-01

    Many coastal areas in the South Pacific Ocean can provide significant marine energy resources in the near future. The installation of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in these regions will require new approaches to understand physical and environmental processes that are relevant for the installation of turbine arrays, which are also specific of each site. The coastal morphology of the Chacao channel in southern Chile, which separates the Chiloé island from the main continent (41º47'S, 73º31'W) stands out as an important energy resource that can potentially contribute a significant power capacity. This coastal area not only sustains delicate ecosystems with limited anthropic intervention, but it is characterized by a complex bathymetry that can have important effects on the performance of MHK devices and their local impacts. To understand the interactions of the local bathymetry and ambient turbulence with turbine arrays, we carry out a series of numerical simulations with a coherent-structure resolving turbulence model using the actuator disk parameterization. The main objective of this study is to further our understanding on the physical processes associated with the installation of the turbine arrays. We perform simulations with different geometries and inlet boundary conditions, from simple cases in a rectangular channel, to more complex cases that include the high-resolution bathymetry of an extensive area of the Chacao channel. The results show how the interactions between the MHK devices, the local flow, and the bed can affect the energy flux and potential generation in specific sites. The results also provide new insights of local impacts of MHK devices and they can also help to optimize turbine arrays in natural environments. This work has been supported by Fondecyt project 1130940, and the Marine Energy Research & Innovation Center (MERIC) financed by Corfo and based in Santiago, Chile.

  5. Seafloor bathymetry in deep and shallow water marine CSEM responses of Nigerian Niger Delta oil field: Effects and corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folorunso, Adetayo Femi; Li, Yuguo

    2015-12-01

    Topography distortions in bathymetrically acquired marine Controlled-Source Electromagnetic (mCSEM) responses are capable of misleading interpretation to the presence or absence of the target if not corrected for. For this reason, the effects and correction of bathymetry distortions on the deep and shallow seafloor mCSEM responses of the Niger Delta Oil province were examined in this paper. Marine CSEM response of the Niger Delta geological structure was modelled by using a 2.5D adaptive finite element forward modelling code. In both the deep water and shallow water cases, the bathymetry distortions in the electric field amplitude and phase were found to get smaller with increasing Tx-Rx offsets and contain short-wavelength components in the amplitude curves which persist at all Tx-Rx offsets. In the deep water, topographic effects on the reservoir signatures are not significant, but as water depth reduces, bathymetric distortions become more significant as a result of the airwave effects, masking the target signatures. The correction technique produces a good agreement between the flat-seafloor reservoir model and its equivalent bathymetric model in deep water at 0.25 Hz, while in shallow water, the corrected response only shows good agreement at shorter offsets but becomes complicated at longer offsets due to airwave effects. Transmission frequency was extended above and below 0.25 Hz in the frequency spectrum and the correction method applied. The bathymetry correction at higher frequency (1.75 Hz) is not effective in removing the topographic effects in either deep or shallow water. At 0.05 Hz for both seafloor scenarios, we obtained the best corrected amplitude profiles, removing completely the distortions from both topographic undulation and airwave effects in the shallow water model. Overall, the work shows that the correction technique is effective in reducing bathymetric effects in deep water at medium frequency and in both deep and shallow waters at a low

  6. ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF THE TSUNAMI OF DECEMBER 26, 2004 ON THE NEAR-SHORE BATHYMETRY OF THE KALPAKKAM COAST, EAST COAST OF INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sasidhar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The devastating impact of the December 26, 2004 tsunami on the coast of South India has been well documented. However, only a few studies assessed the tsunami’s impact in the near-shore region. The present study evaluates changes in bathymetry along the near-shore of Kalpakkam before and after the tsunami. Using GIS software, data was extracted from charts to create three-dimensional bathymetric representations of the offshore region before and after the tsunami. Initially, a TIN (Triangulated Irregular Network surface was created by using Arc GIS software. Subsequently, by employing a 3D analyst tool, a three-dimensional surface of the near shore bathymetry was generated and comparisons were made with the pre-tsunami bathymetry. Based on comparisons of selected profiles, conclusions were drawn as to changes that resulted from the tsunami’s impact. The analysis indicated that the tsunami deposited loose inner shelf sediments that altered significantly the near shore region bathymetry of the Kalpakkam coastal region. Sediment accretion changed the local bathymetry by 10 to 50 cm.

  7. Effects of cross-channel bathymetry and wind direction on destratification and hypoxia reduction in the Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Wang, Harry; Linker, Lewis; Tian, Richard

    2016-09-01

    A coupled estuarine hydrodynamic model and water quality model were used to analyze differences in destratification and anoxia/hypoxia reduction by wind directions in the north-south oriented Chesapeake estuary, USA. The predominant cross-channel bathymetry in the Bay's anoxic center is asymmetric with a steeper and narrower shoal on the eastern shore than on the western shore, which modifies wind-induced circulation differently for two opposite wind directions. Model experiments of winds for 2-day at 8 m/s indicated that, for a stratified water over the aforementioned asymmetric bottom topography, the easterly wind caused greater destratification and hypoxia reduction than the westerly wind. This is a result of differential modulations on the two wind-induced cross-channel circulations by the asymmetric cross channel bathymetry. The downwelling along the gentle slope in the easterly wind was characterized with stronger baroclinicity than the downwelling along the steep slope (nearly perpendicular to surfaces of constant density) in the westerly wind. On the broad slope, there undergo greater contrasting density readjustments to the vorticity changes around the bottom boundary layer (BBL) during upslope and downslope motions. During the upslope condition, the flow in BBL tends to decelerate under adverse pressure gradient which leads to a stable condition in the outer layer; whereas, during the downslope condition, the BBL tends to accelerate under favourable pressure gradient, which leads to unstable condition in the outer layer of the large scale flow. Overall, the easterly wind caused greater anoxia reduction than the westerly wind during the entire wind period. A similar case was found for northerly versus southerly winds in the early stages of the wind period; modulated by the aforementioned bathymetry on the wind-induced cross-channel circulation, the northerly wind caused greater anoxia reduction than the southerly wind. However, as wind continues, the wind

  8. High-resolution bathymetry reveals contrasting landslide activity shaping the walls of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge axial valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannat, Mathilde; Mangeney, Anne; OndréAs, HéLèNe; Fouquet, Yves; Normand, Alain

    2013-04-01

    Axial valleys are found along most slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges and are one of the most prominent topographic features on Earth. In this paper, we present the first deep-tow swath bathymetry for the axial valley walls of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These data allow us to analyze axial valley wall morphology with a very high resolution (0.5 to 1 m compared to ≥ 50 m for shipboard multibeam bathymetry), revealing the role played by landslides. Slow-spreading ridge axial valleys also commonly expose mantle-derived serpentinized peridotites in the footwalls of large offset normal faults (detachments). In our map of the Ashadze area (lat. 13°N), ultramafic outcrops have an average slope of 18° and behave as sliding deformable rock masses, with little fragmentation. By contrast, the basaltic seafloor in the Krasnov area (lat. 16°38'N) has an average slope of 32° and the erosion of the steep basaltic rock faces leads to extensive fragmentation, forming debris with morphologies consistent with noncohesive granular flow. Comparison with laboratory experiments suggests that the repose angle for this basaltic debris is > 25°. We discuss the interplay between the normal faults that bound the axial valley and the observed mass wasting processes. We propose that, along axial valley walls where serpentinized peridotites are exposed by detachment faults, mass wasting results in average slopes ≤ 20°, even in places where the emergence angle of the detachment is larger.

  9. Inversion of gravity and bathymetry in oceanic regions for long-wavelength variations in upper mantle temperature and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Jordan, Thomas H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-wavelength variations in geoid height, bathymetry, and SS-S travel times are all relatable to lateral variations in the characteristic temperature and bulk composition of the upper mantle. The temperature and composition are in turn relatable to mantle convection and the degree of melt extraction from the upper mantle residuum. Thus the combined inversion of the geoid or gravity field, residual bathymetry, and seismic velocity information offers the promise of resolving fundamental aspects of the pattern of mantle dynamics. The use of differential body wave travel times as a measure of seismic velocity information, in particular, permits resolution of lateral variations at scales not resolvable by conventional global or regional-scale seismic tomography with long-period surface waves. These intermediate scale lengths, well resolved in global gravity field models, are crucial for understanding the details of any chemical or physical layering in the mantle and of the characteristics of so-called 'small-scale' convection beneath oceanic lithosphere. In 1991 a three-year project to the NASA Geophysics Program was proposed to carry out a systematic inversion of long-wavelength geoid anomalies, residual bathymetric anomalies, and differential SS-S travel time delays for the lateral variation in characteristic temperature and bulk composition of the oceanic upper mantle. The project was funded as a three-year award, beginning on 1 Jan. 1992.

  10. A Dual EnKF for Estimating Water Level, Bottom Roughness, and Bathymetry in a 1-D Hydrodynamic Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hooshyar, Milad; Wang, Dingbao; Hagen, Scott C

    2016-01-01

    Data assimilation has been applied to coastal hydrodynamic models to better estimate system states or parameters by incorporating observed data into the model. Kalman Filter (KF) is one of the most studied data assimilation methods whose application is limited to linear systems. For nonlinear systems such as hydrodynamic models a variation of the KF called Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is applied to update the system state in the context of Monte Carlo simulation. In this research, a dual EnKF approach is used to simultaneously estimate state (water surface elevation) and parameters (bottom roughness and bathymetry) of the shallow water models. The sensitivity of the filter to 1) the quantity and precision of the observations, and 2) the initial estimation of parameters is investigated in a 1-D shallow water problem located in the Gulf of Mexico. Results show that starting from an initial estimate of bottom roughness and bathymetry within a logical range and utilizing observations available at a limited numbe...

  11. Velocity mapping in the Lower Congo River: a first look at the unique bathymetry and hydrodynamics of Bulu Reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Oberg, Kevin A.; Gardiner, Ned; Shelton, John

    2009-01-01

    The lower Congo River is one of the deepest, most powerful, and most biologically diverse stretches of river on Earth. The river’s 270 m decent from Malebo Pool though the gorges of the Crystal Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean (498 km downstream) is riddled with rapids, cataracts, and deep pools. Much of the lower Congo is a mystery from a hydraulics perspective. However, this stretch of the river is a hotbed for biologists who are documenting evolution in action within the diverse, but isolated, fish populations. Biologists theorize that isolation of fish populations within the lower Congo is due to barriers presented by flow structure and bathymetry. To investigate this theory, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and American Museum of Natural History teamed up with an expedition crew from National Geographic in 2008 to map flow velocity and bathymetry within target reaches in the lower Congo River using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) and echo sounders. Simultaneous biological and water quality sampling was also completed. This paper presents some preliminary results from this expedition, specifically with regard to the velocity structure andbathymetry. Results show that the flow in the bedrock controlled Bulu reach of the lower Congo is highly energetic. Turbulent and secondary flow structures can span the full depth of flow (up to 165 m), while coherent bank-to-bank cross-channel flow structures are absent. Regions of flow separation near the banks are isolated from one another and from the opposite bank by high shear, high velocity zones with depth-averaged flow velocities that can exceed 4 m/s.

  12. Architectures of the Moroccan continental shelf of the Alboran Sea: insights from high-resolution bathymetry and seismic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafosse, Manfred; Gorini, Christian; Leroy, Pascal; d'Acremont, Elia; Rabineau, Marina; Ercilla, Gemma; Alonso, Belén; Ammar, Abdellah

    2016-04-01

    The MARLBORO and the SARAS oceanographic surveys have explored the continental shelf in the vicinity of the transtensive Nekor basin (South Alboran Sea, Western Mediterranean) and over three submarine highs located at several tens of kilometers from the shelf. Those surveys have produced high-resolution (≤29m²/pixel) bathymetry maps. Simultaneously, seismic SPARKER and TOPAS profiles were recorded. To quantify and understand Quaternary vertical motions of this tectonically active area, we searched for morphological and sedimentary paleobathymetric or paleo-elevations markers. Shelf-edge wedges associated marine terraces and paleo-shorelines have been identified on the bathymetry and on seismic cross-sections. These features reflect the trends of long term accommodation variations. Along the Moroccan continental shelf the lateral changes of shelf-edges geometries and the spatial distribution of marine landforms (sedimentary marine terraces, sediment wave fields, marine incisions) reflect the interaction between sea level changes and spatial variations of subsidence rates. Positions of paleo-shorelines identified in the studied area have been correlated with the relative sea-level curve (Rohling et al., 2014). Several still stands or slow stands periods have been recognized between -130-125m, -100-110m and -85-80m. The astronomical forcing controls the architecture of Mediterranean continental shelves. Marine landforms distribution also reveals the way sea level changed since the LGM. The comparison with observations on other western Mediterranean margins (e.g. the Gulf of Lion, the Ionian-Calabrian shelf) allowed a first order access to vertical motion rates.

  13. A geomorphologist's dream come true: synoptic high resolution river bathymetry with the latest generation of airborne dual wavelength lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lague, Dimitri; Launeau, Patrick; Michon, Cyril; Gouraud, Emmanuel; Juge, Cyril; Gentile, William; Hubert-Moy, Laurence; Crave, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Airborne, terrestrial lidar and Structure From Motion have dramatically changed our approach of geomorphology, from low density/precision data, to a wealth of data with a precision adequate to actually measure topographic change across multiple scales, and its relation to vegetation. Yet, an important limitation in the context of fluvial geomorphology has been the inability of these techniques to penetrate water due to the use of NIR laser wavelengths or to the complexity of accounting for water refraction in SFM. Coastal bathymetric systems using a green lidar can penetrate clear water up to 50 m but have a resolution too coarse and deployment costs that are prohibitive for fluvial research and management. After early prototypes of narrow aperture green lidar (e.g., EEARL NASA), major lidar manufacturer are now releasing dual wavelength laser system that offer water penetration consistent with shallow fluvial bathymetry at very high resolution (> 10 pts/m²) and deployment costs that makes the technology, finally accessible. This offers unique opportunities to obtain synoptic high resolution, high precision data for academic research as well as for fluvial environment management (flood risk mapping, navigability,…). In this presentation, we report on the deployment of the latest generation Teledyne-Optech Titan dual-wavelength lidar (1064 nm + 532 nm) owned by the University of Nantes and Rennes. The instrument has been deployed over several fluvial and lacustrine environments in France. We present results and recommendation on how to optimize the bathymetric cover as a function of aerial and aquatic vegetation cover and the hydrology regime of the river. In the surveyed rivers, the penetration depth varies from 0.5 to 4 m with discrete echoes (i.e., onboard detection), heavily impacted by water clarity and bottom reflectance. Simple post-processing of the full waveform record allows to recover an additional 20 % depth. As for other lidar techniques, the main

  14. A method to calibrate channel friction and bathymetry parameters of a Sub-Grid hydraulic model using SAR flood images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M.; Neal, J. C.; Hostache, R.; Corato, G.; Chini, M.; Giustarini, L.; Matgen, P.; Wagener, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites are capable of all-weather day and night observations that can discriminate between land and smooth open water surfaces over large scales. Because of this there has been much interest in the use of SAR satellite data to improve our understanding of water processes, in particular for fluvial flood inundation mechanisms. Past studies prove that integrating SAR derived data with hydraulic models can improve simulations of flooding. However while much of this work focusses on improving model channel roughness values or inflows in ungauged catchments, improvement of model bathymetry is often overlooked. The provision of good bathymetric data is critical to the performance of hydraulic models but there are only a small number of ways to obtain bathymetry information where no direct measurements exist. Spatially distributed river depths are also rarely available. We present a methodology for calibration of model average channel depth and roughness parameters concurrently using SAR images of flood extent and a Sub-Grid model utilising hydraulic geometry concepts. The methodology uses real data from the European Space Agency's archive of ENVISAT[1] Wide Swath Mode images of the River Severn between Worcester and Tewkesbury during flood peaks between 2007 and 2010. Historic ENVISAT WSM images are currently free and easy to access from archive but the methodology can be applied with any available SAR data. The approach makes use of the SAR image processing algorithm of Giustarini[2] et al. (2013) to generate binary flood maps. A unique feature of the calibration methodology is to also use parameter 'identifiability' to locate the parameters with higher accuracy from a pre-assigned range (adopting the DYNIA method proposed by Wagener[3] et al., 2003). [1] https://gpod.eo.esa.int/services/ [2] Giustarini. 2013. 'A Change Detection Approach to Flood Mapping in Urban Areas Using TerraSAR-X'. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote

  15. Archive of bathymetry and backscatter data collected in 2014 nearshore Breton and Gosier Islands, Breton National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Fredericks, Jake J.; Flocks, James G.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Locker, Stanley D.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Bernier, Julie C.; Kelso, Kyle W.; Reynolds, Billy J.; Wiese, Dana S.; Browning, Trevor

    2016-08-01

    As part of the Barrier Island Monitoring Project, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted nearshore geophysical surveys off Breton and Gosier Islands, Louisiana, in July and August of 2014. To assist the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) with restoration planning efforts, the USGS was tasked with answering fundamental questions about the physical environment of the southern Chandeleur Islands, including the geology, morphology, and oceanography. Baseline data needed to answer these questions were either insufficient or missing. The USGS conducted a comprehensive geologic investigation in the summer of 2014, collecting geophysical and sedimentological data.Breton Island, located at the southern end of the Chandeleur Island chain in southeastern Louisiana, was recognized as a natural, globally significant nesting sanctuary for several bird species and was established as the Breton National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in 1904. The areal extent of Breton Island has diminished 90 percent since 1920. Land loss is attributed to ongoing relative sea-level rise, diminished sediment supply, and storm impacts. The bird population on Breton Island has also declined over the years, most notably after Hurricane George in 1998 and after Hurricane Katrina in 2015; the latter completely submerged the island. Despite decreasing habitable acreage, migratory seabirds continue to return and nest on Breton Island. To prevent the island from being submerged in the future, and to protect, stabilize, and provide more nesting and foraging areas for the bird population, the USFWS proposed a restoration effort to rebuild Breton Island to its pre-Katrina footprint.This data series serves as an archive of processed interferometric swath and single-beam bathymetry data, and side-scan sonar data, collected in the nearshore of Breton and Gosier Islands, NWR, Louisiana. The data were collected during two USGS cruises (USGS

  16. Improvment of short cut numerical method for determination of periods of free oscillations for basins with irregular geometry and bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Anton; Kurkin, Andrey; Pelinovsky, Efim; Yalciner, Ahmet; Zaytsev, Andrey

    2010-05-01

    A short cut numerical method for evaluation of the modes of free oscillations of the basins which have irregular geometry and bathymetry was presented in the paper (Yalciner A.C., Pelinovsky E., 2007). In the method, a single wave is inputted to the basin as an initial impulse. The respective agitation in the basin is computed by using the numerical method solving the nonlinear form of long wave equations. The time histories of water surface fluctuations at different locations due to propagation of the waves in relation to the initial impulse are stored and analyzed by the fast Fourier transform technique (FFT) and energy spectrum curves for each location are obtained. The frequencies of each mode of free oscillations are determined from the peaks of the spectrum curves. Some main features were added for this method and will be discussed here: 1. Instead of small number of gauges which were manually installed in the studied area the information from numerical simulation now is recorded on the regular net of the «simulation» gauges which was place everywhere on the sea surface in the depth deeper than "coast" level with the fixed presetted distance between gauges. The spectral analysis of wave records was produced by Welch periodorgam method instead of simple FFT so it's possible to get spectral power estimation for wave process and determine confidence interval for spectra peaks. 2. After the power spectral estimation procedure the common peak of studied seiche can be found and mean spectral amplitudes for this peak were calculated numerically by a Simpson integration method for all gauges in the basin and the mean spectral amplitudes spatial distribution map can be ploted. The spatial distribution helps to study structure of seiche and determine effected dangerous areas. 3. Nested grid module in the NAMI-DANCE - nonlinear shallow water equations calculation software package was developed. This is very important feature for complicated different scale (ocean

  17. Estimation of high resolution shallow water bathymetry via two-media-photogrammetry - a case study at the Pielach River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Michael; Mandlburger, Gottfried; Ressl, Camillo; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    In our contribution, a photogrammetric approach for water depth estimation of a shallow water body is developed and applied to a gravel-bed river in order to evaluate the possibilities of passive optical remote sensing for high resolution bathymetry. While 2-media (air and water) photogrammetry has been described before, it was concentrated on reconstruction of individual points. Here, we take a different approach and aim at a dense surface description of the river bed as seen from the aerial image through the water column. In a first step, the influence of light refraction at the boundary between two media for photogrammetric point retrieval is assessed. The effect is theoretically investigated under varying conditions, i.e. the 3D point displacement caused by refraction is related to parameters such as water depth, image geometry et cetera. Especially the assumption of a plain, horizontal water surface does not hold in practice. Therefore, also the limitations of the theoretical model are determined by investigating, how water surface waves and the corresponding deviation of the surface normal vectors from vertical direction distort the results. In the second, practical part of the work, a refraction correction procedure is derived from the prior investigations and is embedded into the photogrammetric workflow. A full photogrammetric processing chain is applied to a set of aerial images of the pre-Alpine Pielach River in Lower Austria. The RGB images were taken simultaneously to an Airborne Laser Bathymetry (ALB) campaign providing high resolution reference data. Based on these images, a Digital Terrain Model is derived for the open as well as the submerged areas. Running through the procedure gives important insights about the possibilities of influencing the processing pipeline of commercial photogrammetric software packages in order to apply the developed refraction correction. Especially, the deviation from the epipolar constraint caused by refraction and the

  18. Composition, seasonal change and bathymetry of Ligeia Mare, Titan, derived from its 2.2-cm thermal emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, A. A.; Malaska, M.; Lorenz, R. D.; Janssen, M. A.; Tokano, T.; Hayes, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Veyssière, G.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Karatekin, O.; Encrenaz, P.

    2015-12-01

    For the last 10 years, the Cassini RADAR has been exploring Saturn's moon Titan, the only planetary body besides Earth whose surface presently exhibits significant accumulations of liquids in the forms of lakes and seas. In particular, the passive Radiometer that is incorporated in this instrument has been recording the 2.2 cm-wavelength thermal emission from Titan's three seas. Radiometry observations provide new information beyond the active radar reflection data. In this paper, we analyze the radiometry observations collected from Feb. 2007 to July 2013 over one of these seas, Ligeia Mare, with the goal of providing constrains on its liquid composition, seafloor nature, bathymetry, and dynamics. In light of the two-layer model we have developed for this analysis, we find that the dielectric constant of the sea liquid is most likely smaller than 1.8, suggesting that the composition of Ligeia Mare is dominated by liquid methane rather than liquid ethane (although a ternary methane-ethane-nitrogen mixture cannot be ruled out). This result is further supported by the value we infer for the liquid loss tangent of 3-5×10-5. This value is in agreement with the one first published by Mastrogiuseppe et al. (2014) based on active radar observation. A high methane concentration suggests that Ligeia Mare is either a sea from which ethane has been removed by crustal interaction, or a sea primarely fed by methane-rich precipitation, or both. For the seafloor, a dielectric constant of 2.6-2.9±0.9 is determined. Though this result is not very constraining, we favor a scenario where the floor of Ligeia Mare is covered by a sludge of compacted and possibly nitrile-rich organic material formed by the deposition of photochemical haze or by rain-washing of the nearby shores. These results are then used to convert the radiometry mosaic of Ligeia Mare into a qualitative low-resolution bathymetry map. Lastly, we establish limits on the physical temperature variation of the sea

  19. NOAA TIFF Image - 2m Multibeam Bathymetry, W00216 USVI 2011, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-11-1 (2011), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a GeoTIFF with 2x2 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of a sharply sloping swath of the St. John Shelf, a selected portion of...

  20. Integrated hard and soft bottom seafloor substrate map derived from an unsupervised classification of gridded backscatter, World-View 2 imagery and bathymetry derivatives of Ni'ihau Island, Hawaii, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Preliminary hard and soft seafloor substrate map derived from an unsupervised classification of multibeam backscatter, bathymety derivatives, and bathymetry derived...

  1. Preliminary hard and soft bottom seafloor substrate map (5m grid) derived from an unsupervised classification of gridded backscatter and bathymetry derivatives at Rose Atoll Lagoon, Territory of American Samoa, USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Preliminary hard and soft seafloor substrate map derived from an unsupervised classification of multibeam backscatter and bathymetry derivatives at Rose Atoll...

  2. NOAA TIFF Image - 8m Multibeam Bathymetry , W00216 USVI 2011 , Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-11-1 (2011), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a GeoTIFF with 8x8 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of a sharply sloping swath of the St. John Shelf, a selected portion of...

  3. NOAA TIFF Image - 2m Multibeam Bathymetry, W00217 USVI 2011, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-11-1 (2011), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a GeoTIFF with 2x2 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of a broad portion of seafloor south of St. Thomas, USVI, derived from data...

  4. CAPENORTH_GEO4M_XYZ.TXT: ASCII formatted file of the 4-m bathymetry from the northern half of USGS survey 98015 of the Sea Floor off Eastern Cape Cod (Geographic)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes bathymetry of the sea floor offshore of eastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The data were collected with a multibeam sea floor mapping system...

  5. ASCII formatted file of the 4-m bathymetry from the southern half of USGS Survey 98015 of the Sea Floor off Eastern Cape Cod (CAPESOUTH_GEO4M_XYZ.TXT, Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes bathymetry of the sea floor offshore of eastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The data were collected with a multibeam sea floor mapping system...

  6. ASCII formatted file of the 4-m bathymetry from the northern half of USGS survey 98015 of the Sea Floor off Eastern Cape Cod (CAPENORTH_GEO4M_XYZ.TXT, Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes bathymetry of the sea floor offshore of eastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The data were collected with a multibeam sea floor mapping system...

  7. NOAA ESRI Geotiff- 2m Multibeam Bathymetry of NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Reserve, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131860)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 2 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the a portion of the NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and...

  8. NOAA ESRI Geotiff- 2m Multibeam Bathymetry of NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Reserve, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, Project NF-05-05, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Geotiff with 2 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the a portion of the NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and...

  9. Determining change of bathymetry with GPR method in Ordu-Giresun, a sea-filled airport in the Black Sea, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadioglu, Selma; Kagan Kadioglu, Yusuf

    2016-04-01

    Ordu-Giresun (OGU) is a newly-constructed airport, the first sea-filled airport in Turkey and in Europe, and the second airport in the world after Osaca-Japan. The airport is between Gulyalı district in Ordu city and Piraziz district in Giresun city in Black Sea -Turkey. A protection breakwater has been constructed by filling a rock approximately 7.435-m long and with an average height of 5.5 m. Then, the Black Sea has been filled until 1 m over the sea level, approximately the area is 1.770.000 m2 wide and includes a runway, aprons and taxiway covered by breakwater. The runway has a 1-m thickness, 3-km length and 45-m width, PCN84 strength, and stone mastic asphalt surface. The aprons has a 240 x 110 m length and PCN110 strength, the taxiway is 250 x 24 m wide. The airport was started to be constructed in July 2011 and it began to serve on 22th May 2015. The aim of this study was to determine the depth of the rock-filled layer and the amount of sinking of the bathymetry which has been determined before filling processing. In addition, before bathymetry determination, unconsolidated sediments had been removed from the bottom of the sea. There were four drilling points to control the sinking of the bathymetry. Therefore, six suitable Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) profiles were measured, crossing these points with runway and aprons, using 250-MHz and 100-MHz shielded antennas. Starting points of the profiles were in the middle of the runway to merge between depth and thickness changing of the filled layer and bathymetry along the profiles. Surface topography changing was measured spaced 1 m apart with 1 cm sensitivity on each profile. At the same time, similarly the topography changing, bathymetry coordinates was re-arranged along the each profile. Topography corrections were applied to the processed radargrams and then the bottom boundary lines of the rock-filled layer were determined. The maximum height was 3.5 m according to the sea level, which was on the

  10. From oblique subduction to intra-continental transpression : structures of the southern Kermadec-Hikurangi margin from multibeam bathymetry, side-scan sonar and seismic reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Collot, Jean-Yves; Delteil, J; Lewis, K B; Davy, B.; Lamarche, Geoffroy; Audru, J.C.; Barnes, P; Charnier, F.; Chaumillon, E. (collab.); Lallemand, S; Mercier de Lepinay, B.; Orpin, A.; Pelletier, Bernard; Sosson, M; Toussaint, Bertrand

    1996-01-01

    The southern Kermadec-Hikurangi convergent margin, east of New Zealand, accommodates the oblique subduction of the oceanic Hikurangi Plateau at rates of 4-5 cm/yr. Swath bathymetry and sidescan data, together with seismic reflection and geopotential data obtained during the GEODYNZ-SUD cruise, showed major changes in tectonic style along the margin. The changes reflect the size and abundance of seamounts on the subducting plateau, the presence and thickness of trench-fill turbidites, and the ...

  11. Geophysical Surveys of the San Andreas and Crystal Springs Reservoir System Including Seismic-Reflection Profiles and Swath Bathymetry, San Mateo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, David P.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Hart, Patrick E.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes geophysical data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in San Andreas Reservoir and Upper and Lower Crystal Springs Reservoirs, San Mateo County, California, as part of an effort to refine knowledge of the location of traces of the San Andreas Fault within the reservoir system and to provide improved reservoir bathymetry for estimates of reservoir water volume. The surveys were conducted by the Western Coastal and Marine Geology (WCMG) Team of the USGS for the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC). The data were acquired in three separate surveys: (1) in June 2007, personnel from WCMG completed a three-day survey of San Andreas Reservoir, collecting approximately 50 km of high-resolution Chirp subbottom seismic-reflection data; (2) in November 2007, WCMG conducted a swath-bathymetry survey of San Andreas reservoir; and finally (3) in April 2008, WCMG conducted a swath-bathymetry survey of both the upper and lower Crystal Springs Reservoir system. Top of PageFor more information, contact David Finlayson.

  12. Bathymetry data reveal glaciers vulnerable to ice-ocean interaction in Uummannaq and Vaigat glacial fjords, west Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rignot, E.; Fenty, I.; Xu, Y.; Cai, C.; Velicogna, I.; Cofaigh, C. Ó.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Weinrebe, W.; Catania, G.; Duncan, D.

    2016-03-01

    Marine-terminating glaciers play a critical role in controlling Greenland's ice sheet mass balance. Their frontal margins interact vigorously with the ocean, but our understanding of this interaction is limited, in part, by a lack of bathymetry data. Here we present a multibeam echo sounding survey of 14 glacial fjords in the Uummannaq and Vaigat fjords, west Greenland, which extends from the continental shelf to the glacier fronts. The data reveal valleys with shallow sills, overdeepenings (>1300 m) from glacial erosion, and seafloor depths 100-1000 m deeper than in existing charts. Where fjords are deep enough, we detect the pervasive presence of warm, salty Atlantic Water (AW) (>2.5°C) with high melt potential, but we also find numerous glaciers grounded on shallow (<200 m) sills, standing in cold (<1°C) waters in otherwise deep fjords, i.e., with reduced melt potential. Bathymetric observations extending to the glacier fronts are critical to understand the glacier evolution.

  13. Geologic interpretation and multibeam bathymetry of the sea floor in the vicinity of the Race, eastern Long Island Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, L.J.; DiGiacomo-Cohen, M. L.; Doran, E.F.; Smith, S.M.; Stewart, H.F.; Forfinski, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    Digital terrain models (DTMs) produced from multibeam bathymetric data provide valuable base maps for marine geological interpretations (Todd and others, 1999; Mosher and Thomson, 2002; ten Brink and others, 2004; Poppe and others, 2006a, b, c, d). These maps help define the geological variability of the sea floor (one of the primary controls of benthic habitat diversity), improve our understanding of the processes that control the distribution and transport of bottom sediments and the distribution of benthic habitats and associated infaunal community structures, and provide a detailed framework for future research, monitoring, and management activities. The bathymetric survey interpreted herein (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) survey H11250) covers roughly 94 km² of sea floor in an area where a depression along the Orient Point-Fishers Island segment of the Harbor Hill-Roanoke Point-Charlestown Moraine forms the Race, the eastern opening to Long Island Sound. The Race also divides easternmost Long Island Sound from northwestern Block Island Sound (fig. 1). This bathymetry has been examined in relation to seismic reflection data collected concurrently, as well as archived seismic profiles acquired as part of a long-standing geologic mapping partnership between the State of Connecticut and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The objective of this work was to use these acoustic data sets to interpret geomorphological attributes of the sea floor, and to use these interpretations to better understand the Quaternary geologic history and modern sedimentary processes.

  14. Bathymetry of Grounding Zones and Sub-Ice Shelf Cavities of the Amundsen Sea, from Operation IceBridge Gravity Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, K. J.; Cochran, J. R.; Bell, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    In order to understand the observed changes in thinning and grounding line position of outlet glaciers it is essential to have accurate maps of the bathymetry of the sea floor within and around the grounding zone. This bathymetry controls the stability of the grounding line as well as access and circulation of seawater under their stabilizing ice shelves. Since 2009 Operation IceBridge has flown gridded surveys over four of the ice shelves of the Amundsen Sea embayment. We present a 3D inversion of the gravity from the region, supplemented by 2D profile models across the ice shelves to provide a self-consistent bathymetric model of the grounding zone and sub ice cavity of Pine Island, Thwaites, Dotson and Crosson ice shelves. Much attention has been paid to the largest outlet glaciers of the Amundsen Sea, and to the bathymetry beneath the floating ice in front of their grounding zones. Considerable changes have also been observed from the smaller Amundsen ice shelves, Crosson and Dotson, which flow to the east and north respectively, between Thwaites Glacier and Getz ice shelf, but little is known about their sub-ice bathymetry. The Amundsen Sea region is vulnerable to the influence of relatively warm circumpolar deep water encroaching on to the continental shelf. The influence of these waters at the grounding zone of the glaciers in the region is dictated by the depth and orientation of bathymetric features of the sea floor. The dominant geological fabric of the region is a NE-SW trending series of ridges and troughs, formed in association with the rifting of the Amundsen Sea region. The bathymetry models from OIB gravity inversions reveal the continuation of the deep (~1500 m) trough of the Kohler Glacier under Crosson Ice Shelf. At the eastern end of the trough, at the front of Crosson ice shelf, the sea floor rises to an average of ~500 m depth over a broad, 50 km wide region. Further east from here the NE-SW fabric is continued in a previously reported ridge

  15. Multibeam Bathymetry to Measure Volumetric Change and Particle Size Distributions in the Snake River through Hells Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K.; Morehead, M. D.; Anderson, K.; Wilson, T.; Butler, M.; Conner, J. T.; Hocker, B.

    2011-12-01

    Multi-beam bathymetry (MBB) surveys can be used to measure the change in storage and particle size distributions on riverbeds even in the inaccessible and rugged Hells Canyon reach of the Snake River. Our work to date has shown that differencing repeated MBB surveys can be an effective method of measuring volumetric changes in riverbed storage of sediment and that the data can also be used to categorize particle size distributions across the entire riverbed. The volumetric and particle size information allows us to investigate the patterns of sand and salmon spawning gravels and the underlying transport and supply processes. These methods will continue to be refined as part of Idaho Power's long-term compliance monitoring program and will provide a unique, long-term record of sediment transport in a steep, canyon-bound river. The Hells Canyon Reach of the Snake River flows north 95 kilometers from Hells Canyon Dam to the confluence with the Salmon River and forms the border between Idaho and Oregon. The reach contains 15 named rapids (Class II to IV) and has an average slope of approximately 0.002%, an average bankfull width of 75-100 m, and an extreme confinement ratio (bankfull width: floodplain width) of 1. The bankfull flow (recurrence interval of about 2 years) of 1,400 cms has not been changed by the construction of the Hells Canyon Complex (HCC) immediately upstream, because the HCC reservoirs can only store 11% of the mean annual flow and 87% of the upstream drainage area had already been impounded by dams. Most methods of bathymetric surveying and particle size characterization were developed in small, wadeable streams and cannot be used in large, unwadeable channels like Hells Canyon. Many of the previous methods also require too much time or effort to feasibly cover the 950 hectares of riverbed in Hells Canyon. Instead, we have adapted multibeam sonar technology typically used in coastal areas or large, low-gradient rivers to the steep, canyon

  16. Where to Forage in the Absence of Sea Ice? Bathymetry As a Key Factor for an Arctic Seabird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amélineau, Françoise; Grémillet, David; Bonnet, Delphine; Le Bot, Tangi; Fort, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The earth is warming at an alarming rate, especially in the Arctic, where a marked decline in sea ice cover may have far-ranging consequences for endemic species. Little auks, endemic Arctic seabirds, are key bioindicators as they forage in the marginal ice zone and feed preferentially on lipid-rich Arctic copepods and ice-associated amphipods sensitive to the consequences of global warming. We tested how little auks cope with an ice-free foraging environment during the breeding season. To this end, we took advantage of natural variation in sea ice concentration along the east coast of Greenland. We compared foraging and diving behaviour, chick diet and growth and adult body condition between two years, in the presence versus nearby absence of sea ice in the vicinity of their breeding site. Moreover, we sampled zooplankton at sea when sea ice was absent to evaluate prey location and little auk dietary preferences. Little auks foraged in the same areas both years, irrespective of sea ice presence/concentration, and targeted the shelf break and the continental shelf. We confirmed that breeding little auks showed a clear preference for larger copepod species to feed their chick, but caught smaller copepods and nearly no ice-associated amphipod when sea ice was absent. Nevertheless, these dietary changes had no impact on chick growth and adult body condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of bathymetry for profitable little auk foraging, whatever the sea-ice conditions. Our investigations, along with recent studies, also confirm more flexibility than previously predicted for this key species in a warming Arctic. PMID:27438790

  17. Bathymetry and Sediment-Storage Capacity Change in Three Reservoirs on the Lower Susquehanna River, 1996-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langland, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The Susquehanna River transports a substantial amount of the sediment and nutrient load to the Chesapeake Bay. Upstream of the bay, three large dams and their associated reservoirs trap a large amount of the transported sediment and associated nutrients. During the fall of 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection completed bathymetric surveys of three reservoirs on the lower Susquehanna River to provide an estimate of the remaining sediment-storage capacity. Previous studies indicated the upper two reservoirs were in equilibrium with long-term sediment storage; only the most downstream reservoir retained capacity to trap sediments. A differential global positioning system (DGPS) instrument was used to provide the corresponding coordinate position. Bathymetry data were collected using a single beam 210 kHz (kilohertz) echo sounder at pre-defined transects that matched previous surveys. Final horizontal (X and Y) and vertical (Z) coordinates of the geographic positions and depth to bottom were used to create bathymetric maps of the reservoirs. Results indicated that from 1996 to 2008 about 14,700,000 tons of sediment were deposited in the three reservoirs with the majority (12,000,000 tons) being deposited in Conowingo Reservoir. Approximately 20,000 acre-feet or 30,000,000 tons of remaining storage capacity is available in Conowingo Reservoir. At current transport (3,000,000 tons per year) and deposition (2,000,000 tons per year) rates and with no occurrence of major scour events due to floods, the remaining capacity may be filled in 15 to 20 years. Once the remaining sediment-storage capacity in the reservoirs is filled, sediment and associated phosphorus loads entering the Chesapeake Bay are expected to increase.

  18. Where to Forage in the Absence of Sea Ice? Bathymetry As a Key Factor for an Arctic Seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amélineau, Françoise; Grémillet, David; Bonnet, Delphine; Le Bot, Tangi; Fort, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The earth is warming at an alarming rate, especially in the Arctic, where a marked decline in sea ice cover may have far-ranging consequences for endemic species. Little auks, endemic Arctic seabirds, are key bioindicators as they forage in the marginal ice zone and feed preferentially on lipid-rich Arctic copepods and ice-associated amphipods sensitive to the consequences of global warming. We tested how little auks cope with an ice-free foraging environment during the breeding season. To this end, we took advantage of natural variation in sea ice concentration along the east coast of Greenland. We compared foraging and diving behaviour, chick diet and growth and adult body condition between two years, in the presence versus nearby absence of sea ice in the vicinity of their breeding site. Moreover, we sampled zooplankton at sea when sea ice was absent to evaluate prey location and little auk dietary preferences. Little auks foraged in the same areas both years, irrespective of sea ice presence/concentration, and targeted the shelf break and the continental shelf. We confirmed that breeding little auks showed a clear preference for larger copepod species to feed their chick, but caught smaller copepods and nearly no ice-associated amphipod when sea ice was absent. Nevertheless, these dietary changes had no impact on chick growth and adult body condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of bathymetry for profitable little auk foraging, whatever the sea-ice conditions. Our investigations, along with recent studies, also confirm more flexibility than previously predicted for this key species in a warming Arctic.

  19. Where to Forage in the Absence of Sea Ice? Bathymetry As a Key Factor for an Arctic Seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amélineau, Françoise; Grémillet, David; Bonnet, Delphine; Le Bot, Tangi; Fort, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The earth is warming at an alarming rate, especially in the Arctic, where a marked decline in sea ice cover may have far-ranging consequences for endemic species. Little auks, endemic Arctic seabirds, are key bioindicators as they forage in the marginal ice zone and feed preferentially on lipid-rich Arctic copepods and ice-associated amphipods sensitive to the consequences of global warming. We tested how little auks cope with an ice-free foraging environment during the breeding season. To this end, we took advantage of natural variation in sea ice concentration along the east coast of Greenland. We compared foraging and diving behaviour, chick diet and growth and adult body condition between two years, in the presence versus nearby absence of sea ice in the vicinity of their breeding site. Moreover, we sampled zooplankton at sea when sea ice was absent to evaluate prey location and little auk dietary preferences. Little auks foraged in the same areas both years, irrespective of sea ice presence/concentration, and targeted the shelf break and the continental shelf. We confirmed that breeding little auks showed a clear preference for larger copepod species to feed their chick, but caught smaller copepods and nearly no ice-associated amphipod when sea ice was absent. Nevertheless, these dietary changes had no impact on chick growth and adult body condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of bathymetry for profitable little auk foraging, whatever the sea-ice conditions. Our investigations, along with recent studies, also confirm more flexibility than previously predicted for this key species in a warming Arctic. PMID:27438790

  20. Plate tectonics and the origin of the Juan Fernández Ridge: analysis of bathymetry and magnetic patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristián Rodrigo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Juan Fernández Ridge (JFR is a cα. 800 km long alignment of seamounts and islands which is thought to be fed by a deep mantle plume. JFR includes the Friday and Domingo seamounts in the western active edge close to the active hotspot, and the O'Higgins Seamount and Guyot at the eastern limit just in front of the Chile-Perú trench. Recent bathymetric (Global Topography and magnetic (EMAG-2 datasets were interpreted both qualitatively and quantitatively by means of 3D inverse modeling and 2D direct modeling for geometry and susceptibility, together with an interpretation of the synthetic anomalies related to the classical hypothesis of deep seafloor spreading. Topographic and magnetic patterns are used to understand the tectonic evolution and origin of the JFR, especially in the western segment. Results show a continuous corridor with a base at ~3900 m depth formed by four groups of seamounts/islands with a number of summits. The deep ocean floor is ~22 to ~37 Myr old and is younger to the south of the Challenger Fracture Zone that runs in a SW-NE direction. The magnetic pattern of the western JFR segment, which is different than the eastern one, has no correlation with bathymetry and does not present a common polarity nor fit with magnetic models for isolated bodies. This superposition of magnetic patterns indicates a role of the faults/fractures of the Nazca Plate. Geological evidence supports the hypothesis of a fixed mantle plume for the origin of JFR but our data suggest that tectonic processes play a role, thus fueling the global controversy about these competing processes.

  1. Where to Forage in the Absence of Sea Ice? Bathymetry As a Key Factor for an Arctic Seabird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Amélineau

    Full Text Available The earth is warming at an alarming rate, especially in the Arctic, where a marked decline in sea ice cover may have far-ranging consequences for endemic species. Little auks, endemic Arctic seabirds, are key bioindicators as they forage in the marginal ice zone and feed preferentially on lipid-rich Arctic copepods and ice-associated amphipods sensitive to the consequences of global warming. We tested how little auks cope with an ice-free foraging environment during the breeding season. To this end, we took advantage of natural variation in sea ice concentration along the east coast of Greenland. We compared foraging and diving behaviour, chick diet and growth and adult body condition between two years, in the presence versus nearby absence of sea ice in the vicinity of their breeding site. Moreover, we sampled zooplankton at sea when sea ice was absent to evaluate prey location and little auk dietary preferences. Little auks foraged in the same areas both years, irrespective of sea ice presence/concentration, and targeted the shelf break and the continental shelf. We confirmed that breeding little auks showed a clear preference for larger copepod species to feed their chick, but caught smaller copepods and nearly no ice-associated amphipod when sea ice was absent. Nevertheless, these dietary changes had no impact on chick growth and adult body condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of bathymetry for profitable little auk foraging, whatever the sea-ice conditions. Our investigations, along with recent studies, also confirm more flexibility than previously predicted for this key species in a warming Arctic.

  2. Different key roles of mesoscale oceanographic structures and ocean bathymetry in shaping larval fish distribution pattern: A case study in Sicilian waters in summer 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttitta, Angela; Quinci, Enza Maria; Patti, Bernardo; Bonomo, Sergio; Bonanno, Angelo; Musco, Marianna; Torri, Marco; Placenti, Francesco; Basilone, Gualtiero; Genovese, Simona; Armeri, Grazia Maria; Spanò, Antonina; Arculeo, Marco; Mazzola, Antonio; Mazzola, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    Fish larvae data collected in year 2009 were used to examine the effects of particular environmental conditions on the structure of larval assemblages in two oligotrophic Mediterranean areas (the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea and the Strait of Sicily). For this purpose, relationships with environmental variables (temperature, salinity and fluorescence), zooplankton biomass, water circulation and bathymetry are discussed. Hydrodynamic conditions resulted very differently between two study areas. The Southern Tyrrhenian Sea was characterized by moderate shallow circulation compared to the Strait of Sicily. In this framework, distribution pattern of larval density in the Tyrrhenian Sea was mainly driven by bathymetry, due to spawning behavior of adult fish. There, results defined four assemblages: two coastal assemblages dominated by pelagic and demersal families and two oceanic assemblages dominated by mesopelagic species more abundant in western offshore and less abundant in eastern offshore. The assemblage variations in the western side was related to the presence of an anti-cyclonic gyre in the northern side of the Gulf of Palermo, while in the eastern side the effect of circulation was not very strong and the environmental conditions rather than the dispersal of species determined the larval fish communities structure. Otherwise in the Strait of Sicily the currents were the main factor governing the concentration and the assemblage structure. In fact, the distribution of larvae was largely consistent with the branch of the Atlantic Ionian Stream (AIS). Moreover, very complex oceanographic structures (two cyclonic circulations in the western part of the study area and one anti-cyclonic circulation in the eastern part) caused the formation of uncommon spatial distribution of larval fish assemblages, only partially linked to bathymetry of the study area. Typically coastal larvae (pelagic families: Engraulidae and Clupeidae) were mostly concentrated in the offshore areas

  3. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter of the mid and outer continental shelf, head of De Soto Canyon, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, James V.; Hughes-Clarke, John E.; Meyer, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    bathymetry is a fundamental first step in the study of an area suspected to be critical benthic habitats. Morphology is thought to be critical to define the distribution of dominant demersal plankton/planktivores communities. Community structure and trophodynamics of demersal fishes of the outer continental shelf of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico presently are focuses of a major USGS research project. A goal of the project is to answer questions concerning the relative roles played by morphology and surficial geology in controlling biological differentiation. Deep-water ridges, reefs, and outcrops are important because they are fish havens and key spawning sites, and are critical habitats for larval, juvenile, and economically important sport/food fishes.

  4. Optimal Band Ratio Analysis of WORLDVIEW-3 Imagery for Bathymetry of Shallow Rivers (case Study: Sarca River, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niroumand-Jadidi, M.; Vitti, A.

    2016-06-01

    The Optimal Band Ratio Analysis (OBRA) could be considered as an efficient technique for bathymetry from optical imagery due to its robustness on substrate variability. This point receives more attention for very shallow rivers where different substrate types can contribute remarkably into total at-sensor radiance. The OBRA examines the total possible pairs of spectral bands in order to identify the optimal two-band ratio that its log transformation yields a strong linear relation with field measured water depths. This paper aims at investigating the effectiveness of additional spectral bands of newly launched WorldView-3 (WV-3) imagery in the visible and NIR spectrum through OBRA for retrieving water depths in shallow rivers. In this regard, the OBRA is performed on a WV-3 image as well as a GeoEye image of a small Alpine river in Italy. In-situ depths are gathered in two river reaches using a precise GPS device. In each testing scenario, 50% of the field data is used for calibration of the model and the remained as independent check points for accuracy assessment. In general, the effect of changes in water depth is highly pronounced in longer wavelengths (i.e. NIR) due to high and rapid absorption of light in this spectrum as long as it is not saturated. As the studied river is shallow, NIR portion of the spectrum has not been reduced so much not to reach the riverbed; making use of the observed radiance over this spectral range as denominator has shown a strong correlation through OBRA. More specifically, tightly focused channels of red-edge, NIR-1 and NIR-2 provide a wealth of choices for OBRA rather than a single NIR band of conventional 4-band images (e.g. GeoEye). This advantage of WV-3 images is outstanding as well for choosing the optimal numerator of the ratio model. Coastal-blue and yellow bands of WV-3 are identified as proper numerators while only green band of the GeoEye image contributed to a reliable correlation of image derived values and field

  5. Constructing river stage-discharge rating curves using remotely sensed river cross-sectional inundation areas and river bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feifei; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan

    2016-09-01

    Remote sensing from satellites and airborne platforms provides valuable data for monitoring and gauging river discharge. One effective approach first estimates river stage from satellite-measured inundation area based on the inundation area-river stage relationship (IARSR), and then the estimated river stage is used to compute river discharge based on the stage-discharge rating (SDR) curve. However, this approach is difficult to implement because of a lack of data for constructing the SDR curves. This study proposes a new method to construct the SDR curves using remotely sensed river cross-sectional inundation areas and river bathymetry. The proposed method was tested over a river reach between two USGS gauging stations, i.e., Kingston Mines (KM) and Copperas Creek (CC) along the Illinois River. First a polygon over each of two cross sections was defined. A complete IARSR curve was constructed inside each polygon using digital elevation model (DEM) and river bathymetric data. The constructed IARSR curves were then used to estimate 47 river water surface elevations at each cross section based on 47 river inundation areas estimated from Landsat TM images collected during 1994-2002. The estimated water surface elevations were substituted into an objective function formed by the Bernoulli equation of gradually varied open channel flow. A nonlinear global optimization scheme was applied to solve the Manning's coefficient through minimizing the objective function value. Finally the SDR curve was constructed at the KM site using the solved Manning's coefficient, channel cross sectional geometry and the Manning's equation, and employed to estimate river discharges. The root mean square error (RMSE) in the estimated river discharges against the USGS measured river discharges is 112.4 m3/s. To consider the variation of the Manning's coefficient in the vertical direction, this study also suggested a power-law function to describe the vertical decline of the Manning

  6. Arctic Bathymetry (batharcst)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The digitally compiled map includes geology, oil and gas field centerpoints, and geologic provinces of the Arctic (North Pole area encircled by 640 N Latitude). The...

  7. Chukchi Sea Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Bathymetric contours were generated from soundings collected during geophysical surveys conducted by the USGS from 1969 to 1982, and supplemented by data from other...

  8. Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Originally designed for military use, the multibeam echosounder has proved very useful for nautical charting, oceanographic research and modeling, habitat...

  9. Arctic_Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Models project the Arctic Ocean will become undersaturated with respect to carbonate minerals in the next decade. Recent field results indicate parts may already be...

  10. Bathymetry in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 4x4 meter resolution bathymetric surface for Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico (in NAD83 UTM 19 North). The depth values are in meters referenced to...

  11. Review on available information on wind, water level, current, geology and bathymetry in the DanWEC area, (DanWEC Vaekstforum 2011)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margheritini, L.

    2012-02-15

    The Danish Wave Energy Centre (DanWEC) has been established in 2009 because of participated desire to market the trial wave energy projects which are already in Hanstholm and others to come. The DanWEC is a part of Hanstholm harbour in the North-West of Denmark. The Center will contribute at creating a local base for knowledge, education and possibly a workplace which will be leased out to trial projects. It is therefore likely that different developers will deploy their wave energy devices during the next years in this location and therefore detailed knowledge on a number of environmental and physical parameter is necessary. The report should function as a review and assessment of the existing documents and present knowledge on wind, current, water level, geology and bathymetry information at the DanWEC location. The present report has been prepared under the project No. 834101 ''DanWEC Vaekstforum 2011'', task 3: ''Collection and presentation of basic data about wind, current, water head, bathymetry and geology for the DanWEC site at the Port of Hanstholm''. (LN)

  12. Morphology and shallow geological structure of the continental slope located between Manzanillo, Colima and Chamela, Jalisco, Mexico, using multibeam bathymetry and high resolution seismic reflection data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, M.; Bandy, W. L.; Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.

    2013-05-01

    The west coast of Mexico presents a complex array of tectonic processes related with the subduction of the Rivera plate beneath the Jalisco Block/North American plate including seamount subduction and forearc slivering. To better understand these processes and related deformation, an analysis and integration of marine geophysical data was undertaken to map the morphology and shallow geologic structure of the continental slope located between Manzanillo, Colima and Chamela, Jalisco, Mexico (Longitude: 104 ° 20 'to 106 ° 0 Latitude: 18 ° 24 'to 19 ° 48'). These data include multibeam bathymetry and seafloor backscatter data (Kongsberg EM300 system) and high-resolution seismic reflection data (Kongsberg TOPAS system) collected during the MORTIC07 campaign aboard the oceanographic vessel "El Puma". 3D models of the bathymetry and acoustic backscatter strength were constructed along with maps of the major geological and structural features, such as landslides and active faults and folds. The analysis indicates that the continental slope in this area has undergone significant vertical and horizontal movements producing several large slump blocks, a prominent sedimentary filled basin, and a series of transpressional ridges suggestive of a recent collision and subduction of a seamount, or similar bathymetric features.

  13. New constraints on the structure of Hess Deep from regional- and micro-bathymetry data acquired during RRS James Cook in Jan-Feb 2008 (JC021)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillington, D. J.; Ferrini, V. L.; MacLeod, C. J.; Teagle, D. A.; Gillis, K. M.; Cazenave, P. W.; Hurst, S. D.; Scientific Party, J.

    2008-12-01

    In January-February 2008, new geophysical and geological data were acquired in Hess Deep using the RRS James Cook and the British ROV Isis. Hess Deep provides a tectonic window into oceanic crust emplaced by fast seafloor spreading at the East Pacific Rise, thereby offering the opportunity to test competing hypotheses for oceanic crustal accretion. The goal of this cruise was to collect datasets that can constrain the structure and composition of the lower crustal section exposed in the south-facing slope of the Intrarift Ridge just north of the Deep, and thus provide insights into the emplacement of gabbroic lower crust at fast spreading rates. Additionally, the acquired datasets provide site survey data for IODP Proposal 551-Full. The following datasets were acquired during JC021: 1) regional multibeam bathymetry survey complemented with sub-bottom profiler (SBP) data (in selected areas), 2) two micro-bathymetry surveys, and 3) seafloor rock samples acquired with an ROV. Here we present grids of regional multibeam and microbathymetry data following post-cruise processing. Regional multibeam bathymetry were acquired using the hull-mounted Kongsberg Simrad EM120 system (12 kHz). These data provide new coverage of the northern flank of the rift as far east as 100°W, which show that it comprises of a series of 50- to 100-km-long en echelon segments. Both E-W and NE-SW striking features are observed in the immediate vicinity of the Deep, including in a newly covered region to the SW of the rift tip. Such features might arise due to the rotation of the Galapagos microplate(s), as proposed by other authors. The ROV Isis acquired micro-bathymetry data in two areas using a Simrad SM2000 (200 kHz) multibeam sonar. Data were acquired at a nominal altitude of ~100 m and speed of 0.3 kts to facilitate high-resolution mapping of seabed features and also permit coverage of two relatively large areas. Swath widths were ~200- 350 m depending on noise and seabed characteristics

  14. Assessing the variability of glacier lake bathymetries and potential peak discharge based on large-scale measurements in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochachin, Alejo; Huggel, Christian; Salazar, Cesar; Haeberli, Wilfried; Frey, Holger

    2015-04-01

    Over timescales of hundreds to thousands of years ice masses in mountains produced erosion in bedrock and subglacial sediment, including the formation of overdeepenings and large moraine dams that now serve as basins for glacial lakes. Satellite based studies found a total of 8355 glacial lakes in Peru, whereof 830 lakes were observed in the Cordillera Blanca. Some of them have caused major disasters due to glacial lake outburst floods in the past decades. On the other hand, in view of shrinking glaciers, changing water resources, and formation of new lakes, glacial lakes could have a function as water reservoirs in the future. Here we present unprecedented bathymetric studies of 124 glacial lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Huallanca, Huayhuash and Raura in the regions of Ancash, Huanuco and Lima. Measurements were carried out using a boat equipped with GPS, a total station and an echo sounder to measure the depth of the lakes. Autocad Civil 3D Land and ArcGIS were used to process the data and generate digital topographies of the lake bathymetries, and analyze parameters such as lake area, length and width, and depth and volume. Based on that, we calculated empirical equations for mean depth as related to (1) area, (2) maximum length, and (3) maximum width. We then applied these three equations to all 830 glacial lakes of the Cordillera Blanca to estimate their volumes. Eventually we used three relations from the literature to assess the peak discharge of potential lake outburst floods, based on lake volumes, resulting in 3 x 3 peak discharge estimates. In terms of lake topography and geomorphology results indicate that the maximum depth is located in the center part for bedrock lakes, and in the back part for lakes in moraine material. Best correlations are found for mean depth and maximum width, however, all three empirical relations show a large spread, reflecting the wide range of natural lake bathymetries. Volumes of the 124 lakes with bathymetries amount to 0

  15. Subglacial bathymetry and sediment distribution beneath Pine Island Glacier ice shelf modeled using aerogravity and in situ geophysical data: New results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Atsuhiro; Peters, Leo E.; Gohl, Karsten; Sasgen, Ingo; Alley, Richard B.; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Riverman, Kiya L.

    2016-01-01

    Pine Island Glacier (PIG) in the Amundsen Sea sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is losing mass and contributing to global sea-level rise at an accelerating rate. Although recent observations and modeling have identified the incursion of relatively warm Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) beneath the PIG ice shelf (PIGIS) as the main driver of this ice-mass loss, the lack of precise bathymetry limits furthering our understanding of the ice-ocean interactions and improving the accuracy of modeling. Here we present updated bathymetry and sediment distribution beneath the PIGIS, modeled by the inversion of aerogravity data with constraints from active-source seismic data, observations from an autonomous underwater vehicle, and the regional gravity-anomaly field derived from satellite gravity observations. Modeled bathymetry shows a submarine ridge beneath the middle of PIGIS that rises ∼350 to 400 m above the surrounding sea floor, with a minimum water-column thickness of ∼200 m above it. This submarine ridge continues across the whole width of the 45-km wide ice shelf, with no deep troughs crossing it, confirming the general features of the previously predicted sub-ice-shelf ocean circulation. However, the relatively low resolution of the aerogravity data and limitations in our inversion method leave a possibility that there is an undetected, few-kilometers-wide or narrower trough that may alter the predicted sub-ice-shelf ocean circulation. Modeled sediment distribution indicates a sedimentary basin of up to ∼800 m thick near the current grounding zone of the main PIG trunk and extending farther inland, and a region seaward of the submarine ridge where sediments are thin or absent with exposed crystalline basement that extends seaward into Pine Island Bay. Therefore, the submarine ridge marks the transition from a thick sedimentary basin providing a smooth interface over which ice could flow easily by sliding or sediment deformation, to a region with no to

  16. New 3D bathymetry and sediment distribution in Lake Vostok: Implication for pre-glacial origin and numerical modeling of the internal processes within the lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filina, Irina Y.; Blankenship, Donald D.; Thoma, Malte; Lukin, Valery V.; Masolov, Valery N.; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2008-11-01

    A new distribution of water and unconsolidated sediments in subglacial Lake Vostok, East Antarctica was developed via inversion of airborne gravity data constrained by 60 seismic soundings. A model was developed for host rock with a density of 2550 kg/m 3 that was inferred from prior 2D modeling. Our 3D bathymetry model of Lake Vostok corresponds better with seismic data (RMS of 125 m) than two previous models based on the same gravity dataset. The good match in both water and sediment thicknesses between the gravity model and seismic measurements confirms two major facts about Lake Vostok: (1) the lake is hosted by sedimentary rocks, and (2) the bottom of the lake is covered with a layer of unconsolidated sediments that does not exceed 300 m in the southern basin and thickens almost to 400 m in the northern basin. Our new bathymetry model suggests much shallower water thicknesses (up to twice the previous estimates) in the middle and northern parts of the lake, while the water layer is thicker in the southern basin. Numerical modeling of the internal processes in the lake reveals the relevance of our new bathymetry model to the basal mass balance. A significant decrease in transport is observed in the shallower northern basin, as well as a decrease of 33% in the turbulent kinetic energy. However, only minor differences were observed in the distribution of the calculated freezing and melting zones compared to previous models. Estimates for the sedimentation rates for six possible mechanisms were made. Possible sedimentation mechanisms are: (1) fluvial and periglacial, i.e. those that are active prior to the establishment of a large subglacial lake; (2) deposition due to overlying ice sheet, including melting out of the ice, as well as bulldozering by the overriding ice; and (3) suspended sediments from subglacial water flow including those deposited by periodical subglacial outbursts. The estimates for these mechanisms show that unconsolidated sediments of the

  17. NOAA TIFF Image - Bathymetry - Lang bank, St. Croix, USVI - Benthic Habitat Characterization - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - M-1907-NF-14 (2014), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0128255)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1 meter resolution bathymetry of the reef shelf and the steep slopes of Lang Bank (H12639) of St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. The M-I907-NF-14...

  18. Raw data files for single-beam bathymetry data of field activity 90027 (F-8-90-NC) in Gulf of Farallones, Northern California from 08/05/1990 to 08/17/1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise 1990-027-FA. The cruise was conducted in Gulf...

  19. Mapping the bathymetry of supraglacial lakes and streams on the Greenland Ice Sheet using field measurements and high resolution satellite images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Legleiter

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent melt events on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS accentuate the need to constrain estimates of sea level rise through improved characterization of meltwater pathways. This effort will require more precise estimates of the volume of water stored on the surface of the GrIS. We assessed the potential to obtain such information by mapping the bathymetry of supraglacial lakes and streams from WorldView2 (WV2 satellite images. Simultaneous {in situ} observations of depth and reflectance from two streams and a lake with measured depths up to 10.45 m were used to test a spectrally-based depth retrieval algorithm. We performed Optimal Band Ratio Analysis (OBRA of continuous field spectra and spectra convolved to the bands of the WV2, Landsat, MODIS, and ASTER sensors. The field spectra yielded a strong relationship with depth (R2 = 0.94, and OBRA R2 values were nearly as high (0.87–0.92 for convolved spectra, suggesting that these sensors' broader bands would be sufficient for depth retrieval. Our field measurements thus indicated that remote sensing of supraglacial bathymetry is not only feasible but potentially highly accurate. OBRA of spectra from 2 m-pixel WV2 images acquired within 3–72 h of our field observations produced an optimal R2 value of 0.92 and unbiased, precise depth estimates, with mean and root-mean square errors < 1% and 10–25% of the mean depth. Bathymetric maps produced by applying OBRA relations revealed subtle features of lake and channel morphology. In addition to providing refined storage volume estimates for lakes of various sizes, this approach can help provide estimates of the transient flux of meltwater through streams.

  20. Objective classification of oceanic ridge-crest terrains using two-dimensional spectral models of bathymetry: Application to the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christopher G.

    1996-12-01

    An important application of detailed bathymetric mapping is the interpretation of geological processes based on the nature of the fine-scale morphology of the seafloor. This interpretation is usually accomplished through qualitative analysis of contour maps. In this paper, an objective classification technique, based on a two-dimensional spectral model of bathymetry developed by Fox and Hayes (1985) is applied to detailed Sea Beam data from the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Parameters of the model can be directly related to seafloor properties corresponding to 1) isotropic (non-directionally dependent) roughness; 2) anisotropic (directionally dependent) roughness; 3) orientation of the anisotropic component; and 4) spectral rool-off ( ˜ fractal dimension), by fitting the model surface to two-dimensional amplitude spectra of bathymetry determined on a regular grid over the study area. A test area was selected which encompasses the southern volcanic rift zone of Axial Volcano and the northern terminus of the Vance Segment. Parameters of the model clearly define the contrast between the constructional volcanic terrain (rough, isotropic, with high fractal dimension) and the tectonic extensional terrain (smoother, anisotropic, with low fractal dimension). An agglomerative, hierarchical cluster analysis is applied to the data, independent of spatial information, to delineate groups of spectra with similar characteristics. Distinct, mappable regions, corresponding to volcanic and tectonic provinces, are objectively determined. Also, coherent sub-regions of consistent spectral properties occur within the larger volcanic/tectonic divisions. The classification is extended to the Juan de Fuca Ridge system from 44°30' N to 47°20' N through combining these results with an a priori technique (K-means clustering). Broad-scale physiographic regions of the Juan de Fuca Ridge are delineated by the technique, which may aid geologists in the interpretation of crustal accretion processes at

  1. The use of multibeam backscatter and bathymetry as a means of identifying faunal assemblages in a deep-sea cold seep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Arunima; Ondréas, Hélène; Gaillot, Arnaud; Marcon, Yann; Augustin, Jean-Marie; Olu, Karine

    2016-04-01

    Deep-sea ecosystems have attracted considerable commercial interest in recent years because of their potential to sustain a diverse range of mankind's industrial needs. If these systems are to be preserved or exploited in a sustainable manner, mapping habitats and species distributions is critical. As biodiversity at cold-seeps or other deep-sea ecosystems is driven by habitat heterogeneity, imagery is the obvious choice for characterizing these systems and has indeed proven extremely valuable towards mapping biogenic habitats formed by dense aggregations of large sized species, such as coral reefs, tubeworm bushes or bivalve beds. However, the acquisition of detailed images with resolution sufficient for reliable identification is extremely time consuming, labor intensive and highly susceptible to logistical issues. We developed a novel method for quickly mapping cold seep fauna and habitats over large areas, at the scale of squares of kilometers. Our method uses multibeam echosounder bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data, both segmented and reclassified based on topographical features and then combined to obtain a raster containing unique values incorporating both backscatter and bathymetry data. Two datasets, obtained from 30 m and 8 m above the seafloor were used and the results from the two datasets were compared. The method was applied to a cold seep community located in a pockmark in the deep Congo channel and we were able to ground truth the accuracy of our method against images of the area. The two datasets, obtained from different altitudes gave varying results: the 8 m altitude dataset reliably predicted tubeworms and carbonate rock, while the 30 m altitude dataset predicted tubeworms and vesicomyid clams. The 30 m dataset was more accurate than the 8 m altitude dataset in predicting distributions of tubeworms. Overall, all the predictions were quite accurate, with at least 90% of predictions being within 5 m of real distributions.

  2. NOS ESRI Grid Unified 10m Multibeam Bathymetry La Parguera, Puerto Rico, St Croix, St. John and St. Thomas, 2004-2006: Projects NF-04-06, NF-05-05 and NF-06-03, UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified ESRI Grid with 10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of selected portions of seafloor around La Parguera, P.R. and St....

  3. High resolution seismic data coupled to Multibeam bathymetry of Stromboli island collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment: implications with the marine geophysics and volcanology of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex (Sicily, Southern Tyrrhenian sea, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Gemma; Di Fiore, Vincenzo; Marsella, Ennio; Passaro, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    New high resolution seismic data (Subbottom Chirp) coupled to high resolution Multibeam bathymetry collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment aimed at recording active seismic data and tomography of the Stromboli Island are here presented. The Stromboli geophysical experiment has been already carried out based on onshore and offshore data acquisition in order to investigate the deep structure and the location of the magma chambers of the Stromboli volcano. A new detailed swath bathymetry of Stromboli Island is here shown and discussed to reconstruct an up-to-date morpho-bathymetry and marine geology of the area compared to the volcanologic setting of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex. Due to its high resolution the new Digital Terrain Model of the Stromboli Island gives interesting information about the submerged structure of the volcano, particularly about the volcano-tectonic and gravitational processes involving the submarine flanks of the edifice. Several seismic units have been identified based on the geologic interpretation of Subbottom Chirp profiles recorded around the volcanic edifice and interpreted as volcanic acoustic basement pertaining to the volcano and overlying slide chaotic bodies emplaced during its complex volcano-tectonic evolution. They are related to the eruptive activity of Stromboli, mainly poliphasic and to regional geological processes involving the intriguing geology of the Aeolian Arc, a volcanic area still in activity and needing improved research interest. PMID:24860717

  4. Mapping lava morphology of the Galapagos Spreading Center at 92°W: fuzzy logic provides a classification of high-resolution bathymetry and backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClinton, J. T.; White, S. M.; Sinton, J. M.; Rubin, K. H.; Bowles, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Differences in axial lava morphology along the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) can indicate variations in magma supply and emplacement dynamics due to the influence of the adjacent Galapagos hot spot. Unfortunately, the ability to discriminate fine-scale lava morphology has historically been limited to observations of the small coverage areas of towed camera surveys and submersible operations. This research presents a neuro-fuzzy approach to automated seafloor classification using spatially coincident, high-resolution bathymetry and backscatter data. The classification method implements a Sugeno-type fuzzy inference system trained by a multi-layered adaptive neural network and is capable of rapidly classifying seafloor morphology based on attributes of surface geometry and texture. The system has been applied to the 92°W segment of the western GSC in order to quantify coverage areas and distributions of pillow, lobate, and sheet lava morphology. An accuracy assessment has been performed on the classification results. The resulting classified maps provide a high-resolution view of GSC axial morphology and indicate the study area terrain is approximately 40% pillow flows, 40% lobate and sheet flows, and 10% fissured or faulted area, with about 10% of the study area unclassifiable. Fine-scale features such as eruptive fissures, tumuli, and individual pillowed lava flow fronts are also visible. Although this system has been applied to lava morphology, its design and implementation are applicable to other undersea mapping applications.

  5. End of the chain? Rugosity and fine-scale bathymetry from existing underwater digital imagery using structure-from-motion (SfM) technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Dartnell, Peter; Hatcher, Gerald A.; Gibbs, Ann E.

    2016-09-01

    The rugosity or complexity of the seafloor has been shown to be an important ecological parameter for fish, algae, and corals. Historically, rugosity has been measured either using simple and subjective manual methods such as `chain-and-tape' or complicated and expensive geophysical methods. Here, we demonstrate the application of structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry to generate high-resolution, three-dimensional bathymetric models of a fringing reef from existing underwater video collected to characterize the seafloor. SfM techniques are capable of achieving spatial resolution that can be orders of magnitude greater than large-scale lidar and sonar mapping of coral reef ecosystems. The resulting data provide finer-scale measurements of bathymetry and rugosity that are more applicable to ecological studies of coral reefs than provided by the more expensive and time-consuming geophysical methods. Utilizing SfM techniques for characterizing the benthic habitat proved to be more effective and quantitatively powerful than conventional methods and thus might portend the end of the `chain-and-tape' method for measuring benthic complexity.

  6. Bathymetry, morphology, and lakebed geologic characteristics of potential Kokanee salmon spawning habitat in Lake Pend Oreille, Bayview and Lakeview quadrangles, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Gary J.; Dux, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    Kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) are a keystone species in Lake Pend Oreille in northern Idaho, historically supporting a high-yield recreational fishery and serving as the primary prey for the threatened native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and the Gerrard-strain rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). After 1965, the kokanee population rapidly declined and has remained at a low level of abundance. Lake Pend Oreille is one of the deepest lakes in the United States, the largest lake in Idaho, and home to the U.S. Navy Acoustic Research Detachment Base. The U.S. Geological Survey and Idaho Department of Fish and Game are mapping the bathymetry, morphology, and the lakebed geologic units and embeddedness of potential kokanee salmon spawning habitat in Lake Pend Oreille. Relations between lake morphology, lakebed geologic units, and substrate embeddedness are characterized for the shore zone, rise zone, and open water in bays and the main stem of the lake. This detailed knowledge of physical habitat along the shoreline of Lake Pend Oreille is necessary to better evaluate and develop kokanee recovery actions.

  7. Characterizing Dynamic Bedforms Using Multibeam Bathymetry in the Haro Strait and San Juan Channel Areas of British Columbia, Canada, and the San Juan Islands, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, H. L.; Greene, H.

    2003-12-01

    The San Juan Islands in the U.S. and British Columbia, Canada, are an archipelago located in Northwestern Washington, between the Northern Cascades Mountain Range and the Olympic Peninsula and are the result of tectonic compressional processes. This region has experienced a complex tectonic history of convergence, thrust faulting, uplift, subsidence, glaciation, tidal scour and sediment transport (deposition and erosion) that in turn have produced diverse marine benthic habitats. There are a variety of habitats including dynamic bedforms, moraines, and glacially scoured fractured and faulted bedrock outcrops. Multibeam bathymetric and backscatter data image the bedforms in detail and show they are concentrated within the waterways of the San Juan Islands, including Haro Strait, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and San Juan Channel. These bedforms may provide habitat for marine species, including migrating salmon. An interpreted map will be presented that focuses on the characterization of marine benthic habitats based on high-resolution (Simrad EM 1002 95 kHz) multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data. This study will assist in a better understanding of the physical and biological characteristics of the San Juan Islands Archipelago, especially near established Marine Protected Areas and will benefit effective implementation of resource management objectives.

  8. 基于多波束测深的海底基床监测与分析%Monitoring and analysis of seafloor subgrade using multi- beam bathymetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙阳阳; 徐良; 张建军; 宁进进

    2015-01-01

    随着多波束测深精度的提高及深水基床铺设精度要求的提高,多波束在深水基床铺设中的监测作用越来越大。文章以港珠澳大桥岛隧工程深水碎石基床铺设为例,详细介绍了多波束在碎石基床整平浅点分析、回淤监测分析中所发挥作用。可为类似工程提供参考。%With the improvement of the accuracy of the multi-beam bathymetry and seafloor subgrade pavement, multi-beam plays an increasing role in the monitoring of the seafloor subgrade pavement. Taking the deepwater gravel subgrade pavement of the Hongkong-Zhuhai-macao Bridge island&tunnel project as an example, we introduced a huge role about the multi-beam at the shallow point analysis on gravel subgrade leveling and the siltation monitoring analysis, which can provide references for similar projects.

  9. End of the chain? Rugosity and fine-scale bathymetry from existing underwater digital imagery using structure-from-motion (SfM) technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Curt; Dartnell, Peter; Hatcher, Gerry; Gibbs, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    The rugosity or complexity of the seafloor has been shown to be an important ecological parameter for fish, algae, and corals. Historically, rugosity has been measured either using simple and subjective manual methods such as ‘chain-and-tape’ or complicated and expensive geophysical methods. Here, we demonstrate the application of structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry to generate high-resolution, three-dimensional bathymetric models of a fringing reef from existing underwater video collected to characterize the seafloor. SfM techniques are capable of achieving spatial resolution that can be orders of magnitude greater than large-scale lidar and sonar mapping of coral reef ecosystems. The resulting data provide finer-scale measurements of bathymetry and rugosity that are more applicable to ecological studies of coral reefs than provided by the more expensive and time-consuming geophysical methods. Utilizing SfM techniques for characterizing the benthic habitat proved to be more effective and quantitatively powerful than conventional methods and thus might portend the end of the ‘chain-and-tape’ method for measuring benthic complexity.

  10. Bank Erosion, Mass Wasting, Water Clarity, Bathymetry and a Sediment Budget Along the Dam-Regulated Lower Roanoke River, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Edward R.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Richter, Jean M.; Kroes, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Dam construction and its impact on downstream fluvial processes may substantially alter ambient bank stability, floodplain inundation patterns, and channel morphology. Most of the world's largest rivers have been dammed, which has prompted management efforts to mitigate dam effects. Three high dams (completed between 1953 and 1963) occur along the Piedmont portion of the Roanoke River, North Carolina; just downstream, the lower part of the river flows across largely unconsolidated Coastal Plain deposits. To document bank erosion rates along the lower Roanoke River, more than 700 bank erosion pins were installed along 124 bank transects. Additionally, discrete measurements of channel bathymetry, water clarity, and presence or absence of mass wasting were documented along the entire 153-kilometer-long study reach. Amounts of bank erosion in combination with prior estimates of floodplain deposition were used to develop a bank erosion and floodplain deposition sediment budget for the lower river. Present bank erosion rates are relatively high [mean 42 milimeters per year (mm/yr)] and are greatest along the middle reaches (mean 60 mm/yr) and on lower parts of the bank on all reaches. Erosion rates were likely higher along upstream reaches than present erosion rates such that erosion rate maxima have migrated downstream. Mass wasting and water clarity also peak along the middle reaches.

  11. A Cartesian method for fitting the bathymetry and tracking the dynamic position of the shoreline in a three-dimensional, hydrodynamic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a Cartesian method for the simultaneous fitting of the bathymetry and shorelines in a three-dimensional, hydrodynamic model for free-surface flows. The model, named LESS3D (Lake and Estuarine Simulation System in Three Dimensions), solves flux-based finite difference equations in the Cartesian-coordinate system (x,y,z). It uses a bilinear bottom to fit the bottom topography and keeps track the dynamic position of the shoreline. The resulting computational cells are hybrid: interior cells are regular Cartesian grid cells with six rectangular faces, and boundary/bottom cells (at least one face is the water-solid interface) are unstructured cells whose faces are generally not rectangular. With the bilinear interpolation, the shape of a boundary/bottom cell can be determined at each time step. This allows the Cartesian coordinate model to accurately track the dynamic position of the shorelines. The method was tested with a laboratory experiment of a Tsunami runup case on a circular island. It was also tested for an estuary in Florida, USA. Both model applications demonstrated that the Cartesian method is quite robust. Because the present method does not require any coordinate transformation, it can be an attractive alternative to curvilinear grid model

  12. Impact of recent Global Digital Bathymetry and Topography Models on geoid modelling: Results from two case studies in Balearic and Aegean Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delikaraoglou, D.; Mintourakis, I.; Kallianou, F.

    2009-04-01

    With the realization of the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) and the free distribution of its global elevation dataset with 3 arcsec (90 m) resolution and less than 16 m vertical accuracy, together with the availability of the higher resolution (30 m) and accuracy (10 m) Digital Terrain Models (DTM) from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), these two valuable sources of uniform DEM data represent a revolution in the world of terrain modelling. DEMs are an important source of data for the generation of high resolution geoids since they provide the high-frequency content of the gravity field spectrum and are suitable for the computation of terrain effects to gravity and indirect effects to the geoid, thus allowing the combination of global geopotential models, local gravity anomalies and information about the earth's topography (represented by a given DEM). However, although such models are available for land, there are no readily accessible Digital Bathymetry Models (DBMs) of equivalent quality for the coastal and oceanic regions. Most of the global DBM's (e.g. ETOPO1, SRTM30, and GEBCO global bathymetric grid) are compilations of heterogeneous data with medium resolution and accuracy. This prevents to exploit the potential of the recent high resolution (1 arcmin) marine free-air gravity anomalies datasets derived from satellite altimetry (such as the DNSC08, and the Sandwell & Smith v18.1 (S&Sv18.1) global solutions) in conjunction with such global DBM's. Fortunately, for some regions, recently have become available DBM's of much better accuracy and resolution, such as the DBM of 1 km resolution for many regions of the Mediterranean Sea which is distributed by IFREMER, the French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea. The scope of this study is to use this latest regional DBM in combination with the newly available DNSC08 and SSV18.1 global marine free-air gravity anomalies datasets for marine and near shore

  13. 基于C/S模式的海洋测深数据管理系统%A bathymetry data management system based on Client/Server Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅赛; 高金耀; 赵铁虎; 杨春国; 杨勇

    2011-01-01

    随着海洋调查数据不断积累,如何对处于分散状态的数据进行有效的管理和整合,以提高数据利用效率和共享程度,成为“数字海洋”首先需要关心解决的问题.根据中国近海“数字海洋”信息基础框架构建的总体需求,按照“数字海底”“产品—航次—测线—点”的数据组织结构,设计开发海洋测深基础数据库.以此数据库为基础,开发数据标准化模块、数据库管理模块和数据查询模块.应用该软件对积累的多波束测深数据进行处理,实现多波束测深数据面向产品加工和基于数据库的有效管理.%With the accumulation of marine survey data, how to manage and integrate dispersed data effectively is becoming the primary problem of "Digital Ocean". According to the overall demand for information infrastructure framework of State "Digital Ocean" project, we designed and developed the marine bathymetry database with the "digital sea" "products-voyage-measure line-point" data structure. Based on this database, we developed data standardization module, database management module and the data query module. The effective management of multi-beam sounding data based on the database was achieved by using this software.

  14. Archive of Side Scan Sonar and Swath Bathymetry Data collected during USGS Cruise 10CCT02 Offshore of Petit Bois Island Including Petit Bois Pass, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Mississippi, March 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, William R.; Flocks, James G.; DeWitt, Nancy T.; Forde, Arnell S.; Kelso, Kyle; Thompson, Phillip R.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2011-01-01

    In March of 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys offshore of Petit Bois Island, Mississippi, and Dauphin Island, Alabama (fig. 1). These efforts were part of the USGS Gulf of Mexico Science Coordination partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to assist the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) and the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazards Susceptibility Project by mapping the shallow geologic stratigraphic framework of the Mississippi Barrier Island Complex. These geophysical surveys will provide the data necessary for scientists to define, interpret, and provide baseline bathymetry and seafloor habitat for this area and to aid scientists in predicting future geomorphological changes of the islands with respect to climate change, storm impact, and sea-level rise. Furthermore, these data will provide information for barrier island restoration, particularly in Camille Cut, and protection for the historical Fort Massachusetts on Ship Island, Mississippi. For more information please refer to http://ngom.usgs.gov/gomsc/mscip/index.html. This report serves as an archive of the processed swath bathymetry and side scan sonar data (SSS). Data products herein include gridded and interpolated surfaces, seabed backscatter images, and ASCII x,y,z data products for both swath bathymetry and side scan sonar imagery. Additional files include trackline maps, navigation files, GIS files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and formal FGDC metadata. Scanned images of the handwritten and digital FACS logs are also provided as PDF files. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report.

  15. Multiscale Terrain Analysis of Multibeam Bathymetry Data for Lake Trout Spawning Habitat Mapping in the Drummond Island Refuge, northern Lake Huron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattrus, N. J.; Binder, T.

    2012-12-01

    Until the 1950s, lake trout supported a valuable commercial fishery in the Great Lakes. The introduction of sea lamprey into the Great Lakes and overfishing resulted in the loss of most populations. Despite consistent stocking efforts since the 1960s, restoration of these populations has been slow. The reasons are numerous, but may be related to differences in the spawning behavior between hatchery and wild trout. A four-year study initiated in 2010, utilizes acoustic telemetry to characterize and compare the spawning behaviors of hatchery and wild lake trout in the Drummond Island Refuge in northern Lake Huron. In this project, the movement of tagged fish are monitored by an array of over 125 lake floor hydrophones during the fall spawning period. Fish behavior is overlaid over detailed bathymetric and substrate data and compared with environmental variables (e.g. water temperature, wind speed and direction, and wave height and direction) to develop a conceptual behavioral model. Sites suspected of being spawning sites based upon telemetry data are verified through the use of divers and trapping eggs and fry. Prior to this study, the factors that influenced how the spawning fish utilize the lake floor shoals have been poorly understood. Among the factors thought to impact spawning success were: bathymetry and substrate composition. Diver and telemetry data suggest that the fish(both hatchery raised and wild) are particularly attracted to rocky substrates and that fragment size is important. High resolution multibeam bathymetric surveys conducted in 2010 and 2011 have been used to characterize the shape and composition of the lake floor in the study area. Classification of the substrate is a labor intensive process requiring divers, drop cameras and sediment sampling. To improve this, the traditional approach has been to use supervised and unsupervised classification techniques that are based upon measured acoustic backscatter from an echosounder or sidescan sonar

  16. From oblique subduction to intra-continental transpression: Structures of the southern Kermadec-Hikurangi margin from multibeam bathymetry, side-scan sonar and seismic reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collot, Jean-Yves; Delteil, Jean; Lewis, Keith B.; Davy, Bryan; Lamarche, Geoffroy; Audru, Jean-Christophe; Barnes, Phil; Chanier, Franck; Chaumillon, Eric; Lallemand, Serge; de Lepinay, Bernard Mercier; Orpin, Alan; Pelletier, Bernard; Sosson, Marc; Toussaint, Bertrand; Uruski, Chris

    1996-06-01

    The southern Kermadec-Hikurangi convergent margin, east of New Zealand, accommodates the oblique subduction of the oceanic Hikurangi Plateau at rates of 4 5 cm/yr. Swath bathymetry and sidescan data, together with seismic reflection and geopotential data obtained during the GEODYNZ-SUD cruise, showed major changes in tectonic style along the margin. The changes reflect the size and abundance of seamounts on the subducting plateau, the presence and thickness of trench-fill turbidites, and the change to increasing obliquity and intracontinental transpression towards the south. In this paper, we provide evidence that faulting with a significant strike-slip component is widespread along the entire 1000 km margin. Subduction of the northeastern scrap of the Hikurangi Plateau is marked by an offset in the Kermadec Trench and adjacent margin, and by a major NW-trending tear fault in the scarp. To the south, the southern Kermadec Trench is devoid of turbidite fill and the adjacent margin is characterized by an up to 1200 m high scarp that locally separates apparent clockwise rotated blocks on the upper slope from strike-slip faults and mass wasting on the lower slope. The northern Hikurangi Trough has at least 1 km of trench-fill but its adjacent margin is characterized by tectonic erosion. The toe of the margin is indented by 10 25 km for more than 200 km, and this is inferred to be the result of repeated impacts of the large seamounts that are abundant on the northern Hikurangi Plateau. The two most recent impacts have left major indentations in the margin. The central Hikurangi margin is characterized by development of a wide accretionary wedge on the lower slope, and by transpression of presubduction passive margin sediments on the upper slope. Shortening across the wedge together with a component of strike-slip motion on the upper slope supports an interpretation of some strain partitioning. The southern Hikurangi margin is a narrow, mainly compressive belt along a

  17. Hawaii ESI: BATHY (Bathymetry Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains the vector arcs representing 10- and 100-fathom bathymetric contours used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for...

  18. o199sc.m77t and o199sc.h77t: MGD77T data and header file for single-beam bathymetry for field activity O-1-99-SC in Southern California from 06/05/1999 to 06/17/1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise O-1-99-SC. The cruise was conducted in...

  19. o100sc.m77t and o100sc.h77t: MGD77T data and header file for single-beam bathymetry for field activity O-1-00-SC in San Pedro Bay, Santa Monica, California from 04/09/2000 to 04/14/2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise O-1-00-SC. The cruise was conducted in San...

  20. f991cp.m77t and f991cp.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity F-9-91-CP in Central Pacific from 09/24/1991 to 09/25/1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise F-9-91-CP. The cruise was conducted in the...

  1. a298sc.m77t and a298sc.h77t: MGD77T data and header file for single-beam bathymetry for field activity A-2-98-SC in Santa Monica Bay from 08/23/1998 to 08/31/1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise A-2-98-SC. The cruise was conducted in Santa...

  2. j695mb.m77t and j695mb.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity J-6-95-MB in Monterey Bay from 10/16/1995 to 11/30/1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise J-6-95-MB. The cruise was conducted from in...

  3. p192sc.m77t and p192sc.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity P-1-92-SC in Santa Monica Basin, Southern California from 01/30/1992 to 02/04/1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with Loran-C and GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise P-1-92-SC. The cruise was...

  4. g295sf.m77t and g295sf.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity G-2-95-SF in San Francisco Bay, Golden Gate from 05/30/1995 to 06/10/1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise G-2-95-SF. The cruise was conducted in San...

  5. j200sf.m77t and j200sf.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity J-2-00-SF in Grizzly Bay, San Pablo Bay from 03/22/2000 to 03/27/2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise J-2-00-SF. The cruise was conducted in Grizzly...

  6. f389sc.m77t and f389sc.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity F-3-89-SC in Monterey Bay, California from 02/02/1989 to 02/15/1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with Loran-C RHO-RHO and GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise F-3-89-SC. The cruise was...

  7. p192mb.m77t and p192mb.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity P-1-92-MB in Monterey Bay from 03/20/1992 to 03/22/1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with SINS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise P-1-92-MB. The cruise was conducted in...

  8. s196wo.m77t and s196wo.h77t: MGD77T data and header file for single-beam bathymetry for field activity S-1-96-WO in Cascadia, Washington from 04/14/1996 to 06/06/1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise S-1-96-WO. The cruise was conducted in...

  9. f786hw.m77t and f786hw.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity F-7-86-HW in in Hawaii from 11/28/1986 to 12/20/1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise F-7-86-HW. The cruise was conducted in Hawaii...

  10. a194yb.m77t and a194yb.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry for field activity A-1-94-YB in Yakutat Bay and Yakutat Sea Valley, Alaska from 08/05/1994 to 08/08/1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise A-1-94-YB. The cruise was conducted in Yakutat...

  11. m197wo.m77t and m197wo.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity M-1-97-WO in Southwest Washington Inner Shelf from 07/07/1997 to 07/15/1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with DGPS and GPS navigation data were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise M-1-97-WO. The cruise was conducted...

  12. t198gb.m77t and t198gb.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity T-1-98-GB in Glacier Bay, Alaska from 08/21/1998 to 09/01/1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise T-1-98-GB. The cruise was conducted in...

  13. j295mb.m77t and j295mb.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity J-2-95-MB in Monterey Bay from 03/06/1995 to 04/15/1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise J-2-95-MB. The cruise was conducted from in...

  14. k194hw.m77t and k194hw.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity K-1-94-HW in Mamala Bay, Offshore Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii from 05/10/1994 to 05/16/1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise K-1-94-HW. The cruise was conducted in Oahu,...

  15. k293hw.m77t and k293hw.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity K-2-93-HW in Kauai, Hawaii from 02/27/1993 to 03/02/1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise K-2-93-HW. The cruise was conducted in Kauai,...

  16. j281nc.m77t and j281nc.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity J-2-81-NC in Carmel Bay, Monterey Bay, Northern California from 06/23/1981 to 06/30/1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with miniranger navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise J-2-81-NC. The cruise was conducted in...

  17. k193hw.m77t and k193hw.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity K-1-93-HW in Oahu, Hawaii from 02/20/1993 to 02/26/1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise K-1-93-HW. The cruise was conducted in Oahu,...

  18. f392sc.m77t and f392sc.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity F-3-92-SC in in Southern California from 04/22/1992 to 05/15/1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise F-3-92-SC. The cruise was conducted in...

  19. l486nc.m77t and l486nc.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity L-4-86-NC in Northern California from 08/21/1986 to 09/05/1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with Loran-C RHO-RHO and GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise L-4-86-NC. The cruise was...

  20. s378sc.m77t and s378sc.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity S-3-78-SC in Southern California from 05/24/1978 to 06/01/1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with radar and Loran-C navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise G-1-77-EG. The cruise was...

  1. k190gb.m77t and k190gb.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity K-1-90-GB in Glacier Bay, Alaska from 06/14/1990 to 06/24/1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with SINS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise K-1-90-GB. The cruise was conducted in...

  2. g177eg.m77t and g177eg.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity G-1-77-EG in Yakutat Bay, Eastern Gulf of Alaska from 04/27/1977 to 05/22/1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with dead reckoning navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise G-1-77-EG. The cruise was conducted...

  3. f690sc.m77t and f690sc.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity F-6-90-SC in Southern California, Monterey Canyon from 06/19/1990 to 07/12/1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with Loran-C RHO-RHO and GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise F-6-90-SC. The cruise was...

  4. k195hw.m77t and k195hw.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity K-1-95-HW in in Hawaii from 06/14/1995 to 06/18/1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise K-1-95-HW. The cruise was conducted in Oahu,...

  5. k191yb.m77t and k191yb.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity K-1-91-YB in Yakutat Bay, Alaska from 06/22/1991 to 06/28/1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with radar and GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise K-1-91-YB. The cruise was conducted...

  6. a194gb.m77t and a194gb.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity A-1-94-GB in Prince William Sound, Yakutat Bay, Glacier Bay and Icy Strait, Alaska from 08/08/1994 to 08/17/1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise A-1-94-GB. The cruise was conducted in Prince...

  7. a193yb.m77t and a193yb.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity A-1-93-YB in Yakukat Bay, Alaska from 08/21/1993 to 08/27/1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise A-1-93-YB. The cruise was conducted in Yakukat...

  8. a100sc.m77t and a100sc.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity A-1-00-SC in Southern California from Port Hueneme to Mexican Border from 06/05/2000 to 06/29/2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise A-1-00-SC. The cruise was conducted from Port...

  9. k185ar.m77t and k185ar.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity K-1-85-AR in the Arctic from 09/04/1985 to 09/04/1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with SINS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise K-1-85-AR. The cruise was conducted in the...

  10. p194ar.m77t and p194ar.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity P-1-94-AR in Arctic Ocean from 07/25/1994 to 08/30/1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with SINS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise P-1-94-AR. The cruise was conducted in...

  11. c179nc.m77t and c179nc.h77t: MGD77T data and header file for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity C-1-79-NC in Northern California from 05/01/1979 to 05/02/1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with miniranger navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise C-1-79-NC. The cruise was conducted in...

  12. d179eg.m77t and d179eg.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity D-1-79-EG in the Eastern Gulf of Alaska from 05/24/1979 to 06/01/1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with SINS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise D-1-79-EG. The cruise was conducted in the...

  13. j299sf.m77t and j299sf.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity J-2-99-SF in Grizzly Bay, San Francisco Bay from 02/24/1999 to 03/08/1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise J-2-99-SF. The cruise was conducted in...

  14. j100sf.m77t and j100sf.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity J-1-00-SF in Grizzly Bay and Suisun Bay from 03/13/2000 to 03/14/2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise J-1-00-SF. The cruise was conducted in Grizzly...

  15. j399sf.m77t and j399sf.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity J-3-99-SF in Grizzly Bay, San Francisco Bay from 11/08/1999 to 11/18/1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise J-3-99-SF. The cruise was conducted in...

  16. f890nc.m77t and f890nc.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity F-8-90-NC in Gulf of Farallones, Northern California from 08/05/1990 to 08/17/1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with Loran-C RHO-RHO and GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise F-8-90-NC. The cruise was...

  17. j483hb.m77t and j483hb.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity J-4-83-HB in Humboldt Bay, California from 08/16/1983 to 08/19/1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with miniranger navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise J-4-83-HB. The cruise was conducted in...

  18. o399mb.m77t and o399mb.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity O-3-99-MB in Point Sur, Monterey Canyon, California from 06/25/1999 to 06/29/1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise O-3-99-MB. The cruise was conducted in Point...

  19. f790nc.m77t and f790nc.h77t: MGD77T data and header files for single-beam bathymetry data for field activity F-7-90-NC in the Gulf of Farallones, Northern California from 07/19/1990 to 08/03/1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with Loran-C RHO-RHO and GPS navigation data was collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey cruise F-7-90-NC. The cruise was...

  20. Archive of single-beam bathymetry data collected during USGS cruise 07CCT01 nearshore of Fort Massachusetts and within Camille Cut, West and East Ship Islands, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Mississippi, July 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Flocks, James G.; Reynolds, B.J.; Hansen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The Gulf Islands National Seashore (GUIS) is composed of a series of barrier islands along the Mississippi - Alabama coastline. Historically these islands have undergone long-term shoreline change. The devastation of Hurricane Katrina in 2005 prompted questions about the stability of the barrier islands and their potential response to future storm impacts. Additionally, there was concern from the National Park Service (NPS) about the preservation of the historical Fort Massachusetts, located on West Ship Island. During the early 1900s, Ship Island was an individual island. In 1969 Hurricane Camille breached Ship Island, widening the cut and splitting it into what is now known as West Ship Island and East Ship Island. In July of 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was able to provide the NPS with a small bathymetric survey of Camille Cut using high-resolution single-beam bathymetry. This provided GUIS with a post-Katrina assessment of the bathymetry in Camille Cut and along the northern shoreline directly in front of Fort Massachusetts. Ultimately, this survey became an initial bathymetry dataset toward a larger USGS effort included in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project (http://ngom.usgs.gov/gomsc/mscip/). This report serves as an archive of the processed single-beam bathymetry. Data products herein include gridded and interpolated digital depth surfaces and x,y,z data products. Additional files include trackline maps, navigation files, geographic information system (GIS) files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Scanned images of the handwritten FACS logs and digital FACS logs are also provided as PDF files. Refer to the Acronyms page for description of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report or hold the cursor over an acronym for a pop-up explanation. The USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center assigns a unique