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Sample records for bat lyssaviruses type-1

  1. Natural and experimental infection of sheep with European bat lyssavirus type-1 of Danish bat origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Fooks, A.R.; Agerholm, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    In 1998 and 2002, European bat lyssavirus type-1 (EBLV-1) was demonstrated in brain tissue of five Danish sheep suffering from micrological disorders. Four of the five sheep also had encephalic listeriosis. The animals originated from four flocks on pastures within a limited area of western Jutla...

  2. Tentative novel lyssavirus in a bat in Finland.

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    Nokireki, T; Tammiranta, N; Kokkonen, U-M; Kantala, T; Gadd, T

    2018-02-15

    A tentative novel member of the genus Lyssavirus, designated as Kotalahti bat lyssavirus, was detected in a Brandt's bat (Myotis brandtii) in Finland. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the virus differs from other known lyssaviruses, being closely related to Khujand virus, Aravan virus, Bokeloh bat lyssavirus and European bat lyssavirus 2. © 2018 The Authors. Transboundary and Emerging Diseases Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Longitudinal survey of two serotine bat (Eptesicus serotinus maternity colonies exposed to EBLV-1 (European Bat Lyssavirus type 1: Assessment of survival and serological status variations using capture-recapture models.

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    Emmanuelle Robardet

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study describes two longitudinal serological surveys of European Bat Lyssavirus type 1 (EBLV-1 antibodies in serotine bat (Eptesicus serotinus maternity colonies located in the North-East of France. This species is currently considered as the main EBLV-1 reservoir. Multievent capture-recapture models were used to determine the factors influencing bat rabies transmission as this method accounts for imperfect detection and uncertainty in disease states. Considering the period of study, analyses revealed that survival and recapture probabilities were not affected by the serological status of individuals, confirming the capacity of bats to be exposed to lyssaviruses without dying. Five bats have been found with EBLV-1 RNA in the saliva at the start of the study, suggesting they were caught during virus excretion period. Among these bats, one was interestingly recaptured one year later and harbored a seropositive status. Along the survey, some others bats have been observed to both seroconvert (i.e. move from a negative to a positive serological status and serorevert (i.e. move from a positive to a negative serological status. Peak of seroprevalence reached 34% and 70% in site A and B respectively. On one of the 2 sites, global decrease of seroprevalence was observed all along the study period nuanced by oscillation intervals of approximately 2-3 years supporting the oscillation infection dynamics hypothesized during a previous EBLV-1 study in a Myotis myotis colony. Seroprevalence were affected by significantly higher seroprevalence in summer than in spring. The maximum time observed between successive positive serological statuses of a bat demonstrated the potential persistence of neutralizing antibodies for at least 4 years. At last, EBLV-1 serological status transitions have been shown driven by age category with higher seroreversion frequencies in adults than in juvenile. Juveniles and female adults seemed indeed acting as distinct drivers

  4. Detection of European bat lyssavirus type 2 in Danish Daubenton’s bats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Chriél, Mariann; Baagøe, Hans J.

    European bat lyssavirus (EBLV) is considered to be endemic in the Danish bat populations, but limited information exists about the types of EBLV strains currently in circulation. EBLV type 1 (EBLV-1) is seen as the predominant type in the Serotine bats (Eptesicus serotinus) with the latest case...

  5. Bat Rabies and Other Lyssavirus Infections

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    Constantine, Denny G.; Blehert, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Bat Rabies and Other Lyssavirus Infections offers readers an overview of the virus variants that cause bat rabies, and geographical patterns in occurrence of this disease. The section Species Susceptibility describes infection rates and trends among bats, humans, and other animals. Disease Ecology considers the biological and environmental dynamics of the disease in various species of bats. Points to Ponder: Interspecies Interactions in Potential Bat Rabies Transmission Settings discusses the narrowing interface of bat colonies and human society and how humans and domestic animals play a role in transmission of bat rabies. Disease Prevention and Control outlines how to limit exposure to rabid bats and other animals. Appendixes include extensive tables of reported infections in bat species and in humans, and a glossary of technical terms is included. The author, Denny G. Constantine, helped define rabies infection in insect-eating bats and has investigated bat rabies ecology for more than half a century. He has authored more than 90 papers during the course of his career and is widely considered to be the world's foremost authority on the disease. Currently, Dr. Constantine is a public health officer emeritus and veterinary epidemiologist for the California Department of Health Services Viral and Rickettsial Disease Laboratory. Milt Friend, first director of the USGS National Wildlife Health Center, wrote the foreword. David Blehert, a USGS microbiologist who is investigating the emergence and causes of bat white-nose syndrome, edited the volume. Bat Rabies is intended for scholars and the general public. Dr. Constantine presents the material in a simple, straightforward manner that serves both audiences. The goal of the author is to increase people's understanding of both bat and disease ecology and also provide a balanced perspective on human risks pertaining to bat rabies.

  6. First detection of European bat lyssavirus type 2 (EBLV-2) in Norway.

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    Moldal, Torfinn; Vikøren, Turid; Cliquet, Florence; Marston, Denise A; van der Kooij, Jeroen; Madslien, Knut; Ørpetveit, Irene

    2017-07-11

    In Europe, bat rabies is primarily attributed to European bat lyssavirus type 1 (EBLV-1) and European bat lyssavirus type 2 (EBLV-2) which are both strongly host-specific. Approximately thirty cases of infection with EBLV-2 in Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii) and pond bats (M. dasycneme) have been reported. Two human cases of rabies caused by EBLV-2 have also been confirmed during the last thirty years, while natural spill-over to other non-flying mammals has never been reported. Rabies has never been diagnosed in mainland Norway previously. In late September 2015, a subadult male Daubenton's bat was found in a poor condition 800 m above sea level in the southern part of Norway. The bat was brought to the national Bat Care Centre where it eventually displayed signs of neurological disease and died after two days. EBLV-2 was detected in brain tissues by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by sequencing of a part of the nucleoprotein gene, and lyssavirus was isolated in neuroblastoma cells. The detection of EBLV-2 in a bat in Norway broadens the knowledge on the occurrence of this zoonotic agent. Since Norway is considered free of rabies, adequate information to the general public regarding the possibility of human cases of bat-associated rabies should be given. No extensive surveillance of lyssavirus infections in bats has been conducted in the country, and a passive surveillance network to assess rabies prevalence and bat epidemiology is highly desired.

  7. Paediatric Australian bat lyssavirus encephalomyelitis - sequential MRI appearances from symptom onset to death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shetty, Umesh; Phillips, Mark; Walsh, Mark [Mater Hospital and Lady Cilento Children' s Hospital Medical Imaging Department, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Francis, Joshua R. [Royal Darwin Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Darwin (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Human infection with Australian bat lyssavirus is extremely rare. Here we present the craniospinal findings in a fatal case of Australian bat lyssavirus infection in an 8-year-old child. MRI plays a very important role, not only in the diagnostic work-up of Australian bat lyssavirus infection but also in the prognostic assessment. (orig.)

  8. Paediatric Australian bat lyssavirus encephalomyelitis - sequential MRI appearances from symptom onset to death.

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    Shetty, Umesh; Phillips, Mark; Francis, Joshua R; Walsh, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Human infection with Australian bat lyssavirus is extremely rare. Here we present the craniospinal findings in a fatal case of Australian bat lyssavirus infection in an 8-year-old child. MRI plays a very important role, not only in the diagnostic work-up of Australian bat lyssavirus infection but also in the prognostic assessment.

  9. Phylogeography, population dynamics, and molecular evolution of European bat lyssaviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, P.L.; Holmes, E.C.; Larrous, F.

    2005-01-01

    European bat lyssaviruses types I and 2 (EBLV-1 and EBLV-2) are widespread in Europe, although little is known of their evolutionary history. We undertook a comprehensive sequence analysis to infer the selection pressures, rates of nucleotide substitution, age of genetic diversity, geographical...... of EBLVs reflects their distinctive epidemiology in bats, where they occupy a relatively stable fitness peak....

  10. Second case of European bat lyssavirus type 2 detected in a Daubenton's bat in Finland.

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    Nokireki, Tiina; Sironen, Tarja; Smura, Teemu; Karkamo, Veera; Sihvonen, Liisa; Gadd, Tuija

    2017-09-25

    European bat lyssavirus type 2 (EBLV-2) was detected in Finland in a Daubenton's bat (Myotis daubentonii) found in the municipality of Inkoo (60°02'45″N, 024°00'20″E). The bat showed neurological signs and was later found dead. The laboratory analysis revealed the presence of lyssavirus, and the virus was characterized as EBLV-2. This isolation of EBLV-2 was the second time that the virus has been detected in a Daubenton's bat in Finland. This provides additional proof that EBLV-2 is endemic in the Finnish Daubenton's bat population.

  11. Presence of European bat lyssavirus RNas in apparently healthy Rousettus aegyptiacus bats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, G.J.; Audry, L.; Ronsholt, L.; Poel, van der W.H.M.; Bruschke, C.J.M.; Bourhy, H.

    2002-01-01

    Apparently healthy Rousettus aegyptiacus bats were randomly chosen from a Dutch colony naturally infected with European bat lyssavirus subgenotype 1a (EBL1a). These bats were euthanised three months after the first evidence of an EBL1a infection in the colony. EBL1a genomic and antigenomic RNAs of

  12. Recent Observations on Australian Bat Lyssavirus Tropism and Viral Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn L. Weir

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV is a recently emerged rhabdovirus of the genus lyssavirus considered endemic in Australian bat populations that causes a neurological disease in people indistinguishable from clinical rabies. There are two distinct variants of ABLV, one that circulates in frugivorous bats (genus Pteropus and the other in insectivorous microbats (genus Saccolaimus. Three fatal human cases of ABLV infection have been reported, the most recent in 2013, and each manifested as acute encephalitis but with variable incubation periods. Importantly, two equine cases also arose recently in 2013, the first occurrence of ABLV in a species other than bats or humans. Similar to other rhabdoviruses, ABLV infects host cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and subsequent pH-dependent fusion facilitated by its single fusogenic envelope glycoprotein (G. Recent studies have revealed that proposed rabies virus (RABV receptors are not sufficient to permit ABLV entry into host cells and that the unknown receptor is broadly conserved among mammalian species. However, despite clear tropism differences between ABLV and RABV, the two viruses appear to utilize similar endocytic entry pathways. The recent human and horse infections highlight the importance of continued Australian public health awareness of this emerging pathogen.

  13. Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of European Bat Lyssavirus 2.

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    McElhinney, Lorraine M; Marston, Denise A; Wise, Emma L; Freuling, Conrad M; Bourhy, Hervé; Zanoni, Reto; Moldal, Torfinn; Kooi, Engbert A; Neubauer-Juric, Antonie; Nokireki, Tiina; Müller, Thomas; Fooks, Anthony R

    2018-01-05

    Bat rabies cases in Europe are mainly attributed to two lyssaviruses, namely European Bat Lyssavirus 1 (EBLV-1) and European Bat Lyssavirus 2 (EBLV-2). Prior to the death of a bat worker in Finland in 1985, very few bat rabies cases were reported. Enhanced surveillance in the two subsequent years (1986-1987) identified 263 cases (more than a fifth of all reported cases to date). Between 1977 and 2016, 1183 cases of bat rabies were reported, with the vast majority (>97%) being attributed to EBLV-1. In contrast, there have been only 39 suspected cases of EBLV-2, of which 34 have been confirmed by virus typing and presently restricted to just two bat species; Myotis daubentonii and Myotis dasycneme . The limited number of EBLV-2 cases in Europe prompted the establishment of a network of European reference laboratories to collate all available viruses and data. Despite the relatively low number of EBLV-2 cases, a large amount of anomalous data has been published in the scientific literature, which we have here reviewed and clarified. In this review, 29 EBLV-2 full genome sequences have been analysed to further our understanding of the diversity and molecular evolution of EBLV-2 in Europe. Analysis of the 29 complete EBLV-2 genome sequences clearly corroborated geographical relationships with all EBLV-2 sequences clustering at the country level irrespective of the gene studied. Further geographical clustering was also observed at a local level. There are high levels of homogeneity within the EBLV-2 species with nucleotide identities ranging from 95.5-100% and amino acid identities between 98.7% and 100%, despite the widespread distribution of the isolates both geographically and chronologically. The mean substitution rate for EBLV-2 across the five concatenated genes was 1.65 × 10 -5 , and evolutionary clock analysis confirms the slow evolution of EBLV-2 both between and within countries in Europe. This is further supported by the first detailed EBLV-2 intra

  14. Ecological Factors Associated with European Bat Lyssavirus Seroprevalence in Spanish Bats

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    Serra-Cobo, Jordi; López-Roig, Marc; Seguí, Magdalena; Sánchez, Luisa Pilar; Nadal, Jacint; Borrás, Miquel; Lavenir, Rachel; Bourhy, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    Bats have been proposed as major reservoirs for diverse emerging infectious viral diseases, with rabies being the best known in Europe. However, studies exploring the ecological interaction between lyssaviruses and their natural hosts are scarce. This study completes our active surveillance work on Spanish bat colonies that began in 1992. Herein, we analyzed ecological factors that might affect the infection dynamics observed in those colonies. Between 2001 and 2011, we collected and tested 2,393 blood samples and 45 dead bats from 25 localities and 20 bat species. The results for dead confirmed the presence of EBLV-1 RNA in six species analyzed (for the first time in Myotis capaccinii). Samples positive for European bat lyssavirus-1 (EBLV-1)–neutralizing antibodies were detected in 68% of the localities sampled and in 13 bat species, seven of which were found for the first time (even in Myotis daubentonii, a species to date always linked to EBLV-2). EBLV-1 seroprevalence (20.7%) ranged between 11.1 and 40.2% among bat species and seasonal variation was observed, with significantly higher antibody prevalence in summer (July). EBLV-1 seroprevalence was significantly associated with colony size and species richness. Higher seroprevalence percentages were found in large multispecific colonies, suggesting that intra- and interspecific contacts are major risk factors for EBLV-1 transmission in bat colonies. Although bat-roosting behavior strongly determines EBLV-1 variability, we also found some evidence that bat phylogeny might be involved in bat-species seroprevalence. The results of this study highlight the importance of life history and roost ecology in understanding EBLV-1–prevalence patterns in bat colonies and also provide useful information for public health officials. PMID:23700480

  15. Understanding human - bat interactions in NSW, Australia: improving risk communication for prevention of Australian bat lyssavirus.

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    Quinn, Emma K; Massey, Peter D; Cox-Witton, Keren; Paterson, Beverley J; Eastwood, Keith; Durrheim, David N

    2014-07-02

    Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV) infects a number of flying fox and insectivorous bats species in Australia. Human infection with ABLV is inevitably fatal unless prior vaccination and/or post-exposure treatment (PET) is given. Despite ongoing public health messaging about the risks associated with bat contact, surveillance data have revealed a four-fold increase in the number of people receiving PET for bat exposure in NSW between 2007 and 2011. Our study aimed to better understand these human - bat interactions in order to identify additional risk communication messages that could lower the risk of potential ABLV exposure. All people aged 18 years or over whom received PET for non-occupation related potential ABLV exposure in the Hunter New England Local Health District of Australia between July 2011 and July 2013 were considered eligible for the study. Eligible participants were invited to a telephone interview to explore the circumstances of their bat contact. Interviews were then transcribed and thematically analysed by two independent investigators. Of 21 eligible participants that were able to be contacted, 16 consented and participated in a telephone interview. Participants reported bats as being widespread in their environment but reported a general lack of awareness about ABLV, particularly the risk of disease from bat scratches. Participants who attempted to 'rescue' bats did so because of a deep concern for the bat's welfare. Participants reported a change in risk perception after the exposure event and provided suggestions for public health messages that could be used to raise awareness about ABLV. Reframing the current risk messages to account for the genuine concern of people for bat welfare may enhance the communication. The potential risk to the person and possible harm to the bat from an attempted 'rescue' should be promoted, along with contact details for animal rescue groups. The potential risk of ABLV from bat scratches merits greater emphasis.

  16. Potential Exposures to Australian Bat Lyssavirus Notified in Queensland, Australia, 2009-2014.

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    Damin Si

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV belongs to the genus Lyssavirus which also includes classic rabies virus and the European lyssaviruses. To date, the only three known human ABLV cases, all fatal, have been reported from Queensland, Australia. ABLV is widely distributed in Australian bats, and any bite or scratch from an Australian bat is considered a potential exposure to ABLV.Potential exposure to ABLV has been a notifiable condition in Queensland since 2005. We analysed notification data for potential exposures occurring between 2009 and 2014. There were 1,515 potential exposures to ABLV notified in Queensland, with an average annual notification rate of 5.6 per 100,000 population per year. The majority of notified individuals (96% were potentially exposed to ABLV via bats, with a small number of cases potentially exposed via two ABLV infected horses and an ABLV infected human. The most common routes of potential exposure were through bat scratches (47% or bites (37%, with less common routes being mucous membrane/broken skin exposure to bat saliva/brain tissue (2.2%. Intentional handling of bats by the general public was the major cause of potential exposures (56% of notifications. Examples of these potential exposures included people attempting to rescue bats caught in barbed wire fences/fruit tree netting, or attempting to remove bats from a home. Following potential exposures, 1,399 cases (92% were recorded as having appropriate post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP as defined in national guidelines, with the remainder having documentation of refusal or incomplete PEP. Up to a quarter of notifications occurred after two days from the potential exposure, but with some delays being more than three weeks. Of 393 bats available for testing during the reporting period, 20 (5.1% had ABLV detected, including four species of megabats (all flying foxes and one species of microbats (yellow-bellied sheathtail bat.Public health strategies should address the

  17. Bat Rabies Surveillance in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz, J.; Fooks, A. R.; McElhinney, L.

    2013-01-01

    Rabies is the oldest known zoonotic disease and was also the first recognized bat associated infection in humans. To date, four different lyssavirus species are the causative agents of rabies in European bats: the European Bat Lyssaviruses type 1 and 2 (EBLV-1, EBLV-2), the recently discovered pu...

  18. Bat Rabies Surveillance in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schatz, J.; Fooks, A.R.; McElhinney, L.M.; Horton, D.; Echevarria, J.; Vázquez-Morón, S.; Kooi, E.A.; Rasmussen, T.B.; Müller, T.; Freuling, C.

    2013-01-01

    Rabies is the oldest known zoonotic disease and was also the first recognized bat associated infection in humans. To date, four different lyssavirus species are the causative agents of rabies in European bats: the European Bat Lyssaviruses type 1 and 2 (EBLV-1, EBLV-2), the recently discovered

  19. Potential exposure to Australian bat lyssavirus is unlikely to prevent future bat handling among adults in South East Queensland.

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    Young, M K; Banu, S; McCall, B J; Vlack, S; Carroll, H; Bennett, S; Davison, R; Francis, D

    2018-02-01

    Despite ongoing public health messages about the risks associated with bat contact, the number of potential exposures to Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV) due to intentional handling by members of the general public in Queensland has remained high. We sought to better understand the reasons for intentional handling among these members of the public who reported their potential exposure to inform future public health messages. We interviewed adults who resided in a defined geographic area in South East Queensland and notified potential exposure to ABLV due to intentional handling of bats by telephone between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013. The participation rate was 54%. Adults who reported they had intentionally handled bats in South East Queensland indicated high levels of knowledge and perception of a moderately high risk associated with bats with overall low intentions to handle bats in the future. However, substantial proportions of people would attempt to handle bats again in some circumstances, particularly to protect their children or pets. Fifty-two percent indicated that they would handle a bat if a child was about to pick up or touch a live bat, and 49% would intervene if a pet was interacting with a bat. Future public health communications should recognize the situations in which even people with highrisk perceptions of bats will attempt to handle them. Public health messages currently focus on avoidance of bats in all circumstances and recommend calling in a trained vaccinated handler, but messaging directed at adults for circumstances where children or pets may be potentially exposed should provide safe immediate management options. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Evolutionary trends of European bat lyssavirus type 2 including genetic characterization of Finnish strains of human and bat origin 24 years apart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakava-Viljanen, Miia; Miia, Jakava-Viljanen; Nokireki, Tiina; Tiina, Nokireki; Sironen, Tarja; Tarja, Sironen; Vapalahti, Olli; Olli, Vapalahti; Sihvonen, Liisa; Liisa, Sihvonen; Huovilainen, Anita; Anita, Huovilainen

    2015-06-01

    Among other Lyssaviruses, Daubenton's and pond-bat-related European bat lyssavirus type 2 (EBLV-2) can cause human rabies. To investigate the diversity and evolutionary trends of EBLV-2, complete genome sequences of two Finnish isolates were analysed. One originated from a human case in 1985, and the other originated from a bat in 2009. The overall nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence identity of the two Finnish isolates were high, as well as the similarity to fully sequenced EBLV-2 strains originating from the UK and the Netherlands. In phylogenetic analysis, the EBLV-2 strains formed a monophyletic group that was separate from other bat-type lyssaviruses, with significant support. EBLV-2 shared the most recent common ancestry with Bokeloh bat lyssavirus (BBLV) and Khujan virus (KHUV). EBLV-2 showed limited diversity compared to RABV and appears to be well adapted to its host bat species. The slow tempo of viral evolution was evident in the estimations of divergence times for EBLV-2: the current diversity was estimated to have built up during the last 2000 years, and EBLV-2 diverged from KHUV about 8000 years ago. In a phylogenetic tree of partial N gene sequences, the Finnish EBLV-2 strains clustered with strains from Central Europe, supporting the hypothesis that EBLV-2 circulating in Finland might have a Central European origin. The Finnish EBLV-2 strains and a Swiss strain were estimated to have diverged from other EBLV-2 strains during the last 1000 years, and the two Finnish strains appear to have evolved from a common ancestor during the last 200 years.

  1. Molecular double-check strategy for the identification and characterization of European Lyssaviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Melina; Freuling, Conrad M.; Müller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The “gold standard” for post-mortem rabies diagnosis is the direct fluorescent antibody test (FAT). However, in the case of ante-mortem non-neural sample material or decomposed tissues, the FAT reaches its limit, and the use of molecular techniques can be advantageous. In this study, we developed......-systems for Rabies virus, European bat lyssavirus type 1 and 2 as well as Bokeloh bat lyssavirus. All assays were validated successfully with a comprehensive panel of lyssavirus positive samples, as well as negative material from various host species. This double-check strategy allows for both safe and sensitive...

  2. Enhanced passive bat rabies surveillance in indigenous bat species from Germany--a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Juliane; Freuling, Conrad Martin; Auer, Ernst; Goharriz, Hooman; Harbusch, Christine; Johnson, Nicholas; Kaipf, Ingrid; Mettenleiter, Thomas Christoph; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Mühle, Ralf-Udo; Ohlendorf, Bernd; Pott-Dörfer, Bärbel; Prüger, Julia; Ali, Hanan Sheikh; Stiefel, Dagmar; Teubner, Jens; Ulrich, Rainer Günter; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Müller, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    In Germany, rabies in bats is a notifiable zoonotic disease, which is caused by European bat lyssaviruses type 1 and 2 (EBLV-1 and 2), and the recently discovered new lyssavirus species Bokeloh bat lyssavirus (BBLV). As the understanding of bat rabies in insectivorous bat species is limited, in addition to routine bat rabies diagnosis, an enhanced passive surveillance study, i.e. the retrospective investigation of dead bats that had not been tested for rabies, was initiated in 1998 to study the distribution, abundance and epidemiology of lyssavirus infections in bats from Germany. A total number of 5478 individuals representing 21 bat species within two families were included in this study. The Noctule bat (Nyctalus noctula) and the Common pipistrelle (Pipistrellus pipistrellus) represented the most specimens submitted. Of all investigated bats, 1.17% tested positive for lyssaviruses using the fluorescent antibody test (FAT). The vast majority of positive cases was identified as EBLV-1, predominately associated with the Serotine bat (Eptesicus serotinus). However, rabies cases in other species, i.e. Nathusius' pipistrelle bat (Pipistrellus nathusii), P. pipistrellus and Brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus) were also characterized as EBLV-1. In contrast, EBLV-2 was isolated from three Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii). These three cases contribute significantly to the understanding of EBLV-2 infections in Germany as only one case had been reported prior to this study. This enhanced passive surveillance indicated that besides known reservoir species, further bat species are affected by lyssavirus infections. Given the increasing diversity of lyssaviruses and bats as reservoir host species worldwide, lyssavirus positive specimens, i.e. both bat and virus need to be confirmed by molecular techniques.

  3. Enhanced Passive Bat Rabies Surveillance in Indigenous Bat Species from Germany - A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Ernst; Goharriz, Hooman; Harbusch, Christine; Johnson, Nicholas; Kaipf, Ingrid; Mettenleiter, Thomas Christoph; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Mühle, Ralf-Udo; Ohlendorf, Bernd; Pott-Dörfer, Bärbel; Prüger, Julia; Ali, Hanan Sheikh; Stiefel, Dagmar; Teubner, Jens; Ulrich, Rainer Günter; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Müller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In Germany, rabies in bats is a notifiable zoonotic disease, which is caused by European bat lyssaviruses type 1 and 2 (EBLV-1 and 2), and the recently discovered new lyssavirus species Bokeloh bat lyssavirus (BBLV). As the understanding of bat rabies in insectivorous bat species is limited, in addition to routine bat rabies diagnosis, an enhanced passive surveillance study, i.e. the retrospective investigation of dead bats that had not been tested for rabies, was initiated in 1998 to study the distribution, abundance and epidemiology of lyssavirus infections in bats from Germany. A total number of 5478 individuals representing 21 bat species within two families were included in this study. The Noctule bat (Nyctalus noctula) and the Common pipistrelle (Pipistrellus pipistrellus) represented the most specimens submitted. Of all investigated bats, 1.17% tested positive for lyssaviruses using the fluorescent antibody test (FAT). The vast majority of positive cases was identified as EBLV-1, predominately associated with the Serotine bat (Eptesicus serotinus). However, rabies cases in other species, i.e. Nathusius' pipistrelle bat (Pipistrellus nathusii), P. pipistrellus and Brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus) were also characterized as EBLV-1. In contrast, EBLV-2 was isolated from three Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii). These three cases contribute significantly to the understanding of EBLV-2 infections in Germany as only one case had been reported prior to this study. This enhanced passive surveillance indicated that besides known reservoir species, further bat species are affected by lyssavirus infections. Given the increasing diversity of lyssaviruses and bats as reservoir host species worldwide, lyssavirus positive specimens, i.e. both bat and virus need to be confirmed by molecular techniques. PMID:24784117

  4. The Recently Discovered Bokeloh Bat Lyssavirus: Insights Into Its Genetic Heterogeneity and Spatial Distribution in Europe and the Population Genetics of Its Primary Host.

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    Eggerbauer, Elisa; Troupin, Cécile; Passior, Karsten; Pfaff, Florian; Höper, Dirk; Neubauer-Juric, Antonie; Haberl, Stephanie; Bouchier, Christiane; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Bourhy, Hervé; Müller, Thomas; Dacheux, Laurent; Freuling, Conrad M

    2017-01-01

    In 2010, a novel lyssavirus named Bokeloh bat lyssavirus (BBLV) was isolated from a Natterer's bat (Myotis nattereri) in Germany. Two further viruses were isolated in the same country and in France in recent years, all from the same bat species and all found in moribund or dead bats. Here we report the description and the full-length genome sequence of five additional BBLV isolates from Germany (n=4) and France (n=1). Interestingly, all of them were isolated from the Natterer's bat, except one from Germany, which was found in a common Pipistrelle bat (Pipistrellus pipistrellus), a widespread and abundant bat species in Europe. The latter represents the first case of transmission of BBLV to another bat species. Phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated the presence of two different lineages among this lyssavirus species: lineages A and B. The spatial distribution of these two lineages remains puzzling, as both of them comprised isolates from France and Germany; although clustering of isolates was observed on a regional scale, especially in Germany. Phylogenetic analysis based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b (CYTB) gene from positive Natterer's bat did not suggest a circulation of the respective BBLV sublineages in specific Natterer's bat subspecies, as all of them were shown to belong to the M. nattereri sensu stricto clade/subspecies and were closely related (German and French positive bats). At the bat host level, we demonstrated that the distribution of BBLV at the late stage of the disease seems large and massive, as viral RNA was detected in many different organs. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficacy of rabies vaccines in dogs and cats and protection in a mouse model against European bat lyssavirus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokireki, Tiina; Jakava-Viljanen, Miia; Virtala, Anna-Maija; Sihvonen, Liisa

    2017-10-02

    Rabies is preventable by pre- and/or post-exposure prophylaxis consisting of series of rabies vaccinations and in some cases the use of immunoglobulins. The success of vaccination can be estimated either by measuring virus neutralising antibodies or by challenge experiment. Vaccines based on rabies virus offer cross-protection against other lyssaviruses closely related to rabies virus. The aim was to assess the success of rabies vaccination measured by the antibody response in dogs (n = 10,071) and cats (n = 722), as well as to investigate the factors influencing the response to vaccination when animals failed to reach a rabies antibody titre of ≥ 0.5 IU/ml. Another aim was to assess the level of protection afforded by a commercial veterinary rabies vaccine against intracerebral challenge in mice with European bat lyssavirus type 2 (EBLV-2) and classical rabies virus (RABV), and to compare this with the protection offered by a vaccine for humans. A significantly higher proportion of dogs (10.7%, 95% confidence interval CI 10.1-11.3) than cats (3.5%; 95% CI 2.3-5.0) had a vaccination antibody titre of dogs, vaccination with certain vaccines, vaccination over 6 months prior the time of antibody determination and vaccination of dogs with a size of > 60 cm or larger resulted in a higher risk of failing to reach an antibody level of at least 0.5 IU/ml. When challenged with EBLV-2 and RABV, 80 and 100% of mice vaccinated with the veterinary rabies vaccine survived, respectively. When mice were vaccinated with the human rabies vaccine and challenged with EBLV-2, 75-80% survived, depending on the booster. All vaccinated mice developed sufficient to high titres of virus-neutralising antibodies (VNA) against RABV 21-22 days post-vaccination, ranging from 0.5 to 128 IU/ml. However, there was significant difference between antibody titres after vaccinating once in comparison to vaccinating twice (P dogs and cats in their ability to reach a post vaccination

  6. Public health risk analysis of European bat lyssavirus infection in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takumi, K.; Lina, P.H.C.; Poel, van der W.H.M.; Kramps, J.A.; Giessen, van der J.W.B.

    2009-01-01

    We present the frequency and the nature of contact incidents of the Serotine bat, Eptesicus serotinus, with humans and with companion animals (specifically cats and dogs), in The Netherlands between 2000 and 2005. Out of 17 bats in bite contact with humans, five tested positive for European bat

  7. Utilisation of Chimeric Lyssaviruses to Assess Vaccine Protection against Highly Divergent Lyssaviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Evans

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lyssaviruses constitute a diverse range of viruses with the ability to cause fatal encephalitis known as rabies. Existing human rabies vaccines and post exposure prophylaxes (PEP are based on inactivated preparations of, and neutralising antibody preparations directed against, classical rabies viruses, respectively. Whilst these prophylaxes are highly efficient at neutralising and preventing a productive infection with rabies virus, their ability to neutralise other lyssaviruses is thought to be limited. The remaining 15 virus species within the lyssavirus genus have been divided into at least three phylogroups that generally predict vaccine protection. Existing rabies vaccines afford protection against phylogroup I viruses but offer little to no protection against phylogroup II and III viruses. As such, work involving sharps with phylogroup II and III must be considered of high risk as no PEP is thought to have any effect on the prevention of a productive infection with these lyssaviruses. Whilst rabies virus itself has been characterised in a number of different animal models, data on the remaining lyssaviruses are scarce. As the lyssavirus glycoprotein is considered to be the sole target of neutralising antibodies we generated a vaccine strain of rabies using reverse genetics expressing highly divergent glycoproteins of West Caucasian Bat lyssavirus and Ikoma lyssavirus. Using these recombinants, we propose that recombinant vaccine strain derived lyssaviruses containing heterologous glycoproteins may be a suitable surrogate for wildtype viruses when assessing vaccine protection for the lyssaviruses.

  8. Efficacy of rabies vaccines in dogs and cats and protection in a mouse model against European bat lyssavirus type 2

    OpenAIRE

    Nokireki, Tiina; Jakava-Viljanen, Miia; Virtala, Anna-Maija; Sihvonen, Liisa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Rabies is preventable by pre- and/or post-exposure prophylaxis consisting of series of rabies vaccinations and in some cases the use of immunoglobulins. The success of vaccination can be estimated either by measuring virus neutralising antibodies or by challenge experiment. Vaccines based on rabies virus offer cross-protection against other lyssaviruses closely related to rabies virus. The aim was to assess the succes...

  9. Comparison of pathogenic domains of rabies and African rabies-related lyssaviruses and pathogenicity observed in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Joe Kgaladi; Louis H. Nel; Wanda Markotter

    2013-01-01

    Several lyssavirus species occur in Africa (Rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus), displaying a high sequence diversity between isolates belonging to the same species. There is limited information about comparative pathogenesis of these African lyssaviruses and this precludes authoritative opinion on the potential public and veterinary health impact. In this study, an analysis of representative African lyssaviruses attempted...

  10. Lyssavirus in Eptesicus serotinus (Chiroptera: Verpertilionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Jordá, Juan L.; Ibáñez, Carlos; Muñoz-Cervera, Marina; Tellez, Antonio

    1995-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of European Bat Lyssavirus 1 (EBL1), antibodies plasma samples were obtained from 175 serotine bats (Eptesicus serotinus) from four colonies in southern Spain between September of 1991 and September 1992. Five bats were detected with EBL1 virus in one colony in 1989. The prevalence of antibodies rose to 74% in one of the colonies studied (Villarrasa) in the spring of 1992. After a few months the prevalence declined to under 10%. Individuals with a high antibody lev...

  11. Antigenic characterisation of lyssaviruses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ngoepe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There are at least six Lyssavirus species that have been isolated in Africa, which include classical rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus. In this retrospective study, an analysis of the antigenic reactivity patterns of lyssaviruses in South Africa against a panel of 15 anti-nucleoprotein monoclonal antibodies was undertaken. A total of 624 brain specimens, collected between 2005 and 2009, confirmed as containing lyssavirus antigen by direct fluorescent antibody test, were subjected to antigenic differentiation. The lyssaviruses were differentiated into two species, namely rabies virus (99.5% and Mokola virus (0.5%. Furthermore, rabies virus was further delineated into two common rabies biotypes in South Africa: canid and mongoose. Initially, it was found that the canid rabies biotype had two reactivity patterns; differential staining was observed with just one monoclonal antibody. This difference was likely to have been an artefact related to sample quality, as passage in cell culture restored staining. Mongoose rabies viruses were more heterogeneous, with seven antigenic reactivity patterns detected. Although Mokola viruses were identified in this study, prevalence and reservoir host species are yet to be established. These data demonstrate the usefulness of monoclonal antibody typing panels in lyssavirus surveillance with reference to emergence of new species or spread of rabies biotypes to new geographic zones.

  12. Bleeding score in Type 1 von Willebrand disease patients using the ISTH-BAT questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, A; Al Omrani, S; Al Hajri, F; Al Obaidani, N; Al Balushi, B; Al Falahi, K

    2018-04-01

    Bleeding assessment tools have evolved in the last decade to standardize the assessment of the severity of bleeding symptom in a consistent way. In 2010, the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis-Bleeding Assessment Tool (ISTH-BAT) was developed and validated. Our aim was to administer ISTH-BAT questionnaire to the Omani patients with type 1 VWD and obtain the bleeding score (BS). We also studied the severity of their bleeding symptoms and correlated it with the BS as well as with the laboratory parameters. Forty-eight type I VWD index cases and 52 normal subjects were interviewed and the ISTH-BAT questionnaire administered. The BS was calculated based on a history of bleeding symptoms from 12 different sites according to the standard ISTH-BAT questionnaire. Laboratory parameters were obtained from patient's medical records. The mean age of this cohort was 27 years (range, 6-49) with 60% being females. The median time to administer this questionnaire was 10 minutes with an interquartile range (IQR) from 8 to 17 minutes. Overall, the median BS was 7 (IQR; 2,11) although individual scores ranged between 0 and 36. The BS was negatively correlated with VWF: Ag, VWF: RCo, and VWF: CB and the Spearman's correlation coefficient "rho" was, respectively, -0.15, -0.08, and -0.22. The ISTH-BAT BS is designed to reflect the severity of bleeding. Our results demonstrate the inherent variability of this bleeding pattern. We also found that the ISTH-BAT BS significantly correlated with VWF: Ag and VWF: CB. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Evidence of Two Lyssavirus Phylogroups with Distinct Pathogenicity and Immunogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Badrane, Hassan; Bahloul, Chokri; Perrin, Pierre; Tordo, Noël

    2001-01-01

    The genetic diversity of representative members of the Lyssavirus genus (rabies and rabies-related viruses) was evaluated using the gene encoding the transmembrane glycoprotein involved in the virus-host interaction, immunogenicity, and pathogenicity. Phylogenetic analysis distinguished seven genotypes, which could be divided into two major phylogroups having the highest bootstrap values. Phylogroup I comprises the worldwide genotype 1 (classic Rabies virus), the European bat lyssavirus (EBL)...

  14. BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey. VIII. Type 1 AGN with Massive Absorbing Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Davies, Richard I.; Koss, Michael; Ricci, Claudio; Lamperti, Isabella; Oh, Kyuseok; Schawinski, Kevin; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Burtscher, Leonard; Genzel, Reinhard; Lin, Ming-yi; Lutz, Dieter; Rosario, David; Sturm, Eckhard; Tacconi, Linda

    2018-04-01

    We explore the relationship between X-ray absorption and optical obscuration within the BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS), which has been collecting and analyzing the optical and X-ray spectra for 641 hard X-ray selected (E > 14 keV) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use the deviation from a linear broad Hα-to-X-ray relationship as an estimate of the maximum optical obscuration toward the broad line region (BLR) and compare the A V to the hydrogen column densities ({N}{{H}}) found through systematic modeling of their X-ray spectra. We find that the inferred columns implied by A V toward the BLR are often orders of magnitude less than the columns measured toward the X-ray emitting region, indicating a small-scale origin for the X-ray absorbing gas. After removing 30% of Sy 1.9s that potentially have been misclassified due to outflows, we find that 86% (164/190) of the Type 1 population (Sy 1–1.9) are X-ray unabsorbed as expected based on a single obscuring structure. However, 14% (26/190), of which 70% (18/26) are classified as Sy 1.9, are X-ray absorbed, suggesting that the BLR itself is providing extra obscuration toward the X-ray corona. The fraction of X-ray absorbed Type 1 AGNs remains relatively constant with AGN luminosity and Eddington ratio, indicating a stable BLR covering fraction.

  15. Serological Surveillance for Non-Rabies Lyssaviruses among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Out of the seven recognized and four putative genotypes of lyssaviruses, genotypes 1-3 comprising namely the classical rabies virus (RABV), Lagos bat virus (LBV) and Mokola virus (MOKV) respectively have been reported in Nigeria. The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, is recognized as the reservoir for genotype 1, and the ...

  16. Novel Alphacoronaviruses and Paramyxoviruses Cocirculate with Type 1 and Severe Acute Respiratory System (SARS)-Related Betacoronaviruses in Synanthropic Bats of Luxembourg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Maude; Pir, Jacques B; Loesch, Catherine; Sausy, Aurélie; Snoeck, Chantal J; Hübschen, Judith M; Muller, Claude P

    2017-09-15

    zoonotic potential and despite the zoonotic transmission of European bat 1 lyssavirus in Luxembourg, knowledge about the diversity and epidemiology of bat viruses remains limited in this country. Moreover, in contrast to other European countries, bat viruses are currently not included in the national surveillance activities of this land-locked country. We suggest that this gap in disease surveillance should be addressed, since we show here that synanthropic bats host viruses that may be able to cross the species barrier. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Host Switching in Lyssavirus History from the Chiroptera to the Carnivora Orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrane, Hassan; Tordo, Noël

    2001-01-01

    Lyssaviruses are unsegmented RNA viruses causing rabies. Their vectors belong to the Carnivora and Chiroptera orders. We studied 36 carnivoran and 17 chiropteran lyssaviruses representing the main genotypes and variants. We compared their genes encoding the surface glycoprotein, which is responsible for receptor recognition and membrane fusion. The glycoprotein is the main protecting antigen and bears virulence determinants. Point mutation is the main force in lyssavirus evolution, as Sawyer's test and phylogenetic analysis showed no evidence of recombination. Tests of neutrality indicated a neutral model of evolution, also supported by globally high ratios of synonymous substitutions (dS) to nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) (>7). Relative-rate tests suggested similar rates of evolution for all lyssavirus lineages. Therefore, the absence of recombination and similar evolutionary rates make phylogeny-based conclusions reliable. Phylogenetic reconstruction strongly supported the hypothesis that host switching occurred in the history of lyssaviruses. Indeed, lyssaviruses evolved in chiropters long before the emergence of carnivoran rabies, very likely following spillovers from bats. Using dated isolates, the average rate of evolution was estimated to be roughly 4.3 × 10−4 dS/site/year. Consequently, the emergence of carnivoran rabies from chiropteran lyssaviruses was determined to have occurred 888 to 1,459 years ago. Glycoprotein segments accumulating more dN than dS were distinctly detected in carnivoran and chiropteran lyssaviruses. They may have contributed to the adaptation of the virus to the two distinct mammal orders. In carnivoran lyssaviruses they overlapped the main antigenic sites, II and III, whereas in chiropteran lyssaviruses they were located in regions of unknown functions. PMID:11483755

  18. New Adenovirus in Bats, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Michael; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Speck, Stephanie; Wibbelt, Gudrun

    2009-01-01

    We tested 55 deceased vespertilionid bats of 12 species from southern Germany for virus infections. A new adenovirus was isolated from tissue samples of 2 Pipistrellus pipistrellus bats, which represents the only chiropteran virus isolate found in Europe besides lyssavirus (rabies virus). Evidence was found for adenovirus transmission between bats. PMID:19961700

  19. Bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents information about bats, including definitions and descriptions of the characteristics of bats. Provides teaching activities such as "Bat and Math,""A Bat Like That,""Bat Party,""Ears in the Dark," and "The Big Bat Mystery." Contains reproducible handouts and quizzes. (TW)

  20. Bat rabies surveillance in France: first report of unusual mortality among serotine bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Servat, Alexandre; Wasniewski, Marine; Gaillard, Matthieu; Borel, Christophe; Cliquet, Florence

    2017-12-13

    Rabies is a fatal viral encephalitic disease that is caused by lyssaviruses which can affect all mammals, including human and bats. In Europe, bat rabies cases are attributed to five different lyssavirus species, the majority of rabid bats being attributed to European bat 1 lyssavirus (EBLV-1), circulating mainly in serotine bats (Eptesicus serotinus). In France, rabies in bats is under surveillance since 1989, with 77 positive cases reported between 1989 and 2016. In the frame of the bat rabies surveillance, an unusual mortality of serotine bats was reported in 2009 in a village in North-East France. Six juvenile bats from an E. serotinus maternity colony counting ~200 individuals were found to be infected with EBLV-1. The active surveillance of the colony by capture sessions of bats from July to September 2009 showed a high detection rate of neutralising EBLV-1 antibodies (≈ 50%) in the colony. Moreover, one out of 111 animals tested was found to shed viable virus in saliva, while lyssavirus RNA was detected by RT-PCR for five individuals. This study demonstrated that the lyssavirus infection in the serotine maternity colony was followed by a high rate of bat rabies immunity after circulation of the virus in the colony. The ratio of seropositive bats is probably indicative of an efficient virus transmission coupled to a rapid circulation of EBLV-1 in the colony.

  1. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assenberg, René [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Delmas, Olivier [UPRE Lyssavirus Dynamics and Host Adaptation, WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, Institut Pasteur, 28 Rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J. [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Bourhy, Hervé [UPRE Lyssavirus Dynamics and Host Adaptation, WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, Institut Pasteur, 28 Rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Grimes, Jonathan M., E-mail: jonathan@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of the full-length matrix protein from three lyssaviruses is described. The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress.

  2. The Global Phylogeography of Lyssaviruses - Challenging the 'Out of Africa' Hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T S Hayman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rabies virus kills tens of thousands of people globally each year, especially in resource-limited countries. Yet, there are genetically- and antigenically-related lyssaviruses, all capable of causing the disease rabies, circulating globally among bats without causing conspicuous disease outbreaks. The species richness and greater genetic diversity of African lyssaviruses, along with the lack of antibody cross-reactivity among them, has led to the hypothesis that Africa is the origin of lyssaviruses. This hypothesis was tested using a probabilistic phylogeographical approach. The nucleoprotein gene sequences from 153 representatives of 16 lyssavirus species, collected between 1956 and 2015, were used to develop a phylogenetic tree which incorporated relevant geographic and temporal data relating to the viruses. In addition, complete genome sequences from all 16 (putative species were analysed. The most probable ancestral distribution for the internal nodes was inferred using three different approaches and was confirmed by analysis of complete genomes. These results support a Palearctic origin for lyssaviruses (posterior probability = 0.85, challenging the 'out of Africa' hypothesis, and suggest three independent transmission events to the Afrotropical region, representing the three phylogroups that form the three major lyssavirus clades.

  3. Molecular double check strategy for the identification and characterization of European Lyssaviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Melina; Freuling, Conrad; Mueller, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Lyssaviruses (order Mononegavirales, family Rhabdoviridae), the causative agents of rabies, represent a remarkable public health threat in developing countries. Among human exposures RABV is transmitted predominantly by dog bite; however bat lyssaviruses have also caused human cases. The “gold...... standard” for post-mortem rabies diagnosis is the fluorescence antibody test (FAT). However, in the case of ante-mortem non-neural sample material (e.g. saliva, cerebral spinal fluid, skin biopsies) or badly decomposed tissues the FAT reaches its limit and the use of molecular methods like reverse...

  4. Comparison of pathogenic domains of rabies and African rabies-related lyssaviruses and pathogenicity observed in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kgaladi, Joe; Nel, Louis H; Markotter, Wanda

    2013-03-08

    Several lyssavirus species occur in Africa (Rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus), displaying a high sequence diversity between isolates belonging to the same species. There is limited information about comparative pathogenesis of these African lyssaviruses and this precludes authoritative opinion on the potential public and veterinary health impact. In this study, an analysis of representative African lyssaviruses attempted to correlate viral genomic sequence similarities and differences with the corresponding pathogenic profiles observed in mice. The study demonstrated that the virus isolates evaluated could be lethal to mice when introduced intramuscularly and that different isolates of the same lyssavirus species differ in their virulence. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), viral RNA was detected in brain tissue, but no viral RNA was detected in the salivary glands or blood of mice that succumbed to infection. Comparison of known pathogenic domains indicated that pathogenicity is likely to be dependent on multiple domains. Cumulatively, our results re-emphasised the realisation that the pathogenicity of a lyssavirus species cannot be deduced based on studies of only a single isolate of the species or a single pathogenic domain.

  5. Comparison of pathogenic domains of rabies and African rabies-related lyssaviruses and pathogenicity observed in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Kgaladi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Several lyssavirus species occur in Africa (Rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus, displaying a high sequence diversity between isolates belonging to the same species. There is limited information about comparative pathogenesis of these African lyssaviruses and this precludes authoritative opinion on the potential public and veterinary health impact. In this study, an analysis of representative African lyssaviruses attempted to correlate viral genomic sequence similarities and differences with the corresponding pathogenic profiles observed in mice. The study demonstrated that the virus isolates evaluated could be lethal to mice when introduced intramuscularly and that different isolates of the same lyssavirus species differ in their virulence. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR, viral RNA was detected in brain tissue, but no viral RNA was detected in the salivary glands or blood of mice that succumbed to infection. Comparison of known pathogenic domains indicated that pathogenicity is likely to be dependent on multiple domains. Cumulatively, our results re-emphasised the realisation that the pathogenicity of a lyssavirus species cannot be deduced based on studies of only a single isolate of the species or a single pathogenic domain.

  6. Pathogenesis of bat rabies in a natural reservoir: Comparative susceptibility of the straw-colored fruit bat (Eidolon helvum) to three strains of Lagos bat virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suu-Ire, R. (Richard); L. Begeman (Lineke); A. Banyard (Ashley); A.C. Breed; C. Drosten (Christian); Eggerbauer, E. (Elisa); Freuling, C.M. (Conrad M.); Gibson, L. (Louise); Goharriz, H. (Hooman); D.L. Horton; Jennings, D. (Daisy); I.V. Kuzmin (Ivan); D.A. Marston (Denise); Ntiamoa-Baidu, Y. (Yaa); Riesle Sbarbaro, S. (Silke); Selden, D. (David); Wise, E.L. (Emma L.); Kuiken, T. (Thijs); A.R. Fooks (Anthony); T. Müller (Thomas); Wood, J.L.N. (James L. N.); A.A. Cunningham

    2018-01-01

    textabstractRabies is a fatal neurologic disease caused by lyssavirus infection. People are infected through contact with infected animals. The relative increase of human rabies acquired from bats calls for a better understanding of lyssavirus infections in their natural hosts. So far, there is no

  7. Pathogenesis of bat rabies in a natural reservoir: Comparative susceptibility of the straw-colored fruit bat (Eidolon helvum) to three strains of Lagos bat virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suu-Ire, Richard; Begeman, Lineke; Banyard, Ashley C; Breed, Andrew C; Drosten, Christian; Eggerbauer, Elisa; Freuling, Conrad M; Gibson, Louise; Goharriz, Hooman; Horton, Daniel L; Jennings, Daisy; Kuzmin, Ivan V; Marston, Denise; Ntiamoa-Baidu, Yaa; Riesle Sbarbaro, Silke; Selden, David; Wise, Emma L; Kuiken, Thijs; Fooks, Anthony R; Müller, Thomas; Wood, James L N; Cunningham, Andrew A

    2018-03-01

    Rabies is a fatal neurologic disease caused by lyssavirus infection. People are infected through contact with infected animals. The relative increase of human rabies acquired from bats calls for a better understanding of lyssavirus infections in their natural hosts. So far, there is no experimental model that mimics natural lyssavirus infection in the reservoir bat species. Lagos bat virus is a lyssavirus that is endemic in straw-colored fruit bats (Eidolon helvum) in Africa. Here we compared the susceptibility of these bats to three strains of Lagos bat virus (from Senegal, Nigeria, and Ghana) by intracranial inoculation. To allow comparison between strains, we ensured the same titer of virus was inoculated in the same location of the brain of each bat. All bats (n = 3 per strain) were infected, and developed neurological signs, and fatal meningoencephalitis with lyssavirus antigen expression in neurons. There were three main differences among the groups. First, time to death was substantially shorter in the Senegal and Ghana groups (4 to 6 days) than in the Nigeria group (8 days). Second, each virus strain produced a distinct clinical syndrome. Third, the spread of virus to peripheral tissues, tested by hemi-nested reverse transcriptase PCR, was frequent (3 of 3 bats) and widespread (8 to 10 tissues positive of 11 tissues examined) in the Ghana group, was frequent and less widespread in the Senegal group (3/3 bats, 3 to 6 tissues positive), and was rare and restricted in the Nigeria group (1/3 bats, 2 tissues positive). Centrifugal spread of virus from brain to tissue of excretion in the oral cavity is required to enable lyssavirus transmission. Therefore, the Senegal and Ghana strains seem most suitable for further pathogenesis, and for transmission, studies in the straw-colored fruit bat.

  8. Quantification of Lyssavirus-Neutralizing Antibodies Using Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Pseudotype Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Moeschler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is a highly fatal zoonotic disease which is primarily caused by rabies virus (RABV although other members of the genus Lyssavirus can cause rabies as well. As yet, 14 serologically and genetically diverse lyssaviruses have been identified, mostly in bats. To assess the quality of rabies vaccines and immunoglobulin preparations, virus neutralization tests with live RABV are performed in accordance with enhanced biosafety standards. In the present work, a novel neutralization test is presented which takes advantage of a modified vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV from which the glycoprotein G gene has been deleted and replaced by reporter genes. This single-cycle virus was trans-complemented with RABV envelope glycoprotein. Neutralization of this pseudotype virus with RABV reference serum or immune sera from vaccinated mice showed a strong correlation with the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT. Importantly, pseudotype viruses containing the envelope glycoproteins of other lyssaviruses were neutralized by reference serum to a significantly lesser extent or were not neutralized at all. Taken together, a pseudotype virus system has been successfully developed which allows the safe, fast, and sensitive detection of neutralizing antibodies directed against different lyssaviruses.

  9. Identification of rhabdoviral sequences in oropharyngeal swabs from German and Danish bats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Melina; Freuling, Conrad M.; Müller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the frame of active lyssavirus surveillance in bats, oropharyngeal swabs from German (N = 2297) and Danish (N = 134) insectivorous bats were investigated using a newly developed generic pan-lyssavirus real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR).Findings: In total, 15 RT......-qPCR positive swabs were detected. Remarkably, sequencing of positive samples did not confirm the presence of bat associated lyssaviruses but revealed nine distinct novel rhabdovirus-related sequences. Conclusions: Several novel rhabdovirus-related sequences were detected both in German and Danish insectivorous...... bats. The results also prove that the novel generic pan-lyssavirus RT-qPCR offers a very broad detection range that allows the collection of further valuable data concerning the broad and complex diversity within the family Rhabdoviridae....

  10. Public health awareness of emerging zoonotic viruses of bats: A European perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, van der W.H.M.; Lina, P.H.C.; Kramps, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Bats classified in the order Chiroptera are the most abundant and widely distributed non-human mammalian species in the world. Several bat species are reservoir hosts of zoonotic viruses and therefore can be a public health hazard. Lyssaviruses of different genotypes have emerged from bats in

  11. Emerging diseases in Chiroptera: why bats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibbelt, Gudrun; Moore, Marianne S.; Schountz, Tony; Voigt, Christian C.

    2010-01-01

    A conference entitled ‘2nd International Berlin Bat Meeting: Bat Biology and Infectious Diseases’ was held between the 19 and 21 of February 2010 in Berlin, Germany. Researchers from two major disciplines, bat biologists and disease specialists, met for the first time in an interdisciplinary event to share their knowledge about bat-associated diseases. The focus of the meeting was to understand why in particular bats are the hosts of so many of the most virulent diseases globally. During several sessions, key note speakers and participants discussed infectious diseases associated with bats, including viral diseases caused by Henipa-, Filo-, Corona- and Lyssaviruses, the spread of white-nose syndrome in North American bats, bat immunology/immunogenetics, bat parasites, and finally, conservation and human health issues. PMID:20427329

  12. Bat rabies--a Gordian knot?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freuling, Conrad; Vos, Ad; Johnson, Nicholas; Fooks, Anthony R; Müller, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Although classical rabies is one of the earliest identified and best studied infectious diseases, there is still limited knowledge about lyssaviruses and their major natural hosts, bats. Focussing on bat rabies in Europe caused by European bat lyssaviruses 1 (EBLV-1) and 2, for instance the association of EBLV-1 to Eptesicus bats and EBLV-2 to Myotis daubentonii and M. dasycneme together with an apparent clustering of cases is one question still to be answered. Furthermore, the question whether EBLVs are less virulent or bats less susceptible is the key to the understanding of the disease. Accumulating evidence from experimental studies and field observations, however, has resulted in contradicting hypotheses. Serological surveys, using tools developed for classical rabies, are often used for bat rabies surveillance. However, such surveys are hampered by the lack of validated methods applicable for bat sera. Bats seem to play a prominent role as reservoir for viral pathogens and the unique biology of bats especially the immune response may contribute to this. Considering all known aspects, bat rabies seems to form a yet unsolvable entanglement, reminiscent of the ancient tale of the Gordian knot. In this manuscript we will not be able to untangle this knot, but we hope to offer some suggestions of where to start.

  13. A Step Forward in Molecular Diagnostics of Lyssaviruses – Results of a Ring Trial among European Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Melina; Wernike, Kerstin; Freuling, Conrad M.; Müller, Thomas; Aylan, Orhan; Brochier, Bernard; Cliquet, Florence; Vázquez-Morón, Sonia; Hostnik, Peter; Huovilainen, Anita; Isaksson, Mats; Kooi, Engbert A.; Mooney, Jean; Turcitu, Mihai; Rasmussen, Thomas B.; Revilla-Fernández, Sandra; Smreczak, Marcin; Fooks, Anthony R.; Marston, Denise A.; Beer, Martin; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Rabies is a lethal and notifiable zoonotic disease for which diagnostics have to meet the highest standards. In recent years, an evolution was especially seen in molecular diagnostics with a wide variety of different detection methods published. Therefore, a first international ring trial specifically designed on the use of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of lyssavirus genomic RNA was organized. The trial focussed on assessment and comparison of the performance of conventional and real-time assays. In total, 16 European laboratories participated. All participants were asked to investigate a panel of defined lyssavirus RNAs, consisting of Rabies virus (RABV) and European bat lyssavirus 1 and 2 (EBLV-1 and -2) RNA samples, with systems available in their laboratory. The ring trial allowed the important conclusion that conventional RT-PCR assays were really robust assays tested with a high concordance between different laboratories and assays. The real-time RT-PCR system by Wakeley et al. (2005) in combination with an intercalating dye, and the combined version by Hoffmann and co-workers (2010) showed good sensitivity for the detection of all RABV samples included in this test panel. Furthermore, all used EBLV-specific assays, real-time RT-PCRs as well as conventional RT-PCR systems, were shown to be suitable for a reliable detection of EBLVs. It has to be mentioned that differences were seen in the performance between both the individual RT-PCR systems and the laboratories. Laboratories which used more than one molecular assay for testing the sample panel always concluded a correct sample result. Due to the markedly high genetic diversity of lyssaviruses, the application of different assays in diagnostics is needed to achieve a maximum of diagnostic accuracy. To improve the knowledge about the diagnostic performance proficiency testing at an international level is recommended before using lyssavirus molecular diagnostics e

  14. Lagos bat virus transmission in an Eidolon helvum bat colony, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freuling, Conrad M; Binger, Tabea; Beer, Martin; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Schatz, Juliane; Fischer, Melina; Hanke, Dennis; Hoffmann, Bernd; Höper, Dirk; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Oppong, Samual K; Drosten, Christian; Müller, Thomas

    2015-12-02

    A brain sample of a straw-coloured fruit bat (Eidolon helvum) from Ghana without evident signs of disease tested positive by generic Lyssavirus RT-PCR and direct antigen staining. Sequence analysis confirmed the presence of a Lagos bat virus belonging to phylogenetic lineage A. Virus neutralization tests using the isolate with sera from the same group of bats yielded neutralizing antibodies in 74% of 567 animals. No cross-neutralization was observed against a different Lagos bat virus (lineage B). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Laboratory Surveillance of Rabies in Humans, Domestic Animals, and Bats in Madagascar from 2005 to 2010

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    Jean-Marc Reynes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rabies virus (RABV has circulated in Madagascar at least since the 19th century. Objectives. To assess the circulation of lyssavirus in the island from 2005 to 2010. Materials and Methods. Animal (including bats and human samples were tested for RABV and other lyssavirus using antigen, ribonucleic acid (RNA, and antibodies detection and virus isolation. Results. Half of the 437 domestic or tame wild terrestrial mammal brains tested were found RABV antigen positive, including 54% of the 341 dogs tested. This percentage ranged from 26% to 75% across the period. Nine of the 10 suspected human cases tested were laboratory confirmed. RABV circulation was confirmed in 34 of the 38 districts sampled. No lyssavirus RNA was detected in 1983 bats specimens. Nevertheless, antibodies against Lagos bat virus were detected in the sera of 12 among 50 Eidolon dupreanum specimens sampled. Conclusion. More than a century after the introduction of the vaccine, rabies still remains endemic in Madagascar.

  16. Rabies virus in a pregnant naturally infected southern yellow bat (Lasiurus ega)

    OpenAIRE

    Allendorf, S. D. [UNESP; Albas, A.; Cipriano, J. R. B. [UNESP; Antunes, J. M. A. P. [UNESP; Appolinario, C. M. [UNESP; Peres, M. G. [UNESP; Megid, Jane [UNESP

    2011-01-01

    Current knowledge on bat lyssavirus infections in their native hosts is limited and little is known about the virulence, virus dissemination and transmission among free-living insectivorous bats. The present study is a brief description of rabies virus (RABV) dissemination in tissues of a naturally infected pregnant southern yellow bat (Lasiurus ega) and its fetuses, obtained by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The RT-PCR was positive in samples from the brain, saliva...

  17. Conservation of a Unique Mechanism of Immune Evasion across the Lyssavirus Genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltzer, L.; Larrous, F.; Oksayan, S.; Ito, N.; Marsh, G. A.; Wang, L. F.; Blondel, D.; Bourhy, H.; Jans, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    The evasion of host innate immunity by Rabies virus, the prototype of the genus Lyssavirus, depends on a unique mechanism of selective targeting of interferon-activated STAT proteins by the viral phosphoprotein (P-protein). However, the immune evasion strategies of other lyssaviruses, including several lethal human pathogens, are unresolved. Here, we show that this mechanism is conserved between the most distantly related members of the genus, providing important insights into the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targeting of lyssaviruses. PMID:22740405

  18. Conservation of a unique mechanism of immune evasion across the Lyssavirus genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltzer, L; Larrous, F; Oksayan, S; Ito, N; Marsh, G A; Wang, L F; Blondel, D; Bourhy, H; Jans, D A; Moseley, G W

    2012-09-01

    The evasion of host innate immunity by Rabies virus, the prototype of the genus Lyssavirus, depends on a unique mechanism of selective targeting of interferon-activated STAT proteins by the viral phosphoprotein (P-protein). However, the immune evasion strategies of other lyssaviruses, including several lethal human pathogens, are unresolved. Here, we show that this mechanism is conserved between the most distantly related members of the genus, providing important insights into the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targeting of lyssaviruses.

  19. Rabies virus vaccines: is there a need for a pan-lyssavirus vaccine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jennifer S; Horton, Daniel L; Easton, Andrew J; Fooks, Anthony R; Banyard, Ashley C

    2012-12-14

    All members of the lyssavirus genus are capable of causing disease that invariably results in death following the development of clinical symptoms. The recent detection of several novel lyssavirus species across the globe, in different animal species, has demonstrated that the lyssavirus genus contains a greater degree of genetic and antigenic variation than previously suspected. The divergence of species within the genus has led to a differentiation of lyssavirus isolates based on both antigenic and genetic data into two, and potentially a third phylogroup. Critically, from both a human and animal health perspective, current rabies vaccines appear able to protect against lyssaviruses classified within phylogroup I. However no protection is afforded against phylogroup II viruses or other more divergent viruses. Here we review current knowledge regarding the diversity and antigenicity of the lyssavirus glycoprotein. We review the degree of cross protection afforded by rabies vaccines, the genetic and antigenic divergence of the lyssaviruses and potential mechanisms for the development of novel lyssavirus vaccines for use in areas where divergent lyssaviruses are known to circulate, as well as for use by those at occupational risk from these pathogens. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of potential zoonotic disease exposure and illness related to an annual bat festival--Idanre, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Neil M; Osinubi, Modupe; Wallace, Ryan M; Aman-Oloniyo, Abimbola; Gbadegesin, Yemi H; Sebastian, Yennan Kerecvel; Saliman, Olugbon Abdullateef; Niezgoda, Mike; Davis, Lora; Recuenco, Sergio

    2014-04-18

    Bats provide vital ecologic services that humans benefit from, such as seed dispersal and pest control, and are a food source for some human populations. However, bats also are reservoirs for a number of high-consequence zoonoses, including paramyxoviruses, filoviruses, and lyssaviruses. The variety of viruses that bats harbor might be related to their evolutionary diversity, ability to fly large distances, long lifespans, and gregarious roosting behaviors. Every year a festival takes place in Idanre, Nigeria, in which males of all ages enter designated caves to capture bats; persons are forbidden from entering the caves outside of these festivities. Festival participants use a variety of techniques to capture bats, but protective equipment rarely is used, placing hunters at risk for bat scratches and bites. Many captured bats are prepared as food, but some are transported to markets in other parts of the country for sale as bushmeat. Bats also are presented to dignitaries in elaborate rituals. The health consequences of contact with these bats are unknown, but a number of viruses have been previously identified among Nigerian bats, including lyssaviruses, pegiviruses, and coronaviruses. Furthermore, the caves are home to Rousettus aegyptiacus bats, which are reservoirs for Marburg virus in other parts of Africa.

  1. Bats, emerging infectious diseases, and the rabies paradigm revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Ivan V.; Bozick, Brooke; Guagliardo, Sarah A.; Kunkel, Rebekah; Shak, Joshua R.; Tong, Suxiang; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    The significance of bats as sources of emerging infectious diseases has been increasingly appreciated, and new data have been accumulated rapidly during recent years. For some emerging pathogens the bat origin has been confirmed (such as lyssaviruses, henipaviruses, coronaviruses), for other it has been suggested (filoviruses). Several recently identified viruses remain to be ‘orphan’ but have a potential for further emergence (such as Tioman, Menangle, and Pulau viruses). In the present review we summarize information on major bat-associated emerging infections and discuss specific characteristics of bats as carriers of pathogens (from evolutionary, ecological, and immunological positions). We also discuss drivers and forces of an infectious disease emergence and describe various existing and potential approaches for control and prevention of such infections at individual, populational, and societal levels. PMID:24149032

  2. Long-term survival of an urban fruit bat seropositive for Ebola and Lagos bat viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T S Hayman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Ebolaviruses (EBOV (family Filoviridae cause viral hemorrhagic fevers in humans and non-human primates when they spill over from their wildlife reservoir hosts with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Fruit bats may act as reservoirs of the Filoviridae. The migratory fruit bat, Eidolon helvum, is common across sub-Saharan Africa and lives in large colonies, often situated in cities. We screened sera from 262 E. helvum using indirect fluorescent tests for antibodies against EBOV subtype Zaire. We detected a seropositive bat from Accra, Ghana, and confirmed this using western blot analysis. The bat was also seropositive for Lagos bat virus, a Lyssavirus, by virus neutralization test. The bat was fitted with a radio transmitter and was last detected in Accra 13 months after release post-sampling, demonstrating long-term survival. Antibodies to filoviruses have not been previously demonstrated in E. helvum. Radio-telemetry data demonstrates long-term survival of an individual bat following exposure to viruses of families that can be highly pathogenic to other mammal species. Because E. helvum typically lives in large urban colonies and is a source of bushmeat in some regions, further studies should determine if this species forms a reservoir for EBOV from which spillover infections into the human population may occur.

  3. Host and viral ecology determine bat rabies seasonality and maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D.B.; Webb, C.T.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; O'Shea, T.J.; Bowen, R.A.; Smith, D.L.; Stanley, T.R.; Ellison, L.E.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    Rabies is an acute viral infection that is typically fatal. Most rabies modeling has focused on disease dynamics and control within terrestrial mammals (e.g., raccoons and foxes). As such, rabies in bats has been largely neglected until recently. Because bats have been implicated as natural reservoirs for several emerging zoonotic viruses, including SARS-like corona viruses, henipaviruses, and lyssaviruses, understanding how pathogens are maintained within a population becomes vital. Unfortunately, little is known about maintenance mechanisms for any pathogen in bat populations. We present a mathematical model parameterized with unique data from an extensive study of rabies in a Colorado population of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) to elucidate general maintenance mechanisms. We propose that life history patterns of many species of temperate-zone bats, coupled with sufficiently long incubation periods, allows for rabies virus maintenance. Seasonal variability in bat mortality rates, specifically low mortality during hibernation, allows long-term bat population viability. Within viable bat populations, sufficiently long incubation periods allow enough infected individuals to enter hibernation and survive until the following year, and hence avoid an epizootic fadeout of rabies virus. We hypothesize that the slowing effects of hibernation on metabolic and viral activity maintains infected individuals and their pathogens until susceptibles from the annual birth pulse become infected and continue the cycle. This research provides a context to explore similar host ecology and viral dynamics that may explain seasonal patterns and maintenance of other bat-borne diseases.

  4. European Bats as Carriers of Viruses with Zoonotic Potential

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    Claudia Kohl

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bats are being increasingly recognized as reservoir hosts of highly pathogenic and zoonotic emerging viruses (Marburg virus, Nipah virus, Hendra virus, Rabies virus, and coronaviruses. While numerous studies have focused on the mentioned highly human-pathogenic bat viruses in tropical regions, little is known on similar human-pathogenic viruses that may be present in European bats. Although novel viruses are being detected, their zoonotic potential remains unclear unless further studies are conducted. At present, it is assumed that the risk posed by bats to the general public is rather low. In this review, selected viruses detected and isolated in Europe are discussed from our point of view in regard to their human-pathogenic potential. All European bat species and their roosts are legally protected and some European species are even endangered. Nevertheless, the increasing public fear of bats and their viruses is an obstacle to their protection. Educating the public regarding bat lyssaviruses might result in reduced threats to both the public and the bats.

  5. European bats as carriers of viruses with zoonotic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Claudia; Kurth, Andreas

    2014-08-13

    Bats are being increasingly recognized as reservoir hosts of highly pathogenic and zoonotic emerging viruses (Marburg virus, Nipah virus, Hendra virus, Rabies virus, and coronaviruses). While numerous studies have focused on the mentioned highly human-pathogenic bat viruses in tropical regions, little is known on similar human-pathogenic viruses that may be present in European bats. Although novel viruses are being detected, their zoonotic potential remains unclear unless further studies are conducted. At present, it is assumed that the risk posed by bats to the general public is rather low. In this review, selected viruses detected and isolated in Europe are discussed from our point of view in regard to their human-pathogenic potential. All European bat species and their roosts are legally protected and some European species are even endangered. Nevertheless, the increasing public fear of bats and their viruses is an obstacle to their protection. Educating the public regarding bat lyssaviruses might result in reduced threats to both the public and the bats.

  6. Rabies-related knowledge and practices among persons at risk of bat exposures in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kis Robertson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rabies is a fatal encephalitis caused by lyssaviruses. Evidence of lyssavirus circulation has recently emerged in Southeast Asian bats. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Thailand to assess rabies-related knowledge and practices among persons regularly exposed to bats and bat habitats. The objectives were to identify deficiencies in rabies awareness, describe the occurrence of bat exposures, and explore factors associated with transdermal bat exposures. METHODS: A survey was administered to a convenience sample of adult guano miners, bat hunters, game wardens, and residents/personnel at Buddhist temples where mass bat roosting occurs. The questionnaire elicited information on demographics, experience with bat exposures, and rabies knowledge. Participants were also asked to describe actions they would take in response to a bat bite as well as actions for a bite from a potentially rabid animal. Bivariate analysis was used to compare responses between groups and multivariable logistic regression was used to explore factors independently associated with being bitten or scratched by a bat. FINDINGS: Of 106 people interviewed, 11 (10% identified bats as a potential source of rabies. A history of a bat bite or scratch was reported by 29 (27%, and 38 (36% stated either that they would do nothing or that they did not know what they would do in response to a bat bite. Guano miners were less likely than other groups to indicate animal bites as a mechanism of rabies transmission (68% vs. 90%, p=0.03 and were less likely to say they would respond appropriately to a bat bite or scratch (61% vs. 27%, p=0.003. Guano mining, bat hunting, and being in a bat cave or roost area more than 5 times a year were associated with history of a bat bite or scratch. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate the need for educational outreach to raise awareness of bat rabies, promote exposure prevention, and ensure appropriate health-seeking behaviors for bat

  7. Analysis of Adaptive Evolution in Lyssavirus Genomes Reveals Pervasive Diversifying Selection during Species Diversification

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    Carolina M. Voloch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Lyssavirus is a diverse genus of viruses that infect a variety of mammalian hosts, typically causing encephalitis. The evolution of this lineage, particularly the rabies virus, has been a focus of research because of the extensive occurrence of cross-species transmission, and the distinctive geographical patterns present throughout the diversification of these viruses. Although numerous studies have examined pattern-related questions concerning Lyssavirus evolution, analyses of the evolutionary processes acting on Lyssavirus diversification are scarce. To clarify the relevance of positive natural selection in Lyssavirus diversification, we conducted a comprehensive scan for episodic diversifying selection across all lineages and codon sites of the five coding regions in lyssavirus genomes. Although the genomes of these viruses are generally conserved, the glycoprotein (G, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L and polymerase (P genes were frequently targets of adaptive evolution during the diversification of the genus. Adaptive evolution is particularly manifest in the glycoprotein gene, which was inferred to have experienced the highest density of positively selected codon sites along branches. Substitutions in the L gene were found to be associated with the early diversification of phylogroups. A comparison between the number of positively selected sites inferred along the branches of RABV population branches and Lyssavirus intespecies branches suggested that the occurrence of positive selection was similar on the five coding regions of the genome in both groups.

  8. [Bats and Viruses: complex relationships].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhain, F

    2015-10-01

    With more than 1 200 species, bats and flying foxes (Order Chiroptera) constitute the most important and diverse order of Mammals after Rodents. Many species of bats are insectivorous while others are frugivorous and few of them are hematophagous. Some of these animals fly during the night, others are crepuscular or diurnal. Some fly long distances during seasonal migrations. Many species are colonial cave-dwelling, living in a rather small home range while others are relatively solitary. However, in spite of the importance of bats for terrestrial biotic communities and ecosystem ecology, the diversity in their biology and lifestyles remain poorly known and underappreciated. More than sixty viruses have been detected or isolated in bats; these animals are therefore involved in the natural cycles of many of them. This is the case, for instance, of rabies virus and other Lyssavirus (Family Rhabdoviridae), Nipah and Hendra viruses (Paramyxoviridae), Ebola and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae), SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV (Coronaviridae). For these zoonotic viruses, a number of bat species are considered as important reservoir hosts, efficient disseminators or even directly responsible of the transmission. Some of these bat-borne viruses cause highly pathogenic diseases while others are of potential significance for humans and domestic or wild animals; so, bats are an important risk in human and animal public health. Moreover, some groups of viruses developed through different phylogenetic mechanisms of coevolution between viruses and bats. The fact that most of these viral infections are asymptomatic in bats has been observed since a long time but the mechanisms of the viral persistence are not clearly understood. The various bioecology of the different bat populations allows exchange of virus between migrating and non-migrating conspecific species. For a better understanding of the role of bats in the circulation of these viral zoonoses, epidemiologists must pay attention to

  9. Type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin-dependent diabetes; Juvenile onset diabetes; Diabetes - type 1; High blood sugar - type 1 diabetes ... Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age. It is most often diagnosed in children, adolescents, or young adults. Insulin is ...

  10. Bat Bonanza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Amanda J.; Scott, Catherine; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a lesson on bats developed for kindergartners, which uses models of bats to teach about their physiology, diet, and habitat. The lesson uses craft sticks, wax paper, and colored construction paper that kindergarten teachers can use to help their students compare the features of 4 different kinds of bats. The use of online…

  11. Breaking Bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Isaac-Cesar; Kagan, David

    2013-01-01

    The sight of a broken bat in Major League Baseball can produce anything from a humorous dribbler in the infield to a frightening pointed projectile headed for the stands. Bats usually break at the weakest point, typically in the handle. Breaking happens because the wood gets bent beyond the breaking point due to the wave sent down the bat created…

  12. Host Cell Virus Entry Mediated by Australian Bat Lyssavirus Envelope G glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    intracellular vesicular trafficking pathways as physiological ligands and membrane components, such as hormones , growth factors, and plasma membrane factors...been a cause of considerable concern to wildlife, veterinary , and health-care workers. There are two genetically distinct variants of ABLV, one which...entry. It was surprising that the 293F cells, which are a derivative of HEK293 cells that have been adapted for growth in serum-free medium as

  13. Twenty years of active bat rabies surveillance in Germany: a detailed analysis and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, J; Ohlendorf, B; Busse, P; Pelz, G; Dolch, D; Teubner, J; Encarnação, J A; Mühle, R-U; Fischer, M; Hoffmann, B; Kwasnitschka, L; Balkema-Buschmann, A; Mettenleiter, T C; Müller, T; Freuling, C M

    2014-06-01

    In Germany, active bat rabies surveillance was conducted between 1993 and 2012. A total of 4546 oropharyngeal swab samples from 18 bat species were screened for the presence of EBLV-1- , EBLV-2- and BBLV-specific RNA. Overall, 0·15% of oropharyngeal swab samples tested EBLV-1 positive, with the majority originating from Eptesicus serotinus. Interestingly, out of seven RT-PCR-positive oropharyngeal swabs subjected to virus isolation, viable virus was isolated from a single serotine bat (E. serotinus). Additionally, about 1226 blood samples were tested serologically, and varying virus neutralizing antibody titres were found in at least eight different bat species. The detection of viral RNA and seroconversion in repeatedly sampled serotine bats indicates long-term circulation of the virus in a particular bat colony. The limitations of random-based active bat rabies surveillance over passive bat rabies surveillance and its possible application of targeted approaches for future research activities on bat lyssavirus dynamics and maintenance are discussed.

  14. Caracterização de amostras do vírus da raiva, isoladas nas regiões Norte e Centro-Oeste do Brasil, com anticorpos monoclonais antilissavírus Antigenic characterization of Brazilian rabies virus isolate North and Central West regions of Brazil with anti-lyssavirus monoclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.B.C.R. Batista

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of rabies virus antigenic variants in North and Central West regions of Brazil was studied using 61 rabies viruses isolated from different species: 30 from domestic dogs, 20 from cattle, four from horses, two from cats, one from a human and four from unidentified species. The isolates were submitted to antigenic analyses by indirect immunofluorescence with a panel of 12 monoclonal antibodies (Mabs to lyssavirus antigens. Antigenic analyses revealed consistent differences between isolates whose natural hosts were dogs and those of haematophagous bats, often isolated from cattle. Three out of four isolates from horses and one from a domestic dog showed patterns of reactivity found only in viruses of insectivorous bats, indicating that non-haematophagous bats do play a unique role in the transmission of the virus to other species.

  15. Diabetes Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  16. Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2001-01-01

    Prediction of Type 1 diabetes at individual level is relevant for any possible intervention before clinical disease develops. Currently available markers of Type 1 diabetes include genetic specificities and immune markers, in addition to a positive family history. This chapter reviews the measures...... and methods of importance in predicting Type 1 diabetes. Based on numerical examples it is demonstrated that available markers have a low level of performance, even when combined. Even so, combined marker information may allow for the identification of the large majority of the general population who...... is at very low disease risk. The impact at population level of predicting Type 1 diabetes varies between societies because the performance of markers depends on levels of disease risk and distribution of markers within a population. The incorporation of the influence of non-genetic etiological factors may...

  17. Rabies virus in a pregnant naturally infected southern yellow bat (Lasiurus ega

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SD Allendorf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Current knowledge on bat lyssavirus infections in their native hosts is limited and little is known about the virulence, virus dissemination and transmission among free-living insectivorous bats. The present study is a brief description of rabies virus (RABV dissemination in tissues of a naturally infected pregnant southern yellow bat (Lasiurus ega and its fetuses, obtained by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The RT-PCR was positive in samples from the brain, salivary gland, tongue, lungs, heart, kidneys and liver. On the other hand, the placenta, three fetuses, spleen, intestine and brown fat tissue tested negative. This research demonstrated the absence of rabies virus in the fetuses, thus, in this specific case, the transplacentary transmission was not observed.

  18. Bat rabies in France: a 24-year retrospective epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Arthur, Laurent; Larcher, Gérald; Harbusch, Christine; Servat, Alexandre; Cliquet, Florence

    2014-01-01

    Since bat rabies surveillance was first implemented in France in 1989, 48 autochthonous rabies cases without human contamination have been reported using routine diagnosis methods. In this retrospective study, data on bats submitted for rabies testing were analysed in order to better understand the epidemiology of EBLV-1 in bats in France and to investigate some epidemiological trends. Of the 3176 bats submitted for rabies diagnosis from 1989 to 2013, 1.96% (48/2447 analysed) were diagnosed positive. Among the twelve recognised virus species within the Lyssavirus genus, two species were isolated in France. 47 positive bats were morphologically identified as Eptesicus serotinus and were shown to be infected by both the EBLV-1a and the EBLV-1b lineages. Isolation of BBLV in Myotis nattereri was reported once in the north-east of France in 2012. The phylogenetic characterisation of all 47 French EBLV-1 isolates sampled between 1989 and 2013 and the French BBLV sample against 21 referenced partial nucleoprotein sequences confirmed the low genetic diversity of EBLV-1 despite its extensive geographical range. Statistical analysis performed on the serotine bat data collected from 1989 to 2013 showed seasonal variation of rabies occurrence with a significantly higher proportion of positive samples detected during the autumn compared to the spring and the summer period (34% of positive bats detected in autumn, 15% in summer, 13% in spring and 12% in winter). In this study, we have provided the details of the geographical distribution of EBLV-1a in the south-west of France and the north-south division of EBLV-1b with its subdivisions into three phylogenetic groups: group B1 in the north-west, group B2 in the centre and group B3 in the north-east of France.

  19. Bat Rabies in France: A 24-Year Retrospective Epidemiological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Arthur, Laurent; Larcher, Gérald; Harbusch, Christine; Servat, Alexandre; Cliquet, Florence

    2014-01-01

    Since bat rabies surveillance was first implemented in France in 1989, 48 autochthonous rabies cases without human contamination have been reported using routine diagnosis methods. In this retrospective study, data on bats submitted for rabies testing were analysed in order to better understand the epidemiology of EBLV-1 in bats in France and to investigate some epidemiological trends. Of the 3176 bats submitted for rabies diagnosis from 1989 to 2013, 1.96% (48/2447 analysed) were diagnosed positive. Among the twelve recognised virus species within the Lyssavirus genus, two species were isolated in France. 47 positive bats were morphologically identified as Eptesicus serotinus and were shown to be infected by both the EBLV-1a and the EBLV-1b lineages. Isolation of BBLV in Myotis nattereri was reported once in the north-east of France in 2012. The phylogenetic characterisation of all 47 French EBLV-1 isolates sampled between 1989 and 2013 and the French BBLV sample against 21 referenced partial nucleoprotein sequences confirmed the low genetic diversity of EBLV-1 despite its extensive geographical range. Statistical analysis performed on the serotine bat data collected from 1989 to 2013 showed seasonal variation of rabies occurrence with a significantly higher proportion of positive samples detected during the autumn compared to the spring and the summer period (34% of positive bats detected in autumn, 15% in summer, 13% in spring and 12% in winter). In this study, we have provided the details of the geographical distribution of EBLV-1a in the south-west of France and the north-south division of EBLV-1b with its subdivisions into three phylogenetic groups: group B1 in the north-west, group B2 in the centre and group B3 in the north-east of France. PMID:24892287

  20. Type 1 narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn, Matilda; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness with unintentional sleep attacks and cataplexy. The disorder is caused by a loss of hypocretinergic neurons in the brain. The specific loss of these neurons in narcolepsy is thought to result from an autoimmune...... attack, and this is supported by evidence of both environmental and genetic factors pointing toward an involvement of the immune system. However, definitive proof of an autoimmune etiology is still missing. Several different immune-mediated disorders targeting neurons are known, and many...

  1. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  2. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  3. Type 1 Tyrosinaemia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mannion, MA

    2016-06-01

    Tyrosinaemia type 1 (TYR1, OMIM# 276700) is a rare autosomal recessive disease that results from an enzyme defect that leads to a deficiency in fumarylacetoacetase (FAH)1. We present 3 cases of TYR1 in the Irish population over a 9 year period, the only cases known to have been diagnosed in Ireland since 1989. The common presenting symptom was hypoglycaemia and the diagnosis was made by the identification of the pathognomonic biomarker succinylacetone on urine organic acid analysis. We discuss the clinical presentation, biochemical and genetic results including one novel mutation. We also highlight the importance of early initiation of Nitisinone (NTBC), which reduces the complications of TYR1 and the incidence of liver transplantation in this population2.

  4. Bat consumption in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanokwan Suwannarong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human consumption of bats poses an increasing public health threat globally. Communities in which bat guano is mined from caves have extensive exposure to bat excreta, often harvest bats for consumption, and are at risk for bat-borne diseases. Methods: This rapid ethnographic study was conducted in four provinces of Thailand (Ratchaburi, Sakaeo, Nakorn Sawan, and Phitsanulok, where bat guano was mined and sold during the period April–August 2014. The aim of this study was to understand behaviors and risk perceptions associated with bat conservation, exposure to bats and their excreta, and bat consumption. Sixty-seven respondents playing various roles in bat guano mining, packaging, sale, and use as fertilizer participated in the study. Data were collected through interviews and/or focus group discussions. Results: In spite of a bat conservation program dating back to the 1980s, the benefits of conserving bats and the risks associated with bat consumption were not clear and infrequently articulated by study respondents. Discussion: Since bat consumption continues, albeit covertly, the risk of bat-borne diseases remains high. There is an opportunity to reduce the risk of bat-borne diseases in guano-mining communities by strengthening bat conservation efforts and raising awareness of the health risks of bat consumption. Further research is suggested to test behavior change strategies for reducing bat consumption.

  5. Bat consumption in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Schuler, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Human consumption of bats poses an increasing public health threat globally. Communities in which bat guano is mined from caves have extensive exposure to bat excreta, often harvest bats for consumption, and are at risk for bat-borne diseases. This rapid ethnographic study was conducted in four provinces of Thailand (Ratchaburi, Sakaeo, Nakorn Sawan, and Phitsanulok), where bat guano was mined and sold during the period April-August 2014. The aim of this study was to understand behaviors and risk perceptions associated with bat conservation, exposure to bats and their excreta, and bat consumption. Sixty-seven respondents playing various roles in bat guano mining, packaging, sale, and use as fertilizer participated in the study. Data were collected through interviews and/or focus group discussions. In spite of a bat conservation program dating back to the 1980s, the benefits of conserving bats and the risks associated with bat consumption were not clear and infrequently articulated by study respondents. Since bat consumption continues, albeit covertly, the risk of bat-borne diseases remains high. There is an opportunity to reduce the risk of bat-borne diseases in guano-mining communities by strengthening bat conservation efforts and raising awareness of the health risks of bat consumption. Further research is suggested to test behavior change strategies for reducing bat consumption.

  6. A Study of the Fruit Bat (Rousettus sp Brain Anatomy as Natural Reservoir Wild Animal for the Rabies Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Mayang Sari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rousettus sp. (Fruit bat is one type of fruit bats in Indonesia and act as a natural reservoir of rabies. Rabies is caused by a virus from genus Lyssavirus, family Rhabdoviridae, which attack central nervous system (CNS.The brain is an organ that is sensitive to rabies infection. The purpose of this study was to determine the anatomical structure of the fruit bat brain macroscopically. Five fruit bat were used in this study, they were anaesthetized using ketamine and xylazin. Animals were perfused using physiological saline and 10% buffered formalin. Brains were taken using tweezers after all the bones of the skull were separated. Analysis of macroscopic brain was done descriptively. The results showed that the fruit bat brain were generally divided into cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem. Gyrus, sulcus and the paraflokulus lobes of the fruit bat brain were less developed than that of the dogs brain.

  7. Type 1 Diabetes and Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Farabi, Sarah S.

    2016-01-01

    IN BRIEF In people with type 1 diabetes, sleep may be disrupted as a result of both behavioral and physiological aspects of diabetes and its management. This sleep disruption may negatively affect disease progression and development of complications. This review highlights key research findings regarding sleep in people with type 1 diabetes.

  8. Type 1 Diabetes and Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farabi, Sarah S

    2016-02-01

    IN BRIEF In people with type 1 diabetes, sleep may be disrupted as a result of both behavioral and physiological aspects of diabetes and its management. This sleep disruption may negatively affect disease progression and development of complications. This review highlights key research findings regarding sleep in people with type 1 diabetes.

  9. Cloud Model Bat Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Yongquan Zhou; Jian Xie; Liangliang Li; Mingzhi Ma

    2014-01-01

    Bat algorithm (BA) is a novel stochastic global optimization algorithm. Cloud model is an effective tool in transforming between qualitative concepts and their quantitative representation. Based on the bat echolocation mechanism and excellent characteristics of cloud model on uncertainty knowledge representation, a new cloud model bat algorithm (CBA) is proposed. This paper focuses on remodeling echolocation model based on living and preying characteristics of bats, utilizing the transformati...

  10. Innate Immune Responses of Bat and Human Cells to Filoviruses: Commonalities and Distinctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Ivan V; Schwarz, Toni M; Ilinykh, Philipp A; Jordan, Ingo; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Basler, Christopher F; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2017-04-15

    Marburg (MARV) and Ebola (EBOV) viruses are zoonotic pathogens that cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. The natural reservoir of MARV is the Egyptian rousette bat ( Rousettus aegyptiacus ); that of EBOV is unknown but believed to be another bat species. The Egyptian rousette develops subclinical productive infection with MARV but is refractory to EBOV. Interaction of filoviruses with hosts is greatly affected by the viral interferon (IFN)-inhibiting domains (IID). Our study was aimed at characterization of innate immune responses to filoviruses and the role of filovirus IID in bat and human cells. The study demonstrated that EBOV and MARV replicate to similar levels in all tested cell lines, indicating that permissiveness for EBOV at cell and organism levels do not necessarily correlate. Filoviruses, particularly MARV, induced a potent innate immune response in rousette cells, which was generally stronger than that in human cells. Both EBOV VP35 and VP24 IID were found to suppress the innate immune response in rousette cells, but only VP35 IID appeared to promote virus replication. Along with IFN-α and IFN-β, IFN-γ was demonstrated to control filovirus infection in bat cells but not in human cells, suggesting host species specificity of the antiviral effect. The antiviral effects of bat IFNs appeared not to correlate with induction of IFN-stimulated genes 54 and 56, which were detected in human cells ectopically expressing bat IFN-α and IFN-β. As bat IFN-γ induced the type I IFN pathway, its antiviral effect is likely to be partially induced via cross talk. IMPORTANCE Bats serve as reservoirs for multiple emerging viruses, including filoviruses, henipaviruses, lyssaviruses, and zoonotic coronaviruses. Although there is no evidence for symptomatic disease caused by either Marburg or Ebola viruses in bats, spillover of these viruses into human populations causes deadly outbreaks. The reason for the lack of symptomatic disease in bats infected with

  11. Living with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Count Glycemic Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely ... Balancing nutrition, exercise and proper blood glucose management techniques with the rest of your life's priorities mean ...

  12. Dermatomyositis and Type 1 Interferons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Dermatomyositis is a poorly understood multisystem disease predominantly affecting skin and muscle. This review focuses on the potential role of a group of related cytokines, the type 1 interferons, in the pathogenesis of dermatomyositis. Type 1 interferon–inducible transcripts and proteins are uniquely elevated in dermatomyositis muscle compared with all other muscle diseases studied to date. The endothelial cell tubuloreticular inclusions present in affected dermatomyositis muscle are biomarkers of type 1 interferon exposure. The cell-poor lichenoid reaction in skin with predominant involvement of the basal epidermal cell layer and its topologic equivalent in muscle, perifascicular atrophy, may be lesions that develop directly in response to type 1 interferon signaling. PMID:20425524

  13. Cloud model bat algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongquan; Xie, Jian; Li, Liangliang; Ma, Mingzhi

    2014-01-01

    Bat algorithm (BA) is a novel stochastic global optimization algorithm. Cloud model is an effective tool in transforming between qualitative concepts and their quantitative representation. Based on the bat echolocation mechanism and excellent characteristics of cloud model on uncertainty knowledge representation, a new cloud model bat algorithm (CBA) is proposed. This paper focuses on remodeling echolocation model based on living and preying characteristics of bats, utilizing the transformation theory of cloud model to depict the qualitative concept: "bats approach their prey." Furthermore, Lévy flight mode and population information communication mechanism of bats are introduced to balance the advantage between exploration and exploitation. The simulation results show that the cloud model bat algorithm has good performance on functions optimization.

  14. Cloud Model Bat Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongquan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bat algorithm (BA is a novel stochastic global optimization algorithm. Cloud model is an effective tool in transforming between qualitative concepts and their quantitative representation. Based on the bat echolocation mechanism and excellent characteristics of cloud model on uncertainty knowledge representation, a new cloud model bat algorithm (CBA is proposed. This paper focuses on remodeling echolocation model based on living and preying characteristics of bats, utilizing the transformation theory of cloud model to depict the qualitative concept: “bats approach their prey.” Furthermore, Lévy flight mode and population information communication mechanism of bats are introduced to balance the advantage between exploration and exploitation. The simulation results show that the cloud model bat algorithm has good performance on functions optimization.

  15. Molecular inferences suggest multiple host shifts of rabies viruses from bats to mesocarnivores in Arizona during 2001-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan V Kuzmin

    Full Text Available In nature, rabies virus (RABV; genus Lyssavirus, family Rhabdoviridae represents an assemblage of phylogenetic lineages, associated with specific mammalian host species. Although it is generally accepted that RABV evolved originally in bats and further shifted to carnivores, mechanisms of such host shifts are poorly understood, and examples are rarely present in surveillance data. Outbreaks in carnivores caused by a RABV variant, associated with big brown bats, occurred repeatedly during 2001-2009 in the Flagstaff area of Arizona. After each outbreak, extensive control campaigns were undertaken, with no reports of further rabies cases in carnivores for the next several years. However, questions remained whether all outbreaks were caused by a single introduction and further perpetuation of bat RABV in carnivore populations, or each outbreak was caused by an independent introduction of a bat virus. Another question of concern was related to adaptive changes in the RABV genome associated with host shifts. To address these questions, we sequenced and analyzed 66 complete and 20 nearly complete RABV genomes, including those from the Flagstaff area and other similar outbreaks in carnivores, caused by bat RABVs, and representatives of the major RABV lineages circulating in North America and worldwide. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that each Flagstaff outbreak was caused by an independent introduction of bat RABV into populations of carnivores. Positive selection analysis confirmed the absence of post-shift changes in RABV genes. In contrast, convergent evolution analysis demonstrated several amino acids in the N, P, G and L proteins, which might be significant for pre-adaptation of bat viruses to cause effective infection in carnivores. The substitution S/T₂₄₂ in the viral glycoprotein is of particular merit, as a similar substitution was suggested for pathogenicity of Nishigahara RABV strain. Roles of the amino acid changes, detected in our

  16. House bat management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhall, Arthur M.

    1982-01-01

    The soundest long-term solution for the management of bats that enter buildings and cause a nuisance problem or present a public health hazard is by batproofing the structure. Chemical toxicants do not solve house bat problems and may create worse ones. This manual describes batproofing techniques that will provide effective and acceptable alternatives for dealing with house bat problems and hazards. Recent declines in bat populations and greater appreciation of the ecological importance of bats have identified the need for sound management strategies that will encourage bat conservation while protecting human health and solving nuisance problems. One of the best deterrents against house bats is to improve the energy efficiency of the structure since bats may enter holes through which heat is lost. Heat conservation methods used for batproofing will also be eligible for Federal residential energy tax credits. The manual should be useful to homeowners, public health officials, physicians, veterinarians, conservationists, and others interested or concerned about bat interactions with humans.

  17. Bat Predation by Spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyffeler, Martin; Knörnschild, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    In this paper more than 50 incidences of bats being captured by spiders are reviewed. Bat-catching spiders have been reported from virtually every continent with the exception of Antarctica (∼90% of the incidences occurring in the warmer areas of the globe between latitude 30° N and 30° S). Most reports refer to the Neotropics (42% of observed incidences), Asia (28.8%), and Australia-Papua New Guinea (13.5%). Bat-catching spiders belong to the mygalomorph family Theraphosidae and the araneomorph families Nephilidae, Araneidae, and Sparassidae. In addition to this, an attack attempt by a large araneomorph hunting spider of the family Pisauridae on an immature bat was witnessed. Eighty-eight percent of the reported incidences of bat catches were attributable to web-building spiders and 12% to hunting spiders. Large tropical orb-weavers of the genera Nephila and Eriophora in particular have been observed catching bats in their huge, strong orb-webs (of up to 1.5 m diameter). The majority of identifiable captured bats were small aerial insectivorous bats, belonging to the families Vespertilionidae (64%) and Emballonuridae (22%) and usually being among the most common bat species in their respective geographic area. While in some instances bats entangled in spider webs may have died of exhaustion, starvation, dehydration, and/or hyperthermia (i.e., non-predation death), there were numerous other instances where spiders were seen actively attacking, killing, and eating the captured bats (i.e., predation). This evidence suggests that spider predation on flying vertebrates is more widespread than previously assumed. PMID:23516436

  18. Bats and SARS

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-11-08

    Bats are a natural reservoir for emerging viruses, among them henipaviruses and rabies virus variants. Dr. Nina Marano, Chief, Geographic Medicine and Health Promotion Branch, Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, CDC, explains connection between horseshoe bats and SARS coronavirus transmission.  Created: 11/8/2006 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 11/17/2006.

  19. Bats as bushmeat in Madagascar

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Richard K. B. Jenkins and Paul A. Racey

    2008-12-01

    Dec 1, 2008 ... preferred, small insectivorous bats are also eaten. The national hunting season for bats is widely ignored and both unsuitable hunting practices and high offtake represent a serious threat to bat populations in some areas. Bat bushmeat may be an important source of protein for Malagasy people during ...

  20. Puberty and type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhankar Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various data on type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM have showed that the incidence of T1DM peaks at puberty. However, diabetes control and complications could be adversely affected by the physiological changes of puberty. In early years of insulin therapy, severe growth retardation with pubertal delay, like in Mauriac syndrome, have been reported. Insulin and leptin are metabolic factors, circulating in the periphery, which participate in the hypothalamic control of metabolism and reproduction. Insulin may be an important regulator of leptin in humans. Increased levels of advanced glycation end products suppress activation of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH pulse generator, resulting in pubertal delay. Glycemic control deteriorates during puberty as the lean body mass doubles mainly over a period of 25 years, which increases insulin requirement. There is also an increase in insulin resistance over the period of puberty. In normal individuals, fasting and postprandial insulin concentrations reach a peak in both sexes in mid to late puberty. Puberty, at all stages, has the worst insulin resistance. It has been observed that an excessive GH secretion in T1DM during puberty has significant effects on ketogenesis. Adolescent T1DM tends to decompensate very rapidly and develop ketoacidosis when the late night insulin dose is omitted. Adolescence is a critical developmental phase that presents unique challenges and opportunities to individuals with diabetes, their families and their healthcare providers.

  1. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzi Ettore

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1 is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndrome presented mostly by tumours of the parathyroids, endocrine pancreas and anterior pituitary, and characterised by a very high penetrance and an equal sex distribution. It occurs in approximately one in 30,000 individuals. Two different forms, sporadic and familial, have been described. The sporadic form presents with two of the three principal MEN1-related endocrine tumours (parathyroid adenomas, entero-pancreatic tumours and pituitary tumours within a single patient, while the familial form consists of a MEN1 case with at least one first degree relative showing one of the endocrine characterising tumours. Other endocrine and non-endocrine lesions, such as adrenal cortical tumours, carcinoids of the bronchi, gastrointestinal tract and thymus, lipomas, angiofibromas, collagenomas have been described. The responsible gene, MEN1, maps on chromosome 11q13 and encodes a 610 aminoacid nuclear protein, menin, with no sequence homology to other known human proteins. MEN1 syndrome is caused by inactivating mutations of the MEN1 tumour suppressor gene. This gene is probably involved in the regulation of several cell functions such as DNA replication and repair and transcriptional machinery. The combination of clinical and genetic investigations, together with the improving of molecular genetics knowledge of the syndrome, helps in the clinical management of patients. Treatment consists of surgery and/or drug therapy, often in association with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Currently, DNA testing allows the early identification of germline mutations in asymptomatic gene carriers, to whom routine surveillance (regular biochemical and/or radiological screenings to detect the development of MEN1-associated tumours and lesions is recommended.

  2. The bats of Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husson, A.M.

    1962-01-01

    CONTENTS I. Introduction.................. 3 A. Scope of the present paper............. 3 B. Measurements................ 7 C. Nomenclature................ 8 D. Acknowledgements............... 9 II. General Part.................. 10 A. History of the study of Suriname bats.......... 10 B. Remarks on

  3. Indiana Bat (Towns)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset includes towns that contain documented hibernacula or summer range occupied by federally endangered Indiana bats. Survey data used to create this...

  4. Bat Influenza (Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic information. Reassortment can sometimes lead to the emergence of new flu viruses capable of infecting humans. Yellow-shouldered ... important for public health because bats represent a new animal species that may act as a source of flu ...

  5. Neurofibromatosis type 1 growth charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, M; Milani, S; Mammi, I; Boni, S; Monciotti, C; Tenconi, R

    1999-12-03

    Growth abnormalities such as macrocephaly and short stature have been described and are considered a consistent finding in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), one of the most common autosomal dominant disorders in man. We present here a clinical study on the growth profile of a sample of NF1 patients collected through a population-based registry that covers three contiguous regions of North-East Italy (NEI-NF Registry). Auxometric traits of 528 NF1 patients have been measured with the aim of drawing growth charts for height, weight, and head circumference (OFC). Height velocity charts were based on a subset of 143 children who underwent multiple measurements. No differences in height were apparent between NF1 and normal subjects up to age 7 (girls) and 12 (boys) years; subsequently, the 50th centile of NF1 subjects tends to overlap with the 25th centile of normal subjects, and the 3rd centile is much lower in NF1 subjects than in normal subjects, mainly during adolescence. The negatively skewed distribution of height seems to indicate that height growth impairment affects only a proportion of NF1 subjects; height growth impairment does not seem related to disease severity. As for weight, our data suggest that slight overweight is a characteristic of adult NF1 subjects (mainly among males), independent of disease severity. Height growth velocity is normal during childhood for both sexes, whereas the pubertal spurt is slightly anticipated and reduced in NF1 boys but not in girls. Our data confirm previous observations that macrocrania affects most NF1 subjects; the shape of the head growth curve is similar in NF1 and normal girls, whereas NF1 boys present an OFC pubertal growth spurt much more pronounced and delayed than normal boys. The disproportion between OFC and height seems to be related to disease severity in boys but not in girls. Growth charts presented here can be useful in neurofibromatosis clinics for the identification of the effects of secondary growth

  6. Ultrasonic Bat Deterrent Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzie, Kevin; Rominger, Kathryn M.

    2017-12-14

    The project objective was to advance the development and testing of an Near commercial bat-deterrent system with a goal to increase the current GE deterrent system effectiveness to over 50% with broad species applicability. Additionally, the research supported by this program has provided insights into bat behavior and ultrasonic deterrent design that had not previously been explored. Prior research and development had demonstrated the effectiveness of a commercial-grade, air-powered, ultrasonic bat deterrent to be between 30-50% depending upon the species of bat. However, the previous research provided limited insight into the behavioral responses of bats in the presence of ultrasonic deterrent sound fields that could be utilized to improve effectiveness. A unique bat flight room was utilized to observe the behavioral characteristics of bats in the presence of ultrasonic sound fields. Behavioral testing in the bat flight facility demonstrated that ultrasonic sounds similar to those produced by the GE deterrent influenced the activities and behaviors, primarily those associated with foraging, of the species exposed. The study also indicated that continuous and pulsing ultrasonic signals had a similar effect on the bats, and confirmed that as ultrasonic sounds attenuate, their influence on the bats’ activities and behavior decreases. Ground testing at Wolf Ridge Wind, LLC and Shawnee National Forest assessed both continuous and pulsing deterrent signals emitted from the GE deterrent system and further enhanced the behavioral understanding of bats in the presence of the deterrent. With these data and observations, the existing 4-nozzle continuous, or steady, emission ultrasonic system was redesigned to a 6-nozzle system that could emit a pulsing signal covering a larger air space around a turbine. Twelve GE 1.6-100 turbines were outfitted with the deterrent system and a formal three-month field study was performed using daily carcass searches beneath the 12

  7. Learning about Bats and Rabies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rabies Day Rabies and Kids! Rabies Learning about bats and rabies Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... areas where they might contact people and pets. Bats and human rabies in the United States Rabies ...

  8. Insulin requirements in type 1 diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Nicoline; Ringholm, Lene; Stage, Edna

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the insulin requirements in women with type 1 diabetes during twin pregnancy compared with singleton pregnancy.......To evaluate the insulin requirements in women with type 1 diabetes during twin pregnancy compared with singleton pregnancy....

  9. Parasites of parasites of bats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haelewaters, Danny; Pfliegler, Walter P.; Szentiványi, Tamara; Földvári, Mihály; Sándor, Attila D.; Barti, Levente; Camacho, Jasmin J.; Gort, Gerrit; Estók, Péter; Hiller, Thomas; Dick, Carl W.; Pfister, Donald H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bat flies (Streblidae and Nycteribiidae) are among the most specialized families of the order Diptera. Members of these two related families have an obligate ectoparasitic lifestyle on bats, and they are known disease vectors for their hosts. However, bat flies have their own

  10. MetaBAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-04-01

    Assembling individual genomes from shotgun metagenomic sequences derived from complex microbial communities is so far one of the most challenging problems in bioinformatics. As it is impractical to directly assemble full-length genomes, a first step that groups contigs from the same organisms, called metagenome binning, has been developed to provide insights of individual organisms. However, current binning methods perform poorly in the context of large complex community, and as a result they fail to recover many novel genomes. To overcome this limitation, we developed integrated software, called MetaBAT, which automatically forms hundreds of individual genome bins from metagenome contigs. Probabilistic models of abundance and tetranucleotide frequency were trained by extensive empirical studies and integrated to decide the membership of contigs iteratively. To test the performance of MetaBAT, we applied MetaBAT to both synthetic and several large-scale real world metagenome datasets. By using two independent metrics, we demonstrate that in all the data sets tested MetaBAT achieves good sensitivity (16~87%) and very high specificity (56~99%) in forming genome bins. Further analyses of the novel genomes recovered from the human gut microbiome suggest a subset of these genomes are potentially associated with pathological conditions. In conclusion, we believe MetaBAT is a powerful tool

  11. Eating disorders in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, J.; Skinner, T. C.

    2005-01-01

    There is some debate in the literature as to whether there is an increased risk of developing eating disorders in individuals with type 1 diabetes. This review located 12 empirical studies of eating pathology in females with type 1 diabetes. Review of these papers indicates that there is no evide......There is some debate in the literature as to whether there is an increased risk of developing eating disorders in individuals with type 1 diabetes. This review located 12 empirical studies of eating pathology in females with type 1 diabetes. Review of these papers indicates...... that there is no evidence for an increase in the rates of anorexia or bulimia, in females with type 1 diabetes. However, the data do suggest that eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS) are more prevalent in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Key features of these articles are reviewed and discussed....

  12. Do bat gantries and underpasses help bats cross roads safely?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Berthinussen

    Full Text Available Major roads can reduce bat abundance and diversity over considerable distances. To mitigate against these effects and comply with environmental law, many European countries install bridges, gantries or underpasses to make roads permeable and safer to cross. However, through lack of appropriate monitoring, there is little evidence to support their effectiveness. Three underpasses and four bat gantries were investigated in northern England. Echolocation call recordings and observations were used to determine the number of bats using underpasses in preference to crossing the road above, and the height at which bats crossed. At gantries, proximity to the gantry and height of crossing bats were measured. Data were compared to those from adjacent, severed commuting routes that had no crossing structure. At one underpass 96% of bats flew through it in preference to crossing the road. This underpass was located on a pre-construction commuting route that allowed bats to pass without changing flight height or direction. At two underpasses attempts to divert bats from their original commuting routes were unsuccessful and bats crossed the road at the height of passing vehicles. Underpasses have the potential to allow bats to cross roads safely if built on pre-construction commuting routes. Bat gantries were ineffective and used by a very small proportion of bats, even up to nine years after construction. Most bats near gantries crossed roads along severed, pre-construction commuting routes at heights that put them in the path of vehicles. Crossing height was strongly correlated with verge height, suggesting that elevated verges may have some value in mitigation, but increased flight height may be at the cost of reduced permeability. Green bridges should be explored as an alternative form of mitigation. Robust monitoring is essential to assess objectively the case for mitigation and to ensure effective mitigation.

  13. BAT 3-chapter 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olatunde Akanni

    on advertisement to take products to the doorsteps of potential consumers. Consequently, local and ... ideation, encoding and presentation of visual information to target audiences in a way that breaks cultural bounds and ... BAT realises the importance of cultural attributes in ads in such a culture sensitive environment like ...

  14. Vitamin D and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    К.S. Biliaieva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data concerning the problem of vitamin D deficiency in adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1. A correlation between vitamin D deficiency and compensation of the disease is shown. The examination of adolescent patients suffering from type 1 diabetes mellitus found a connection between levels of vitamin D, duration and the degree of type 1 diabetes compensation. Further studies are focused on studying the impact and the correction of vitamin D status in children with diabetes mellitus type 1, on improving the glycemic control and quality of life of a patient.

  15. Outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte Møller; Damm, Peter; Moelsted-Pedersen, Lars

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare pregnancy outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies with the background population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This nationwide prospective multicenter study took place in eight Danish centers treating pregnant women with type 1 diabetes during 1993-...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to control the amount of sugar in the blood. Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age; however, it usually ... Insulin Antibody Test Encyclopedia: Diabetic Ketoacidosis Encyclopedia: Home Blood Sugar Testing Encyclopedia: Type 1 Diabetes Health Topic: Diabetes Medicines Health Topic: Diabetes Type ...

  17. Inferring echolocation in ancient bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Nancy B; Seymour, Kevin L; Habersetzer, Jörg; Gunnell, Gregg F

    2010-08-19

    Laryngeal echolocation, used by most living bats to form images of their surroundings and to detect and capture flying prey, is considered to be a key innovation for the evolutionary success of bats, and palaeontologists have long sought osteological correlates of echolocation that can be used to infer the behaviour of fossil bats. Veselka et al. argued that the most reliable trait indicating echolocation capabilities in bats is an articulation between the stylohyal bone (part of the hyoid apparatus that supports the throat and larynx) and the tympanic bone, which forms the floor of the middle ear. They examined the oldest and most primitive known bat, Onychonycteris finneyi (early Eocene, USA), and argued that it showed evidence of this stylohyal-tympanic articulation, from which they concluded that O. finneyi may have been capable of echolocation. We disagree with their interpretation of key fossil data and instead argue that O. finneyi was probably not an echolocating bat.

  18. Bat flight and zoonotic viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Thomas J.; Cryan, Paul M.; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Hayman, David T.S.; Luis, Angela D.; Peel, Alison J.; Plowright, Raina K.; Wood, James L.N.

    2014-01-01

    Bats are sources of high viral diversity and high-profile zoonotic viruses worldwide. Although apparently not pathogenic in their reservoir hosts, some viruses from bats severely affect other mammals, including humans. Examples include severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses, Ebola and Marburg viruses, and Nipah and Hendra viruses. Factors underlying high viral diversity in bats are the subject of speculation. We hypothesize that flight, a factor common to all bats but to no other mammals, provides an intensive selective force for coexistence with viral parasites through a daily cycle that elevates metabolism and body temperature analogous to the febrile response in other mammals. On an evolutionary scale, this host–virus interaction might have resulted in the large diversity of zoonotic viruses in bats, possibly through bat viruses adapting to be more tolerant of the fever response and less virulent to their natural hosts.

  19. The status of BAT detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Amy; Markwardt, Craig B.; Krimm, Hans Albert; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Cenko, Bradley

    2018-01-01

    We will present the current status of the Swift/BAT detector. In particular, we will report the updated detector gain calibration, the number of enable detectors, and the global bad time intervals with potential calibration issues. We will also summarize the results of the yearly BAT calibration using the Crab nebula. Finally, we will discuss the effects on the BAT survey, such as the sensitivity, localization, and spectral analysis, due to the changes in detector status.

  20. Bats, cyanide, and gold mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    Although the boom days of prospectors and gold nuggets are long gone, modern technology enables gold to continue to be extracted from ore. Unfortunately, the extraction method has often been disastrous for bats and other wildlife, an issue I first became aware of in early 1989. Phone calls from Drs. Merlin Tuttle and Elizabeth Pierson, a BCI member and bat researcher from Berkeley, California, alerted me that bats were dying from apparent cyanide poisoning at gold mines in the western United States.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: neurofibromatosis type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most people with neurofibromatosis type 1 have normal intelligence, learning disabilities and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) ... as neurofibromas can form along nerves throughout the body. It is unclear how mutations in the NF1 ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: distal arthrogryposis type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 is a disorder characterized by joint deformities (contractures) that restrict movement in the hands and feet. ... distal arthrogryposis type 1 . However, researchers speculate that contractures may be related to problems with muscle contraction ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R, Giunti P. Clinical, genetic, molecular, and pathophysiological insights into spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. Cerebellum. 2008;7( ... editing and CRISPR-Cas9? What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What is precision medicine? What is ...

  4. Liraglutide for treating type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Thomas Fremming; Frandsen, Christian Seerup; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many persons with type 1 diabetes do not achieve glycemic targets, why new treatments, complementary to insulin, are of interest. Liraglutide, a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist could be a potential pharmacological supplement to insulin. This review discusses...... the mechanism of actions, efficacy and safety of liraglutide as add-on to insulin in persons with type 1 diabetes. AREAS COVERED: Physiological and clinical data on liraglutide in type 1 diabetes were reviewed. We searched the Cochrane library, MEDLINE and EMBASE, with the final search performed February 16...... there was no clinically relevant effect on HbA1c. Adverse events were mostly transient gastrointestinal side effects, primarily nausea. Based on the available data, liraglutide cannot be recommended as add-on therapy to insulin in persons with type 1 diabetes with the aim to improve glycemic control. Ongoing trials...

  5. Maculopathy and spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebranchu, Pierre; Le Meur, Guylène; Magot, Armelle

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia is a rare heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by cerebellar symptoms, often associated with other multisystemic signs. Mild optic neuropathy has been associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), but macular dysfunction has been reported...

  6. Bat biology, genomes, and the Bat1K project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teeling, Emma C; Vernes, Sonja C; Dávalos, Liliana M

    2018-01-01

    Bats are unique among mammals, possessing some of the rarest mammalian adaptations, including true self-powered flight, laryngeal echolocation, exceptional longevity, unique immunity, contracted genomes, and vocal learning. They provide key ecosystem services, pollinating tropical plants, dispers......Bats are unique among mammals, possessing some of the rarest mammalian adaptations, including true self-powered flight, laryngeal echolocation, exceptional longevity, unique immunity, contracted genomes, and vocal learning. They provide key ecosystem services, pollinating tropical plants...... and endangered. Here we announce Bat1K, an initiative to sequence the genomes of all living bat species (n∼1,300) to chromosome-level assembly. The Bat1K genome consortium unites bat biologists (>148 members as of writing), computational scientists, conservation organizations, genome technologists, and any...... interested individuals committed to a better understanding of the genetic and evolutionary mechanisms that underlie the unique adaptations of bats. Our aim is to catalog the unique genetic diversity present in all living bats to better understand the molecular basis of their unique adaptations; uncover...

  7. Social Grooming in Bats: Are Vampire Bats Exceptional?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Carter

    Full Text Available Evidence for long-term cooperative relationships comes from several social birds and mammals. Vampire bats demonstrate cooperative social bonds, and like primates, they maintain these bonds through social grooming. It is unclear, however, to what extent vampires are special among bats in this regard. We compared social grooming rates of common vampire bats Desmodus rotundus and four other group-living bats, Artibeus jamaicensis, Carollia perspicillata, Eidolon helvum and Rousettus aegyptiacus, under the same captive conditions of fixed association and no ectoparasites. We conducted 13 focal sampling sessions for each combination of sex and species, for a total of 1560 presence/absence observations per species. We observed evidence for social grooming in all species, but social grooming rates were on average 14 times higher in vampire bats than in other species. Self-grooming rates did not differ. Vampire bats spent 3.7% of their awake time social grooming (95% CI = 1.5-6.3%, whereas bats of the other species spent 0.1-0.5% of their awake time social grooming. Together with past data, this result supports the hypothesis that the elevated social grooming rate in the vampire bat is an adaptive trait, linked to their social bonding and unique regurgitated food sharing behavior.

  8. Social Grooming in Bats: Are Vampire Bats Exceptional?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Gerald; Leffer, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Evidence for long-term cooperative relationships comes from several social birds and mammals. Vampire bats demonstrate cooperative social bonds, and like primates, they maintain these bonds through social grooming. It is unclear, however, to what extent vampires are special among bats in this regard. We compared social grooming rates of common vampire bats Desmodus rotundus and four other group-living bats, Artibeus jamaicensis, Carollia perspicillata, Eidolon helvum and Rousettus aegyptiacus, under the same captive conditions of fixed association and no ectoparasites. We conducted 13 focal sampling sessions for each combination of sex and species, for a total of 1560 presence/absence observations per species. We observed evidence for social grooming in all species, but social grooming rates were on average 14 times higher in vampire bats than in other species. Self-grooming rates did not differ. Vampire bats spent 3.7% of their awake time social grooming (95% CI = 1.5-6.3%), whereas bats of the other species spent 0.1-0.5% of their awake time social grooming. Together with past data, this result supports the hypothesis that the elevated social grooming rate in the vampire bat is an adaptive trait, linked to their social bonding and unique regurgitated food sharing behavior.

  9. Auditory Impairment in Young Type 1 Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yanlian; Xiao, Xiaoyan; Ren, Jianmin; Wang, Yajuan; Zhao, Faming

    2015-10-01

    More attention has recently been focused on auditory impairment of young type 1 diabetics. This study aimed to evaluate auditory function of young type 1 diabetics and the correlation between clinical indexes and hearing impairment. We evaluated the auditory function of 50 type 1 diabetics and 50 healthy subjects. Clinical indexes were measured along with analyzing their relation of auditory function. Type 1 diabetic patients demonstrated a deficit with elevated thresholds at right ear and left ear when compared to healthy controls (p p V and interwave I-V) and left ear (wave III, V and interwave I-III, I-V) in diabetic group significantly increased compared to those in control subjects (p p p p p <0.01). Type 1 diabetics exerted higher auditory threshold, slower auditory conduction time and cochlear impairment. HDL-cholesterol, diabetes duration, systemic blood pressure, microalbuminuria, GHbA1C, triglyceride, and age may affect the auditory function of type 1 diabetics. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The aural anatomy of bats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pye, Ade

    1970-01-01

    The fine structure of the ears of 62 species of bats from 13 families has been studied by means of serial sections. The bats were caught alive in Britain, West Indies, Panama, Central and North Africa and were intra-vitally perfused with fixative in order to obtain perfect preservation of the

  11. Adrenal incidentaloma in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tančić-Gajić Milina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Neurofibromatosis type 1 is one of the most common genetically transmitted diseases with a high index of spontaneous mutations and extremely varied and unpredictable clinical manifestations. It is diagnosed by the existence of certain clinical criteria. The presence of numerous localised cutaneous neurofibromas or a plexiform neurofibroma is virtually pathognomonic of neurofibromatosis type 1. The incidence of pheochromocytoma in neurofibromatosis type 1 is 0.1-5.7%. CASE OUTLINE A 56-year old female patient was admitted for further evaluation of incidental adrenal tumour previously diagnosed on computerized tomography (CT. She had previously unrecognized neurofibromatosis type 1 and a clinical picture which could remind of pheochromocytoma. None of the catecholamine samples in 24 hr urine indicated functionally active pheochromocytoma. Chromogranin A was moderately increased. Decision for operation was made after performing the image techniques. Adrenal incidentaloma had features of pheochromocytoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, with positive 131I-MIBG (iodine 131-labelled metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy. After being treated with phenoxybenzamine and propranolol, she was operated on. The pathohistological finding showed the case of left adrenal pheochromocytoma. CONCLUSION Detailed diagnostic procedure for pheochromocytoma should be performed with patients having neurofibromatosis type 1 and adrenal incidentaloma. Pheochromocytomas are rare tumours with fatal outcome if not duly recognized and cured.

  12. Neurofibromatosis type 1: clinical and radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, Marcos Pontes; Souza, Antonio Soares; Bertelli, Erika Cristina Pavarino; Bertollo, Eny Maria Goloni

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic disease with an incidence of approximately 1 in 3,000 people, characterized mainly by systemic and progressive involvement, manifesting by physical deformity and compromising of neurological functions. The diagnosis of the neurofibromatosis type 1 must be performed the earliest possible through clinical exams and familiar history. The use of imaging diagnosis as radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging is valuable for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up of patients and control of lesions, preventing complications. In this study we describe the clinical and radiological aspects of the neurofibromatosis type 1, considering clinical features, genetics, bone alterations in chest, vertebral column, upper and lower limbs, and craniofacial abnormalities. (author)

  13. Dehydroepiandrosterone in the type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duskova, M; Hruskovicova, H; Hill, M; Starka, L

    2012-04-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is believed to exert, besides others, positive effects on the insulin resistance or its secretion and glucose metabolism. There are several reports dealing with the DHEA levels and its effects in the type 2 diabetes mellitus, but less information is available on the type 1 diabetic subjects. Recently, a report dealing with the lack of the age-dependent decline of the DHEA levels in the type 2 diabetic subjects was published. The aim of the present study was to answer the question whether a comparable change in the aging pattern of the DHEA and its sulphate could be detected in the type 1 diabetes mellitus. The data regarding the DHEA and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) concentrations in the serum obtained from 116 patients with the type 1 diabetes mellitus and 259 controls were gathered from the database of the Institute of Endocrinology (Prague, Czech Republic). No significant differences in the level of the DHEA-S were found between the type 1 diabetics and controls either in men or women. However, lower DHEA levels were found in the type 1 diabetic women, but not in men. The age-dependent declines of both the DHEA and DHEA-S were similar to those in controls. In contrast to the type 2 diabetes, the levels of DHEA-S in the type 1 diabetic patients were practically identical with those in controls. In contrast to men, in women, the DHEA basal levels were lower than those seen in controls. The age dependence of both hormones followed the pattern of the decline in controls.

  14. Glycogenic Hepatopathy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Atmaca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycogenic hepatopathy is a rare cause of high transaminase levels in type 1 diabetes mellitus. This condition, characterized by elevated liver enzymes and hepatomegaly, is caused by irreversible and excessive accumulation of glycogen in hepatocytes. This is a case report on a 19-year-old male case, diagnosed with glycogenic hepatopathy. After the diagnosis was documented by liver biopsy, the case was put on glycemic control which led to significant decline in hepatomegaly and liver enzymes. It was emphasized that, in type 1 diabetes mellitus cases, hepatopathy should also be considered in the differential diagnoses of elevated liver enzyme and hepatomegaly.

  15. The BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Michael

    2017-08-01

    We present the Swift BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS) and discus the first four papers. The catalog represents an unprecedented census of hard-X-ray selected AGN in the local universe, with ~90% of sources at zBAT catalog, we analyze a total of 1279 optical spectra, taken from twelve different telescopes, for a total of 642 spectra of unique AGN. We present the absorption and emission line measurements as well as black hole masses and accretion rates for the majority of obscured and un-obscured AGN (473), representing more than a factor of 10 increase from past studies. Consistent with previous surveys, we find an increase in the fraction of un-obscured (type 1) AGN, as measured from broad Hbeta and Halpha, with increasing 14-195 keV and 2-10 keV luminosity. We find the FWHM of the emission lines to show broad agreement with the X-ray obscuration measurements. Compared to narrow line AGN in the SDSS, the X-ray selected AGN in our sample with emission lines have a larger fraction of dustier galaxies suggesting these types of galaxies are missed in optical AGN surveys using emission line diagnostics.

  16. Immunogenetics of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    and components of the complement system. These histological ... Children who progress to T1D have IAAs of high affinity15 and also develop GADAs concomitantly or soon after the first IAA response. Spreading of the response to. IA-2 and IA-2Я often .... Early feeding may influence the risk of type 1. (T1D) later in life.

  17. Learning Disabilities in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of specific leaning disabilities (SLD in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 was determined in a cohort of 81 patients (43 males, 38 females; mean age 11 years 6 months; age range 8-16 followed at Children's Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia.

  18. Mouse adenovirus type 1 infection of macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashley, S.L.; Welton, A.R.; Harwood, K.M.; Rooijen, van N.; Spindler, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) causes acute and persistent infections in mice, with high levels of virus found in the brain, spinal cord and spleen in acute infections. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells throughout the mouse, and monocytes/macrophages have also been implicated as targets of the virus.

  19. Early infant feeding and type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savilahti, Erkki; Saarinen, Kristiina M

    2009-06-01

    Infant feeding practices, particularly the type of milk feeding, have been associated with the development of type 1 diabetes. We studied the relationship between early infant feeding (during the first year of life) and diabetes in a large population-based cohort. In 1994-1995, 6,209 healthy full-term newborns participated in a study examining the effect of supplementary feeding, on development of allergy to cow's milk, in maternity hospitals. All supplements in the maternity hospitals were known. Mothers recorded the feeding of infants prospectively at home. In August 2006, from a nationwide diabetes registry, 45 children from our cohort were listed as having type 1 diabetes. The distribution of cases was similar in the randomized feeding groups: 9/1,789 in the group that received adapted cow's milk-based formula; 12/1,737 in those who received extensively hydrolyzed formula; 16/1,859 in those who received banked human milk; and 8 among those 824 exclusively breast-fed in the hospital. When children who had received cow's milk-based formula in the maternity hospital were compared with those without such exposure, less number of children in the former group had diabetes by age 8 (P = 0.026), but by the end of the follow-up (11.5 years) the difference disappeared (P = 0.16). Length of breast-feeding and introduction of cereals and other solid foods were similar among those developing type 1 diabetes and those remaining healthy, while early regular daily feeding with cow's milk-based formula tended to associate with lower risk for type 1 diabetes (OR 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.38-1.13; P = 0.08). In an extended, secondary analysis of a population-based cohort, very early exposure to cow's milk is not a risk factor for type 1 diabetes; it may in fact diminish its appearance before age 8.

  20. This could be the start of something big—20 years since the identification of bats as the natural host of Hendra virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Black

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hendra virus was first described in 1994 in Australia, causally associated with a cluster of fatal equine and human cases at a thoroughbred racing stable in the Brisbane suburb of Hendra. This year marks the twentieth anniversary of the identification of pteropid bats (flying-foxes as the natural host of the virus, and it is timely to reflect on a pivotal meeting of an eclectic group of scientists in that process. They included animal and public health experts, environmental scientists, veterinary and horse industry representatives, and wildlife experts. The task was to review and prioritise wildlife surveillance seeking the origin of the previously unknown virus. The group determined that the likely reservoir must occur in disparate locations, and be capable of moving between locations, or exist in continuous, overlapping populations spanning multiple locations. Flying-foxes were considered to be a more probable source of the novel virus than birds. Within weeks, antibodies were detected in several species of flying-fox, and the virus was subsequently isolated. While the identification of the natural host of Hendra virus within 18 months of its description was remarkable in itself, a broader legacy followed. In the subsequent years, a suite of zoonotic viruses including Australian bat lyssavirus, Nipah virus, SARS coronavirus, and Ebola and Marburg viruses have been detected in bats. Bats are now the “go to” taxa for novel viruses. History has repeatedly demonstrated that knowledge begets knowledge. This simple notion of bringing a diverse group of people together in an environment of mutual respect reinforced this principle and proves that the sum is often so much more powerful than the parts.

  1. This could be the start of something big-20 years since the identification of bats as the natural host of Hendra virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Peter; Douglas, Ian; Field, Hume

    2015-12-01

    Hendra virus was first described in 1994 in Australia, causally associated with a cluster of fatal equine and human cases at a thoroughbred racing stable in the Brisbane suburb of Hendra. This year marks the twentieth anniversary of the identification of pteropid bats (flying-foxes) as the natural host of the virus, and it is timely to reflect on a pivotal meeting of an eclectic group of scientists in that process. They included animal and public health experts, environmental scientists, veterinary and horse industry representatives, and wildlife experts. The task was to review and prioritise wildlife surveillance seeking the origin of the previously unknown virus. The group determined that the likely reservoir must occur in disparate locations, and be capable of moving between locations, or exist in continuous, overlapping populations spanning multiple locations. Flying-foxes were considered to be a more probable source of the novel virus than birds. Within weeks, antibodies were detected in several species of flying-fox, and the virus was subsequently isolated. While the identification of the natural host of Hendra virus within 18 months of its description was remarkable in itself, a broader legacy followed. In the subsequent years, a suite of zoonotic viruses including Australian bat lyssavirus, Nipah virus, SARS coronavirus, and Ebola and Marburg viruses have been detected in bats. Bats are now the "go to" taxa for novel viruses. History has repeatedly demonstrated that knowledge begets knowledge. This simple notion of bringing a diverse group of people together in an environment of mutual respect reinforced this principle and proves that the sum is often so much more powerful than the parts.

  2. Premarriage counseling in Type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan Priya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes is a challenging illness and needs lifelong diabetes self-care. At the same time, there is a significant stigma associated with it, especially with relation to marriage. There are concerns related to premarriage disclosure, marital relationship, ability to procreate, risk during pregnancy in women, and the risk of disease in children. In this document, we discuss the issue of disease-related stigma which may become a significant challenge for a prospective spouse and the impact of type 1 diabetes on marital relationships and procreation. We also highlight the need for premarriage counseling to ensure long-term success in achieving both individual and interpersonal well-being.

  3. Reporting Severe Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To describe potential factors influencing reporting of severe hypoglycemia in adult patients with type 1 diabetes and to analyze their effect on reported rates of severe hypoglycemia. RECENT FINDINGS: Reported rates of severe hypoglycemia defined as need for third party...... by partners report higher rates of severe hypoglycemia. There is a large variation between studies reporting incidence and prevalence of severe hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes, mainly explained by definition of severity, methods of reporting, and patient selection. These findings call...... hypoglycemia are 0.02-0.5 events per patient-year and 1-29%, respectively. When subjects with recurrent severe hypoglycemia in the past or suffering from impaired hypoglycemia awareness are excluded from participation in studies, lower rates are reported. Studies applying anonymous reporting or reporting...

  4. Genetic risk factors for type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pociot, Flemming; Lernmark, Åke

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed at the end of a prodrome of β-cell autoimmunity. The disease is most likely triggered at an early age by autoantibodies primarily directed against insulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase, or both, but rarely against islet antigen-2. After the initial appearance of one...... of the three stages can differ. Type 1 diabetes could serve as a disease model for organ-specific autoimmune disorders such as coeliac disease, thyroiditis, and Addison's disease, which show similar early markers of a prolonged disease process before clinical diagnosis....... of these autoantibody biomarkers, a second, third, or fourth autoantibody against either islet antigen-2 or the ZnT8 transporter might also appear. The larger the number of β-cell autoantibody types, the greater the risk of rapid progression to clinical onset of diabetes. This association does not necessarily mean...

  5. Erythropoietin during hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Peter Lommer; Høi-Hansen, Thomas; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Preservation of cognitive function during hypoglycaemic episodes is crucial for patients with insulin-treated diabetes to avoid severe hypoglycaemic events. Erythropoietin has neuroprotective potential. However, the role of erythropoietin during hypoglycaemia is unclear. The aim of the stud....... CONCLUSIONS: Hypoglycaemia triggers a rise in plasma erythropoietin in patients with type 1 diabetes. The response is influenced by basal RAS activity. Erythropoietin may carry a neuroprotective potential during hypoglycaemia.......AIMS: Preservation of cognitive function during hypoglycaemic episodes is crucial for patients with insulin-treated diabetes to avoid severe hypoglycaemic events. Erythropoietin has neuroprotective potential. However, the role of erythropoietin during hypoglycaemia is unclear. The aim of the study...... was to explore plasma erythropoietin response to hypoglycaemia and the relationship to basal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity and cognitive function. METHODS: We performed a single-blinded, controlled, cross-over study with induced hypoglycaemia or maintained glycaemic level. Nine patients with type 1...

  6. Birth Weight in Type 1 Diabetic Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquemyn Yves

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to investigate whether birth weight in mothers with diabetes mellitus type 1 is higher as compared to nondiabetic controls. Methods. A retrospective study was performed using an existing database covering the region of Flanders, Belgium. Data included the presence of diabetes type 1, hypertension, parity, maternal age, the use artificial reproductive technology, fetal- neonatal death, congenital anomalies, admission to a neonatal intensive care unit, and delivery by Caesarean section or vaginally. Results. In the period studied, 354 women with diabetes type 1 gave birth and were compared with 177.471 controls. Women with type 1 diabetes more often had a maternal age of over 35 years (16.7% versus 12.0%, P=.008, OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.09–1.95. They more frequently suffered hypertension in pregnancy (19.5% versus 4.7%, P<.0001, OR 4.91; 95% CI 3.73–6.44. Perinatal death was significantly higher in the diabetes mellitus group (3.05% versus 0.73%, P<.0001, OR 4.28; 95% CI 2.22–8.01. Caesarean section was performed almost 5 times as frequently in the diabetes versus the control group (OR 4.57; 95% CI 3.70–5.65. Birth weight was significantly higher in diabetic pregnant women from 33 until 38 weeks included, but those reaching 39 weeks and later were not different with control groups. Conclusion. In Belgium, diabetic pregnancy still carries a high risk for fetal and maternal complications; in general birth weight is significantly higher but for those reaching term there is no significant difference in birth weight.

  7. Aeromechanics of Highly Maneuverable Bats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swartz, S. M; Breuer, K. S

    2008-01-01

    Bats fly with astounding agility, maneuverability and efficiency. Their flight mechanics are completely different from those of insects and birds and characterized by several unique aeromechanical features including: (1...

  8. Is Batting Last an Advantage?

    OpenAIRE

    Theodore L. Turocy

    2003-01-01

    This paper applies the theory of zero-sum stochastic games to assess the validity of baseball's ancient wisdom that batting last confers a strategic advantage. Results from numerical calculation of Markov perfect equilibrium suggest that the team that bats last will have an advantage if in fact the offense has, in some sense, more useful strategic actions available than the defense. An example is provided where the advantage depends on details of the teams playing. Regardless of which team ha...

  9. Human–Bat Interactions in Rural West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anti, Priscilla; Owusu, Michael; Agbenyega, Olivia; Annan, Augustina; Badu, Ebenezer Kofi; Nkrumah, Evans Ewald; Tschapka, Marco; Oppong, Samuel; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw

    2015-01-01

    Because some bats host viruses with zoonotic potential, we investigated human–bat interactions in rural Ghana during 2011–2012. Nearly half (46.6%) of respondents regularly visited bat caves; 37.4% had been bitten, scratched, or exposed to bat urine; and 45.6% ate bat meat. Human–bat interactions in rural Ghana are frequent and diverse. PMID:26177344

  10. Human-Bat Interactions in Rural West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anti, Priscilla; Owusu, Michael; Agbenyega, Olivia; Annan, Augustina; Badu, Ebenezer Kofi; Nkrumah, Evans Ewald; Tschapka, Marco; Oppong, Samuel; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Drosten, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Because some bats host viruses with zoonotic potential, we investigated human-bat interactions in rural Ghana during 2011-2012. Nearly half (46.6%) of respondents regularly visited bat caves; 37.4% had been bitten, scratched, or exposed to bat urine; and 45.6% ate bat meat. Human-bat interactions in rural Ghana are frequent and diverse.

  11. Bat Hunting and Bat-Human Interactions in Bangladeshi Villages: Implications for Zoonotic Disease Transmission and Bat Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, J J; Hegde, S; Sazzad, H M S; Khan, S U; Hossain, M J; Epstein, J H; Daszak, P; Gurley, E S; Luby, S P

    2017-08-01

    Bats are an important reservoir for emerging zoonotic pathogens. Close human-bat interactions, including the sharing of living spaces and hunting and butchering of bats for food and medicines, may lead to spillover of zoonotic disease into human populations. We used bat exposure and environmental data gathered from 207 Bangladeshi villages to characterize bat exposures and hunting in Bangladesh. Eleven percent of households reported having a bat roost near their homes, 65% reported seeing bats flying over their households at dusk, and 31% reported seeing bats inside their compounds or courtyard areas. Twenty percent of households reported that members had at least daily exposure to bats. Bat hunting occurred in 49% of the villages surveyed and was more likely to occur in households that reported nearby bat roosts (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.9) and villages located in north-west (aPR 7.5, 95% CI 2.5-23.0) and south-west (aPR 6.8, 95% CI 2.1-21.6) regions. Our results suggest high exposure to bats and widespread hunting throughout Bangladesh. This has implications for both zoonotic disease spillover and bat conservation. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Prompt Emission Observations of Swift BAT Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmy, Scott

    2009-01-01

    We review the prompt emission properties of Swift BAT gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We present the global properties of BAT GRBs based on their spectral and temporal characteristics. The BAT T90 and T50 durations peak at 80 and 20 s, respectively. The peak energy (Epeak) of about 60% of BAT GRBs is very likely to be less than 1.00 keV. We also present the BAT characteristics of GRBs with soft spectra, so called Xray flashes (XRFs). We will compare the BAT GRBs and XRFs parameter distribution to the other missions.

  13. Genetics of Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friday, R P; Trucco, M; Pietropaolo, M

    1999-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is the archetypal example of a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterised by selective destruction of a single cell type: the insulin-producing beta-cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. The pathogenic equation for IDDM presents a complex interrelation of genetic and environmental factors, most of which have yet to be identified. Based on the observed familial aggregation of IDDM, it is certain that there is a decided heritable genetic susceptibility for developing autoimmune diabetes. The well-known association of IDDM with certain human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) was a major step toward understanding the role of inheritance in IDDM. Landmark molecular biological investigations of diabetes HLA susceptibility genes provided great potential for insights into the molecular basis for the autoimmune nature of the disease, beginning a story that continues to unfold. Although the association of certain HLA alleles with IDDM is very strong, this genetic locus is estimated to account for less than 50% of genetic contributions to disease susceptibility. The search for non-HLA susceptibility genes has received great attention in recent years. Albeit genome wide searches are wrought with controversy, such studies have suggested the association of numerous non-MHC loci with Type 1 diabetes that will require careful follow-up investigation. Cell biological and genetic functional analyses will provide clues that are indispensable for further progress. The necessary studies include research on immunological abnormalities that are present many years before the clinical onset of Type 1 diabetes.

  14. BGD: a database of bat genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfei Fang

    Full Text Available Bats account for ~20% of mammalian species, and are the only mammals with true powered flight. For the sake of their specialized phenotypic traits, many researches have been devoted to examine the evolution of bats. Until now, some whole genome sequences of bats have been assembled and annotated, however, a uniform resource for the annotated bat genomes is still unavailable. To make the extensive data associated with the bat genomes accessible to the general biological communities, we established a Bat Genome Database (BGD. BGD is an open-access, web-available portal that integrates available data of bat genomes and genes. It hosts data from six bat species, including two megabats and four microbats. Users can query the gene annotations using efficient searching engine, and it offers browsable tracks of bat genomes. Furthermore, an easy-to-use phylogenetic analysis tool was also provided to facilitate online phylogeny study of genes. To the best of our knowledge, BGD is the first database of bat genomes. It will extend our understanding of the bat evolution and be advantageous to the bat sequences analysis. BGD is freely available at: http://donglab.ecnu.edu.cn/databases/BatGenome/.

  15. BGD: a database of bat genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jianfei; Wang, Xuan; Mu, Shuo; Zhang, Shuyi; Dong, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Bats account for ~20% of mammalian species, and are the only mammals with true powered flight. For the sake of their specialized phenotypic traits, many researches have been devoted to examine the evolution of bats. Until now, some whole genome sequences of bats have been assembled and annotated, however, a uniform resource for the annotated bat genomes is still unavailable. To make the extensive data associated with the bat genomes accessible to the general biological communities, we established a Bat Genome Database (BGD). BGD is an open-access, web-available portal that integrates available data of bat genomes and genes. It hosts data from six bat species, including two megabats and four microbats. Users can query the gene annotations using efficient searching engine, and it offers browsable tracks of bat genomes. Furthermore, an easy-to-use phylogenetic analysis tool was also provided to facilitate online phylogeny study of genes. To the best of our knowledge, BGD is the first database of bat genomes. It will extend our understanding of the bat evolution and be advantageous to the bat sequences analysis. BGD is freely available at: http://donglab.ecnu.edu.cn/databases/BatGenome/.

  16. The Kinetics of Swinging a Baseball Bat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisco, Joseph J; Osvalds, Nikolas J; Rainbow, Michael J

    2018-04-13

    The purpose of this study was to compute the three-dimensional kinetics required to swing three youth baseball bats of varying moments of inertia (MOI). 306 swings by 22 male players (13-18 yrs.) were analyzed. Inverse dynamics with respect to the batter's hands were computed given the known kinematics and physical properties of the bats. We found that peak force increased with larger bat MOI and was strongly correlated with bat tip speed. In contrast, peak moments were weakly correlated with bat MOI and bat tip speed. Throughout the swing, the force applied to the bat was dominated by a component aligned with the long axis of the bat and directed away from the bat knob, while the moment applied to the bat was minimal until just prior to ball impact. These results indicate that players act to mostly "pull" the bat during their swing until just prior to ball impact, at which point they rapidly increase the moment on the bat. This kinetic analysis provides novel insight into the forces and moments used to swing baseball bats.

  17. Therapeutic perspectives in type-1 diabetes

    CERN Document Server

    SINGH, PRACHI; TUPALLY, KARNAKER R; PODDAR, KINGSHUK; Tan, Aaron; VENKATESAN, VENKY; PAREKH, HARENDRA S; PASTORIN, GIORGIA

    2016-01-01

    This book provides critical insights into and appraisals of recent breakthroughs in type 1 diabetes modulation, with a particular emphasis on the potential impact of current prevention and treatment strategies. It also discusses recent successes and failures in clinical trials. Presenting an comprehensive overview of the disease, it is especially useful for newcomers in the field. It also includes illustrations, which make it easy for the reader to grasp the basic concepts involved. Furthermore, the tables include concise and easy-to-understand information on current clinical trials.

  18. Insulinbehandling af voksne med type 1-diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2015-01-01

    treatment can be delivered with insulin pumps. Adjustments of insulin dosing can be rationally based on dosing algorithms. This requires frequent glucose measurements and knowledge about dietary carbohydrate content. Today, the treatment and its complexity are individualized according to needs and wishes......Whereas insulin treatment of type 1 diabetes formerly was limited by the availability of one or a few types of insulin with suboptimal pharmacokinetic properties, insulin analogues with more fitting physiological action profiles have now been developed and ultimately near-physiological insulin...

  19. Why is type 1 diabetes increasing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egro, Francesco Maria

    2013-01-01

    A series of studies have reported a constant global rise in the incidence of type 1 diabetes. Epidemiological and immunological studies have demonstrated that environmental factors may influence the pathogenesis, leading to a cell-mediated pancreatic β-cell destruction associated with humoral immunity. The search for the triggering factor(s) has been going on for the past century, and yet they are still unknown. This review provides an overview of some of the most well-known theories found in the literature: hygiene, viral, vitamin D deficiency, breast milk and cow's milk hypotheses. Although the hygiene hypothesis appears to be the most promising, positive evidence from animal, human and epidemiological studies precludes us from completely discarding any of the other hypotheses. Moreover, due to contrasting evidence in the literature, a single factor is unlikely to cause an increase in the incidence of diabetes all over the world, which suggests that a multifactorial process might be involved. Although the immunological mechanisms are still unclear, there seems to be some overlap between the various hypotheses. It is thought that the emphasis should be shifted from a single to a multifactorial process and that perhaps the 'balance shift' model should be considered as a possible explanation for the rise in the incidence of type 1 diabetes.

  20. [Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Lado, C; Landín-Iglesias, G; Pintos-Martínez, E; Pastor-Benavent, N; Eirís-Puñal, J; Castro-Gago, M

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasias constitute a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders of uncertain aetiopathogenesis. They have been reported as being associated with deficiencies of complexes in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) and with congenital disorders of glycosylation. On the basis of clinical and neuropathological criteria, two phenotypes can be distinguished in this condition. Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1 is characterised by hypoplasia of the pons and the cerebellum associated with the degeneration of the motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord. A 4-year-old female with symptoms of severe psychomotor retardation associated with microcephaly, important generalised hypotonia, muscle hypotrophy, contractions in the four limbs, absence of stretch reflex and epilepsy with onset in the neonatal period. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed pontocerebellar hypoplasia. An electroneuromyography showed a trace that was compatible with axonal neuropathy and a biopsy of the deltoid muscle revealed the existence of neurogenic muscular atrophy. In the MRC study conducted in muscle homogenate and in skin fibroblasts, complex IV values were found to be at the lower limits of what could be considered to be normal levels. Results of the genetic study for spinal muscular atrophy were negative. The case reported here could be included as a case of pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1. MRC studies can be of interest in cases of pontocerebellar hypoplasia in order to explain the role it plays in this disorder.

  1. Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetic Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Simon; Damm, Peter; Mersebach, Henriette; Skjøth, Trine Vang; Kaaja, Risto; Hod, Moshe; Durán-García, Santiago; McCance, David; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A recent randomized trial compared prandial insulin aspart (IAsp) with human insulin in type 1 diabetic pregnancy. The aim of this exploratory analysis was to investigate the incidence of severe hypoglycemia during pregnancy and compare women enrolled preconception with women enrolled during early pregnancy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS IAsp administered immediately before each meal was compared with human insulin administered 30 min before each meal in 99 subjects (44 to IAsp and 55 to human insulin) randomly assigned preconception and in 223 subjects (113 for IAsp and 110 for human insulin) randomly assigned in early pregnancy (IAsp versus human insulin were 0.9 versus 2.4, 0.9 versus 2.4, 0.3 versus 1.2, and 0.2 versus 2.2 episodes per patient per year, respectively (NS). CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that initiation of insulin analog treatment preconception rather than during early pregnancy may result in a lower risk of severe hypoglycemia in women with type 1 diabetes. PMID:20007944

  2. Neurofibromatosis type 1: brain stem tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilaniuk, L.T.; Molloy, P.T.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Phillips, P.C.; Vaughan, S.N.; Liu, G.T.; Sutton, L.N.; Needle, M.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the clinical and imaging findings of brain stem tumours in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The NF1 patients imaged between January 1984 and January 1996 were reviewed and 25 patients were identified with a brain stem tumour. Clinical, radiographical and pathological results were obtained by review of records and images. Brain stem tumour identification occurred much later than the clinical diagnosis of NF1. Medullary enlargement was most frequent (68 %), followed by pontine (52 %) and midbrain enlargement (44 %). Patients were further subdivided into those with diffuse (12 patients) and those with focal (13 patients) tumours. Treatment for hydrocephalus was required in 67 % of the first group and only 15 % of the second group. Surgery was performed in four patients and revealed fibrillary astrocytomas, one of which progressed to an anaplastic astrocytoma. In 40 % of patients both brain stem and optic pathway tumours were present. The biological behaviour of brain stem tumours in NF1 is unknown. Diffuse tumours in the patients with NF1 appear to have a much more favourable prognosis than patients with similar tumours without neurofibromatosis type 1. (orig.). With 7 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Teenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, David; Doyle, Aoife; Firth, Richard G R; Byrne, Maria M; Daly, Sean; Mc Auliffe, Fionnuala; Foley, Micheal; Coulter-Smith, Samuel; Kinsley, Brendan T

    2010-03-01

    Younger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  4. Bat study in the Kharaa region, Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariunbold Jargalsaikhan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Our study objectives were to determine bat species composition and to study the genetic variations and sound characteristics in bats of the Kharaa, Shatan, and Ulgii areas of Mongolia. This study is the first bat survey in this area. Nineteen species were from Mongolia. Six bat species belonged to three genera. We performed mitochondrial DNA sequencing of Myotis bombinus, Myotis gracilis, and Myotis petax to confirm the morphological identification of these species. We also determined the sound frequencies of the six bat species, based on their echolocation calls. The conservation status was determined using World Conservation Union red list categories and criteria. Sixteen bats from three species were ringed during this study and three artificial boxes were placed on trees in the Kharaa River Valley. Other than the northern bat, all species were eastern Palearctic. The northern bat (Eptesicus nilssonii species is widespread in the northern Palearctic region.

  5. The evolution of echolocation in bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth; Teeling, Emma C

    2006-03-01

    Recent molecular phylogenies have changed our perspective on the evolution of echolocation in bats. These phylogenies suggest that certain bats with sophisticated echolocation (e.g. horseshoe bats) share a common ancestry with non-echolocating bats (e.g. Old World fruit bats). One interpretation of these trees presumes that laryngeal echolocation (calls produced in the larynx) probably evolved in the ancestor of all extant bats. Echolocation might have subsequently been lost in Old World fruit bats, only to evolve secondarily (by tongue clicking) in this family. Remarkable acoustic features such as Doppler shift compensation, whispering echolocation and nasal emission of sound each show multiple convergent origins in bats. The extensive adaptive radiation in echolocation call design is shaped largely by ecology, showing how perceptual challenges imposed by the environment can often override phylogenetic constraints.

  6. Swing Weights of Baseball and Softball Bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Baseball and softball bats are sold according to length in inches and weight in ounces. Much to the consternation of players buying new bats, however, not all bats that weigh the same swing the same. The reason for this has to do with moment of inertia of the bat about a pivot point on the handle, or what the sporting goods industry refers to as…

  7. Genetics Home Reference: leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 is a disorder that ...

  8. Pregnancy in women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colstrup, Miriam; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Damm, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In 1989 the St. Vincent declaration set a five-year target for approximating outcomes of pregnancies in women with diabetes to those of the background population. We investigated and quantified the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes (T1DM...... outcomes was two to five times increased in women with T1DM compared with the general population. The goals of the St. Vincent declaration have not been achieved.......) to evaluate if the goals of the 1989 St. Vincent Declaration have been obtained concerning foetal and neonatal complications. Methods: Twelve population-based studies published within the last 10 years with in total 14 099 women with T1DM and 4 035 373 women from the background population were identified...

  9. Research progress of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-wei ZHANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 is a kind of autosomal dominant genetic neurodegenerative disorder. To date, the pathogenesis of SCA1 remains unclear. Studies in numerous SCA1 experimental models, including transgenic mice, transgenic drosophila and induced pluripotent stem cells, have shown that phosphorylation of S776 in mutant ataxin-1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin-proteasome system and down-regulation of several components of RAS-MAPK-MSK1 pathway may involve in the pathogenesis of SCA1. In this review, the clinical and pathological features of SCA1, and the latest advances of pathogenesis, model systems and therapeutic exploration will be briefly summarized. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.017

  10. The intestinal microbiome in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, J L; Triplett, E W; Gevers, D; Xavier, R; Insel, R; Danska, J; Atkinson, M A

    2014-07-01

    Few concepts in recent years have garnered more disease research attention than that of the intestinal (i.e. 'gut') microbiome. This emerging interest has included investigations of the microbiome's role in the pathogenesis of a variety of autoimmune disorders, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Indeed, a growing number of recent studies of patients with T1D or at varying levels of risk for this disease, as well as in animal models of the disorder, lend increasing support to the notion that alterations in the microbiome precede T1D onset. Herein, we review these investigations, examining the mechanisms by which the microbiome may influence T1D development and explore how multi-disciplinary analysis of the microbiome and the host immune response may provide novel biomarkers and therapeutic options for prevention of T1D. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  11. Metformin in adults with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrie, John R; Chaturvedi, Nish; Ford, Ian

    2017-01-01

    but there are no data on its cardiovascular effects. We have therefore initiated an international double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (REMOVAL: REducing with MetfOrmin Vascular Adverse Lesions in type 1 diabetes) to examine whether metformin reduces progression of atherosclerosis in adults with T1D...... are randomized to metformin or matching placebo for 3 years with insulin titrated towards HbA1c 7.0% (53 mmol/mol). The primary endpoint is progression of averaged mean far wall common carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) measured by ultrasonography at baseline, 12, 24 and 36 months. This design provides 90...... of hypoglycaemia. CONCLUSION: REMOVAL is the largest clinical trial of adjunct metformin therapy in T1D to date and will provide clinically meaningful information on its potential to impact CV disease and other complications....

  12. Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nete M; Westergaard, Tine; Frisch, Morten

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) and multiple sclerosis (MS) contribute considerably to the burden of autoimmune diseases in young adults. Although HLA patterns of T1D and MS are considered mutually exclusive, individual and familial co-occurrence of the 2 diseases has been reported...... Multiple Sclerosis Register were used to identify patients with T1D, defined as patients in whom diabetes was diagnosed before age 20 years (N = 6078), and patients with MS (N = 11 862). First-degree relatives (N = 14,771) of patients with MS were identified from family information in the Danish Civil....... OBJECTIVE: To assess the co-occurrence of T1D and MS by estimating the risk for MS in patients with T1D and the risk for T1D in first-degree relatives of patients with MS. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Two population-based disease registers, the Danish Hospital Discharge Register and the Danish...

  13. Emerging adulthood and Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallis, M; Willaing, I; Holt, R I G

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: To compare clinical, psychological, education and social variables in emerging adults (aged 18-30 years) with Type 1 diabetes with their adult counterparts aged >30 years. METHODS: A single assessment multinational sample was surveyed as part of the larger second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes...... experience and family support) and diabetes education factors. RESULTS: Emerging adults differed from adults aged >30 years with regard to a number of psychosocial variables. Emerging adults reported better overall quality of life, social support and support from their healthcare team compared with adults...... aged >30 years of age; however, emerging adults experienced greater diabetes-specific distress and were less engaged in self-management. Diabetes education was related to a number of indicators, while experience of discrimination was harmful, but these impacts did not differ between emerging adults...

  14. Type 1 neurofibromatosis with periodontal manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 also known as von Recklinghausen's disease is an autosomal dominant disease transmitted with a high degree of penetrance. The disease is expressed in different forms. NF1 accounts for almost 90% of the cases although nine types have been described to date. We report one such case of a 36-year-old female who presented with multiple nodules on the body. He was diagnosed to have NF1, having satisfied the diagnostic criteria for the same. Oral manifestations can be found in almost 72% of NF1 patients. This case report highlights the clinical features and diagnostic criteria of NF1, the prevalence and the significance of intraoral neurofibromas and the need for the dental practitioner to be aware of this condition.

  15. Type 1 diabetes care updates: Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandi Catherine Muze

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tanzania is located in east Africa with a population of 45 million. The country′s population is growing at 2.5% annually. The International Diabetes Federation Child Sponsorship Program was launched in Tanzania in 2005. The number of type 1 diabetes mellitus children enrolled in the changing diabetes in children program in Tanzania has augmented from almost below 50 in 2005 to over 1200 in 2014. The country had an overall trend of HbA1c value of 14% in 2005 while the same has reduced over the years to 10% in 2012-13. The program has been able to reduce the proportion of patients with HbA1c values of 11-14%; from 71.9% in 2008 to 49.8% in 2012-13. The challenges, which CDiC faces are misdiagnosis, low public awareness, and stigma especially in the reproductive age/adolescent groups.

  16. Gut Microbiota and Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Han

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D has increased rapidly and became a major public health concern worldwide. Various factors are associated with the development of T1D, such as diet, genome, and intestinal microbiota. The gastrointestinal (GI tract harbors a complex and dynamic population of microorganisms, the gut microbiota, which exert a marked influence on the host homeostasis and metabolic diseases. Recent evidence shows that altered gut bacterial composition (dysbiosis is highly associated with the pathogenesis of insulin dysfunction and T1D and, thus, targeting gut microbiota may serve as a therapeutic potential for T1D patients. In this study, we updated the effect of gut microbiota on T1D and potential mechanisms were discussed.

  17. Bats as bushmeat in Madagascar | Jenkins | Madagascar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bats are eaten by people throughout Madagascar and although the larger species like Pteropus rufus, Eidolon dupreanum, Rousettus madagascariensis and Hipposideros commersoni are preferred, small insectivorous bats are also eaten. The national hunting season for bats is widely ignored and both unsuitable

  18. Coccidioides posadasii infection in bats, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; e Silva, Kylvia Rocha de Castro; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Moura, Francisco Bergson Pinheiro; Duarte, Naylê Francelino Holanda; Marques, Francisca Jakelyne de Farias; Cordeiro, Rebecca de Aguiar; Filho, Renato Evando Moreira; de Araújo, Roberto Wagner Bezerra; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2012-04-01

    To analyze the eco-epidemiologic aspects of Histoplasma capsulatum in Brazil, we tested 83 bats for this fungus. Although H. capsulatum was not isolated, Coccidioides posadasii was recovered from Carollia perspicillata bat lungs. Immunologic studies detected coccidioidal antibodies and antigens in Glossophaga soricina and Desmodus rotundus bats.

  19. Coccidioides posadasii Infection in Bats, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Rocha de Castro e Silva, Kylvia; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Moura, Francisco Bergson Pinheiro; Duarte, Naylê Francelino Holanda; Marques, Francisca Jakelyne de Farias; Cordeiro, Rebecca de Aguiar; Filho, Renato Evando Moreira; Bezerra de Araújo, Roberto Wagner; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the eco-epidemiologic aspects of Histoplasma capsulatum in Brazil, we tested 83 bats for this fungus. Although H. capsulatum was not isolated, Coccidioides posadasii was recovered from Carollia perspicillata bat lungs. Immunologic studies detected coccidioidal antibodies and antigens in Glossophaga soricina and Desmodus rotundus bats.

  20. Teenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carmody, David

    2010-03-01

    Younger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p < 0.02). Glycaemic was worse in TG compared to CON at 13, 26 and 35 weeks gestation, despite higher insulin doses. First trimester miscarriage rate did not differ between groups. Major congenital anomaly rate was 6.2% (1\\/16) compared to 3.2% in CON. This preliminary study has demonstrated that pregnant teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  1. A perspective on bats (Chiroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brock Fenton

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available With over 130 species, bats are the most diverse group of mammals almost everywhere in sub-Saharan Africa. Since 2000, two books (Monadjem et al. 2010; Taylor 2000 have made it much easier to appreciate this reality. Species previously unrecognised are frequent discoveries (e.g. Taylor et al. 2012. Whilst most species are mainly insectivorous, some rely more directly on plants, taking fruit and visiting flowers to obtain nectar and pollen. The combination of mobility, long lifespan and diversity of trophic roles makes bats potentially valuable as indicators of ecosystem health (Cumming & Spiesman 2006. Lack of detailed information, however, makes it easy to overlook bats when focusing on issues of conservation.

  2. A perspective on bats (Chiroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brock Fenton

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available With over 130 species, bats are the most diverse group of mammals almost everywhere in sub-Saharan Africa. Since 2000, two books (Monadjem et al. 2010; Taylor 2000 have made it much easier to appreciate this reality. Species previously unrecognised are frequent discoveries (e.g. Taylor et al. 2012. Whilst most species are mainly insectivorous, some rely more directly on plants, taking fruit and visiting flowers to obtain nectar and pollen. The combination of mobility, long lifespan and diversity of trophic roles makes bats potentially valuable as indicators of ecosystem health (Cumming & Spiesman 2006. Lack of detailed information, however, makes it easy to overlook bats when focusing on issues of conservation.

  3. Intensity and directionality of bat echolocation signals

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Brinkl?v, Signe; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    The paper reviews current knowledge of intensity and directionality of bat echolocation signals. Recent studies have revealed that echolocating bats can be much louder than previously believed. Bats previously dubbed “whispering” can emit calls with source levels up to 110 dB SPL at 10 cm and the louder open space hunting bats have been recorded at above 135 dB SPL. This implies that maximum emitted intensities are generally 30 dB or more above initial estimates. Bats' dynamic control of acou...

  4. Obesity and type 1 diabetes mellitus management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillarón, J J; Benaiges, D; Mañé, L; Pedro-Botet, J; Flores Le-Roux, J A

    2015-03-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) traditionally had a low body mass index and microangiopathic complications were common. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, published in 1993, demonstrated that therapy aimed at maintaining HbA1c levels as close to normal as feasible reduced the incidence of microangiopathy. Since then, the use of intensive insulin therapy to optimise metabolic control became generalised, with two main side effects: a higher rate of severe hypoglycaemia and increased weight gain. Approximately 50% of patients with T1DM are currently obese or overweight, which reduces or nullifies the benefits of good metabolic control, and which has other negative consequences; therefore, strategies to achieve weight control in patients with T1DM are necessary. At present, treatment with GLP-1 and SGLT-2 inhibitors has yielded promising short-term results that need to be confirmed in studies with larger numbers of patients and long-term follow-up. It is possible that, in coming years, the applicability of bariatric surgery in obese patients with T1DM will be similar to that of the general population or T2DM.

  5. Lung parenchima changes in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilić, Aleksandra; Raljević, Snezana; Adzić, Tatjana; Vesna Skodrić-Trifunović; Stanimirović, Jelena

    2016-02-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), also known as von Recklinghausen disease, is one of the most common single-gene disorders (mutation on chromosome 17q) and usually associated with cutaneous, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders in humans. NF1 is generally complicated with one or more neurobehavioral disorders or tumors located in the peripheral nervous system such as neurofibromas, peripheral nerve sheath tumor, pheochromocytoma, etc. In the available medical literature, the thoracic manifestations of NF1 have been rarely described in these patients. There are few reports about intrathoracic neurogenic tumors, kyphoscoliosis, pneu- monitis and pulmonary fibrosis in patients with NF1. A 65-year-old female was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit at the Lung Clinic of Belgrade University Clinical Center of Serbia. The patient's general condition was poor with shortness of breath and present cyanosis. At the same time, the skin changes similar to NF1 were noticed, which were additionally documented by her medical history and diagnosed as NF1. After the application of noninvasive mechanical ventilation and other emergency respiratory medicine measures, the patient soon felt better. The parenchymal changes were viewed by subsequent X-rays and CT scanning of the thorax. This is a case report presenting the NF1 associated with the abnormality of lung parenchyma established during diagnostic procedures at the Intensive Care Unit, Clinic of Pulmonology.

  6. [Learning disorders in neurofibromatosis type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Penas, J J

    2017-02-24

    Neurocognitive deficits and academic learning difficulties are the most common neurologic complication of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in childhood and can be responsible for significant lifetime morbidity. Children with NF1 show impairments in attention, visual perception, language, executive function, academic skills, and behavior. Studies in animal models suggest that the learning disabilities associated with NF1 are caused by excessive Ras activity that leads to increased gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibition and to decreased long-term potentiation. To describe the frequency, severity, typology, and natural course of specific cognitive deficits in children with NF1. Cognitive and behavioral disorders affect between 50-80% of all children with NF1. We can define three subtypes of cognitive profiles in children with NF1 and learning disorder, including global learning disorder, specific learning disorder, and isolated attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The most common cognitive deficits are connected with visual-spatial impairment, however working memory and executive function deficits associated with prefrontal cortex dysfunction are also important. There is an extremely high frequency of cognitive problems in children with NF1, making cognitive dysfunction the most common complication to affect quality of life in these children. Early diagnosis and treatment of learning disorders in these patients leads to improved academic outcome.

  7. Type 1 diabetes guidelines: Are they enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Abdul Zargar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of insulin by Banting and Best in 1922 changed the landscape of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Guidelines on T1DM should be evidence based and should emphasize comprehensive risk management. Guidelines would improve awareness amongst governments, state health care providers and the general public about the serious long-term implications of poorly managed diabetes and of the essential resources needed for optimal care. T1DM requires lifelong daily medication, regular control as well as access to facilities to manage acute and chronic complications. American Diabetes Association 2014 guidelines recommends annual nephropathy screening for albumin levels; random spot urine sample for albumin-to-creatinine ratio at start of puberty or age ≥10 years, whichever is earlier, once the child has had diabetes for 5 years. Hypertension should be screened for in T1DM patients by measuring blood pressure at each routine visit. Dyslipidemia in T1DM patients is important and patients should be screened if there is a family history of hypercholesterolemia or a cardiovascular event before the age of 55 years exists or if family history is unknown. Retinopathy is another important complication of diabetes and patients should be subjected to an initial dilated and comprehensive eye examination. Basic diabetes training should be provided for school staff, and they should be assigned with responsibilities for the care of diabetic children. Self-management should be allowed at all school settings for students.

  8. Lung parenchima changes in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, also known as von Recklinghausen disease, is one of the most common single-gene disorders (mutation on chromosome 17q and usually associated with cutaneous, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders in humans. NF1 is generally complicated with one or more neurobehavioral disorders or tumors located in the peripheral nervous system such as neurofibromas, peripheral nerve sheath tumor, pheochromocytoma, etc. In the available medical literature, the thoracic manifestations of NF1 have been rarely described in these patients. There are few reports about intrathoracic neurogenic tumors, kyphoscoliosis, pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis in patients with NF1. Case report. A 65-year-old female was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit at the Lung Clinic of Belgrade University Clinical Center of Serbia. The patient’s general condition was poor with shortness of breath and present cyanosis. At the same time, the skin changes similar to NF1 were noticed, which were additionally documented by her medical history and diagnosed as NF1. After the application of noninvasive mechanical ventilation and other emergency respiratory medicine measures, the patient soon felt better. The parenchymal changes were viewed by subsequent X-rays and CT scanning of the thorax. Conclusion. This is a case report presenting the NF1 associated with the abnormality of lung parenchyma established during diagnostic procedures at the Intensive Care Unit, Clinic of Pulmonology.

  9. The Genetic Architecture of Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T Jerram

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D is classically characterised by the clinical need for insulin, the presence of disease-associated serum autoantibodies, and an onset in childhood. The disease, as with other autoimmune diseases, is due to the interaction of genetic and non-genetic effects, which induce a destructive process damaging insulin-secreting cells. In this review, we focus on the nature of this interaction, and how our understanding of that gene–environment interaction has changed our understanding of the nature of the disease. We discuss the early onset of the disease, the development of distinct immunogenotypes, and the declining heritability with increasing age at diagnosis. Whilst Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA have a major role in causing T1D, we note that some of these HLA genes have a protective role, especially in children, whilst other non-HLA genes are also important. In adult-onset T1D, the disease is often not insulin-dependent at diagnosis, and has a dissimilar immunogenotype with reduced genetic predisposition. Finally, we discuss the putative nature of the non-genetic factors and how they might interact with genetic susceptibility, including preliminary studies of the epigenome associated with T1D.

  10. Celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camarca Maria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac Disease (CD occurs in patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D ranging the prevalence of 4.4-11.1% versus 0.5% of the general population. The mechanism of association of these two diseases involves a shared genetic background: HLA genotype DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8 are strongly associated with T1D, DR3-DQ2 with CD. The classical severe presentation of CD rarely occurs in T1D patients, but more often patients have few/mild symptoms of CD or are completely asymptomatic (silent CD. In fact diagnosis of CD is regularly performed by means of the screening in T1D patients. The effects of gluten-free diet (GFD on the growth and T1D metabolic control in CD/T1D patient are controversial. Regarding of the GFD composition, there is a debate on the higher glycaemic index of gluten-free foods respect to gluten-containing foods; furthermore GFD could be poorer of fibers and richer of fat. The adherence to GFD by children with CD-T1D has been reported generally below 50%, lower respect to the 73% of CD patients, a lower compliance being more frequent among asymptomatic patients. The more severe problems of GFD adherence usually occur during adolescence when in GFD non compliant subjects the lowest quality of life is reported. A psychological and educational support should be provided for these patients.

  11. How do tiger moths jam bat sonar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Aaron J; Barber, Jesse R; Hristov, Nickolay I; Conner, William E

    2011-07-15

    The tiger moth Bertholdia trigona is the only animal in nature known to defend itself by jamming the sonar of its predators - bats. In this study we analyzed the three-dimensional flight paths and echolocation behavior of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) attacking B. trigona in a flight room over seven consecutive nights to determine the acoustic mechanism of the sonar-jamming defense. Three mechanisms have been proposed: (1) the phantom echo hypothesis, which states that bats misinterpret moth clicks as echoes; (2) the ranging interference hypothesis, which states that moth clicks degrade the bats' precision in determining target distance; and (3) the masking hypothesis, which states that moth clicks mask the moth echoes entirely, making the moth temporarily invisible. On nights one and two of the experiment, the bats appeared startled by the clicks; however, on nights three through seven, the bats frequently missed their prey by a distance predicted by the ranging interference hypothesis (∼15-20 cm). Three-dimensional simulations show that bats did not avoid phantom targets, and the bats' ability to track clicking prey contradicts the predictions of the masking hypothesis. The moth clicks also forced the bats to reverse their stereotyped pattern of echolocation emissions during attack, even while bats continued pursuit of the moths. This likely further hinders the bats' ability to track prey. These results have implications for the evolution of sonar jamming in tiger moths, and we suggest evolutionary pathways by which sonar jamming may have evolved from other tiger moth defense mechanisms.

  12. BAT-BORNE RABIES IN LATIN AMERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Escobar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The situation of rabies in America is complex: rabies in dogs has decreased dramatically, but bats are increasingly recognized as natural reservoirs of other rabies variants. Here, bat species known to be rabies-positive with different antigenic variants, are summarized in relation to bat conservation status across Latin America. Rabies virus is widespread in Latin American bat species, 22.5%75 of bat species have been confirmed as rabies-positive. Most bat species found rabies positive are classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as “Least Concern”. According to diet type, insectivorous bats had the most species known as rabies reservoirs, while in proportion hematophagous bats were the most important. Research at coarse spatial scales must strive to understand rabies ecology; basic information on distribution and population dynamics of many Latin American and Caribbean bat species is needed; and detailed information on effects of landscape change in driving bat-borne rabies outbreaks remains unassessed. Finally, integrated approaches including public health, ecology, and conservation biology are needed to understand and prevent emergent diseases in bats.

  13. Intensity and directionality of bat echolocation signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Brinkløv, Signe; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    The paper reviews current knowledge of intensity and directionality of bat echolocation signals. Recent studies have revealed that echolocating bats can be much louder than previously believed. Bats previously dubbed "whispering" can emit calls with source levels up to 110 dB SPL at 10 cm...... and the louder open space hunting bats have been recorded at above 135 dB SPL. This implies that maximum emitted intensities are generally 30 dB or more above initial estimates. Bats' dynamic control of acoustic features also includes the intensity and directionality of their sonar calls. Aerial hawking bats...... will increase signal directionality in the field along with intensity thus increasing sonar range. During the last phase of prey pursuit, vespertilionid bats broaden their echolocation beam considerably, probably to counter evasive maneuvers of eared prey. We highlight how multiple call parameters (frequency...

  14. [Neuropsychological performance in neurofibromatosis type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Del Castillo, Lilia; Martínez Bermejo, Antonio; Portellano Pérez, José Antonio; Tirado Requero, Pilar; Garriz Luis, Alexandra; Velázquez Fragua, Ramón

    2017-08-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder with various clinical manifestations that affect the peripheral and central nervous system, as well as the skin, bones and endocrine and vascular system. There is still insufficient knowledge of neuropsychological effects of NF1 on children, and there is some controversy about the cognitive deficits that defines the cognitive profile of patients affected by this disorder. In this study an analysis is made of the neuropsychological performance of a group of patients affected by NF1, compared with a control group of healthy children. A comparison was made between the neuropsychological performance of a group of 23 boys and girls with a mean age of 8.7 years (+/-1.39) and diagnosed with NF1, and a control group consisting of 21 healthy children, with mean age of 8.9 years (+/- 1.41) and with similar socio-demographic characteristics. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) was applied to evaluate the subjects of both groups. The group of patients affected with NF1 showed a lower performance in every primary index of WISC IV: Verbal Comprehension Index, Fluid Reasoning Index, Working Memory Index, Processing Speed Index, and full Scale IQ. Only in two subscales were no statistically significant differences observed: similarities and coding. The results show subtle and generalised neuropsychological alterations in the sample of children affected with NF1, which affect most of cognitive domains that have been evaluated. Proper specific and early neuropsychological treatment should be provided in order to prevent the high risk for these children of presenting learning difficulties and school failure. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Type 1 diabetes in India: Overall insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is also on increase like type 2 diabetes, even though not in the same proportion, but still with a trend of 3-5% increase/year. India has three new cases of T1DM/100,000 children of 0-14 years. Three sets of prevalence data shows 17.93 cases/100,000 children in Karnataka, 3.2 cases/100,000 children in Chennai, and 10.2 cases/100,000 children in Karnal (Haryana.T1DM may be autoimmune or idiopathic in nature and is present in 9% cases of insulin deficiency. T1DM is primarily caused by genetic factors, environmental factors, and disorder of the immune regulatory mechanism. A combination of all these three factors causes autoimmune disease, which may ultimately result in the destruction of pancreatic beta cells leading to hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis and potentially death, if not treated with insulin. Prediabetes is the phase before the onset of T1DM, which provides a window of opportunity for early intervention. All available interventions including steroids, immunosuppressants, and cyclosporins can be possibly applied during the prediabetes phase. The treatment goals for T1DM are simple and include maintaining near normal blood glucose levels and avoiding long-term complications, which is a constant juggle between insulin and maintaining an appropriate lifestyle. The Indian Council of Medical Research funded Registry of People with diabetes in India with young age at onset (YDR was started in the year 2006 with 10 collaborating centres across India. This registry is focusing on to provide an overview of diabetes in the young.

  16. Type 1 diabetes in India: Overall insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ashok Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also on increase like type 2 diabetes, even though not in the same proportion, but still with a trend of 3-5% increase/year. India has three new cases of T1DM/100,000 children of 0-14 years. Three sets of prevalence data shows 17.93 cases/100,000 children in Karnataka, 3.2 cases/100,000 children in Chennai, and 10.2 cases/100,000 children in Karnal (Haryana). T1DM may be autoimmune or idiopathic in nature and is present in 9% cases of insulin deficiency. T1DM is primarily caused by genetic factors, environmental factors, and disorder of the immune regulatory mechanism. A combination of all these three factors causes autoimmune disease, which may ultimately result in the destruction of pancreatic beta cells leading to hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis and potentially death, if not treated with insulin. Prediabetes is the phase before the onset of T1DM, which provides a window of opportunity for early intervention. All available interventions including steroids, immunosuppressants, and cyclosporins can be possibly applied during the prediabetes phase. The treatment goals for T1DM are simple and include maintaining near normal blood glucose levels and avoiding long-term complications, which is a constant juggle between insulin and maintaining an appropriate lifestyle. The Indian Council of Medical Research funded Registry of People with diabetes in India with young age at onset (YDR) was started in the year 2006 with 10 collaborating centres across India. This registry is focusing on to provide an overview of diabetes in the young.

  17. Constipation in children with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Cecilie E; Krogh, Klaus; Siggaard, Charlotte; Joensson, Iben M; Haagerup, Annette

    2013-02-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a hereditary, heterogenic, and multiorganic disease. The NF1 phenotype shows great variability in expressivity and often includes symptoms from the central and peripheral nervous systems. Bowel symptoms have been reported, but gastrointestinal function in NF1 remains to be described in detail. In this first systematic study of bowel function in children with NF1, we aimed to investigate symptoms of constipation and test the hypotheses that children with NF1 have abnormally large rectum and prolonged colonic transit time (CTT). A total of 20 children with NF1 (age 8.2 ± 2.4 years) were evaluated with medical history; clinical examination; digital rectal examination; bowel and dietary diaries; Rome III criteria; measurement of rectal diameter by transabdominal ultrasound; and radiographic estimation of CTT. The control group for assessment of rectal diameter comprised 23 healthy children (mean age 9.1 ± 2.7 years). A total of 6 children with NF1 (30%) were constipated according to Rome III criteria. Average rectal diameter was significantly larger than for healthy children (32.9 ± 7.2 mm vs 21.4 ± 5.9 mm, P children was 53 hours (range 26-101). Compared with existing normative data, CTT was prolonged (>84 hours) in 3 (19%). Symptoms of constipation were surprisingly common in children with NF1. Correspondingly, rectal diameters were abnormally large and a higher proportion than expected had prolonged CTT. The underlying pathophysiology remains obscure, but we hypothesise that abnormalities of the enteric nervous system or disturbed cellular growth could be present.

  18. An analysis of batting backlift techniques among coached and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the first principles of cricket batsmanship for batting coaches is to teach junior cricketers to play using a straight bat. This requires the bat to be lifted directly towards the stumps with the bat face facing downwards. No study has yet examined whether there are differences in the batting back lift techniques (BTT) of ...

  19. Bat Biology, Genomes, and the Bat1K Project: To Generate Chromosome-Level Genomes for All Living Bat Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeling, Emma C; Vernes, Sonja C; Dávalos, Liliana M; Ray, David A; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Myers, Eugene

    2018-02-15

    Bats are unique among mammals, possessing some of the rarest mammalian adaptations, including true self-powered flight, laryngeal echolocation, exceptional longevity, unique immunity, contracted genomes, and vocal learning. They provide key ecosystem services, pollinating tropical plants, dispersing seeds, and controlling insect pest populations, thus driving healthy ecosystems. They account for more than 20% of all living mammalian diversity, and their crown-group evolutionary history dates back to the Eocene. Despite their great numbers and diversity, many species are threatened and endangered. Here we announce Bat1K, an initiative to sequence the genomes of all living bat species (n∼1,300) to chromosome-level assembly. The Bat1K genome consortium unites bat biologists (>148 members as of writing), computational scientists, conservation organizations, genome technologists, and any interested individuals committed to a better understanding of the genetic and evolutionary mechanisms that underlie the unique adaptations of bats. Our aim is to catalog the unique genetic diversity present in all living bats to better understand the molecular basis of their unique adaptations; uncover their evolutionary history; link genotype with phenotype; and ultimately better understand, promote, and conserve bats. Here we review the unique adaptations of bats and highlight how chromosome-level genome assemblies can uncover the molecular basis of these traits. We present a novel sequencing and assembly strategy and review the striking societal and scientific benefits that will result from the Bat1K initiative.

  20. Bat Flight and Zoonotic Viruses

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-30

    Reginald Tucker reads an abridged version of the EID perspective Bat Flight and Zoonotic Viruses.  Created: 5/30/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/2/2014.

  1. Henipavirus RNA in African bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Felix Drexler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Henipaviruses (Hendra and Nipah virus are highly pathogenic members of the family Paramyxoviridae. Fruit-eating bats of the Pteropus genus have been suggested as their natural reservoir. Human Henipavirus infections have been reported in a region extending from Australia via Malaysia into Bangladesh, compatible with the geographic range of Pteropus. These bats do not occur in continental Africa, but a whole range of other fruit bats is encountered. One of the most abundant is Eidolon helvum, the African Straw-coloured fruit bat. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Feces from E. helvum roosting in an urban setting in Kumasi/Ghana were tested for Henipavirus RNA. Sequences of three novel viruses in phylogenetic relationship to known Henipaviruses were detected. Virus RNA concentrations in feces were low. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The finding of novel putative Henipaviruses outside Australia and Asia contributes a significant extension of the region of potential endemicity of one of the most pathogenic virus genera known in humans.

  2. Environmental modulators of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banshi Saboo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In genetically susceptible subjects, type 1 diabetes (T1D appears to be a chronic immune- mediated disease with a subclinical prodromal period characterized by selective loss of insulin-releasing pancreatic beta cells. However, only a relatively small proportion of genetically susceptible subjects progress to clinical disease, which indicates that environmental factors are needed to trigger and drive the disease process in genetically predisposed subjects. In this article we provide a selective review on environmental factors involved in the pathogenesis of T1D. Accumulating evidence suggests that the proportion of subjects with high-risk human leukocyte antigen (HLA genotypes has decreased over the last decades among patients with newly diagnosed T1D, whereas the proportion of those with low-risk or even protective HLA genotypes has increased. These findings indicate that increased environmental pressure is responsible for progression to clinical diabetes in patients with less genetic predisposition. The birth cohort studies indicate that the first signs of beta cell autoimmunity may be induced during infancy before age 3, which implies that dietary factors for beta cell autoimmunity and T1D may be active in that time period, during which early nutrition provides essential exogenous exposure. Progression to clinical T1D typically needs the combination of genetic disease susceptibility, a diabetogenic trigger, and a high exposure to a driving antigen. The triggers appear to be enteroviruses and rotaviruses as well as components of the infant diet including cows milk and gluten, while the Mediterranean diet appears protective. The only definite enterovirus responsible for T1D is congenital rubella, which may be complicated by late development of T1D. There is a temporal association between enteroviral infection and future development of antibodies resulting in T1D. Clinical studies indicate that islet cell antibodies develop 3 months after birth

  3. Bartonellae are Prevalent and Diverse in Costa Rican Bats and Bat Flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, S D; Frank, H K; Hadly, E A

    2015-12-01

    Species in the bacterial genus, Bartonella, can cause disease in both humans and animals. Previous reports of Bartonella in bats and ectoparasitic bat flies suggest that bats could serve as mammalian hosts and bat flies as arthropod vectors. We compared the prevalence and genetic similarity of bartonellae in individual Costa Rican bats and their bat flies using molecular and sequencing methods targeting the citrate synthase gene (gltA). Bartonellae were more prevalent in bat flies than in bats, and genetic variants were sometimes, but not always, shared between bats and their bat flies. The detected bartonellae genetic variants were diverse, and some were similar to species known to cause disease in humans and other mammals. The high prevalence and sharing of bartonellae in bat flies and bats support a role for bat flies as a potential vector for Bartonella, while the genetic diversity and similarity to known species suggest that bartonellae could spill over into humans and animals sharing the landscape. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Ultraviolet vision may be widespread in bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorresen, P. Marcos; Cryan, Paul; Dalton, David C.; Wolf, Sandy; Bonaccorso, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Insectivorous bats are well known for their abilities to find and pursue flying insect prey at close range using echolocation, but they also rely heavily on vision. For example, at night bats use vision to orient across landscapes, avoid large obstacles, and locate roosts. Although lacking sharp visual acuity, the eyes of bats evolved to function at very low levels of illumination. Recent evidence based on genetics, immunohistochemistry, and laboratory behavioral trials indicated that many bats can see ultraviolet light (UV), at least at illumination levels similar to or brighter than those before twilight. Despite this growing evidence for potentially widespread UV vision in bats, the prevalence of UV vision among bats remains unknown and has not been studied outside of the laboratory. We used a Y-maze to test whether wild-caught bats could see reflected UV light and whether such UV vision functions at the dim lighting conditions typically experienced by night-flying bats. Seven insectivorous species of bats, representing five genera and three families, showed a statistically significant ‘escape-toward-the-light’ behavior when placed in the Y-maze. Our results provide compelling evidence of widespread dim-light UV vision in bats.

  5. Bats in Agroecosytems around California's Central Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, A.

    2014-12-01

    Bats in agroecosystems around California's Central Coast: A full quarter of California's land area is farmland. Crops account for 32.5 billion of California's GDP. Insect control is a big problem for farmers, and California bats eat only insects, saving farmers an estimated 3 to $53 billion a year. As farmers maximize crop yield, they use more pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers, which contaminate runoff streams that bats drink from. Also, pesticide use kills bats' sole food source: insects. My research objective was to find out how farm management practices and landscape complexity affect bat diversity and activity, and to see which one affects bat activity more. We monitored 18 sites, including conventional, organic, and low and high-complexity landscapes. We noted more bat activity at sites with high complexity landscapes and organic practices than at sites with either low-complexity landscapes or conventional farming practices. I captured and processed bats and recorded data. I also classified insects collected from light traps. I learned how to handle bats and measure forearm length and weight, as well as how to indentify their gender. I took hair clippings and fecal samples, which yield data about the bats' diet. Their diet, in turn, gives us data about which pests they eat and therefore help control. I also learned about bats' echolocation: they have a special muscle over their ears that closes when they echolocate so that they don't burst their own eardrum. Also, some insects have evolved a special call that will disrupt bats echolocation so bats can't track it.

  6. Disease: H00378 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available up of viruses that includes rabies virus and other rabies-related bat lyssaviruses. Rabies-related lyssaviru...ses can cause acute, fatal encephalitis similar to that seen with rabies virus infection of humans. There is

  7. Leg structure explains host site preference in bat flies (Diptera: Streblidae) parasitizing neotropical bats (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Thomas; Honner, Benjamin; Page, Rachel A; Tschapka, Marco

    2018-03-22

    Bat flies (Streblidae) are diverse, obligate blood-feeding insects and probably the most conspicuous ectoparasites of bats. They show preferences for specific body regions on their host bat, which are reflected in behavioural characteristics. In this study, we corroborate the categorization of bat flies into three ecomorphological groups, focusing only on differences in hind leg morphology. As no detailed phylogeny of bat flies is available, it remains uncertain whether these morphological differences reflect the evolutionary history of bat flies or show convergent adaptations for the host habitat type. We show that the division of the host bat into three distinct habitats contributes to the avoidance of interspecific competition of bat fly species. Finally, we found evidence for density-dependent competition between species belonging to the same ecomorphological group.

  8. Bartonella species in bats (Chiroptera) and bat flies (Nycteribiidae) from Nigeria, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamani, Joshua; Baneth, Gad; Mitchell, Mark; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Harrus, Shimon

    2014-09-01

    Previous and ongoing studies have incriminated bats as reservoirs of several emerging and re-emerging zoonoses. Most of these studies, however, have focused on viral agents and neglected important bacterial pathogens. To date, there has been no report investigating the prevalence of Bartonella spp. in bats and bat flies from Nigeria, despite the fact that bats are used as food and for cultural ritual purposes by some ethnic groups in Nigeria. To elucidate the role of bats as reservoirs of bartonellae, we screened by molecular methods 148 bats and 34 bat flies, Diptera:Hippoboscoidea:Nycteribiidae (Cyclopodia greeffi) from Nigeria for Bartonella spp. Overall, Bartonella spp. DNA was detected in 76 out of 148 (51.4%) bat blood samples tested and 10 out of 24 (41.7%) bat flies tested by qPCR targeting the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) locus. Bartonella was isolated from 23 of 148 (15.5%) bat blood samples, and the isolates were genetically characterized. Prevalence of Bartonella spp. culture-positive samples ranged from 0% to 45.5% among five bat species. Micropterus spp. bats had a significantly higher relative risk of 3.45 for being culture positive compared to Eidolon helvum, Epomophorus spp., Rhinolophus spp., and Chaerephon nigeriae. Bartonella spp. detected in this study fall into three distinct clusters along with other Bartonella spp. isolated from bats and bat flies from Kenya and Ghana, respectively. The isolation of Bartonella spp. in 10.0-45.5% of four out of five bat species screened in this study indicates a widespread infection in bat population in Nigeria. Further investigation is warranted to determine the role of these bacteria as a cause of human and animal diseases in Nigeria.

  9. How the bat got its buzz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratcliffe, John M; Elemans, Coen P H; Jakobsen, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of echolocation in bats, the final phase of an attack on a flying insect, the 'terminal buzz', has proved enigmatic. During the buzz, bats increase information update rates by producing vocalizations up to 220 times s(-1). The buzz's ubiquity in hawking and trawling bats implies...... its importance for hunting success. Superfast muscles, previously unknown in mammals, are responsible for the extreme vocalization rate. Some bats produce a second phase-buzz II-defined by a large drop in the fundamental frequency (F(0)) of their calls. By doing so, bats broaden their acoustic field...... tension. Furthermore, we propose that buzz II represents a countermeasure against the evasive flight of eared prey in the evolutionary arms-race that saw the independent evolution of bat-detecting ears in various groups of night-flying insects....

  10. A review of fire effects on bats and bat habitat in the eastern oak region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger W. Perry

    2012-01-01

    Fire is increasingly being used in oak forests to promote oak regeneration, improve wildlife habitat, and reduce hazardous fuel loads. Although recent research has begun to shed light on the relationships among fire, bats, and bat habitat, these interactions are not yet fully understood. Fire may affect bats directly through heat and smoke during the burning process or...

  11. A review of fire effects on bats and bat habitat in the eastern oaks region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger W. Perry

    2012-01-01

    Fire is increasingly being used in oak forests to promote oak regeneration, improve wildlife habitat, and reduce hazardous fuel loads. Although recent research has begun to shed light on the relationships among fire, bats, and bat habitat, these interactions are not yet fully understood. Fire may affect bats directly through heat and smoke during the burning process or...

  12. Pregnancy outcome in type 1 diabetic women with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekbom, P; Damm, P; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    2001-01-01

    To determine the influence of microalbuminuria on pregnancy outcome in women with type 1 diabetes.......To determine the influence of microalbuminuria on pregnancy outcome in women with type 1 diabetes....

  13. Genetics Home Reference: medullary cystic kidney disease type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 Medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 Printable PDF Open All Close All ... is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Pelizaeus-Merzbacher- ...

  14. Diet Treatment Glucose Transporter Type 1 Deficiency (G1D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-17

    GLUT1DS1; Epilepsy; Glut1 Deficiency Syndrome 1, Autosomal Recessive; Glucose Metabolism Disorders; Glucose Transport Defect; Glucose Transporter Type 1 Deficiency Syndrome; Glucose Transporter Protein Type 1 Deficiency Syndrome

  15. Convergences in the diversification of bats

    OpenAIRE

    M. Brock FENTON

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-five characters or suites of characters from bats are considered in light of changes in bat classification. The characters include some associated with flower-visiting (two), echolocation (12), roosting (six), reproduction (two) and three are of unknown adaptive function. In both the 1998 and 2006 classifications of bats into suborders (Megachiroptera and Microchiroptera versus Yinpterochiroptera and Yangochiroptera, respectively), some convergences between suborders are the same (e.g....

  16. Behavior of bats at wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryan, Paul M; Gorresen, P Marcos; Hein, Cris D; Schirmacher, Michael R; Diehl, Robert H; Huso, Manuela M; Hayman, David T S; Fricker, Paul D; Bonaccorso, Frank J; Johnson, Douglas H; Heist, Kevin; Dalton, David C

    2014-10-21

    Wind turbines are causing unprecedented numbers of bat fatalities. Many fatalities involve tree-roosting bats, but reasons for this higher susceptibility remain unknown. To better understand behaviors associated with risk, we monitored bats at three experimentally manipulated wind turbines in Indiana, United States, from July 29 to October 1, 2012, using thermal cameras and other methods. We observed bats on 993 occasions and saw many behaviors, including close approaches, flight loops and dives, hovering, and chases. Most bats altered course toward turbines during observation. Based on these new observations, we tested the hypotheses that wind speed and blade rotation speed influenced the way that bats interacted with turbines. We found that bats were detected more frequently at lower wind speeds and typically approached turbines on the leeward (downwind) side. The proportion of leeward approaches increased with wind speed when blades were prevented from turning, yet decreased when blades could turn. Bats were observed more frequently at turbines on moonlit nights. Taken together, these observations suggest that bats may orient toward turbines by sensing air currents and using vision, and that air turbulence caused by fast-moving blades creates conditions that are less attractive to bats passing in close proximity. Tree bats may respond to streams of air flowing downwind from trees at night while searching for roosts, conspecifics, and nocturnal insect prey that could accumulate in such flows. Fatalities of tree bats at turbines may be the consequence of behaviors that evolved to provide selective advantages when elicited by tall trees, but are now maladaptive when elicited by wind turbines.

  17. Characteristics of children presenting with newly diagnosed type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of these, half a million are children under the age of 15 years diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is increasing in incidence worldwide at a rate of 2 - 5% per year, and roughly 200 children are diagnosed with new-onset type 1 diabetes every day.[1] The condition is increasing in all age groups, with a ...

  18. Tests for genetic interactions in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morahan, Grant; Mehta, Munish; James, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between genetic and environmental factors lead to immune dysregulation causing type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune disorders. Recently, many common genetic variants have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, but each has modest individual effects. Familial clustering of type 1 ...

  19. Green roofs provide habitat for urban bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.L. Parkins

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding bat use of human-altered habitat is critical for developing effective conservation plans for this ecologically important taxon. Green roofs, building rooftops covered in growing medium and vegetation, are increasingly important conservation tools that make use of underutilized space to provide breeding and foraging grounds for urban wildlife. Green roofs are especially important in highly urbanized areas such as New York City (NYC, which has more rooftops (34% than green space (13%. To date, no studies have examined the extent to which North American bats utilize urban green roofs. To investigate the role of green roofs in supporting urban bats, we monitored bat activity using ultrasonic recorders on four green and four conventional roofs located in highly developed areas of NYC, which were paired to control for location, height, and local variability in surrounding habitat and species diversity. We then identified bat vocalizations on these recordings to the species level. We documented the presence of five of nine possible bat species over both roof types: Lasiurus borealis, L. cinereus, L. noctivagans, P. subflavus,andE. fuscus. Of the bat calls that could be identified to the species level, 66% were from L. borealis. Overall levels of bat activity were higher over green roofs than over conventional roofs. This study provides evidence that, in addition to well documented ecosystem benefits, urban green roofs contribute to urban habitat availability for several North American bat species.

  20. Bat flight: aerodynamics, kinematics and flight morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenström, Anders; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-03-01

    Bats evolved the ability of powered flight more than 50 million years ago. The modern bat is an efficient flyer and recent research on bat flight has revealed many intriguing facts. By using particle image velocimetry to visualize wake vortices, both the magnitude and time-history of aerodynamic forces can be estimated. At most speeds the downstroke generates both lift and thrust, whereas the function of the upstroke changes with forward flight speed. At hovering and slow speed bats use a leading edge vortex to enhance the lift beyond that allowed by steady aerodynamics and an inverted wing during the upstroke to further aid weight support. The bat wing and its skeleton exhibit many features and control mechanisms that are presumed to improve flight performance. Whereas bats appear aerodynamically less efficient than birds when it comes to cruising flight, they have the edge over birds when it comes to manoeuvring. There is a direct relationship between kinematics and the aerodynamic performance, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how (and if) the bat controls the movements and shape (planform and camber) of the wing. Considering the relatively few bat species whose aerodynamic tracks have been characterized, there is scope for new discoveries and a need to study species representing more extreme positions in the bat morphospace. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Wind power and bats : Ontario guideline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuiness, F. [Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Peterborough, ON (Canada). Renewable Energy Resources; Stewart, J. [Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Toronto, ON (Canada). Wildlife Section

    2008-07-01

    None of the 8 species of bats in Ontario are considered as species at risk. However, all bats in Ontario are protected under the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) is responsible for identifying significant wildlife habitat for bats, including hibernacula and maternity roosts. The MNR's role in wind development includes environmental assessments (EA) and surveys. The MNR bat guideline includes a summary of Ontario species, a literature review of research related to wind turbines and bats, and a review of methods for assessing and monitoring bats. Guideline development includes a bat working group responsible for obtaining data on risk factors and monitoring requirements. The MNR has determined that site selection is critical for minimizing potential impacts. Wind farm proponents can use MNR data, information, and maps for their site selection process. Information requirements include bat species data; habitat data; and meteorological data. The presence of risk factors results in a sensitivity rating. The MNR is also developing a site sensitivity mapping project in order to assist proponents in making siting decisions. All proposed sites are required to conduct pre-construction site surveys. Acoustic detectors and radar are used to determine bat activity at the site. Monitoring and mitigation strategies include selective wind turbine shutdown during key periods or weather conditions. tabs., figs.

  2. Bat habitat research. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, B.L.; Bosworth, W.R.; Doering, R.W.

    1993-12-31

    This progress report describes activities over the current reporting period to characterize the habitats of bats on the INEL. Research tasks are entitled Monitoring bat habitation of caves on the INEL to determine species present, numbers, and seasons of use; Monitor bat use of man-made ponds at the INEL to determine species present and rates of use of these waters; If the Big Lost River is flowing on the INEL and/or if the Big Lost River sinks contain water, determine species present, numbers and seasons of use; Determine the habitat requirement of Townsend`s big-eared bats, including the microclimate of caves containing Townsend`s big-eared bats as compared to other caves that do not contain bats; Determine and describe an economical and efficient bat census technique to be used periodically by INEL scientists to determine the status of bats on the INEL; and Provide a suggestive management and protective plan for bat species on the INEL that might, in the future, be added to the endangered and sensitive list;

  3. A perspective on bats (Chiroptera)

    OpenAIRE

    M. Brock Fenton

    2013-01-01

    With over 130 species, bats are the most diverse group of mammals almost everywhere in sub-Saharan Africa. Since 2000, two books (Monadjem et al. 2010; Taylor 2000) have made it much easier to appreciate this reality. Species previously unrecognised are frequent discoveries (e.g. Taylor et al. 2012). Whilst most species are mainly insectivorous, some rely more directly on plants, taking fruit and visiting flowers to obtain nectar and pollen. The combination of mobility, long lifespan and dive...

  4. Stigma Perceived and Experienced by Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ulla Møller; Willaing, Ingrid; Ventura, Adriana D

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to (a) culturally and linguistically adapt the Type 1 Diabetes Stigma Assessment Scale (DSAS-1) from English (for Australia) into Danish and (b) examine psychometric properties of the measure among Danish adults with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: We performed a forward-backward t......OBJECTIVES: We aimed to (a) culturally and linguistically adapt the Type 1 Diabetes Stigma Assessment Scale (DSAS-1) from English (for Australia) into Danish and (b) examine psychometric properties of the measure among Danish adults with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: We performed a forward...... to advance research into the stigma perceived and experienced by adults with type 1 diabetes in a Danish context....

  5. Prelabor Cesarean Section and Risk of Childhood Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tine Dalsgaard; Bergholt, Thomas; Eriksson, Frank

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Unfavorable conditions associated with cesarean section may influence the risk of type 1 diabetes in offspring, but results from studies are conflicting. We aimed to evaluate the association between prelabor cesarean section and risk of childhood type 1 diabetes. METHODS: A Danish...... contributed 20,436,684 person-years, during which 4,400 were diagnosed with childhood type 1 diabetes. RESULTS: The hazard ratio for childhood type 1 diabetes was increased in children delivered by prelabor cesarean section compared with vaginal delivery when adjusted for year of birth, parity, sex, parental...... age, and education and paternal type 1 diabetes status at childbirth (HR 1.2; 95% CI 1.0 to 1.3), but not after additional adjustment for maternal type 1 diabetes status at childbirth (HR 1.1; 95% CI 0.95 to 1.2). Delivery by intrapartum cesarean section was not associated with childhood type 1...

  6. A comparison of bats and rodents as reservoirs of zoonotic viruses: are bats special?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Angela D.; Hayman, David T. S.; O'Shea, Thomas J.; Cryan, Paul M.; Gilbert, Amy T.; Pulliam, Juliet R. C.; Mills, James N.; Timonin, Mary E.; Willis, Craig K. R.; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Wood, James L. N.; Webb, Colleen T.

    2013-01-01

    Bats are the natural reservoirs of a number of high-impact viral zoonoses. We present a quantitative analysis to address the hypothesis that bats are unique in their propensity to host zoonotic viruses based on a comparison with rodents, another important host order. We found that bats indeed host more zoonotic viruses per species than rodents, and we identified life-history and ecological factors that promote zoonotic viral richness. More zoonotic viruses are hosted by species whose distributions overlap with a greater number of other species in the same taxonomic order (sympatry). Specifically in bats, there was evidence for increased zoonotic viral richness in species with smaller litters (one young), greater longevity and more litters per year. Furthermore, our results point to a new hypothesis to explain in part why bats host more zoonotic viruses per species: the stronger effect of sympatry in bats and more viruses shared between bat species suggests that interspecific transmission is more prevalent among bats than among rodents. Although bats host more zoonotic viruses per species, the total number of zoonotic viruses identified in bats (61) was lower than in rodents (68), a result of there being approximately twice the number of rodent species as bat species. Therefore, rodents should still be a serious concern as reservoirs of emerging viruses. These findings shed light on disease emergence and perpetuation mechanisms and may help lead to a predictive framework for identifying future emerging infectious virus reservoirs. PMID:23378666

  7. A comparison of bats and rodents as reservoirs of zoonotic viruses: are bats special?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Angela D.; Hayman, David T.S.; O'Shea, Thomas J.; Cryan, Paul M.; Gilbert, Amy T.; Pulliam, Juliet R.C.; Mills, James N.; Timonin, Mary E.; Willis, Craig K.R.; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Wood, James L.N.; Webb, Colleen T.

    2013-01-01

    Bats are the natural reservoirs of a number of high-impact viral zoonoses. We present a quantitative analysis to address the hypothesis that bats are unique in their propensity to host zoonotic viruses based on a comparison with rodents, another important host order. We found that bats indeed host more zoonotic viruses per species than rodents, and we identified life-history and ecological factors that promote zoonotic viral richness. More zoonotic viruses are hosted by species whose distributions overlap with a greater number of other species in the same taxonomic order (sympatry). Specifically in bats, there was evidence for increased zoonotic viral richness in species with smaller litters (one young), greater longevity and more litters per year. Furthermore, our results point to a new hypothesis to explain in part why bats host more zoonotic viruses per species: the stronger effect of sympatry in bats and more viruses shared between bat species suggests that interspecific transmission is more prevalent among bats than among rodents. Although bats host more zoonotic viruses per species, the total number of zoonotic viruses identified in bats (61) was lower than in rodents (68), a result of there being approximately twice the number of rodent species as bat species. Therefore, rodents should still be a serious concern as reservoirs of emerging viruses. These findings shed light on disease emergence and perpetuation mechanisms and may help lead to a predictive framework for identifying future emerging infectious virus reservoirs.

  8. Sound localization by echolocating bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytekin, Murat

    Echolocating bats emit ultrasonic vocalizations and listen to echoes reflected back from objects in the path of the sound beam to build a spatial representation of their surroundings. Important to understanding the representation of space through echolocation are detailed studies of the cues used for localization, the sonar emission patterns and how this information is assembled. This thesis includes three studies, one on the directional properties of the sonar receiver, one on the directional properties of the sonar transmitter, and a model that demonstrates the role of action in building a representation of auditory space. The general importance of this work to a broader understanding of spatial localization is discussed. Investigations of the directional properties of the sonar receiver reveal that interaural level difference and monaural spectral notch cues are both dependent on sound source azimuth and elevation. This redundancy allows flexibility that an echolocating bat may need when coping with complex computational demands for sound localization. Using a novel method to measure bat sonar emission patterns from freely behaving bats, I show that the sonar beam shape varies between vocalizations. Consequently, the auditory system of a bat may need to adapt its computations to accurately localize objects using changing acoustic inputs. Extra-auditory signals that carry information about pinna position and beam shape are required for auditory localization of sound sources. The auditory system must learn associations between extra-auditory signals and acoustic spatial cues. Furthermore, the auditory system must adapt to changes in acoustic input that occur with changes in pinna position and vocalization parameters. These demands on the nervous system suggest that sound localization is achieved through the interaction of behavioral control and acoustic inputs. A sensorimotor model demonstrates how an organism can learn space through auditory-motor contingencies

  9. Ecological dynamics of emerging bat virus spillover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowright, Raina K.; Eby, Peggy; Hudson, Peter J.; Smith, Ina L.; Westcott, David; Bryden, Wayne L.; Middleton, Deborah; Reid, Peter A.; McFarlane, Rosemary A.; Martin, Gerardo; Tabor, Gary M.; Skerratt, Lee F.; Anderson, Dale L.; Crameri, Gary; Quammen, David; Jordan, David; Freeman, Paul; Wang, Lin-Fa; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Marsh, Glenn A.; Kung, Nina Y.; McCallum, Hamish

    2015-01-01

    Viruses that originate in bats may be the most notorious emerging zoonoses that spill over from wildlife into domestic animals and humans. Understanding how these infections filter through ecological systems to cause disease in humans is of profound importance to public health. Transmission of viruses from bats to humans requires a hierarchy of enabling conditions that connect the distribution of reservoir hosts, viral infection within these hosts, and exposure and susceptibility of recipient hosts. For many emerging bat viruses, spillover also requires viral shedding from bats, and survival of the virus in the environment. Focusing on Hendra virus, but also addressing Nipah virus, Ebola virus, Marburg virus and coronaviruses, we delineate this cross-species spillover dynamic from the within-host processes that drive virus excretion to land-use changes that increase interaction among species. We describe how land-use changes may affect co-occurrence and contact between bats and recipient hosts. Two hypotheses may explain temporal and spatial pulses of virus shedding in bat populations: episodic shedding from persistently infected bats or transient epidemics that occur as virus is transmitted among bat populations. Management of livestock also may affect the probability of exposure and disease. Interventions to decrease the probability of virus spillover can be implemented at multiple levels from targeting the reservoir host to managing recipient host exposure and susceptibility. PMID:25392474

  10. Schizamniogenesis in the rusty bat, Pipistrellus rusticus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schizamniogenesis in the rusty bat,. Pipistrellus rusticus. M. van der Merwe. Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria, Pretoria,. 0002 Republic of South Africa. Received 20 September 1993; accepled 3 May 1994. Rusty bats are seasonally mono estrous, carrying a single foetus in each of the two uterine horns.

  11. Dengue Virus in Bats from Southeastern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomayor-Bonilla, Jesús; Chaves, Andrea; Rico-Chávez, Oscar; Rostal, Melinda K.; Ojeda-Flores, Rafael; Salas-Rojas, Mónica; Aguilar-Setien, Álvaro; Ibáñez-Bernal, Sergio; Barbachano-Guerrero, Arturo; Gutiérrez-Espeleta, Gustavo; Aguilar-Faisal, J. Leopoldo; Aguirre, A. Alonso; Daszak, Peter; Suzán, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    To identify the relationship between landscape use and dengue virus (DENV) occurrence in bats, we investigated the presence of DENV from anthropogenically changed and unaltered landscapes in two Biosphere Reserves: Calakmul (Campeche) and Montes Azules (Chiapas) in southern Mexico. Spleen samples of 146 bats, belonging to 16 species, were tested for four DENV serotypes with standard reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocols. Six bats (4.1%) tested positive for DENV-2: four bats in Calakmul (two Glossophaga soricina, one Artibeus jamaicensis, and one A. lituratus) and two bats in Montes Azules (both A. lituratus). No effect of anthropogenic disturbance on the occurrence of DENV was detected; however, all three RT-PCR–positive bat species are considered abundant species in the Neotropics and well-adapted to disturbed habitats. To our knowledge, this study is the first study conducted in southeastern Mexico to identify DENV-2 in bats by a widely accepted RT-PCR protocol. The role that bats play on DENV's ecology remains undetermined. PMID:24752688

  12. Intensity and directionality of bat echolocation signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse eJakobsen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews current knowledge of intensity and directionality of bat echolocation signals. Recent studies have revealed that echolocating bats can be much louder than previously believed. Bats previously dubbed whispering can emit calls with source levels up to 110 dB SPL at 10 cm and the louder open space hunting bats have been recorded at above 135 dB SPL. This implies that maximum emitted intensities are generally 30 dB or more above initial estimates. Bats’ dynamic control of acoustic features also includes the intensity and directionality of their sonar calls. Aerial hawking bats will increase signal directionality in the field along with intensity thus increasing sonar range. During the last phase of prey pursuit, vespertilionid bats broaden their echolocation beam considerably, probably to counter evasive manoeuvres of eared prey. We highlight how multiple call parameters (frequency, duration, intensity and directionality of echolocation signals in unison define the search volume probed by bats and in turn how bats perceive their surroundings. Small changes to individual parameters can, in combination, drastically change the bat’s perception, facilitating successful navigation and food acquisition across a vast range of ecological niches. To better understand the function of echolocation in the natural habitat it is critical to determine multiple acoustic features of the echolocation calls. The combined (interactive effects, not only of frequency and time parameters, but also of intensity and directionality, define the bat’s view of its acoustic scene.

  13. Vision Quest seeks answer to bat mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2006-01-15

    Two research programs investigating bat mortalities at Vision Quest Windelectric's 68 MW Summerview Wind Farm in southern Alberta were reviewed. Field teams discovered 532 bat carcasses during the first year of routine post-construction monitoring at the wind farm. The problem appeared to be confined to the fall migration, with over 90 per cent of mortalities found during the fall. Most collisions occurred on low-wind speed nights. Thermal imaging has shown that the bats collided with moving blades. However, very little is known about the migratory patterns that bring them into contact with the wind farms. Vision Quest has provided funding for a study to examine the echolocation abilities of bats during migration, the influence of weather conditions, the wind speed of bats, and whether or not there is anything about the turbines that attracts them. Preliminary studies have suggested that machines that were on low wind shutdown had fewer collisions. It was anticipated that a comparison between activity levels at Summerview with other wind farms or sites will provide clues about the high levels of collision. In addition to the study, the United States based EcoSystems Technology will track bat behaviour during the fall migration using radar. Alberta Fish and Wildlife is currently developing a set of guidelines for siting and monitoring wind projects and has asked the Alberta Bat Action Team to develop a set of monitoring protocols to help in predicting the risk to bats prior to the construction of wind farms.

  14. A study of wood baseball bat breakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick Drane; James Sherwood; Renzo Colosimo; David Kretschmann

    2012-01-01

    Over the span of three months in 2008, 2232 baseball bats broke while being used during Major League Baseball (MLB) games; of which 756 were classified as Multi Piece Failures (MPFs). This rate of failure motivated Major League Baseball to explore options for potential changes in the bat regulations to reduce the rate. After a study of the information that could be...

  15. Roost characteristics of hoary bats in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger W. Perry; Ronald E. Thill

    2007-01-01

    We radiotracked nine hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus) and characterized 12 roosts during late spring and early summer in the Ouachita Mountains of central Arkansas. Hoary bats generally roosted on the easterly sides of tree canopies in the foliage of white oaks (Quercus alba), post oaks (Q. stellata) and shortleaf pines (Pinus...

  16. Vampire Bat Rabies: Ecology, Epidemiology and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas; Aréchiga-Ceballos, Nidia; Aguilar-Setien, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Extensive surveillance in bat populations in response to recent emerging diseases has revealed that this group of mammals acts as a reservoir for a large range of viruses. However, the oldest known association between a zoonotic virus and a bat is that between rabies virus and the vampire bat. Vampire bats are only found in Latin America and their unique method of obtaining nutrition, blood-feeding or haematophagy, has only evolved in the New World. The adaptations that enable blood-feeding also make the vampire bat highly effective at transmitting rabies virus. Whether the virus was present in pre-Columbian America or was introduced is much disputed, however, the introduction of Old World livestock and associated landscape modification, which continues to the present day, has enabled vampire bat populations to increase. This in turn has provided the conditions for rabies re-emergence to threaten both livestock and human populations as vampire bats target large mammals. This review considers the ecology of the vampire bat that make it such an efficient vector for rabies, the current status of vampire-transmitted rabies and the future prospects for spread by this virus and its control. PMID:24784570

  17. Effects of acoustic deterrents on foraging bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua B. Johnson; W. Mark Ford; Jane L. Rodrigue; John W. Edwards

    2012-01-01

    Significant bat mortality events associated with wind energy expansion, particularly in the Appalachians, have highlighted the need for development of possible mitigation practices to reduce or prevent strike mortality. Other than increasing turbine cut-in speed, acoustic deterrents probably hold the greatest promise for reducing bat mortality. However, acoustic...

  18. Use of the forest canopy by bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. Wunder; A.B. Carey

    1994-01-01

    Of the 15 species of bats in the Pacific Northwest, 11 are known to make regular use of the forest canopy for roosting, foraging, and reproduction. This paper reviews roosting requirements, foraging, and the importance of landscape-scale factors to canopy using species in the Northwest. Many northwest bats use several different types of tree roosts. Common roosting...

  19. Poxviruses in Bats … so What?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate S. Baker

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Poxviruses are important pathogens of man and numerous domestic and wild animal species. Cross species (including zoonotic poxvirus infections can have drastic consequences for the recipient host. Bats are a diverse order of mammals known to carry lethal viral zoonoses such as Rabies, Hendra, Nipah, and SARS. Consequent targeted research is revealing bats to be infected with a rich diversity of novel viruses. Poxviruses were recently identified in bats and the settings in which they were found were dramatically different. Here, we review the natural history of poxviruses in bats and highlight the relationship of the viruses to each other and their context in the Poxviridae family. In addition to considering the zoonotic potential of these viruses, we reflect on the broader implications of these findings. Specifically, the potential to explore and exploit this newfound relationship to study coevolution and cross species transmission together with fundamental aspects of poxvirus host tropism as well as bat virology and immunology.

  20. Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Instrument Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, A.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Gehrels, N.; Hullinger, D.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, C.; Tueller, J.; Fenimore, E.; Palmer, D.; Sato, G.; Takahashi, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Okada, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Suzuki, M.; Tashiro, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), a large coded aperture instrument with a wide field-of-view (FOV), provides the gamma-ray burst triggers and locations for the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer. In addition to providing this imaging information, BAT will perform a 15 keV - 150 keV all-sky hard x-ray survey based on the serendipitous pointings resulting from the study of gamma-ray bursts, and will also monitor the sky for transient hard x-ray sources. For BAT to provide spectral and photometric information for the gamma-ray bursts, the transient sources and the all-sky survey, the BAT instrument response must be determined to an increasingly greater accuracy. This paper describes the spectral models and the ground calibration experiments used to determine the BAT response to an accuracy suitable for gamma-ray burst studies

  1. The natural history of type 1A diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenbarth, George S.; Jeffrey, Joy

    2008-01-01

    We can now predict the development of Type 1A (Immune Mediated) diabetes primarily through the determination of four biochemically characterized islet autoantibodies [insulin, GAD65, IA-2 (ICA512) and (Znt8)]. Prediction is possible because beta-cell destruction is chronically progressive and very slow in most, but not all individuals. We can also prevent type 1A diabetes in animal models and a major goal is the prevention of type 1A diabetes in man with multiple clinical trials underway. ...

  2. Metabolomic Biomarkers in the Progression to Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Anne Julie; Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is the snapshot of all detectable metabolites and lipids in biological materials and has potential in reflecting genetic and environmental factors contributing to the development of complex diseases, such as type 1 diabetes. The progression to seroconversion to development of type 1...... diabetes has been studied using this technique, although in relatively small cohorts and at limited time points. Overall, three observations have been consistently reported; phospholipids at birth are lower in children developing type 1 diabetes early in childhood, methionine levels are lower in children...... at seroconversion, and triglycerides are increased at seroconversion and associated to microbiome diversity, indicating an association between the metabolome and microbiome in type 1 diabetes progression....

  3. Vampire bats exhibit evolutionary reduction of bitter taste receptor genes common to other bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Zhao, Huabin

    2014-01-01

    The bitter taste serves as an important natural defence against the ingestion of poisonous foods and is thus believed to be indispensable in animals. However, vampire bats are obligate blood feeders that show a reduced behavioural response towards bitter-tasting compounds. To test whether bitter taste receptor genes (T2Rs) have been relaxed from selective constraint in vampire bats, we sampled all three vampire bat species and 11 non-vampire bats, and sequenced nine one-to-one orthologous T2Rs that are assumed to be functionally conserved in all bats. We generated 85 T2R sequences and found that vampire bats have a significantly greater percentage of pseudogenes than other bats. These results strongly suggest a relaxation of selective constraint and a reduction of bitter taste function in vampire bats. We also found that vampire bats retain many intact T2Rs, and that the taste signalling pathway gene Calhm1 remains complete and intact with strong functional constraint. These results suggest the presence of some bitter taste function in vampire bats, although it is not likely to play a major role in food selection. Together, our study suggests that the evolutionary reduction of bitter taste function in animals is more pervasive than previously believed, and highlights the importance of extra-oral functions of taste receptor genes. PMID:24966321

  4. Bat-mouse bone marrow chimera: a novel animal model for dissecting the uniqueness of the bat immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Kylie Su Mei; Ng, Justin Han Jia; Her, Zhisheng; Hey, Ying Ying; Tan, Sue Yee; Tan, Wilson Wei Sheng; Irac, Sergio Erdal; Liu, Min; Chan, Xue Ying; Gunawan, Merry; Foo, Randy Jee Hiang; Low, Dolyce Hong Wen; Mendenhall, Ian Hewitt; Chionh, Yok Teng; Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Chen, Qingfeng; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2018-03-16

    Bats are an important animal model with long lifespans, low incidences of tumorigenesis and an ability to asymptomatically harbour pathogens. Currently, in vivo studies of bats are hampered due to their low reproduction rates. To overcome this, we transplanted bat cells from bone marrow (BM) and spleen into an immunodeficient mouse strain NOD-scid IL-2R -/- (NSG), and have successfully established stable, long-term reconstitution of bat immune cells in mice (bat-mice). Immune functionality of our bat-mouse model was demonstrated through generation of antigen-specific antibody response by bat cells following immunization. Post-engraftment of total bat BM cells and splenocytes, bat immune cells survived, expanded and repopulated the mouse without any observable clinical abnormalities. Utilizing bat's remarkable immunological functions, this novel model has a potential to be transformed into a powerful platform for basic and translational research.

  5. Bats of the Savannah River Site and vicinity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Menzel; J.M. Menzel; J.C. Kilgo; W.M. Ford; T.C. Carter; J.W. Edwards

    2003-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site supports a diverse bat community. Nine species occur there regularly, including the eastern pipistrelle (Pipistrellus subflavus), southeastern myotis (Myotis austroriparius), evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis), Rafinesque's big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii), silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans), eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis), Seminole bat (L. seminolus), hoary bat (L. cinereus), and big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus). There are extralimital capture records for two additional species: little brown bat (M. lucifigus) and northern yellow bat (Lasiurus intermedius). Acoustical sampling has documented the presence of Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis), but none has been captured. Among those species common to the Site, the southeastern myotis and Rafinesque's big-eared bat are listed in South Carolina as threatened and endangered, respectively. The presence of those two species, and a growing concern for the conservation of forest-dwelling bats, led to extensive and focused research on the Savannah River Site between 1996 and 2002. Summarizing this and other bat research, we provide species accounts that discuss morphology and distribution, roosting and foraging behaviors, home range characteristics, habitat relations, and reproductive biology. We also present information on conservation needs and rabies issues; and, finally, identification keys that may be useful wherever the bat species we describe are found.

  6. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism and type 1 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune multifactorial disease which has a great socio-economic impact. In Morocco, less is known about the contribution of Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles to type 1 diabetes susceptibility. Our study focused on evaluating the distribution of class II ...

  7. Partial sleep restriction decreases insulin sensitivity in type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke [Leiden Univ., LUMC; van Dijk, J. Gert; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Lammers, Gert-Jan; van Kralingen, Klaas; Hoogma, Roel P. L. M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P. M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep restriction results in decreased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that sleep duration is also a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. We studied seven patients (three men, four women) with type 1 diabetes: mean age 44

  8. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Type 1 diabetes is a serious, debilitating disease, with life-threatening complications, and the financial burden associated with the management of this disease is enormous. Early diagnosis and intervention can improve morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, in Africa, type 1 diabetes is poorly characterised, and there is ...

  9. Lymphocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    INTRODUCTION. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) is the effect of T cell dependant autoimmune destruction of insulin producing beta cells in the pancreatic islets. T cells are activated in response to islet dominant autoantigens, the result being the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus.1. Apoptosis (a combination of the ...

  10. Breast-feeding and childhood-onset type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Stene, Lars C; Ludvigsson, Johnny

    2012-01-01

    To investigate if there is a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes in children breastfed or exclusively breastfed by performing a pooled analysis with adjustment for recognized confounders.......To investigate if there is a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes in children breastfed or exclusively breastfed by performing a pooled analysis with adjustment for recognized confounders....

  11. Audit on stillbirths in women with pregestational type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Mathiesen, Elisabeth Reinhardt; Ovesen, Per Glud

    2003-01-01

    To audit stillbirth cases in women with type 1 diabetes to search for specific characteristics in order to improve antenatal care and treatment.......To audit stillbirth cases in women with type 1 diabetes to search for specific characteristics in order to improve antenatal care and treatment....

  12. Stem cell transplantation for type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voltarelli Júlio C

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of stem cells to treat type 1 diabetes mellitus has been proposed for many years, both to downregulate the immune system and to provide β cell regeneration. Conclusion High dose immunosuppression followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is able to induce complete remission (insulin independence in most patients with early onset type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  13. Type 1,1-operators defined by vanishing frequency modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Jon

    This paper presents a general definition of pseudo-differential operators of type 1,1; the definition is shown to be the largest one that is both compatible with negligible operators and stable under vanishing frequency modulation. Elaborating counter-examples of Ching andHörmander, type 1...

  14. A Neuropsychological Perspective on Attention Problems in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templer, Alexandra K.; Titus, Jeffrey B.; Gutmann, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive problems are common in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 and they can often complicate treatment. The current literature review examines cognitive functioning in neurofibromatosis type 1, with a specific focus on executive functioning. This includes exploration of how deficits in executive functioning are expressed in children with…

  15. Management of Type 1 Diabetes in Schools: Whose Responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandali, Swarna L.; Gordon, Theresa A.

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2008) reports that approximately 0.2% of all persons under the age of 20 have been diagnosed with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This represents 186,300 children and young adults. Type 1 diabetes has traditionally been a disease of children and adolescents. Although type 2 diabetes has in the past…

  16. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy/complex regional pain syndrome, type 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    over the left ankle was also present. (Fig. 6 and Figs 7a and 7b). There was contradiction between the two diagnoses of stress fractures and CPRS type 1. As CPRS type 1 is a clinical diagnosis the boy was treated as such. He was admitted into hospital and received epidural narcotic infusion with sympathetic blockage for a ...

  17. Thyroid Hormones and Glycaemic Indices in Types 1 and 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies comparing the relationship between thyroid hormones and the glycaemic indices in Types 1 and 2 diabetics are scanty. This study compared the relationship between thyroid hormones and glycaemic indices in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics on various therapies. The thyroid hormones, thyroid stimulating hormone ...

  18. Experimental Therapy Shows Promise for Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... triggers cells to take up sugar from the blood. In type 1 diabetes, the immune system The cells and tissues that ... people to eat or drink to raise their blood sugar levels. However, many people with type 1 diabetes can’t tell when their blood sugar is ...

  19. Efficacy of standardised herbal extracts in type 1 diabetes - an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reg. and Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng. extracts have been studied in an experimental model of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes was induced in albino rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg). Rats with fasting blood glucose (FBG) more than 250 mg/dl, 72 h after STZ administration, were treated ...

  20. Convergent evolution of anti-bat sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Aaron J; Hristov, Nickolay I

    2014-09-01

    Bats and their insect prey rely on acoustic sensing in predator prey encounters--echolocation in bats, tympanic hearing in moths. Some insects also emit sounds for bat defense. Here, we describe a previously unknown sound-producing organ in Geometrid moths--a prothoracic tymbal in the orange beggar moth (Eubaphe unicolor) that generates bursts of ultrasonic clicks in response to tactile stimulation and playback of a bat echolocation attack sequence. Using scanning electron microscopy and high-speed videography, we demonstrate that E. unicolor and phylogenetically distant tiger moths have evolved serially homologous thoracic tymbal organs with fundamentally similar functional morphology, a striking example of convergent evolution. We compared E. unicolor clicks to that of five sympatric tiger moths and found that 9 of 13 E. unicolor clicking parameters were within the range of sympatric tiger moths. Remaining differences may result from the small size of the E. unicolor tymbal. Four of the five sympatric clicking tiger moth species were unpalatable to bats (0-20% eaten), whereas E. unicolor was palatable to bats (86% eaten). Based on these results, we hypothesize that E. unicolor evolved tymbal organs that mimic the sounds produced by toxic tiger moths when attacked by echolocating bats.

  1. Bat echolocation calls: adaptation and convergent evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth; Holderied, Marc W

    2007-04-07

    Bat echolocation calls provide remarkable examples of 'good design' through evolution by natural selection. Theory developed from acoustics and sonar engineering permits a strong predictive basis for understanding echolocation performance. Call features, such as frequency, bandwidth, duration and pulse interval are all related to ecological niche. Recent technological breakthroughs have aided our understanding of adaptive aspects of call design in free-living bats. Stereo videogrammetry, laser scanning of habitat features and acoustic flight path tracking permit reconstruction of the flight paths of echolocating bats relative to obstacles and prey in nature. These methods show that echolocation calls are among the most intense airborne vocalizations produced by animals. Acoustic tracking has clarified how and why bats vary call structure in relation to flight speed. Bats using broadband echolocation calls adjust call design in a range-dependent manner so that nearby obstacles are localized accurately. Recent phylogenetic analyses based on gene sequences show that particular types of echolocation signals have evolved independently in several lineages of bats. Call design is often influenced more by perceptual challenges imposed by the environment than by phylogeny, and provides excellent examples of convergent evolution. Now that whole genome sequences of bats are imminent, understanding the functional genomics of echolocation will become a major challenge.

  2. Bat echolocation calls: adaptation and convergent evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth; Holderied, Marc W

    2007-01-01

    Bat echolocation calls provide remarkable examples of ‘good design’ through evolution by natural selection. Theory developed from acoustics and sonar engineering permits a strong predictive basis for understanding echolocation performance. Call features, such as frequency, bandwidth, duration and pulse interval are all related to ecological niche. Recent technological breakthroughs have aided our understanding of adaptive aspects of call design in free-living bats. Stereo videogrammetry, laser scanning of habitat features and acoustic flight path tracking permit reconstruction of the flight paths of echolocating bats relative to obstacles and prey in nature. These methods show that echolocation calls are among the most intense airborne vocalizations produced by animals. Acoustic tracking has clarified how and why bats vary call structure in relation to flight speed. Bats using broadband echolocation calls adjust call design in a range-dependent manner so that nearby obstacles are localized accurately. Recent phylogenetic analyses based on gene sequences show that particular types of echolocation signals have evolved independently in several lineages of bats. Call design is often influenced more by perceptual challenges imposed by the environment than by phylogeny, and provides excellent examples of convergent evolution. Now that whole genome sequences of bats are imminent, understanding the functional genomics of echolocation will become a major challenge. PMID:17251105

  3. Bat echolocation calls: Orientation to communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, M. Brock

    2004-05-01

    Bats hunting flying insects adjust the design of their echolocation calls according to the situation in which they forage and stage in an attack. Changes in call design across attack sequences alert other bats within earshot to the presence of prey, demonstrating a continuum in roles for biosonar signals between orientation and communication. Many aerial-feeding bats change the design of their echolocation calls in the presence of echolocating conspecifics. Bats may change frequency parameters, durations, and/or intensities of their calls. While a variety of free-tailed bats (Molossidae Otomops martiensseni, Tadarida teniotis, Molossus molossus) consistently change their echolocation calls when more than one bat is flying in an area, at least one sheath-tailed bat (Emballonuridae Taphozous perforatus) does not. Changes in echolocation calls may maximize jamming avoidance and/or enhance the communicative function of the calls. The data for molossids support the hypothesis that when hunting some species fly in formation. Here, variation in individual call design could provide positional information and reduce the chances of mid-air collisions.

  4. Fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunir, E.; Nenfiati

    2018-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease caused by insulin deficiency that results from destruction of β-cells in the pancreas. Based on American Diabetes Association, there are two types of type 1 diabetes mellitus: type 1A (autoimmune) and 1B (idiopathic). In this case, we are presenting a new archetype of type 1 diabetes named fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus. This disease results from quick destruction of β-cells byanautoimmune mechanism. The manifestation of this disease consists of unspecific flu-like symptoms, abdominal symptoms, to specific hyperglycemia symptoms such as fatigue, malaise, change in mental status that are attributable to high blood glucose and ketosis. Laboratory examination reveals high blood glucose, normal glycosylated hemoglobin, ketosis or ketoacidosis, potassium depletion and elevation of liver function tests. Treatment consists of intravenous infusion followed by insulin injection for blood glucose control, followed by treatment of metabolic derangements such as acid-base and electrolyte disorder.

  5. Beta attenuation transmission system (BATS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, R.C.; Fullbright, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    The beta attenuation transmission system (BATS) is an automated radiation gauge designed for quantitative measurement of component thickness in explosive detonators. The BATS was designed and built by Group M-1, the Nondestructive Testing Group, of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to measure the areal thickness, in mg/cm 2 , of a cylinder of high explosive (HE) enclosed within a plastic holder. The problem is to determine the density of the HE. A 90 Sr source is collimated by a 0.25 x 1.59-mm slit, and the transmitted beta-particle flux is detected by a plastic scintillator, coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The detonator is transported through the radiation beam by a leadscrew, ballnut, stepping-motor combination. Continuous analog position data are available, derived from the output from a linear-actuated potentiometer attached to the scanner. A linear electrometer amplifies the detected signal, which is then integrated for a preselected time, to obtain the desired statistical accuracy. A microprocessor (μP) is used to control the scanner position and to make the data readings at the assigned positions. The data are stored, and, at the completion of the scan, are processed into the desired format. The final answer is displayed to the operator or output to a peripheral device for permanent record. The characteristics of the radiation source, the collimator, the signal detection and conditioning, and the final results are described in detail. The scanner and the microprocessor control system are briefly outlined

  6. Rabies virus infection in Eptesicus fuscus bats born in captivity (naïve bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April D Davis

    Full Text Available The study of rabies virus infection in bats can be challenging due to quarantine requirements, husbandry concerns, genetic differences among animals, and lack of medical history. To date, all rabies virus (RABV studies in bats have been performed in wild caught animals. Determining the RABV exposure history of a wild caught bat based on the presence or absence of viral neutralizing antibodies (VNA may be misleading. Previous studies have demonstrated that the presence of VNA following natural or experimental inoculation is often ephemeral. With this knowledge, it is difficult to determine if a seronegative, wild caught bat has been previously exposed to RABV. The influence of prior rabies exposure in healthy, wild caught bats is unknown. To investigate the pathogenesis of RABV infection in bats born in captivity (naïve bats, naïve bats were inoculated intramuscularly with one of two Eptesicus fuscus rabies virus variants, EfV1 or EfV2. To determine the host response to a heterologous RABV, a separate group of naïve bats were inoculated with a Lasionycteris noctivagans RABV (LnV1. Six months following the first inoculation, all bats were challenged with EfV2. Our results indicate that naïve bats may have some level of innate resistance to intramuscular RABV inoculation. Additionally, naïve bats inoculated with the LnV demonstrated the lowest clinical infection rate of all groups. However, primary inoculation with EfV1 or LnV did not appear to be protective against a challenge with the more pathogenic EfV2.

  7. Navigation: Bat orientation using Earth's magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, Richard A.; Thorup, Kasper; Vonhof, Maarten J.

    2006-01-01

    Bats famously orientate at night by echolocation 1 , but this works over only a short range, and little is known about how they navigate over longer distances 2 . Here we show that the homing behaviour of Eptesicus fuscus, known as the big brown bat, can be altered by artificially shifting...... the Earth's magnetic field, indicating that these bats rely on a magnetic compass to return to their home roost. This finding adds to the impressive array of sensory abilities possessed by this animal for navigation in the dark....

  8. NHSBSP type 1 interval cancers: a scientifically valid grouping?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, G.J.R.; Evans, A.J.; Burrell, H.C.; Lee, A.H.S.; Chakrabarti, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To assess whether there are differences in the pathological features or survival between the new National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) interval cancer classification system category of type 1 interval cancers, and the previously used, separate categories of occult, unclassified, and true interval cancers. Materials and methods: The prognostic pathological features (grade, lymph node stage, size, vascular invasion, oestrogen receptor status, and histological type) and survival of 428 type 1 interval invasive breast cancers were analysed by subgroup (occult, unclassified and true interval). Results: Occult cancers compared with other type 1 interval cancers were of significantly lower grade [38 of 52 (73%) versus 151 of 340 (44%) grade 1 or 2, p = 0.0005], more likely to be smaller size [37 of 51 (73%) versus 158 of 341 (46%) <20 mm, p = 0.0003] and more frequently of lobular type at histology [14 of 42 (32%) versus 50 of 286 (17%), p = 0.03]. There was no significant difference in pathological features of unclassified tumours compared with other type 1 tumours. There was no significant survival difference between different type 1 subgroups (p = 0.12). Conclusion: The NHSBSP type 1 interval cancers are a heterogeneous grouping with markedly differing pathological features. However, no significant survival difference is seen between the different type 1 subgroups

  9. NHSBSP type 1 interval cancers: a scientifically valid grouping?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, G.J.R. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: garethporter@doctors.org.uk; Evans, A.J. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Burrell, H.C. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Lee, A.H.S. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Chakrabarti, J. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-15

    Aim: To assess whether there are differences in the pathological features or survival between the new National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) interval cancer classification system category of type 1 interval cancers, and the previously used, separate categories of occult, unclassified, and true interval cancers. Materials and methods: The prognostic pathological features (grade, lymph node stage, size, vascular invasion, oestrogen receptor status, and histological type) and survival of 428 type 1 interval invasive breast cancers were analysed by subgroup (occult, unclassified and true interval). Results: Occult cancers compared with other type 1 interval cancers were of significantly lower grade [38 of 52 (73%) versus 151 of 340 (44%) grade 1 or 2, p = 0.0005], more likely to be smaller size [37 of 51 (73%) versus 158 of 341 (46%) <20 mm, p = 0.0003] and more frequently of lobular type at histology [14 of 42 (32%) versus 50 of 286 (17%), p = 0.03]. There was no significant difference in pathological features of unclassified tumours compared with other type 1 tumours. There was no significant survival difference between different type 1 subgroups (p = 0.12). Conclusion: The NHSBSP type 1 interval cancers are a heterogeneous grouping with markedly differing pathological features. However, no significant survival difference is seen between the different type 1 subgroups.

  10. New technologies in the treatment of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition characterized by insufficient production of insulin, a hormone needed for proper control of blood glucose levels. People with type 1 diabetes must monitor their blood glucose throughout the day using a glucose meter or a continuous glucose monitor, calculate...... how much insulin is needed to maintain normal blood glucose levels, and administer the insulin dose by pen injection or insulin pump infusion into the subcutaneous tissue. In recent years, several new technologies for the treatment of type 1 diabetes have been developed. This PhD thesis covers two...

  11. AcEST: BP917326 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rase, cytosolic OS... 29 6.3 sp|Q9QSP1|VGLG_ABLVB Glycoprotein G OS=Australian bat lyssavirus... 29 8.2 >sp|...9QSP1|VGLG_ABLVB Glycoprotein G OS=Australian bat lyssavirus (isolate Bat/AUS/1996) GN=G PE=1 SV=1 Length =

  12. Site 300 Bat Monitoring Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drennan, Joe [Garcia and Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States); Tortosa, Justin [Garcia and Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-07-18

    From June 15 to 18, 2015, GANDA biologist Graham Neale assisted in programming and fieldtesting of the bat monitoring equipment. The equipment was deployed in the field on a meteorological (MET) tower within Site 300 on June 18, 2015.

  13. Bat echolocation calls facilitate social communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten; Nagy, Martina; Metz, Markus; Kalko, Elisabeth

    2012-12-07

    Bat echolocation is primarily used for orientation and foraging but also holds great potential for social communication. The communicative function of echolocation calls is still largely unstudied, especially in the wild. Eavesdropping on vocal signatures encoding social information in echolocation calls has not, to our knowledge, been studied in free-living bats so far. We analysed echolocation calls of the polygynous bat Saccopteryx bilineata and found pronounced vocal signatures encoding sex and individual identity. We showed experimentally that free-living males discriminate approaching male and female conspecifics solely based on their echolocation calls. Males always produced aggressive vocalizations when hearing male echolocation calls and courtship vocalizations when hearing female echolocation calls; hence, they responded with complex social vocalizations in the appropriate social context. Our study demonstrates that social information encoded in bat echolocation calls plays a crucial and hitherto underestimated role for eavesdropping conspecifics and thus facilitates social communication in a highly mobile nocturnal mammal.

  14. Somatosensory Substrates of Flight Control in Bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara L. Marshall

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Flight maneuvers require rapid sensory integration to generate adaptive motor output. Bats achieve remarkable agility with modified forelimbs that serve as airfoils while retaining capacity for object manipulation. Wing sensory inputs provide behaviorally relevant information to guide flight; however, components of wing sensory-motor circuits have not been analyzed. Here, we elucidate the organization of wing innervation in an insectivore, the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus. We demonstrate that wing sensory innervation differs from other vertebrate forelimbs, revealing a peripheral basis for the atypical topographic organization reported for bat somatosensory nuclei. Furthermore, the wing is innervated by an unusual complement of sensory neurons poised to report airflow and touch. Finally, we report that cortical neurons encode tactile and airflow inputs with sparse activity patterns. Together, our findings identify neural substrates of somatosensation in the bat wing and imply that evolutionary pressures giving rise to mammalian flight led to unusual sensorimotor projections.

  15. White-Nose Syndrome of bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessie A. Glaeser; Martin J. Pfeiffer; Daniel L. Lindner

    2016-01-01

    Devastating. Catastrophic. Unprecedented. This is how white-nose syndrome of bats (WNS) is characterized. It is one of the deadliest wildlife diseases ever observed and could have significant impacts on outdoor recreation, agriculture and wildlife management.

  16. Bat distribution size or shape as determinant of viral richness in african bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaël D Maganga

    Full Text Available The rising incidence of emerging infectious diseases (EID is mostly linked to biodiversity loss, changes in habitat use and increasing habitat fragmentation. Bats are linked to a growing number of EID but few studies have explored the factors of viral richness in bats. These may have implications for role of bats as potential reservoirs. We investigated the determinants of viral richness in 15 species of African bats (8 Pteropodidae and 7 microchiroptera in Central and West Africa for which we provide new information on virus infection and bat phylogeny. We performed the first comparative analysis testing the correlation of the fragmented geographical distribution (defined as the perimeter to area ratio with viral richness in bats. Because of their potential effect, sampling effort, host body weight, ecological and behavioural traits such as roosting behaviour, migration and geographical range, were included into the analysis as variables. The results showed that the geographical distribution size, shape and host body weight have significant effects on viral richness in bats. Viral richness was higher in large-bodied bats which had larger and more fragmented distribution areas. Accumulation of viruses may be related to the historical expansion and contraction of bat species distribution range, with potentially strong effects of distribution edges on virus transmission. Two potential explanations may explain these results. A positive distribution edge effect on the abundance or distribution of some bat species could have facilitated host switches. Alternatively, parasitism could play a direct role in shaping the distribution range of hosts through host local extinction by virulent parasites. This study highlights the importance of considering the fragmentation of bat species geographical distribution in order to understand their role in the circulation of viruses in Africa.

  17. Bat guilds, a concept to classify the highly diverse foraging and echolocation behaviors of microchiropteran bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzinger, Annette; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Throughout evolution the foraging and echolocation behaviors as well as the motor systems of bats have been adapted to the tasks they have to perform while searching and acquiring food. When bats exploit the same class of environmental resources in a similar way, they perform comparable tasks and thus share similar adaptations independent of their phylogeny. Species with similar adaptations are assigned to guilds or functional groups. Habitat type and foraging mode mainly determine the foraging tasks and thus the adaptations of bats. Therefore, we use habitat type and foraging mode to define seven guilds. The habitat types open, edge and narrow space are defined according to the bats' echolocation behavior in relation to the distance between bat and background or food item and background. Bats foraging in the aerial, trawling, flutter detecting, or active gleaning mode use only echolocation to acquire their food. When foraging in the passive gleaning mode bats do not use echolocation but rely on sensory cues from the food item to find it. Bat communities often comprise large numbers of species with a high diversity in foraging areas, foraging modes, and diets. The assignment of species living under similar constraints into guilds identifies patterns of community structure and helps to understand the factors that underlie the organization of highly diverse bat communities. Bat species from different guilds do not compete for food as they differ in their foraging behavior and in the environmental resources they use. However, sympatric living species belonging to the same guild often exploit the same class of resources. To avoid competition they should differ in their niche dimensions. The fine grain structure of bat communities below the rather coarse classification into guilds is determined by mechanisms that result in niche partitioning. PMID:23840190

  18. Bat guilds, a concept to classify the highly diverse foraging and echolocation behaviors of microchiropteran bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzinger, Annette; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Throughout evolution the foraging and echolocation behaviors as well as the motor systems of bats have been adapted to the tasks they have to perform while searching and acquiring food. When bats exploit the same class of environmental resources in a similar way, they perform comparable tasks and thus share similar adaptations independent of their phylogeny. Species with similar adaptations are assigned to guilds or functional groups. Habitat type and foraging mode mainly determine the foraging tasks and thus the adaptations of bats. Therefore, we use habitat type and foraging mode to define seven guilds. The habitat types open, edge and narrow space are defined according to the bats' echolocation behavior in relation to the distance between bat and background or food item and background. Bats foraging in the aerial, trawling, flutter detecting, or active gleaning mode use only echolocation to acquire their food. When foraging in the passive gleaning mode bats do not use echolocation but rely on sensory cues from the food item to find it. Bat communities often comprise large numbers of species with a high diversity in foraging areas, foraging modes, and diets. The assignment of species living under similar constraints into guilds identifies patterns of community structure and helps to understand the factors that underlie the organization of highly diverse bat communities. Bat species from different guilds do not compete for food as they differ in their foraging behavior and in the environmental resources they use. However, sympatric living species belonging to the same guild often exploit the same class of resources. To avoid competition they should differ in their niche dimensions. The fine grain structure of bat communities below the rather coarse classification into guilds is determined by mechanisms that result in niche partitioning.

  19. Bat echolocation calls: adaptation and convergent evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Gareth; Holderied, Marc W

    2007-01-01

    Bat echolocation calls provide remarkable examples of ‘good design’ through evolution by natural selection. Theory developed from acoustics and sonar engineering permits a strong predictive basis for understanding echolocation performance. Call features, such as frequency, bandwidth, duration and pulse interval are all related to ecological niche. Recent technological breakthroughs have aided our understanding of adaptive aspects of call design in free-living bats. Stereo videogrammetry, lase...

  20. Warm-up with weighted bat and adjustment of upper limb muscle activity in bat swinging under movement correction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yoichi; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Nakamoto, Hiroki

    2014-02-01

    The effects of weighted bat warm-up on adjustment of upper limb muscle activity were investigated during baseball bat swinging under dynamic conditions that require a spatial and temporal adjustment of the swinging to hit a moving target. Seven male college baseball players participated in this study. Using a batting simulator, the task was to swing the standard bat coincident with the arrival timing and position of a moving target after three warm-up swings using a standard or weighted bat. There was no significant effect of weighted bat warm-up on muscle activity before impact associated with temporal or spatial movement corrections. However, lower inhibition of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle activity was observed in a velocity-changed condition in the weighted bat warm-up, as compared to a standard bat warm-up. It is suggested that weighted bat warm-up decreases the adjustment ability associated with inhibition of muscle activation under movement correction conditions.

  1. Epidemiology of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders

    1999-01-01

    Recent estimates suggest that more than 100,000 inhabitants in the Middle East suffer from type 1 diabetes and that about 6000 subjects in the region develop the disease each year. This paper illustrates how epidemiological principles and methods may assist in a rational assessment of the public...... health impact of type 1 diabetes in the Middle East. Making a series of assumptions, it is estimated that the future prevalence of type 1 diabetes in the region will increase slightly, but that the increase may be more pronounced if the disease incidence is increasing and the prognosis improved....... It is recommended that more valid information is established on the basic epidemiological features of type 1 diabetes in the Middle East, as this will provide the basis of more rational planning of the current and future diabetes healthcare in the region....

  2. On Generalized Type 1 Logistic Distribution | Ahsanullah | Afrika ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some distributional properties of the generalized type 1 logistic distribution are given. Based on these distributional property a characterization of this distribution is presented. Key words: Conditional Expectation; Reversed Hazard Rate; Characterization.

  3. Fertility treatment and childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Laura Ozer; Matthiesen, Niels Bjerregaard; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between specific types of fertility treatment and childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus. DESIGN: Nationwide birth cohort study. SETTING: Not applicable. PATIENT(S): All pregnancies resulting in a live-born singleton child in Denmark from 1995 to 2003......, and 8,490 children were conceived by in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection. During the follow-up period, 2,011 (0.4%) children developed type 1 diabetes mellitus. The primary analyses showed no association between fertility treatment and childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus....... In secondary analyses, ovulation induction or intrauterine insemination with follicle-stimulating hormone was associated with an increased risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio 3.22; 95% confidence interval 1.20 to 8.64). No clear associations were seen with other types of fertility treatment...

  4. Ketogenic Diet for Epilepsy with Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2010-01-01

    Researchers at Medical University Vienna, Austria, report the efficacy and safety of the ketogenic diet (KD) in treatment of epilepsy in a 3-year 6 month-old girl with diabetes type 1 followed for 15 months.

  5. Microalbuminuria and glycated hemoglobin in children with type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % of patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The main modifiable DNP initiation and progression factors in susceptible individuals may be sustained hyperglycemia and hypertension. The aim of the present work was to study glycemic control in ...

  6. The Effect of Type-1 Error on Deterrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, Henrik; Mungan, Murat C.

    2018-01-01

    According to a conventional view, type-1 error (wrongful conviction) is as detrimental to deterrence as type-2 error (wrongful acquittal), because type-1 error lowers the pay-off from acting within the law. This view has led to the claim that the pro-defendant bias of criminal procedure, and its...... rarely and for some crimes not at all when the lawful act is chosen, type-1 error conditional on adjudication affects deterrence less than type-2 error, and for some crimes not at all. For the latter crimes, type-1 errors concerning the identity of the offender may still be thought to either affect...... evidentiary standards of criminal law that apply uniformly....

  7. Heart rate variability in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Gardim, Camila Balsamo; Oliveira, Bruno Affonso P. de; Bernardo, Aline Fernanda B.; Gomes, Rayana Loch; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Lorençoni, Roselene Modolo R.; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To gather current information about the effects of type 1 diabetes mellitus on children's cardiac autonomic behavior.DATA SOURCES: The search of articles was conducted on PubMed, Ibecs, Medline, Cochrane, Lilacs, SciELO and PEDro databases using the MeSH terms: "autonomic nervous system", "diabetes mellitus", "child", "type 1 diabetes mellitus", "sympathetic nervous system" and "parasympathetic nervous system", and their respective versions in Portuguese (DeCS). Articles published f...

  8. Omkostningseffektivitet ved behandling af type 1-diabetes med insulinpumpe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kirsten; Sohlberg, Anna; Goodall, Gordan

    2010-01-01

    This study's aim was to project the long-term clinical and economic outcomes of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) treatment compared to multiple daily injections (MDI) in type 1 diabetes patients in Denmark.......This study's aim was to project the long-term clinical and economic outcomes of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) treatment compared to multiple daily injections (MDI) in type 1 diabetes patients in Denmark....

  9. Interleukin-1 antagonism in type 1 diabetes of recent onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moran, Antoinette; Bundy, Brian; Becker, Dorothy J

    2013-01-01

    Innate immunity contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, but until now no randomised, controlled trials of blockade of the key innate immune mediator interleukin-1 have been done. We aimed to assess whether canakinumab, a human monoclonal anti-interleukin-1...... antibody, or anakinra, a human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, improved β-cell function in recent-onset type 1 diabetes....

  10. Biological correlates of extinction risk in bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kate E; Purvis, Andy; Gittleman, John L

    2003-04-01

    We investigated patterns and processes of extinction and threat in bats using a multivariate phylogenetic comparative approach. Of nearly 1,000 species worldwide, 239 are considered threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) and 12 are extinct. Small geographic ranges and low wing aspect ratios are independently found to predict extinction risk in bats, which explains 48% of the total variance in IUCN assessments of threat. The pattern and correlates of extinction risk in the two bat suborders are significantly different. A higher proportion (4%) of megachiropteran species have gone extinct in the last 500 years than microchiropteran bats (0.3%), and a higher proportion is currently at risk of extinction (Megachiroptera: 34%; Microchiroptera: 22%). While correlates of microchiropteran extinction risk are the same as in the order as a whole, megachiropteran extinction is correlated more with reproductive rate and less with wing morphology. Bat extinction risk is not randomly distributed phylogenetically: closely related species have more similar levels of threat than would be expected if extinction risk were random. Given the unbalanced nature of the evolutionary diversification of bats, it is probable that the amount of phylogenetic diversity lost if currently threatened taxa disappear may be greater than in other clades with numerically more threatened species.

  11. Convergences in the diversification of bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brock FENTON

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five characters or suites of characters from bats are considered in light of changes in bat classification. The characters include some associated with flower-visiting (two, echolocation (12, roosting (six, reproduction (two and three are of unknown adaptive function. In both the 1998 and 2006 classifications of bats into suborders (Megachiroptera and Microchiroptera versus Yinpterochiroptera and Yangochiroptera, respectively, some convergences between suborders are the same (e.g., foliage roosting, tent building, but others associated with echolocation differ substantially. In the 1998 phylogeny convergences associated with echolocation (high duty cycle echolocation, nasal emission of echolocation calls occurred among the Microchiroptera. In the 2006 phylogeny, they occur between Yinpterochiroptera and Yangochiroptera. While some traits apparently arose independently in two suborders (e.g., foliage-roosting, tent building, low intensity echolocation calls, noseleafs, nasal emission of echolocation calls, high duty cycle echolocation behaviour, others appear to have been ancestral (roosting in narrow spaces, laryngeal echolocation, stylohyal-tympanic contact, oral emission of echolocation calls, and small litter size. A narrow profile through the chest is typical of bats reflecting the thoracic skeleton. This feature suggests that the ancestors of bats spent the day in small crevices. Features associated with laryngeal echolocation appear to be ancestral, suggesting that echolocation evolved early in bats but was subsequently lost in one yinpterochiropteran lineage [Current Zoology 56 (4: 454–468, 2010].

  12. Heavy metal contamination in bats in Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, L.A.; Simpson, V.R.; Rockett, L.; Wienburg, C.L.; Shore, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Toxic metals are bioaccumulated by insectivorous mammals but few studies (none from Britain) have quantified residues in bats. We measured renal mercury (Hg), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) concentrations in bats from south-west England to determine how they varied with species, sex, age, and over time, and if they were likely to cause adverse effects. Residues were generally highest in whiskered bats (Myotis mystacinus). Compared with other species, pipistrelle (Pipistrellus spp) and Natterer's bats (Myotis nattereri) had significantly lower kidney Hg and Pb concentrations, respectively. Renal Hg increased over time in pipistrelles but the contributory sources are unknown. Kidney Pb did not decrease over time despite concurrent declines in atmospheric Pb. Overall, median renal metal concentrations were similar to those in bats from mainland Europe and 6- to 10-fold below those associated with clinical effect, although 5% of pipistrelles had kidney Pb residues diagnostic of acute lead poisoning. - Heavy metal contamination has been quantified in bats from Britain for the first time and indicates increased accumulation of Hg and no reduction in Pb

  13. The communicative potential of bat echolocation pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth; Siemers, Björn M

    2011-05-01

    Ecological constraints often shape the echolocation pulses emitted by bat species. Consequently some (but not all) bats emit species-specific echolocation pulses. Because echolocation pulses are often intense and emitted at high rates, they are potential targets for eavesdropping by other bats. Echolocation pulses can also vary within species according to sex, body size, age, social group and geographic location. Whether these features can be recognised by other bats can only be determined reliably by playback experiments, which have shown that echolocation pulses do provide sufficient information for the identification of sex and individual in one species. Playbacks also show that bats can locate conspecifics and heterospecifics at foraging and roost sites by eavesdropping on echolocation pulses. Guilds of echolocating bat species often partition their use of pulse frequencies. Ecology, allometric scaling and phylogeny play roles here, but are not sufficient to explain this partitioning. Evidence is accumulating to support the hypothesis that frequency partitioning evolved to facilitate intraspecific communication. Acoustic character displacement occurs in at least one instance. Future research can relate genetic population structure to regional variation in echolocation pulse features and elucidate those acoustic features that most contribute to discrimination of individuals.

  14. Hawkmoths produce anti-bat ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Jesse R.; Kawahara, Akito Y.

    2013-01-01

    Bats and moths have been engaged in aerial warfare for nearly 65 Myr. This arms race has produced a suite of counter-adaptations in moths, including bat-detecting ears. One set of defensive strategies involves the active production of sound; tiger moths' ultrasonic replies to bat attack have been shown to startle bats, warn the predators of bad taste and jam their biosonar. Here, we report that hawkmoths in the Choerocampina produce entirely ultrasonic sounds in response to tactile stimulation and the playback of biosonar attack sequences. Males do so by grating modified scraper scales on the outer surface of the genital valves against the inner margin of the last abdominal tergum. Preliminary data indicate that females also produce ultrasound to touch and playback of echolocation attack, but they do so with an entirely different mechanism. The anti-bat function of these sounds is unknown but might include startling, cross-family acoustic mimicry, warning of unprofitability or physical defence and/or jamming of echolocation. Hawkmoths present a novel and tractable system to study both the function and evolution of anti-bat defences. PMID:23825084

  15. Indiana bats, northern long-eared bats, and prescribed fire in the Appalachians: challenges and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Loeb; Joy O' Keefe

    2014-01-01

    The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalist) is an endangered species and the northern long-eared bat (M. septentrionalis) has been proposed for listing as endangered. Both species are found throughout the Appalachians, and they commonly inhabit fire-dependent ecosystems such as pine and pine-oak forests. Due to their legal status, prescribed burns in areas where these species...

  16. Novel Cryptosporidium bat genotypes III and IV in bats from the USA and Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kváč, Martin; Hořická, Anna; Sak, Bohumil; Prediger, Jitka; Salát, Jiří; Širmarová, Jana; Bartonička, Tomáš; Clark, Mark; Chelladurai, Jeba Rose Jennifer Jesudoss; Gillam, Erin; McEvoy, John

    2015-10-01

    Bats from the families Rhinolophidae (n = 90) and Vespertilionidae (n = 191) in the USA and Czech Republic were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium by microscopic and molecular analysis of faecal samples collected from rectum of dissected animals and from the ground beneath roosting sites. Cryptosporidium oocysts were not detected in any of the 281 faecal specimens examined using the aniline-carbol-methyl violet staining method. Nested PCR amplification, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the small ribosomal subunit rRNA and actin genes were used to identify isolates and infer evolutionary relationships. Cryptosporidium parvum was identified in a western small-footed bat (Myotis ciliolabrum) from the USA and a common pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus) from the Czech Republic. Two novel genotypes were identified and named Cryptosporidium bat genotype III and IV. Bat genotype III was found in two big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) from the USA. Bat genotype IV was detected in two common pipistrelle bats from the Czech Republic.

  17. Keeping bats cool in the winter: hibernating bats and their exposure to 'hot' incandescent lamplight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haarsma, A.J.; Hullu, de E.

    2012-01-01

    In order to monitor bat population trends, an annual census is performed of all known underground hibernacula in Europe. During these censuses, bats are sometimes found to show signs of arousal, presumably from non-tactile stimuli caused by the observer, e.g. air currents, sound, light or an

  18. Bat distribution size or shape as determinant of viral richness in African bats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maganga, G. D.; Bourgarel, M.; Vallo, Peter; Dallo, T. D.; Ngoagouni, C.; Drexler, J. F.; Drosten, C.; Nakouné, E. R.; Leroy, E. M.; Morand, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 6 (2014), e100172 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : cytochrome-b gene * fruit bats * Rousettus aegyptiacus * Eidolon helvum * species richness * Marburg virus * molecular phylogeny * infectious diseases * geographical range * neotropical bats Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  19. Type 1 renal tubular acidosis in a patient of Type 1 diabetes mellitus: Is it coincidence or coexistence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzafar Naik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old male patient suffering from Type 1 diabetes mellitus got admitted with abdominal pain and high blood sugars. On further evaluation, he was found to have normal anion gap metabolic acidosis without ketonuria and urinary pH was alkaline. The patient was diagnosed as Type 1 renal tubular acidosis (RTA (distal RTA and was managed by alkali replacement in addition to control of blood sugars. The association of Type 1 RTA with Type 1 diabetes mellitus has been rarely reported in the literature. The association needs a different attention as diagnosis and management of diabetic ketoacidosis in such cases will be tricky. The case presented here is the first of its kind from our part of the world and second as far as English literature is concerned.

  20. BAT Exosomes: Metabolic Crosstalk with Other Organs and Biomarkers for BAT Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Deborah; Pfeifer, Alexander

    2018-04-10

    In the last decade, exosomes have gained interest as a new type of intercellular communication between cells and tissues. Exosomes are circulating, cell-derived lipid vesicles smaller than 200 nm that contain proteins and nucleic acids, including microRNAs (miRNAs), and are able to modify cellular targets. Exosomal miRNAs function as signalling molecules that regulate the transcription of their target genes and can cause phenotypic transformation of recipient cells. Recent studies have shown that brown fat secretes exosomes as a form of communication with other metabolic organs such as the liver. Moreover, it has been shown that levels of miRNAs in BAT-derived exosomes change after BAT activation in vitro and in vivo. Thus, BAT-derived exosomes can be used as potential biomarkers of BAT activity. Here, we review the present knowledge about BAT-derived exosomes and their role in metabolism.

  1. Strategies for the prevention of autoimmune type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, J A; Knip, M; Mathieu, C

    2011-10-01

    European experts on autoimmune Type 1 diabetes met for 2 days in October 2010 in Cambridge, to review the state-of-the-art and to discuss strategies for prevention of Type 1 diabetes (http://www-gene.cimr.cam.ac.uk/todd/sub_pages/T1D_prevention_Cambridge_workshop_20_21Oct2010.pdf). Meeting sessions examined the epidemiology of Type 1 diabetes; possible underlying causes of the continuing and rapid increase in Type 1 diabetes incidence at younger ages; and lessons learned from previous prevention trials. Consensus recommendations from the meeting were: 1. Resources such as national diabetes registries and natural history studies play an essential role in developing and refining assays to be used in screening for risk factors for Type 1 diabetes. 2. It is crucial to dissect out the earliest physiological events after birth, which are controlled by the susceptibility genes now identified in Type 1 diabetes, and the environmental factors that might affect these phenotypes, in order to bring forward a mechanistic approach to designing future prevention trials. 3. Current interventions at later stages of disease, such as in newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetes, have relied mainly on non-antigen-specific mechanisms. For primary prevention-preventing the onset of autoimmunity-interventions must be based on knowledge of the actual disease process such that: participants in a trial would be stratified according the disease-associated molecular phenotypes; the autoantigen(s) and immune responses to them; and the manipulation of the environment, as early as possible in life. Combinations of interventions should be considered as they may allow targeting different components of disease, thus lowering side effects while increasing efficacy. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  2. Bat guilds, a concept to classify the highly diverse foraging and echolocation behaviors of microchiropteran bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette eDenzinger

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Throughout evolution the foraging and echolocation behaviors as well as the motor systems of bats have been adapted to the tasks they have to perform while searching and acquiring food. When bats exploit the same class of environmental resources in a similar way, they perform comparable tasks and thus share similar adaptations independent of their phylogeny. Species with similar adaptations are assigned to guilds or functional groups. Habitat type and foraging mode mainly determine the foraging tasks and thus the adaptations of bats. Therefore we use habitat type and foraging mode to define seven guilds. The habitat types open, edge and narrow space are defined according to the bats’ echolocation behavior in relation to the distance between bat and background or food item and background. Bats foraging in the aerial, trawling, flutter detecting, or active gleaning mode use only echolocation to acquire their food. When foraging in the passive gleaning mode bats do not use echolocation but rely on sensory cues from the food item to find it. Bat communities often comprise large numbers of species with a high diversity in foraging areas, foraging modes, and diets. The assignment of species living under similar constraints into guilds identifies pattern of community structure and helps to understand the factors that underlie the organization of highly diverse bat communities. Bat species from different guilds do not compete for food as they differ in their foraging behavior and in the environmental resources they use. However, sympatric living species belonging to the same guild often exploit the same class of resources. To avoid competition they should differ in their niche dimensions. The fine grain structure of bat communities below the rather coarse classification into guilds is determined by mechanisms that result in niche partitioning.

  3. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Dysregulation in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Kathryn M.; Bunn, Robert C.; Moreau, Cynthia S.; Cockrell, Gael E.; Simpson, Pippa M.; Coleman, Hannah N.; Frindik, J. Paul; Kemp, Stephen F.; Fowlkes, John L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Dysregulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 may contribute pathologically to the development of diabetes complications, including diabetic retinopathy and coronary and peripheral arterial disease. Our objective was to explore whether systemic MMP-2 dysregulation could be demonstrated in type 1 diabetes and to determine how MMP-2 concentration relates to disease status. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this cross-sectional study, MMP-2 concentrations and MMP-2 activity were measured in plasma and limed urine samples from 93 type 1 diabetic and 50 healthy control subjects, aged 14–40 years. Relationships between MMP-2 concentrations in these biological fluids and subject characteristics (sex, age, and duration of type 1 diabetes), indexes of glycemic control (A1C, fasting plasma glucose, and continuous glucose monitoring system average daily glucose), and measurements of renal function (urinary albumin excretion and glomerular filtration rate} were examined. RESULTS Urine and plasma MMP-2 concentrations and plasma MMP-2 activity were all significantly elevated in type 1 diabetic subjects compared with those in control subjects. Urine MMP-2 concentrations, in particular, were correlated with several clinical parameters that infer increased risk for diabetic comorbidity and specifically for diabetic nephropathy, including higher A1C, longer duration of disease, evidence of renal hyperfiltration, and the presence of microalbuminuria. CONCLUSIONS Urine and plasma MMP-2 concentrations are dysregulated in type 1 diabetes; urinary excretion of MMP-2, in particular, might provide a unique biomarker of diabetes-induced intrarenal pathologic processes. PMID:17563344

  4. Advances in the cellular immunological pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Song, Lu-Jun; Qin, Xin-Yu

    2014-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease caused by the immune-mediated destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. In recent years, the incidence of type 1 diabetes continues to increase. It is supposed that genetic, environmental and immune factors participate in the damage of pancreatic β cells. Both the immune regulation and the immune response are involved in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, in which cellular immunity plays a significant role. For the infiltration of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte, B lymphocytes, natural killer cells, dendritic cells and other immune cells take part in the damage of pancreatic β cells, which ultimately lead to type 1 diabetes. This review outlines the cellular immunological mechanism of type 1 diabetes, with a particular emphasis to T lymphocyte and natural killer cells, and provides the effective immune therapy in T1D, which is approached at three stages. However, future studies will be directed at searching for an effective, safe and long-lasting strategy to enhance the regulation of a diabetogenic immune system with limited toxicity and without global immunosuppression. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  5. [Type 1 diabetes: from genetic predisposition to hypothetical environmental triggers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phlips, J-C; Radermecker, R P

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results in a progressive (complete in most cases) destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells from Langerhans islets. Even if the autoimmune process becomes to be well known, no one is yet sure what specifically prompts the autoimmune response that destroys the body's ability to produce insulin. Etiology of this complex disease combines a genetic predisposition and still (almost) unknown environmental factors that trigger autoimmuninty specifically targeting beta cells. Genetic HLA predispositions are clearly identified. However, only few people with apparent genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes actually end up getting the disease. Moreover, the remarkable increase of type 1 diabetes prevalence observed in numerous countries can not be explained by genetics. Because genetic factors can't predict alone the development of type 1 diabetes, environmental factors must be involved such as viral infections, toxins from food, cow milk during childhood (instead of breast feeding) or vitamin D deficiency. This paper aims at describing the role of the genetic predisposition and the environmental hypothesis which can be involved in the development of type 1 diabetes. We will conclude by briefly describing clinical trials targeting either the immune response or the potentially toxic environment.

  6. The physics of bat echolocation: Signal processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2004-12-01

    The physical principles and signal processing techniques underlying bat echolocation are investigated. It is shown, by calculation and simulation, how the measured echolocation performance of bats can be achieved.

  7. Transition to Adult Care for Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Katharine C.; Markowitz, Jessica T.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adults with type 1 diabetes are at risk for poor glycemic control, gaps in medical care, and adverse health outcomes. With the increasing incidence in type 1 diabetes in the pediatric population, there will be an increase in the numbers of teens and young adults transferring their care from pediatric providers to adult diabetes services in the future. In recent years, the topic of transitioning pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes to adult diabetes care has been discussed at length in the literature and there have been many observational studies. However, there are few interventional studies and, to date, no randomized clinical trials. This paper discusses the rationale for studying this important area. We review both observational and interventional literature over the past several years, with a focus on new research. In addition, important areas for future research are outlined. PMID:22922877

  8. [Eating disorders and type 1 diabetes: about 4 clinical reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Márcia; Rodrigues, Dírcea; Gouveia, José Pinto; Bastos, Margarida; Carvalheiro, Manuela

    2011-12-01

    Type 1 Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease, often diagnosed in youth and associated with important psychological, familial and social disorders. Its intensive treatment with insulin and dietary changes is an extra stress factor in a stage of life already complicated. This vulnerability, coupled with low self-esteem and psychological factors typical of the youth, makes eating disorders twice as common in young girls with type 1 diabetes. The omission of insulin is the sole purging behavior used to lose weight, culminating in a poor glycemic control and increased acute and chronic complications. The treatment seeks to achieve specific objectives, depending on the associated psychiatric pathology. Because of its frequency, the clinician should be alert to early manifestations of this association. We present four clinical cases of young people with type 1 diabetes and eating disorders, which show the complexity of the approach and monitoring of these patients.

  9. Intervening before the onset of Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Jesper Irving

    2003-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: To set up a clinical trial to establish whether nicotinamide can prevent or delay clinical onset of Type 1 diabetes. METHOD: The European Nicotinamide Diabetes Intervention Trial is a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention trial undertaken in 18 European...... countries, Canada and the USA. Entry criteria were a first-degree family history of Type 1 diabetes, age 3-40 years, confirmed islet cell antibody (ICA) levels greater than or equal to 20 JDF units, and a non-diabetic OGTT; the study group was further characterised by intravenous glucose tolerance testing....../INTERPRETATION: ENDIT has shown that a trial of an intervention designed to halt or delay progression to Type 1 diabetes can be carried out on a multinational collaborative basis, as and when potentially safe and effective forms of intervention become available. Primary screening with biochemically defined...

  10. Early feeding and risk of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knip, Mikael; Virtanen, Suvi M; Becker, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Short-term breastfeeding and early exposure to complex dietary proteins, such as cow milk proteins and cereals, or to fruit, berries, and roots have been implicated as risk factors for ß cell autoimmunity, clinical type 1 diabetes, or both. The Trial to Reduce Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus...... in the Genetically at Risk (TRIGR) is an international, randomized, double-blind, controlled intervention trial designed to answer the question of whether weaning to an extensively hydrolyzed formula in infancy will decrease the risk of type 1 diabetes later in childhood. In our pilot study, weaning to a highly...... recruited 5606 newborn infants with a family member affected by type 1 diabetes and enrolled 2159 eligible subjects who carried a risk-conferring HLA genotype. All recruited mothers were encouraged to breastfeed. The intervention lasted for 6-8 mo with a minimum study formula exposure time of 2 mo...

  11. Severe hypoglycaemia in 1076 adult patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Pramming, Stig; Heller, Simon R

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Differences between studies in rates of severe hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetic cohorts are common and poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia in unselected patients treated in different secondary care centres and to evaluate...... the influence of risk markers, clinical setting and selection. METHODS: Cross-sectional Danish-British multicentre survey of 1076 consecutive adult patients with clinical type 1 diabetes who completed a detailed questionnaire on hypoglycaemia and related issues. Key variable was the self-reported rate of severe......, the rate of severe hypoglycaemia was 0.35 episodes/patient-year and only retinopathy was a significant risk marker together with state of awareness. CONCLUSION: Severe hypoglycaemia remains a significant clinical problem in type 1 diabetes. The rate of severe hypoglycaemia and the influence of risk markers...

  12. Viruses and type 1 diabetes: ignorance acquires a better vocabulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, E A M

    2012-04-01

    The hypothesis that a virus might in some way be involved in the causation of type 1 diabetes has a long history, but decades of research have failed to resolve the issue beyond reasonable doubt. Viruses could potentially play a primary role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes by initiating autoimmunity, a secondary role by promoting established immune responses, or a tertiary role by precipitating the onset of hyperglycaemia. There is currently little evidence to suggest that viruses play a primary role in the causation of type 1 diabetes, let alone a necessary or sufficient role. Secondary or tertiary roles remain possible, but have yet to be confirmed in prospective studies. © 2011 The Author. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  13. Presenting symptoms in type 1 vs. type 2 myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, L.; Sarkisian, Laura; Poulsen, T. S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The classification of myocardial infarction (MI) into five types was introduced in 2007 as a component of the Universal definition. However, data outlining clinical symptoms in different MI types are limited. Purpose: To describe the presenting symptoms in patients with type 1 MI vs...... on the debut symptoms at the time of MI. The diagnosis and classification of MI were according to the Universal definition. Thus, a rise/fall pattern of troponin values was required with at least one value above the 99th percentile of the upper reference limit. Also, clilinical evidence of myocardial ischemia...... had to be present. Results: During the inclusion period 360 patients with a type 1 MI were indentified, whereas 119 patients had a type 2 MI. As shown in the Table patients with type 1 MI more frequently had chest pain/discomfort than type 2 MI patients. However, patients with type 2 MI more often...

  14. Abnormal islet sphingolipid metabolism in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Laurits J; Krogvold, Lars; Hasselby, Jane P

    2018-01-01

    treated NOD mice with fenofibrate, a known activator of sulfatide biosynthesis, to evaluate the effect on experimental autoimmune diabetes development. RESULTS: We found reduced amounts of sulfatide, 23% of the levels in control participants, in pancreatic islets of individuals with newly diagnosed type 1...... diabetes. These gene polymorphisms correlated with the degree of cellular islet autoimmunity in a cohort of individuals with type 1 diabetes. Finally, using fenofibrate, which activates sulfatide biosynthesis, we completely prevented diabetes in NOD mice and even reversed the disease in half of otherwise...... of human type 1 diabetes and whether increasing the levels of the sphingolipid sulfatide would prevent models of diabetes in NOD mice. METHODS: We examined the amount and distribution of sulfatide in human pancreatic islets by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy...

  15. The pregnancy journey for women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Helen; Speight, Jane; Bridgman, Heather

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and develop a model of the pregnancy journey for women with type 1 diabetes. We undertook a thematic analysis of written interactions (n = 200; n = 2060 text excerpts) with an online counselling support service from 93 women with type 1 diabetes. Seven...... reassurance during Pregnancy; however, some women still worried, with peer support offering the most reassurance. In conclusion, women with type 1 diabetes potentially experience seven distinct phases of the pregnancy journey, with eight themes varying in significance across phases. Contemplation begins well...... Contemplation and Motherhood. During pregnancy, social identity and peer support were paramount. Negative emotions in Pregnancy, while connected to diabetes, also centred on the unborn baby. In Motherhood, diabetes-specific distress and depressed mood increased. Medicalisation was expected and offered...

  16. Confirmation of novel type 1 diabetes risk loci in families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, J D; Howson, J M M; Smyth, D

    2012-01-01

    Over 50 regions of the genome have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, mainly using large case/control collections. In a recent genome-wide association (GWA) study, 18 novel susceptibility loci were identified and replicated, including replication evidence from 2,319 families. Here, we, th......, the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC), aimed to exclude the possibility that any of the 18 loci were false-positives due to population stratification by significantly increasing the statistical power of our family study.......Over 50 regions of the genome have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, mainly using large case/control collections. In a recent genome-wide association (GWA) study, 18 novel susceptibility loci were identified and replicated, including replication evidence from 2,319 families. Here, we...

  17. New technologies in the treatment of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition characterized by insufficient production of insulin, a hormone needed for proper control of blood glucose levels. People with type 1 diabetes must monitor their blood glucose throughout the day using a glucose meter or a continuous glucose monitor, calculate...... how much insulin is needed to maintain normal blood glucose levels, and administer the insulin dose by pen injection or insulin pump infusion into the subcutaneous tissue. In recent years, several new technologies for the treatment of type 1 diabetes have been developed. This PhD thesis covers two...... studies of the effects of commercially available technologies--sensor-augmented pump therapy and automated insulin bolus calculators--when used in clinical practice. Both studies demonstrated that these technologies have the potential to improve diabetes care. In addition, two in-clinic studies related...

  18. Clustering of microvascular complications in Type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Lasse; Hulman, Adam; Charles, Morten

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: To describe to what extent microvascular complications exhibit clustering in persons with Type 1 diabetes, and to assess whether the presence of one complication modified the strength of the association between the other two. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the electronic...... duration and HbA1c, persons with neuropathy had an OR of 2.15 (95% CI: 1.73-2.66) for concurrent diabetic kidney disease. Those with retinopathy had an OR of 2.49 (1.92-3.24) for diabetic kidney disease and of 2.66 (1.94-3.64) for neuropathy. CONCLUSIONS: Microvascular complications in persons with Type 1...... medical records of 2276 persons with Type 1 diabetes treated in a specialized care hospital in Denmark in 2013. We used log-linear analysis to describe associations between diabetic kidney disease, neuropathy and retinopathy and logistic regression models to quantify the magnitude of associations...

  19. Morphology-induced information transfer in bat sonar

    OpenAIRE

    Reijniers, Jonas; Vanderelst, Dieter; Peremans, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: It has been argued that an important part of understanding bat echolocation comes down to understanding the morphology of the bat sound processing apparatus. In this Letter we present a method based on information theory that allows us to assess target localization performance of bat sonar, without a priori knowledge on the position, size, or shape of the reflecting target. We demonstrate this method using simulated directivity patterns of the frequency-modulated bat Micronycteris m...

  20. Identification of Novel Betaherpesviruses in Iberian Bats Reveals Parallel Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Pozo, Francisco; Juste, Javier; Vázquez-Morón, Sonia; Anar-López, Carolina; Ibáñez, Carlos; Garin, Inazio; Aihartza, Joxerra; Casas, Inmaculada; Tenorio, Antonio; Echevarría, Juan E.

    2016-01-01

    A thorough search for bat herpesviruses was carried out in oropharyngeal samples taken from most of the bat species present in the Iberian Peninsula from the Vespertilionidae, Miniopteridae, Molossidae and Rhinolophidae families, in addition to a colony of captive fruit bats from the Pteropodidae family. By using two degenerate consensus PCR methods targeting two conserved genes, distinct and previously unrecognized bat-hosted herpesviruses were identified for the most of the tested species. ...

  1. Antioxidant Defenses in the Brains of Bats during Hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qiuyuan; Ge, Hanxiao; Liao, Chen-Chong; Liu, Di; Zhang, Shuyi; Pan, Yi-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Hibernation is a strategy used by some mammals to survive a cold winter. Small hibernating mammals, such as squirrels and hamsters, use species- and tissue-specific antioxidant defenses to cope with oxidative insults during hibernation. Little is known about antioxidant responses and their regulatory mechanisms in hibernating bats. We found that the total level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in the brain of each of the two distantly related hibernating bats M. ricketti and R. ferrumequinum at arousal was lower than that at torpid or active state. We also found that the levels of malondialdehyde (product of lipid peroxidation) of the two hibernating species of bats were significantly lower than those of non-hibernating bats R. leschenaultia and C. sphinx. This observation suggests that bats maintain a basal level of ROS/RNS that does no harm to the brain during hibernation. Results of Western blotting showed that hibernating bats expressed higher amounts of antioxidant proteins than non-hibernating bats and that M. ricketti bats upregulated the expression of some enzymes to overcome oxidative stresses, such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and catalase. In contrast, R. ferrumequinum bats maintained a relatively high level of superoxide dismutase 2, glutathione reductase, and thioredoxin-2 throughout the three different states of hibernation cycles. The levels of glutathione (GSH) were higher in M. ricketti bats than in R. ferrumequinum bats and were significantly elevated in R. ferrumequinum bats after torpor. These data suggest that M. ricketti bats use mainly antioxidant enzymes and R. ferrumequinum bats rely on both enzymes and low molecular weight antioxidants (e.g., glutathione) to avoid oxidative stresses during arousal. Furthermore, Nrf2 and FOXOs play major roles in the regulation of antioxidant defenses in the brains of bats during hibernation. Our study revealed strategies used by bats against oxidative

  2. Disclosure of Type 1 diabetes at work among Finnish workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, P; Moilanen, L; Hänninen, V; Räsänen, K; Munir, F

    2017-01-01

    To determine which self-management factors and psychosocial work factors were associated with disclosing diabetes to colleagues, line managers and occupational health personnel among workers with Type 1 diabetes. A total of 767 working-aged respondents with Type 1 diabetes completed a Finnish cross-sectional survey named 'People with Type 1 Diabetes in Worklife'. Factor analysis was carried out, followed by logistic regressions to estimate the associations between self-management factors, psychosocial work factors and the likelihood of disclosure separately to colleagues, line managers and occupational health personnel. The models were adjusted for sociodemographic, diabetes-related and work-related variables. A total of 52% of the respondents had disclosed their diabetes to their colleagues, 45% to occupational health personnel and 28% to their line manager. Receiving social support and having good psychosocial work ability were significantly associated with disclosure to colleagues, line managers and occupational health personnel. Relations at work were associated with disclosure to colleagues and the line manager. Furthermore, opportunity to self-manage diabetes at work was associated with disclosure to colleagues. Line managers and colleagues have a remarkable role to play in providing workplace support to workers with Type 1 diabetes. Disclosure of Type 1 diabetes should be encouraged as line managers can provide workers with the right support, implement work adaptations and facilitate job retention. As only half of respondents disclosed their Type 1 diabetes at work, further research is required into the reasons for and consequences of not disclosing a diagnosis. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  3. Altered neuroendocrine sleep architecture in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Schmid, Sebastian M; Hallschmid, Manfred; Born, Jan; Schultes, Bernd

    2008-06-01

    The modulatory influence of nocturnal sleep on neuroendocrine secretory activity is increasingly recognized as a factor critical to health. Disturbances of sleep may arise from and contribute to the disease process in chronically ill patients with type 1 diabetes. Using standard polysomnography and repetitive blood sampling, neuroendocrine sleep architecture was assessed under well-controlled nonhypoglycemic conditions in 14 type 1 diabetic patients and 14 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex, and BMI. As expected, plasma glucose (P = 0.02) and serum insulin (P < 0.001) levels were constantly higher in type 1 diabetic patients than in healthy subjects throughout the night. Beside these characteristic alterations of glucose metabolism, type 1 diabetic patients displayed higher blood levels of growth hormone (P = 0.001) and epinephrine (P = 0.02) during the entire night and higher levels of ACTH (P = 0.01) as well as a tendency toward higher cortisol levels (P = 0.072) during the first night-half, compared with healthy control subjects. Patients spent slightly less time in slow wave sleep (P = 0.09) during the first night-half (where this sleep stage predominates), and overall exhibited an increased proportion of stage 2 sleep (P = 0.01). Correspondingly, assessment of mood and symptoms after sleep revealed that subjective sleep was less restorative in type 1 diabetic patients than in healthy subjects. Our data indicate distinct alterations in the neuroendocrine sleep architecture of patients with type 1 diabetes, which add to the generally adverse impact of the disease on the patients' health.

  4. Hand functions in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akpinar Pinar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Objective. Hand functions have an enormous impact on activities of daily living in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM, such as self-care, administering insulin injections, and preparing and eating meals. The aim of the study was to evaluate hand functions and grip strength in patients with type 1 and type 2 DM. Methods. This was an observational case-control study investigating the hand functions and grip strength in patients with type 1 and type 2 DM. The study comprised 41 patients with type 1 DM aged 25–50 years sex- and age-matched, 40 non-diabetic controls, and 91 patients with type 2 DM aged 40–65 years sex- and age-matched 60 non-diabetic controls. Patients with documented history of diabetic sensorimotor neuropathy and adhesive capsulitis were excluded. The Duruoz Hand Index was used to assess the functional hand disability. Grip strength was tested with a calibrated Jamar dynamometer. Results. The Duruoz Hand Index scores in patients with type 2 DM were significantly higher than in persons in the control group (p 0.05. Grip strength values of patients with type 1 DM were significantly lower compared to those in the control group (p < 0.05, whereas there was no significant difference between patients with type 2 DM and their control group. There was a negatively significant correlation between grip strength and the Duruoz Hand Index scores in patients with both type 1 and type 2 DM (p < 0.05. Conclusion. Patients with type 1 DM and type 2 DM have different degrees of hand disability as compared to healthy control groups.

  5. Partial Sleep Restriction Decreases Insulin Sensitivity in Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke; van Dijk, J. Gert; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Lammers, Gert-Jan; van Kralingen, Klaas; Hoogma, Roel P.L.M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P.M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Sleep restriction results in decreased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that sleep duration is also a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied seven patients (three men, four women) with type 1 diabetes: mean age 44 ± 7 years, BMI 23.5 ± 0.9 kg/m2, and A1C 7.6 ± 0.3%. They were studied once after a night of normal sleep duration and once after a night of only 4 h of sleep...

  6. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Children and Adolescents With Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejerskov, Cecilie; Krogh, Klaus; Ostergaard, John R

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a complex genetic disorder characterized by symptoms of the skin and nervous system. A previous study indicated that constipation is common in children with NF1. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phenotype and prevalence of gastroint......OBJECTIVES: Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a complex genetic disorder characterized by symptoms of the skin and nervous system. A previous study indicated that constipation is common in children with NF1. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phenotype and prevalence...

  7. Multiple mortality events in bats: a global review

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Thomas J.; Cryan, Paul; Hayman, David TH; Plowright, Raina K.; Streicker, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Despite conservation concerns for many species of bats, factors causing mortality in bats have not been reviewed since 1970. Here, we review and qualitatively describe trends in the occurrence and apparent causes of multiple mortality events (MMEs) in bats around the world.

  8. Bats roosting in public buildings: A preliminary assessment from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Madagascar has many synanthropic bat species but relatively little is known about how people interact with them. A preliminary assessment on the presence of bats in buildings and their interactions with people was conducted in the eastern town of Moramanga. Fifty of the 156 buildings were reported to contain active bat ...

  9. Roost temperature and fidelity of Wahlberg's epauletted fruit bat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Generally,Wahlberg's epauletted fruit bat (Epomophorus wahlbergi) roost in trees or under the eaves of buildings. This study investigated the roosting dynamics of E. wahlbergi in the urban environment of Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. To determine roost fidelity bats were radiotracked to daytime roosts. Bats were found to ...

  10. Schizamniogenesis in the rusty bat, Pipistrellus rusticus | van der ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rusty bats are seasonally monoestrous, carrying a single foetus in each of the two uterine horns. Implantation is superficial with amniogenesis initiated very early during embryogenesis. Contrary to most other bat species where the amnion is formed by folding, it is formed by cavitation in the rusty bat.

  11. Food resource partitioning inb syntopic nectarivorous bats on Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    We analyzed stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) to estimate the importance of plants and insects to the diet of two nectar-feeding bats on Puerto Rico, the brown flower bat (Erophylla bombifrons) and the Greater Antillean long-tongued bat (Monophyllus redmani). Concentrations of stable ...

  12. Ovarian activity and early embryonic development in the rusty bat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reproductive pattern of the female rusty bat, Pipistrellus rusticus, was investigated by means of a histological examination of the ovarian follicles as well as early embryonic development. Bats were collected from two localities in Limpopo Province. Female rusty bats are seasonal monestrous breeders, initiating ...

  13. Large roads reduce bat activity across multiple species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations.

  14. Monitoring bat activity at the Dutch EEZ in 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerveld, S.; Jonge Poerink, B.; Vries, de P.

    2015-01-01

    IMARES conducted studies in 2012 and 2013 to monitor offshore bat activity with passive acoustic ultrasonic recorders. In the follow-up project reported here, more data on the offshore occurrence of bats was collected in 2014. Using the same methodology as in 2012 and 2013, bat activity was

  15. Resource selection by Indiana bats during the maternity season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn M. Womack; Sybill K. Amelon; Frank R. Thompson

    2013-01-01

    Little information exists on resource selection by foraging Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis) during the maternity season. Existing studies are based on modest sample sizes because of the rarity of this endangered species and the difficulty of radio-tracking bats. Our objectives were to determine resource selection by foraging Indiana bats during the maternity season and...

  16. Personal Reflections My Tryst with the Bats of Madurai -86 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Space Memory in Bats: Most animals have space memory in that they return to the same place after the day or night ... The other species of insectivorous bats ofMadurai, nine in all, do have roost memory but not space ... cally, the auditory region of the brain of insectivorous bats are disproportionately large compared to the.

  17. [Hematophagous bats as reservoirs of rabies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Karin Corrêa; Iamamoto, Keila; Asano, Karen Miyuki; Mori, Enio; Estevez Garcia, Andrea Isabel; Achkar, Samira M; Fahl, Williande Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Rabies continues to be a challenge for public health authorities and a constraint to the livestock industry in Latin America. Wild and domestic canines and vampire bats are the main transmitter species and reservoirs of the disease. Currently, variations observed in the epidemiological profile of rabies, where the species of hematophagous bat Desmodus rotundus constitutes the main transmitting species. Over the years, knowledge has accumulated about the ecology, biology and behavior of this species and the natural history of rabies, which should lead to continuous development of methods of population control of d. Rotundus as well as prevention and diagnostic tools for rabies. Ecological relationships of this species with other hematophagous and non-hematophagous bats is unknown, and there is much room for improvement in reporting systems and surveillance, as well as creating greater awareness among the farming community. Understanding the impact of human-induced environmental changes on the rabies virus in bats should be cause for further investigation. This will require a combination of field studies with mathematical models and new diagnostic tools. This review aims to present the most relevant issues on the role of hematophagous bats as reservoirs and transmitters of the rabies virus.

  18. Sexually selected infanticide in a polygynous bat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Knörnschild

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adult individuals of many species kill unrelated conspecific infants for several adaptive reasons ranging from predation or resource competition to the prevention of misdirected parental care. Moreover, infanticide can increase the reproductive success of the aggressor by killing the offspring of competitors and thereafter mating with the victimized females. This sexually selected infanticide predominantly occurs in polygynous species, with convincing evidence for primates, carnivores, equids, and rodents. Evidence for bats was predicted but lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the first case, to our knowledge, of sexually selected infanticide in a bat, the polygynous white-throated round-eared bat, Lophostoma silvicolum. Behavioral studies in a free-living population revealed that an adult male repeatedly attacked and injured the pups of two females belonging to his harem, ultimately causing the death of one pup. The infanticidal male subsequently mated with the mother of the victimized pup and this copulation occurred earlier than any other in his harem. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that sexually selected infanticide is more widespread than previously thought, adding bats as a new taxon performing this strategy. Future work on other bats, especially polygynous species in the tropics, has great potential to investigate the selective pressures influencing the evolution of sexually selected infanticide and to study how infanticide impacts reproductive strategies and social structures of different species.

  19. The hearing gene Prestin reunites echolocating bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Jinhong; Rossiter, Stephen J.; Jones, Gareth; Cotton, James A.; Zhang, Shuyi

    2008-01-01

    The remarkable high-frequency sensitivity and selectivity of the mammalian auditory system has been attributed to the evolution of mechanical amplification, in which sound waves are amplified by outer hair cells in the cochlea. This process is driven by the recently discovered protein prestin, encoded by the gene Prestin. Echolocating bats use ultrasound for orientation and hunting and possess the highest frequency hearing of all mammals. To test for the involvement of Prestin in the evolution of bat echolocation, we sequenced the coding region in echolocating and nonecholocating species. The resulting putative gene tree showed strong support for a monophyletic assemblage of echolocating species, conflicting with the species phylogeny in which echolocators are paraphyletic. We reject the possibilities that this conflict arises from either gene duplication and loss or relaxed selection in nonecholocating fruit bats. Instead, we hypothesize that the putative gene tree reflects convergence at stretches of functional importance. Convergence is supported by the recovery of the species tree from alignments of hydrophobic transmembrane domains, and the putative gene tree from the intra- and extracellular domains. We also found evidence that Prestin has undergone Darwinian selection associated with the evolution of specialized constant-frequency echolocation, which is characterized by sharp auditory tuning. Our study of a hearing gene in bats strongly implicates Prestin in the evolution of echolocation, and suggests independent evolution of high-frequency hearing in bats. These results highlight the potential problems of extracting phylogenetic signals from functional genes that may be prone to convergence. PMID:18776049

  20. Harmonic-hopping in Wallacea's bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Tigga; Rossiter, Stephen J

    2004-06-10

    Evolutionary divergence between species is facilitated by ecological shifts, and divergence is particularly rapid when such shifts also promote assortative mating. Horseshoe bats are a diverse Old World family (Rhinolophidae) that have undergone a rapid radiation in the past 5 million years. These insectivorous bats use a predominantly pure-tone echolocation call matched to an auditory fovea (an over-representation of the pure-tone frequency in the cochlea and inferior colliculus) to detect the minute changes in echo amplitude and frequency generated when an insect flutters its wings. The emitted signal is the accentuated second harmonic of a series in which the fundamental and remaining harmonics are filtered out. Here we show that three distinct, sympatric size morphs of the large-eared horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus philippinensis) echolocate at different harmonics of the same fundamental frequency. These morphs have undergone recent genetic divergence, and this process has occurred in parallel more than once. We suggest that switching harmonics creates a discontinuity in the bats' perception of available prey that can initiate disruptive selection. Moreover, because call frequency in horseshoe bats has a dual function in resource acquisition and communication, ecological selection on frequency might lead to assortative mating and ultimately reproductive isolation and speciation, regardless of external barriers to gene flow.

  1. Bats and zoonotic viruses: can we confidently link bats with emerging deadly viruses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moratelli, Ricardo; Calisher, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    An increasingly asked question is 'can we confidently link bats with emerging viruses?'. No, or not yet, is the qualified answer based on the evidence available. Although more than 200 viruses - some of them deadly zoonotic viruses - have been isolated from or otherwise detected in bats, the supposed connections between bats, bat viruses and human diseases have been raised more on speculation than on evidence supporting their direct or indirect roles in the epidemiology of diseases (except for rabies). However, we are convinced that the evidence points in that direction and that at some point it will be proved that bats are competent hosts for at least a few zoonotic viruses. In this review, we cover aspects of bat biology, ecology and evolution that might be relevant in medical investigations and we provide a historical synthesis of some disease outbreaks causally linked to bats. We provide evolutionary-based hypotheses to tentatively explain the viral transmission route through mammalian intermediate hosts and to explain the geographic concentration of most outbreaks, but both are no more than speculations that still require formal assessment. PMID:25742261

  2. Increasing evidence that bats actively forage at wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Cecily F; Bennett, Victoria J; Hale, Amanda M; Korstian, Jennifer M; Schildt, Alison J; Williams, Dean A

    2017-01-01

    Although the ultimate causes of high bat fatalities at wind farms are not well understood, several lines of evidence suggest that bats are attracted to wind turbines. One hypothesis is that bats would be attracted to turbines as a foraging resource if the insects that bats prey upon are commonly present on and around the turbine towers. To investigate the role that foraging activity may play in bat fatalities, we conducted a series of surveys at a wind farm in the southern Great Plains of the US from 2011-2016. From acoustic monitoring we recorded foraging activity, including feeding buzzes indicative of prey capture, in the immediate vicinity of turbine towers from all six bat species known to be present at this site. From insect surveys we found Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, and Orthoptera in consistently high proportions over several years suggesting that food resources for bats were consistently available at wind turbines. We used DNA barcoding techniques to assess bat diet composition of (1) stomach contents from 47 eastern red bat ( Lasiurus borealis ) and 24 hoary bat ( Lasiurus cinereus ) carcasses collected in fatality searches, and (2) fecal pellets from 23 eastern red bats that were found on turbine towers, transformers, and tower doors. We found that the majority of the eastern red bat and hoary bat stomachs, the two bat species most commonly found in fatality searches at this site, were full or partially full, indicating that the bats were likely killed while foraging. Although Lepidoptera and Orthoptera dominated the diets of these two bat species, both consumed a range of prey items with individual bats having from one to six insect species in their stomachs at the time of death. The prey items identified from eastern red bat fecal pellets showed similar results. A comparison of the turbine insect community to the diet analysis results revealed that the most abundant insects at wind turbines, including terrestrial insects such as crickets and several

  3. Recurrent hypoglycemia in a patient of neurofibromatosis type 1 and type 1 diabetes mellitus: Munchausen′s syndrome mimicking Insulinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubaraq Naqash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old widow having neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF 1 and type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM was admitted for abdominal pain, vomiting and recent onset low blood sugars. During hospitalization, the patient developed recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia despite stopping insulin. A possibility of insulinoma was made due to the presence of abdominal pain, vomiting, hypoglycemia, and association of insulinoma with NF 1. However, surprisingly c-peptide was very low and plasma insulin levels were high. A detailed psychiatric evaluation of the patient revealed Munchausen′s syndrome as a cause of recurrent hypoglycemia. Unrecognized psychiatric illnesses in type 1 DM may lead to overzealous investigation. In conclusion, the clinical presentations of persons with factitious disorder are varied and impact every area of medicine, factitious causes should always be considered in unclarified recurrent hypoglycemia, especially in cases presented with dramatic but inconsistent medical history, and an unusual personal behavior.

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 diversity has an impact on vaccine efficacy and drug resistance. It is important to know the circulating genetic variants and associated drug-resistance mutations in the context of scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Nigeria. The objective of this study was to ...

  5. Peptide and protein biomarkers for type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Metz, Thomas O.

    2016-08-30

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes mellitus, or having type I diabetes mellitus, utilizing selected biomarkers described herein either alone or in combination. The present disclosure allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases. Also provided are arrays and kits that can be used to perform such methods.

  6. Sensor Augmented Pump Therapy Use in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carolan, E

    2016-11-01

    Tight metabolic control in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) reduces incidence and delays progression of micro-vascular complications. Severe hypoglycaemia remains a significant barrier to achieving optimal diabetes control. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) systems refine insulin delivery with programmable basal rates and mealtime bolusing

  7. Determinants of daily insulin use in Type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muis, Marian J.; Bots, Michiel L.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Hoogma, Roel P. L. M.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Stolk, Ronald P.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin need for a given degree of glucose control varies markedly among individuals. We examined which factors determine daily insulin use in patients with Type 1 diabetes. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed in 416 patients. Clinical parameters, medication use, physical

  8. Viral infections as potential triggers of type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Nienke; Kroese, Frans G. M.; Rozing, Jan; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    During the last decades, the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) has increased significantly, reaching percentages of 3% annually worldwide. This increase suggests that besides genetical factors environmental perturbations (including viral infections) are also involved in the pathogenesis of T1D. T1D

  9. Association between Diabetes Mellitus type 1 and Celiac Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gluten sensitive enteropathy (celiac disease (CD)) has a strong association with diabetes mellitus (type 1DM). Since, 2-3% of CD patients have selective IgA deficiency, the majority of the available tests may fail to show the auto-antibodies (the IgA endomysial antibody (EMA). To prevent such a false negativity, ...

  10. Type 1 diabetes, glucocorticoids and the brain : a sweet connection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revsin, Yanina

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral and autonomous neuropathies are well-known and devastating complications of type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, T1D can also impact the integrity of the central nervous system (CNS), and the reason why T1D affects CNS integrity remains to be elucidated. Studies on diabetic patients

  11. Neuroendocrine Tumour in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report the case of an HIV-positive female patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 who was treated for recurrent peptic ulcer disease and later developed diabetes mellitus and chronic diarrhoea. A metastasising somatostatinoma was histologically proven and evidence of a concomitant gastrin-producing neuroendocrine ...

  12. Disturbed lipid metabolism in glycogen storage disease type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, RHJ; Smit, GPA; Kuipers, F

    2002-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD1) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase, the enzyme catalysing the conversion of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) to glucose. GSD1 is associated with severe hyperlipidaemia and hepatic steatosis. The underlying mechanisms

  13. On the Mutation Rate of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, John W.; Hwang, Charles B. C.

    2005-01-01

    All seven DNA-based microbes for which carefully established mutation rates and mutational spectra were previously available displayed a genomic mutation rate in the neighborhood of 0.003 per chromosome replication. The pathogenic mammalian DNA virus herpes simplex type 1 has an estimated genomic mutation rate compatible with that value.

  14. Erythropoietin in patients with type 1 diabetes (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khantakova Е.А.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the literature on the issue of regulation of erythropoietin in patients with type 1 diabetes. The connection between the secretion of erythropoietin disturbance with the development and progression of diabetes complications has been observed. Various pleiotropic effects of erythropoietin have been considered

  15. Aldosterone synthase C-344T, angiotensin II type 1 receptor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-26

    Dec 26, 2014 ... RESEARCH ARTICLE. Aldosterone synthase C-344T, angiotensin II type 1 receptor A1166C and 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase G534A gene polymorphisms and essential hypertension in the population of Odisha, India. MANISHA PATNAIK1,5, PALLABI PATI1, SURENDRA N. SWAIN2, MANOJ K.

  16. The vaccines for Bovine Herpesvirus Type 1: A review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-05

    Sep 5, 2011 ... Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) is the pathogen of Infectious Bovine Rhinothracheitis (IBR) disease, causing great economic losses in the livestock industry. Vaccine is a powerful means to control the virus. Here, the review described the currently available knowledge regarding to the advance in the ...

  17. Peptide and protein biomarkers for type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Metz, Thomas O.

    2014-06-10

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes mellitus, or having type I diabetes mellitus, utilizing selected biomarkers described herein either alone or in combination. The present disclosure allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases. Also provided are arrays and kits that can be used to perform such methods.

  18. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Børglum, A D; Brandt, C A

    1994-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy associated with a DNA duplication on chromosome 17p11.2-p12 in the majority of cases. Most of the sporadic cases are due to a de novo duplication. We have screened for this duplication in 11 Danish patients...

  19. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 and NALP5, parathyroid autoantigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Bjorklund, Peyman; Hallgren, Asa; Pontynen, Nora; Szinnai, Gabor; Shikama, Noriko; Keller, Marcel P.; Ekwall, Olov; Kinkel, Sarah A.; Husebye, Eystein S.; Gustafsson, Jan; Rorsman, Fredrik; Peltonen, Leena; Betterle, Corrado; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Akerstrom, Goran; Westin, Gunnar; Scott, Hamish S.; Hollaender, Georg A.; Kampe, Olle

    2008-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a multiorgan autoimmune disorder caused by mutations in AIRE, the autoimmune regulator gene. Though recent studies concerning AIRE deficiency have begun to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of organ-specific autoimmunity in patients

  20. Lymphocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Beta cell apoptosis has been associated with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) onset in newly diagnosed diabetic patients. There is an emerging evidence that T cell-induced apoptosis is a dominant effector mechanism in diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1). Pancreatic β-cells derived from newly ...

  1. Case report: type 1 diabetes in monozygotic quadruplets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štechová, K.; Halbhuber, Z.; Hubáčková, M.; Kayserová, J.; Petruželková, L.; Včeláková, J.; Koloušková, S.; Ulmannová, T.; Faresjo, M.; Neuwirth, Aleš; Spíšek, R.; Šedivá, A.; Filipp, Dominik; Sumnik, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 4 (2012), s. 457-462 ISSN 1018-4813 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08066 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : autoimmunity * type 1 diabetes * beta cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.319, year: 2012

  2. The Effect of Type-1 Error on Deterrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, Henrik; Mungan, Murat C.

    A traditional view of law and economics holds that an increase in the probability with which a court will convict an innocent defendant (type-1 error) lowers deterrence as much as an increase in the probability with which the court will acquit a guilty defendant (type-2 error). We demonstrate tha...

  3. Bile salt and cholesterol metabolism in diabetes mellitus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker-van Waarde, Willemijntje Maria

    2006-01-01

    W.M. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) is associated with microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy) and macrovascular complications (cardiovascular disease). Macrovascular disease is the major cause of death in patients with DM1. The mortality rate due to coronary artery

  4. Laboratory surveillance of Shigella dysenteriae type 1 in Kwazulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To collect data on the antimicrobial susceptibility of Shigella dysenteriae type 1 in KwaZulu-Natal, including the testing of newer therapeutic agents, and to evaluate the ability of laboratories to participate in a provincial surveillance programme. Design. Prospective descriptive study. Setting. Hospital laboratories in ...

  5. [Complex regional pain syndrome type 1: negating the myth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frolke, J.P.M.; Dongen, R.T.M. van; Meent, H. van de

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) was identified in the Netherlands more than 30 years ago, but since then the arguments supporting this diagnosis have become weaker. Incidence has decreased, it is often not possible to make a definite diagnosis, the pathophysiology remains unclear and

  6. Motor problems in children with neurofibromatosis type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Rietman (André); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne); Bongers, S. (Sanne); Gaukema, E. (Eddy); Van Abeelen, S. (Sandra); J.G.M. Hendriksen; C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); P.F.A. de Nijs (Pieter); M.C.Y. de Wit (Marie Claire)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Children with the neurogenetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) often have problems with learning and behaviour. In both parent reports and neuropsychological assessment, motor problems are reported in approximately one third to one half of the children with NF1.

  7. Milder phenotypes of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anand, G.; Padeniya, A.; Hanrahan, D.; Scheffer, H.; Zaiwalla, Z.; Cox, D.; Mann, N.; Hewertson, J.; Price, S.; Nemeth, A.; Arsov, T.; Scheffer, I.; Jayawant, S.; Pike, M.; McShane, T.

    2011-01-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS) is a treatable condition resulting from impaired glucose transport into the brain. The classical presentation is with infantile-onset epilepsy and severe developmental delay. Non-classical phenotypes with movement disorders and early-onset

  8. Type 1,1-operators defined by vanishing frequency modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Jon

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a general definition of pseudo-differential operators of type 1,1; the definition is shown to be the largest one that is both compatible with negliible operators and stable under vanishing frequency modulation. Elaborating counter-examples of Ching, Hörmander and Parenti...

  9. Type 1,1-operators on spaces of temperate distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Jon

    This paper is a follow-up on the author’s general definition of pseudo-differential operators of type 1,1, in Hörmander’s sense. It is shown that such operators are always defined on the smooth functions that are temperate; and moreover are defined and continuous on the space of temperate...

  10. Increased basal glucose production in type 1 Gaucher's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corssmit, E. P.; Hollak, C. E.; Endert, E.; van Oers, M. H.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Romijn, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the metabolic effects of Gaucher's disease, glucose metabolism and parameters of fat metabolism were studied by indirect calorimetry and primed continuous infusion of [3-3H]glucose in seven clinically stable untreated patients with type 1 Gaucher's disease and in seven healthy matched

  11. Non HLA genetic markers association with type-1 diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The currently available data identified IDDM1 and IDDM2 as 2 susceptibility loci for type 1 diabetes (T1D). The major histocompatibility complex (MHC)/HLA region referred to as IDDM1 contains several 100 genes known to have a great influence on T1D risk. Within IDDM2, a minisatellite variable number of tandem repeats ...

  12. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and atopic diseases in children.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    Adapted from: Stankov K, Benc D, Draskovic D. Genetic and epigenetic factors in etiology of diabetes mellitus type 1. Pediatrics. 2013 Dec .... The prevalence of asthmatic symptoms in the T1D group was clearly lower than in the control group. However, the overall prevalence of atopy was not significantly different in these ...

  13. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-01

    Apr 1, 2011 ... different therapeutic options available to treat the different forms of diabetes. Worldwide, the incidence of type 1 diabetes is increasing, with more children being obese on presentation as a result of the escalating prevalence of obesity in the youth.3 In addition, there is an epidemic of type. 2 diabetes in ...

  14. The vaccines for Bovine Herpesvirus Type 1: A review | Zhao ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) is the pathogen of Infectious Bovine Rhinothracheitis (IBR) disease, causing great economic losses in the livestock industry. Vaccine is a powerful means to control the virus. Here, the review described the currently available knowledge regarding to the advance in the field of BoHV-1 ...

  15. The cognitive profile of type 1 Gaucher disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegstraaten, Marieke; Wesnes, Keith A.; Luzy, Cécile; Petakov, Milan; Mrsic, Mirando; Niederau, Claus; Giraldo, Pilar; Hughes, Derralynn; Mehta, Atul; Mengel, Karl-Eugen; Hollak, Carla E. M.; Maródi, László; van Schaik, Ivo N.

    2012-01-01

    The absence of neurological symptoms and signs is traditionally considered mandatory for a diagnosis of type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1), but in recent years many reports have emerged on neurological manifestations in GD1 patients. Nevertheless, it has been unclear whether cognitive deficits are part of

  16. Exercise management in type 1 diabetes: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Michael C; Gallen, Ian W; Smart, Carmel E; Taplin, Craig E; Adolfsson, Peter; Lumb, Alistair N; Kowalski, Aaron; Rabasa-Lhoret, Remi; McCrimmon, Rory J; Hume, Carin; Annan, Francesca; Fournier, Paul A; Graham, Claudia; Bode, Bruce; Galassetti, Pietro; Jones, Timothy W; Millán, Iñigo San; Heise, Tim; Peters, Anne L; Petz, Andreas; Laffel, Lori M

    2017-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a challenging condition to manage for various physiological and behavioural reasons. Regular exercise is important, but management of different forms of physical activity is particularly difficult for both the individual with type 1 diabetes and the health-care provider. People with type 1 diabetes tend to be at least as inactive as the general population, with a large percentage of individuals not maintaining a healthy body mass nor achieving the minimum amount of moderate to vigorous aerobic activity per week. Regular exercise can improve health and wellbeing, and can help individuals to achieve their target lipid profile, body composition, and fitness and glycaemic goals. However, several additional barriers to exercise can exist for a person with diabetes, including fear of hypoglycaemia, loss of glycaemic control, and inadequate knowledge around exercise management. This Review provides an up-to-date consensus on exercise management for individuals with type 1 diabetes who exercise regularly, including glucose targets for safe and effective exercise, and nutritional and insulin dose adjustments to protect against exercise-related glucose excursions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Characteristics of children presenting with newly diagnosed type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The clinical presentation of type 1 diabetes in children can be acute or insidious, and symptoms may be subtle and frequently misinterpreted. Presentation with diabetic keto-acidosis (DKA) may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the paediatric population. This study aims to determine the ...

  18. Speech Disorders in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: A Sample Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosyns, Marjan; Vandeweghe, Lies; Mortier, Geert; Janssens, Sandra; Van Borsel, John

    2010-01-01

    Background: Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal-dominant neurocutaneous disorder with an estimated prevalence of two to three cases per 10 000 population. While the physical characteristics have been well documented, speech disorders have not been fully characterized in NF1 patients. Aims: This study serves as a pilot to identify key…

  19. Articulation in Schoolchildren and Adults with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosyns, Marjan; Mortier, Geert; Janssens, Sandra; Bogaert, Famke; D'Hondt, Stephanie; Van Borsel, John

    2012-01-01

    Several authors mentioned the occurrence of articulation problems in the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) population. However, few studies have undertaken a detailed analysis of the articulation skills of NF1 patients, especially in schoolchildren and adults. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine in depth the articulation skills of…

  20. Cerebellar pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidich, M.J.; Walker, M.T.; Han, G. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Gottardi-Littell, N.R. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chandler, J.P. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2004-10-01

    We describe a case of cerebellar pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) occurring in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The histomorphology of this uncommon glial (astrocytic) neoplasm is discussed. The occurrence of this tumor within the posterior fossa is extremely rare. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a cerebellar PXA in a patient with NF1. (orig.)

  1. Muscle phenotype in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Grete; Orngreen, Mette C; Preisler, Nicolai

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The pathogenesis of muscle involvement in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is not well understood. In this study, we characterized the muscle phenotype in patients with confirmed DM1. Methods: In 38 patients, muscle strength was tested by hand-held dynamometry. Myotonia...

  2. Chronic comorbidities in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazelifarsani, Soulmaz; Souverein, Patrick C.; Van Der Vorst, Marja M.J.; Knibbe, Catherijne A.J.; De Boer, Anthonius; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Limited quantitative data exist on the burden of chronic comorbidities in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Such knowledge is necessary for the development of guidelines and prevention programs. Objectives: To determine the incidence of chronic comorbidities in

  3. Improving School Experiences for Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, Saori S.; Hopkins, Amanda; Burke, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is one of the most common metabolic diseases in children worldwide and the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is growing. T1D is complicated to manage and adolescents with diabetes face unique, age-specific challenges. The purpose of this article is to discuss ways in which schools can create a positive…

  4. Strategies for glucose control in people with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiroux, Dimitri; Finan, Daniel Aaron; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we apply a robust feedforward-feedback control strategy to people with type 1 diabetes. The feedforward controller consists of a bolus calculator which compensates the disturbance coming from meals. The feedback controller is based on a linearized description of the model describing...

  5. Nuclear Receptors and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreijerink, K.M.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311470238

    2009-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an inherited syndrome that is characterized by the occurrence of tumours of the parathyroid glands, gastroenteropancreatic tumours, pitui-tary gland adenomas, as well as adrenal adenomas and neuro-endocrine tumours, often at a young age. MEN1 tumours can

  6. Insulin analogues and severe hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P L; Hansen, L S; Jespersen, M J

    2012-01-01

    The effect of insulin analogues on glycaemic control is well-documented, whereas the effect on avoidance of severe hypoglycaemia remains tentative. We studied the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia in unselected patients with type 1 diabetes treated with insulin analogues, human insulin, or mixed...

  7. Overnight glucose control in people with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiroux, Dimitri; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Schmidt, Signe

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an individualized model predictive control (MPC) algorithm for overnight blood glucose stabilization in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The MPC formulation uses an asymmetric objective function that penalizes low glucose levels more heavily. We compute the model parameters...

  8. Imaging Finding of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yum, Tae Jun; Cho, Hee Woo

    2012-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant inherited syndrome with characteristic clinical and radiological manifestations. Many reports on MEN1 have been published; however, no cases of radiologically diagnosed MEN1 have been reported. Therefore, we report on a radiologically diagnosed case of MEN1 with clinical symptoms of gastroduodenal ulcer.

  9. Kanyawara Virus: A Novel Rhabdovirus Infecting Newly Discovered Nycteribiid Bat Flies Infesting Previously Unknown Pteropodid Bats in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Tony L; Bennett, Andrew J; Kityo, Robert; Kuhn, Jens H; Chapman, Colin A

    2017-07-13

    Bats are natural reservoir hosts of highly virulent pathogens such as Marburg virus, Nipah virus, and SARS coronavirus. However, little is known about the role of bat ectoparasites in transmitting and maintaining such viruses. The intricate relationship between bats and their ectoparasites suggests that ectoparasites might serve as viral vectors, but evidence to date is scant. Bat flies, in particular, are highly specialized obligate hematophagous ectoparasites that incidentally bite humans. Using next-generation sequencing, we discovered a novel ledantevirus (mononegaviral family Rhabdoviridae, genus Ledantevirus) in nycteribiid bat flies infesting pteropodid bats in western Uganda. Mitochondrial DNA analyses revealed that both the bat flies and their bat hosts belong to putative new species. The coding-complete genome of the new virus, named Kanyawara virus (KYAV), is only distantly related to that of its closest known relative, Mount Elgon bat virus, and was found at high titers in bat flies but not in blood or on mucosal surfaces of host bats. Viral genome analysis indicates unusually low CpG dinucleotide depletion in KYAV compared to other ledanteviruses and rhabdovirus groups, with KYAV displaying values similar to rhabdoviruses of arthropods. Our findings highlight the possibility of a yet-to-be-discovered diversity of potentially pathogenic viruses in bat ectoparasites.

  10. Deciphering the bat virome catalog to better understand the ecological diversity of bat viruses and the bat origin of emerging infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Yang, Li; Ren, Xianwen; He, Guimei; Zhang, Junpeng; Yang, Jian; Qian, Zhaohui; Dong, Jie; Sun, Lilian; Zhu, Yafang; Du, Jiang; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Shuyi; Jin, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Studies have demonstrated that ~60%-80% of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) in humans originated from wild life. Bats are natural reservoirs of a large variety of viruses, including many important zoonotic viruses that cause severe diseases in humans and domestic animals. However, the understanding of the viral population and the ecological diversity residing in bat populations is unclear, which complicates the determination of the origins of certain EIDs. Here, using bats as a typical wildlife reservoir model, virome analysis was conducted based on pharyngeal and anal swab samples of 4440 bat individuals of 40 major bat species throughout China. The purpose of this study was to survey the ecological and biological diversities of viruses residing in these bat species, to investigate the presence of potential bat-borne zoonotic viruses and to evaluate the impacts of these viruses on public health. The data obtained in this study revealed an overview of the viral community present in these bat samples. Many novel bat viruses were reported for the first time and some bat viruses closely related to known human or animal pathogens were identified. This genetic evidence provides new clues in the search for the origin or evolution pattern of certain viruses, such as coronaviruses and noroviruses. These data offer meaningful ecological information for predicting and tracing wildlife-originated EIDs.

  11. Bats Increase the Number of Cultivable Airborne Fungi in the "Nietoperek" Bat Reserve in Western Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokurewicz, Tomasz; Ogórek, Rafał; Pusz, Wojciech; Matkowski, Krzysztof

    2016-07-01

    The "Nietoperek" bat reserve located in Western Poland is one of the largest bat hibernation sites in the European Union with nearly 38,000 bats from 12 species. Nietoperek is part of a built underground fortification system from WWII. The aims of the study were (1) to determine the fungal species composition and changes during hibernation season in relation to bat number and microclimatic conditions and (2) evaluate the potential threat of fungi for bat assemblages and humans visiting the complex. Airborne fungi were collected in the beginning, middle and end of hibernation period (9 November 2013 and 17 January and 15 March 2014) in 12 study sites, one outside and 11 inside the complex. Ambient temperature (T a) and relative humidity (RH) were measured by the use of data loggers, and species composition of bats was recorded from the study sites. The collision method (Air Ideal 3P) sampler was used to detect 34 species of airborne fungi including Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd). The density of airborne fungi isolated from the outdoor air samples varied from 102 to 242 CFU/1 m(3) of air and from 12 to 1198 CFU in the underground air samples. There was a positive relationship between number of bats and the concentration of fungi. The concentration of airborne fungi increased with the increase of bats number. Analysis of other possible ways of spore transport to the underground indicated that the number of bats was the primary factor determining the number of fungal spores in that hibernation site. Microclimatic conditions where Pd was found (median 8.7 °C, min-max 6.1-9.9 °C and 100 %, min-max 77.5-100.0 %) were preferred by hibernating Myotis myotis and Myotis daubentonii; therefore, these species are most probably especially prone to infection by this fungi species. The spores of fungi found in the underground can be pathogenic for humans and animals, especially for immunocompromised persons, even though their concentrations did not exceed limits and

  12. Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1: Definition, Etiopathogenesis, Diagnostics and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolic Tomislav

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1 (CRS-1 is defined as an acute worsening of heart function leading to acute kidney injury and/or dysfunction. It is an important cause of hospitalization which affects the diagnosis as well as the prognosis and treatment of patients. The purpose of this paper is to analyze causes that lead to the development of cardiorenal syndrome type 1 and its clinical consequences, as well as to emphasize the clinical importance of its early detection. The clinical studies and professional papers dealing with etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of cardiorenal syndrome type 1, have been analyzed. The most important role in the occurrence of cardio renal syndrome type 1 is played by hemodynamic mechanisms, activation of neurohumoral systems, inflammation and imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO. Diagnosis of cardiorenal syndrome type 1 involves biomarkers of acute renal injury among which the most important are: neutrophil gelatinaseassociated lipocalin (NGAL, cystatin C, kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1, liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP, IL-18 and the values of nitrogen compounds in serum. In addition to a pharmacological therapy, various modalities of extracorporeal ultrafiltration are applied in treatment of CRS-1, particularly if there is resistance to the use of diuretic therapy. As opposed to the experimental models, in clinical practice acute renal injury is often diagnosed late so that the measures taken do not give the expected results and the protective role shown in experimental conditions do not give the same results. For all these reasons, it is necessary to analyze the pathophysiology of renal impairment in cardiorenal syndrome as well as detect early indicators of kidney injury that could have clinical benefit and positive impact on reducing the cost of treatment.

  13. Increased plasma osteoprotegerin concentrations in Type 1 diabetes with albuminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shen-tian; Xu, Jian-min; Wang, Meng; Chen, Fu-lian; Ding, Gang

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the plasma osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels in Type 1 diabetic patients with albuminuria. A total of 80 Type 1 diabetic subjects and 30 control subjects were enrolled. Diabetic subjects were divided into normoalbuminuric group, microalbuminuric group and macroalbuminuric group according to urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER) and serum creatinine measurements. Plasma osteoprotegerin level was measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. The serum OPG levels were significantly elevated in patients with microalbuminuria (3.62 ± 0.70 ng/l) and macroalbuminuria (4.45 ± 0.76 ng/l) as compared with patients with normoalbuminuria (2.77 ± 0.78 ng/l) and control subjects (2.29 ± 0.37 ng/l). And the plasma osteoprotegerin level in macroalbuminuric group was also higher than that in microalbuminuria group. The plasma osteoprotegerin level had a positive correlation with the fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h plasma glucose (2hPG), glycohemoglobin A1c (HbA1C), highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP)and UAER. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the plasma osteoprotegerin level was an independent factor associated with albuminuria in Type 1 diabetes. The plasma values of osteoprotegerin were elevated in Type 1 diabetic patients with nephropathy and gradually increased with the severity, so there is a association between plasma osteoprotegerin levels and the presence and severity of diabetic nephropathy. This finding supports the growing concept that osteoprotegerin may act as an important regulatory molecule in the angiopathy, and particularly, that it may be involved in the development of nephropathy in Type 1 diabetes.

  14. Acoustic mirrors as sensory traps for bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greif, Stefan; Zsebők, Sándor; Schmieder, Daniela; Siemers, Björn M

    2017-09-08

    Sensory traps pose a considerable and often fatal risk for animals, leading them to misinterpret their environment. Bats predominantly rely on their echolocation system to forage, orientate, and navigate. We found that bats can mistake smooth, vertical surfaces as clear flight paths, repeatedly colliding with them, likely as a result of their acoustic mirror properties. The probability of collision is influenced by the number of echolocation calls and by the amount of time spent in front of the surface. The echolocation call analysis corroborates that bats perceive smooth, vertical surfaces as open flyways. Reporting on occurrences with different species in the wild, we argue that it is necessary to more closely monitor potentially dangerous locations with acoustic mirror properties (such as glass fronts) to assess the true frequency of fatalities around these sensory traps. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  15. The amazing bats: Friends, enemies or allies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mattar V

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bats are a group of extraordinarily specialized vertebrates and are the only mammals capable of flying; their nocturnal habits have stigmatized them to such an extent that in the Hollywood film productions Count Dracula of the Carpathian Mountains was considered the first vampire man; even before Batman himself. In ecosystems, bats are actors with leading roles, 70% of them are insectivores, pollinators, or frugivorous and contribute to the regeneration of forests by disseminating seeds. Some are even fish hunters. Although their large population is mostly distributed in the tropics, they are cosmopolitan and are also found in the Northern Hemisphere. The population of these bats has been displaced in the South American tropics, due to, among many factors, illegal mining, pesticide spraying, indiscriminate deforestation to provide pasture for cattle, and the invasion of their habitats by humans (1.

  16. Molecular evolution of bat color vision genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daryi; Oakley, Todd; Mower, Jeffrey; Shimmin, Lawrence C; Yim, Sokchea; Honeycutt, Rodney L; Tsao, Hsienshao; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2004-02-01

    The two suborders of bats, Megachiroptera (megabats) and Microchiroptera (microbats), use different sensory modalities for perceiving their environment. Megabats are crepuscular and rely on a well-developed eyes and visual pathway, whereas microbats occupy a nocturnal niche and use acoustic orientation or echolocation more than vision as the major means of perceiving their environment. In view of the differences associated with their sensory systems, we decided to investigate the function and evolution of color vision (opsin genes) in these two suborders of bats. The middle/long wavelength (M/L) and short wavelength (S) opsin genes were sequenced from two frugivorous species of megabats, Haplonycteris fischeri and Pteropus dasymallus formosus, and one insectivorous species of microbat, Myotis velifer. Contrary to the situation in primates, where many nocturnal species have lost the functional S opsin gene, both crepuscular and strictly nocturnal species of bats that we examined have functional M/L and S opsin genes. Surprisingly, the S opsin in these bats may be sensitive to UV light, which is relatively more abundant at dawn and at dusk. The M/L opsin in these bats appears to be the L type, which is sensitive to red and may be helpful for identifying fruits among leaves or for other purposes. Most interestingly, H. fischeri has a recent duplication of the M/L opsin gene, representing to date the only known case of opsin gene duplication in non-primate mammals. Some of these observations are unexpected and may provide insights into the effect of nocturnal life on the evolution of opsin genes in mammals and the evolution of the life history traits of bats in general.

  17. Adaptive vocal behavior drives perception by echolocation in bats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moss, Cynthia F; Chiu, Chen; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2011-01-01

    Echolocation operates through adaptive sensorimotor systems that collectively enable the bat to localize and track sonar objects as it flies. The features of sonar signals used by a bat to probe its surroundings determine the information available to its acoustic imaging system. In turn, the bat......'s perception of a complex scene guides its active adjustments in the features of subsequent sonar vocalizations. Here, we propose that the bat's active vocal-motor behaviors play directly into its representation of a dynamic auditory scene....

  18. Sonar bat for visually impaired people

    OpenAIRE

    Pedrero Rodríguez, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Visually impaired people have many difficulties when traveling because it is impossible for them to detect obstacles that stand in their way. Bats instead of using the sight to detect these obstacles use a method based on ultrasounds, as their sense of hearing is much more developed than that of sight. The aim of the project is to design and build a device based on the method used by the bats to detect obstacles and transmit this information to people with vision problems to improve the...

  19. Consensus guidelines for management of glycogen storage disease type 1b - European Study on Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G; Rake, JP; Labrune, P; Leonard, JV; Moses, S; Ullrich, K; Wendel, U; Smit, GPA

    2002-01-01

    Life expectancy in glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1) has improved considerably. Its relative rarity implies that no metabolic centre has experience of large series of patients and therefore experience with long-term management and follow-up at each centre is limited. There is wide variation in

  20. Effects of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker on bones in mice with type 1 diabetes induced by streptozotocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Diao, Teng-Yue; Gu, Sa-Sa; Wu, Shu-Yan; Gebru, Yoseph A; Chen, Xi; Wang, Jing-Yu; Ran, Shu; Wong, Man-Sau

    2014-09-01

    This study was performed to address the pathological roles of the skeletal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in type 1 diabetes-induced osteoporosis and the effects of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker losartan on bones in diabetic mice. Bone histomorphology was detected by H&E staining, Safranin O staining and X-ray radiography. Micro-CT was performed for the analysis of bone parameters. Gene and protein expression were determined by RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Type 1 diabetic mice displayed osteopenia phenotype, and losartan treatment had no osteoprotective effects on diabetic mice as shown by the reduction of bone mineral density and microarchitectural parameters at the proximal metaphysis of the tibia. The mRNA expression of AGT, renin receptor and ACE, and protein expression of renin and AT1R were markedly up-regulated in the bones of vehicle-treated diabetic mice compared to those of non-diabetic mice. The treatment with losartan further significantly increased the expression of AGT, renin, angiotensin II and AT1R, and reduced the expression of AT2R receptor as compared to those of diabetic mice. Local bone RAS functionally played a role in the development of type 1 diabetic osteoporosis, and losartan had no bone-sparing function in diabetes mice because of enhance skeletal RAS activity. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bat1 and Bat2 aminotransferases have functionally diverged from the ancestral-like Kluyveromyces lactis orthologous enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritrini Colón

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene duplication is a key evolutionary mechanism providing material for the generation of genes with new or modified functions. The fate of duplicated gene copies has been amply discussed and several models have been put forward to account for duplicate conservation. The specialization model considers that duplication of a bifunctional ancestral gene could result in the preservation of both copies through subfunctionalization, resulting in the distribution of the two ancestral functions between the gene duplicates. Here we investigate whether the presumed bifunctional character displayed by the single branched chain amino acid aminotransferase present in K. lactis has been distributed in the two paralogous genes present in S. cerevisiae, and whether this conservation has impacted S. cerevisiae metabolism. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results show that the KlBat1 orthologous BCAT is a bifunctional enzyme, which participates in the biosynthesis and catabolism of branched chain aminoacids (BCAAs. This dual role has been distributed in S. cerevisiae Bat1 and Bat2 paralogous proteins, supporting the specialization model posed to explain the evolution of gene duplications. BAT1 is highly expressed under biosynthetic conditions, while BAT2 expression is highest under catabolic conditions. Bat1 and Bat2 differential relocalization has favored their physiological function, since biosynthetic precursors are generated in the mitochondria (Bat1, while catabolic substrates are accumulated in the cytosol (Bat2. Under respiratory conditions, in the presence of ammonium and BCAAs the batbat2Δ double mutant shows impaired growth, indicating that Bat1 and Bat2 could play redundant roles. In K. lactis wild type growth is independent of BCAA degradation, since a Klbat1Δ mutant grows under this condition. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that BAT1 and BAT2 differential expression and subcellular relocalization has resulted in the distribution of the

  2. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bat1 and Bat2 Aminotransferases Have Functionally Diverged from the Ancestral-Like Kluyveromyces lactis Orthologous Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón, Maritrini; Hernández, Fabiola; López, Karla; Quezada, Héctor; González, James; López, Geovani; Aranda, Cristina; González, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene duplication is a key evolutionary mechanism providing material for the generation of genes with new or modified functions. The fate of duplicated gene copies has been amply discussed and several models have been put forward to account for duplicate conservation. The specialization model considers that duplication of a bifunctional ancestral gene could result in the preservation of both copies through subfunctionalization, resulting in the distribution of the two ancestral functions between the gene duplicates. Here we investigate whether the presumed bifunctional character displayed by the single branched chain amino acid aminotransferase present in K. lactis has been distributed in the two paralogous genes present in S. cerevisiae, and whether this conservation has impacted S. cerevisiae metabolism. Principal Findings Our results show that the KlBat1 orthologous BCAT is a bifunctional enzyme, which participates in the biosynthesis and catabolism of branched chain aminoacids (BCAAs). This dual role has been distributed in S. cerevisiae Bat1 and Bat2 paralogous proteins, supporting the specialization model posed to explain the evolution of gene duplications. BAT1 is highly expressed under biosynthetic conditions, while BAT2 expression is highest under catabolic conditions. Bat1 and Bat2 differential relocalization has favored their physiological function, since biosynthetic precursors are generated in the mitochondria (Bat1), while catabolic substrates are accumulated in the cytosol (Bat2). Under respiratory conditions, in the presence of ammonium and BCAAs the batbat2Δ double mutant shows impaired growth, indicating that Bat1 and Bat2 could play redundant roles. In K. lactis wild type growth is independent of BCAA degradation, since a Klbat1Δ mutant grows under this condition. Conclusions Our study shows that BAT1 and BAT2 differential expression and subcellular relocalization has resulted in the distribution of the biosynthetic and catabolic

  3. Abnormal islet sphingolipid metabolism in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Laurits J; Krogvold, Lars; Hasselby, Jane P; Kaur, Simranjeet; Claessens, Laura A; Russell, Mark A; Mathews, Clayton E; Hanssen, Kristian F; Morgan, Noel G; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Roep, Bart O; Gerling, Ivan C; Pociot, Flemming; Dahl-Jørgensen, Knut; Buschard, Karsten

    2018-04-18

    Sphingolipids play important roles in beta cell physiology, by regulating proinsulin folding and insulin secretion and in controlling apoptosis, as studied in animal models and cell cultures. Here we investigate whether sphingolipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis of human type 1 diabetes and whether increasing the levels of the sphingolipid sulfatide would prevent models of diabetes in NOD mice. We examined the amount and distribution of sulfatide in human pancreatic islets by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Transcriptional analysis was used to evaluate expression of sphingolipid-related genes in isolated human islets. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and a T cell proliferation assay were used to identify type 1 diabetes related polymorphisms and test how these affect cellular islet autoimmunity. Finally, we treated NOD mice with fenofibrate, a known activator of sulfatide biosynthesis, to evaluate the effect on experimental autoimmune diabetes development. We found reduced amounts of sulfatide, 23% of the levels in control participants, in pancreatic islets of individuals with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, which were associated with reduced expression of enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism. Next, we discovered eight gene polymorphisms (ORMDL3, SPHK2, B4GALNT1, SLC1A5, GALC, PPARD, PPARG and B4GALT1) involved in sphingolipid metabolism that contribute to the genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes. These gene polymorphisms correlated with the degree of cellular islet autoimmunity in a cohort of individuals with type 1 diabetes. Finally, using fenofibrate, which activates sulfatide biosynthesis, we completely prevented diabetes in NOD mice and even reversed the disease in half of otherwise diabetic animals. These results indicate that islet sphingolipid metabolism is abnormal in type 1 diabetes and suggest that modulation may represent a novel therapeutic approach. The RNA expression data is

  4. Education to Action: Improving Public Perception of Bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Hoffmaster

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Public perception of bats has historically been largely negative with bats often portrayed as carriers of disease. Bats are commonly associated with vampire lore and thus elicit largely fearful reactions despite the fact that they are a vital and valuable part of the ecosystem. Bats provide a variety of essential services from pest control to plant pollination. Despite the benefits of bats to the environment and the economy, bats are suffering at the hands of humans. They are victims of turbines, human encroachment, pesticides, and, most recently, white nose syndrome. Because of their critical importance to the environment, humans should do what they can to help protect bats. We propose that humans will be more likely to do so if their perceptions and attitudes toward bats can be significantly improved. In a preliminary study we found some support for the idea that people can be educated about bats through bat oriented events and exhibits, and that this greater knowledge can inspire humans to act to save bats.

  5. [Trematodes (Trematoda) of bats (Chiroptera) from the Middle Volga Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, A A; Kirillova, N Iu; Vekhnik, V P

    2012-01-01

    The data on species diversity of trematodes from bats collected in the Middle Volga Region are summarized. According to original and literary data, 20 trematode species were recorded in bats of the region examined. Plagiorchis elegans, Lecithodendrium skrjabini, L. rysavyi, Prosthodendrium hurkovaae, and Pycnoporus megacotyle are specified for the bat fauna of Russia for the first time. For 11 species of parasites, new hosts are recorded. The analysis of bat helminthes demonstrated that the fauna of trematodes of the northern bat (12 species of trematodes), of the pond, and of the Brandt's bats is the most diverse, constituting more than 10 parasite species per bat species. The largest number of final hosts in the Middle Volga Region is characteristic of Plagiorchis koreanus and Prosthodendrium chilostomum; the latter species were revealed in 8 and 7 bat species, respectively. Trematodes of bats possess a high degree of host specificity. 17 species parasitize exclusively in bats out of 20 parasite species registered for the order Chiroptera. Only 3 species (Plagiorchis elegans, P. vespertilionis, and Prosthodendrium chilostomum) show wide degree of specificity, being found in other animals. Taxonomic position, the circle of hosts, collecting sites, and brief data in biology and geographical distribution for each helminth species are specified. Morphological descriptions and original figures for all the trematode species revealed in bats of the Middle Volga Region are given.

  6. Novel Bartonella Species in Insectivorous Bats, Northern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ju Han

    Full Text Available Bartonella species are emerging human pathogens. Bats are known to carry diverse Bartonella species, some of which are capable of infecting humans. However, as the second largest mammalian group by a number of species, the role of bats as the reservoirs of Bartonella species is not fully explored, in term of their species diversity and worldwide distribution. China, especially Northern China, harbors a number of endemic insectivorous bat species; however, to our knowledge, there are not yet studies about Bartonella in bats in China. The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence and genetic diversity of Bartonella species in bats in Northern China. Bartonella species were detected by PCR amplification of gltA gene in 25.2% (27/107 bats in Mengyin County, Shandong Province of China, including 1/3 Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, 2/10 Rhinolophus pusillus, 9/16 Myotis fimbriatus, 1/5 Myotis ricketti, 14/58 Myotis pequinius. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Bartonella species detected in bats in this study clustered into ten groups, and some might be novel Bartonella species. An association between Bartonella species and bat species was demonstrated and co-infection with different Bartonella species in a single bat was also observed. Our findings expanded our knowledge on the genetic diversity of Bartonella in bats, and shed light on the ecology of bat-borne Bartonella species.

  7. Nonecholocating fruit bats produce biosonar clicks with their wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonman, Arjan; Bumrungsri, Sara; Yovel, Yossi

    2014-12-15

    Because evolution mostly acts over millions of years, the intermediate steps leading to a functional sensory system remain enigmatic. Accordingly, there is an ongoing debate regarding the evolution of bat echolocation. In search of the origin of bat echolocation, we studied how Old World fruit bats, which have always been classified as nonecholocating, orient in complete darkness. We found that two of these nonecholocating species used click-like sounds to detect and discriminate objects in complete darkness. However, we discovered that this click-based echo sensing is rudimentary and does not allow these bats to estimate distance accurately as all other echolocating bats can. Moreover, unlike all other echolocating bats, which generate pulses using the larynx or the tongue, these bats generated clicks with their wings. We provide evidence suggesting that all Old World fruit bats can click with their wings. Although this click-based echo sensing used by Old World fruit bats may not represent the ancestral form of current (laryngeal) bat echolocation, we argue that clicking fruit bats could be considered behavioral fossils, opening a window to study the evolution of echolocation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A bony connection signals laryngeal echolocation in bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselka, Nina; McErlain, David D; Holdsworth, David W; Eger, Judith L; Chhem, Rethy K; Mason, Matthew J; Brain, Kirsty L; Faure, Paul A; Fenton, M Brock

    2010-02-18

    Echolocation is an active form of orientation in which animals emit sounds and then listen to reflected echoes of those sounds to form images of their surroundings in their brains. Although echolocation is usually associated with bats, it is not characteristic of all bats. Most echolocating bats produce signals in the larynx, but within one family of mainly non-echolocating species (Pteropodidae), a few species use echolocation sounds produced by tongue clicks. Here we demonstrate, using data obtained from micro-computed tomography scans of 26 species (n = 35 fluid-preserved bats), that proximal articulation of the stylohyal bone (part of the mammalian hyoid apparatus) with the tympanic bone always distinguishes laryngeally echolocating bats from all other bats (that is, non-echolocating pteropodids and those that echolocate with tongue clicks). In laryngeally echolocating bats, the proximal end of the stylohyal bone directly articulates with the tympanic bone and is often fused with it. Previous research on the morphology of the stylohyal bone in the oldest known fossil bat (Onychonycteris finneyi) suggested that it did not echolocate, but our findings suggest that O. finneyi may have used laryngeal echolocation because its stylohyal bones may have articulated with its tympanic bones. The present findings reopen basic questions about the timing and the origin of flight and echolocation in the early evolution of bats. Our data also provide an independent anatomical character by which to distinguish laryngeally echolocating bats from other bats.

  9. Assessing the impacts of wind energy development on bats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, E.B. [Bat Conservation International, Austin, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Research conducted by the Bats and Wind Energy Cooperative in West Virginia was presented. Bats are key pollinators, seed dispersers, and insect predators. Bats also help to protect crops and play an important role in helping to reduce pesticide use. However, bats reproduce slowly and are susceptible to mortality factors. In 2003, between 1398 and 4031 bats were killed at the Mountaineer Wind Energy Facility in West Virginia. Possible explanations why bats are killed by wind turbines include the fact that wind farms form a linear corridor. Acoustics, echolocation failure, and electromagnetic-disorientation may also play a role in bat mortalities. Unifying patterns of bat fatalities at wind facilities include the fact that fatalities are heavily skewed toward migratory bats. Peak turbine collision fatalities occur in mid-summer. Bat fatalities are highest during periods of low wind speed and seem to be related to climate variables associated with the passage of weather fronts. Studies have also shown that the changing cut-in speeds of turbines may also reduce bat fatalities. It was concluded that pre-construction assessments should be conducted to determine high risk areas. tabs., figs.

  10. Echolocating bats cry out loud to detect their prey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surlykke, Annemarie; Kalko, Elisabeth K V

    2008-01-01

    Echolocating bats have successfully exploited a broad range of habitats and prey. Much research has demonstrated how time-frequency structure of echolocation calls of different species is adapted to acoustic constraints of habitats and foraging behaviors. However, the intensity of bat calls has...... been largely neglected although intensity is a key factor determining echolocation range and interactions with other bats and prey. Differences in detection range, in turn, are thought to constitute a mechanism promoting resource partitioning among bats, which might be particularly important...... for the species-rich bat assemblages in the tropics. Here we present data on emitted intensities for 11 species from 5 families of insectivorous bats from Panamá hunting in open or background cluttered space or over water. We recorded all bats in their natural habitat in the field using a multi-microphone array...

  11. BAT2 GRB Catalog - Prompt Emission Properties of Swift GRBs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Parsons, A.; Tueller, J.; Baumgartner, W.; Cummings, J.; Fenimore, E.; Palmer, D.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, C.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Ukwatta, T.

    2010-01-01

    We present the second Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which contains 476 bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. This catalog presents burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, time-averaged spectral parameters and time-resolved spectral parameters measured by the BAT. The BAT T 90 duration peaks at 70 s. We confirm that the spectra of the BAT short-duration GRBs are generally harder than those of the long-duration GRBs. The observed durations of the BAT high redshift GRBs are not systematically longer than those of the moderate redshift GRBs. Furthermore, the observed spectra of the BAT high redshift GRBs are similar to or harder than the moderate redshift GRBs.

  12. The distribution of the bats of South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, Jennifer M. [USDA Forest Service, Parsons, WV (United States); Menzel, Michael A. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Ford, W. Mark [USDA Forest Service, Parsons, WV (United States); Edwards, John W. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Sheffield, Steven R. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States); Kilgo, John C. [USDA Forest Service, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Bunch, Mary S. [South Carolina Dept. of Natural Resources, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Menzel. J.M., M.A. Menzel, W.M. Ford, J.W. Edwards, S.R. Sheffield, J.C. Kilgo, and M.S. Bunch. 2003. The distribution of the bats of South Carolina. Southeastern Nat. 2(1): 121-152. There is a paucity of information available about the distribution of bats in the southeastern United States. We synthesized records from museums, bat captures, and bats submitted for rabies testing to provide a more accurate and useful distribution for natural resource managers and those planning to research bats in South Carolina. Distributional information, including maps, collection localities within counties, and literature references, for all 14 species of bats that occur in South Carolina, has never been synthesized. To provide better information on the state's bat fauna, we have updated distributions for all species that occur in South Carolina.

  13. Cave- and Crevice-Dwelling Bats on USACE Projects: Townsend's Big-Eared Bat (Corynorhinus townsendii)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Wilma

    2002-01-01

    ..." (Dickerson, Martin, and Allen 1999; Kasul, Martin, and Allen 2000). This technical note provides information on selected bat species that have the potential to occur on Corps projects in the eastern United States and be impacted by Corps activities...

  14. Adolescents developing life skills for managing type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Gitte R; Esbensen, Bente Appel; Hommel, Eva

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore and illustrate how the Guided Self-Determination-Youth method influences the development of life skills in adolescents with type 1 diabetes supported by their parents and healthcare providers. BACKGROUND: Evidence-based methods that accomplish constructive cooperation between...... adolescents with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes, their parents and healthcare providers are needed. We adjusted an adult life skills intervention comprising reflection sheets and advanced communication for use by adolescent-parent-professional triads in outpatient visits. DESIGN: A qualitative realistic...... evaluation design comprising eight context-mechanism-outcome configurations directed the analysis of the Guided Self-Determination-Youth's influence on adolescent-parent-professional triads to evaluate what worked for whom, how and in what circumstances. Thirteen adolescents aged 13-18 years diagnosed...

  15. Therapeutic management of type 1 diabetes before and during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Damm, Peter; Nielsen, Lene Ringholm

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Pregnancy increases the risks of adverse outcomes for mother and infant in women with type 1 diabetes. Obtaining and maintaining adequate glycemic control during pregnancy is crucial for optimizing outcomes. Areas covered: The importance of prepregnancy planning and treatment during...... pregnancy is reviewed. The use of insulin analogues and antihypertensive drugs in diabetic pregnancy are in focus. The reader is presented with evidence discussing the importance of prepregnancy counseling and treatment during pregnancy in women with type 1 diabetes. Expert opinion: Tight glycemic control...... the risk of malformations. Screening for diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy and thyroid dysfunction is important, and indications for antihypertensive treatment and treatment of thyroid dysfunction need to be in focus before and during pregnancy....

  16. Maternal glycemic control and hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Kinsley, Brendan; Amiel, Stephanie A

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety and efficacy of insulin aspart (IAsp) versus regular human insulin (HI) in basal-bolus therapy with NPH insulin in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Subjects (n = 322) who were pregnant or planning pregnancy were randomized to IAsp...... in basal-bolus therapy with NPH insulin in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes and may potentially offer some benefits in terms of postprandial glucose control and preventing severe hypoglycemia....... with IAsp than HI (P = 0.003 and P = 0.044, respectively), as were mean plasma glucose levels 90 min after breakfast (P = 0.044 and P = 0.001, respectively). Maternal safety profiles and pregnancy outcomes were similar between treatments. CONCLUSIONS: IAsp is at least as safe and effective as HI when used...

  17. Improved prognosis in type 1 diabetic patients with nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Anne Sofie; Tarnow, Lise; Rossing, Peter

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In early studies, a median survival time of 5 to 7 years from onset of diabetic nephropathy was observed. Furthermore, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was the main cause of death. We prospectively assessed the impact of reno- and cardiovascular protective treatment on prognosis in type 1...... diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy. METHODS: We prospectively followed 199 type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy and 192 patients with normoalbuminuria for 10 years. Aggressive antihypertensive treatment was initiated in patients with diabetic nephropathy in mid 1980s, whereas statins......%) died; hereof, 25 deaths (42%) were ascribed to cardiovascular causes while 30 patients (50%) with nephropathy died with ESRD. The estimate of median survival time from onset of diabetic nephropathy was 21.7 years, SE 3.3 years. CONCLUSION: The survival of patients with diabetic nephropathy has improved...

  18. Insulin Administration for People with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiroux, Dimitri; Finan, Daniel Aaron; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we apply model predictive control (MPC) for control of blood glucose in people with type 1 diabetes. The two first control strategies are based on nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC). The first control strategy is based on meal announcement in advance, while the second one...... considers meal announcement at mealtimes only. They give a quantitative upper bound on the achievable control performance. The third control strategy is a feedforward-feedback control strategy. This strategy uses a time-varying setpoint to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia. The feedback controller computes...... the optimal basal insulin infusion rate. The feedforward controller consists of a bolus calculator. It computes the optimal bolus, along with the time-varying glucose setpoint. We test these three strategies on a virtual patient with type 1 diabetes. The numerical results demonstrate the robustness...

  19. Post-translational protein modifications in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wägner, A M; Cloos, P; Bergholdt, R

    2007-01-01

    that recognises and repairs isomerised Asn and Asp residues in proteins. The aim of this study was to assess the role of PIMT in the development of type 1 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis of 59 normal human tissues was performed with a monoclonal PIMT antibody. CGP3466B, which induces......-translational modifications and PIMT in the development of type 1 diabetes in the diabetes-prone BB rat, and perhaps also in humans...... expression of Pcmt1, was tested on MIN6 and INS1 cells, to assess its effect on Pcmt1 mRNA and PIMT levels (RT-PCR and western blot) and apoptosis. Forty-five diabetes-prone BioBreeding (BB) Ottawa Karlsburg (OK) rats were randomised to receive 0, 14 or 500 microg/kg (denoted as the control, low...

  20. Early risk stratification in pediatric type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    in HbA1c was either too small or happened too late. This study highlights that sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy remain a major concern in type 1 diabetes and the importance of early glycemic control. Identifying high-risk patients at a very early stage is not only desired for prevention...... of diabetic retinopathy - neuropathy and nephropathy similarly remain frequent in type 1 diabetes. Early risk stratification will allow for timely implementation of effective interventions and for individualized screening and diabetes care. The second and third studies of this thesis provide the longest...... prospective studies to date on both retinal vessel calibers and retinal fractal dimensions and their predictive value on diabetic microvascular complications. Semi-automated computer software has been developed to measure smaller changes in the retinal vessels on retinal photographs. Two of the first...

  1. ARX MPC for people with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiroux, Dimitri; Finan, Daniel Aaron; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by a lack of production of pancreatic insulin, consequently leading to high blood glucose concentrations (hyperglycemia). Hyperglycemia has negative health effects in the long term such as eye, nerve, and kidney disease. Exogenous insulin must......, or even death. Currently, insulin administration is performed by the subject with type 1 diabetes based on infrequent glucose measurements (in the form of finger-sticks), often resulting in an unsatisfactory blood glucose control. An artificial pancreas is a medical device that injects exogenous insulin...... be injected to keep the blood glucose in the normoglycemic range (approximately 60 – 140 mg/dL, or 3.3 – 8 mmol/L). However, the dosing of exogenous insulin must be done carefully, because low blood glucose concentrations (hypoglycemia) can have immediate and severe consequences like insulin shock, coma...

  2. Bartter Syndrome Type 1 Presenting as Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Vergine

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartter syndrome (BS type 1 (OMIM #601678 is a hereditary salt-losing renal tubular disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, polyuria, recurrent vomiting, and growth retardation. It is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the SLC12A1 gene, encoding the furosemide-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransporter. Recently, a phenotypic variability has been observed in patients with genetically determined BS, including absence of nephrocalcinosis, hypokalemia, and/or metabolic alkalosis in the first year of life as well as persistent metabolic acidosis mimicking distal renal tubular acidosis. We report the case of a child with a genetically determined diagnosis of Bartter syndrome type 1 who presented with a phenotype of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, with severe hypernatremia and urinary concentrating defect. In these atypical cases, molecular analysis is mandatory to define the diagnosis, in order to establish the correct clinical and therapeutic management.

  3. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in myotonic dystrophy type 1: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, Walmari; Baijens, Laura W J; Kremer, Bernd

    2014-06-01

    A systematic review was conducted to investigate the pathophysiology of and diagnostic procedures for oropharyngeal dysphagia in myotonic dystrophy (MD). The electronic databases Embase, PubMed, and The Cochrane Library were used. The search was limited to English, Dutch, French, German, Spanish, and Portuguese publications. Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the included articles. Swallowing assessment tools, the corresponding protocols, the studies' outcome measurements, and main findings are summarized and presented. The body of literature on pathophysiology of swallowing in dysphagic patients with MD type 1 remains scant. The included studies are heterogeneous with respect to design and outcome measures and hence are not directly comparable. More importantly, most studies had methodological problems. These are discussed in detail and recommendations for further research on diagnostic examinations for swallowing disorders in patients with MD type 1 are provided.

  4. Behavioral interventions for adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hampson, S. E.; Skinner, T. C.; Hart, J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - To evaluate the effectiveness of behavioral interventions for adolescents with type 1 diabetes based on a systematic review of the literature. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - The literature was identified by searching 11 electronic databases, hand-searching 3 journals from their start...... dates, and contacting individual researchers. Only articles that reported evaluations of behavioral (including educational and psychosocial) interventions for adolescents (age range 9-21 years) with type 1 diabetes that included a control group were included in the present review. Data summarizing...... were RCTs. Effect sizes could be calculated for 18 interventions. The overall mean effect size calculated across all outcomes was 0.33 (median 0.21), indicating that these interventions have a small- to medium-sized beneficial effect on diabetes management. Interventions that were theoretically based...

  5. Improved prognosis of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrésdóttir, Gudbjörg; Jensen, Majken L; Carstensen, Bendix

    2015-01-01

    The natural history of diabetic nephropathy offered an average survival of only 5-7 years. During the past decades, multiple changes in therapy and lifestyle have occurred. The prognosis of diabetic nephropathy after implementing stricter control of blood pressure (including increased use of long......-term renin-angiotensin system inhibition), lipids, and glycemia, along with less smoking and other lifestyle and treatment advancements, is inadequately analyzed. To clarify this, we studied 497 patients with type 1 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy at the Steno Diabetes Center and compared them...... and nephropathy onset occurred later in life, mortality was reduced by 30%. Risk factors for decline in glomerular filtration rate, death, and other renal end points were generally in agreement with prior studies. Thus, with current treatment of nephropathy in type 1 diabetes, the prognosis and loss of renal...

  6. Diabetic vitrectomy in a large type 1 diabetes patient population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostri, Christoffer; la Cour, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    1996 and 2010. Surgical history was obtained from The Danish National Patient Register. RESULTS: The population consisted of 3980 patients with type 1 diabetes. Median follow-up was 10.0 years. In total, 106 patients underwent diabetic vitrectomy in the observation period. Surgery indications were...... (p diabetic vitrectomy increased in patients experiencing glycosylated haemoglobin A1c > 75 mmol/mol in the observation period (p blood pressure ≥ 140 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mm......Hg, diabetes duration, age, gender and nephropathy were not associated with an increased risk of reaching diabetic vitrectomy (p > 0.05 for all variables). CONCLUSIONS: Diabetic vitrectomy is rarely required in a type 1 diabetes population with varying degrees of retinopathy, but the risk increases markedly...

  7. Eating disorders in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrotti, A; Catino, M; De Luca, F A; Morgese, G; Chiarelli, F

    1999-06-01

    Although the causes of eating disorders remain unclear, epidemiological evidence suggests that peripubertal changes in body shape and weight predispose young women to develop unhealthy eating attitudes. A psychiatric diagnosis of an eating disorder can be made in up to 10% of young women with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 1 diabetes). Eating disorders, anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, pose a particularly serious risk to health in young diabetic people. Several features associated with type 1 diabetes and its treatment, such as weight gain, dietary restraint and food preoccupation, may predispose young diabetic women to develop a clinical or subclinical eating disorder. The coexistence of these conditions could lead to poor metabolic control and an increased risk of microvascular complications.

  8. Sleep and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schnurbein, Julia; Boettcher, Claudia; Brandt, Stephanie; Karges, Beate; Dunstheimer, Desiree; Galler, Angela; Denzer, Christian; Denzer, Friederike; Vollbach, Heike; Wabitsch, Martin; Roenneberg, Till; Vetter, Celine

    2018-02-01

    Increasing evidence link sleep curtailment and circadian misalignment with adverse metabolic outcome. Adolescents might be most affected, given their late sleep timing and early school and work start times. Our aim was to examine the impact of poor sleeping habits on glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. This was a non-interventional multicenter study across Germany recruiting pubertally mature adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Medical records were used to collect information on diabetes duration, treatment, and complications. Participants self-reported sleep quality, timing, chronotype, and social jetlag-a measure of circadian misalignment. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was determined at the time of questionnaire response. We used multivariable linear regression models to examine associations between sleep and glycemic control. A total of 191 patients aged 16.5 years (mean HbA1c 8.0% [64 mmol/mol]) were included in this study. In multivariable adjusted analyses, sleep quality was significantly associated with HbA1c (mean difference; β = -0.07, P = .05). Stratified analysis indicated that this association might be stronger in boys and also in children with migration background. In contrast, neither sleep duration, sleep debt, chronotype, nor social jetlag was associated with HbA1c . Secondary analyses showed that social jetlag was significantly associated with levels of insulin requirements (mean difference; β = 0.035, P = .03). Our study suggests that poor sleep quality is associated with increased HbA1c in adolescents with type 1 diabetes and that higher levels of circadian misalignment are associated with increased insulin requirements. If replicated, our results indicate a clinical relevance of sleep habits in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Eating-Disordered Behaviour in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Sónia; Barros, Vânia; Rui Gomes, A

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate dysfunctional eating behaviour, self-esteem, social physique anxiety and quality of life in adolescents with type 1 diabetes who have differing desired weights and to evaluate the predictors of dysfunctional eating behaviour in these adolescents, with a focus on personal and psychological variables. We evaluated 79 adolescents with type 1 diabetes (mean age of 15.71 years) of both sexes (58.2% females) using the Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), the Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS-R) and the Diabetes Quality of Life (DQoL) measure. Of the adolescents, 44 with type 1 diabetes reported the desire to maintain or increase their current weight, and 35 reported the desire to reduce their current weight. The participants with the desire to weigh less were mainly females who exercised regularly and demonstrated more frequent binge eating and purging. Additionally, this group exhibited an increased frequency of eating disturbances, such as restraint and eating, weight and shape concerns. Moreover, this group demonstrated increased social physique anxiety and decreased diabetes quality of life in relation to the impact of diabetes, worries about diabetes and satisfaction with life. Finally, predictors of eating disturbances included the desire for lower weight, higher social physique anxiety and lower diabetes-related quality of life. The desire for a lower weight in adolescents with type 1 diabetes may increase problems related to eating behaviour and general quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Varenicline may trigger severe hypoglycaemia in Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P.L.; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U.; Thorsteinsson, B.

    2008-01-01

    is important to reduce risk of cardiovascular morbidity, especially in diabetes, use of effective drugs indicated for smoking cessation is rational. Case report We report multiple episodes of severe hypoglycaemia after starting varenicline in a 53-year-old woman with Type 1 diabetes. Since onset of diabetes......, intensified blood glucose monitoring and careful education of patients with diabetes treated with varenicline. Further investigation of the use of varenicline in patients with diabetes is warranted Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  11. Kenny-Caffey syndrome type 1 in an Egyptian girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotb Abbass Metwalley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kenny-Caffey syndrome type 1 (KCS1 (OMIM 244460 is a rare syndrome characterized by growth retardation, uniformly small slender long bones with medullary stenosis, thickened cortex of the long bones, hypocalcemia possibly with tetany at an early age and normal intelligence. The primary outcome of KCS1 is short stature. We present here an Egyptian girl aged 32 months with typical feature of KCS1.

  12. Complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS) type 1 validating case histories

    OpenAIRE

    P. Berger

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1 is challenging and unpredictable as the condition presents with vascular and neuropathic symptoms after nil or even minor injury to a peripheral nerve. The condition is one of a pain and motor dysfunction. The pathophysiology is not well understood and the relief of symptoms may change from being sympathetically mediated to sympathetically independent during  the course of the disease. At any stage physiotherapy has b...

  13. Endotracheal neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis type 1: an unusual manifestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willmann, Juergen K.; Weishaupt, Dominik; Smekal, A. von; Marincek, Borut; Kestenholz, Peter B.

    2002-01-01

    Tracheal involvement is an extremely rare manifestation in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). We present a 33-year-old women with NF-1 suffering from progressive dyspnea. Multislice spiral CT revealed a neurofibroma located within the trachea with intratracheal extension. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an intratracheal neurofibroma which has been documented by CT. This indicates that multislice spiral CT allows accurate demonstration of localization and extent of this rare manifestation of neurofibromas. (orig.)

  14. Sleep and glycemic control in type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Barone,Mark Thomaz Ugliara; Wey,Daniela; Schorr,Fabiola; Franco,Denise Reis; Carra,Mario Kehdi; Lorenzi Filho,Geraldo; Menna-Barreto,Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our aim in the present study was to elucidate how type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and sleep parameters interact, which was rarely evaluated up to the moment. Materials and methods Eighteen T1DM subjects without chronic complications, and 9 control subjects, matched for age and BMI, were studied. The following instruments used to evaluate sleep: the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, sleep diaries, actimeters, and polysomnography in a Sleep Lab. Glycemic control in T1DM individuals was evalua...

  15. Partial sleep restriction decreases insulin sensitivity in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke; van Dijk, J Gert; Biermasz, Nienke R; Lammers, Gert-Jan; van Kralingen, Klaas; Hoogma, Roel P L M; Corssmit, Eleonora P M; Romijn, Johannes A

    2010-07-01

    Sleep restriction results in decreased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that sleep duration is also a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. We studied seven patients (three men, four women) with type 1 diabetes: mean age 44 +/- 7 years, BMI 23.5 +/- 0.9 kg/m(2), and A1C 7.6 +/- 0.3%. They were studied once after a night of normal sleep duration and once after a night of only 4 h of sleep. Sleep characteristics were assessed by polysomnography. Insulin sensitivity was measured by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies with an infusion of [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose. RESULTS Sleep duration was shorter in the night with sleep restriction than in the unrestricted night (469 +/- 8.5 vs. 222 +/- 7.1 min, P = 0.02). Sleep restriction did not affect basal levels of glucose, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), or endogenous glucose production. Endogenous glucose production during the hyperinsulinemic clamp was not altered during the night of sleep restriction compared with the night of unrestricted sleep (6.2 +/- 0.8 vs. 6.9 +/- 0.6 micromol x kg lean body mass(-1) x min(-1), NS). In contrast, sleep restriction decreased the glucose disposal rate during the clamp (25.5 +/- 2.6 vs. 22.0 +/- 2.1 micromol x kg lean body mass(-1) x min(-1), P = 0.04), reflecting decreased peripheral insulin sensitivity. Accordingly, sleep restriction decreased the rate of glucose infusion by approximately 21% (P = 0.04). Sleep restriction did not alter plasma NEFA levels during the clamp (143 +/- 29 vs. 133 +/- 29 micromol/l, NS). Partial sleep deprivation during a single night induces peripheral insulin resistance in these seven patients with type 1 diabetes. Therefore, sleep duration is a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  16. Atypical meningioma and extensive calvarium defects in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simsek, Enver [Department of Paediatrics, Duzce Medical Faculty, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey); Yavuz, Cevdet [Department of Neurosurgery, Duzce Medical Faculty, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey); Ustundag, Nil [Department of Pathology, Abant Izzet Baysal University School of Medicine, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey)

    2003-08-01

    A 9-year-old girl with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) presented with a massive atypical meningioma and calvarial defect. Skull radiographs and cranial CT showed an extensive lytic bone lesion at the vertex. MRI demonstrated a large mass invading the calvarium and sagittal sinus. The histopathological and immunohistochemical diagnosis of the resected mass was atypical meningioma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of NF1 associated with atypical meningioma and massive calvarial defect in a child. (orig.)

  17. Involvement of the eye and orbit in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaonker C

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available 11 individuals were diagnosed to have neurofibromatosis type 1 and were examined for evidence of any ophthalmic lesions. Lisch nodules were the commonest manifestation of the disease and were present in 73% of all the patients (88% of those aged 16 years or more. 55% of the cases showed presence of neurofibroma on the lids. Other findings were optic glioma, unilateral sphenoid dysplasia with enlarged orbit, medullated nerve fibers and prominent corneal nerves with an incidence of 9% each.

  18. Multimodal imaging of choroidal nodules in neurofibromatosis type-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Choroidal nodules in neurofibromatosis type-1 are common and are best imaged with near-infrared reflectance (NIR imaging. The authors describe swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (SSOCTA of choroidal nodules. These nodules are seen as hyperflow areas on SSOCTA and correlate well to bright patches on NIR imaging. The utility of multicolor scanning laser imaging in detecting these abnormalities is also described.

  19. Atypical meningioma and extensive calvarium defects in neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simsek, Enver; Yavuz, Cevdet; Ustundag, Nil

    2003-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) presented with a massive atypical meningioma and calvarial defect. Skull radiographs and cranial CT showed an extensive lytic bone lesion at the vertex. MRI demonstrated a large mass invading the calvarium and sagittal sinus. The histopathological and immunohistochemical diagnosis of the resected mass was atypical meningioma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of NF1 associated with atypical meningioma and massive calvarial defect in a child. (orig.)

  20. Downregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptors during sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, M; Ittner, K P; Hobbhahn, J; Taeger, K; Kurtz, A

    2001-08-01

    Our study aimed to characterize the mechanisms underlying the attenuated cardiovascular responsiveness toward the renin-angiotensin system during sepsis. For this purpose, we determined the effects of experimental Gram-negative and Gram-positive sepsis in rats. We found that sepsis led to a ubiquitous upregulation of NO synthase isoform II expression and to pronounced hypotension. Despite increased plasma renin activity and plasma angiotensin (Ang) II levels, plasma aldosterone concentrations were normal, and the blood pressure response to exogenous Ang II was markedly diminished in septic rats. Mimicking the fall of blood pressure during sepsis by short-term infusion of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside in normal rats did not alter their blood pressure response to exogenous Ang II. Therefore, we considered the possibility of an altered expression of Ang II receptors during sepsis. It turned out that Ang II type 1 receptor expression was markedly downregulated in all organs of septic rats. Further in vitro studies with rat renal mesangial cells showed that NO and a combination of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma) downregulated Ang II type 1 receptor expression in a synergistic fashion. In summary, our data suggest that sepsis causes a systemic downregulation of Ang II type 1 receptors that is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines and NO. We suggest that this downregulation of Ang II type 1 receptors is the main reason for the attenuated responsiveness of blood pressure and of aldosterone formation to Ang II and, therefore, contributes to the characteristic septic shock.

  1. Genetic and Environmental Pathways in Type 1 Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    requirement that family pedigrees were consistent with the pattern of Mendelian inheritance of genetic markers between parents and offspring. It was...disequilib- rium test: history , subdivision, and admixture. Am J Hum Genet 1995: 57: 455–464. 146. MUELLER PW, ROGUS JJ, CLEARY PA et al. Genetics of...0619 TITLE: Genetic and Environmental Pathways in Type 1 Diabetes Complications PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Massimo Trucco, M.D

  2. Trabecular bone histomorphometry in humans with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Laura A G; Akhter, Mohammed P; Drincic, Andjela; Recker, Robert R

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) have markedly increased risk of fracture, but little is known about abnormalities in bone microarchitecture or remodeling properties that might give insight into the pathogenesis of skeletal fragility in these patients. We report here a case-control study comparing bone histomorphometric and micro-CT results from iliac biopsies in 18 otherwise healthy subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with those from healthy age- and sex-matched non-diabetic control subjects. Five of the diabetics had histories of low-trauma fracture. Transilial bone biopsies were obtained after tetracycline labeling. The biopsy specimens were fixed, embedded, and scanned using a desktop μCT at 16 μm resolution. They were then sectioned and quantitative histomorphometry was performed as previously described by Recker et al. [1]. Two sections, >250 μm apart, were read from the central part of each biopsy. Overall there were no significant differences between diabetics and controls in histomorphometric or micro-CT measurements. However, fracturing diabetics had structural and dynamic trends different from nonfracturing diabetics by both methods of analysis. In conclusion, Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus does not result in abnormalities in bone histomorphometric or micro-CT variables in the absence of manifest complications from the diabetes. However, diabetics suffering fractures may have defects in their skeletal microarchitecture that may underlie the presence of excess skeletal fragility. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Independent factors associated with depression in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manarte, Lucas Francisco; Dias, S; Góis, C; Boavida, J M

    2010-09-01

    Diabetes has been associated with depression since Thomas Willis' work in 1684 (Rubin and Peyrot in Diabetes Metab Rev 18:173-175, 2002). The aim of this study is to identify social and clinical factors independently associated with depression in individuals with type 1 diabetes. We carried out a descriptive transversal study with 110 type 1 diabetes patients, administered a questionnaire and obtained demographical and diabetes-related data (number of years from diagnosis, initial admission at diagnosis, glycated hemoglobin, number of complications, insulin dose, number of insulin injections per day, admission for ketoacidosis or hypoglycemia at diagnosis, and specific diabetes complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, coronariopathy, and amputation). Depressive symptoms were quantified using the Hamilton Score. We used T tests to investigate potential relations between the covariates and depression (Hamilton score). We concluded the following: as few as 10% of our patients had glycated hemoglobin under 7%; women had more symptoms of depression, and there are four independent factors associated with depression in individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus: age, Graffar score, admission for ketoacidosis, and insulin dose.

  4. [Prerenal kidney failure in type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloot, N C; Hübinger, A; Scherbaum, W A

    2003-12-05

    A 22-year-old man was admitted in a severely reduced condition. Type 1 diabetes mellitus had been diagnosed when he was 13 years old, hypothyroidism was treated with L-thyroxine for 2 years. For the past 3 years he suffered from repetitive hypoglycemia, combined with vertigo, weakness and low blood pressure. He presented with hypotension and hyperpigmentation of the skin. Pathological laboratory results were: serum creatinine 2.5 mg/dl; urea 145 mg/dl; sodium 124 mmol/l; potassium 8.3 mmol/l, HbA (1c) 9.1%. The ECG showed large T waves. Additionally, plasma aldosterone was decreased (diabetes mellitus type 1 and hypothyroidism (Schmidt-Carpenter-Syndrome) were diagnosed. Initially, the patient was treated with sodium chloride 0.9% i. v. and oral sodium 5 g 4 times/day. In addition, he was given hydrocortisone 100 mg i. v., and then switched to 40 mg per day (20-10-10 mg), fludrocortisone 0.05 mg/ day and L-thyroxine 75 microg/ day orally the clinical condition improved dramatically within 24 hours. Intensified conventional insulin therapy was continued. In patients with type 1 diabetes, especially in combination with associated organ-specific autoimmune diseases, autoimmune polyglandular syndrome should be considered and adequately treated with those hormones that are reduced.

  5. Clustering of microvascular complications in Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerg, Lasse; Hulman, Adam; Charles, Morten; Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Witte, Daniel Rinse

    2018-04-01

    To describe to what extent microvascular complications exhibit clustering in persons with Type 1 diabetes, and to assess whether the presence of one complication modified the strength of the association between the other two. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the electronic medical records of 2276 persons with Type 1 diabetes treated in a specialized care hospital in Denmark in 2013. We used log-linear analysis to describe associations between diabetic kidney disease, neuropathy and retinopathy and logistic regression models to quantify the magnitude of associations adjusting for potential confounders. The median duration of diabetes was 24 years and median HbA1c was 63 mmol/mol (7.9%). We found strong indication of clustering and found no evidence that presence of one complication modified the association between the other two. In models adjusted for diabetes duration and HbA 1c , persons with neuropathy had an OR of 2.15 (95% CI: 1.73-2.66) for concurrent diabetic kidney disease. Those with retinopathy had an OR of 2.49 (1.92-3.24) for diabetic kidney disease and of 2.66 (1.94-3.64) for neuropathy. Microvascular complications in persons with Type 1 diabetes exhibit strong clustering. However, the association between any pair of complications is not modified by the presence of the third. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Glutaric aciduria type 1: neuroimaging features with clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad, Shaimaa Abdelsattar; Ahmed, Khaled A. [Ain-Shams University, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo (Egypt); Abdelkhalek, Heba Salah; Zaki, Osama K. [Ain-Shams University, Medical Genetics Unit, Pediatric Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-10-15

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 is a rare neurometabolic disease with high morbidity. To describe the MR imaging abnormalities in glutaric aciduria type 1 and to identify any association between the clinical and imaging features. MRI scans of 29 children (mean age: 16.9 months) with confirmed diagnosis of glutaric aciduria type 1 were retrospectively reviewed. Gray matter and white matter scores were calculated based on a previously published pattern-recognition approach of assessing leukoencephalopathies. Hippocampal formation and opercular topography were assessed in relation to the known embryological basis. MRI scores were correlated with morbidity score. The most consistent MRI abnormality was widened operculum with dilatation of the subarachnoid spaces surrounding underdeveloped frontotemporal lobes. Incomplete hippocampal inversion was also seen. The globus pallidus was the most frequently involved gray matter structure (86%). In addition to the central tegmental tract, white matter abnormalities preferentially involved the central and periventricular regions. The morbidity score correlated with the gray matter abnormality score (P = 0.004). Patients with dystonia had higher gray matter and morbidity scores. Morbidity is significantly correlated with abnormality of gray matter, rather than white matter, whether secondary to acute encephalopathic crisis or insidious onset disease. (orig.)

  7. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and exercise in competitive athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratjen, I; Weber, K S; Roden, M; Herrmann, M-E; Müssig, K

    2015-07-01

    The number of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who are actively participating in competitive sports is increasing. Here, we aimed to assess individual experiences of competitive athletes with type 1 diabetes and to compare these experiences with current recommendations. A survey of 20 competitive athletes with type 1 diabetes, categorized as endurance (n=10) and non-endurance (n=10) athletes, was performed. Endurance and non-endurance athletes did not differ in gender distribution, age, body mass index, and known diabetes duration. Self-reported target blood glucose values prior to exercise were lower in non-endurance than in endurance athletes (195±34 vs. 137±28 mg/dl, P=0.001). The majority of all athletes experienced activity-induced hypo- and hyperglycemic events, independently of exercise type. However, endurance athletes used additional carbohydrate units to prevent activity-induced hypoglycemic events more frequently without monitoring their blood glucose levels than non-endurance athletes (50% vs. 0%, P=0.01). The reduction of the insulin dose on training and competition days compared to days without exercise was similar for endurance and non-endurance athletes. These results point to a very individual adaption of the athlete's therapy during training and competition. However, there are distinct differences in diabetes management between endurance and non-endurance athletes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Hypophosphatemic Osteomalacia in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Insufficiency Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Yılmaz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis is a group of clinically related systemic disorders characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance. Hypophosphatemia may rarely develop due to phosphorus loss in the urine in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1. We present here a 42-year-old male patient with neurofibromatosis type 1, who has two-year history of bone pain and fatigue. Hypoproteinemia, very low blood phosphorus level, significant reduction in bone mineral density, and insufficiency fractures of the proximal femurs and left fibula were detected. It was considered that hypophosphatemic osteomalacia led to stress fractures. The fractures were sufficiently healed with bisphosphonate, vitamin D, calcium treatment and phosphorus-rich diet. The blood phosphorus level of the patient approached approximately the normal limits. Long-lasting spinal, arm and leg pain in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 must be carefully followed. It should be kept in mind that hypophosphatemic osteomalacia may occur in these patients. In addition to systemic examination, measurement of blood phosphorus level and bone mineral density must be done in order to prevent severe morbidities.

  9. Human betacoronavirus 2c EMC/2012-related viruses in bats, Ghana and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Augustina; Baldwin, Heather J; Corman, Victor Max; Klose, Stefan M; Owusu, Michael; Nkrumah, Evans Ewald; Badu, Ebenezer Kofi; Anti, Priscilla; Agbenyega, Olivia; Meyer, Benjamin; Oppong, Samuel; Sarkodie, Yaw Adu; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; Lina, Peter H C; Godlevska, Elena V; Reusken, Chantal; Seebens, Antje; Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Vallo, Peter; Tschapka, Marco; Drosten, Christian; Drexler, Jan Felix

    2013-03-01

    We screened fecal specimens of 4,758 bats from Ghana and 272 bats from 4 European countries for betacoronaviruses. Viruses related to the novel human betacoronavirus EMC/2012 were detected in 46 (24.9%) of 185 Nycteris bats and 40 (14.7%) of 272 Pipistrellus bats. Their genetic relatedness indicated EMC/2012 originated from bats.

  10. Human Betacoronavirus 2c EMC/2012–related Viruses in Bats, Ghana and Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Augustina; Baldwin, Heather J.; Corman, Victor Max; Klose, Stefan M.; Owusu, Michael; Nkrumah, Evans Ewald; Badu, Ebenezer Kofi; Anti, Priscilla; Agbenyega, Olivia; Meyer, Benjamin; Oppong, Samuel; Sarkodie, Yaw Adu; Kalko, Elisabeth K.V.; Lina, Peter H.C.; Godlevska, Elena V.; Reusken, Chantal; Seebens, Antje; Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Vallo, Peter; Tschapka, Marco; Drosten, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We screened fecal specimens of 4,758 bats from Ghana and 272 bats from 4 European countries for betacoronaviruses. Viruses related to the novel human betacoronavirus EMC/2012 were detected in 46 (24.9%) of 185 Nycteris bats and 40 (14.7%) of 272 Pipistrellus bats. Their genetic relatedness indicated EMC/2012 originated from bats. PMID:23622767

  11. Skin and fur bacterial diversity and community structure on American southwestern bats: effects of habitat, geography and bat traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Ara S; Hathaway, Jennifer J M; Kimble, Jason C; Buecher, Debbie C; Valdez, Ernest W; Porras-Alfaro, Andrea; Young, Jesse M; Read, Kaitlyn J H; Northup, Diana E

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms that reside on and in mammals, such as bats, have the potential to influence their host's health and to provide defenses against invading pathogens. However, we have little understanding of the skin and fur bacterial microbiota on bats, or factors that influence the structure of these communities. The southwestern United States offers excellent sites for the study of external bat bacterial microbiota due to the diversity of bat species, the variety of abiotic and biotic factors that may govern bat bacterial microbiota communities, and the lack of the newly emergent fungal disease in bats, white-nose syndrome (WNS), in the southwest. To test these variables, we used 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing from swabs of external skin and fur surfaces from 163 bats from 13 species sampled from southeastern New Mexico to northwestern Arizona. Community similarity patterns, random forest models, and generalized linear mixed-effects models show that factors such as location (e.g., cave-caught versus surface-netted) and ecoregion are major contributors to the structure of bacterial communities on bats. Bats caught in caves had a distinct microbial community compared to those that were netted on the surface. Our results provide a first insight into the distribution of skin and fur bat bacteria in the WNS-free environment of New Mexico and Arizona. More importantly, it provides a baseline of bat external microbiota that can be explored for potential natural defenses against pathogens.

  12. Bat Accelerated Regions Identify a Bat Forelimb Specific Enhancer in the HoxD Locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty M Booker

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular events leading to the development of the bat wing remain largely unknown, and are thought to be caused, in part, by changes in gene expression during limb development. These expression changes could be instigated by variations in gene regulatory enhancers. Here, we used a comparative genomics approach to identify regions that evolved rapidly in the bat ancestor, but are highly conserved in other vertebrates. We discovered 166 bat accelerated regions (BARs that overlap H3K27ac and p300 ChIP-seq peaks in developing mouse limbs. Using a mouse enhancer assay, we show that five Myotis lucifugus BARs drive gene expression in the developing mouse limb, with the majority showing differential enhancer activity compared to the mouse orthologous BAR sequences. These include BAR116, which is located telomeric to the HoxD cluster and had robust forelimb expression for the M. lucifugus sequence and no activity for the mouse sequence at embryonic day 12.5. Developing limb expression analysis of Hoxd10-Hoxd13 in Miniopterus natalensis bats showed a high-forelimb weak-hindlimb expression for Hoxd10-Hoxd11, similar to the expression trend observed for M. lucifugus BAR116 in mice, suggesting that it could be involved in the regulation of the bat HoxD complex. Combined, our results highlight novel regulatory regions that could be instrumental for the morphological differences leading to the development of the bat wing.

  13. Frequency of Ketoacidosis in Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Razavi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjectives: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (TIDM. Many patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes present with DKA. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency and the clinical presentation of diabetic ketoacidosis at the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus in youths in hamadan, Western Province of Iran.Methods: The Clinical and laboratory data of a total of 200 patients under 19 years of age with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus between 1995-2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 11.Results: 48 (24%of the children were presented in a state of ketoacidosis. Sever form of DKA (pH≤7.2 was observed in 54.5% of patients. The mean age at diagnosis was 7.3±5.15 years in DKA group and 8.59±3.07 in non-DKA group (p=0.22. 60.4% of patient with DKA were female whereas in the non-DKA group, 53.3% of patients were female, the difference was not significant (p=0.38. The duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 14.84±8.19 days in patients with DKA and 22.39±2.27 in the non-DKA group, (p=0.11. No significant difference was found between the age, sex and duration of the symptoms and occurance of DKA. Polydipsia (85.4 polyuria (83.3%, weakness (68.8% and abdominal pain (52.1% were the most frequently notified symptoms among the patients. In two cases, diagnosis of DKA was preceded by as appendicitis and the patient underwent appendectomy.Conclusion: Frequency of DKA at onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus was significant in the studied region. However, it was lower than other regions in Asia. Polydipsia, polyuria, fatigue and abdominal pain were the most common symptoms on presentation.

  14. Long-term mortality and retinopathy in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauslund, Jakob

    2010-05-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes is increasing in Denmark as well as the rest of the world. Due to diabetes-related micro- and macrovascular complications, the morbidity and the mortality is higher among type 1 diabetic patients. The aim of this thesis was to examine a population-based cohort of 727 type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark, with an onset of diabetes before 1 July 1973 in order to: (1) Evaluate the all-cause mortality rates and the influence of sex, duration of diabetes and calendar year of diagnosis in a 33-year follow-up (Paper I). (2) Examine glycaemic regulation, lipids and renal dysfunction as risk factors for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and IHD (Paper II). (3) Estimate the prevalence of DR as well as the 25-year incidence of PDR and associated risk factors in long-time surviving patients (Paper III). (4) To compare the grading of DR between ETDRS seven standard field 30 degrees stereoscopic colour films and nine field 45 degrees monoscopic digital colour images in long-term surviving patients (Paper IV). In the years 1973-2006 an overall MR of 22.3 per 1000 person-years was found. Furthermore a relative mortality of 3.4 was found as compared to the general population in Denmark. The relative mortality was especially high for patients aged 30-39 (SMR 9.8). There was a tendency towards a better survival for patients diagnosed after 1964. This was especially seen for men. Diabetes was the most common cause of death for those who died in the group. In 1993-1996 blood samples were drawn and glycaemic regulation, lipids and renal markers were subsequently used as predictors of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and ischaemic heart disease. Glycaemic regulation, dyslipidaemia and creatinine were all significantly associated with all three endpoints. Furthermore, variations in glycaemic control were also identified as a risk factor for overall mortality. Two hundred and one patients were examined for diabetic

  15. Echolocation The Strange Ways of Bats

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 5. Echolocation The Strange Ways of Bats. G Marimuthu. General Article Volume 1 Issue 5 May 1996 pp 40-48. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/05/0040-0048. Author Affiliations.

  16. Analysis of bat wings for morphing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leylek, Emily A.; Manzo, Justin E.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2008-03-01

    The morphing of wings from three different bat species is studied using an extension of the Weissinger method. To understand how camber affects performance factors such as lift and lift to drag ratio, XFOIL is used to study thin (3% thickness to chord ratio) airfoils at a low Reynolds number of 100,000. The maximum camber of 9% yielded the largest lift coefficient, and a mid-range camber of 7% yielded the largest lift to drag ratio. Correlations between bat wing morphology and flight characteristics are covered, and the three bat wing planforms chosen represent various combinations of morphological components and different flight modes. The wings are studied using the extended Weissinger method in an "unmorphed" configuration using a thin, symmetric airfoil across the span of the wing through angles of attack of 0°-15°. The wings are then run in the Weissinger method at angles of attack of -2° to 12° in a "morphed" configuration modeled after bat wings seen in flight, where the camber of the airfoils comprising the wings is varied along the span and a twist distribution along the span is introduced. The morphed wing configurations increase the lift coefficient over 1000% from the unmorphed configuration and increase the lift to drag ratio over 175%. The results of the three different species correlate well with their flight in nature.

  17. Economic dispatch using chaotic bat algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adarsh, B.R.; Raghunathan, T.; Jayabarathi, T.; Yang, Xin-She

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a new metaheuristic optimization algorithm, the chaotic bat algorithm for solving the economic dispatch problem involving a number of equality and inequality constraints such as power balance, prohibited operating zones and ramp rate limits. Transmission losses and multiple fuel options are also considered for some problems. The chaotic bat algorithm, a variant of the basic bat algorithm, is obtained by incorporating chaotic sequences to enhance its performance. Five different example problems comprising 6, 13, 20, 40 and 160 generating units are solved to demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm. The algorithm requires little tuning by the user, and the results obtained show that it either outperforms or compares favorably with several existing techniques reported in literature. - Highlights: • The chaotic bat algorithm, a new metaheuristic optimization algorithm has been used. • The problem solved – the economic dispatch problem – is nonlinear, discontinuous. • It has number of equality and inequality constraints. • The algorithm has been demonstrated to be applicable on high dimensional problems.

  18. Echolocation The Strange Ways of Bats

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 5. Echolocation The Strange Ways of Bats. G Marimuthu. General Article Volume 1 Issue 5 May 1996 pp 40-48. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/05/0040-0048. Author Affiliations.

  19. The distribution of bats in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braaksma, S.

    1970-01-01

    The Research Institute for Nature Management (R.I.N.) has compiled all available information on the distribution of bats in the Netherlands up till 1968. The data were derived from literature and museum specimens, as well as from numerous unpublished observations. Around 1960 much was known already

  20. Bats, Blood-Feeders and Biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohmann, Kristine

    minimising the occurrence of errors. Centered around metabarcoding dietary studies of bat droppings and leech gut contents, this continuous exploration and refinement is reflected in both the work and structure of this thesis. After a thesis introduction and two chapters on environmental DNA and biodiversity...

  1. Summer ecology of Indiana bats in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) is a tree roosting species found throughout the eastern United States that is federally listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. A more detailed understanding of summer roosting and foraging habitat...

  2. Neurophysiological analysis of echolocation in bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, N.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis of echolocation and signal processing in brown bats is presented. Data cover echo detection, echo ranging, echolocalization, and echo analysis. Efforts were also made to identify the part of the brain that carries out the most essential processing function for echolocation. Results indicate the inferior colliculus and the auditory nuclei function together to process this information.

  3. The innervation of the bat cochlea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Firbas, Wilhelm

    1970-01-01

    For different species of bats, fixed in 5 % formaldehyd, an estimation of the number of neurons in the spiral ganglion was made. The cochleae were decalcified in EDTA and embedded in paraffin. The complete series of sections were stained with hematoxylin. On the sections through the ganglion, the

  4. Hibernation by tree-roosting bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbill, Christopher; Geiser, Fritz

    2008-07-01

    In summer, long-eared bats (Nyctophilus spp.) roost under bark and in tree cavities, where they appear to benefit from diurnal heating of roosts. In contrast, hibernation is thought to require a cool stable temperature, suggesting they should prefer thermally insulated tree cavities during winter. To test this prediction, we quantified the winter thermoregulatory physiology and ecology of hibernating tree-roosting bats, Nyctophilus geoffroyi and N. gouldi in the field. Surprisingly, bats in winter continued to roost under exfoliating bark (65%) on the northern, sunny side of trees and in shallow tree cavities (35%). Despite passive re-warming of torpid bats by 10-20 degrees C per day, torpor bouts lasted up to 15 days, although shorter bouts were also common. Arousals occurred more frequently and subsequent activity lasted longer on warmer nights, suggesting occasional winter foraging. We show that, because periodic arousals coincide with maximum roost temperatures, when costs of rewarming and normothermic thermoregulation are minimal, exposure to a daily temperature cycle could largely reduce energy expenditure during hibernation. Our study provides further evidence that models of torpor patterns and energy expenditure from hibernators in cold temperate climates are not directly applicable in milder climates, where prolonged torpor can be interspersed with more frequent arousals and occasional foraging.

  5. Bat records from Malawi (Mammalia, Chiroptera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmans, Wim; Jachmann, Hugo

    1983-01-01

    Five species of bats are recorded from Kasungu National Park, Malawi: Eidolon helvum (Kerr, 1792); Epomophorus anurus Heuglin, 1864; Epomophorus minor Dobson, 1880; Epomops dobsonii (Bocage, 1889); and Scotoecus hindei Thomas, 1901. Some other Malawian records of these species, based on literature

  6. Fire and the endangered Indiana bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Dickinson; Michael J. Lacki; Daniel R. Cox

    2009-01-01

    Fire and Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis) have coexisted for millennia in the central hardwoods region, yet past declines in populations of this endangered species, and the imperative of fire use in oak silviculture and ecosystem conservation, call for an analysis of both the risks and opportunities associated with using fires on landscapes in...

  7. Association between type 1, type 2 cytokines, diabetic autoantibodies and 25-hydroxyvitamin D in children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, I M; Nasr, A; Alsulaimani, A A; Alghamdi, H; Alswat, K A; Almalki, D M; Abushouk, A; Saleh, A M; Allam, G

    2016-12-01

    Vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The aim of the current study was to determine the possible association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels and circulating levels of type 1 and type 2 cytokines, as well as the pathophysiology of T1D in children. A total of 250 T1D patients and 250 sex- and age-matched T1D-free controls were screened for 25(OH)D, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), type 1 and type 2 cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP) and bone mineral metabolism, as well as antibodies against insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD 65) and islet cells. Our data showed that the plasma level of 25(OH)D was significantly lower in T1D patients and that there was a significant negative correlation between 25(OH)D levels and HbA1c values. There was a significant association between deficient levels of 25(OH)D and higher levels of cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-4 and IL-10) and CRP. Total blood hemoglobin, the hematocrit percentage, body mass index SDS values, phosphate and magnesium levels were significantly lower in T1D patients than in T1D-free subjects. The levels of parathyroid hormone and alkaline phosphatase were significantly higher in T1D patients. Higher levels of cytokines were significantly associated with deficient levels of 25(OH)D. Moreover, in T1D patients, higher levels of islet antibodies, anti-GAD antibodies and anti-insulin antibodies were significantly associated with deficient levels of 25(OH)D. In type 1 diabetic children, deficient levels of 25(OH)D are associated with high levels of HbA1c, circulatory cytokines and antibody markers.

  8. T-helper Cell Type-1 Transcription Factor T-Bet Is Down-regulated in Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseghi, Hajar; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Jadali, Zohreh

    2016-10-01

    T cells have been identified as key players in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. However, the exact role of T-cell subpopulations in this pathway is presently unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess the expression pattern of two lineage-specifying transcription factors GATA-3 and T-bet, which are important in T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cell development, respectively. Gene expression analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was performed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Plasma levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 were also determined by ELISA. T-bet and IFN-γ gene expression was significantly lower in patients group compared with healthy controls (p<0.05). The expression of GATA-3 was relatively similar in patients and controls; however, IL-4 mRNAs were significantly increased in the PBMCs from patients as compared with normal controls (p<0.05). In addition, a marked increase in plasma IL-4 levels were observed in patient group compared with controls (p<0.001). To the contrary, IFN-γ protein levels were decreased in patients in comparison with controls (p<0.001). These data suggest additional implications of the role of Th1/Th2 imbalance for the immunopathogenesis of type 1 diabetes.

  9. Bats are rare reservoirs of Staphylococcus aureus complex in Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Jana; Gmeiner, Markus; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Matsiégui, Pierre-Blaise; Schaer, Juliane; Eckerle, Isabella; Weber, Natalie; Matuschewski, Kai; Bletz, Stefan; Schaumburg, Frieder

    2017-01-01

    The colonization of afro-tropical wildlife with Staphylococcus aureus and the derived clade Staphylococcus schweitzeri remains largely unknown. A reservoir in bats could be of importance since bats and humans share overlapping habitats. In addition, bats are food sources in some African regions and can be the cause of zoonotic diseases. Here, we present a cross-sectional survey employing pharyngeal swabs of captured and released bats (n=133) in a forest area of Gabon. We detected low colonization rates of S. aureus (4-6%) and S. schweitzeri (4%) in two out of four species of fruit bats, namely Rousettus aegyptiacus and Micropteropus pusillus, but not in insectivorous bats. Multilocus sequence typing showed that S. aureus from Gabonese bats (ST2984, ST3259, ST3301, ST3302) were distinct from major African human associated clones (ST15, ST121, ST152). S. schweitzeri from bats (ST1697, ST1700) clustered with S. schweitzeri from other species (bats, monkeys) from Nigeria and Côte d'Ivoire. In conclusion, colonization rates of bats with S. aureus and S. schweitzeri were low in our study. Phylogenetic analysis supports an intense geographical dispersal of S. schweitzeri among different mammalian wildlife hosts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Timing matters: sonar call groups facilitate target localization in bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Ninad B; Wohlgemuth, Melville J; Hulgard, Katrine; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F

    2014-01-01

    To successfully negotiate a cluttered environment, an echolocating bat must control the timing of motor behaviors in response to dynamic sensory information. Here we detail the big brown bat's adaptive temporal control over sonar call production for tracking prey, moving predictably or unpredictably, under different experimental conditions. We studied the adaptive control of vocal-motor behaviors in free-flying big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, as they captured tethered and free-flying insects, in open and cluttered environments. We also studied adaptive sonar behavior in bats trained to track moving targets from a resting position. In each of these experiments, bats adjusted the features of their calls to separate target and clutter. Under many task conditions, flying bats produced prominent sonar sound groups identified as clusters of echolocation pulses with relatively stable intervals, surrounded by longer pulse intervals. In experiments where bats tracked approaching targets from a resting position, bats also produced sonar sound groups, and the prevalence of these sonar sound groups increased when motion of the target was unpredictable. We hypothesize that sonar sound groups produced during flight, and the sonar call doublets produced by a bat tracking a target from a resting position, help the animal resolve dynamic target location and represent the echo scene in greater detail. Collectively, our data reveal adaptive temporal control over sonar call production that allows the bat to negotiate a complex and dynamic environment.

  11. Mercury accumulation in bats near hydroelectric reservoirs in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syaripuddin, Khairunnisa; Kumar, Anjali; Sing, Kong-Wah; Halim, Muhammad-Rasul Abdullah; Nursyereen, Muhammad-Nasir; Wilson, John-James

    2014-09-01

    In large man-made reservoirs such as those resulting from hydroelectric dam construction, bacteria transform the relatively harmless inorganic mercury naturally present in soil and the submerged plant matter into toxic methylmercury. Methylmercury then enters food webs and can accumulate in organisms at higher trophic levels. Bats feeding on insects emerging from aquatic systems can show accumulation of mercury consumed through their insect prey. In this study, we investigated whether the concentration of mercury in the fur of insectivorous bat species was significantly higher than that in the fur of frugivorous bat species, sampled near hydroelectric reservoirs in Peninsular Malaysia. Bats were sampled at Temenggor Lake and Kenyir Lake and fur samples from the most abundant genera of the two feeding guilds-insectivorous (Hipposideros and Rhinolophus) and frugivorous (Cynopterus and Megaerops) were collected for mercury analysis. We found significantly higher concentrations of total mercury in the fur of insectivorous bats. Mercury concentrations also differed significantly between insectivorous bats sampled at the two sites, with bats from Kenyir Lake, the younger reservoir, showing higher mercury concentrations, and between the insectivorous genera, with Hipposideros bats showing higher mercury concentrations. Ten bats (H. cf. larvatus) sampled at Kenyir Lake had mercury concentrations approaching or exceeding 10 mg/kg, which is the threshold at which detrimental effects occur in humans, bats and mice.

  12. Response of neotropical bat assemblages to human land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Rodrigo; Badano, Ernesto I; Moreno, Claudia E

    2013-10-01

    Neotropical bats are sensitive to human-induced habitat changes, and some authors believe bats can be used as bioindicators. In the literature, however, the results are disparate. Some results show bat diversity deceases as disturbance increases, whereas others indicate no effect. Determining the general response patterns of bats when they encounter different degrees of human-induced disturbance across the Neotropics would help to determine their usefulness as bioindicators. In a series of meta-analyses, we compared the occurrence frequency of bat species between well-preserved forests and human-use areas. We obtained data through an extensive review of published peer-reviewed articles, theses, and reports. The overall effect size indicated that human-use areas harbored more bat species than well-preserved forests. Different response patterns emerged when meta-analyses were conducted separately by family, feeding habit, vegetation stratum, and conservation status. Our results suggest that bat assemblages display strong responses to forest loss and land-use change and that the direction and magnitude of these responses depends on the bat group under study and the type of disturbance. Our results are consistent with the idea that bats are useful for assessing the effects of habitat changes in the Neotropics. However, with our meta-analyses we could not detect fine differences in bat feeding habits, especially within Phyllostomidae, or elucidate the effect of landscape configuration. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  13. A decade of U.S. Air Force bat strikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peurach, Suzanne C.; Dove, Carla J.; Stepko, Laura

    2009-01-01

    From 1997 through 2007, 821 bat strikes were reported to the U.S. Air Force (USAF) Safety Center by aircraft personnel or ground crew and sent to the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, for identification. Many samples were identified by macroscopic and or microscopic comparisons with bat specimens housed in the museum and augmented during the last 2 years by DNA analysis. Bat remains from USAF strikes during this period were received at the museum from 40 states in the United States and from 20 countries. We confirmed that 46% of the strikes were caused by bats, but we did not identify them further; we identified 5% only to the family or genus level, and 49% to the species level. Fifty-five of the 101 bat-strike samples submitted for DNA analysis have been identified to the species level. Twenty-five bat species have been recorded striking USAF planes worldwide. The Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis; n = 173) is the species most commonly identified in USAF strike impacts, followed by the red bat (Lasiurus borealis; n = 83). Bat strikes peak during the spring and fall, with >57% occurring from August through October; 82% of the reports that included time of strike were recorded between 2100 and 0900 hours. More than 12% of the bat strikes were reported at >300 m above ground level (AGL). Although $825,000 and >50% of this sum was attributable to 5 bat-strike incidents. Only 5 bats from the 10 most damaging bat strikes were identified to the species level, either because we did not receive remains with the reports or the sample was insufficient for identification.

  14. Smooth muscle antibodies and type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Muratori, Luigi; Agostinelli, Daniela; Pappas, Georgios; Veronesi, Lorenza; Granito, Alessandro; Cassani, Fabio; Terlizzi, Paolo; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2002-12-01

    Smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) characterize type 1 autoimmune hepatitis. Our aim was to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of different immunofluorescence substrates for the detection of SMA. Sera from 55 patients with type 1 AIH 20 with primary biliary cirrhosis, 20 with HCV-related chronic hepatitis and 25 blood donors were studied for SMA and anti-microfilaments reactivity by immunofluorescence on rat tissue sections, cultured fibroblasts and commercially available HEp-2 cells (collectively revealing the so called anti-actin pattern), and for the XR1 system by counterimmunoelectrophoresis. SMA was classified on the basis of its immunofluorescence pattern (V--vessels, G--glomerular, T--tubular). As further control group, we studied 26 patients with a diagnosis other than AIH, selected on the basis of a SMA-non-T/XR1 positivity. In patients with AIH the SMA-T pattern on rodent tissue, and anti-MF on fibroblasts and on HEp-2 cells were present in 80, 82 and 80%, respectively. Five out of 11 SMA-non T positive AIH patients were anti-MF positive. None of the pathological and healthy controls was positive for SMA-T or anti-MF reactivity. XR1 system was present in 84% of AIH patients and in 5% of pathological controls (p = 0.01). Two out of 26 SMA-non-T/XR1 positive sera were positive for anti-MF by fibroblasts and HEp-2 cells. A significant correlation was found between SMA-T pattern and anti-MF reactivity; no correlation was found between XR1 system and SMA-T pattern or anti-MF reactivity. SMA-T pattern is highly sensitive and specific first diagnostic test for type 1 AIH; anti-MF can be used as additional tool for the diagnosis, particularly when, despite the absence of the SMA-T pattern, AIH is strongly suspected.

  15. Glycaemic behaviour during breastfeeding in women with Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achong, N; McIntyre, H D; Callaway, L; Duncan, E L

    2016-07-01

    To describe glycaemia in both breastfeeding women and artificially feeding women with Type 1 diabetes, and the changes in glycaemia induced by suckling. A blinded continuous glucose monitor was applied for up to 6 days in eight breastfeeding and eight artificially feeding women with Type 1 diabetes 2-4 months postpartum. Women recorded glucose levels, insulin dosages, oral intake and breastfeeding episodes. A standardized breakfast was consumed on 2 days. A third group (clinic controls) were identified from a historical database. Carbohydrate intake tended to be higher in breastfeeding than artificially feeding women (P = 0.09) despite similar insulin requirements. Compared with breastfeeding women, the high blood glucose index and standard deviation of glucose were higher in artificially feeding women (P = 0.02 and 0.06, respectively) and in the clinical control group (P = 0.02 and 0.05, respectively). The low blood glucose index and hypoglycaemia were similar. After suckling, the low blood glucose index increased compared with before (P l) occurred within 3 h of suckling in 14% of suckling episodes, and was associated with time from last oral intake (P = 0.04) and last rapid-acting insulin (P = 0.03). After a standardized breakfast, the area under the glucose curve was positive. In breastfeeding women the area under the glucose curve was positive if suckling was avoided for 1 h after eating and negative if suckling occurred within 30 min of eating. Breastfeeding women with Type 1 diabetes had similar hypoglycaemia but lower glucose variability than artificially feeding women. Suckling reduced maternal glucose levels but did not cause hypoglycaemia in most episodes. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  16. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism in Males with Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Evelyn M; Lehman, Anna; Acott, Philip; Gillis, Jane; Metzger, Daniel L; Sirrs, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1 is an autosomal recessive disorder with an incidence of 1 in 100,000. Long-term complications include chronic blood glucose lability, lactic academia, short stature, osteoporosis, delayed puberty, gout, progressive renal insufficiency, systemic or pulmonary hypertension, hepatic adenomas at risk for malignant transformation, anemia, vitamin D deficiency, hyperuricemic nephrocalcinosis, inflammatory bowel syndrome (type 1b), hypertriglyceridemia, and irregular menstrual cycles. We describe hypogonadotropic hypogonadism as a novel complication in glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1. Case Studies and Methods: Four unrelated patients with GSD 1a (N = 1) and 1b (N = 3) were found to have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism diagnosed at different ages. Institutional Research Ethics Board approval was obtained as appropriate. Participant consent was obtained. A retrospective chart review was performed and clinical symptoms and results of investigations summarized as a case series. All patients were confirmed biochemically to have low luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicular stimulating hormone (FSH), and correspondingly low total testosterone. Clinical symptoms of hypogonadism varied widely. Investigations for other causes of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism were unremarkable. In addition, all patients were found to have disproportionately low bone mineral density at the lumbar spine compared to the hip. Common to all patients was erratic metabolic control, including recurrent hypoglycemia and elevated lactate levels. Recurrent elevations in cortisol in response to hypoglycemia may be the underlying pathology leading to suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release. Incorporating clinical and/or biochemical screening of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis may be important in the management of this disease. Testosterone therapy however needs to be carefully considered because of the risk of hepatic adenomas.

  17. Quality of life of adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luce Marina F.C. da Costa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent chronic disease. Type 1 diabetes mellitus usually develops during infancy and adolescence and may affect the quality of life of adolescents. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of life of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus in a metropolitan region of western central Brazil. METHODS: Adolescents aged 10-19 years who had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus at least 1 year previously were included. Patients with verbal communication difficulties, severe disease, and symptomatic hypo- or hyperglycemic crisis as well as those without an adult companion and who were 7%. In general, the adolescents consistently reported having a good quality of life. The median scores for the domains of the instrument were as follows: “satisfaction”: 35; “impact”: 51; and “worries“: 26. The total score for all domains was 112. Bivariate analysis showed significant associations among a lower family income, public health assistance, and insulin type in the “satisfaction” domain; and a lower family income, public health assistance, public school attendance, and a low parental education level in the “worries“ domain and for the total score. A longer time since diagnosis was associated with a lower total score. Multivariable analysis confirmed the association of a worse quality of life with public health assistance, time since diagnosis, and sedentary lifestyle in the “satisfaction” domain; female gender in the “worries” domain; and public health assistance for the total score. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the adolescents evaluated in this study viewed their quality of life as good. Specific factors that led to the deterioration of quality of life, including public assistance, time since diagnosis, sedentary lifestyle, and female gender, were identified. No potential conflict of interest was reported.

  18. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 associated with parkinsonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Marie; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Thomsen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    parkinsonism with rigidity, bradykinesia and a resting tremor. An MRI showed a normal substantia nigra, but a bilateral loss of substance in the basal ganglia, which is in contrast to the typically normal MRI in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging with single-photon emission...... Parkinson's disease remains unanswered.......Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the CACNA1A gene on chromosome 19p13. It is well described that FHM1 can present with cerebellar signs, but parkinsonism has not previously...

  19. Partial Sleep Restriction Decreases Insulin Sensitivity in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke; van Dijk, J. Gert; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Lammers, Gert-Jan; van Kralingen, Klaas; Hoogma, Roel P.L.M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P.M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Sleep restriction results in decreased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that sleep duration is also a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied seven patients (three men, four women) with type 1 diabetes: mean age 44 ± 7 years, BMI 23.5 ± 0.9 kg/m2, and A1C 7.6 ± 0.3%. They were studied once after a night of normal sleep duration and once after a night of only 4 h of sleep. Sleep characteristics were assessed by polysomnography. Insulin sensitivity was measured by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies with an infusion of [6,6-2H2]glucose. RESULTS Sleep duration was shorter in the night with sleep restriction than in the unrestricted night (469 ± 8.5 vs. 222 ± 7.1 min, P = 0.02). Sleep restriction did not affect basal levels of glucose, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), or endogenous glucose production. Endogenous glucose production during the hyperinsulinemic clamp was not altered during the night of sleep restriction compared with the night of unrestricted sleep (6.2 ± 0.8 vs. 6.9 ± 0.6 μmol · kg lean body mass−1 · min−1, NS). In contrast, sleep restriction decreased the glucose disposal rate during the clamp (25.5 ± 2.6 vs. 22.0 ± 2.1 μmol · kg lean body mass−1 · min−1, P = 0.04), reflecting decreased peripheral insulin sensitivity. Accordingly, sleep restriction decreased the rate of glucose infusion by ∼21% (P = 0.04). Sleep restriction did not alter plasma NEFA levels during the clamp (143 ± 29 vs. 133 ± 29 μmol/l, NS). CONCLUSIONS Partial sleep deprivation during a single night induces peripheral insulin resistance in these seven patients with type 1 diabetes. Therefore, sleep duration is a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:20357381

  20. Type 1 diabetes and Ramadan fasting: A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Vakili

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ramadan fasting is an important pillars of Islam .although patients and children expected from fasting during Ramadan, but every diabetic adolescents intends to fast should consult his diabetes management time, and intensive monitoring of blood glucose and urine ketones .close observation by endocrinologist, and weekly follow- up and highly individualized planning for each diabetic person is essential. In this Article we described general role that should be considered by type 1 diabetic people if they want to be fast during Ramadan.

  1. Diabetes Distress Among Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagger, Virginia; Hendrieckx, Christel; Sturt, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    with type 1 diabetes: the prevalence of DD; demographic, clinical, behavioral and psychosocial correlates of DD and interventions that reduce DD. Consistent with adult studies, around one third of adolescents experience elevated DD and this is frequently associated with suboptimal glycemic control, low self......Diabetes distress (DD) refers to the negative emotions arising from living with diabetes and the burden of self-management. Among adults, the prevalence and significance of DD are well established, but this is not the case among adolescents. This systematic review investigated among adolescents...

  2. Overnight glucose control in people with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiroux, Dimitri; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Schmidt, Signe

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an individualized model predictive control (MPC) algorithm for overnight blood glucose stabilization in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The MPC formulation uses an asymmetric objective function that penalizes low glucose levels more heavily. We compute the model parameters...... in the MPC in a systematic way based on a priori available patient information. The model used by the MPC algorithm for filtering and prediction is an autoregressive integrated moving average with exogenous input (ARIMAX) model implemented as a linear state space model in innovation form. The control...

  3. Varenicline may trigger severe hypoglycaemia in Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P.L.; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U.; Thorsteinsson, B.

    2008-01-01

    is important to reduce risk of cardiovascular morbidity, especially in diabetes, use of effective drugs indicated for smoking cessation is rational. Case report We report multiple episodes of severe hypoglycaemia after starting varenicline in a 53-year-old woman with Type 1 diabetes. Since onset of diabetes......Background Varenicline is a new drug indicated for smoking cessation. It has primarily been investigated in healthy adults. The commonest side-effects are nausea, headache, sleep disturbance, constipation, flatulence and vomiting. Hypoglycaemia has not been reported. As smoking cessation...

  4. Evidence-based insulin treatment in type 1 diabetes mellitus

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    Jacobsen, Iben Brock; Henriksen, J E; Hother-Nielsen, O

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Evaluation of the evidence base for recommending different insulin treatment regimens in type 1 diabetes. METHODS: A computerised literature survey was conducted using The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and the Pub Med database for the period of 1982-2007. RESULTS: A meta-analysis on only...... for a clinical trial, and only 5 trials on insulin analogues were performed as double-blinded. Current evidence suggests that CSII treatment results in a significant reduction in HbA1c without inducing more hypoglycaemia. Rapid-acting insulin analogues compared to human soluble insulin provide statistically...

  5. The soft-tissue manifestations of neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillier, J.C. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: julia.hillier@chelwest.nhs.uk; Moskovic, E. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Royal Mardsen Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-01

    The radiological appearances of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) are numerous and variable, because of the widespread presence of peripheral nerves. Knowledge of this variability can prevent unnecessary intervention. For example, occasionally lesions can be misinterpreted and biopsies performed unnecessarily. Thus, familiarity with the manifestations of this disease and the spectrum of associated abnormalities is an important part of the radiologist's armamentarium. This paper explores the manifold radiological appearances of extracranial NF-1 as experienced by the Sarcoma and Soft Tissue Tumour Unit at the Royal Marsden Hospital.

  6. The soft-tissue manifestations of neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillier, J.C.; Moskovic, E.

    2005-01-01

    The radiological appearances of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) are numerous and variable, because of the widespread presence of peripheral nerves. Knowledge of this variability can prevent unnecessary intervention. For example, occasionally lesions can be misinterpreted and biopsies performed unnecessarily. Thus, familiarity with the manifestations of this disease and the spectrum of associated abnormalities is an important part of the radiologist's armamentarium. This paper explores the manifold radiological appearances of extracranial NF-1 as experienced by the Sarcoma and Soft Tissue Tumour Unit at the Royal Marsden Hospital

  7. Bat detective-Deep learning tools for bat acoustic signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Aodha, Oisin; Gibb, Rory; Barlow, Kate E; Browning, Ella; Firman, Michael; Freeman, Robin; Harder, Briana; Kinsey, Libby; Mead, Gary R; Newson, Stuart E; Pandourski, Ivan; Parsons, Stuart; Russ, Jon; Szodoray-Paradi, Abigel; Szodoray-Paradi, Farkas; Tilova, Elena; Girolami, Mark; Brostow, Gabriel; Jones, Kate E

    2018-03-01

    Passive acoustic sensing has emerged as a powerful tool for quantifying anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity, especially for echolocating bat species. To better assess bat population trends there is a critical need for accurate, reliable, and open source tools that allow the detection and classification of bat calls in large collections of audio recordings. The majority of existing tools are commercial or have focused on the species classification task, neglecting the important problem of first localizing echolocation calls in audio which is particularly problematic in noisy recordings. We developed a convolutional neural network based open-source pipeline for detecting ultrasonic, full-spectrum, search-phase calls produced by echolocating bats. Our deep learning algorithms were trained on full-spectrum ultrasonic audio collected along road-transects across Europe and labelled by citizen scientists from www.batdetective.org. When compared to other existing algorithms and commercial systems, we show significantly higher detection performance of search-phase echolocation calls with our test sets. As an example application, we ran our detection pipeline on bat monitoring data collected over five years from Jersey (UK), and compared results to a widely-used commercial system. Our detection pipeline can be used for the automatic detection and monitoring of bat populations, and further facilitates their use as indicator species on a large scale. Our proposed pipeline makes only a small number of bat specific design decisions, and with appropriate training data it could be applied to detecting other species in audio. A crucial novelty of our work is showing that with careful, non-trivial, design and implementation considerations, state-of-the-art deep learning methods can be used for accurate and efficient monitoring in audio.

  8. Bat detective—Deep learning tools for bat acoustic signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Kate E.; Firman, Michael; Freeman, Robin; Harder, Briana; Kinsey, Libby; Mead, Gary R.; Newson, Stuart E.; Pandourski, Ivan; Russ, Jon; Szodoray-Paradi, Abigel; Tilova, Elena; Girolami, Mark; Jones, Kate E.

    2018-01-01

    Passive acoustic sensing has emerged as a powerful tool for quantifying anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity, especially for echolocating bat species. To better assess bat population trends there is a critical need for accurate, reliable, and open source tools that allow the detection and classification of bat calls in large collections of audio recordings. The majority of existing tools are commercial or have focused on the species classification task, neglecting the important problem of first localizing echolocation calls in audio which is particularly problematic in noisy recordings. We developed a convolutional neural network based open-source pipeline for detecting ultrasonic, full-spectrum, search-phase calls produced by echolocating bats. Our deep learning algorithms were trained on full-spectrum ultrasonic audio collected along road-transects across Europe and labelled by citizen scientists from www.batdetective.org. When compared to other existing algorithms and commercial systems, we show significantly higher detection performance of search-phase echolocation calls with our test sets. As an example application, we ran our detection pipeline on bat monitoring data collected over five years from Jersey (UK), and compared results to a widely-used commercial system. Our detection pipeline can be used for the automatic detection and monitoring of bat populations, and further facilitates their use as indicator species on a large scale. Our proposed pipeline makes only a small number of bat specific design decisions, and with appropriate training data it could be applied to detecting other species in audio. A crucial novelty of our work is showing that with careful, non-trivial, design and implementation considerations, state-of-the-art deep learning methods can be used for accurate and efficient monitoring in audio. PMID:29518076

  9. Camel milk: a possible boon for type 1 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, R P; Tantia, P; Jain, S; Agrawal, R; Agrawal, V

    2013-11-03

    Poor nutrition in utero and in early life combined with over nutrition in later life may also play a role in epidemic of diabetes. The efficacy of camel milk consumption as an adjunct to routine diabetic management in type 1 diabetes is a approach showing new rays of hope to cope with this disorder by adding a food supplement with medicinal values. Research on the beneficial aspects of camel milk has been taking place in different corners of globe since last three decades. Continuous efforts to disclose the role of camel milk in diabetes has rendered it title of 'white gold'. Biochemical studies has revealed the components e.g. insulin like protein, lactoferrin, immunoglobulins are responsible for imparting camel milk the scientific weightage. In parallel, epidemiological surveys stating low prevalence of diabetes in communities consuming camel milk clearly indicate towards its hopeful role in maintaining hyperglycemia. This article shades light on camel milk production, composition, characteristics as well as it expresses positive effect of camel milk on blood glucose level, insulin dose, beta cell function. This review also compiles various epidemiological studies carried out to bring forth utility of camel milk suggesting it as a useful food supplement or alternative therapy for type 1 diabetic patients.

  10. Neglected-Noncompliant Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afdal .

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakDiabetes mellitus (DM tipe 1 merupakan kelainan sistemik akibat terjadinya gangguan metabolisme glukosayang ditandai oleh hiperglikemia kronis. Keadaan ini disebabkan oleh proses autoimun yang merusak sel βpankreas sehingga produksi insulin berkurang bahkan terhenti, penderitanya akan memerlukan asupan insulineksogen. Penyakit ini menimbulkan komplikasi kronik sehingga memerlukan manajemen pengobatan yangberkelanjutan dan edukasi pada pasien serta keluarganya. Penyakit yang tidak terkontrol akan menimbulkanberbagai komplikasi metabolisme, gangguan makrovaskular dan mikrovaskular yang menyebabkan penurunankualitas dan harapan hidup penderita.Kata Kunci : Diabetes melitus tipe 1, makrovaskular, mikrovaskularAbstractDiabetes mellitus (DM type 1 is a result of the systemic disorder of glucose metabolism disorder characterized bychronic hyperglycemia. This situation is caused by the autoimmune processes that destroy pancreatic β cellsresulting in the production of insulin is reduced even halted, the sufferer will require exogenous insulin intake. Thisraises the complications of chronic disease that requires ongoing medication management and education forpatients and their families. Uncontrolled disease will cause various metabolic complications, macrovascular andmicrovascular disorders that cause loss of quality and life expectancy of the patient.Keywords: Type 1 diabetes mellitus, macrovascular, microvascular

  11. Complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS type 1 validating case histories

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    P. Berger

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS type 1 is challenging and unpredictable as the condition presents with vascular and neuropathic symptoms after nil or even minor injury to a peripheral nerve. The condition is one of a pain and motor dysfunction. The pathophysiology is not well understood and the relief of symptoms may change from being sympathetically mediated to sympathetically independent during  the course of the disease. At any stage physiotherapy has been advocated as the corner stone and most important aspect of treatment in the rehabilitation of these individuals but unfortunately it has been difficult to execute when pain is exacerbated due to allodynia (unbearable to touch or move and hyperalgesia. Best results have been obtained if the patients are recognised and treated in the early or acute phase and it has been found that through careful assessment and analysis these patients can be recognised by previous events that have occurred in their initial case history. The treatment in the acute stage with physiotherapy modalities such as electrical stimulation and acupuncture will produce an early cessation of the symptoms and prevention of the disease developing into the fully blown CRPS type 1 with irreversible and possibly atrophic consequences. Case histories have been presented that illustrate these important aspects and demonstrate  the value of early and the appropriate physiotherapy that may be more successful than other pharmacological and physical interventions in this disease.

  12. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy/complex regional pain syndrome, type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Botha

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CPRS, type 1 is a pain disorder that develops unpredictably and can follow a minor injury. A 12-year-old boy presented with severe pain in the feet and could not walk or stand weight bearing. Normal X-rays showed osteopenic changes and radiolucent lines, which appeared to be stress fractures. Three-phase bone scintigraphy showed no uptake in the left lower leg on the blood pool phase or on the immediate or delayed images. This indicated typical CPRS type 1 in children. The uptake in the right foot was increased and the stress fracture and other illness could not be differentiated. Computed tomography was done to exclude stress fractures. Only osteopenic changes in both calcaneus bones were found and there was no evidence of cortical stress fractures. Magnetic resonance images revealed oedema in the calcaneus and talus bones of both feet. The patient received epidural narcotic infusion with sympathetic blockage for 1 week combined with extensive physiotherapy. The blood pool phase of the bone scan became normal within 2 weeks, and increased uptake in both feet was noticed. The patient was followed up with MRI every 3 months and the bone marrow oedema disappeared after 6 months.

  13. Carbohydrate counting for children with diabetes type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanita Mena-Gallego

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM1 is an endocrine disease with autoimmune bases that mainly affects children and adolescents. It is characterized by progressive loss of beta cells mass to a critical level where the ability to release the insulin, needed for the utilization of glucose by tissues, is affected, triggering microvascular damage, main long-term complication. Short-term complications are diabetic keto-acidosis and, secondary to insulin therapy, the hypoglycemia. Although insulin therapy is the mainstay of treatment, sometimes it is difficult to calculate the proper dosage for precise glycemic control; carbohydrate counting plays an important role here in the optimization of postprandial glycemic levels, which is demonstrated by the correct levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c. This review seeks to assess the available scientific evidence on the effectiveness of carbohydrate counting in children with DM1. Search until May 2014 was conducted in PubMed, Trip database, Cochrane and academic Google; three clinical trials performed in individuals under 18 were found. The studies demonstrate effectiveness but the quality is not strong enough. No systematic reviews were found. A more exhaustive search and possibly more clinical trials are needed to be recommended as a technique of metabolic control of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in children.

  14. Self-efficacy scale for Brazilians with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Alves Gastal

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Diabetes is a public health problem and good glycemic control is able to prevent or contain its complications. Self-efficacy is a key factor in successfully achieving behavior goals. The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the insulin management diabetes self-efficacy scale (IMDSES on type 1 diabetes patients from southern Brazil. DESIGN AND SETTING: Validation study in two cities in southern Brazil. METHODS: The psychometric properties of IMDSES were evaluated in a population of type 1 diabetes patients (n = 213, from September to December 2004, who were attended within the Brazilian public healthcare system. Principal component analysis was conducted to develop the subscales. Cronbach’s alpha was used as the reliability coefficient. RESULTS: The analysis of psychometric properties resulted in an IMDSES consisting of 20 items and three subscales: diet (alpha: 0.83, insulin (alpha: 0.92 and general management (alpha: 0.78 and accounted for 53% of the variance. Criteria validity was investigated through two parameters: glycohemoglobin, which showed significant association with self-efficacy on the insulin subscale (p = 0.04, and the variable "adherence", which was significantly associated with self-efficacy on two subscales (p < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the IMDSES is valid and reliable, and can be used to measure results from diabetes educational programs and to measure self-efficacy relating to diabetes management, for possible interventions.

  15. IgG4-unrelated type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Eriko; Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Yoshida, Naoki; Hongo, Seiji; Miura, Shin; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Hamada, Shin; Kume, Kiyoshi; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Nakayama, Keisuke; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old male was referred to our hospital for the evaluation of hyperproteinemia. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed high fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the pancreas, bilateral lacrimal glands, submandibular glands, parotid glands, bilateral pulmonary hilar lymph nodes, and kidneys. Laboratory data showed an elevation of hepatobiliary enzymes, renal dysfunction, and remarkably high immunoglobulin (Ig) G levels, without elevated serum IgG4. Abdominal computed tomography revealed swelling of the pancreatic head and bilateral kidneys. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed an irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic head and stricture of the lower common bile duct. Histological examination by endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration revealed findings of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis without IgG4-positive plasma cells. Abnormal laboratory values and the swelling of several organs were improved by the treatment with steroids. The patient was diagnosed as having type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) based on the International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria. Therefore, we encountered a case of compatible type 1 AIP without elevated levels of serum IgG4 or IgG4-positive plasma cells. This case suggests that AIP phenotypes are not always associated with IgG4. PMID:26361429

  16. Characterization of retrokeratoprosthetic membranes in the Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, Rebecca C; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Michaud, Norman A; Dohlman, Claes H; Colby, Kathryn A

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate retroprosthetic membranes that can occur in 25% to 65% of patients with the Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis (KPro). Two patients with Peter anomaly and 2 with neurotrophic scarred corneas underwent revisions of their type 1 KPros because of visually compromising retroprosthetic membranes. The excised membranes were studied by light microscopy with hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, and toluidine blue stains. Immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscopic examination were also used. Light microscopic examination revealed that the retro-KPro fibrous membranes originated from the host's corneal stroma. These mildly to moderately vascularized membranes grew through gaps in the Descemet membrane to reach behind the KPro back plate and adhere to the anterior iris surface, which had undergone partial lysis. In 2 cases, the fibrous membranes merged at the pupil with matrical portions of metaplastic lens epithelium, forming a bilayered structure that crossed the optical axis. Retro-KPro membranes stained positively for α-smooth muscle actin but negatively for pancytokeratin. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of actin filaments within myofibroblasts and small surviving clusters of metaplastic lens epithelial cells. Stromal downgrowth, rather than epithelial downgrowth, was the major element of the retro-KPro membranes in this series. Metaplastic lens epithelium also contributed to opacification of the visual axis. Florid membranous inflammation was not a prominent finding and thus probably not a requisite stimulus for membrane development. Further advances in prosthetic design and newer antifibroproliferative agents may reduce membrane formation.

  17. PSYCHOSOCIAL EFFECTS OF TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS IN CHILDREN

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    Madhava Vijaya Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to assess the psychological and general scholastic performances of the children with type 1 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study design is a hospital-based cross-sectional study. 42 children of age 1-15 years were enrolled for the study. Data collected from the records and from direct interviews of parents and children. Analysis were done based on CPMS and SDQ scoring system. Statistics was done using SPSS software and Student’s t-test was used for comparison. RESULTS Most of the children showed average school performance and reduction in school performance was noticed with advancing age. Psychological effects were experienced by all children and its severity increased with age. CONCLUSION Children with type 1 diabetes experience psychological stress due to the chronic nature of the illness. Financial constraints add to the stress. Severe stress was seen in older children and in girls. Regular follow up and counseling reduces the severity of stress.

  18. Heart rate variability in neonates of type 1 diabetic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Noirin E; Higgins, Mary F; Kinsley, Brendan F; Foley, Michael E; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a common finding in offspring of pre-gestational type 1 diabetic pregnancy. Echocardiographic and biochemical evidence of fetal cardiac dysfunction have also been reported. Studies suggest that offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM) undergo a fetal programming effect due to the hyperglycaemic intrauterine milieu which increases their risk of cardiovascular morbidity in adult life. Decreased neonatal heart rate variability (HRV) has been described in association with in-utero growth restriction, prematurity, sudden infant death syndrome and congenital heart disease. The effect of in-utero exposure to hyperglycaemia in diabetic pregnancy on neonatal HRV is unknown. Our aim was to determine if neonatal HRV differs between normal and diabetic pregnancy. This was a prospective observational study of 38 patients with pregestational type 1 diabetes and 26 controls. HRV assessment was performed using Powerlab (ADI Instruments Ltd). Heart rate variability assessment and cord blood sampling for pH and glucose were performed for all neonates. Maternal glycaemic control was assessed via measurement of glycosylated haemoglobin in each trimester in the diabetic cohort. Neonates of diabetic mothers had evidence of altered heart rate variability, with increased low frequency to high frequency ratio (LF: HF), suggestive of a shift towards sympathetic predominance (pheart to fluctuations in maternal glycaemia with subsequent alterations in HRV may explain why infants of diabetic mothers are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease in later life. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Molecular Genetics of Type 1 Glycogen Storage Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang Chou J; Mansfield

    1999-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1), also known as von Gierke disease, is caused by a deficiency in the activity of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). It is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, kidney enlargement, growth retardation, lactic acidemia, hyperlipidemia and hyperuricemia. The disease presents with both clinical and biochemical heterogeneity consistent with the existence of two major subgroups, GSD-1a and GSD-1b, which have been confirmed at the molecular genetic level. GSD-1a, the most prevalent form, is caused by mutations in the G6Pase gene that abolish or greatly reduce enzymatic activity. The gene maps to chromosome 17q21 and encodes a microsomal transmembrane protein. Animal models of GSD-1a exist and are being exploited to delineate the disease more precisely. It has been proposed that GSD-1b is caused by a defect in the microsomal glucose-6-phosphate transporter. The gene responsible for GSD-1b has been mapped to chromosome 11q23 and a cDNA encoding a microsomal transmembrane protein has been identified. The function of this putative GSD-1b protein remains to be determined. These recent developments, along with newly characterized animal models of GSD-1a, are increasing our understanding of the interrelationship between the components of the G6Pase complex and type 1 glycogen storage diseases.

  20. Role of immune system in type 1 diabetes mellitus pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szablewski, Leszek

    2014-09-01

    The immune system is the body's natural defense system against invading pathogens. It protects the body from infection and works to communicate an individual's well-being through a complex network of interconnected cells and cytokines. This system is an associated host defense. An uncontrolled immune system has the potential to trigger negative complications in the host. Type 1 diabetes results from the destruction of pancreatic β-cells by a β-cell-specific autoimmune process. Examples of β-cell autoantigens are insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, tyrosine phosphatase, and insulinoma antigen. There are many autoimmune diseases, but type 1 diabetes mellitus is one of the well-characterized autoimmune diseases. The mechanisms involved in the β-cell destruction are still not clear; it is generally believed that β-cell autoantigens, macrophages, dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, and T lymphocytes are involved in the β-cell-specific autoimmune process. It is necessary to determine what exact factors are causing the immune system to become unregulated in such a manner as to promote an autoimmune response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.