WorldWideScience

Sample records for basin volume vi

  1. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VI - Groundwater Flow Model Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-11-01

    Volume VI of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the groundwater flow model data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  2. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume VI. Data documentation. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B J

    1979-02-01

    This documentation describes the PIES Integrating Model as it existed on January 1, 1978. This Volume VI of six volumes is data documentation, containing the standard table data used for the Administrator's Report at the beginning of 1978, along with the primary data sources and the office responsible. It also contains a copy of a PIES Integrating Model Report with a description of its content. Following an overview chapter, Chapter II, Supply and Demand Data Tables and Sources for the Mid-range Scenario for Target Years 1985 and 1990, data on demand, price, and elasticity; coal; imports; oil and gas; refineries; synthetics, shale, and solar/geothermal; transportation; and utilities are presented. The following data on alternate scenarios are discussed: low and high demand; low and high oil and gas supply; refinery and oil and gas data assuming a 5% annual increase in real world oil prices. Chapter IV describes the solution output obtained from an execution of PIES.

  3. VI Congress on radiation research (radiobiology, radioecology, radiation safety). Abstracts. Volume 1 (sections I-VII)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection contains abstracts at the VI Congress on radiation studies, a program that included various aspects of the action of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on living organisms, problems of radioecology and radiation safety of human health and environment. Congress is confined to the 25th anniversary of the accident at the Chernobyl NPP. Several reports have summarized the 25-years studying the effects of the accident, articulated forecasts and the main directions of further research. The first volume contains the plenary reports, presentations on the sections of radiation biochemistry and molecular radiobiology, radiation genetics, radiation immunology and hematology, medical and biological aspects of radiation effect, mechanisms of low dose and low intensity radiation effects, long-term effects of radiation. Radiation protection and modification of radiation effects, radiobiology of tumors, problems of radiation therapy are under consideration

  4. VI Congress on radiation research (radiobiology, radioecology, radiation safety). Abstracts. Volume 2 (sections VIII-XIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection contains abstracts at the VI Congress on radiation research, in which program is included various aspects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations on living organisms, problems of radioecology and radiation safety of humans and the environment. The Congress is dedicated to the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident . Several reports have summarized the 25-year study of the effects of the accident, formulated forecasts and the main directions of further research. The second volume includes reports in sections : radioecology, combined effect of radiation and other environmental factors, agricultural radioecology, radiobiology of heavy ions, theoretical problems of radiobiology, systematic radiobiology. Radiobiology of non-ionizing radiation, biological effects, electromagnetic safety and regulation, radiobiological and radioecological education are discussed

  5. K East basin sludge volume estimates for integrated water treatment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, K.L.

    1998-08-19

    This document provides estimates of the volume of sludge expected from Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) processing of the fuel elements and in the fuel storage canisters in K East Basin. The original estimates were based on visual observations of fuel element condition in the basin and laboratory measurements of canister sludge density. Revision 1 revised the volume estimates of sludge from processing of the fuel elements based on additional data from evaluations of material from the KE Basin fuel subsurface examinations. A nominal Working Estimate and an upper level Working Bound is developed for the canister sludge and the fuel wash sludge components in the KE Basin.

  6. K East basin sludge volume estimates for integrated water treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides estimates of the volume of sludge expected from Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) processing of the fuel elements and in the fuel storage canisters in K East Basin. The original estimates were based on visual observations of fuel element condition in the basin and laboratory measurements of canister sludge density. Revision 1 revised the volume estimates of sludge from processing of the fuel elements based on additional data from evaluations of material from the KE Basin fuel subsurface examinations. A nominal Working Estimate and an upper level Working Bound is developed for the canister sludge and the fuel wash sludge components in the KE Basin

  7. Application of chromium stable isotopes to the evaluation of Cr(VI) contamination in groundwater and rock leachates from central Euboea and the Assopos basin (Greece)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Economou-Eliopoulos, Maria; Frei, Robert; Atsarou, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Major and trace elements (a) in groundwater, ultramafic rocks from natural outcrops and soil samples from cultivated sites of Central Euboea and Assopos basin, and (b) in experimentally produced laboratory water leachates of rocks and soils were investigated by SEM/EDS, XRD and ICP/MS. In addition......, stable chromium isotopes (expressed as δ53Cr values) were measured in groundwater and leachates in order to identify potential sources for Cr-contamination. The higher Cr(VI) concentrations in soil leachates compared to those in the rock pulp leachates potentially can be explained by the presence...... signatures. The variation in δ53Cr values (0.84 to 1.98‰ in groundwater from Euboea, and from 0.98 to 1.03‰ in samples from the Assopos basin) imply initial oxidative mobilization of Cr(VI) from the ultramafic host rocks, followed by reductive processes that lead to immobilization of portions of Cr...

  8. Lava flooding of ancient planetary crusts: geometry, thickness, and volumes of flooded lunar impact basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates of lava volumes on planetary surfaces provide important data on the lava flooding history and thermal evolution of a planet. Lack of information concerning the configuration of the topography prior to volcanic flooding requires the use of a variety of techniques to estimate lava thicknesses and volumes. A technique is described and developed which provides volume estimates by artificially flooding unflooded lunar topography characteristic of certain geological environments, and tracking the area covered, lava thicknesses, and lava volumes. Comparisons of map patterns of incompletely buried topography in these artificially flooded areas are then made to lava-flooded topography on the Moon in order to estimate the actual lava volumes. This technique is applied to two areas related to lunar impact basins; the relatively unflooded Orientale basin, and the Archimedes-Apennine Bench region of the Imbrium basin. (Auth.)

  9. Water Resources Data, Texas Water Year 1998, Volume 1. Arkansas River Basin, Red River Basin, Sabine River Basin, Neches River Basin, Trinity River Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Barbie, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1998 water year for Texas are presented in four volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 112 gaging stations; stage only at 5 gaging stations; stage and contents at 33 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 65 gaging stations; and data for 12 partial-record stations comprised of 7 flood-hydrograph, 2 low-flow, and 3 creststage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  10. Water Resources Data, Texas Water Year 1998, Volume 3. Colorado River Basin, Lavaca River Basin, Guadalupe River Basin, Nueces River Basin, Rio Grande Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Barbie, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1998 water year for Texas are presented in four volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3 contains records for water discharge at 126 gaging stations; stage only at 3 gaging stations; stage and contents at 15 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 62 gaging stations; and data for 35 partial-record stations comprised of 8 flood-hydrograph, 14 low-flow, and 18 creststage, and 5 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  11. PISA 2009 Results: Students On Line. Digital Technologies and Performance. Volume VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    This sixth volume of the Programme for International Student Assessment 2009 (PISA 2009) results explores students' use of information technologies to learn. For PISA 2009, the framework for reading literacy has been developed to encompass reading electronic texts. This has led to an expansion of the description of text types to take account of…

  12. Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department Of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology added Appendix L (Volume 6), Response to Public Comments, to the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, to fully address and respond to public comments on the Draft EIS. In addition, DOE considered public comments, along with other factors such as programmatic need, short- and long-term impacts, technical feasibility, and cost, in arriving at DOE's preferred alternative. During the public comment period for the Draft EIS, more than 350 individuals, agencies, Tribal Nations, and organizations provided comments. This volume represents a broad spectrum of private citizens; businesses; local, State, and Federal officials; Tribal Nations; and public interest groups

  13. K Basin spent fuel sludge treatment alternatives study. Volume 2, Technical options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 2100 metric tons of irradiated N Reactor fuel are stored in the KE and KW Basins at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Corrosion of the fuel has led to the formation of sludges, both within the storage canisters and on the basin floors. Concern about the degraded condition of the fuel and the potential for leakage from the basins in proximity to the Columbia River has resulted in DOE's commitment in the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) to Milestone M-34-00-T08 to remove the fuel and sludges by a December 2002 target date. To support the planning for this expedited removal action, the implications of sludge management under various scenarios are examined. This report, Volume 2 of two volumes, describes the technical options for managing the sludges, including schedule and cost impacts, and assesses strategies for establishing a preferred path

  14. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume VI. Data documentation. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B J

    1979-02-01

    This documentation describes the PIES Integrating Model as it existed on January 1, 1978. This volume contains two chapters. In Chapter I, Overview, the following subjects are briefly described: supply data, EIA projection series and scenarios, demand data and assumptions, and supply assumptions - oil and gas availabilities. Chapter II contains supply and demand data tables and sources used by the PIES Integrating Model for the mid-range scenario target years 1985 and 1990. Tabulated information is presented for demand, price, and elasticity data; coal data; imports data; oil and gas data; refineries data; synthetics, shale, and solar/geothermal data; transportation data; and utilities data.

  15. Identification of sites within the Palo Duro Basin. Volume 2. Palo Duro Location B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This three-volume document narrows to two sites for continued investigations for potential nuclear waste repository sites in the Palo Duro Basin of the Texas Panhandle. Volume 1 narrows a site previously identified in Deaf Smith County, Texas; Volume 2 narrows a site previously identified in Swisher County, Texas; and Volume 3 contains responses to comments received regarding the drafts of Volumes 1 and 2 (BMI/ONWI-531). These volumes discuss the methodology and logic used as well as the results that narrowed these sites. Each of the 10 site performance criteria was divided into descriptors related to site performance characteristics. Each descriptor was evaluated by a systematic logic to determine if it could be used as a discriminator. Then more- and less-preferred areas for groups of discriminators were defined and composite maps were prepared and evaluated to identify the sites

  16. Identification of sites within the Palo Duro Basin. Volume 1. Palo Duro Location A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This three-volume document narrows to two sites for continued investigations for potential nuclear waste repository sites in the Palo Duro Basin of the Texas Panhandle. Volume 1 narrows a site previously identified in Deaf Smith County, Texas; Volume 2 narrows a site previously identified in Swisher County, Texas; and Volume 3 contains responses to comments received regarding the drafts of Volumes 1 and 2 (BMI/ONWI-531). These volumes discuss the methodology and logic used as well as the results that narrowed these sites. Each of the 10 site performance criteria was divided into descriptors related to site performance characteristics. Each descriptor was evaluated by a systematic logic to determine if it could be used as a discriminator. Then more- and less-preferred areas for groups of discriminators were defined and composite maps were prepared and evaluated to identify the sites

  17. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils. Volume VI.- Andalucia (a): Jaen, Cordoba, Sevilla and Huelva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-137 and Sr-90. The Departamento de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. Depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source, the information compiled from the available bibliography is very heterogeneous. Therefore, an important effort has been made to normalize and process the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalize and process the data as well as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the provinces of Jaen, Cordoba, Sevilla and Huelva of the Comunidad Autonoma de Andalucia. (Author) 67 refs

  18. Final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC appendices. Volume 6. Appendix VI-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils dated September 1994 contains LEFPC Appendices, Volume 6, Appendix VI - X. These appendices cover the following areas: chain of custody, miscellaneous process calculations (residence time and orifice plate calculations), waste management (mercury and radiation confirmatory testing before and after final verification run), health and safety (training, respirator fit test and radiation work permits), and transportation (soil receipt documentation)

  19. Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 1999, Volume 1. Arkansas River Basin, Red River Basin, Sabine River Basin, Neches River Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.; Jones, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1999 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 71 gaging stations; stage only at 3 gaging stations; stage and contents at 23 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 47 gaging stations; and data for 9 partial-record stations comprised of 6 flood-hydrograph and 3 low-flow stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  20. Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 2000, Volume 1. Arkansas River Basin, Red River Basin, Sabine River Basin, Neches River Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 68 gaging stations; stage only at 3 gaging stations; stage and contents at 37 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 39 gaging stations; and data for 9 partial-record stations comprised of 6 flood-hydrograph and 3 low-flow stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  1. Empirical models to predict the volumes of debris flows generated by recently burned basins in the western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, J.E.; Cannon, S.H.; Santi, P.M.; deWolfe, V.G.

    2008-01-01

    Recently burned basins frequently produce debris flows in response to moderate-to-severe rainfall. Post-fire hazard assessments of debris flows are most useful when they predict the volume of material that may flow out of a burned basin. This study develops a set of empirically-based models that predict potential volumes of wildfire-related debris flows in different regions and geologic settings. The models were developed using data from 53 recently burned basins in Colorado, Utah and California. The volumes of debris flows in these basins were determined by either measuring the volume of material eroded from the channels, or by estimating the amount of material removed from debris retention basins. For each basin, independent variables thought to affect the volume of the debris flow were determined. These variables include measures of basin morphology, basin areas burned at different severities, soil material properties, rock type, and rainfall amounts and intensities for storms triggering debris flows. Using these data, multiple regression analyses were used to create separate predictive models for volumes of debris flows generated by burned basins in six separate regions or settings, including the western U.S., southern California, the Rocky Mountain region, and basins underlain by sedimentary, metamorphic and granitic rocks. An evaluation of these models indicated that the best model (the Western U.S. model) explains 83% of the variability in the volumes of the debris flows, and includes variables that describe the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30%, the basin area burned at moderate and high severity, and total storm rainfall. This model was independently validated by comparing volumes of debris flows reported in the literature, to volumes estimated using the model. Eighty-seven percent of the reported volumes were within two residual standard errors of the volumes predicted using the model. This model is an improvement over previous models in

  2. II-VI semiconductor compounds

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    For condensed matter physicists and electronic engineers, this volume deals with aspects of II-VI semiconductor compounds. Areas covered include devices and applications of II-VI compounds; Co-based II-IV semi-magnetic semiconductors; and electronic structure of strained II-VI superlattices.

  3. Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 2000, Volume 4. Colorado River Basin, Lavaca River Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 4 contains records for water discharge at 58 gaging stations; stage only at 2 gaging stations; stage and contents at 14 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 30 gaging stations; and data for 13 partial-record stations comprised of 5 flood-hydrograph, 5 low-flow, 1 crest-stage, and 2 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  4. Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 1999, Volume 4. Colorado River Basin, Lavaca River Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.; Jones, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1999 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 4 contains records for water discharge at 61 gaging stations; stage only at 1 gaging station; stage and contents at 11 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 30 gaging stations; and data for 13 partial-record stations comprised of 6 flood-hydrograph, 5 low-flow, and 2 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic datacollection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  5. Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

    1993-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

  6. Effects of Time, Heat, and Oxygen on K Basin Sludge Agglomeration, Strength, and Solids Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2011-01-04

    Sludge disposition will be managed in two phases under the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project. The first phase is to retrieve the sludge that currently resides in engineered containers in the K West (KW) Basin pool at ~10 to 18°C. The second phase is to retrieve the sludge from interim storage in the sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and treat and package it in preparation for eventual shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The work described in this report was conducted to gain insight into how sludge may change during long-term containerized storage in the STSCs. To accelerate potential physical and chemical changes, the tests were performed at temperatures and oxygen partial pressures significantly greater than those expected in the T Plant canyon cells where the STSCs will be stored. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of 50°C oxygenated water exposure on settled quiescent uraninite (UO2) slurry and a full simulant of KW containerized sludge to determine the effects of oxygen and heat on the composition and mechanical properties of sludge. Shear-strength measurements by vane rheometry also were conducted for UO2 slurry, mixtures of UO2 and metaschoepite (UO3•2H2O), and for simulated KW containerized sludge. The results from these tests and related previous tests are compared to determine whether the settled solids in the K Basin sludge materials change in volume because of oxidation of UO2 by dissolved atmospheric oxygen to form metaschoepite. The test results also are compared to determine if heating or other factors alter sludge volumes and to determine the effects of sludge composition and settling times on sludge shear strength. It has been estimated that the sludge volume will increase with time because of a uranium metal → uraninite → metaschoepite oxidation sequence. This increase could increase the number of containers required for storage and increase overall costs of sludge management activities. However, the volume

  7. Interpretation of a 3D Seismic-Reflection Volume in the Basin and Range, Hawthorne, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, J. N.; Kell, A. M.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Oldow, J. S.; Sabin, A.; Lazaro, M.

    2009-12-01

    A collaborative effort by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Optim Inc. of Reno has interpreted a 3d seismic data set recorded by the U.S. Navy Geothermal Programs Office (GPO) at the Hawthorne Army Depot, Nevada. The 3d survey incorporated about 20 NNW-striking lines covering an area of approximately 3 by 10 km. The survey covered an alluvial area below the eastern flank of the Wassuk Range. In the reflection volume the most prominent events are interpreted to be the base of Quaternary alluvium, the Quaternary Wassuk Range-front normal fault zone, and sequences of intercalated Tertiary volcanic flows and sediments. Such a data set is rare in the Basin and Range. Our interpretation reveals structural and stratigraphic details that form a basis for rapid development of the geothermal-energy resources underlying the Depot. We interpret a map of the time-elevation of the Wassuk Range fault and its associated splays and basin-ward step faults. The range-front fault is the deepest, and its isochron map provides essentially a map of "economic basement" under the prospect area. There are three faults that are the most readily picked through vertical sections. The fault reflections show an uncertainty in the time-depth that we can interpret for them of 50 to 200 ms, due to the over-migrated appearance of the processing contractor’s prestack time-migrated data set. Proper assessment of velocities for mitigating the migration artifacts through prestack depth migration is not possible from this data set alone, as the offsets are not long enough for sufficiently deep velocity tomography. The three faults we interpreted appear as gradients in potential-field maps. In addition, the southern boundary of a major Tertiary graben may be seen within the volume as the northward termination of the strong reflections from older Tertiary volcanics. Using a transparent volume view across the survey gives a view of the volcanics in full

  8. Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume I. Dalhart Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and highly variable prcipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources

  9. Identification of sites within the Palo Duro Basin. Volume 3. Responses to comments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document responds to comments received by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the draft report entitled Identification of Sites Within the Palo Duro Basin: Volume I - Palo Duro Location A (in Deaf Smith County) and Volume II - Palo Duro Location B (in Swisher County), BMI/ONWI-531, February 1984. The purpose of the report was to review existing geologic, environmental, and socioeconomic data for previously identified potentially acceptable sites consisting of approximately 200 square miles in Swisher County and 400 square miles in Deaf Smith County in the Texas Panhandle and to narrow them to preferred smaller sites for possible further study for a nuclear waste repository. The smaller sites thus identified within the two counties would then be more comparable in size to those in salt deposits in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Utah

  10. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume VI, workplace and environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This is the sixth in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume VI is to describe record series pertaining to workplace and environmental monitoring activities at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of workplace and environmental monitoring practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to workplace and environmental monitoring policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of this volume and the organization to contact for access to these records. Comprehensive introductory and background information is available in Volume I. Other volumes in the guide pertain to administrative and general subjects, facilities and equipment, production and materials handling, waste management, and employee health. In addition, HAI has produced a subject-specific guide, titled The September 1957 Rocky Flats Fire. A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and Its Contractors, which researchers should consult for further information about records related to this incident.

  11. Sustainable development around the Lake Victoria basin, part 1, : a case study of farmers'perception of the VI Agroforestry Project Masaka/Rakai, Uganda, from a gender perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Sara

    2004-01-01

    During the years the awareness of gender issues has increased in the international arena and the importance of including gender aspects in development projects has been emphasised. This Master’s thesis is based on a case study of the VI Agroforestry Project (VIAFP) in Uganda and is one of the two subprojects of the study Sustainable development around the Lake Victoria basin, with the purpose to investigate the importance of local anchoring and active participation in the work towards sustain...

  12. Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 2000, Volume 3. San Jacinto River Basin, Brazos River Basin, San Bernard River Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3 contains records for water discharge at 84 gaging stations; stage only at 9 gaging stations; stage and contents at 32 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 25 gaging stations; and data for 43 partial-record stations comprised of 18 flood-hydrograph, 8 low-flow, 14 crest-stage, and 3 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  13. Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 1999, Volume 3. San Jacinto River Basin, Brazos River Basin, San Bernard River Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.; Jones, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1999 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3 contains records for water discharge at 78 gaging stations; stage only at 7 gaging stations; stage and contents at 28 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 27 gaging stations; and data for 48 partial-record stations comprised of 19 flood-hydrograph, 8 low-flow, and 17 crest-stage, and 4 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  14. Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 1999, Volume 5. Guadalupe River Basin, Nueces River Basin, Rio Grande Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.; Jones, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1999 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 5 contains records for water discharge at 76 gaging stations; stage only at 1 gaging stations; stage and contents at 4 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 38 gaging stations; and data for 30 partial-record stations comprised of 3 flood-hydrograph, 14 low-flow, and 8 crest-stage, and 5 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  15. Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 2000, Volume 5. Guadalupe River Basin, Nueces River Basin, Rio Grande Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 5 contains records for water discharge at 71 gaging stations; stage only at 4 gaging stations; stage and contents at 4 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 29 gaging stations; and data for 23 partial-record stations comprised of 3 flood-hydrograph, 10 low-flow, 6 crest-stage, and 4 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  16. Water Resources Data, Texas Water Year 1998, Volume 2. San Jacinto River Basin, Brazos River Basin, San Bernard River Basin, and Intervening Coastal Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Barbie, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1998 water year for Texas are presented in four volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 2 contains records for water discharge at 74 gaging stations; stage only at 9 gaging stations; stage and contents at 21 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 32 gaging stations; and data for 73 partial-record stations comprised of 43 flood-hydrograph, 9 low-flow, and 16 crest-stage, and 5 miscellaneous stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  17. Identification of sites within the Palo Duro Basin. Volume 1. Palo Duro Location A. [Contains glossary, Deaf Smith site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-11-01

    This three-volume document narrows to two sites for continued investigations for potential nuclear waste repository sites in the Palo Duro Basin of the Texas Panhandle. Volume 1 narrows a site previously identified in Deaf Smith County, Texas; Volume 2 narrows a site previously identified in Swisher County, Texas; and Volume 3 contains responses to comments received regarding the drafts of Volumes 1 and 2 (BMI/ONWI-531). These volumes discuss the methodology and logic used as well as the results that narrowed these sites. Each of the 10 site performance criteria was divided into descriptors related to site performance characteristics. Each descriptor was evaluated by a systematic logic to determine if it could be used as a discriminator. Then more- and less-preferred areas for groups of discriminators were defined and composite maps were prepared and evaluated to identify the sites.

  18. Design data and safety features of commercial nuclear power plants including cumulative index for Volumes I--VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design data, safety features, and site characteristics are summarized for 12 nuclear power units in 6 power stations in the United States. Six pages of data are presented for each station, consisting of thermal-hydraulic and nuclear factors, containment features, emergency-core-cooling systems, site features, circulating water system data, and miscellaneous factors. In addition, an aerial perspective is presented for each plant. This volume covers plants with docket numbers 50-553 through 50-569 (Phipps Bend, Black Fox, Yellow Creek, and NEP) and two earlier plants not previously reported--Hope Creek (50-354, 50-355) and WPPSS 1 and 4 (50-460, 50-513). Indexes for this volume and the five earlier volumes are presented in three forms--by docket number, by plant name, and by participating utility

  19. POLLUTION EFFECTS OF ABNORMAL OPERATIONS IN IRON AND STEEL MAKING. VOLUME VI. BASIC OXYGEN PROCESS, MANUAL OF PRACTICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report is one in a six-volume series considering abnormal operating conditions (AOCs) in the primary section (sintering, blast furnace ironmaking, open hearth, electric furnace, and basic oxygen steelmaking) of an integrated iron and steel plant. Pollution standards, generall...

  20. Introduction to Psychology and Leadership. Part Four; Achieving Effective Communication. Segments IV, V, VI, & VII, Volume IV, Script.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westinghouse Learning Corp., Annapolis, MD.

    The fourth volume of the introduction to psychology and leadership course (see the final reports which summarize the development project, EM 010 418, EM 010 419, and EM 010 484) concentrates on achieving effective communication. It is a self-instructional tape script and intrinsically programed booklet. EM 010 427 and EM 010 428 are the first and…

  1. Techniques for simulating flood hydrographs and estimating flood volumes for ungaged basins in east and west Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    A dimensionless hydrograph developed for a variety of basin conditions in Georgia was tested for its applicability to streams in East and West Tennessee by comparing it to a similar dimensionless hydrograph developed for streams in East and West Tennessee. Hydrographs of observed discharge at 83 streams in East Tennessee and 38 in West Tennessee were used in the study. Statistical analyses were performed by comparing simulated (or computed) hydrographs, derived by application of the Georgia dimensionless hydrograph, and dimensionless hydrographs developed from Tennessee data, with the observed hydrographs at 50 and 75% of their peak-flow widths. Results of the tests indicate that the Georgia dimensionless hydrography is virtually the same as the one developed for streams in East Tennessee, but that it is different from the dimensionless hydrograph developed for streams in West Tennessee. Because of the extensive testing of the Georgia dimensionless hydrograph, it was determined to be applicable for East Tennessee, whereas the dimensionless hydrograph developed from data on streams in West Tennessee was determined to be applicable in West Tennessee. As part of the dimensionless hydrograph development, an average lagtime in hours for each study basin, and the volume in inches of flood runoff for each flood event were computed. By use of multiple-regression analysis, equations were developed that relate basin lagtime to drainage area size, basin length, and percent impervious area. Similarly, flood volumes were related to drainage area size, peak discharge, and basin lagtime. These equations, along with the appropriate dimensionless hydrograph, can be used to estimate a typical (average) flood hydrograph and volume for recurrence-intervals up to 100 years at any ungaged site draining less than 50 sq mi in East and West Tennessee. (USGS)

  2. 105-K Basin material design basis feed description for spent nuclear fuel project facilities. Volume 2: Sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 2 provides the design feed compositions for the baseline K East and K West Basin sludge process streams expected to be generated during Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project activities. Four types of feeds are required to support evaluation of specific facility and process considerations during the development of new facilities and processes. These four design feeds provide nominal and bounding conditions for design evaluations. Volume 2 includes definition of inventories for: (1) KE and KW Basins sludge locations (pit sludges, floor sludge, canister.sludge, and wash sludge components), (2) nominal feed for each of five process feed streams, (3) shielding design feed, (4) safety/regulatory assessment feed, and (5) criticality assessment feed

  3. 105-K Basin material design basis feed description for spent nuclear fuel project facilities. Volume 2: Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, K.L.

    1998-08-30

    Volume 2 provides the design feed compositions for the baseline K East and K West Basin sludge process streams expected to be generated during Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project activities. Four types of feeds are required to support evaluation of specific facility and process considerations during the development of new facilities and processes. These four design feeds provide nominal and bounding conditions for design evaluations. Volume 2 includes definition of inventories for: (1) KE and KW Basins sludge locations (pit sludges, floor sludge, canister.sludge, and wash sludge components), (2) nominal feed for each of five process feed streams, (3) shielding design feed, (4) safety/regulatory assessment feed, and (5) criticality assessment feed.

  4. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    OpenAIRE

    Harmatz Paul; Nicely Helen; Valayannopoulos Vassili; Turbeville Sean

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a lysosomal storage disease with progressive multisystem involvement, associated with a deficiency of arylsulfatase B leading to the accumulation of dermatan sulfate. Birth prevalence is between 1 in 43,261 and 1 in 1,505,160 live births. The disorder shows a wide spectrum of symptoms from slowly to rapidly progressing forms. The characteristic skeletal dysplasia includes short stature, dysostosis multiplex and degenerative joint disease. Rapidly ...

  5. 105-K Basin Material Design Basis Feed Description for Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Facilities, Volume 1, Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) is currently stored within two water filled pools, 105-KE Basin (KE Basin) and 105-KW Basin (KW Basin), at the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) is responsible to DOE for operation of these fuel storage pools and for the 2100 metric tons of SNF materials that they contain. The SNF Project mission includes safe removal and transportation of all SNF from these storage basins to a new storage facility in the 200 East Area. To accomplish this mission, the SNF Project modifies the existing KE Basin and KW Basin facilities and constructs two new facilities: the 100 K Area Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF), which drains and dries the SNF; and the 200 East Area Canister Storage Building (CSB), which stores the SNF. The purpose of this document is to describe the design basis feed compositions for materials stored or processed by SNF Project facilities and activities. This document is not intended to replace the Hanford Spent Fuel Inventory Baseline (WHC 1994b), but only to supplement it by providing more detail on the chemical and radiological inventories in the fuel (this volume) and sludge. A variety of feed definitions is required to support evaluation of specific facility and process considerations during the development of these new facilities. Six separate feed types have been identified for development of new storage or processing facilities. The approach for using each feed during design evaluations is to calculate the proposed facility flowsheet assuming each feed. The process flowsheet would then provide a basis for material compositions and quantities which are used in follow-on calculations

  6. High-sulfur spray dryer Shawnee test program. Volume VI. R-C/TVA spray dryer/ESP evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    TVA's continued investigations of FGD systems led to evaluating the spray drying technology on high-sulfur coal. Initial successful testing of a spraydryer/baghouse combination (see Volume II of this report series) led to the use of an ESP as the particulate collection device. This report describes the spray dryer/ESP testing and results. The goal of the spray dryer/ESP evaluation was to provide a proof-of-concept for this FGD technology. Data collected will be used for further scaleup and to help establish control strategies for TVA facilities. The major objectives were to determine spray dryer and ESP performance (SO/sub 2/ and particulate removal, operating characteristics) when treating flue gas generated from burning high-sulfur coal, and to determine spray-dried particulate characteristics under various spray dryer conditions.

  7. Underground flux studies in waste basin of CIPC using natural and artificial tracers (volume I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents studies to be done in wastes basin of CIPC in order to verify the contamination possibility of Rio das Antas basin, by infiltration in subsoil, of liquid wastes proceeding from mineral and industrial complex of Pocos de Caldas to be done up to February/82. (author)

  8. Precipitation Frequency for Ohio River Basin, USA - NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This GIS grid atlas contains precipitation frequency estimates for the Ohio River Basin and Surrounding states is based on precipitation data collected between...

  9. Volume of Impact Melt Generated by the Formation of the South Pole-Aitken Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, Noah E.

    2011-01-01

    The South Pole-Aitken Basin (SPA) is the largest, deepest, and oldest identified basin on the Moon and as such contains surfaces that are unique due to their age, composition, and depth of origin in the lunar crust [1-5] (Figure 1). SPA has been a target of intense interest as an area for robotic sample return in order to determine the age of the basin and the composition and origin of its interior [6-8]. In response to this interest there have been several efforts to estimate the likely provenance of regolith material within central SPA [9-12]. These model estimates suggest that, despite the formation of basins and craters following SPA, the regolith within SPA is dominated by locally derived material. An assumption of these models has been that the locally derived material is primarily SPA impact-melt as opposed to local basement material (e.g. unmelted lower crust). However, the definitive identification of SPA derived impact melt on the basin floor, either by remote sensing [5, 13] or via photogeology [2, 14] is extremely difficult due to the number of subsequent impacts and volcanic activity [4].

  10. H-Area Seepage Basins Groundwater Monitoring Report: Volume 1, Third and Fourth quarters 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoconcentration/isocactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1994. Geologic cross sections indicate both the extent and depth of contamination of the primary contaminants in all of the hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1994. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the H-Area Seepage Basins have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988

  11. F-Area Seepage Basins Groundwater Monitoring Report: Volume 1, Third and fourth quarters 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units. Geologic cross sections indicate both the extent and depth of contamination of the primary contaminants in all of the hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1994. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the F-Area Seepage Basins have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988

  12. Methodologies for Assessing the Cumulative Environmental Effects of Hydroelectric Development of Fish and Wildlife in the Columbia River Basin, Volume 1, Recommendations, 1987 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stull, Elizabeth Ann

    1987-07-01

    This volume is the first of a two-part set addressing methods for assessing the cumulative effects of hydropower development on fish and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin. Species and habitats potentially affected by cumulative impacts are identified for the basin, and the most significant effects of hydropower development are presented. Then, current methods for measuring and assessing single-project effects are reviewed, followed by a review of methodologies with potential for use in assessing the cumulative effects associated with multiple projects. Finally, two new approaches for cumulative effects assessment are discussed in detail. Overall, this report identifies and reviews the concepts, factors, and methods necessary for understanding and conducting a cumulative effects assessment in the Columbia River Basin. Volume 2 will present a detailed procedural handbook for performing a cumulative assessment using the integrated tabular methodology introduced in this volume. 308 refs., 18 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Learning Directory 1970-71. A Comprehensive Guide to Instructional Materials in All Media. Volume I, Users Guide, Source Index, Instructional Materials Index A-Boun; Volume II, Bourq-Dros; Volume III, Drou-Gree; Volume IV, Greg-Mari; Volume V, Mark-Pisc; Volume VI, Pise-Smel; Volume VII, Smer-Z, 0-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westinghouse Learning Corp., New York, NY.

    Over 200,000 distinct items of instructional material are indexed in this seven volume annual directory. They are presented in 600,000 entries under more than 225,000 different topics. Information in the directory is divided into two sections: the instructional materials index and the source index. The instructional materials index is organized…

  14. Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM): industrial energy use in the United States, 1974-2000. Volume 1: primary model documentation, Book 2, Chapters IV, V, VI, and VII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, R.E.; Herod, J.S.

    1978-06-19

    The Industrial Sector Technology Use Model provides a single framework for integrating all of the information and analysis into a set of predictions of industrial energy use. Given this volume of information which must be considered, this requires a set of computerized engineering-economic models. The design of these models is the subject of Chapter IV. The environmental factors in ISTUM are developed and presented in Chapter V. Chapter VI discusses the work accomplished by DATA Resources, Inc. in support of the ISTUM. A glossary, briefly defining special terms used in the ISTUM documentation, is given in Chapter VII. (MCW)

  15. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmatz Paul

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI is a lysosomal storage disease with progressive multisystem involvement, associated with a deficiency of arylsulfatase B leading to the accumulation of dermatan sulfate. Birth prevalence is between 1 in 43,261 and 1 in 1,505,160 live births. The disorder shows a wide spectrum of symptoms from slowly to rapidly progressing forms. The characteristic skeletal dysplasia includes short stature, dysostosis multiplex and degenerative joint disease. Rapidly progressing forms may have onset from birth, elevated urinary glycosaminoglycans (generally >100 μg/mg creatinine, severe dysostosis multiplex, short stature, and death before the 2nd or 3rd decades. A more slowly progressing form has been described as having later onset, mildly elevated glycosaminoglycans (generally ARSB gene, located in chromosome 5 (5q13-5q14. Over 130 ARSB mutations have been reported, causing absent or reduced arylsulfatase B (N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase activity and interrupted dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate degradation. Diagnosis generally requires evidence of clinical phenotype, arylsulfatase B enzyme activity ®, clinical management was limited to supportive care and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Galsulfase is now widely available and is a specific therapy providing improved endurance with an acceptable safety profile. Prognosis is variable depending on the age of onset, rate of disease progression, age at initiation of ERT and on the quality of the medical care provided.

  16. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report -- third and fourth quarters 1993. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    During the second half of 1993, the groundwater at the F-Area Seepage Basins (FASB) was monitored in compliance with Module 3, Section C, of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989, effective November 2, 1992. The monitoring well network is composed of 87 FSB wells screened in the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the FASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning in the first quarter of 1993, the standard for comparison became the SCDHEC Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS) specified in the approved F-Area Seepage Basins Part B permit. Currently and historically, gross alpha, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium are among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Numerous other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the FASB during the second half of 1993, notably aluminum, iodine-129, and zinc. The elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} and Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1} wells. However, several Aquifer Unit 2A wells also contain elevated levels of constituents. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the FASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  17. Global Spent Fuel Logistics Systems Study (GSFLS). Volume 4. Pacific basin spent fuel logistics system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    This report summarizes the conceptual framework for a Pacific Basin Spent Fuel Logistics System (PBSFLS); and preliminarily describes programatic steps that might be taken to implement such a system. The PBSFLS concept is described in terms of its technical and institutional components. The preferred PBSFLS concept embodies the rationale of emplacing a fuel cycle system which can adjust to the technical and institutional non-proliferation solutions as they are developed and accepted by nations. The concept is structured on the basis of initially implementing a regional spent fuel storage and transportation system which can technically and institutionally accommodate downstream needs for energy recovery and long-term waste management solutions.

  18. Global Spent Fuel Logistics Systems Study (GSFLS). Volume 4. Pacific basin spent fuel logistics system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the conceptual framework for a Pacific Basin Spent Fuel Logistics System (PBSFLS); and preliminarily describes programatic steps that might be taken to implement such a system. The PBSFLS concept is described in terms of its technical and institutional components. The preferred PBSFLS concept embodies the rationale of emplacing a fuel cycle system which can adjust to the technical and institutional non-proliferation solutions as they are developed and accepted by nations. The concept is structured on the basis of initially implementing a regional spent fuel storage and transportation system which can technically and institutionally accommodate downstream needs for energy recovery and long-term waste management solutions

  19. Evaluation of upland disposal of Oakland Harbor, California, sediment; Volume I: Turning basin sediments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.R.; Tatem, H.E.; Simmers, J.W.; Skogerboe, J.G.; Folsom, B.L.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes testing and evaluation performed by the Environmental Laboratory of the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station on sediment from the turning basin of Oakland Inner Harbor, Oakland, CA. Test protocols from the Corps' Management Strategy for Disposal of Dredged Material were used in the present evaluation to determine the potential for migration of contaminants into effluent, surface runoff, leachates, plants, and animals at an upland disposal site. Two sediments from the turning basin of Oakland Inner Harbor were tested: a composite sample of cores taken from the surface to 38-ft depth (upper sediment) and a composite sample of cores taken from 38- to 45-ft depth (lower sediment). In addition, two potential disposal site soils were tested: Twitchell Island and 7th Street disposal site. Sediment characterization indicated that the Oakland upper sediment contained higher concentrations of most contaminants than the lower sediment. Metal concentrations in the Oakland lower sediment were in the range of values found at the Twitchell Island disposal site. The Oakland upper sediment contained levels of cadmium and arsenic similar to those in Twitchell Island levee soils, but higher levels of zinc, nickel, lead, and copper.... Contaminant migration, Sediment testing, Contaminated sediments, Upland disposal, Dredged material.

  20. Environmental status of the Lake Michigan region. Volume 14. Birds of the Lake Michigan drainage basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, G.J.

    1977-07-01

    This report characterizes the bird life found in 100 counties of the four states peripheral to Lake Michigan. It discusses major habitats (the Lake Michigan shoreline, inland lakes, rivers and streams, marshes, fields and open spaces, and woodlots) and associates specific birds with habitats according to preferences for space and food. It also discusses the special attributes of state parks and lakeshores, refuges and sanctuaries, and other special areas which are attractive to avifauna. Patterns of historical occurrence and abundance, and the influence of pesticides and pollution, disease, and hunting pressure are explored to place present occurrence in a modern perspective. Migration patterns are discussed to explain increases and decreases which occur in nonresident avifauna of the Basin. The distribution and habits of birds that occur regularly in the Basin are described in an annotated list; a more complete list is presented in a table which encapsulates data for rapid and convenient reference. Separate sections deal with extinct, extirpated, and introduced species, and with endangered, threatened, and declining species.

  1. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report -- third and fourth quarters 1993. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    During the second half of 1993, the groundwater at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) was monitored in compliance with the September 30, 1992, modification of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning first quarter 1993, the HASB`s Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS), established in Appendix 3D-A of the cited permit, became the standard for comparison. Historically as well as currently, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constitutents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the HASB (notably aluminum, iodine-129, strontium-90, technetium-99, and zinc) during the second half of 1993. Elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} and in the upper portion of Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1}. However, constituents exceeding standards also occurred in several wells screened in the lower portion of Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1} and Aquifer Unit 2A. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps include in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1993. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the HASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  2. Water Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding Project Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synoptic sites, and partial-record sit -aid (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake-and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures 8a through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two or three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  3. Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 1999, Volume 2. Trinity River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.; Jones, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1999 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 2 contains records for water discharge at 47 gaging stations; stage only at 2 gaging stations; stage and contents at 18 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 35 gaging stations; and data for 3 partial-record stations comprised of 2 flood-hydrograph and 1 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  4. Water Resources Data - Texas Water Year 2000, Volume 2. Trinity River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Barbie, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for Texas are presented in six volumes, and consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and canals; stage, contents, and water-quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 2 contains records for water discharge at 49 gaging stations; stage only at 3 gaging stations; stage and contents at 24 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 34 gaging stations; and data for 3 partial-record stations comprised of 2 flood-hydrograph and 1 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating Federal, State, and local agencies in Texas. Records for a few pertinent stations in the bordering States also are included.

  5. Potential use of geothermal resources in the Snake River Basin: an environmental overview. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F. (eds.)

    1979-09-01

    Environmental baseline data for the Snake River Plain known geothermal resource areas (KGRAs) are evaluated for geothermal development. The objective is to achieve a sound data base prior to geothermal development. These KGRAs are: Vulcan Hot Springs, Crane Creek, Castle Creek, Bruneau, Mountain Home, Raft River, Island Park, and Yellowstone. Air quality, meteorology, hydrology, water quality, soils, land use, geology, subsidence, seismicity, terrestrial and aquatic ecology, demography, socioeconomics, and heritage resources are analyzed. This program includes a summary of environmental concerns related to geothermal development in each of the KGRAs, an annotated bibliography of reference materials (Volume II), detailed reports on the various program elements for each of the KGRAs, a program plan identifying future research needs, and a comprehensive data file.

  6. Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 1, Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

    1992-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1991 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 131 gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and water levels at 431 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio.

  7. Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin: Statewide project data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

    1992-03-01

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Ohio each water year. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations, 95 miscellaneous sites; (2) stage and content records for 5 streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality for 40 streamflow-gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and (4) water levels for 431 observation wells.

  8. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils. Volume VI.- Andalucia (a): Jaen, Cordoba, Sevilla and Huelva; Base de Datos de Propiedades Edafologicas de los Suelos Espanoles. Volumen VI.- Andalucia (a): Jaen, Cordoba, Sevilla y Huelva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, C.; Millan, R.; Schmid, T.; Lago, C. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain); Roquero, C.; Magister, M. [UPM. Madrid (Spain)

    1999-05-01

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-137 and Sr-90. The Department de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. Depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source, the information compiled from the available bibliography is very heterogeneous. Therefore, an important effort has been made to normalize and process the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalize and process the data as well as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the provinces of Jaen, Cordoba, Sevilla and Huelva of the Comunidad Autonoma de Andalucia. (Author) 67 refs.

  9. State policies and requirements for management of uranium mining and milling in New Mexico. Volume II. Water availability in the San Juan Structural Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains Two parts: Part One is an analysis of an issue paper prepared by the office of the New Mexico State Engineer on water availability for uranium production. Part Two is the issue paper itself. The State Engineer's report raises the issue of a scarce water supply in the San Juan Structural Basin acting as a constraint on the growth of the uranium mining and milling industry in New Mexico. The water issue in the structural basin is becoming an acute policy issue because of the uranium industry's importance to and rapid growth within the structural basin. Its growth places heavy demands on the region's scarce water supply. The impact of mine dewatering on water supply is of particular concern. Much of the groundwater has been appropriated or applied for. The State Engineer is currently basing water rights decisions upon data which he believes to be inadequate to determine water quality and availability in the basin. He, along with the USGS and the State Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, recommends a well drilling program to acquire the additional information about the groundwater characteristics of the basin. The information would be used to provide input data for a computer model, which is used as one of the bases for decisions concerning water rights and water use in the basin. The recommendation is that the appropriate DOE office enter into discussions with the New Mexico State Engineer to explore the potential mutual benefits of a well drilling program to determine the water availability in the San Juan Structural Basin

  10. Cu vi parolas Esperante?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej; Pettyn

    1999-01-01

    LA DEKDUA LECIONOu vi longe atendis min?—Danuta:Saluton,Banjo!—Barbara:Saluton!—D:Cu vi longe atendis min?—B:Tute ne.Mi jus venis i tien.—D:Mi esperas,ke nun vi estas libera.—B:Mi estas tute libera,do ni povas iriien,kien vi deziras.—D:Bone.Mi proponas do,ke unue niiru al magazenoj fari aetojn kaj

  11. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VI. Safety and environmental considerations for licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 6 of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program report addresses safety and environmental considerations in licensing the principal alternative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles in the United States for large-scale commercial nuclear power plants. In addition, this volume examines the safety and environmental considerations for licensing fuel service centers. These centers, which have been proposed for controlling sensitive fuel-cycle facilities and special nuclear materials, would contain a combination of such facilities as reprocessing plants, fabrication plants, and reactors. For this analysis, two fuel service center concepts were selected - one with power-generating capability and one without. This volume also provides estimates of the time required for development of large-scale commercial reactor systems to reach the construction permit application stage and for fuel-cycle facilities to reach the operating license application stage, which is a measure of the relative technical status of alternative nuclear systems

  12. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VI. Safety and environmental considerations for licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program report addresses safety and environmental considerations in licensing the principal alternative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles in the United States for large-scale commercial nuclear power plants. In addition, this volume examines the safety and environmental considerations for licensing fuel service centers. These centers, which have been proposed for controlling sensitive fuel-cycle facilities and special nuclear materials, would contain a combination of such facilities as reprocessing plants, fabrication plants, and reactors. For this analysis, two fuel service center concepts were selected - one with power - generating capability and one without

  13. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VI. Safety and environmental considerations for licensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program report addresses safety and environmental considerations in licensing the principal alternative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles in the United States for large-scale commercial nuclear power plants. In addition, this volume examines the safety and environmental considerations for licensing fuel service centers. These centers, which have been proposed for controlling sensitive fuel-cycle facilities and special nuclear materials, would contain a combination of such facilities as reprocessing plants, fabrication plants, and reactors. For this analysis, two fuel service center concepts were selected - one with power - generating capability and one without.

  14. Water resources data for Texas, water year 1996. Volume 2. San Jacinto River basin, Brazos River basin, San Bernard River basin, and intervening coastal basins. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Jones, R.E.; Barbie, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Volume 2 contains records for water discharge at 74 gaging stations; stage only at 6 gaging stations; stage and contents at 19 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 41 gaging stations; and data for 44 partial-record stations comprised of 18 flood-hydrograph, 10 low-flow, and 16 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  15. Water resources data for California, water year 1980; Volume 1, Colorado River basin, Southern Great Basin from Mexican border to Mono Lake basin, and Pacific slope basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1981-01-01

    Volume 1 of water resources data for the 1980 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lake and reservoirs; and water levels in wells. This report contains discharge records for 174 gaging stations; stage and contents for 18 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 51 stations; water levels for 165 observation wells. Also included are 9 crest-stage partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  16. Environmental status of the Lake Michigan region. Volume 16. Amphibians and reptiles of the Lake Michigan drainage basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of this report is on regional distribution of the herpetofauna of the Lake Michigan Drainage Basin. The introduction includes a brief discussion of plant communities and their associated herpetofauna, and the importance of hibernacula and migration routes. Some aspects of the status, distribution, habitat, and life history of the amphibians and reptiles of the Basin are described in an annotated checklist. Special attention is given to uncommon and endangered species. Species range is shown on distribution maps

  17. Environmental status of the Lake Michigan region. Volume 16. Amphibians and reptiles of the Lake Michigan drainage basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentecost, E.D.; Vogt, R.C.

    1976-07-01

    The focus of this report is on regional distribution of the herpetofauna of the Lake Michigan Drainage Basin. The introduction includes a brief discussion of plant communities and their associated herpetofauna, and the importance of hibernacula and migration routes. Some aspects of the status, distribution, habitat, and life history of the amphibians and reptiles of the Basin are described in an annotated checklist. Special attention is given to uncommon and endangered species. Species range is shown on distribution maps.

  18. Rock mechanics evaluation of potential repository sites in the Paradox, Permian, and Gulf Coast Basins: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal and thermomechanical analyses of a conceptual radioactive waste repository containing commercial and defense high-level wastes and spent fuel have been performing using finite element models. The thermal and thermomechanical responses of the waste package, disposal room, and repository regions were evaluated. four bedded salt formations, in Davis and Lavender Canyons in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah and in Deaf Smith and Swisher counties in the Permian Basin of northwestern Texas, and three salt domes, Vacherie Dome in northwestern Louisiana and Richton and Cypress Creek Domes in southeastern Mississippi, located in the Gulf Coast Basin, were examined. In the Paradox Basin, the pressure exerted on the waste package overpack was much greater than the initial in situ stress. The disposal room closure was less than 10 percent after 5 years. Surface uplift was nominal, and no significant thermomechanical perturbation of the aquitards was observed. In the Permian Basin, the pressure exerted on the waste package overpack was greater than the initial in situ stress. The disposal room closures were greater than 10 percent in less than 5 years. Surface uplift was nominal, and no significant thermomechanical perturbation of the aquitards was observed. In the Gulf Coast Basin, the pressure exerted on the waste package overpack was greater than the initial in situ stress. The disposal room closures were greater than 10 percent in less than 5 years. No significant thermomechanical perturbation of the overlying geology was observed. 40 refs., 153 figs., 32 tabs

  19. Cu vi parolas Esperante?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej; Pettyn

    1999-01-01

    LA DEKA LECIONOKiom da mono vi bezonas?—Barbara:Mi foriras aeti ion pormani.u vi deziras ion de mi?—Sinjoro Petro(la edzo de Barbara):Aetu por mi skatolon da cigaredoj aǔeble...aetu por mi du skatolojn dacigaredoj kaj unu skatolon da alume-toj.—B:Bone.u vi ankoraǔ deziras ion?—P:Ne,dankon.Estasio.u vihavas monon?

  20. Wabash River Basin comprehensive study covering reservoir sites on Embarrass River, Illinois and Clifty Creek and Patoka River, Indiana. Volume index. Volume I. Report. Interim report No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-01-01

    The purpose of this interim report is to present comprehensive plans of development for reservoir sites on the Embarrass River, Clifty Creek and Patoka River for one or more of the following needs: flood control, water supply, water quality control and low flow augmentation, water recreation and general conservation of water and related resources. The projects presented in this interim report are compatible with comprehensive development of the water and related land resources of the Wabash River Basin currently being developed.

  1. Hydrologic modeling as a tool for land management and contingency planning in the Calcasieu Sabine Basin. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Calcasieu-Sabine Basin in southwest Louisiana contains approximately 126,518 hectares of wetlands, consisting of fresh marsh, intermediate marsh, brackish marsh and saline marsh. The hydrodynamics of the basin involves a combination of estuarine processes such as saltwater intrusion, response to water level fluctuations at an open boundary and lake dynamics. The basin is also affected by deep ship channels. As such, a robust, flexible and efficient numerical model is needed to incorporate all of these processes in an operational program. This study developed a hydrodynamic and salinity model for a portion of the basin that includes the lakes and marshes for the purpose of land management and contingency planning. The newly developed finite-difference hydrodynamic and salinity model is a combination of 1 and 2 dimensional computations and is intended for land, wildlife and habitat management. It can be used as a coastal restoration tool to evaluate the effectiveness of future and ongoing coastal restoration projects. The model was calibrated and validated against field measurements. It was shown to produce accurate simulations of the complex flow patterns of the Calcasieu-Sabine Basin along with information on salinity, water level fluctuations, velocities and discharges throughout the main channels and open water bodies within the area. It was concluded that the model provides a very useful planning and adaptive management tool to improve the understanding of the complex hydrology and salinity circulation pattern within the system. 5 refs., 4 tabs., 9 figs

  2. Assessment of retention basin volume and outlet capacity in urban stormwater drainage systems with respect to water quality

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet A Yurdusev; Ahmet A Kumanlioğlu; Bekir Solmaz

    2005-12-01

    The quality of river water or other surface waters is detrimentally affected by the contaminants carried by the rainfall runoff in urban areas. The control of pollution moved by rainfall runoff is achieved by installing outlets and small retention basins in stormwater collection systems, thereby allowing only a certain amount of rainfall water to overflow and leading the remaining to treatment plants. This study analyses the effect of concentration time on surface water pollution caused by rainfall runoff. For this purpose, a linear -curve is assumed for the flow hydrograph arising from the collection system, based on parameters of rainfall considered and the catchment area. An independent code is developed to analyse such a system and this is applied to an urban area using nine-year single-discrete rainfall records of Izmir Station, Turkey. The system is capable of tackling situations where there is only a basin or a basin with outlet.

  3. Cu vi parolas Esperante?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej; Pettyn

    2000-01-01

    LA DEKKVARA LEOIONOMi havas por vi surprizon—Barbara:Bonan matenon!—Petro:Bonan matenon,mia kara!—B Mi havas pot vi surprizon.—P:Viiam havas pot mi surprizojn.—B:Sed hodiaǔ mi parolas treserioze."Okaze de via naskitago ak-

  4. Riparian cottonwood ecosystems and regulated flows in Kootenai and Yakima sub-basins : Volume II Yakima (overview, report, appendices); TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins

  5. Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume III (Overview and Tools).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

    2001-10-01

    Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

  6. Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume II Yakima (Overview, Report, Appendices).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

    2001-10-01

    Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

  7. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may reduce the risk by controlling their blood sugar. Alternative Names Abducens paralysis; Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; Vith nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References Rucker JC. Cranial ...

  8. Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume VI, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faletra, P.; Schuetz, A.; Cherkerzian, D.; Clark, T.

    2006-01-01

    Students who conducted research at DOE National Laboratories during 2005 were invited to include their research abstracts, and for a select few, their completed research papers in this Journal. This Journal is direct evidence of students collaborating with their mentors. Fields in which these students worked include: Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Engineering; Environmental Science; General Sciences; Materials Sciences; Medical and Health Sciences; Nuclear Sciences; Physics; and Science Policy.

  9. Water resources data for Texas, water year 1996. Volume 3. Colorado River basin, Lavaca River basin, Guadalupe River basin, Nueces River basin, Rio Grande basin, and intervening coastal basins. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Jones, R.E.; Barbie, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Volume 3 contains records for water discharge at 110 gaging stations; stage only at 1 gaging station; stage and contents at 12 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 53 gaging stations; and data for 38 partial-record stations comprised of 9 flood-hydrograph, 17 low-flow, and 12 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations.

  10. Smolt Monitoring Program, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1986 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish Passage Center

    1987-02-01

    Smolt Monitoring Program Annual Report, 1986, Volume I, describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the data from Fish Passage Center freeze brands used in the analysis of travel time for Lewiston, Lower Granite, Lower Monumental, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data. Data for marked fish not presented in this report will be provided upon request. Daily catch statistics (by species), flow, and sample parameters for the smolt monitoring sites, Clearwater, Lewiston, Lower Granite, Lower Monumental, Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville also will be provided upon request.

  11. Potential use of geothermal resources in the Snake River Basin: an environmental overview. Volume II. Annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F. (eds.)

    1979-09-01

    This volume is a partially annotated bibliography of reference materials pertaining to the seven KGRA's. The bibliography is divided into sections by program element as follows: terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, heritage resources, socioeconomics and demography, geology, geothermal, soils, hydrology and water quality, seismicity, and subsidence. Cross-referencing is available for those references which are applicable to specific KGRA's. (MHR)

  12. Water resources data for Texas, water year 1996. Volume 1. Arkansas River basin, Red River basin, Sabine River basin, Neches River basin, Trinity River basin, and intervening coastal basins. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1995-30 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandara, S.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Andrews, F.L.; Jones, R.E.; Barbie, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Volume 1 contains records for water discharge at 112 gaging stations; stage only at 4 gaging stations; stage and contents at 34 lakes and reservoirs; water quality at 76 gaging stations; and data for 15 partial-record stations comprised of 9 flood-hydrograph, 3 low-flow, and 3 crest-stage stations. Also included are lists of discontinued surface-water discharge or stage-only stations and discontinued surface-water-quality stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data-collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements.

  13. Skal vi danse apokalypso?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2009-01-01

    Den danske forfatter Lene Andersen satte sig for år tilbage for at sætte verden stævne. Det er siden blevet til storværket Baade Og, der nu tager de sidste skridt hen mod sin afslutning. Værket er skrevet under pseudonymet Jesper Knallhatt, og det næstsidste bind Torsdag er netop udkommet. De før...... formaningerne, ender nytestamentelige dommedagsprofetier med at gå i opfyldelse. Skal vi danse apokalypso, eller skal vi rent faktisk tage de verdslige problemer seriøst op til overvejelse?...

  14. Wadter Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin and Statewide Project Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synaptic sites, and partial-record sites; and (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake- and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures ga through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two to three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions mucopolysaccharidosis type VI mucopolysaccharidosis type VI Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI), also known as Maroteaux- ...

  16. Protostars and Planets VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuther, Henrik; Klessen, Ralf S.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Henning, Thomas

    star and planet formation. They are used by students to dive into new topics, and they are much valued by experienced researchers as a comprehensive overview of the field with all its interactions. We hope that you will enjoy reading (and learning from) this book as much as we do. The organization of the Protostars and Planets conference was carried out in close collaboration between the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy and the Center for Astronomy of the University Heidelberg, with generous support from the German Science Foundation. This volume is a product of effort and care by many people. First and foremost, we want to acknowledge the 250 contributing authors, as it is only due to their expertise and knowledge that such a comprehensive review compendium in all its depth and breadth is possible. The Protostars and Planets VI conference and this volume was a major undertaking, with support and contributions by many people and institutions. We like to thank the members of the Scientific Advisory Committee who selected the 38 teams and chapters out of more than 120 submitted proposals. Similarly, we are grateful to the reviewers, who provided valuable input and help to the chapter authors. The book would also not have been possible without the great support of Renée Dotson and other staff from USRA’s Lunar and Planetary Institute, who handled the detailed processing of all manuscripts and the production of the book, and of Allyson Carter and other staff from the University of Arizona Press. We are also grateful to Richard Binzel, the General Editor of the Space Science Series, for his constant support during the long process, from the original concept to this final product. Finally, we would like to express a very special thank you to the entire conference local organizing committee, and in particular, Carmen Cuevas and Natali Jurina, for their great commitment to the project and for a very fruitful and enjoyable collaboration.

  17. u vi parolas Esperante?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej; Pettyn

    1999-01-01

    LA DEKTRIA LECIONOMi preferas bonan glaciaonBarbara kaj Danuta faris aetojnkaj nun ili estas en kafejo kaj interparo-las.—Danuta:Kion vi trinkos, Banjo?—Barbara:Mi ankoraǚ ne scias. Sedmi tre soifas kaj ankaǚ malsatas.—D:Mi ankaǚ devas ion mani. Sed itie en la menuo ne estas manajoj...

  18. KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using GeeWiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL

    2008-09-01

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. The well-known KENO-VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code is one of the primary criticality safety analysis tools in SCALE. The KENO-VI primer is designed to help a new user understand and use the SCALE/KENO-VI Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with SCALE/KENO-VI in particular. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of SCALE/KENO-VI that are useful in criticality analyses. The primer is based on SCALE 6, which includes the Graphically Enhanced Editing Wizard (GeeWiz) Windows user interface. Each example uses GeeWiz to provide the framework for preparing input data and viewing output results. Starting with a Quickstart section, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for SCALE/KENO-VI input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with SCALE/KENO-VI. The sections that follow Quickstart include a list of basic objectives at the beginning that identifies the goal of the section and the individual SCALE/KENO-VI features that are covered in detail in the sample problems in that section. Upon completion of the primer, a new user should be comfortable using GeeWiz to set up criticality problems in SCALE/KENO-VI. The primer provides a starting point for the criticality safety analyst who uses SCALE/KENO-VI. Complete descriptions are provided in the SCALE/KENO-VI manual. Although the primer is self-contained, it is intended as a companion volume to the SCALE/KENO-VI documentation. (The SCALE manual is provided on the SCALE installation DVD.) The primer provides specific examples of

  19. Water Resources Data, California Water Year 1982, Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake basin, and Pacific slope basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J.C.; Butcher, M.T.; Lamb, C.E.; Singer, J.A.; Smith, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1982 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 160 gaging stations; stage and contents for 19 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 20 streams and 20 wells; water levels for 174 observation wells. Also included are 10 crest-stage partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  20. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1988. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polinoski, K.G.; Hoffman, E.B.; Smith, G.B.; Bowers, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1988 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 134 gaging stations; stage and contents for 17 lakes and reservoirs; and water quality for 24 streams. Also included are 10 crest-stage partial-record stations, 5 miscellaneous measurement sites, and 16 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  1. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1986. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J.C.; McConaughy, C.E.; Polinoski, K.G.; Smith, G.B.

    1988-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1986 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 144 gaging stations; stage and contents for 15 lakes and reservoirs; watet quality for 21 streams. Also included are crest-stage partial-record stations, 3 miscellaneous measurement sites, and 5 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  2. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1987. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J.C.; McConaughy, C.E.; Polinoski, K.G.; Smith, G.B.

    1988-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1987 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 134 gaging stations; stage and contents for 16 lakes and reservoirs; and water quality for 16 streams. Also included are 10 crest-stage partial-record stations, 3 miscellaneous measurement sites, and 10 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  3. Water Resources Data for California, 1983. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J.C.; Butcher, M.T.; Lamb, C.E.; Singer, J.A.; Smith, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1983 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 154 gaging stations; stage and contents for 18 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 20 streams and 18 wells; water levels for 165 observation wells. Also included are 10 crest-stage partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and federal agencies in California.

  4. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1985. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J.C.; McConaughy, C.E.; Polinoski, K.G.; Smith, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1985 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 150 gaging stations; stage and contents for 17 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 23 streams. Also included are 10 crest-stage partial-record stations, three miscellaneous measurement sites, and one waterquality partial-record station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  5. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1998. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin; and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agajanian, J.; Rockwell, G.L.; Hayes, P.D.; Anderson, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1998 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 157 gaging stations and 13 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 21 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 1 station, water quality for 22 streamflow-gaging stations and 14 partialrecord stations, and precipitation data for 3 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  6. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1996. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, G.L.; Hayes, P.D.; Agajanian, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1996 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 149 gaging stations and 6 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 21 lakes and reservoirs, gage height records for 1 station, water quality for 19 streamflow-gaging stations and 17 partial record stations, and precipitation data for 4 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  7. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1997. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, P.D.; Agajanian, J.A.; Rockwell, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1997 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 151 gaging stations and 16 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 21 lakes and reservoirs, gage height records for 1 station, water quality for 23 streamflow-gaging stations and 10 partialrecord stations, and precipitation data for 5 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Califomia.

  8. Water Resources Data--California, Water Year 2002, Volume 1, Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, G.L.; Pope, G.L.; Agajanian, J.; Caldwell, L.A.

    2003-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2002 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 188 gaging stations and 10 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 19 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 2 stations, water quality for 39 streamflow-gaging stations and 11 partial-record stations, and precipitation data for 1 station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  9. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1990. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin; and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J.C.; Jensen, R.M.; Hoffman, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1990 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 157 streamflow-gaging stations, 16 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations, and 2miscellaneous measurement stations; stage and contents records for 16 lakes and reservoirs; water-quality records for 19 streamflow-gaging stations, 2 partial-record stations; and precipitation records for 13 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  10. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1995. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin; and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agajanian, J.A.; Rockwell, G.L.; Hayes, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1995 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains (1) discharge records for 141 streamflow-gaging stations, 6 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations; (2) stage and contents records for 20 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water quality records for 21 streamflow-gaging stations and 3 partial-record stations; and (4) precipitation records for 1 station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  11. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1993. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, J.R.; Hayes, P.D.; Agajanian, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1993 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains (1) discharge records for 156 streamflow-gaging stations, 12 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations, and 5 miscellaneous measurement stations; (2) stage and contents records for 26 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water-quality records for 17 streamflow-gaging stations and 6 partial-record stations; and (4) precipitation records for 10 stations . These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  12. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1989. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin; and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, E.B.; Bowers, J.C.; Jensen, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1989 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 137 gaging stations; stage and contents for 15 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 25 streams; and precipitation for 8 gaging stations. Also included are 15 crest-stage partial-record stations, 7 miscellaneous measurement sites, and 5 water-quality partial record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  13. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1994. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, P.D.; Agajanian, J.A.; Rockwell, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1994 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains (1) discharge records for 143 streamflow-gaging stations, 15 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations; (2) stage and contents records for 20 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water quality records for 19 streamflow-gaging stations and 2 partial-record stations; and ( 4) precipitation records for 8 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  14. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1991. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin; and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R.M.; Hoffman, E.B.; Bowers, J.C.; Mullen, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains dischrage records for 171 streamflow-gaging stations, 16 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations, and 3 miscellaneous measurement stations; stage and contents records for 24 lakes and reservoirs; water-quality records for 23 streamflow-gaging stations, 4 partial-record stations; and precipitation records for 16 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U,S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  15. Water Resources Data--California, Water Year 2000, Volume 1, Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S.W.; Agajanian, J.; Rockwell, G.L.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 175 gaging stations and 13 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 20 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 2 stations, water quality for 27 streamflow-gaging stations and 3 partial-record stations, and precipitation data for 4 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  16. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin; and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, E.B.; Bowers, J.C.; Mullen, J.R.; Hayes, P.D.

    1993-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1992 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains (1) discharge records for 161 streamflow-gaging stations, 15 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations, and 5 miscellaneous measurement stations; (2) stage and contents records for 26 lakes and reservoirs; (3) water-quality records for 23 streamflow-gaging stations and 3 partialrecord stations; and ( 4) precipitation records for 11 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  17. Water Resources Data--California, Water Year 2001, Volume 1, Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agajanian, J.; Rockwell, G.L.; Anderson, S.W.; Pope, G.L.

    2002-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2001 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 180 gaging stations and 13 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 20 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 2 stations, water quality for 37 streamflow-gaging stations and 2 partial-record stations, and precipitation data for 3 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  18. Water Resources Data -- California, Water Year 2003, Volume 1, Southern Great Basin from Mexican Border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope Basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, G.L.; Agajanian, J.; Caldwell, L.A.; Rockwell, G.L.

    2004-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 193 gaging stations and 11 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 22 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 2 stations, water quality for 47 streamflow-gaging stations and 12 partial-record stations, and precipitation data for 1 station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  19. Water resources data, California, water year 2004, volume 1. southern Great Basin from Mexican border to Mono Lake Basin, and Pacific Slope basins from Tijuana River to Santa Maria River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agajanian, J.; Caldwell, L.A.; Rockwell, G.L.; Pope, G.L.

    2005-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 195 gaging stations and 10 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage and contents for 25 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 2 stations, water quality for 47 streamflow-gaging stations and 7 partial-record stations, and precipitation data for 5 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  20. u vi parolas Esperante?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdrzej; Pettyn

    2000-01-01

    LA DEKSESA LECIONO Oni povas ci tie bone babili Ni trovigas en la restoracio "Fabelo", kie okazas nun la naskigtaga festeno de Petro. —Danuta: "Fabelo" estas tre agrabla. —K: Jes, oni povas ci tie bone mangi kaj ankau bone babili, car la orkestro ne estas tro brua. —D: Ec la plej bona orkestro Renas, kiam gi estas tro brua. —K: Vi pravas. Rigardu, tie en la an

  1. Intelsat VI antenna system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, M. F.; Lane, S. O.; Taormina, F. A.

    The antenna system design of a series of five new communications satellites known as Intelsat VI is described in detail. Each satellite will utilize 50 transponders operating in the C and K band portions of the frequency spectrum. The transponders are interconnectible using either static switch matrices or a network which provides satellite switched time division multiple access capability. The antenna coverages, characteristics, and special design features are shown and discussed.

  2. Extraction behavior of uranium(VI) with polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution with polyether-based polyurethane (PU) foam was studied. The effects of the kinds and concentrations of nitrate salts, uranium(VI) concentration, temperature, nitric acid concentration, pH, the content of poly(ethylene oxide) in the polyurethane foam, and the ratio of PU foam weight and solution volume on the extraction of uranium(VI) were investigated. The interferences of fluoride and carbonate ions on the extraction of uranium(VI) were also examined, and methods to overcome both interferences were suggested. It was found that no uranium was extracted in the absence of a nitrate salting-out agent, and the extraction behaviors of uranium(IV) with polyurethane foam could be explained in terms of an etherlike solvent extraction mechanism. In addition, the percentage extraction of a multiple stage was also estimated theoretically

  3. Vi lever i en verden af ting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Vi lever i en verden af ting Vi lever i en verden af ting. Menneskeligt frembragte påvirkninger, konstruktioner og manipulationer af vores natur, hvis det da er vores natur. Vi lever også i et særligt innovations-regime, hvor vi bliver vurderet på og defineret af, hvad og hvordan vi kan bidrage med...

  4. Kinetic desorption and sorption of U(VI) during reactive transport in a contaminated Hanford sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qafoku, Nikolla P; Zachara, John M; Liu, Chongxuan; Gassman, Paul L; Qafoku, Odeta S; Smith, Steven C

    2005-05-01

    Column experiments were conducted to investigate U(VI) desorption and sorption kinetics in a sand-textured, U(VI)-contaminated (22.7 micromol kg(-1)) capillary fringe sediment from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. Saturated column experiments were performed under mildly alkaline conditions representative of the Hanford site where uranyl-carbonate and calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes dominate aqueous speciation. A U(VI)-free solution was used to study contaminant U(VI) desorption in columns where different flow rates were applied. Sorbed, contaminant U(VI) was partially labile (11.8%), and extended leaching times and water volumes were required for complete desorption of the labile fraction. Uranium-(VI) sorption was studied after the desorption of labile, contaminant U(VI) using different U(VI) concentrations in the leaching solution. Strong kinetic effects were observed for both U(VI) sorption and desorption, with half-life ranging from 8.5 to 48.5 h for sorption and from 39.3 to 150 h for desorption. Although U(VI) is semi-mobile in mildly alkaline, subsurface environments, we observed substantial U(VI) adsorption, significant retardation during transport, and atypical breakthrough curves with extended tailing. A distributed rate model was applied to describe the effluent data and to allow comparisons between the desorption rate of contaminant U(VI) with the rate of shortterm U(VI) sorption. Desorption was the slower process. We speculate that the kinetic behavior results from transport or chemical phenomena within the phyllosilicate-dominated fine fraction present in the sediment. Our results suggest that U(VI) release and transport in the vadose zone and aquifer system from which the sediment was obtained are kinetically controlled. PMID:15926566

  5. The annual mean sketches and climatological variability of the volume and heat transports through the inter-basin passages:A study based on 1 400-year spin up of MOM4p1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yaohua; WEI Zexun; WANG Yonggang; GUAN Yuping; WANG Xinyi

    2014-01-01

    The annual mean volume and heat transport sketches through the inter-basin passages and transoceanic sections have been constructed based on 1 400-year spin up results of the MOM4p1. The spin up starts from a state of rest, driven by the monthly climatological mean force from the NOAA World Ocean Atlas (1994). The volume transport sketch reveals the northward transport throughout the Pacific and southward trans-port at all latitudes in the Atlantic. The annual mean strength of the Pacific-Arctic-Atlantic through flow is 0.63×106 m3/s in the Bering Strait. The majority of the northward volume transport in the southern Pacific turns into the Indonesian through flow (ITF) and joins the Indian Ocean equatorial current, which subse-quently flows out southward from the Mozambique Channel, with its majority superimposed on the Ant-arctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). This anti-cyclonic circulation around Australia has a strength of 11×106 m3/s according to the model-produced result. The atmospheric fresh water transport, known as P-E+R (pre-cipitation minus evaporation plus runoff ), constructs a complement to the horizontal volume transport of the ocean. The annual mean heat transport sketch exhibits a northward heat transport in the Atlantic and poleward heat transport in the global ocean. The surface heat flux acts as a complement to the horizontal heat transport of the ocean. The climatological volume transports describe the most important features through the inter-basin passages and in the associated basins, including:the positive P-E+R in the Arctic substantially strengthening the East Greenland Current in summer;semiannual variability of the volume transport in the Drake Passage and the southern Atlantic-Indian Ocean passage;and annual transport vari-ability of the ITF intensifying in the boreal summer. The climatological heat transports show heat storage in July and heat deficit in January in the Arctic;heat storage in January and heat deficit in July in the

  6. ViPAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Kim W; Francis, Richard W; Bresnahan, M; Gissler, M; Grønborg, T K; Gross, R; Gunnes, N; Hammond, G; Hornig, M; Hultman, C M; Huttunen, J; Langridge, A; Leonard, H; Newman, S; Parner, E T; Petersson, G; Reichenberg, A; Sandin, S; Schendel, Diana; Schalkwyk, L; Sourander, A; Steadman, C; Stoltenberg, C; Suominen, A; Surén, P; Susser, E; Sylvester Vethanayagam, A; Yusof, Z

    2015-01-01

    free and open source methods to provide researchers with a web-based platform to analyse datasets housed in disparate locations. METHODS: Database federation permits controlled access to remotely located datasets from a central location. The Secure Shell protocol allows data to be securely exchanged......PAR infrastructure, remote sites manage their own harmonized research dataset in a database hosted at their site, while a central server hosts the data federation component and a secure analysis portal. When an analysis is initiated, requested data are retrieved from each remote site and virtually pooled at the...... central site. The data are then analysed by statistical software and, on completion, results of the analysis are returned to the user and the virtually pooled data are removed from memory. CONCLUSIONS: ViPAR is a secure, flexible and powerful analysis platform built on open source technology that is...

  7. Monitoring and evaluation of smolt migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume II: Evaluation of the 1996 predictions of the run-timing of wild migrant subyearling chinook in the Snake River Basin using Program RealTime.; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project was initiated in 1991 in response to the Endangered Species Act (ESA) listings in the Snake River Basin of the Columbia River Basin. Primary objectives and management implications of this project include: (1)to address the need for further synthesis of historical tagging and other biological information to improve understanding and identify future research and analysis needs; (2)to assist in the development of improved monitoring capabilities, statistical methodologies and software tools to aid management in optimizing operational and fish passage strategies to maximize the protection and survival of listed threatened and endangered Snake River salmon populations and other listed and nonlisted stocks in the Columbia River Basin; (3)to design better analysis tools for evaluation programs; and (4)to provide statistical support to the Bonneville Power Administration and the Northwest fisheries community

  8. ViFiLite Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ViFiLite is a wireless infrastructure that utilizes the advantages of a V-band technology in supporting data gathering for structural health monitoring as well as...

  9. Environmental status of the Lake Michigan region. Volume II. Natural areas of the Lake Michigan drainage basin and endangered or threatened plant and animal species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stearns, F.; Lindsley, D.

    1977-09-01

    The accelerating encroachment of human activity on the natural landscape has made many citizens appreciate the need to save representative biotic communities before urbanization and technologically induced change eliminate such communities. Active programs in natural-area preservation are now in progress in the four basin states; these programs have strong public support and legislative mandate. Local, state, and federal agencies and private individuals have taken an active interest in protecting select areas as samples of the biotic communities and natural features of the Basin. Most natural areas described in this report have been dedicated or reserved in some fashion. Other areas are being added by the basin states each year. The maintenance of natural communities is closely linked to the preservation of endangered and threatened species of plants and animals which would cease to survive as isolated populations. Under federal regulations, certain plants and animals are listed as endangered or threatened in the Basin. As individual state lists are prepared and investigations proceed, it is probable that many more threatened species will be found.

  10. Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume I Kootenai River (Overview, Report and Appendices).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

    2001-10-01

    Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

  11. Supplementary information on K-Basin sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAKENAS, B.J.

    1999-03-15

    Three previous documents in this series have been published covering the analysis of: K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludge, K East Basin Canister Sludge, and K West Basin Canister Sludge. Since their publication, additional data have been acquired and analyses performed. It is the purpose of this volume to summarize the additional insights gained in the interim time period.

  12. Supplementary information on K-Basin sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three previous documents in this series have been published covering the analysis of: K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludge, K East Basin Canister Sludge, and K West Basin Canister Sludge. Since their publication, additional data have been acquired and analyses performed. It is the purpose of this volume to summarize the additional insights gained in the interim time period

  13. Salivary carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelä, Jyrki; Parkkila, Seppo; Parkkila, Anna-Kaisa; Leinonen, Jukka; Rajaniemi, Hannu

    1999-01-01

    The carbonic anhydrases (CAs) participate in the maintenance of pH homeostasis in various tissues and biological fluids of the human body by catalysing the reversible reaction CO2+ H2O ⇌ HCO3−+ H+ (Davenport & Fisher, 1938; Davenport, 1939; Maren, 1967). Carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme VI (CA VI) is the only secretory isoenzyme of the mammalian CA gene family. It is exclusively expressed in the serous acinar cells of the parotid and submandibular glands, from where it is secreted into the saliva. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in research focused on the physiological role of salivary CA VI in the oral cavity and upper alimentary canal. PMID:10523402

  14. Chromium (VI) adsorption on boehmite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados-Correa, F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: fgc@nuclear.inin.mx; Jimenez-Becerril, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027 Col., Escandon, Delegacion Miguel Hidalgo, C.P. 11801 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-03-15

    Boehmite was synthesized and characterized in order to study the adsorption behavior and the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions as a function of contact time, initial pH solution, amount of adsorbent and initial metal ion concentration, using batch technique. Adsorption data of Cr(VI) on the boehmite were analyzed according to Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption models. Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption system were determinated at 293, 303, 313 and 323 K temperatures. The kinetic values and thermodynamic parameters from the adsorption process show that the Cr(VI) ions adsorption on boehmite is an endothermic and spontaneous process. These results show that the boehmite could be considered as a potential adsorbent for chromium ions in aqueous solutions.

  15. VI Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaal / Leonhard Lapin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lapin, Leonhard, 1947-

    2005-01-01

    15.-17. IX Tallinnas Niguliste kirikus toimuval VI Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaalil esinevad inglise arhitektuurikriitik Peter Davey, šveitsi arhitekt Peter Zumthor, soome arhitekt Juha Leviskä, eesti arhitekt Vilen Künnapu, eesti kunstiajaloolane Juhan Maiste jt. Külastatakse KUMU, tutvutab autor Pekka Vapaavuori

  16. Bliver vi aldrig mætte?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    Vi har de sidste 100 år oplevet en utrolig vækst i den materielle levestandard. Mobiltelefoner og IT er eksempler på dette. Men det høje forbrug sætter kloden under pres. Bliver vi aldrig ”mætte” af forbruget? Og har vi et ansvar som enkeltpersoner?...

  17. viDA Thereapeutics, Inc. Business Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nancy; Lestou, Valia S

    2008-01-01

    viDA Therapeutics Inc. (herein called viDA), with headquarters in Vancouver, British Columbia, was incorporated in April of 2008. viDA is a new specialty biotechnology company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of first-in-class drugs for the treatment of age-related degenerative processes, such as age related wrinkling and hair loss. viDA has chosen a distinct company strategy, focusing strongly on the development and marketing of specialty products. viDA bases its b...

  18. Evaluation of Helium Purge and Vent Process to Reduce Oxygen Concentrations in the Large Diameter Container and Cask Void Volumes at K Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to provide calculations to model the following activities and associated procedures: (1) Model a Helium Purge System (HPS) to reduce the oxygen concentration (i.e., O2 mole fraction) to less than 1% in the single Large Diameter Container (LDC) void volume, by a direct purge and vent process, after sludge load out is complete. (2) Model a HPS to reduce oxygen concentration (i.e., O2 mole fraction) to less than 1% in the Cask and filter-connected LDC void volumes prior to transport to T-Plant. This document will evaluate and determine the following items, in order, to address the issues noted above: (1) Demonstrate the purge system process and methodology will ensure the Cask and LDC void volumes can be purged below 1% oxygen for both models defined above. (2) Based on previous item (1), determine the number of purge/vent cycles for the Cask/LDC, and single LDC, to enable the LDC void volume to obtain an oxygen concentration below 1%. (3) Based on previous items (1) and (2), determine the length of purge/vent time for each cycle and model using a reduced final purge cycle pressure in single LDC (i.e., 35 psig) and Cask/LDC (37 psig) and using an increased final vent cycle pressure in single LDC (i.e., 4 psig) and Cask/LDC (7 psig). Revision 2 of this document provides a greater purge pressure and reduced vent pressure per cycle which increases process cycle durations but decreases oxygen concentrations per cycle. (4) Determine a recommended dynamic pressure setting on the helium purge feed regulator setting or volumetric helium feed flow to meet the proposed cycle times in previous items (1) through (3). (5) Determine a final Cask purge pressure based on the single LDC process run data. The final pressure shall ensure the process avoids damaging the filter media between the two void volumes (6) Provide any special design change recommendations or specific design requirements that the purge system must meet to adequately optimize the

  19. Determination of uranium(VI) using Penicillium chrysogenum immobilized on silica gel and spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solid phase extraction method for separation and enrichment of uranium(VI) was developed using Penicillium chrysogenum immobilized on silica mixed with double distilled water. Conditions such as pH, sample flow rate and volume, eluting solution and interfering ions with uranium(VI) optimized and determined spectrophotometrically for quantitative sorption. Maximum adsorption found at monolayer was 1.3004 mg/g using Langmuir isotherm. The limits of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the proposed method for uranium(VI) was 0.61 μg/L and was 2.02 μg/L respectively. The method developed for the separation and recovery of uranium(VI) was applied sediment samples and tap water samples. (author)

  20. Western oil-shale development: a technology assessment. Volume 6: oil-shale development in the Piceance Creek Basin and potential water-quality changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    This report brackets the stream quality changes due to pre-mining pumping activites required to prepare oil shale lease Tracts C-a and C-b for modified in situ retorting. The fluxes in groundwater discharged to the surface were identified for Tract C-b in a modeling effort by another laboratory. Assumed fluxes were used for Tract C-a. The quality of the groundwater aquifers of the Piceance Basin is assumed to be that reported in the literature. The changes are bracketed in this study by assuming all premining pumping is discharged to the surface stream. In one case, the pumped water is assumed to be of a quality like that of the upper aquifer with a relatively high quality. In the second case, the pumped water is assumed to come from the lower aquifer. Complete mixing and conservation of pollutants was assumed at sample points at the White River and at Lees Ferry of the Colorado River. A discussion of possible secondary effects of oil shale and coal mining is presented. In addition, a discussion of the uncertainties associated with the assumptions used in this study and alternative uses for the water to prevent stream contamination by oil shale development is provided.

  1. Wilderness Study Report : Volume VI : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In order to conform to the Wilderness Act of 1964, a study was conducted by the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife personnel to ascertain which of the Kenai...

  2. World Energy Data System (WENDS). Volume VI. International agreement profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    The World Energy Data System contains organized data on those countries and international organizations that may have critical impact on world energy. The international agreement profiles in WENDS are all energy-related and are organized by energy technology. These are: coal; conservation; fusion; geothermal; nuclear fission; oil, gas, and shale; solar, wind, and ocean thermal; and other (cooperation in electrical power equipment acquisition, energy, energy research, etc.). The agreement profiles are accessible by energy technology and alphabetically by country.

  3. Computer Programs for Chemical Engineering, Volume VI: Stagewise Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, James H., Ed.

    Presented are some computer programs for undergraduate students. These computer programs were designed for use in standard chemical engineering courses such as kinetics, control, thermodynamics, transport, stagewise operation, and stoichiometry. Each of the 17 computer programs is presented in a separate section. Each section presents problem…

  4. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volume VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    Eleven papers on theory and research in higher education have the following titles and authors: "A Paradigm for Research on Higher Education" (William F. Massy); "Minority Student Access to, and Persistence and Performance in College: A Review of the Trends and Research Literature" (Shirley L. Mow and Michael T. Nettles); "Master's Degree Programs…

  5. Precision engineering center. 1988 Annual report, Volume VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dow, T. [ed.; Fornaro, R.; Keltie, R.; Paesler, M. [and others

    1988-12-01

    To reverse the downward trend in the balance of trade, American companies must concentrate on increasing research into new products, boosting productivity, and improving manufacturing processes. The Precision Engineering Center at North Carolina State University is a multidisciplinary research and graduate education program dedicated to providing the new technology necessary to respond to this challenge. One extremely demanding manufacturing area is the fabrication and assembly of optical systems. These systems are at the heart of such consumer products as cameras, lenses, copy machines, laser bar-code scanners, VCRs, and compact audio discs - products that the Japanese and other East Asian countries are building dominance. A second critical area is the fabrication of VLSI and ULSI circuits. The tolerances required to produce the next generation of components for such systems have created the need for new approaches - approaches that could either make or break America`s competitive position. This report contains individual reports on research projects grouped into three broad areas: measurement and actuation; real-time control; precision fabrication. Separate abstracts for these articles have been indexed into the energy database.

  6. Rare mycetes of Romania, VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denes PAZMANY

    1987-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper it's a new contribution to the knowledge of the Macromycetes growing in Romania. There are presented 52 species collected from Central Transylvania, mostly of them new for mycoflora of the whole country. The chorological code used for the localization (MTB is that presented by D. PAZMANY (1986. In the enumeration of the species the paper follows KREISEL's system from "Handbuch fur Pilzfreunde VI" (1975: the species are grouped in 2 classes and 6 orders, mostly of them belongs to the order Agaricales. Ecological, chorological and taxonomical problems are discussed.

  7. Kinetic-spectrophotometric determination of molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(VI) in mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple kinetic-spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(VI) in mixtures, without prior separation. The method is based on the catalytic effect of molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(VI) on the 2,4-diaminophenol dihydrochloride (DAP) by hydrogen peroxide in acidic medium. The reaction was followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the rate of change in absorbance with time at 500 nm. A partial inhibition in the catalytic activity of each catalyst, when the other one is present, at all ratios of Mo(VI):W(VI) mixtures studied was observed. On the other hand, the catalytic activity of tungsten(VI) dropped to zero whilst that of molybdenum(VI) decreased slightly, in the presence of citrate ions. Two sets of experiments were carried out, the first in the absence and the other in the presence of citrate, and the resolution of Mo(VI)/W(VI) mixtures was achieved by solving two simultaneous equations. Various molar ratios of Mo(VI):W(VI), at the 10-6 M level, from 0.2:1 to 5:1 can be determined with satisfactory precision and accuracy. The selectivity of the method was investigated and the method was applied successfully to the determination of molybdenum and tungsten in each other's presence in steel. (authors)

  8. Semiconductors. Subvol. A. New data and updates for I-VII, III-V, III-VI and IV-VI compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roessler, U (ed.) [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Dietl, T.; Dobrowolski, W.; Story, T. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa (Poland). Lab. for Cryogenic and Spintronic Research; Fernandes da Silva, E.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Novos Materiais Semiconductores; Hoenerlage, B. [IPCMS/GONLO, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Meyer, B.K. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). 1. Physikalisches Inst.

    2008-07-01

    The Landolt-Boernstein subvolumes III/44A and III/44B update the existing 8 volumes III/41 about Semiconductors and contain new Data and Updates for I-VII, III-V, III-VI, IV, VI and II-VI Compounds. The text, tables figures and references are provided in self-contained document files, each one dedicated to a substance and property. The first subvolume III/44A contains a ''Systematics of Semiconductor Properties'', which should help the non-specialist user to understand the meaning of the material parameters. Hyperlinked lists of substances and properties lead directly to the documents and make the electronic version an easy-to-use source of semiconductor data. In the new updates III/44A and III/44B, links to existing material in III/41 or to related documents for a specific substance are also included. (orig.)

  9. One-step fabrication of amino functionalized magnetic graphene oxide composite for uranium(VI) removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lili; Zhao, Donglin; Chen, Shaohua; Wang, Xianbiao; Chen, Changlun

    2016-06-15

    Amino functionalized magnetic graphene oxide composite (AMGO), a good sorbent for U(VI), was fabricated and characterized. The AMGO was applied as a magnetic sorbent for the U(VI) removal from aqueous solutions. The AMGO can be easily recovered from the solution with the magnetic separation within one minute. The kinetic data were well-described by the pseudo-second-order equation. The Langmuir model fitted the sorption isotherm data better than the Freundlich model. The maximum sorption capacity of the AMGO for U(VI) was 141.2mg/g, displaying a high efficiency for the removal of U(VI). It was found that the U(VI) sorption was accomplished mainly via chelation or ion exchange. The thermodynamic parameters illustrated that the sorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. In addition, the excellent reproducibility indicate that the AMGO can be used as a potential sorbent for removal of U(VI) from large volumes of aqueous solution. PMID:27016915

  10. Genetics Home Reference: collagen VI-related myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions collagen VI-related myopathy collagen VI-related myopathy Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Collagen VI-related myopathy is a group of disorders ...

  11. ■u vi parolas Esperante?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej; Pettyn

    2000-01-01

    LA DEKSEPA LECIONO Cu tio ci estas gripo? Barbara estas malsana kaj nun estas ce si kuracisto —Kuracisto: Bonan tagon! —Barbara: Bonan tagon! —Petro: Bonan tagon, sinjoro! —K: Vi efektive malbone aspektas, Kio estas al vi, sinjorino? —B: Mitre malbone fartas. Miaj kapo kaj gorgo doloras.

  12. Occupational exposure to chromium(VI compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Skowroń

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the effect of chromium(VI (Cr(VI on human health under conditions of acute and chronic exposure in the workplace. Chromium(VI compounds as carcinogens and/or mutagens pose a direct danger to people exposed to them. If carcinogens cannot be eliminated from the work and living environments, their exposure should be reduced to a minimum. In the European Union the proposed binding occupational exposure limit value (BOELV for chromium(VI of 0.025 mg/m³ is still associated with high cancer risk. Based on the Scientific Commitee of Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL document chromium(VI concentrations at 0.025 mg/m³ increases the risk of lung cancer in 2–14 cases per 1000 exposed workers. Exposure to chromium(VI compounds expressed in Cr(VI of 0.01 mg Cr(VI/m3 is responsible for the increased number of lung cancer cases in 1–6 per 1000 people employed in this condition for the whole period of professional activity. Med Pr 2015;66(3:407–427

  13. [Occupational exposure to chromium(VI) compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowroń, Jolanta; Konieczko, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)) on human health under conditions of acute and chronic exposure in the workplace. Chromium(VI) compounds as carcinogens and/or mutagens pose a direct danger to people exposed to them. If carcinogens cannot be eliminated from the work and living environments, their exposure should be reduced to a minimum. In the European Union the proposed binding occupational exposure limit value (BOELV) for chromium(VI) of 0.025 mg/m³ is still associated with high cancer risk. Based on the Scientific Commitee of Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL) document chromium(VI) concentrations at 0.025 mg/m³ increases the risk of lung cancer in 2-14 cases per 1000 exposed workers. Exposure to chromium(VI) compounds expressed in Cr(VI) of 0.01 mg Cr(VI)/m3; is responsible for the increased number of lung cancer cases in 1-6 per 1000 people employed in this condition for the whole period of professional activity. PMID:26325053

  14. Når vi taler om 68

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Metz, Georg

    Når vi taler om 68 er en intellektuel samtale mellem to ligeværdige gentlemen og skallesmækkere. En essayistisk dyst om porno, RAF, Pittelkow og livsfilosofi......Når vi taler om 68 er en intellektuel samtale mellem to ligeværdige gentlemen og skallesmækkere. En essayistisk dyst om porno, RAF, Pittelkow og livsfilosofi...

  15. The chemistry of uranium (VI), neptunium (VI), and plutonium (VI) in aqueous carbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic behavior of carbonate ion as a ligand that interacts with the hexavalent actinyl ions of U, Np, and Pu was examined by 13C NMR spectroscopy. The first-order rate parameter, k, that describes the exchange between bulk solution and bound carbonate decreases with increasing pH. At a pH of 10.0, and 25 degrees C, the respective values of k for the U(VI), Np(VI) complexes are 27.1 ± 0.3, 64.7 ± 3.3, and 706 ± 29. The variation of k with temperature was used to calculate the values of activation enthalpy ΔH double-dagger = 53 and 42 kJ mol-1; and activation entropy ΔS double-dagger = - 40 and - 71 J mol-1 K-1 for the uranyl and neptunyl systems, respectively. In this paper a plausible reaction scheme for the exchange reaction is considered. The influence of these slow carbonate-exchange reactions on selected electron-transfer reactions is noted

  16. 100KE/KW fuel storage basin surface volumetric factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Supporting Document presents calculations of surface Volumetric factors for the 100KE and 100KW Fuel Storage Basins. These factors relate water level changes to basin loss or additions of water, or the equivalent water displacement volumes of objects added to or removed from the basin

  17. Econophys-Kolkata VI Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, Bikas; Chakraborti, Anirban; Ghosh, Asim

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of the book is to present the ideas and research findings of active researchers such as physicists, economists, mathematicians and financial engineers working in the field of “Econophysics,” who have undertaken the task of modeling and analyzing systemic risk, network dynamics and other topics. Of primary interest in these studies is the aspect of systemic risk, which has long been identified as a potential scenario in which financial institutions trigger a dangerous contagion mechanism, spreading from the financial economy to the real economy. This type of risk, long confined to the monetary market, has spread considerably in the recent past, culminating in the subprime crisis of 2008. As such, understanding and controlling systemic risk has become an extremely important societal and economic challenge. The Econophys-Kolkata VI conference proceedings are dedicated to addressing a number of key issues involved. Several leading researchers in these fields report on their recent work and al...

  18. Anaerobic bio-removal of uranium (VI) and chromium (VI): Comparison of microbial community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB - Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Santos, Erika [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-04-15

    Several microbial communities, obtained from uranium contaminated and non-contaminated samples, were investigated for their ability to remove uranium (VI) and the cultures capable for this removal were further assessed on their efficiency for chromium (VI) removal. The highest efficiency for removal of both metals was observed on a consortium from a non-contaminated soil collected in Monchique thermal place, which was capable to remove 91% of 22 mg L{sup -1} U(VI) and 99% of 13 mg L{sup -1} Cr(VI). This study revealed that uranium (VI) removing communities have also ability to remove chromium (VI), but when uranium (VI) was replaced by chromium (VI) several differences in the structure of all bacterial communities were observed. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene showed that the uranium (VI) removing bacterial consortia are mainly composed by members of Rhodocyclaceae family and Clostridium genus. On the other hand, bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae family were detected in the community with ability for chromium (VI) removal. The existence of members of Enterobacteriaceae and Rhodocyclaceae families never reported as chromium or uranium removing bacteria, respectively, is also a relevant finding, encouraging the exploitation of microorganisms with new abilities that can be useful for bioremediation.

  19. Anaerobic bio-removal of uranium (VI) and chromium (VI): Comparison of microbial community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several microbial communities, obtained from uranium contaminated and non-contaminated samples, were investigated for their ability to remove uranium (VI) and the cultures capable for this removal were further assessed on their efficiency for chromium (VI) removal. The highest efficiency for removal of both metals was observed on a consortium from a non-contaminated soil collected in Monchique thermal place, which was capable to remove 91% of 22 mg L-1 U(VI) and 99% of 13 mg L-1 Cr(VI). This study revealed that uranium (VI) removing communities have also ability to remove chromium (VI), but when uranium (VI) was replaced by chromium (VI) several differences in the structure of all bacterial communities were observed. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene showed that the uranium (VI) removing bacterial consortia are mainly composed by members of Rhodocyclaceae family and Clostridium genus. On the other hand, bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae family were detected in the community with ability for chromium (VI) removal. The existence of members of Enterobacteriaceae and Rhodocyclaceae families never reported as chromium or uranium removing bacteria, respectively, is also a relevant finding, encouraging the exploitation of microorganisms with new abilities that can be useful for bioremediation.

  20. Complex molybdates of U(VI) and Np(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Double molybdates of uranyl with monovalent cations are known - Na2UO2(MoO4)2.6H2O and K2UO2(MoO4)2 .4H2O, and also with divalent cations - M(UO2)3(MoO4)4 8H2O (M = Mg, Zn). It is established by spectrophotometrical method, that the degree of uranyl complexation in acidified water molybdate solutions is great. The solutions have strong luminescence and are metastable. After several days from them the bright yellow crystal product of composition: Na2UO2(MoO4)2.4H2O is isolated. With change of conditions, for example, temperature and ratio [Mo]:[H+] from acidified solutions of sodium molybdate only the complex of the specified composition is obtained. Neptunyl forms in water solutions of sodium molybdate 1-2M, probably, several complexes because the isobestic points in spectra of Np(VI) at various concentrations of molybdate are absent. From such solutions in time the dark - marsh crystals of composition: Na2NpO2(MoO4)2.4H2O are isolated. From acidified solutions of sodium molybdate the complexes of other structure are formed. With replacement of sodium by cesium the crystals Cs2NpO2(MoO4). 2H2O are formed. The behavior of uranyl and neptunyl differs also in solutions of ammonium paramolybdate: (NH4)2UO2(MoO4).2H2O and (NH4)2NpO2.(MoO4)2.2H2O are formed correspondingly. From sodium molybdate solutions at the presence of some organic solvents was isolated mixed-valent complex of composition: Na6[Np(V)O2]2[Np(VI)O2](MoO4)5.13H2O. The study of thermal and spectral behavior of the synthesized solid complexes also specifies the difference in properties of uranyl and neptunyl in investigated compounds and even in isostructural compounds

  1. Learning the vi and Vim Editor

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Arnold; Hannah, Elbert

    2008-01-01

    There's nothing that hard-core Unix and Linux users are more fanatical about than their text editor. Editors are the subject of adoration and worship, or of scorn and ridicule, depending upon whether the topic of discussion is your editor or someone else's. vi has been the standard editor for close to 30 years. Popular on Unix and Linux, it has a growing following on Windows systems, too. Most experienced system administrators cite vi as their tool of choice. And since 1986, this book has been the guide for vi. However, Unix systems are not what they were 30 years ago, and neither is this

  2. Radiological findings in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI; Manifestacoes radiologicas da mucopolissacaridose tipo VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turtelli, Celso Montenegro [Hospital Sao Domingos, Uberaba, MG (Brazil). Servico de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: celso@mednet.com.br

    2002-10-01

    The radiological findings in two siblings with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (muco polysaccharide VI) are reported. Conventional radiographs of the skeleton and magnetic resonance imaging examination of the central nervous system were performed. Skeletal abnormalities in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI have already well described by other authors and are generally similar to other mucopolysaccharides. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system may be helpful in the differential diagnosis, assessment of extension, and follow-up of these diseases. (author)

  3. 19 CFR Annex Vi to Part 351 - Countervailing Investigations Timeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Countervailing Investigations Timeline VI Annex VI to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex VI Annex VI to Part 351—Countervailing Investigations Timeline ER19MY97.000...

  4. ViSIT: Visitor Survey Information Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — ViSIT is an interactive web tool created by USGS to visualize the data collected as part of the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey. The national survey was...

  5. SaVi: satellite constellation visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, Lloyd

    2012-01-01

    SaVi, a program for visualizing satellite orbits, movement, and coverage, is maintained at the University of Surrey. This tool has been used for research in academic papers, and by industry companies designing and intending to deploy satellite constellations. It has also proven useful for demonstrating aspects of satellite constellations and their geometry, coverage and movement for educational and teaching purposes. SaVi is introduced and described briefly here.

  6. O VI IN THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the results of a search for O VI absorption in the spectra of 80 hot DA white dwarfs observed by the FUSE satellite. We have carried out a detailed analysis of the radial velocities of interstellar and (where present) stellar absorption lines for the entire sample of stars. In approximately 35% of cases (where photospheric material is detected), the velocity differences between the interstellar and photospheric components were beneath the resolution of the FUSE spectrographs. Therefore, in 65% of these stars the interstellar and photospheric contributions could be separated and the nature of the O VI component unambiguously determined. Furthermore, in other examples, where the spectra were of a high signal-to-noise, no photospheric material was found and any O VI detected was assumed to be interstellar. Building on the earlier work of Oegerle et al. and Savage and Lehner, we have increased the number of detections of interstellar O VI and, for the first time, compared their locations with both the soft X-ray background emission and new detailed maps of the distribution of neutral gas within the local interstellar medium. We find no strong evidence to support a spatial correlation between O VI and SXRB emission. In all but a few cases, the interstellar O VI was located at or beyond the boundaries of the local cavity. Hence, any T ∼ 300,000 K gas responsible for the O VI absorption may reside at the interface between the cavity and surrounding medium or in that medium itself. Consequently, it appears that there is much less O VI-bearing gas than previously stated within the inner rarefied regions of the local interstellar cavity.

  7. Vinna Basin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honěk, J.; Franců, J.; Mikuláš, Radek; Pešek, J.; Sýkorová, Ivana; Tomanová-Petrová, P.

    Prague: Czech Geological Survey, 2014, s. 223-241 ISBN 978-80-7075-862-5 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/06/0653 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:67985831 Keywords : Tertiary basins * Czech Republic * Cenomanian and Tertiary lignite * geology * stratigraphy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  8. Assessing Potential Conservation and Restoration Areas of Freshwater Fish Fauna in the Indian River Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Jay P.; Manish, Kumar; Mehta, Rajender; Pandit, Maharaj K.

    2016-05-01

    Conservation efforts globally are skewed toward terrestrial ecosystems. To date, conservation of aquatic ecosystems, in particular fish fauna, is largely neglected. We provide a country-wide assessment of Indian river ecosystems in order to identify and prioritize areas for protection and restoration of freshwater fish fauna. Using various biodiversity and anthropogenic attributes, coupled with tools of ecological modeling, we delineated areas for fish fauna conservation and restoration in the 20 major river basins of India. To do this, we used prioritization analyses and reserve selection algorithms to derive conservation value index (CVI) and vulnerability index (VI) of the river basins. CVI was estimated using endemicity, rarity, conservation value, and taxonomic singularity, while VI was estimated using a disturbance index derived from percent geographic area of the basin under human settlements, human population density, predominant land use, and total number of exotic fish species in each basin. The two indices, CVI and VI, were converted into geo-referenced maps, and each map was super-imposed onto species richness and forest cover maps, respectively. After superimposition, areas with high CVI and low VI shade intensities were delineated for conservation, while areas with high CVI and high VI shade intensities were demarcated for restoration. In view of the importance of freshwater fish for human livelihoods and consumption, and ecosystems of India's rivers, we call for urgent attention to the conservation of their fish fauna along with restoration of their degraded habitats.

  9. Plutonium(VI) accumulation and reduction by lichen biomass: correlation with U(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Aoyagi, Hisao; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Samadfam, Mohammad; Kimura, Yasuhiko; William Purvis, O

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of plutonium(VI) and uranium(VI) by lichen biomass was studied in the foliose lichen Parmotrema tinctorum to elucidate the migration behavior of Pu and U in the terrestrial environment. Pu and U uptake by P. tinctorum averaged 0.040+/-0.010 and 0.055+/-0.015 g gdry (-1), respectively, after 96 h incubation with 4.0 x 10(14) mol 1(-1) Pu solutions of pH 3, 4 and 5. SEM observations showed that the accumulated Pu is evenly distributed on the upper and lower surfaces of P. tinctorum, in contrast to U(VI), which accumulated in both cortical and medullary layers. UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that a fraction of Pu(VI) in the solution is reduced to Pu(V) by the organic substances released from P. tinctorum, and the accumulated Pu on the surface is reduced to Pu(IV), while U(VI) keeps the oxidation state of VI. Since the solubility of Pu(IV) hydroxides is very low, reduced Pu(VI) does not penetrate to the medullary layers, but is probably precipitated as Pu(IV) hydroxides on the cortical lichen surface. It is concluded that the uptake and reduction of Pu(VI) by lichens is important to determine the mobilization and oxidation states of Pu in the terrestrial environment. PMID:15381325

  10. ViA: a perceptual visualization assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Chris G.; St. Amant, Robert; Elhaddad, Mahmoud S.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes an automated visualized assistant called ViA. ViA is designed to help users construct perceptually optical visualizations to represent, explore, and analyze large, complex, multidimensional datasets. We have approached this problem by studying what is known about the control of human visual attention. By harnessing the low-level human visual system, we can support our dual goals of rapid and accurate visualization. Perceptual guidelines that we have built using psychophysical experiments form the basis for ViA. ViA uses modified mixed-initiative planning algorithms from artificial intelligence to search of perceptually optical data attribute to visual feature mappings. Our perceptual guidelines are integrated into evaluation engines that provide evaluation weights for a given data-feature mapping, and hints on how that mapping might be improved. ViA begins by asking users a set of simple questions about their dataset and the analysis tasks they want to perform. Answers to these questions are used in combination with the evaluation engines to identify and intelligently pursue promising data-feature mappings. The result is an automatically-generated set of mappings that are perceptually salient, but that also respect the context of the dataset and users' preferences about how they want to visualize their data.

  11. Merilni modul za višino kvadrokopterja nad tlemi

    OpenAIRE

    Klajderič, Aljoša

    2016-01-01

    Tematika diplomske naloge je opis in izdelava višinomera za kvadrokopterje. Višinomer je instrument, ki meri višino objekta nad ravnjo nadmorske višine. Za merjenje višine se uporabljajo metode, ki temeljijo na preletu ultrazvočnega valovanja ter na razliki zračnega tlaka. Merilniški modul meri višino na obeh fizikalnih načelih, torej na preletu ultrazvočnega valovanja, tlačni razliki in na fuzijski ravni oziroma na združitvi obeh fizikalnih načel. Namen diplomske naloge je bilo razumeti omej...

  12. An organic-reagent-free method for determination of chromium(VI) in steel alloys, sewage sludge and wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jing; Sun, Yuping; Wang, Jianji; Fan, Maohong

    2009-04-27

    One of the active areas of green chemistry research and development is in the development of new analytical methods and techniques that reduce and eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances. In this work, a rapid and organic-reagent-free method was developed for the determination of chromium(VI) by sequential injection analysis (SIA). The method was based on the detection of a blue unstable intermediate compound resulting from the reaction of Cr(VI) with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in acidic medium. H(2)O(2) and its reaction products were environmentally friendly, and chromogenic reagents and organic solvents were not used in the proposed method. Different SIA parameters have been optimized and used to obtain the analytical figures of merit. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the linear range for Cr(VI) was 0.5-100.0 microg mL(-1), and the detection limit was 0.16 microg mL(-1). The sample throughput was 80 h(-1), and the total volume of only 145 microL was consumed in each determination of Cr(VI). The method was applied for the determination of Cr(VI) in seven real samples, including alloy steel, sewage sludge and wastewater samples, and the results were compared with those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry as well as with the certified value of Cr(VI) in standard reference material. Statistical analysis revealed that there was no significant difference at 95% confidence level. PMID:19362620

  13. ViHAP3D - Final report

    OpenAIRE

    Scopigno, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Nearly all of our cultural heritage is inherently three-dimensional. Recent hard- and software developments enabled 3D computer graphics to be one of the most powerful means to represent complex data sets. The ViHAP3D project (ViHAP3D is an acronym for Virtual Heritage - High Quality 3D Acquisition and Presentation) aimed therefore at preserving, presenting, accessing, and promoting cultural heritage using interactive, high-quality 3D graphics. The vision of the project was to create an exact...

  14. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VI. Project Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Report VI presents a comprehensive plan for the management of the Breckinridge Project. For the purpose of this report, the project work is divided into five major project phases: Development, Engineering, Procurement, Construction, and Operations. The results of the Development Phase (Initial Effort) of the project are discussed in Section 1.0. This phase of the project was performed under a Cooperative Agreement with US Department of Energy and has produced 43 volumes of documentation. Fifteen volumes contain information of proprietary nature for patented processes and are therefore classified as Limited Access; however, twenty-eight volumes are not classified and are suitable for public dissemination. This Project Management Plan is a volume of the unclassified documentation. The other twenty-seven volumes contain comprehensive data on technical, financial, and environmental aspects of the project. Each of the four remaining project phases is presented starting with the extensive planning that will be performed and continuing through to the execution and completion of each phase. The major roles of the Operator, Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (ASFI), and the Managing Contractor are defined. Although a contract has not yet been executed with a Managing Contractor, the procedures, controls, organization and management philosophy of Bechtel Petroleum, Inc., are presented in this report as being representative of those used by contractors in the business of performing the engineering, procurement, and construction of projects of this size and complexity. The organizational structures of the Operator and the Managing Contractor are described, with designation of key project team personnel by job description and organization charts. Provisions for cost, schedule, and material control are described.

  15. Basin stability in delayed dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Siyang; Lin, Wei; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Basin stability (BS) is a universal concept for complex systems studies, which focuses on the volume of the basin of attraction instead of the traditional linearization-based approach. It has a lot of applications in real-world systems especially in dynamical systems with a phenomenon of multi-stability, which is even more ubiquitous in delayed dynamics such as the firing neurons, the climatological processes, and the power grids. Due to the infinite dimensional property of the space for the initial values, how to properly define the basin’s volume for delayed dynamics remains a fundamental problem. We propose here a technique which projects the infinite dimensional initial state space to a finite-dimensional Euclidean space by expanding the initial function along with different orthogonal or nonorthogonal basis. A generalized concept of basin’s volume in delayed dynamics and a highly practicable calculating algorithm with a cross-validation procedure are provided to numerically estimate the basin of attraction in delayed dynamics. We show potential applicabilities of this approach by applying it to study several representative systems of biological or/and physical significance, including the delayed Hopfield neuronal model with multistability and delayed complex networks with synchronization dynamics.

  16. Natural gas conversion. Part VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains peer-reviewed manuscripts describing the scientific and technological advances presented at the 6th Natural Gas Conversion Symposium held in Alaska in June 2001. This symposium continues the tradition of excellence and the status as the premier technical meeting in this area established by previous meetings. The 6th Natural Gas Conversion Symposium is conducted under the overall direction of the Organizing Committee. The Program Committee was responsible for the review, selection, editing of most of the manuscripts included in this volume. A standing International Advisory Board has ensured the effective long-term planning and the continuity and technical excellence of these meetings. The titles of the contributions are: Impact of syngas generation technology selection on a GTL FPSO; Methane conversion via microwave plasma initiated by a metal initiator; Mechanism of carbon deposit/removal in methane dry reforming on supported metal catalysts; Catalyst-assisted oxidative dehydrogenation of light paraffins in short contact time reactors; Catalytic dehydrogenation of propane over a PtSn/SiO2 catalyst with oxygen addition: selective oxidation of H2 in the presence of hydrocarbons; Hydroconversion of a mixture of long chain n-paraffins to middle distillate: effect of the operating parameters and products properties; Decomposition/reformation processes and CH4 combustion activity of PdO over Al2O3 supported catalysts for gas turbine applications; Lurgi's mega-methanol technology opens the door for a new era in down-stream applications;Expanding markets for GTL fuels and specialty products; Some critical issues in the analysis of partial oxidation reactions in monolith reactors

  17. Det øvrige vi nyde

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Peder

    persiller, og at vi i dag kan kortlægge disse som egnsspecifikke persiller. Men den samlede størrelse af landgilden, angivet i fællesenheden tønder hartkorn, og de forskellige produkter, som landgilden blev ydet i, persillerne, var ikke en afspejling af produktionen, sådan som flere historikere har tolket...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall also... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i)...

  19. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall also... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i)...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1915.97. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall also... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i)...

  1. Thermodynamical analysis of the fission product release in the ORNL VI-3 and VI-5 tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermodynamical equilibrium hypothesis has been applied to the tests ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) VI-3 and VI-5 (Vertical Induction heated), to study fission release products. Irradiated fuel samples were heated under oxidizing (VI-3) and reducing (VI-5) controlled atmosphere. They can be compared to the Vercors 4 and 5 tests. The thermodynamical calculus results of barium and ruthenium fission products release, agree in the lump with measures, whatever the gas phase nature. The strontium release calculus under reducing atmosphere, is largely upper than those measured and correctly evaluated under oxidizing atmosphere. These results confirm those obtained for Vercors 4 and 5 and show the interest of the select model. (A.L.B.)

  2. 40 CFR Appendixes Vi-Vii to Part 600 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false VI Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Appendixes VI-VII to Part 600...

  3. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  4. ENDF-201, ENDF/B-VI summary documentation supplement 1, ENDF/HE-VI summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) provides coordination for and serves as the secretariat to the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSWEG). CSEWG is responsible for the oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data File. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the file is maintained at the NNDC. For a description of the ENDF/B-VI file, see the ENDF-102 Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF-6. The purpose of this addendum to the ENDF/B-VI Summary Documentation is to provide documentation of Releases 1, 2, 3, and 4 for the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/HE-VI evaluated nuclear data libraries. These releases contain many new and revised evaluations for the neutron, photo-atomic interaction, radioactive decay data, spontaneous fission product yield, neutron-induced fission product yield, thermal neutron scattering, proton, deuteron, and triton sublibraries. The summaries have been extracted mainly from the ENDF/B-VI File 1 comments (MT = 451), which have been checked, edited, and may also include supplementary information. Some summaries have been provided by the evaluators in electronic format, while others are extracted from reports on the evaluations. All references have been checked and corrected, or updated where appropriate. A list of the laboratories which have contributed evaluations used in ENDF/B-VI is given

  5. Volume Entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Astuti, Valerio; Christodoulou, Marios; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  6. Assessing Potential Conservation and Restoration Areas of Freshwater Fish Fauna in the Indian River Basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Jay P; Manish, Kumar; Mehta, Rajender; Pandit, Maharaj K

    2016-05-01

    Conservation efforts globally are skewed toward terrestrial ecosystems. To date, conservation of aquatic ecosystems, in particular fish fauna, is largely neglected. We provide a country-wide assessment of Indian river ecosystems in order to identify and prioritize areas for protection and restoration of freshwater fish fauna. Using various biodiversity and anthropogenic attributes, coupled with tools of ecological modeling, we delineated areas for fish fauna conservation and restoration in the 20 major river basins of India. To do this, we used prioritization analyses and reserve selection algorithms to derive conservation value index (CVI) and vulnerability index (VI) of the river basins. CVI was estimated using endemicity, rarity, conservation value, and taxonomic singularity, while VI was estimated using a disturbance index derived from percent geographic area of the basin under human settlements, human population density, predominant land use, and total number of exotic fish species in each basin. The two indices, CVI and VI, were converted into geo-referenced maps, and each map was super-imposed onto species richness and forest cover maps, respectively. After superimposition, areas with high CVI and low VI shade intensities were delineated for conservation, while areas with high CVI and high VI shade intensities were demarcated for restoration. In view of the importance of freshwater fish for human livelihoods and consumption, and ecosystems of India's rivers, we call for urgent attention to the conservation of their fish fauna along with restoration of their degraded habitats. PMID:26872885

  7. Homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction of uranium (VI) using tri-n-octylphosphine oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and efficient method for the selective separation and preconcentration of uranium (VI) using homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction was developed. Tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) and tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) were investigated as complexing ligands, and perfluorooctanoate ion (PFOA-) was applied as a phase separator agent under strongly acidic conditions. Under the optimal conditions ([PFOA-] = 1.7 x 10-3M, [TOPO] 5.4 x 10-4 M, [HNO3] = 0.3 M, [acetone] = 3.2% v/v) 10 μg of uranium in 40 ml aqueous phase could be extracted quantitatively into 8 μl of the sedimented phase. The maximum concentration factor was 5000-fold. However, an effort for the quantitative extraction using TBP was inefficient and the percent recovery was at most 56.7. The influence of the type and concentration of acid solution, optimum amount of the ligand, type and volume of the organic solvent, concentration of PFOA, volume of the aqueous sample and effect of different diverse ions on the extraction and determination of uranium (VI) were investigated. The proposed method was applied to the extraction and determination of uranium (VI) in natural water samples. (author)

  8. Extraction of Mo(VI) and U(VI) by alamine 310 and its mixtures from aq. HCl media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extractions of Mo(VI) and U(VI) by Alamine 310, TBP, DPSO and their mixtures are quantitative in the range 6-8 M, and by Cyanex 301 and its mixtures at lower acidity (∼0.2 M). Quantitative extraction of U(VI) is achieved by mixtures of Alamine 310 and TBP from 1 M HCl in presence of SCN- ion (∼0.2 M). Synergism is marked in the extraction of Mo(VI) by the mixtures of Alamine 310 and TBP/Cyanex 301, and for U(VI) by mixtures of Alamine 310 and DPSO/Cyanex 301. (author). 9 refs

  9. Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 10, Basin analysis, formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Aleutian Trench and the Bering Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

    1987-01-01

    Four major areas with inferred gas hydrates are the subject of this study. Two of these areas, the Navarin and the Norton Basins, are located within the Bering Sea shelf, whereas the remaining areas of the Atka Basin in the central Aleutian Trench system and the eastern Aleutian Trench represent a huge region of the Aleutian Trench-Arc system. All four areas are geologically diverse and complex. Particularly the structural features of the accretionary wedge north of the Aleutian Trench still remain the subjects of scientific debates. Prior to this study, suggested presence of the gas hydrates in the four areas was based on seismic evidence, i.e., presence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). Although the disclosure of the BSRs is often difficult, particularly under the structural conditions of the Navarin and Norton basins, it can be concluded that the identified BSRs are mostly represented by relatively weak and discontinuous reflectors. Under thermal and pressure conditions favorable for gas hydrate formation, the relative scarcity of the BSRs can be attributed to insufficient gas supply to the potential gas hydrate zone. Hydrocarbon gas in sediment may have biogenic, thermogenic or mixed origin. In the four studied areas, basin analysis revealed limited biogenic hydrocarbon generation. The migration of the thermogenically derived gases is probably diminished considerably due to the widespread diagenetic processes in diatomaceous strata. The latter processes resulted in the formation of the diagenetic horizons. The identified gas hydrate-related BSRs seem to be located in the areas of increased biogenic methanogenesis and faults acting as the pathways for thermogenic hydrocarbons.

  10. IV-VI ferromagnetic semiconductors recent studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrowolski W.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In some IV-VI semimagnetic semiconductors, the RKKY interaction can dominate over the standard d-d superexchange and become the driving mechanism for ion-ion coupling. In effect, for low hole concentrations the Mn ion system is in a paramagnetic phase, whereas for higher ones it reveals typical ferromagnetic behavior. In this paper, recent work on IV-VI ferromagnetic (SnMnTe, PbSnMnTe and GeMnTe systems will be presented. In particular, the influence of the presence of two types of magnetic ions (transition metal: Mn and rare earth metal: Eu or Er incorporated into a semiconductor matrix on magnetic properties of resultant semimagnetic semiconductor will be described.

  11. Solvent extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions with N,N,N',N'-tetrabutylsuccinylamide from nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solvent extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) from nitric acid medium by N,N,N',N'-tetrabutylsuccinylamide (TBSA) in a diluent composed of 0.5 volume fraction trimethyl benzene (TMB) and 0.5 volume fraction kerosene (OK) has been studied. The distribution ratios of U(VI) and Th(IV) as a function of aqueous HNO3 concentration, extractant concentration and temperature have been measured. From the data, the composition of extracted species, equilibrium constants and enthalpies of extraction reaction are also calculated

  12. Diagnostic and treatment strategies in mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairo, Filippo; Federhen, Andressa; Baldo, Guilherme; Riegel, Mariluce; Burin, Maira; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ARSB gene, which lead to deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme ASB. This enzyme is important for the breakdown of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, which accumulate in body tissues and organs of MPS VI patients. The storage of GAGs (especially dermatan sulfate) causes bone dysplasia, joint restriction, organomegaly, heart disease, and corneal clouding, among several other problems, and reduced life span. Despite the fact that most cases are severe, there is a spectrum of severity and some cases are so attenuated that diagnosis is made late in life. Although the analysis of urinary GAGs and/or the measurement of enzyme activity in dried blood spots are useful screening methods, the diagnosis is based in the demonstration of the enzyme deficiency in leucocytes or fibroblasts, and/or in the identification of pathogenic mutations in the ARSB gene. Specific treatment with enzyme replacement has been available since 2005. It is safe and effective, bringing measurable benefits and increased survival to patients. As several evidences indicate that early initiation of therapy may lead to a better outcome, newborn screening is being considered for this condition, and it is already in place in selected areas where the incidence of MPS VI is increased. However, as enzyme replacement therapy is not curative, associated therapies should be considered, and research on innovative therapies continues. The management of affected patients by a multidisciplinary team with experience in MPS diseases is highly recommended. PMID:26586959

  13. Diagnostic and treatment strategies in mucopolysaccharidosis VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairo, Filippo; Federhen, Andressa; Baldo, Guilherme; Riegel, Mariluce; Burin, Maira; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ARSB gene, which lead to deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme ASB. This enzyme is important for the breakdown of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, which accumulate in body tissues and organs of MPS VI patients. The storage of GAGs (especially dermatan sulfate) causes bone dysplasia, joint restriction, organomegaly, heart disease, and corneal clouding, among several other problems, and reduced life span. Despite the fact that most cases are severe, there is a spectrum of severity and some cases are so attenuated that diagnosis is made late in life. Although the analysis of urinary GAGs and/or the measurement of enzyme activity in dried blood spots are useful screening methods, the diagnosis is based in the demonstration of the enzyme deficiency in leucocytes or fibroblasts, and/or in the identification of pathogenic mutations in the ARSB gene. Specific treatment with enzyme replacement has been available since 2005. It is safe and effective, bringing measurable benefits and increased survival to patients. As several evidences indicate that early initiation of therapy may lead to a better outcome, newborn screening is being considered for this condition, and it is already in place in selected areas where the incidence of MPS VI is increased. However, as enzyme replacement therapy is not curative, associated therapies should be considered, and research on innovative therapies continues. The management of affected patients by a multidisciplinary team with experience in MPS diseases is highly recommended. PMID:26586959

  14. Nanomaterials based on II-VI Semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Cozzarini, Luca

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes: (i) synthesis and characterization of colloidal nanocrystals of II-VI semiconductor compounds; (II) development of two novel materials using such nanocrystals as “building blocks”: (IIa) a nanocrystals/polymer composite, to be used as phosphor in LED-based lighting devices; (IIb) an inorganic, nano-structured multiphase material, showing a promising geometry as an electronic intermediate band material. Different typologies of nanocrystals (single-phase, alloyed or ...

  15. The potential of compost-based biobarriers for Cr(VI) removal from contaminated groundwater: Column test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of a column reactor test, aiming at evaluating the performance of a biological permeable barrier made of low-cost waste materials, for Cr(VI) removal from contaminated groundwater. A 1:1 by volume mixture of green compost and siliceous gravel was tested as reactive medium in the experimental activity. A 10 mg/l Cr(VI) contaminated solution was used and the residual Cr(VI) concentration along the column height and in the outlet was determined in the water samples collected daily. Also pH, redox potential and COD were analyzed. At the end of the test, the reactive medium was characterized in terms of Cr(VI) and total chromium. The Cr(VI) removal efficiency was higher than 99% during the entire experimental activity. The influence of the biological activity on Cr(VI) removal efficiency was evaluated by varying the organic carbon and nitrogen dosages in the contaminated solution fed to the system; a removal decrease was observed when the organic carbon was not enough to sustain the microbial metabolism. The Cr(VI) removal was strictly linked to the biological activity of the native biomass of compost. No Cr(III) was detected in the outlet: the Cr(III) produced was entrapped in the solid matrix. Two main processes involved were: adsorption on the organic-based matrix and reduction into Cr(III) mediated by the anaerobic microbial metabolism of the bacteria residing in green compost. Siliceous gravel was used as the structure matrix, since its contribution to the removal was almost negligible. Thanks to the proven efficiency and to the low-cost, the reactive medium used can represent a valid alternative to conventional approaches to chromium remediation.

  16. Analytical recovery of Cr (VI), Mo (VI), Ti (IV) and Co (II) by N-phenyl-meta-nitro-benzohydroxamic and N-P-tolyl-meta-nitro-benzohydroxamic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two hydroxamic acids were prepared; N-phenyl-m-nitro-benzohydroxamic and N-p-tolyl-m-nitro-benzo hydroxamic acids. N-phenyl-m-nitro-benzohydroxamic was prepared by coupling the β-phenyl hydroxylamine with m-nitro-benzoyl chloride in ratio 1:1 in alkaline medium at zero degree centigrade. It recrystallized from a mixture of benzene and petroleum ether (2:1) with the yield of 67%. The product was characterized by: A-nitrogen content which was found to be 10.7% (lit. 10.9%). B-infra-red spectroscopy. C-the molecular weight which was determined by titration, was found to be 257.7 gram (lit. 257 gram). D-the molecular weight which was determined by elevation of the boiling point, was found to be 253.7 gram (lit. 257 gram). E-characteristic violet color reaction with vanadium and blood-red reaction with ferric chloride solutions. F-melting point 117 degree centigrade. N-p-tolyl-m-nitro benzo hydroxamic acid was prepared by coupling the p-tolyl-hydroxylamine with m-nitro benzoyl chloride using the same procedure. It was recrystallized from a mixture of benzene and petroleum ether (2:1) with the yield of 63%. The product was characterized by: A-nitrogen content which was found to be 10.1% (lit. 10.3). B-infra-red spectroscopy. C-the molecular weight which was determined by titration, was found to be 271.6 gram (lit. 272). D-the molecular weight which was determined by elevation of the boiling point, was found to be 269.9 gram (lit. 272 gram). E.characteristic violet color reaction with vanadium and blood-red color with ferric chloride solutions. F-melting point which was found to be 105 degree centigrade (lit. 106 degree c). the two hydroxamic acids were used as analytical reagents for extraction of metal ions Ti (IV), Cr (VI), Mo (VI) and Co (II). With an equal volume of the organic and aqueous phase, and only one extraction, N-phenyl-m-nitro-benzohydroxamic acid was found to have a maximum extraction of 30.18% for Ti (IV) at pH 2.0, of 97.06% for Cr (VI) at 3MH2SO4, of

  17. Identifying the need for a multidisciplinary approach for early recognition of mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Yew Sing; Bhattacharya, Kaustuv; Balasubramaniam, Shanti; Fietz, Michael; Fu, Antony; Inwood, Anita; Jin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Kosuga, Motomichi; Kwun, Young Hee; Lin, Hsiang-Yu; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Mendelsohn, Nancy J; Okuyama, Torayuki; Samion, Hasri; Tan, Adeline; Tanaka, Akemi; Thamkunanon, Verasak; Thong, Meow-Keong; Toh, Teck-Hock; Yang, Albert D; McGill, Jim

    2015-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI, Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome) is caused by deficient activity of the enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase, resulting in impaired degradation of the glycosaminoglycan dermatan sulfate. Patients experience a range of manifestations including joint contractures, short stature, dysostosis multiplex, coarse facial features, decreased pulmonary function, cardiac abnormalities, corneal clouding and shortened life span. Recently, clinicians from institutions in the Asia-Pacific region met to discuss the occurrence and implications of delayed diagnosis and misdiagnosis of MPS VI in the patients they have managed. Eighteen patients (44% female) were diagnosed. The most common sign presented by the patients was bone deformities in 11 patients (65%). Delays to diagnosis occurred due to the lack of or distance to diagnostic facilities for four patients (31%), alternative diagnoses for two patients (15%), and misleading symptoms experienced by two patients (15%). Several patients experienced manifestations that were subtler than would be expected and were subsequently overlooked. Several cases highlighted the unique challenges associated with diagnosing MPS VI from the perspective of different specialties and provide insights into how these patients initially present, which may help to elucidate strategies to improve the diagnosis of MPS VI. PMID:25892708

  18. Few-layer III-VI and IV-VI 2D semiconductor transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Liu, Mei; Kumar, Rajesh; Sankar, Raman; Chou, Fang C.; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Gao, Xuan

    Since the discovery of atomically thin graphene, a large variety of exfoliable 2D materials have been thoroughly explored for their exotic transport behavior and promises in technological breakthroughs. While most attention on 2D materials beyond graphene is focused on transition metal-dichalcogenides, relatively less attention is paid to layered III-VI and IV-VI semiconductors such as InSe, SnSe etc which bear stronger potential as 2D materials with high electron mobility or thermoelectric figure of merit. We will discuss our recent work on few-layer InSe 2D field effect transistors which exhibit carrier mobility approaching 1000 cm2/Vs and ON-OFF ratio exceeding 107 at room temperature. In addition, the fabrication and device performance of transistors made of mechanically exfoliated multilayer IV-VI semiconductor SnSe and SnSe2 will be discussed.

  19. Role of anions and reaction conditions in the preparation of uranium(VI), neptunium(VI), and plutonium(VI) borates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuao; Villa, Eric M; Diwu, Juan; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2011-03-21

    U(VI), Np(VI), and Pu(VI) borates with the formula AnO(2)[B(8)O(11)(OH)(4)] (An = U, Np, Pu) have been prepared via the reactions of U(VI) nitrate, Np(VI) perchlorate, or Pu(IV) or Pu(VI) nitrate with molten boric acid. These compounds are all isotypic and consist of a linear actinyl(VI) cation, AnO(2)(2+), surrounded by BO(3) triangles and BO(4) tetrahedra to create an AnO(8) hexagonal bipyramidal environment. The actinyl bond lengths are consistent with actinide contraction across this series. The borate anions bridge between actinyl units to create sheets. Additional BO(3) triangles and BO(4) tetrahedra extend from the polyborate layers and connect these sheets together to form a three-dimensional chiral framework structure. UV-vis-NIR absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy confirms the hexavalent oxidation state in all three compounds. Bond-valence parameters are developed for Np(VI). PMID:21291194

  20. Volume-to-volume registration

    OpenAIRE

    Harg, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Implementation of automated volume-to-volume registration applications for three separate registration steps desired in enhancing neurosurgical navigation is considered. Prototype implementations for MRI-to-MRI registration, MRI-to-US registration and US-to-US registration have been made using registration methods available in the Insight Toolkit, with variants of the Mutual Information similarity metric. The obtained results indicate that automatic volume-to-volume registration using Normali...

  1. The geologically recent giant impact basins at Vesta's south pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Paul; O'Brien, David P; Marchi, Simone; Gaskell, Robert; Preusker, Frank; Roatsch, Thomas; Jaumann, Ralf; Buczkowski, Debra; McCord, Thomas; McSween, Harry Y; Williams, David; Yingst, Aileen; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Chris

    2012-05-11

    Dawn's global mapping of Vesta reveals that its observed south polar depression is composed of two overlapping giant impact features. These large basins provide exceptional windows into impact processes at planetary scales. The youngest, Rheasilvia, is 500 kilometers wide and 19 kilometers deep and finds its nearest morphologic analog among large basins on low-gravity icy satellites. Extensive ejecta deposits occur, but impact melt volume is low, exposing an unusual spiral fracture pattern that is likely related to faulting during uplift and convergence of the basin floor. Rheasilvia obliterated half of another 400-kilometer-wide impact basin, Veneneia. Both basins are unexpectedly young, roughly 1 to 2 billion years, and their formation substantially reset Vestan geology and excavated sufficient volumes of older compositionally heterogeneous crustal material to have created the Vestoids and howardite-eucrite-diogenite meteorites. PMID:22582256

  2. A study of low-cost adsorbent materials for removing Cr(VI from aqueous waste effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Vargas-Niño

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available  The present paper shows very high potential for two types of solid (a commercial alumina and material obtained by composting, i.e. matured compost on Cr(VI adsorption/elimination in aqueous solution using a concentration range close to those previously detected in waste-water from Colombian industries. Both had important properties for eliminating Cr(VI, the compost being more important as it represents low-cost material. Optimal conditions for chromium adsorption on alumina and compost were established. Initial Cr(VI alumina concentration was 10 mgL-1, with 100 mL/g volume of solution per adsorbent mass, pH=2.0, 1 hour equilibrium time and 150 rpm stirring. For compost, initial Cr(VI concentration was = 3 mg L-1, 50 mL/g volume of solution per adsorbent mass, pH=2.5, 3 hour equilibrium time and 150 rpm stirring. The experiments showed that compost adsorption properties could be enhanced by adding small quantities of alumina. Compost could thus be chosen as a promising material for use in bioremediation chromium-containing waste water in a management programme for using solid waste in for minimising environmental impact.  

  3. A dynamic analysis of water footprint of Jinghe River basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Water footprint in a region is defined as the volume of water needed for the production of goods and services consumed by the local people. Ecosystem services are a kind of important services, so ecological water use is one necessary component in water footprint. Water footprint is divided into green water footprint and blue water footprint but the former one is often ignored. In this paper water footprint includes blue water needed by agricultural irrigation, industrial and domestic water demand, and green water needed by crops, economic forests, livestock products, forestlands and grasslands. The study calculates the footprint of the Jinghe River basin in 1990,1995, 2000 and 2005 with quarto methods. Results of research show that water footprints reached 164.1 × 108m3, 175.69×108m3 and 178.45×108m3 respectively in 1990, 1995 and 2000 including that of ecological water use, but reached 77.68×108m3, 94.24×108m3, 92.92×108m3 and 111.36×108m3 respectively excluding that of ecological water use. Green water footprint is much more than blue water footprint: thereby, green water plays an important role in economic development and ecological construction. The dynamic change of water footprints stows that blue water use increases rapidly and that the ecological water use is occupied by economic and domestic water use. The change also shows that water use is transferred from primary industry to secondary industry. In primary industry, it is transferred from crops farming to forestry and animal agriculture. The factors impelling the change include development anticipation on economy, government policies, readjustment of the industrial structure, population growth, the raise of urbanization level, and structural change of consumption, low level of water-saving and poor ability of waste water treatment. With blue water use per unit, green water use per unit, blue water use structure and green water use structure, we analyzed the difference of the six ecological

  4. Interactions between U(VI) and bovine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in bio-toxicology of uranium resulting from its radioactive heavy metal property has been growing enormously in recent years. The interactions between uranium(VI) [U(VI)] and bovine serum albumin (BSA) at physiological pH were studied by spectroscopic methods. Fluorescence results revealed the formation of BSA-U(VI) complex, the binding constants as well as the number of binding sites were determined. In particular, the effects of U(VI) binding on the secondary structures of BSA were examined by means of Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy equipped with attenuated total reflection (FT-IR/ATR). It was found that the α-helix component of BSA decreased gradually with increasing concentration of U(VI). In contrast, the β-sheets, turns, and random coil structures all increased correspondingly. Our work would shed light on the possible interaction mechanism between U(VI) and proteins in aqueous solutions. (author)

  5. Radiological findings in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological findings in two siblings with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (muco polysaccharide VI) are reported. Conventional radiographs of the skeleton and magnetic resonance imaging examination of the central nervous system were performed. Skeletal abnormalities in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI have already well described by other authors and are generally similar to other mucopolysaccharides. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system may be helpful in the differential diagnosis, assessment of extension, and follow-up of these diseases. (author)

  6. Cr(VI) Generation and Stability in Drinking Water

    OpenAIRE

    Chittaladakorn, Kathita

    2014-01-01

    The current US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) for total chromium of 100 ppb is under revision to consider a specific level for Cr(VI), which has a proposed MCL of 10 ppb in California. Cr(VI) is a suspected carcinogen, and interconverts with the other most commonly found chromium species, Cr(III). To regulate and further understand the behavior of Cr(VI) in water systems, appropriate sample preservation methods are essential for accurate measurements. ...

  7. Removal of chromium(VI) from saline wastewaters by

    OpenAIRE

    AKSU, Zümriye

    2002-01-01

    Some industrial wastewaters contain higher quantities of salts besides chromium(VI) ions so the effect of these salts on the biosorption of chromium(VI) should be investigated. The biosorption of chromium (VI) from saline solutions on two strains of living Dunaliella algae were tested under laboratory conditions as a function of pH, initial metal ion and salt (NaCl) concentrations in a batch system. The biosorption capacity of both Dunaliella strains strongly de...

  8. DBC solvent extraction of U(VI) from thiocyanate medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The extraction behavior of uranium(VI) from thiocyanate medium with dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DBC) in nitrobenzene and the effects of alkali cations on the extraction were investigated. The results showed that the uranium (VI) can be effectively extracted in the presence of potassium cation, uranium (VI) is extracted as complex anionic species UO2(SCN)-3, and the stoichiometry of the extracted complex is KUO2(SCN)32DBC(o).

  9. Uranium(VI) diffusion in low-permeability subsurface materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium(VI) diffusion was investigated in a fine-grained saprolite sediment that was collected from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge site, TN, where uranium contamination in groundwater is a major environmental concern. U(VI) diffusion was studied in a diffusion cell with one cell end in contact with a large, air-equilibrated electrolyte reservoir. The pH, carbonate and U(VI) concentrations in the reservoir solution were varied to investigate the effect of solution chemical composition and uranyl speciation on U(VI) diffusion. The rates of U(VI) diffusion were evaluated by monitoring the U(VI) concentration in the reservoir solution as a function of time; and by measuring the total concentration of U(VI) extracted from the sediment as a function of time and distance in the diffusion cells. The estimated apparent rate of U(VI) diffusion varied significantly with pH, with the slowest rate observed at pH 7 as a result of strong adsorptive retardation. The estimated retardation factor was generally consistent with a surface complexation model. Numerical simulations indicated that a species-based diffusion model that incorporated both aqueous and surface complexation reactions was required to describe U(VI) diffusion in the low permeability material under variable geochemical conditions. Our results implied that low permeability materials will play an important role in storing U(VI) and attenuating U(VI) plume migration at circumneutral pH conditions, and will serve as a long-term source for releasing U(VI) back to the nearby aquifer during and after aquifer decontamination. (orig.)

  10. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVI : Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.

    2007-12-07

    In 2005, the University of Washington developed a new statistical model to analyze the combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged salmon migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine), has been used to estimate survival and transportation effects on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin from 1996 to 2003. Those results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on both a systemwide basis, incorporating all transport dams analyzed, and a dam-specific basis. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 5,000 tagged smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few tagged hatchery steelhead were transported in these years, no transportation effects are estimated for steelhead. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.71% with a standard error (SE) of 0.18% for spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2003, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. For summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin, the estimates of annual SAR averaged 1.15% (SE=0.31%). Only for the release years 1999 and 2000 did the Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for hatchery steelhead from the

  11. Groundwater Mounding Beneath Stormwater Infiltration Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmer, M.; Thompson, A. M.; Misra, D.

    2007-12-01

    An accurate understanding of groundwater mound formation is important in the proper design of stormwater infiltration basins since these basins are often required to recharge a portion of pre-development infiltration volume. Mound formation due to localized recharge may reduce the infiltration rate of the basin and the ability of the soil to filter pollutants. The goal of this research was to understand groundwater mounding and the potential for contaminant transport resulting from recharge beneath stormwater infiltration basins. A 0.10 ha infiltration basin serving a 9.4 ha residential subdivision in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin was used in this study. Subsurface conditions included sand and gravel material and a groundwater table at 2.3 m below grade. Three storm events, 4.9 cm, 2.8 cm, and 4.3 cm, between August 2006 and April 2007 were modeled using the two-dimensional numerical model HYDRUS. The calibrated model was used to evaluate hypothetical basin operation scenarios for various basin sizes, soil types, ponding depths, and water table depths. The groundwater mound intersected the basin floor in most scenarios with loamy sand and sandy loam soils, an unsaturated thickness of 1.52 m, and a ponding depth of 0.61 m. No groundwater table response was observed with ponding depths less than 0.31 m with an unsaturated zone thickness of 6.09 m. The mound height was most sensitive to hydraulic conductivity and unsaturated zone thickness. A 7.6 cm sediment layer delayed the time to reach maximum mound height, but had a minimal effect on the magnitude of the mound. Mound heights increased as infiltration basin size increased.

  12. FINAL REPORT FOR THE REDUCTION OF CHROME (VI) TO CHROME (III) IN THE SECONDARY WASTE STREAM OF THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN JB; GUTHRIE MD

    2008-08-29

    This report documents the laboratory results of RPP-PLAN-35958, Test Plan for the Effluent Treatment Facility to Reduce Chrome (VI) to Chrome (III) in the Secondary Waste Stream With the exception of the electrochemical corrosion scans, all work was carried out at the Center for Laboratory Science (CLS) located at the Columbia Basin College. This document summarizes the work carried out at CLS and includes the electrochemical scans and associated corrosion rates for 304 and 316L stainless steel.

  13. Voltammetry of Os(VI)-modified polysaccharides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trefulka, Mojmír; Paleček, Emil

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 16 (2010), s. 1837-1845. ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) GPP301/10/P548; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400310651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : chemical modification of polysaccharides * electroactive labels * osmium(VI) complexes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2010

  14. Reduction U(VI) using jones reductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction of dissolved oxide uranium in sulfuric acid use of reductor Jones Zn (Hg) was carried out. The reduced uranium sulfate solution was analyzed its U(IV) by measuring its absorbance on 652 nm and compared to oxidation U(IV) solution with KMnO4 solution. It was found that the comparison was in a good agreement. However, measuring of absorbance of U(VI) solution on 429 nm result of oxidation U(IV) with KMnO4 solution was not change. (author)

  15. Farvel til globaliseringen som vi kendte den

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böss, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Vi er endt med en krise, som rækker langt ud over det globale monetære system, fordi den ideologiske ortodoksi, der skabte den, har ført til udflytning af millioner af arbejdspladser, tæring af nationalstaternes sammenhængskraft og overgreb på naturen. Kronikken refererer bl.a. til John Maynard...... Keynes og en artikel af økonomen Robert Skidelsky i The American Prospect. Udgivelsesdato: 12. januar 2009...

  16. Environmental Survey in Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009. Summary report; Miljoeundersoekelse i Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009. Sammendragsrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannvik, Hans-Petter; Wasbotten, Ingar Halvorsen

    2010-07-01

    An environmental survey of Region VI, Haltenbanken, has been carried out. This report presents the results from the analyses carried out on samples from a total of 316 stations at 16 fields and 15 regional stations. A status of the environmental conditions in the region is given at the end of the report. (Author)

  17. Environmental survey of Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009; Miljoeundersoekelse i Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, May-Helen; Cochrane, Sabine; Mannvik, Hans-Petter; Wasbotten, Ingar Halvorsen

    2010-07-01

    There has been an environmental investigation in Region VI Halten Bank. This report presents the results of the chemical and biological assays performed on samples from a total of 316 stations in 16 fields and 15 regional stations. A status of environmental conditions in the region is given at the end of the report. (AG)

  18. Extraction of U(VI) and Pu(VI) from HClO4 by HDEHP and synergism with TOPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction behaviour of U(VI) and Pu(VI) by di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (HDEHP) from perchloric acid was investigated. The actinide species were extracted as MO2(HY2)2, where HY-2 represents the anion of the dimeric HDEHP(H2Y2). Addition of tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) to H2Y2 enhanced the extraction of both U(VI) and Pu(VI). This behaviour is attributed to the adduct MO2(HY2)2 . TOPO and due to the mixed complex MO2ClO4(HY2) . TOPO containing anion from the aqueous perchloric acid. (orig.)

  19. Development of a System-Wide Program, Volume II : Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin, 1992 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, David L.; Nigro, Anthony A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife); Willis, Charles F. (S.P. Cramer and Associates., Gresham, OR)

    1994-06-01

    The authors report their results of studies to determine the extent to which northern squawfish predation on juvenile salmonids is a problem in the Columbia River Basin, and to evaluate how effectively fisheries can be used to control northern squawfish populations and reduce juvenile salmonid losses to predation. These studies were initiated as part of a basinwide program to control northern squawfish predation and reduce mortality of juvenile salmonids on their migration to the ocean. Three papers are included in this report. They are entitled: (1) Development of a Systemwide Predator Control Program: Indexing and Fisheries Evaluation; (2) Economic, Social and Legal Feasibility of Commercial Sport, and Bounty Fisheries on Northern Squawfish; (3) Columbia River Ecosystem Model (CREM): Modeling Approach for Evaluation of Control of Northern Squawfish Populations using Fisheries Exploitation.

  20. Equations of state of ice VI and ice VII at high pressure and high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezacier, Lucile; Hanfland, Michael [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France); Journaux, Baptiste; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Cardon, Hervé; Daniel, Isabelle [Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon, UMR 5276 CNRS, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 rue Raphael Dubois, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-09-14

    High-pressure H{sub 2}O polymorphs among which ice VI and ice VII are abundant in the interiors of large icy satellites and exo-planets. Knowledge of the elastic properties of these pure H{sub 2}O ices at high-temperature and high-pressure is thus crucial to decipher the internal structure of icy bodies. In this study we assess for the first time the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) relations of both polycrystalline pure ice VI and ice VII at high pressures and temperatures from 1 to 9 GPa and 300 to 450 K, respectively, by using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PVT data are adjusted to a second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and give V{sub 0} = 14.17(2) cm{sup 3} mol{sup −1}, K{sub 0} = 14.05(23) GPa, and α{sub 0} = 14.6(14) × 10{sup −5} K{sup −1} for ice VI and V{sub 0} = 12.49(1) cm{sup 3} mol{sup −1}, K{sub 0} = 20.15(16) GPa, and α{sub 0} = 11.6(5) × 10{sup −5} K{sup −1} for ice VII.

  1. High-temperature oxidation of EhP648-VI alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations were carried out in 1000-1200 deg C temperature range on 20x15x(2.45-01) mm sheets of EhP 648-VI alloy melted of pure-charge materials. Oxidation kinetics was studied by thermogravimetric method in continuous heating. It is shown that oxidation of EhP648-VI alloy in 1000-1200 deg C temperature range includes chromium diffusion in oxide crystal lattice, opposing oxygen diffusion along the grain boundaries and oxide microcracks, and chromium, tungsten, molybdenum oxide evaporation. Scale on EhP648-VI alloy, consisting basically of α-Cr2O3, is subjected to a compression stress resulting in crack formation. It's protective properties are due to cracks and a thin surface layer of NiCr2O4 spinel. Chromium, tungsten and molybdenum diffusion from the base to scale proceeds along the alloy grain boundaries and volume, couses changes in alloy chemical composition and structure depletion of chromium, tungsten and molybdenum, and filling the grain boundary vacancies with α-Cr or σ-phase particles, that are substituted for (Ti, Nb) (C, N) carbonitride particles by increase of temperature and oxidation time

  2. Equations of state of ice VI and ice VII at high pressure and high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-pressure H2O polymorphs among which ice VI and ice VII are abundant in the interiors of large icy satellites and exo-planets. Knowledge of the elastic properties of these pure H2O ices at high-temperature and high-pressure is thus crucial to decipher the internal structure of icy bodies. In this study we assess for the first time the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) relations of both polycrystalline pure ice VI and ice VII at high pressures and temperatures from 1 to 9 GPa and 300 to 450 K, respectively, by using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PVT data are adjusted to a second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and give V0 = 14.17(2) cm3 mol−1, K0 = 14.05(23) GPa, and α0 = 14.6(14) × 10−5 K−1 for ice VI and V0 = 12.49(1) cm3 mol−1, K0 = 20.15(16) GPa, and α0 = 11.6(5) × 10−5 K−1 for ice VII

  3. Equations of state of ice VI and ice VII at high pressure and high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezacier, Lucile; Journaux, Baptiste; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Cardon, Hervé; Hanfland, Michael; Daniel, Isabelle

    2014-09-14

    High-pressure H2O polymorphs among which ice VI and ice VII are abundant in the interiors of large icy satellites and exo-planets. Knowledge of the elastic properties of these pure H2O ices at high-temperature and high-pressure is thus crucial to decipher the internal structure of icy bodies. In this study we assess for the first time the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) relations of both polycrystalline pure ice VI and ice VII at high pressures and temperatures from 1 to 9 GPa and 300 to 450 K, respectively, by using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PVT data are adjusted to a second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and give V0 = 14.17(2) cm(3) mol(-1), K0 = 14.05(23) GPa, and α0 = 14.6(14) × 10(-5) K(-1) for ice VI and V0 = 12.49(1) cm(3) mol(-1), K0 = 20.15(16) GPa, and α0 = 11.6(5) × 10(-5) K(-1) for ice VII. PMID:25217935

  4. Diluent effect on the extraction of uranium(VI) from hydrochloric acid solutions by trioctylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of uranium(VI) and divalent metals (copper, zinc and cadmium) from hydrochloric acid solutions by trioctylamine (TOA) has been examined using various toluene, m-xylene, nitrobenzene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform and 1,2-dichloroethane. It is found that a parabolic dependence of the distribution coefficient on the solubility parameter of diluent is not observed in these extraction systems. The results obtained are investigated in comparison with the extraction of uranium(VI) and divalent metals by trioctylmethylammonium chloride (TOMAC) in organic solvents in which the distribution coefficient and the enthalpy change associated with the metal extraction can be expressed in terms of the solubility parameter of extractant, diluent and the complex formed in the organic phase and their molar volume by assuming a regular solution. Consequently, since the solutions of TOA x HCl in organic solvents are not regarded as regular solutions, it is expected that the extraction of uranium(VI) from hydrochloric acid solutions by TOA is not always explained in the view point of a regular solution therapy. 16 references, 7 figures, 9 tables

  5. ViSlang: A system for interpreted domain-specific languages for scientific visualization

    KAUST Repository

    Rautek, Peter

    2014-12-31

    Researchers from many domains use scientific visualization in their daily practice. Existing implementations of algorithms usually come with a graphical user interface (high-level interface), or as software library or source code (low-level interface). In this paper we present a system that integrates domain-specific languages (DSLs) and facilitates the creation of new DSLs. DSLs provide an effective interface for domain scientists avoiding the difficulties involved with low-level interfaces and at the same time offering more flexibility than high-level interfaces. We describe the design and implementation of ViSlang, an interpreted language specifically tailored for scientific visualization. A major contribution of our design is the extensibility of the ViSlang language. Novel DSLs that are tailored to the problems of the domain can be created and integrated into ViSlang. We show that our approach can be added to existing user interfaces to increase the flexibility for expert users on demand, but at the same time does not interfere with the user experience of novice users. To demonstrate the flexibility of our approach we present new DSLs for volume processing, querying and visualization. We report the implementation effort for new DSLs and compare our approach with Matlab and Python implementations in terms of run-time performance.

  6. Infrared and millimeter waves v.15 millimeter components and techniques, pt.VI

    CERN Document Server

    Button, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    Infrared and Millimeter Waves, Volume 15: Millimeter Components and Techniques, Part VI is concerned with millimeter-wave guided propagation and integrated circuits. This book covers low-noise receiver technology for near-millimeter wavelengths; dielectric image-line antennas; EHF satellite communications (SATCOM) terminal antennas; and semiconductor antennas for millimeter-wave integrated circuits. A scanning airborne radiometer for 30 and 90 GHz and a self-oscillating mixer are also described. This monograph is comprised of six chapters and begins with a discussion on the design of low-n

  7. Uranium(VI) uptake by synthetic calcium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immobilization of U(VI) by C-S-H phases under conditions relevant for the cementitious near field of a repository for radioactive waste has been investigated. C-S-H phases have been synthesized using two different procedures: the 'direct reaction' method and the 'solution reaction' method. The stabilities of alkaline solutions of U(VI) (presence of precipitates or colloidal material) were studied prior to sorption and co-precipitation tests in order to determine the experimental U(VI) solubility limits. These U(VI) solubility limits were compared with the U(VI) solubilities obtained from thermodynamic speciation calculations assuming the presence of combinations of different solid U(VI) phases. The solid phase controlling U(VI) solubility in the present experiments was found to be CaUO4s). The U(VI) uptake kinetics and sorption isotherms on C-S-H phases with different C:S ratios were determined under various chemical conditions; e.g., sorption and co-precipitation experiments and different pH's. U(VI) was found to sorb fast and very strongly on C-S-H phases with distribution ratios (Rd values) ranging in value between 103 L kg-1 and 106 L kg-1. Both sorption and co-precipitation experiments resulted in Rd values which were very similar, thus indicating that no additional sorption sites for U(VI) were generated in the co-precipitation process. Furthermore, C-S-H synthesis procedures did not have a significant influence on U(VI) uptake. The U(VI) sorption isotherms were found to be non-linear, and further, increasing Ca concentrations resulted in increasing U(VI) uptake. The latter observation suggests that U(VI) uptake is controlled by a solubility-limiting process, while the former observation further indicates that pure Ca-uranate is not the solubility-limiting phase. It is proposed that a solid solution containing Ca and UO22+ could control U(VI) uptake by C-S-H phases. (authors)

  8. Development and Application of MCNP5 and KENO-VI Monte Carlo Models for the Atucha-2 PHWR Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    O. Mazzantini; F. D'Auria; M. Pecchia; Parisi, C

    2011-01-01

    The geometrical complexity and the peculiarities of Atucha-2 PHWR require the adoption of advanced Monte Carlo codes for performing realistic neutronic simulations. Core models of Atucha-2 PHWR were developed using both MCNP5 and KENO-VI codes. The developed models were applied for calculating reactor criticality states at beginning of life, reactor cell constants, and control rods volumes. The last two applications were relevant for performing successive three dimensional neutron kinetic ana...

  9. Superconductivity of calcium in phase VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczesniak, R. [Institute of Physics, Czestochowa University of Technology, Al. Armii Krajowej 19, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Durajski, A.P., E-mail: adurajski@wip.pcz.pl [Institute of Physics, Czestochowa University of Technology, Al. Armii Krajowej 19, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland)

    2012-01-15

    Thermodynamic parameters of the superconducting state that induces in calcium in phase VI. The high critical temperature and Coulomb pseudopotential. The non BCS value of the ratio 2{Delta}/k{sub B}T{sub C}. The large electron effective mass. The properties of the superconducting state of calcium in phase VI were analyzed. By using the imaginary axis Eliashberg equations it has been shown, that the Coulomb pseudopotential reaches the high value equal to 0.215. In the considered case, the critical temperature is not properly described by the Allen-Dynes formula and it should be calculated with an use of the modified expression. In the paper the exact solutions of the Eliashberg equations on the real axis were also obtained. On this basis it was stated, that the effective potential of the electron-electron interaction is attractive for the frequencies lower or equal to the maximum phonon frequency. Then, the dimensionless parameter 2{Delta}(0)/k{sub B}T{sub C} = 4.10 was calculated. In the last step it has been proven, that the ratio of the electron effective mass to the bare electron mass is high and reaches its maximum equal to 2.36 for the critical temperature.

  10. NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL/ENERGY WORKFORCE ASSESSMENT. ENVIRONMENTAL EMPLOYMENT IN PUBLIC SERVICE JOBS PROGRAMS: AN ANALYSIS OF CETA TITLE VI FY 78 PROJECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This volume presents the findings of an analysis of 4,644 CETA Title VI projects for which 'environment' had been indicated as an appropriate public service area. Statistics regarding numbers employed in specific job categories, median salaries, variances in types of project agen...

  11. Revised draft: Northeastern Regional geologic characterization report. Volume 3. Plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 7(3) contains the following maps: Index Map; Faults, Ground Acceleration, and In Situ Stress; Rock and Mineral Resources; Drainage Basins and Groundwater Discharge Zones; Groundwater Resources; and Crystalline Rock Bodies

  12. Geodynamic evolution of sedimentary basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roure, F.; Ellouz, N.; Shein, V.S.; Skvortsov, I.I. [eds.

    1996-12-01

    This volume constitutes the proceedings of a conference held in Moscow in 1992, and organized by the Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), the IGIRGI and VNIGNI Russian institutes under the auspices of the Russian Ministries of Fuels and Energy, Ecology and Nature. Geological features of the CIS countries, especially Russia, have driven their geologists` interest to specific questions as the petroleum potential of Proterozoic series, the resources located at a depth of 5000 m and more, or the impact of recent deformations on petroleum exploration and production. From the 27 papers of this conference, only 16 were selected which deal with oil and natural gas fields or coal deposits and geologic traps in the extensional and compressional basins of the CIS republics or in their western counterparts, or with physical and numerical structural models and other modeling techniques used for petroleum potential appraisal in sedimentary basins. The other papers deal with thematic aspects of basin formation in general or in specific areas with no reference to hydrocarbon genesis. (J.S.).

  13. Diagnostic and treatment strategies in mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vairo F

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Filippo Vairo,1–3 Andressa Federhen,1,3,4 Guilherme Baldo,1,2,5–7 Mariluce Riegel,1,6 Maira Burin,1 Sandra Leistner-Segal,1,8 Roberto Giugliani1,5,6,81Medical Genetics Service, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 2Department of Genetics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 3Clinical Research Group on Medical Genetics, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 4Post-Graduate Program in Child and Adolescent Health, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 5Gene Therapy Center, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 6Post-Graduate Program in Genetics and Molecular Biology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 7Department of Physiology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 8Post-Graduate Program in Medical Sciences, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, BrazilAbstract: Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ARSB gene, which lead to deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme ASB. This enzyme is important for the breakdown of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, which accumulate in body tissues and organs of MPS VI patients. The storage of GAGs (especially dermatan sulfate causes bone dysplasia, joint restriction, organomegaly, heart disease, and corneal clouding, among several other problems, and reduced life span. Despite the fact that most cases are severe, there is a spectrum of severity and some cases are so attenuated that diagnosis is made late in life. Although the analysis of urinary GAGs and/or the measurement of enzyme activity in dried blood spots are useful screening methods, the diagnosis is based in the demonstration of the enzyme deficiency in leucocytes or fibroblasts, and/or in the identification of pathogenic mutations in the ARSB gene

  14. Polyaniline-modified 3D-flower-like molybdenum disulfide composite for efficient adsorption/photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Chen, Changlun; Tan, Xiaoli; Xu, Huan; Zhu, Kairuo

    2016-08-15

    Polyaniline (PANI) was modified onto 3D flower-like molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) to prepare a novel organic-inorganic hybrid material, PANI@MoS2. PANI@MoS2 was characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The results indicate that PANI was modified onto MoS2. PANI@MoS2 was applied as an adsorbent to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions, and the adsorption isotherms fit well to the Langmuir model; the maximum removal capacity of Cr(VI) by PANI@MoS2 was 526.3 and 623.2mg/g at pH 3.0 and 1.5, respectively. PANI@MoS2 exhibited an enhanced removal capacity of Cr(VI) in comparison with bare MoS2 and other adsorbents. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on PANI@MoS2 might be attributed to the complexation between the amine and imine groups on the surface of PANI@MoS2 with Cr(VI). This study implies that the hybrid material PANI@MoS2 is a potential adsorbent for Cr(VI) removal from large volumes of aqueous solutions. PMID:27209391

  15. Zr oxide-based coloration technique for two-dimensional imaging of labile Cr(VI) using diffusive gradients in thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yu; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Miao, Lingzhan; Hou, Jun; Wang, Teng; Liu, Cui

    2016-10-01

    A novel Zr oxide diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT)-based measurement technique for high-resolution imaging of labile Cr (VI) is introduced in this study. The method is based on the diphenylcarbazide coloration technique for Cr (VI) combined with computer-imaging densitometry, which provides a relation between the accumulated mass of Cr (VI) and the grayscale intensity. The Zr oxide gels show good performance in reflecting the accurate measurement of Cr (VI), independent of the effects of pH, ionic strength, and PO4(3-) concentration. Settling of the Zr-oxide gel was identified as a simple and effective method to suppress leaching of the claret-colored compound out of the gel. In addition, the optimal volume of added coloration reagent was 125 times that of the binding gel and 30min was selected as the optimal time for the chromogenic reaction. The relationship between the accumulated Cr (VI) and grayscale intensity was analyzed under the optimized conditions. The Zr oxide DGT technique could also obviously reflect the heterogeneity of sediment. Consequently, Zr oxide DGT-based coloration is certified to be a robust and suitable tool for providing effective and high-resolution information on bioavailable Cr (VI). PMID:27320737

  16. On the connection between the metal-enriched intergalactic medium and galaxies: an O VI-galaxy cross-correlation study at z < 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Charles W.; Morris, Simon L.; Tejos, Nicolas; Crighton, Neil H. M.; Perry, Robert; Fumagalli, Michele; Bielby, Rich; Theuns, Tom; Schaye, Joop; Shanks, Tom; Liske, Jochen; Gunawardhana, Madusha L. P.; Bartle, Stephanie

    2016-07-01

    We present new results on the auto- and cross-correlation functions of galaxies and O VI absorbers in a ˜18 Gpc3 comoving volume at z r⊥, r∥). We furthermore infer the corresponding `real-space' correlation functions, ξ(r), by projecting ξ(r⊥, r∥) along r∥, and assuming a power-law form, ξ(r) = (r/r0)-γ. Comparing the results from the absorber-galaxy cross-correlation function, ξag, the galaxy autocorrelation function, ξgg, and the absorber autocorrelation function, ξaa, we constrain the statistical connection between galaxies and the metal-enriched intergalactic medium as a function of star formation activity. We also compare these results to predictions from the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulation and find a reasonable agreement. We find that: (i) O VI absorbers show very little velocity dispersion with respect to galaxies on ˜ Mpc scales, likely ≲100 km s-1; (ii) O VI absorbers are less clustered, and potentially more extended around galaxies than galaxies are around themselves; (iii) on ≳100 kpc scales, the likelihood of finding O VI absorbers around star-forming galaxies is similar to the likelihood of finding O VI absorbers around non-star-forming galaxies; and (iv) O VI absorbers are either not ubiquitous to galaxies in our sample, or their distribution around them is patchy on scales ≳100 kpc (or both), at least for the column densities at which most are currently detected.

  17. Procedure for plutonium determination using Pu(VI) spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes a simple spectrophotometric method for determining total plutonium in nitric acid solutions based on the spectrum of Pu(VI). Plutonium samples in nitric acid are oxidized to Pu(VI) with Ce(IV) and the net absorbance at the 830 nm peak is measured

  18. Extraction of uranium (VI) sulphate complexes by Adogen amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of U(VI) between aqueous H2 So4 solutions and organic phases of adogen-368 has been described. The dependence of extraction on acidity, diluent type, metal and extractant concentrations was investigated. The possible extraction mechanism is discussed in the light of results obtained. The separation of U(VI) from rare earths is suggested. 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Type VI Collagen Regulates Dermal Matrix Assembly and Fibroblast Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharidis, Georgios; Drymoussi, Zoe; Kao, Alexander P; Barber, Asa H; Lee, David A; Braun, Kristin M; Connelly, John T

    2016-01-01

    Type VI collagen is a nonfibrillar collagen expressed in many connective tissues and implicated in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization. We hypothesized that type VI collagen regulates matrix assembly and cell function within the dermis of the skin. In the present study we examined the expression pattern of type VI collagen in normal and wounded skin and investigated its specific function in new matrix deposition by human dermal fibroblasts. Type VI collagen was expressed throughout the dermis of intact human skin, at the expanding margins of human keloid samples, and in the granulation tissue of newly deposited ECM in a mouse model of wound healing. Generation of cell-derived matrices (CDMs) by human dermal fibroblasts with stable knockdown of COL6A1 revealed that type VI collagen-deficient matrices were significantly thinner and contained more aligned, thicker, and widely spaced fibers than CDMs produced by normal fibroblasts. In addition, there was significantly less total collagen and sulfated proteoglycans present in the type VI collagen-depleted matrices. Normal fibroblasts cultured on de-cellularized CDMs lacking type VI collagen displayed increased cell spreading, migration speed, and persistence. Taken together, these findings indicate that type VI collagen is a key regulator of dermal matrix assembly, composition, and fibroblast behavior and may play an important role in wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:26763426

  20. 77 FR 64399 - Order of Succession for HUD Region VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Order of Succession for HUD Region VI AGENCY: Office of Field Policy and Management, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Order of Succession. SUMMARY: In this notice, the Assistant Deputy Secretary... Succession for the Fort Worth Regional Office and its Field Offices (Region VI). This Order of...

  1. Kandinsky's "Composition VI": Heideggerian Poetry in Noah's Ark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    The author will begin his investigation of Wassily Kandinsky's painting "Composition VI" with Kandinsky's own commentary on the painting. He will then turn to the analysis of Kandinsky and the "Compositions" in John Sallis's book "Shades." Using this analysis as his point of departure, the author will consider how "Composition VI" resonates with…

  2. Understanding sedimentation in the Song Hong-Yinggehai Basin, South China Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Y.; Carter, A; Palk, C.; S. Brichau; Hu, X

    2011-01-01

    The Cenozoic Song Hong–Yinggehai Basin in the South China Sea contains a large volume of sediment that has been used in previous studies, together with regional geomorphology, to argue for the existence of a large palaeodrainage system that connected eastern Tibet with the South China Sea. To test this and to understand the significance of sediment volumes deposited in the Song Hong–Yinggehai Basin, this study compared erosion histories of source regions with sediment volumes deposited during...

  3. Biosorption of uranium (VI) by immobilized Aspergillus fumigatus beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biosorption of uranium (VI) ions by immobilized Aspergillus fumigatus beads was investigated in a batch system. The influences of solution pH, biosorbent dose, U (VI) concentration, and contact time on U (VI) biosorption were studied. The results indicated that the adsorption capacity was strongly affected by the solution pH, the biosorbent dose and initial U (VI) concentration. Optimum biosorption was observed at pH 5.0, biosrobent dose (w/v) 2.5%, initial U (VI) concentration 60 mg L-1. Biosorption equilibrium was established in 120 min. The adsorption process conformed to the Freunlich and Temkin isothermal adsorption models. The dynamic adsorption model conformed to pseudo-second order model.

  4. Behaviour of chromium(VI) in stormwater soil infiltration systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederkvist, Karin; Ingvertsen, Simon T.; Jensen, Marina B.;

    2013-01-01

    mm in 2 h) and extreme (100 mm in 3 h) rain events. The objectives were to understand the behaviour of the anionic and toxic Cr(VI) in soil at neutral pH and to asses treatment efficiency towards Cr(VI). During normal rain events Cr(VI) was largely retained (more than 50, even though pH was neutral......, while under extreme rain events approximately 20% of Cr(VI) was retained. In both cases effluent concentrations of Cr(VI) would exceed the threshold value of 3.4 mu g/L if the infiltrated water were introduced to freshwater environments. More knowledge on the composition of the stormwater runoff, and...

  5. INFLUENCED FLOW IN LOWER IZA RIVER BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PANDI G.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Maramureş Depression is drained by Vişeu and Iza rivers. Both have a partially influenced regime. The flow in lower Iza Basin is influenced by the Runcu Reservoir and by the Runcu – Valea Neagră derivation that are situated on the upper Mara River. The flow is controlled by three hydrometric stations – Mara and Vadu Izei on Mara River, and Vadu Izei on Iza River. We took into analyse the time period 1993 – 2012 using drained and influenced monthly average discharge data. The variation of monthly and annual deviations for Mara Station shows positive values for each year and for almost each month. The flow influence degree, in absolute and relative values, is evaluated for all three stations. The hydrometric stations are situated into a certain type of influenced flow by using the Q infl. / Q rec. ratio.

  6. Alpha-benzoinoxime. Extracting agent for uranium(VI), tungsten(VI), molybdenum(VI) and some transition metals of the iron family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of pH on the percent extraction of vanadium(V), iron(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI) and uranium(VI) by α-benzoinoxime in different solvents has been studies. The maximum recovery is not appreciably affected by the nature of the solvent, but occurs at different pH values for different metals. The pH corresponding to maximum extraction increases with increasing hydrolysis pK of the species in aqueous solution, and decreases with increasing stability constant of the complexes formed. Alpha-benzoinoxime allows the separation of these metal ions into three groups: V(V), Mo(VI) and W(VI) are extracted at pH=2, U(VI) at pH=5, Fe(II), Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) at around pH=10. (author) 13 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  7. Development of a systemwide predator control program: Stepwise implementation of a predation index, predator control fisheries, and evaluation plan in the Columbia River Basin. Volume 2 -- Evaluation: 1993 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt was made to determine the extent to which northern squawfish predation on juvenile salmonids is a problem in the Columbia River Basin, and to evaluate how effectively fisheries can be used to control northern squawfish populations and reduce juvenile salmonid losses to predation. These studies were initiated as part of a basinwide program to control northern squawfish predation and reduce mortality of juvenile salmonids on their migration to the ocean. Modeling simulations based on work in the John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that if northern squawfish larger than 250 mm fork length were exploited, at a rate of 10--20%, reductions in their numbers and restructuring of their populations could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50% or more. The authors evaluated the success of three test fisheries conducted in 1993--a sport-reward fishery, a dam-angling fishery, and a trap-net fishery, to achieve a 10--20% exploitation rate on northern squawfish. The authors also began evaluating the response of northern squawfish populations to sustained fisheries. In addition, the authors gathered information regarding the economic, social, and legal feasibility of sustaining each fishery, and report on the structure and function of the fish collection and distribution system

  8. Cranial nerves III, IV and VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of advances in CT and MR imaging, accurate identification and evaluation of cranial nerve lesions is now possible. Cranial nerves III, IV, and VI, providing motor and sensory control of the eye, can be evaluated as a unit. In this paper, the authors present an overview of the anatomy and pathology of these cranial nerves. We first illustrate their normal anatomic pathways from the brain stem to the orbit. This is followed by clinical examples of patients with a variety of isolated and complex palsies of these three cranial nerves. This is accomplished by inclusion of ocular photographs, correlative imaging studies, and the use of diagrams. Knowledge of the gross and imaging anatomy and the ophthalmologic manifestations of pathology affecting these three cranial nerves permits a tailored approach to their evaluation

  9. VI. Los Matusalenes de la Sierra

    OpenAIRE

    Ordinaire, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    *** Vi en Jauja algunos compatriotas que habían venido de Lima, o incluso de París, para curarse en ese valle de enfermedades del pecho; y debo decir que si bien no alabaron los atractivos del lugar, fueron unánimes en proclamar los efectos saludables de éste. En una palabra, preferían morir de aburrimiento en Jauja que de una tisis galopante en otra parte. Se cita al Perú como el país donde, en relación a la cifra de su población, hay más centenarios; y es en los valles altos de la Sierra do...

  10. Critical experiment on FCA Assembly VI-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mock-up experiment on prototype fast breeder reactor ''MONJU'' has been performed using Fast Critical Facility (FCA), in JAERI. The first partial physics mock-up system is named FCA Assembly VI-1, which is two zoned core system. The inner core of the Assembly is the test region simulating the composition of the outer core of ''MONJU'', and the outer core of the Assembly is the driver region loaded by enriched uranium fuel. The measurements of critical mass, bunching effect, reaction rate ratio at the core center, and the radial distributions of fission rate have been conducted. Preliminary calculational results agree well with the measured values other than the fission rate distribution at the blanket region. (author)

  11. Six-fold Coordinated Carbon Dioxide VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iota, V; Yoo, C; Klepeis, J; Jenei, Z

    2006-03-01

    Under standard conditions, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a simple molecular gas and an important atmospheric constituent while silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) is a covalent solid, and represents one of the fundamental minerals of the planet. The remarkable dissimilarity between these two group IV oxides is diminished at higher pressures and temperatures as CO{sub 2} transforms to a series of solid phases, from simple molecular to a fully covalent extended-solid V, structurally analogous to SiO{sub 2} tridymite. Here, we present the discovery of a new extended-solid phase of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}): a six-fold coordinated stishovite-like phase VI, obtained by isothermal compression of associated CO{sub 2}-II above 50GPa at 530-650K. Together with the previously reported CO{sub 2}-V and a-carbonia, this new extended phase indicates a fundamental similarity between CO{sub 2}--a prototypical molecular solid, and SiO{sub 2}--one of Earth's fundamental building blocks. The phase diagram suggests a limited stability domain for molecular CO{sub 2}-I, and proposes that the conversion to extended-network solids above 40-50 GPa occurs via intermediate phases II, III, and IV. The crystal structure of phase VI suggests strong disorder along the caxis in stishovite-like P4{sub 2}/mnm, with carbon atoms manifesting an average six-fold coordination within the framework of sp{sup 3} hybridization.

  12. Six-fold coordinated carbon dioxide VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iota, Valentin; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Klepeis, Jae-Hyun; Jenei, Zsolt; Evans, William; Cynn, Hyunchae (LLNL)

    2008-06-16

    Under standard conditions, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a simple molecular gas and an important atmospheric constituent, whereas silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) is a covalent solid, and one of the fundamental minerals of the planet. The remarkable dissimilarity between these two group IV oxides is diminished at higher pressures and temperatures as CO{sub 2} transforms to a series of solid phases, from simple molecular to a fully covalent extended-solid V, structurally analogous to SiO{sub 2} tridymite. Here, we present the discovery of an extended-solid phase of CO{sub 2}: a six-fold coordinated stishovite-like phase VI, obtained by isothermal compression of associated CO{sub 2}-II above 50 GPa at 530-650 K. Together with the previously reported CO{sub 2}-V and a-carbonia, this extended phase indicates a fundamental similarity between CO{sub 2} (a prototypical molecular solid) and SiO{sub 2} (one of Earth's fundamental building blocks). We present a phase diagram with a limited stability domain for molecular CO{sub 2}-I, and suggest that the conversion to extended-network solids above 40-50 GPa occurs via intermediate phases II, III and IV. The crystal structure of phase VI suggests strong disorder along the c axis in stishovite-like P4{sub 2}/mnm, with carbon atoms manifesting an average six-fold coordination within the framework of sp{sup 3} hybridization.

  13. Six-fold coordinated carbon dioxide VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iota, Valentin; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Klepeis, Jae-Hyun; Jenei, Zsolt; Evans, William; Cynn, Hyunchae

    2007-01-01

    Under standard conditions, carbon dioxide (CO2) is a simple molecular gas and an important atmospheric constituent, whereas silicon dioxide (SiO2) is a covalent solid, and one of the fundamental minerals of the planet. The remarkable dissimilarity between these two group IV oxides is diminished at higher pressures and temperatures as CO2 transforms to a series of solid phases, from simple molecular to a fully covalent extended-solid V, structurally analogous to SiO2 tridymite. Here, we present the discovery of an extended-solid phase of CO2: a six-fold coordinated stishovite-like phase VI, obtained by isothermal compression of associated CO2-II (refs 1,2) above 50 GPa at 530-650 K. Together with the previously reported CO2-V (refs 3-5) and a-carbonia, this extended phase indicates a fundamental similarity between CO2 (a prototypical molecular solid) and SiO2 (one of Earth's fundamental building blocks). We present a phase diagram with a limited stability domain for molecular CO2-I, and suggest that the conversion to extended-network solids above 40-50 GPa occurs via intermediate phases II (refs 1,2), III (refs 7,8) and IV (refs 9,10). The crystal structure of phase VI suggests strong disorder along the c axis in stishovite-like P42/mnm, with carbon atoms manifesting an average six-fold coordination within the framework of sp3 hybridization. PMID:17160005

  14. Adsorption of chromium(VI) and Rhodamine B by surface modified tannery waste: Kinetic, mechanistic and thermodynamic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, various activation methods have been employed to examine the potential reuse of tannery residual biomass (TRB) obtained from vegetable tanning process for the removal of Cr(VI) and Rhodamine B (RB) from aqueous solution. The maximum BET surface area (10.42 m2/g), honey comb pore distribution and uptake of both Cr(VI) and RB were achieved when only 3-fold volume of HCl was used to activate the biomass. The pH and temperature experiment showed that they have considerable impact on the adsorption capacity of the used adsorbent. The presence of other ions (Na+, Ca2+ and NH4+) significantly reduces the metal uptake but marginal enhancement in the dye removal was observed when Na+ and NH4+ ions were present in the solution. The equilibrium data fitted satisfactorily with the Langmuir model and monolayer sorption capacity obtained as 177-217 and 213-250 mg/g for Cr(VI) and RB at 30-50 deg. C, respectively. The sorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The increase in adsorption capacity for both metal and dye with increase in temperature indicates that the uptake was endothermic in nature. The results indicate that the HCl modified TRB (A-TRB) could be employed as a low cost adsorbent for the removal of both Cr(VI) and RB from the aqueous solution including industrial wastewater.

  15. The reduction of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) by organic chelating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction of NpO2+ and PuO22+ by oxalate. citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was investigated in low ionic strength media and brines. This was done to help establish the stability of the An(VI) oxidation state in the presence of organic complexants. The stability of the An(VI) oxidation state depended on the pH and relative strength of the various oxidation state-specific complexes. At low ionic strength and pH 6, NpO2O2+ was rapidly reduced to form NpO2+ organic complexes. At longer times, Np(IV) organic complexes were observed in the presence of citrate. PuO22+ was predominantly reduced to Pu4+, resulting in the formation of organic complexes or polymeric/hydrolytic precipitates. The relative rates of reduction to the An(V) complex were EDTA > citrate > oxalate. Subsequent reduction to An(IV) complexes, however, occurred in the following order: citrate > EDTA > oxalate because of the stability of the An(V)-EDTA complex. The presence of organic complexants led to the rapid reduction of NpO22+ and PuO2P2+ in G-seep brine at pHs 5 and 7. At pHs 8 and 10 in ERDA-6 brine, carbonate and hydrolytic complexes predominated and slowed down or prevented the reduction of An(VI) by the organics present

  16. Neptunium (VI) and neptunium (VI/V) mixed valence cluster compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Iain [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Neptunium has three readily accessible oxidation states, IV, V and VI, which can coexist under certain conditions, with the aqueous soluble neptunyl(V) moiety, {l_brace}NpO{sub 2}{r_brace}{sup +}, of most environmental relevance. Careful control of Np chemistry is required during actinide separation processes. In addition, the long half life of the major alpha emitting isotope ({sup 237}Np, t{sub 1/2} = 2.144 x 10{sup 6} years) renders Np a major contributor to the radiotoxicity of nuclear waste as a function of time. Significant quantities of neptunium are generated in nuclear reactors and the current surge in interest in nuclear power will lead to an increase in our need to further understand the chemistry of this element. It is clearly of importance that Np chemistry is well understood and there have been several recent investigations into the structural, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of Np compounds. However, the vast majority of this chemistry has been performed in aqueous solution, prohibiting the use of air and moisture sensitive ligands. This is in stark contrast to uranium and thorium where inert atmosphere chemistry with moisture sensitive donor ligands has flourished, yielding greater insight into the structural and electronic properties of these early actinides. For the uranyl(VI) moiety, {l_brace}UO{sub 2}{r_brace}{sup 2+}, UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(thf){sub 3} (and the desolvated dimer [UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(thf)]{sub 2}) have proven to be excellent moisture-free reagents for inert atmosphere uranyl chemistry. These starting reagents have been used extensively within our group to study soft donor ligand coordination in the uranyl equatorial plane and oxo-activation to Lewis acid coordination. However, until now the absence of such a starting reagent for Np has limited our ability to extend this chemistry any further across the actinide series, which is required if we are to gain a more complete understanding of 5f element chemistry. The synthesis of [Np

  17. Cr(VI) reduction in aqueous solutions by siderite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Mehmet; Gür, Faruk; Tümen, Fikret

    2004-09-10

    Hexavalent chromium is a common and toxic pollutant in soils and wastewaters. Reduction of the mobile Cr(VI) to less mobile and less toxic Cr(III) is a solution for decontamination of industrial effluents. In this study, the reduction of hexavalent chromium in aqueous solutions by siderite was investigated. The influences of amount of acid, contact time, siderite dosage, initial Cr(VI) concentration, temperature and particle size of siderite have been tested in batch runs. The process was found to be acid, temperature and concentration dependent. The amount of acid is the most effective parameter affecting the Cr(VI) reduction since carbonaceous gangue minerals consume acid by side reactions. The highest Cr(VI) reduction efficiency (100%) occurred in the 50 mg/l Cr(VI) solution containing two times acid with respect to stoichiometric amount of Cr(VI) and at the conditions of siderite dosage 20 g/l, contact time 120 min and temperature 25 degrees C. Reduction efficiency increased with increase in temperature and decrease in particle size. The reduction capacity of siderite was found to be 17 mg-Cr(VI)/g. PMID:15363534

  18. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

    2008-12-03

    The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon

  19. Equations for estimating timber volume in the region of the River Basin of Ituxi, Lábrea, Amazon, Brazil Equações para estimativa de volume de madeira para a região da bacia do Rio Ituxi, Lábrea, AM

    OpenAIRE

    Fabio Thaines; Evaldo Muñoz Braz; Patricia Povoa Mattos; Andreia Aparecida Ribeiro Thaines

    2010-01-01

    To quantify the stock of commercial timber in forests demands efficient methods, making possible to estimate efficiently and accurately the present and future timber volume. The aim of this work was to  adjust the mathematical models used to estimate timber volume, allowing the determination of the timber potential of a region with greater accuracy and lower cost. The study was conducted at Lábrea, State of  Amazonas, Brazil in an area of 6,000 ha, inserted in the Project Forest Mana...

  20. Wavelengths and energy levels of I V and I VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectra of iodine were photographed in the 139--1500-Aat;O region on various spectrographs. Earlier analyses of I V and I VI were revised and extended. For I V 26 lines were classified, and for I VI 35 lines were classified. Ionization energies have been estimated to be 415 510 atm≅ 300 cm-1 (51.52 atm≅ 0.04 eV) and 599 800 atm≅ 3 000 cm-1 (74.37 atm≅ 0.37 eV) for I V and I VI, respectively

  1. Synthesis and Structural Studies of 1-Deoxybaccatin VI Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN,Hai-Xia; WANG,Dian-Long; CHEN,Jian-Min; CHEN,Min-Qin

    2008-01-01

    Synthesis and crystal structures of 1-deoxybaccatin VI derivatives, and the influence of C(9), C(10), and C(13) substituents of the tetracyclic moiety on molecular conformations were investigated. Comparison of conformations of 1-deoxybaccatin VI derivatives reveals subtle conformational variations in the tetracyclic ring system due to deacetylation at C(10) and C(13), and 9,10-acetonide. Additionally, C(2)-benzoyl group exhibits an unexpected conformational flexibility in 1-deoxybaccatin VI derivatives, which may be relevant to the bioactivity of taxanes.

  2. Experimental Drainage Basins in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laronne, J. B.; Lekach, J.; Cohen, H.; Gray, J.

    2002-12-01

    Within the hyper-arid to semiarid areas of Israel are three experimental drainage basins. They are the Nahal (stream in Hebrew) Yael, subdivided into five sub-basins, Rahaf-Qanna'im (main and tributary, respectively) and Eshtemoa. These basins vary in drainage area and climate, and in monitoring duration and type. All are drained by gravel-bed channels. As the size of monitored drainage area is limited, 3-4 additional representative basins covering areas of 300, 1000, 2000 and 8000 square kilometers will likely be implemented in the next decade. The basins have precipitation, runoff, sediment and fluviomorphological records. Each was conceived for differing purposes, but all share the common two objectives for the continuous monitoring: 1. Many hydrological issues may be approached if, and only if, there are prototype databases on a wide spectrum of hydrological processes; and 2. There is a need for long-term records to assess large floods and subsequent hydrologic and geomorphic recovery. Lessons derived from a large number of research projects on these experimental basins focus on characteristics of runoff in arid climates. For example, the effect of the spatial distribution of rainfall on runoff generation becomes increasingly important with aridity. Rainfall angle on hillslopes and storm intensity and direction derived from rainfall recorders and radar backscatter are crucial for explanation of runoff response. Runoff hydrographs tend to have more bores, shorter-duration peaks, briefer recessions, longer dry periods, and are more variable in terms of flood volume and peaks with increased aridity. Suspended-sediment fluxes, yields and concentrations are relatively large in the semiarid realm, reaching maxima at the beginning of a flood season and after long dry spells. Bedload fluxes are exceptionally high from dryland basins in which hillslopes are minimally vegetated and where bedload transport takes place in channels lacking an armor layer. Bedload

  3. Cinética e equilíbrio de adsorção dos oxiânions Cr (VI, Mo (VI e Se (VI pelo sal de amônio quaternário de quitosana Kinetics and equilibrium of adsorption of oxyanions Cr (VI, Mo (VI and Se (VI by quaternary ammonium chitosan salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane A. Spinelli

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available O sal quaternário de quitosana foi sintetizado com cloreto de glicidil trimetil amônio. A modificação química foi caracterizada por espectrometria no IV, RMN de 13C e ¹H, e mmol/g de grupos quaternários presentes na matriz polimérica por condutimetria. A remoção de Cr (VI, Mo (VI e Se (VI, em meio aquoso, foi investigada em processo de batelada. A adsorção mostrou ser dependente do pH para o Cr (VI e Se (VI, com um pH ótimo de adsorção, entre 4,0 a 6,0. Para o Mo (VI a adsorção manteve-se quase constante no intervalo de pH entre 4,0 e 11,5. O modelo de isoterma de Langmuir descreveu melhor os dados de equilíbrio na faixa de concentração investigada. No presente estudo, um grama do sal quaternário de quitosana reticulado com glutaraldeído adsorveu 68,3 mg de Cr, 63,4 mg de Mo e 90,0 mg de Se. A velocidade de adsorção, no processo, segue a equação cinética de pseudo segunda-ordem, sendo que o equilíbrio para os três íons foi alcançado próximo aos 200 minutos. A análise dispersiva de raios-X para o Cr (VI mostrou que o principal mecanismo de adsorção é a troca iônica entre os íons Cl- da superfície do polímero pelos oxiânions. O trocador aniônico apresentou a seguinte ordem de seletividade: Cr (VI > Mo (VI > Se (VI.Quaternary chitosan salt was synthesized in the presence of glycidyl trimetyl ammonium chloride. The polymer was characterized by spectroscopic techniques: infrared, 13C and ¹H NMR, while the amount of quaternary ammonium groups was obtained by condutimetry. The removal of Cr (VI, Mo (VI and Se (VI from aqueous solutions was carried out in batch adsorption processes. The process seemed to be pH dependent for Cr (VI and Se (VI with an optimum pH ranging from 4.0 to 6.0; while for Mo (VI the adsorption remained almost constant within the range between 4.0 and 11.5. The Langmuir isotherm model provided the best fit of the equilibrium data over the whole concentration investigated. In the experiment

  4. Solvent extraction of nitric acid, uranium (VI) and thorium (IV) by N, N, N', N'-tetrahexylsuccinylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new kind of diamide N,N,N',N'-tetrahexylsuccinylamide (THSA) was synthesized, characterized and used for the extraction of HNO3, U(VI) and Th(IV) in a diluent composed of 0.5 volume fraction 1,2,4-trimethyl benzene (TMB) and 0.5 volume fraction kerosene (OK). Extraction distribution coefficients of U(VI) and Th(IV) as functions of aqueous nitric acid concentration, extractant concentration, temperature and salting-out agent (LiNO3) have been studied, and it is found that THSA as an extractant is superior to TBP for extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV). Back extraction was also studied. At low acidity, the main adduct of THSA and HNO3 is HNO3·THSA. THSA·(HNO3)2 and THSA·(HNO3)3 are also found at high acidity. The compositions of extracted species, apparent equilibrium constants and enthalpies of extraction reactions have also been calculated

  5. Study of Mo (VI Removal from Aqueous Solution: Application of Different Mathematical Models to Continuous Biosorption Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Kafshgari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum (VI biosorption process was investigated by marine algae Cystoseria indica pretreated with 0.1 M CaCl2 solution in a packed bed column. The biosorbent was characterized by FTIR, BET and SEM analyses. The results showed that Mo (VI ions should be chelated with the hydroxyl, carboxyl and amine groups of the biomass. The effects of inlet metal concentration and flow rate on biosorption process were investigated and the experimental breakthrough curves were obtained. Results showed that the maximum biosorption capacity of Ca-pretreated C. indica for Mo (VI was found to be 18.32 mg/g at optimum flow rate of (1.4 mL/min. The controlled-rate step shifted from external to internal mass transfer limitations, as the flow rate increased. Also, it was observed that the breakthrough and exhaustion time decreased from 17.14 hr to 9.05 hr and from 0.006 h to 0.002 hr respectively, with the increase of flow rate from 0.7 to 2.1 ML/min. The increase in the initial concentration of Mo (VI solution from 30 to 95 ml min-1 increases the adsorption capacity from 18.32 to 30.19 mg/g and decreases the percentage of Mo (VI removal from 61 to 38%. Also, the treated volume was the greatest (1.42 L at the lowest inlet concentration. Column data obtained under different conditions were described using the Thomas, Yoon and Nelson, Yan and Belter models. The breakthrough curve predictions by Belter model were found to be very satisfactory.

  6. Study of Mo (VI removal from aqueous solution: application of different mathematical models to continuous biosorption data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kafshgari Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molybdenum (VI biosorption process was investigated by marine algae Cystoseria indica pretreated with 0.1 M CaCl2 solution in a packed bed column. The biosorbent was characterized by FTIR, BET and SEM analyses. The results showed that Mo (VI ions should be chelated with the hydroxyl, carboxyl and amine groups of the biomass. The effects of inlet metal concentration and flow rate on biosorption process were investigated and the experimental breakthrough curves were obtained. Results showed that the maximum biosorption capacity of Ca-pretreated C. indica for Mo (VI was found to be 18.32 mg/g at optimum flow rate of (1.4 mL/min. The controlled-rate step shifted from external to internal mass transfer limitations, as the flow rate increased. Also, it was observed that the breakthrough and exhaustion time decreased from 17.14 hr to 9.05 hr and from 0.006 h to 0.002 hr respectively, with the increase of flow rate from 0.7 to 2.1 ML/min. The increase in the initial concentration of Mo (VI solution from 30 to 95 ml min-1 increases the adsorption capacity from 18.32 to 30.19 mg/g and decreases the percentage of Mo (VI removal from 61 to 38%. Also, the treated volume was the greatest (1.42 L at the lowest inlet concentration. Column data obtained under different conditions were described using the Thomas, Yoon and Nelson, Yan and Belter models. The breakthrough curve predictions by Belter model were found to be very satisfactory.

  7. BIOSORPTION OF CR (VI BY RESTING CELLS OF ASPERGILLUS SP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sen , M. Ghosh Dastidar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption of Cr(VI from aqueous solution was studied in a batch bioreactor using the resting cells of filamentous fungal biomass (Aspergillus sp. isolated from industrial wastewaters. The specific Cr(VI removal (mg/g of dried biomass decreased with increase in pH and increased with increase in initial Cr(VI concentration, upto 500 mg/L. By increasing biomass concentration from 2.4 to 5.2 g/L, the specific metal removal remained almost constant. The studies carried out by using the resting cells from various stages of growth indicated maximum Cr(VI removal of 34.8 mg/g using the biomass from the beginning of the stationary phase. The adsorption equilibrium constants Qº (42.9 mg/g and b (0.0091/mg were obtained from the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model.

  8. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB - Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Costa, Ana M. Rosa da [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica do Algarve, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, DQF, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Matos, Antonio Pedro [Servico de Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Curry Cabral, Lisboa (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-12-15

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  9. Thermodynamical analysis of the fission product release in the ORNL VI-3 and VI-5 tests; Analyse thermodynamique du relachement des produits de fission dans les essais ORNL VI-3 et VI-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defoort, J.; Froment, K

    1998-06-01

    The thermodynamical equilibrium hypothesis has been applied to the tests ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) VI-3 and VI-5 (Vertical Induction heated), to study fission release products. Irradiated fuel samples were heated under oxidizing (VI-3) and reducing (VI-5) controlled atmosphere. They can be compared to the Vercors 4 and 5 tests. The thermodynamical calculus results of barium and ruthenium fission products release, agree in the lump with measures, whatever the gas phase nature. The strontium release calculus under reducing atmosphere, is largely upper than those measured and correctly evaluated under oxidizing atmosphere. These results confirm those obtained for Vercors 4 and 5 and show the interest of the select model. (A.L.B.)

  10. Adsorption Properties of Chromium (VI by Chitosan Coated Montmorillonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahe Fan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of chromium (VI by Chitosan Coated Montmorillonite (CCM from aqueous solution was studied. To evaluate the adsorption capacity, the effects of pH, initial concentration and temperature on the adsorption were investigated. The isothermal data was applied to Langmuir linear and the Freundlich linear isotherm equation and the thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔG, ΔS were calculated according to the values of binding Langmuir constant, KL. Results indicated that the adsorption between CCM and chromium (VI was significantly physical, the negative ΔH constant at lower temperature confirmed that the more chromium (VI was adsorbed by chitosan coated montmorillonite at lower temperature. The kinetics of the sorption process of chromium (VI on chitosan coated montmorillonite were investigated using the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetics, results showed that the pseudo-second order equation model provided the best correlation with the experimental results.

  11. ALTERATION OF U(VI)-PHASES UNDER OXIDIZING CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.P. Deditius; S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

    2006-02-21

    Uranium-(VI) phases are the primary alteration products of the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel and the UO{sub 2+x}, in natural uranium deposits. The U(VI)-phases generally form sheet structures of edge-sharing UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} polyhedra. The complexity of these structures offers numerous possibilities for coupled-substitutions of trace metals and radionuclides. The incorporation of radionuclides into U(VI)-structures provides a potential barrier to their release and transport in a geologic repository that experiences oxidizing conditions. In this study, we have used natural samples of UO{sub 2+x}, to study the U(VI)-phases that form during alteration and to determine the fate of the associated trace elements.

  12. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  13. Sorption of uranium(VI) onto schwertmannite - EXAFS investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In acid mine drainage conditions uranium(VI) adsorbs on goethite and schwertmannite, forming surface complexes with the ferric iron polyhedra and sulfate, respectively. The structure of these surface species was identified by EXAFS. (orig.)

  14. Polarography of uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system has been studied polarographically in perchloric acid medium. Varying concentrations of HClO4 and salicylic acid have been used. The nature of the polarographic waves is irreversible. (author)

  15. Melo carboniferous basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is about of the Melo carboniferous basin which limits are: in the South the large and high Tupambae hill, in the west the Paraiso hill and the river mountains, in the North Yaguaron river basin to Candidata in Rio Grande del Sur in Brazil.

  16. Quantum volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabov, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum systems in a mechanical embedding, the breathing mode of a small particles, optomechanical system, etc. are far not the full list of examples in which the volume exhibits quantum behavior. Traditional consideration suggests strain in small systems as a result of a collective movement of particles, rather than the dynamics of the volume as an independent variable. The aim of this work is to show that some problem here might be essentially simplified by introducing periodic boundary conditions. At this case, the volume is considered as the independent dynamical variable driven by the internal pressure. For this purpose, the concept of quantum volume based on Schrödinger’s equation in 𝕋3 manifold is proposed. It is used to explore several 1D model systems: An ensemble of free particles under external pressure, quantum manometer and a quantum breathing mode. In particular, the influence of the pressure of free particle on quantum oscillator is determined. It is shown also that correction to the spectrum of the breathing mode due to internal degrees of freedom is determined by the off-diagonal matrix elements of the quantum stress. The new treatment not using the “force” theorem is proposed for the quantum stress tensor. In the general case of flexible quantum 3D dynamics, quantum deformations of different type might be introduced similarly to monopole mode.

  17. Vi behøver innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.

    2007-01-01

    . Især hvad angår vores forbrugsmønstre. Her er der behov for at kongeriget Danmark med sine 13 ton CO2-emission pr. person om året lytter. I landet hvor kraftvarmeproduk­tion, vindturbiner og industrial ecology i form af Kalundborg eksperimentet blev født, bør vi ikke også ride på denne nye miljøbølge......? Den amerikanske videnskabsmand Jeremy Rifkin beskriver i sin seneste bog, The European Dream, hvordan europæisk energipolitik, -forskning, -udvikling og relateret industri kan hjælpe os til at bremse vores for øjeblikket eksponentielt stigende CO2-produktion - og hvordan vores globaliseringstankegang...... rent faktisk kan fremme denne indsats. Den eneste udfordring er, at nogen skal igangsætte en økonomisk/industriel revolution, for at drømmen går i opfyldelse. Hvem skal tage ansvar for at sætte denne revolution i gang, og hvordan skal den opnås? Rifkin's patentløsning er inspirerende. Den er kort...

  18. K Basin safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall

  19. K Basin safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  20. Biosorption of Chromium (VI) from Aqueous Solutions onto Fungal Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Acosta R.; Xöchitl Rodríguez; Conrado Gutiérrez; Ma. de Guadalupe Moctezuma

    2004-01-01

    The biosorption of chromium (VI) on eighteen different natural biosorbents: Natural sediment, chitosan, chitin, Aspergillus flavus I-V, Aspergillus fumigatus I-ll, Helmintosporium sp, Cladosporium sp, Mucor rouxii mutant, M. rouxii IM-80, Mucor sp-I and 2, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans was studied in this work. It was found that the biomass of C. neoformans, natural sediment, Helmintosporium sp and chitosan was more efficient to remove chromium (VI) (determined spectrophotometr...

  1. Plan of propagation and communication experiments using ETS-VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Shingo

    1988-01-01

    In 1992, an Engineering Test Satellite VI is scheduled to be launched by an H-II rocket. The missions of ETS-VI are to establish basic technologies of inter-satellite communications using millimeter waves and optical beams and fix satellite communications using multibeam antenna on board the satellite. Several kinds of frequency bands will be used for the communications missions. However, these frequencies can be used for propagation experiments.

  2. Green Chemical Synthesis of II-VI Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Shahid, Robina

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the science and technology of manipulating materials at atomic and molecular scale with properties different from bulk. Semiconductor QDs are important class of nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties owing to the quantum confinement effect. Size dependent optical properties make research on semiconductor QDs more attractive in the field of nanotechnology. Semiconductor QDs are usually composed of combination of elements from groups II–VI, III–V, or IV–VI ...

  3. Robotics Vision for a Scouting Rover - PRoViScout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paar, G.; Woods, M.; Pullan, D.; Proviscout Team

    2011-10-01

    The FP7-SPACE Project ProViScout (Planetary Robotics Vision Scout, scheduled from April 2010 to September 2012) aims to demonstrate the feasibility of vision-based autonomous sample identification & selection in combination with vision-based navigation for a long range scouting/exploration mission on a terrestrial planet along with the robotic elements required. The paper gives an overview of the PRoViScout technical and scientific objectives, envisaged solutions and achievements so far.

  4. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (Case Report) Brain MRI and MR Spectroscopy Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Fuldem Donmez

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI or Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder with multisystem involvement which is determined by mutations in the arylsulfatase B (ARSB) gene. Herein, we report the radiological findings of a case of Mucopolysaccharidosis VI which showed progression of periventricular lesions on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and slight elevation of myoinositole and no other significant pathological peak on magnetic resonance (MR) spectro...

  5. Morphology controlled synthesis of SnS₂ nanomaterial for promoting photocatalytic reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) under visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Chanchal; Ganguly, Mainak; Pal, Jaya; Roy, Anindita; Jana, Jayasmita; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-04-15

    A mild, template free protocol has been demonstrated for SnS2 nanoflake formation at the gram level from SnCl2 and thioacetamide (TAA). The SnS2 nanoflakes congregate to nanoflowers and nanoyarns with variable TAA concentrations. BET measurements reveal that the synthesized nanomaterials are highly porous having very high surface area, and the nanoflower has higher surface area than the nanoyarn. The synthesized nanomaterial finds application for promoting photoreduction of extremely toxic and lethal Cr(VI) under visible light irradiation due to their porous nature. The nanoflowers photocatalyst is proved to be superior to nanoyarn due to the increased surface area and higher pore volume. It was also inferred that increased pH decreased the reaction rate. The present result suggests that the morphology-dependent photoreduction of Cr(VI) by SnS2 nanomaterial under visible light exposure will endorse a new technique for harvesting energy and purification of wastewater. PMID:24649847

  6. Solid phase extraction and preconcentration of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) on Duolite XAD761 prior to their inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Funda Armagan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2007-04-15

    A simple and effective method is presented for the separation and preconcentration of thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) by solid phase extraction on Duolite XAD761 adsorption resin. Thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) 9-phenyl-3-fluorone chelates are formed and adsorbed onto the Duolite XAD761. Thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) are quantitatively eluted with 2molL(-1) HCl and determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The influences of analytical parameters including pH, amount of reagents, amount of Duolite XAD761 and sample volume, etc. were investigated on the recovery of analyte ions. The interference of a large number of anions and cations has been studied and the optimized conditions developed have been utilized for the trace determination of uranium and thorium. A preconcentration factor of 30 for uranium and thorium was achieved. The relative standard deviation (N=10) was 2.3% for uranium and 4.5% for thorium ions for 10 replicate determinations in the solution containing 0.5mug of uranium and thorium. The three sigma detection limits (N=15) for thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) ions were found to be 4.5 and 6.3ngL(-1), respectively. The developed solid phase extraction method was successively utilized for the determination of traces thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) in environmental samples by ICP-MS. PMID:19071600

  7. Vi har intet lært - hvornår lærer vi det?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    2016-01-01

    WHO anså fra i går ikke længere ebola for at være en trussel mod global folkesundhed, så fra i dag er kameraerne slukket i Vestafrika og vi er tilbage hvor vi startede. SDG målene skal have et dansk udtryk, men hvad er de danske kompetencer på globalt plan når sundhed ikke længere er en kerneakti......WHO anså fra i går ikke længere ebola for at være en trussel mod global folkesundhed, så fra i dag er kameraerne slukket i Vestafrika og vi er tilbage hvor vi startede. SDG målene skal have et dansk udtryk, men hvad er de danske kompetencer på globalt plan når sundhed ikke længere er en...

  8. Modeling Fluid Flow in Faulted Basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faille I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a basin simulator designed to better take faults into account, either as conduits or as barriers to fluid flow. It computes hydrocarbon generation, fluid flow and heat transfer on the 4D (space and time geometry obtained by 3D volume restoration. Contrary to classical basin simulators, this calculator does not require a structured mesh based on vertical pillars nor a multi-block structure associated to the fault network. The mesh follows the sediments during the evolution of the basin. It deforms continuously with respect to time to account for sedimentation, erosion, compaction and kinematic displacements. The simulation domain is structured in layers, in order to handle properly the corresponding heterogeneities and to follow the sedimentation processes (thickening of the layers. In each layer, the mesh is unstructured: it may include several types of cells such as tetrahedra, hexahedra, pyramid, prism, etc. However, a mesh composed mainly of hexahedra is preferred as they are well suited to the layered structure of the basin. Faults are handled as internal boundaries across which the mesh is non-matching. Different models are proposed for fault behavior such as impervious fault, flow across fault or conductive fault. The calculator is based on a cell centered Finite Volume discretisation, which ensures conservation of physical quantities (mass of fluid, heat at a discrete level and which accounts properly for heterogeneities. The numerical scheme handles the non matching meshes and guaranties appropriate connection of cells across faults. Results on a synthetic basin demonstrate the capabilities of this new simulator.

  9. Modeling fluid flow in faulted basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a basin simulator designed to better take faults into account, either as conduits or as barriers to fluid flow. It computes hydrocarbon generation, fluid flow and heat transfer on the 4D (space and time) geometry obtained by 3D volume restoration. Contrary to classical basin simulators, this calculator does not require a structured mesh based on vertical pillars nor a multi-block structure associated to the fault network. The mesh follows the sediments during the evolution of the basin. It deforms continuously with respect to time to account for sedimentation, erosion, compaction and kinematic displacements. The simulation domain is structured in layers, in order to handle properly the corresponding heterogeneities and to follow the sedimentation processes (thickening of the layers). In each layer, the mesh is unstructured: it may include several types of cells such as tetrahedra, hexahedra, pyramid, prism, etc. However, a mesh composed mainly of hexahedra is preferred as they are well suited to the layered structure of the basin. Faults are handled as internal boundaries across which the mesh is non-matching. Different models are proposed for fault behavior such as impervious fault, flow across fault or conductive fault. The calculator is based on a cell centered Finite Volume discretization, which ensures conservation of physical quantities (mass of fluid, heat) at a discrete level and which accounts properly for heterogeneities. The numerical scheme handles the non matching meshes and guaranties appropriate connection of cells across faults. Results on a synthetic basin demonstrate the capabilities of this new simulator. (authors)

  10. Advanced Workflows for Fluid Transfer in Faulted Basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaut Muriel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The traditional 3D basin modeling workflow is made of the following steps: construction of present day basin architecture, reconstruction of the structural evolution through time, together with fluid flow simulation and heat transfers. In this case, the forward simulation is limited to basin architecture, mainly controlled by erosion, sedimentation and vertical compaction. The tectonic deformation is limited to vertical slip along faults. Fault properties are modeled as vertical shear zones along which rock permeability is adjusted to enhance fluid flow or prevent flow to escape. For basins having experienced a more complex tectonic history, this approach is over-simplified. It fails in understanding and representing fluid flow paths due to structural evolution of the basin. This impacts overpressure build-up, and petroleum resources location. Over the past years, a new 3D basin forward code has been developed in IFP Energies nouvelles that is based on a cell centered finite volume discretization which preserves mass on an unstructured grid and describes the various changes in geometry and topology of a basin through time. At the same time, 3D restoration tools based on geomechanical principles of strain minimization were made available that offer a structural scenario at a discrete number of deformation stages of the basin. In this paper, we present workflows integrating these different innovative tools on complex faulted basin architectures where complex means moderate lateral as well as vertical deformation coupled with dynamic fault property modeling. Two synthetic case studies inspired by real basins have been used to illustrate how to apply the workflow, where the difficulties in the workflows are, and what the added value is compared with previous basin modeling approaches.

  11. Organophosphinic, phosphonic acids and their binary mixtures as extractants for molybdenum(VI) and uranium(VI) from aqueous HCl media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction studies of uranium(VI) and molybdenum(VI) with organophosphoric, phosphinic acid and its thiosubstituted derivatives have been carried out from 0.1-1.0M HCl solutions. The extracted species are proposed to be UO2R2 and MoO2CIR on the basis of slope analysis for uranium(VI) and molybdenum(VI), respectively. The extraction efficiencies of PC-88A, Cyanex 272, Cyanex 301 and Cyanex 302 in the extraction of molybdenum(VI) and uranium(VI) are compared. Synergistic effects have been studied with binary mixtures of extractants. Separation of molybdenum(VI) from uranium(VI) is feasible by Cyanex 301 from 1M HCl, the separation factor logβ being 2.3. (author) 20 refs.; 5 figs.; 14 tabs

  12. Diverse anaerobic Cr(VI) tolerant bacteria from Cr(VI)-contaminated 100H site at Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, R.; Phan, R.; Lam, S.; Leung, C.; Brodie, E. L.; Hazen, T. C.

    2007-12-01

    Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] is a widespread contaminant found in soil, sediment, and ground water. Cr(VI) is more soluble, toxic, carcinogenic, and mutagenic compared to its reduced form Cr(III). In order to stimulate microbially mediated reduction of Cr(VI), a poly-lactate compound HRC was injected into the chromium contaminated aquifers at site 100H at Hanford. Based on the results of the bacterial community composition using high-density DNA microarray analysis of 16S rRNA gene products, we recently investigated the diversity of the dominant anaerobic culturable microbial population present at this site and their role in Cr(VI) reduction. Positive enrichments set up at 30°C using specific defined anaerobic media resulted in the isolation of an iron reducing isolate strain HAF, a sulfate reducing isolate strain HBLS and a nitrate reducing isolate, strain HLN among several others. Preliminary 16S rDNA sequence analysis identifies strain HAF as Geobacter metallireducens, strain HLN as Pseudomonas stutzeri and strain HBLS as a member of Desulfovibrio species. Strain HAF isolated with acetate as the electron donor utilized propionate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced metals like Mn(IV) and Cr(VI). Growth was optimal at 37°C, pH of 6.5 and 0% salinity. Strain HLN isolated with lactate as electron donor utilized acetate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced metals like Mn(IV) and Cr(VI). Optimal growth was observed at 37°C, at a pH of 7.5 and 0.3% salinity. Anaerobic active washed cell suspension of strain HLN reduced almost 95 micromolar Cr(VI) within 4 hours relative to controls. Further, with 100 micromolar Cr(VI) as the sole electron acceptor, cells of strain HLN grew to cell numbers of 4.05X 107/ml over a period of 24hrs after an initial lag, demonstrating direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction by this species. 10mM lactate served as the sole electron donor. These results demonstrate that Cr(VI

  13. Annual reviews of computational physics VI

    CERN Document Server

    Stauffer, Dietrich

    1999-01-01

    The sixth volume of the series covers topics ranging from the generation of good random numbers to statistical physics, quantum mechanics, quantum computers and polymers, to protein folding and immunology simulations. It should thus be of interest not only to computational physicists but also to experts in computer science as well as theoretical biology.

  14. Wada basin boundaries and basin cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nusse, H.E.; Yorke, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    In dynamical systems examples are common in which two or more attractors coexist, and in such cases the basin boundary is nonempty. We consider a two-dimensional diffeomorphism F (that is, F is an invertible map and both F and its inverse are differentiable with continuous derivatives), which has at

  15. Síntese eletroquímica do ion ferrato(VI) Eletrochemical synthesis of iron(VI) ferrate

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Augusta de Luca; Sérgio João de Luca; Maria Alice Santana

    2003-01-01

    The optimization of ferrate(VI) ion generation has been studied due to its favorable characteristics for application in several fields, including environmental quality control. The paper presents the best conditions for electrolytic generation of ferrate(VI) in alkaline media. An appropriate electrolyte was NaOH, 10 mol/L. Circulation of the electrolyte solution was important to avoid acidification close to the anode surface. An anode pre-cleaning with 10% HCl was more efficient than a cathod...

  16. Reserves in western basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, R.H.; Cotton, B.W. [Scotia Group, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the reserves potential of tight gas reservoirs in three Rocky Mountain basins: the Greater Green River (GGRB), Uinta and Piceance basins. The basins contain vast gas resources that have been estimated in the thousands of Tcf hosted in low permeability clastic reservoirs. This study documents the productive characteristics of these tight reservoirs, requantifies gas in place resources, and characterizes the reserves potential of each basin. The purpose of this work is to promote understanding of the resource and to encourage its exploitation by private industry. At this point in time, the GGRB work has been completed and a final report published. Work is well underway in the Uinta and Piceance basins which are being handled concurrently, with reports on these basins being scheduled for the middle of this year. Since the GGRB portion of the project has been completed, this presentation win focus upon that basin. A key conclusion of this study was the subdivision of the resource, based upon economic and technological considerations, into groupings that have distinct properties with regard to potential for future producibility, economics and risk profile.

  17. Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Red Sea Basin Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of 5 billion barrels of undiscovered technically recoverable oil and 112 trillion cubic feet of recoverable gas in the Red Sea Basin Province using a geology-based assessment methodology.

  18. Lower Arkansas River basin high priority issue : Rattlesnake creek subbasin : January 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a section from Volume III: Kansas River Basins, of the Kansas Water Plan, January 2009. This section is pertaining to Rattlesnake Creek subbasin,...

  19. Magnetic chitosan for removal of uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chitosan, an aminopolysaccharide formed for repeated units of D-glucosamine, is a deacetylation product of chitin. It presents favorable ionic properties acting as chelant, being considered a removing ionic of contaminants from water effluents. It has ample bioactivity, that is, is biocompatible, biodegradable, bioadhesive and biosorbent. The chitosan interacts for crosslinked by means of its active groups with other substances, can still coat superparamagnetic materials as magnetite nanoparticles producing one conjugated polymer-magnetite. Superparamagnetic materials are susceptible for the magnetic field, thus these particles can be attracted and grouped by a magnetic field and as they do not hold back the magnetization, they can be disagrouped and reused in processes for removal of contaminants from industrial effluents and waste water. The present work consisted of preparing coated magnetic magnetite particles with chitosan (PMQ). The PMQ powder has showed a magnetic response of intense attraction in the presence of a magnetic field without however becoming magnetic, a typical behavior of superparamagnetic material. It was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and measurements of magnetization. Its performance of Uranium (VI) adsorption as uranyl species, U022+, was evaluated with regard to the influence of adsorbent dose, speed of agitation, pH, the contact time and had studied the isotherms of adsorption as well as the behavior of desorption using ions of carbonate and oxalate. The optimal pH to the best removal occurred in pH 5 and that the increase of the dose increases the removal, becoming constant above of 20 g.L-1. In the kinetic study the equilibrium was achieved after 20 minutes. The results of equilibrium isotherm agreed well with the Langmuir model, being the maximum adsorption capacity equal 41.7 mg.g-1. In the desorption studies were verified 94% of U022+ recovered with carbonate ion and 49.9% with oxalate ion. (author)

  20. Thickness of Proximal Ejecta from the Orientale Basin from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Data: Implications for Multi-Ring Basin Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, Caleb I.a; Head, James W.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying the ejecta distribution around large lunar basins is important to understanding the origin of basin rings, the volume of the transient cavity, the depth of sampling, and the nature of the basin formation processes. We have used newly obtained altimetry data of the Moon from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument to estimate the thickness of ejecta in the region surrounding the Orientale impact basin, the youngest and best preserved large basin on the Moon. Our measurements yield ejecta thicknesses of approx.2900 m near the Cordillera Mountains, the topographic rim of Orientale, decaying to approx.1 km in thickness at a range of 215 km. These measurements imply a volume of ejecta in the region from the Cordillera ring to a radial range of one basin diameter of approx.2.9 x 10(exp 6)cu km and permit the derivation of an ejecta-thickness decay model, which can be compared with estimates for the volume of excavation and the size of the transient cavity. These data are consistent with the Outer Rook Mountains as the approximate location of the transient cavity s rim crest and suggest a volume of approx.4.8 x 10(exp 6)cu km for the total amount of basin ejecta exterior to this location.

  1. Basin Hopping Graph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucharik, Marcel; Hofacker, Ivo; Stadler, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    folding free energy landscape, however, can provide the relevant information. Results We introduce the basin hopping graph (BHG) as a novel coarse-grained model of folding landscapes. Each vertex of the BHG is a local minimum, which represents the corresponding basin in the landscape. Its edges connect...... basins when the direct transitions between them are “energetically favorable”. Edge weights endcode the corresponding saddle heights and thus measure the difficulties of these favorable transitions. BHGs can be approximated accurately and efficiently for RNA molecules well beyond the length range...

  2. Molecular evolution of type VI intermediate filament proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Michel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tanabin, transitin and nestin are type VI intermediate filament (IF proteins that are developmentally regulated in frogs, birds and mammals, respectively. Tanabin is expressed in the growth cones of embryonic vertebrate neurons, whereas transitin and nestin are found in myogenic and neurogenic cells. Another type VI IF protein, synemin, is expressed in undifferentiated and mature muscle cells of birds and mammals. In addition to an IF-typical α-helical core domain, type VI IF proteins are characterized by a long C-terminal tail often containing distinct repeated motifs. The molecular evolution of type VI IF proteins remains poorly studied. Results To examine the evolutionary history of type VI IF proteins, sequence comparisons, BLAST searches, synteny studies and phylogenic analyses were performed. This study provides new evidence that tanabin, transitin and nestin are indeed orthologous type VI IF proteins. It demonstrates that tanabin, transitin and nestin genes share intron positions and sequence identities, have a similar chromosomal context and display closely related positions in phylogenic analyses. Despite this homology, fast evolution rates of their C-terminal extremity have caused the appearance of repeated motifs with distinct biological activities. In particular, our in silico and in vitro analyses of their tail domain have shown that (avian transitin, but not (mammalian nestin, contains a repeat domain displaying nucleotide hydrolysis activity. Conclusion These analyses of the evolutionary history of the IF proteins fit with a model in which type VI IFs form a branch distinct from NF proteins and are composed of two major proteins: synemin and nestin orthologs. Rapid evolution of the C-terminal extremity of nestin orthologs could be responsible for their divergent functions.

  3. Thermal stabilization of chromium(VI) in kaolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Ling; Chiu, Shu-Yuan; Tsai, Hsien-Neng; Yang, Yaw-Wen; Lee, Jyh-Fu

    2002-11-01

    Reduction of Cr(VI) by heating may be a useful detoxification mechanism for thermal immobilization. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, the change of speciation of chromium in 105 degrees C dried 3.7% Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin further heated at 500, 900, or 1100 degrees C was studied. The 105 degrees C dried 3.7% Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin sample was prepared by mixing 1.5 L of 0.257 M CrO3 solution (pH 0.71) with 0.5 kg of kaolin powder for 48 h, and then the slurry was heated (dried) at 105 degrees C until a constant weight was reached. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure method was used to determine the percentage of leached chromium from all heated samples. In all 500-900 degrees C heated Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin samples, Cr2O3 transformed from the hydrated Cr(VI) by a 4-h heat application was identified by the X-ray absorption near edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy as the key species that is leaching-resistant due to its low solubility. For the 1100 degrees C heated Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin sample, the Fourier transform of its EXAFS spectrum indicates that the intensity of the peaks at 2.45 (Cr-Cr shell of Cr2O3) and 5.00 A (Cr-Cr and Cr-O shells of Cr2O3) without phase shift correction is either relatively smaller or disappearing, compared with that of the 500-900 degrees C heated Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin samples. It is suggested that chromium octahedra were bridged to silica tetrahedra and incorporated in minerals formed at 1100 degrees C, such as mullite or sillimanite, since these phases were detected by XRD. Cr of this form is not easily leached. PMID:12433175

  4. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science VI

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Bandrauk, André D

    2010-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This sixth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on responses of molecules to ultrashort intense laser pulses, generation and characterization of attosecond pulses and high-order harmonics, and filamentation and laser-plasma interaction.

  5. Early Mesozoic basin aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Early Mesozoic basin aquifers in the states of Massachusettes, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland,...

  6. Mitigation : Closed Basin Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The upcoming meeting on waterfowl mitigation for the Closed Basin Project will have several people talk about possible changes to the waterfowl mitigation program....

  7. Tulare Basin protection plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Tulare Basin Protection Plan has been initiated by The Nature Conservancy to elucidate the problems and opportunities of natural diversity protection....

  8. California Air Basins

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Air ResourcesCalifornia Air Resources BoardThe following datasets are from the California Air Resources Board: * arb_california_airbasins - California Air BasinsThe...

  9. New generation ion-imprinted nanocarrier for removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uygun, Murat, E-mail: muygun@adu.edu.tr [Adnan Menderes University, Kocarl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I Vocational and Training School (Turkey); Feyzioglu, Esra; Oezcal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Emir; Caka, Mueserref; Ergen, Aygen; Akgoel, Sinan [Ege University, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey)

    2013-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel ion-imprinted nanoparticle to remove Cr(VI) ions from waste water. For this, Cr(VI) ions were complexed with 2-methacryloylamido histidine (MAH) and then Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization technique. The templates, Cr(VI) ions, were removed from the nanoparticles using 0.1 M of HNO{sub 3} solution. The specific surface area of the Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles was found to be 1,397.85 m{sup 2}/g, and the particle size was calculated as 155.3 nm. These Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used for the adsorption/desorption of Cr(VI) ions from its aqueous solutions. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration and medium pH on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity were also studied. The maximum adsorbed amount of Cr(VI) on the imprinted nanoparticles was found to be 3,830.58 mg/g nanoparticle in pH 4.0. In order to investigate the selectivity of the imprinted nanoparticle, adsorption studies were repeated using Cr(III) ions. The selectivity results demonstrated that Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles showed high affinity for the Cr(VI) ions than Cr(III). The Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used several times without decreasing their Cr(VI) adsorption capacities.

  10. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report

  11. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062/Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report

  12. The Ebro river basin

    OpenAIRE

    Darbra Roman, Rosa Maria

    2011-01-01

    River basins worldwide are under pressure from economic activities. In Europe, the two main factors hindering the achievement of good chemical and ecological status of European river basins are pollution, mainly coming from agriculture, and hydromorphology (e.g. for navigation, hydroelectricity and flood control). The economic activities affect the chemical and ecological status of rivers, lakes and groundwater and deplete available soil, sediments and water resources. The w...

  13. Treatment of combined sewer overflows using ferrate (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Rohan; Ray, Ajay K; Sharma, Virender K; Nakhla, George

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a study conducted on the treatment of combined sewer overflows using ferrate (VI) [Fe (VI)]. At a Fe (VI) dose of 0.24 mg/L, total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD), soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), total biochemical oxygen demand (TBOD5), soluble biochemical oxygen demand (SBOD5), total suspended solids (TSS), volatile suspended solids (VSS), total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), and soluble TN removal efficiencies of 71, 75, 69, 68, 72, 83, 64, 38, and 36%, respectively, were achieved. Kinetic studies revealed that a contact time of only 15 minutes is sufficient to achieve secondary effluent criteria. An innovative technique of using primary sludge (PS) and thickened waste activated sludge as a source for the in situ synthesis of ferrate was developed. A comparative study of treatment efficiencies achieved by Fe (VI) generated from different sources was done. At 0.1 mg/L dose of Fe (VI) synthesized from PS, TCOD, SCOD, TSS, VSS, TP, and TN removal efficiencies of 60, 62, 63, 67, 30, and 25%, respectively, were achieved. PMID:25509525

  14. ADHD : einkenni og viðbrögð

    OpenAIRE

    Ásdís Emilía Gunnlaugsdóttir; Katla Guðlaugsdóttir

    2009-01-01

    Í þessari ritgerð fjöllum við um helstu einkenni ADHD, algengar fylgiraskanir, greiningu, meðferð og hvernig ADHD hefur áhrif á allt fjölskyldulífið. Við teljum að þörf sé á að auka þekkingu á einkennum ADHD til að hægt sé að mæta þörfum þessara barna á viðeigandi hátt. Með aukinni þekkingu minnka fordómar og skilningur eykst. Við vonum að þessi ritgerð sé gott innlegg í fræðslu um ADHD, sem grunnupplýsingar um helstu einkenni barna með ADHD og einnig fjöllum við um meðferðarleiðir og ráð sem...

  15. Subsurface structure and the stress state of Utopia basin, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searls, Mindi Lea

    Topography and gravity data from recent Mars' space missions are used to analyze the subsurface structure of the Utopia basin, focusing on the volume and density of fill that causes the shallowness of the basin. Using the assumption that the initial isostatic state of Utopia was similar to that of the Hellas basin allows for construction of a thin-shell elastic model of Utopia that facilitates investigation of its interior configuration. A system of equations was developed that allows a solution for the original basin shape, the amount of fill within Utopia basin, the amount of flexure due to the fill material, the total vertical load and the horizontal load potential. The presence of apparently ancient impact craters within the Utopia basin indicates that the majority of the material within Utopia was deposited early in Mars' history when the elastic lithosphere of Mars was (presumably) relatively thin (shell model also allows us to calculate the stress field due to the flexure/membrane strains. The stress results indicate that the radial tectonic features seen in the Utopia region are not due solely to deformation of the elastic lithosphere. However, a more rigorous finite element analysis of the basin mechanics predicts a zone of observed radial faults for large elastic thicknesses. This model also predicts a region of strike-slip faulting just outside of the basin where concentric reverse faults are located. The inclusion of global compressional stresses due to the Tharsis load, global cooling, and/ or global climate changes could effectively increase the zone of predicted radial faults within the basin as well as shift the faulting style outside of the basin from strike-slip to the observed concentric faults.

  16. Organomolybdenum (VI) and lithium Organomolybdate (VI) and (V) Complexes with C,N-Chelating Aminoaryl Ligands

    OpenAIRE

    van Koten, G.; Brandts, J.A.M.; Leur, M. de; Gossage, R. A.; Spek, A.L.

    1999-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of new, five-coordinate molybdenum bis(imidoaryl) complexes [Mo(NAr)2(C-N)X] (Ar = C6H3i-Pr2-2,6; C-N = [C6H4(CH2NMe2)-2]-; X = Cl (1), Me (2), Et (3), Bu (4), CH2SiMe3 (5), (p-tolyl) (6), (C-N) (7)) is reported. The solid-state structure of 2 has been elucidated by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Compounds 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 react with alkyl- or aryllithium compounds to form lithium molybdate(VI) derivatives, of which [Li(DME)Mo(NAr)2(C-N)(Me)(p-tolyl)] (10),...

  17. Information on Measurement Studies Investigated in the Production of Technical Volume 4. Annex VI of Technical Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal dose assessment surveys were undertaken by Fukushima Prefecture, in cooperation with the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). NIRS carried out an internal exposure survey on Fukushima Prefectural residents [VI–1]. Initial measurements were taken between 27 June and 16 July 2011. The survey focused on residents who lived in areas associated with high doses and measured the amount of radionuclides within the whole body, including the thyroid and in urine samples. A total of 122 participants — 90 residents from Namie Town, 20 residents from Iitate Village, and 12 residents from Kawamata Town — were initially enrolled in the survey, and 109 subjects were surveyed in follow-up examinations. Wholebody counters (WBCs) were used to detect activity from 134Cs and 137Cs. Urine bioassays were used to determine a cut-off value for the WBC measurements. Minimum detectable activities (MDA) of 137Cs and 134Cs in three minute measurements in a bed geometry were 570 Bq and 320 Bq, respectively

  18. Millennial-scale variability of the George VI Sound Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, S.; Bentley, M.; Hodgson, D.; Bryant, C.; Carmicheal, E.; Noon, P.; Smith, J.; Sugden, D.; Verleyen, E.

    2003-04-01

    This project provides a Late Quaternary perspective of Antarctic ice shelf variability by examining sediment records from epishelf lakes dammed on the eastern side of Alexander Island by George VI Ice Shelf. In recent decades, vast areas of ice shelves on the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula have fragmented in a series of large break-up events, while others have disintegrated progressively. The global significance of current ice shelf loss is difficult to judge as similar variations may be a feature of the last 10,000 years. George VI Ice Shelf is currently close to the limit for ice shelf stability; hence, a two-season sediment-coring programme was undertaken to establish its palaeo-stability record. Recent results are presented from two principal study sites, Moutonnée and Ablation, with preliminary data from Cannonball and Citadel Bastion. These lakes are almost unique in Antarctica because they possess a continuous palaeolacustrine record of ice shelf history that can be linked to a geomorphological record of ice shelf variability. Most significant thus far, is the discovery of benthic foram-rich zones in the Moutonnée basin cores, representing at least one occasion when the ice shelf withdrew and open marine conditions existed in the sound. To determine when this occurred, mono-specific radiocarbon ages and oxygen and carbon isotope data are being obtained from forams, algal mat material and sediments. Physical, chemical and isotope analysis of cores reveals cyclic patterns that potentially match sections of ice core records.

  19. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Rates of U(VI) release from individual dry-sieved size fractions of a field-aggregated, field-contaminated composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. The principal source of variability in equilibrium U(VI) adsorption properties of the various size fractions was the impact of variable chemistry on adsorption. This source of variability was represented using surface complexation models (SCMs) with different stoichiometric coefficients with respect to hydrogen ion and carbonate concentrations for the different size fractions. A reactive transport model incorporating equilibrium expressions for cation exchange and calcite dissolution, along with rate expressions for aerobic respiration and silica dissolution, described the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through reactor experiments. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multirate SCM with an assumed lognormal distribution for the mass-transfer rate coefficients. The estimated mean and standard deviation of the rate coefficients were the same for all <2 mm size fractions but differed for the 2–8 mm size fraction. Micropore volumes, assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data, were also the same for all dry-sieved <2 mm size fractions, indicating a link between micropore volumes and mass-transfer rate properties. Pore volumes for dry-sieved size fractions exceeded values for the corresponding wet-sieved fractions. We hypothesize that repeated field wetting and drying cycles lead to the formation of aggregates and/or coatings containing (micro)pore networks which provided an additional mass-transfer resistance over that associated with individual particles. The 2–8 mm fraction exhibited a larger average and standard deviation in the distribution of mass-transfer rate coefficients, possibly caused by the abundance of

  20. Oil and gas resources in the West Siberian Basin, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The primary objective of this study is to assess the oil and gas potential of the West Siberian Basin of Russia. The study does not analyze the costs or technology necessary to achieve the estimates of the ultimate recoverable oil and gas. This study uses reservoir data to estimate recoverable oil and gas quantities which were aggregated to the field level. Field totals were summed to a basin total for discovered fields. An estimate of undiscovered oil and gas, from work of the US Geological Survey (USGS), was added to give a total basin resource volume. Recent production decline points out Russia`s need to continue development of its discovered recoverable oil and gas. Continued exploration is required to discover additional oil and gas that remains undiscovered in the basin.

  1. Tectonic subsidence history and thermal evolution of the Orange Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, K.K.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Wees, J.-D. van; Kuhlmann, G.; Paton, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    The Orange Basin offshore southwest Africa appears to represent a classical example of continental rifting and break up associated with large-scale, transient volcanism. The presence of lower crustal bodies of high seismic velocities indicates that large volumes of igneous crust formed as a conseque

  2. Preparation and characterization of surface imprinted polymer for selective sorption of uranium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new surface ion-imprinted polymer for the selective sorption of U(VI) from aqueous solution was prepared by copolymerization of a binary complex of U(VI) with methacrylic acid. The adsorption behavior of U(VI) onto the imprinted polymer was investigated by batch experiments and the results demonstrated that the maximum adsorption capacity of U(VI)-imprinted and non-imprinted polymers was found to be 35.92 and 22.58 mg g-1, respectively. The selectivity study revealed that the U(VI)-imprinted polymer exhibited excellent selectivity and affinity toward U(VI) in the presence of competitive metal ions. (author)

  3. Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Stolz

    2011-06-15

    A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory

  4. Solid phase extraction of uranium(VI) on phosphorus-containing polymer grafted 4-aminoantipyrine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphorus-containing polymer grafted 4-aminoantipyrine has been synthesized and used for solid phase extraction of U(VI) prior to its UV-Visible spectrophotometric determination by using arsenazo(III). The adsorbent was characterized by using FT-IR and SEM analysis. The influence of parameters including pH, adsorbent dose, amount of complexing reagent, sample volume and matrix effect have been optimized. The detection limit was determined as 1.4 μg L-1 with preconcentration factor of 30 and RSD of 1.4 %. The accuracy was checked by the analysis of GBW07424 soil and TMDA-64.2 environmental water certified reference materials. The method was applied to natural water and soil samples. (author)

  5. SOME ASPECTS OF HYDROLOGICAL RISK MANIFESTATION IN JIJIA BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. BURUIANĂ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Jijia river basin surface geographically fits in Moldavian Plateau, Plain of Moldavia subunit. Being lowered by 200 to 300 m compared to adjacent subunits, it appears as a depression with altitudes between 270-300 m.Through its position in the extra-Carpathian region, away from the influence of oceanic air masses, but wide open to the action of air masses of eastern, north-eastern and northern continental origin, Jijia basin receives precipitations which vary according to the average altitude differing from the northern to the southern part of the basin (564 mm in north, 529.4 mm in Iasi. A characteristic phenomenon to the climate is represented by the torrential rains in the hot season, under the form of rain showers with great intensity, fact that influences the drainage of basin rivers. Jijia hydrographic basin is characterized by frequent and sharp variations of flow volumes and levels which lead to floods and flooding throughout the basin. The high waters generally occur between March and June, when approximately 70% of the annual stock is transported. The paper analyzes the main causes and consequences of flooding in the studied area, also identifying some structural and non-structural measures of flood protection applied by authorities in Jijia hydrographic basin. As a case study, the flood recorded in Dorohoi in June 28-29, 2010 is presented.

  6. Novel metal containing polymers: characterization, radiation chemistry, and evaluation of utility for electron lithography. [Polymeric dicarboxylato-dioxouranium (VI) species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardiman, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Polymeric dicarboxylato-dioxouranium(VI) species have been synthesized by two different methods. An equilibrium controlled solution relation has been devised where bis(acetato)dioxouranium(VI) undergoes an acid interchange reaction with a simple dicarboxylic acid. The materials synthesized in this manner have been characterized by several methods. An end group analysis is possible by high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance detection of the acetate reactant fragment. The concentration of acetate relative to bridging ligand can be used to calculate number average molecular weights. The gel permeation chromatographic method has been calibrated with poly((3,3-dimethylpentanedioato)(dimethylsulfoxide)dioxouranium(VI)) and gives a simple relation of molecular weight versus milliliters of retention volume. Inclusion of the respective intrinsic viscosities and a comparison to the universal calibration curve, based on polystyrene, shows no significant difference. The net radiation chemistry of the polymeric materials has been evaluated with gel permeation chromatography. Solid samples were irradiated with TXCs gamma radiation and the change in molecular weight with dose determined. These studies indicate that many of the uranium containing polymers possess unusually high sensitivities to radiation.

  7. Solid phase extraction of chromium(VI) using Aliquat336 immobilized on a thin film of multiwall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a novel and selective method for the preconcentration and determination of Cr(VI) in aqueous samples. Cr(VI) is adsorbed - in a 'batch mode' - on multiwalled carbon nanotubes covered with Aliquat 336 and then determined directly, i.e., on the solid, by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. This reduces the number of reagents and minimizes sample handling. The method combines the advantages of solid-phase extraction with the benefits of the XRF method in that the large areas required by the carbon nanotubes make them a promising solid sorbent for preconcentration. The enrichment factor was calculated after considering that the thin film obtained from the 10 mL solution of 1 mg L-1 of Cr(VI) has a real thickness of 0.04 mm and a final diameter of 16.7 mm, so that the volume deposited on the pellet is 0.0088 cm3 and the preconcentration factor is 1000. (author)

  8. Adsorption thermodynamic and desorption studies of U(VI) on modified silica gel (SiAPMS-HL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the adsorption process was examined by various isotherm models Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich and equilibrium data were successfully described by Langmuir model. Adsorption thermodynamics of uranium (VI) on modified silica gel (SiAPMS-HL) has been studied within a temperature range from 293 to 333 K and the thermodynamic parameters, such as equilibrium constant (KD), standard free energy changes (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°), have been obtained. The desorption studies were conducted in batch system to investigate the kind, concentration and volume of the eluent. (author)

  9. John Prados, La guerre du Viêt-nam

    OpenAIRE

    Cadeau, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Si les écrits ayant pour objet la guerre d’Indochine sont abondants, les ouvrages de référence relatifs à la guerre américaine du Viêt-nam se révèlent plutôt rares dans l’historiographie française. La récente parution du livre de John Prados, La guerre du Viêt-nam, vient combler cette lacune. Cette publication, qui aurait pu aussi bien s’appeler Histoire politique de la guerre du Viêt-nam tant elle se focalise sur une approche analytique des événements politiques au détriment de l’étude des o...

  10. Benchmark analysis of MCNP trademark ENDF/B-VI iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MCNP ENDF/B-VI iron cross-section data was subjected to four benchmark studies as part of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki dose re-evaluation for the National Academy of Science and the Defense Nuclear Agency. The four benchmark studies were: (1) the iron sphere benchmarks from the Lawrence Livermore Pulsed Spheres; (2) the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fusion Reactor Shielding Benchmark; (3) a 76-cm diameter iron sphere benchmark done at the University of Illinois; (4) the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Benchmark for Neutron Transport through Iron. MCNP4A was used to model each benchmark and computational results from the ENDF/B-VI iron evaluations were compared to ENDF/B-IV, ENDF/B-V, the MCNP Recommended Data Set (which includes Los Alamos National Laboratory Group T-2 evaluations), and experimental data. The results show that the ENDF/B-VI iron evaluations are as good as, or better than, previous data sets

  11. The solvent extraction of Am(VI) using centrifugal contactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An engineering-scale centrifugal contactor test bed was built at Idaho National Laboratory to perform solvent extraction testing for the partitioning of hexavalent americium. The raffinate simulant feed was spiked with 243Am and 139Ce and treated with sodium bismuthate to oxidize americium to Am(VI), filtered and contacted with 1 M DAAP/dodecane using centrifugal contactors. Extraction efficiency comparable to batch contacts was obtained, indicating for the first time that Am(VI) can be maintained under process conditions. Contrary to expectations, stripping was not as effective as expected. However, this result may actually be advantageous to process design, since a scrub step, previously thought to be impossible due to rapid Am(VI) reduction, may now be considered for future flowsheet tests. (author)

  12. Manifestações radiológicas da mucopolissacaridose tipo VI Radiological findings in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Montenegro Turtelli

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available O autor relata as alterações radiológicas da mucopolissacaridose tipo VI (mucopolissacárides VI observadas em dois irmãos. Foram realizadas radiografias convencionais do esqueleto e estudo por ressonância magnética do sistema nervoso central. As alterações osteoarticulares são bem conhecidas e em geral semelhantes às das outras mucopolissacárides. O estudo por ressonância magnética do sistema nervoso central pode colaborar no diagnóstico diferencial dessas doenças, avaliar a extensão das lesões e ajudar no controle evolutivo.The author reports the radiological findings in two siblings with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (mucopolysaccharide VI. Conventional radiographs of the skeleton and magnetic resonance imaging examination of the central nervous system were performed. Skeletal abnormalities in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI have already been well described by other authors and are generally similar to other mucopolysaccharides. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system may be helpful in the differential diagnosis, assessment of extension, and follow-up of these diseases.

  13. Extraction of Mo(VI) and U(VI) by alamine 310 and its mixtures from HCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on the extraction of molybdenum(VI) and uranium(VI) from HCl solution by triisodecyl amine (Alamine 310), tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), di-n-pentylsulphoxide (DPSO) and their mixtures in benzene, in the range of 1-10 M aq. HCl, show that extractions are quantitative in most cases in the higher acidity range 6-8 M. Extraction by bis(2,4,4-trimethyl pentyl) dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanex 301) and its mixtures studied in the range of 0.2-1 M aq. HCl shows quantitative extraction for both the metals by Cyanex 301 and Alamine 310 mixtures only at lower acidity (∼0.2 M). The SCN- ion has a profound influence on the extraction of uranium(VI) by mixtures of 5% (v/v) Alamine 310 and 5% (v/v) TBP from 1 M HCl and the extraction is ∼95% at ∼0.2 M SCN- concentration. Synergism is marked in the extraction of molybdenum(VI) for the mixtures of Alamine 310 and TBP, Alamine 310 and Cyanex 301, and for uranium(VI), by mixtures of Alamine 310 and DPSO as well as Alamine 310 and Cyanex 301. (orig.)

  14. Renormalized Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    For any conformally compact manifold with hypersurface boundary we define a canonical renormalized volume functional and compute an explicit, holographic formula for the corresponding anomaly. For the special case of asymptotically Einstein manifolds, our method recovers the known results. The anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, but the coefficients of divergences do. We give explicit formulae for these divergences valid for any choice of regulating hypersurface; these should be relevant to recent studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies. The anomaly is expressed as a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. We show that the variation of these energy functionals is exactly the obstruction to solving a singular Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the...

  15. Depositional setting and diagenetic evolution of some Tertiary unconventional reservoir rocks, Uinta Basin, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, J.K.; Fouch, T.D.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    The Douglas Creek Member of the Tertiary Green River Formation underlies much of the Uinta basin, Utah, and contains large volumes of oil and gas trapped in a complex of fractured low-permeability sandstone reservoirs. In the SE part of the basin at Pariette Bench, the Eocene Douglas Creek Member is a thick sequence of fine- grained alluvial sandstone complexly intercalated with lacustrine claystone and carbonate rock. Sediments were deposited in a subsiding intermontane basin along the shallow fluctuating margin of ancient Lake Uinta. Although the Uinta basin has undergone postdepositional uplift and erosion, the deepest cored rocks at Pariette Bench have never been buried more than 3000m.-from Authors

  16. On the connection between the metal-enriched intergalactic medium and galaxies: an O VI-galaxy cross-correlation study at z < 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Charles W.; Morris, Simon L.; Tejos, Nicolas; Crighton, Neil H. M.; Perry, Robert; Fumagalli, Michele; Bielby, Rich; Theuns, Tom; Schaye, Joop; Shanks, Tom; Liske, Jochen; Gunawardhana, Madusha L. P.; Bartle, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    We present new results on the auto- and cross-correlation functions of galaxies and O VI absorbers in a ˜18~Gpc3 comoving volume at z . We use a sample of 51 296 galaxies and 140 O VIabsorbers in the column density range 13 ≲ log N ≲ 15 to measure two-point correlation functions in the two dimensions transverse and orthogonal to the line-of-sight ξ(r⊥, r∥). We furthermore infer the corresponding `real-space' correlation functions, ξ(r), by projecting ξ(r⊥, r∥) along r∥, and assuming a power-law form, ξ(r) = (r/r0)-γ. Comparing the results from the absorber-galaxy cross-correlation function, ξag, the galaxy auto-correlation function, ξgg, and the absorber auto-correlation function, ξaa, we constrain the statistical connection between galaxies and the metal-enriched intergalactic medium as a function of star-formation activity. We also compare these results to predictions from the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulation and find a reasonable agreement. We find that: (i) O VI absorbers show very little velocity dispersion with respect to galaxies on ˜ Mpc scales, likely ≲ 100 km s-1; (ii) O VI absorbers are less clustered, and potentially more extended around galaxies than galaxies are around themselves; (iii) On ≳ 100 kpc scales, the likelihood of finding O VI absorbers around star-forming galaxies is similar to the likelihood of finding O VI absorbers around non star-forming galaxies; and (iv) O VI absorbers are either not ubiquitous to galaxies in our sample, or their distribution around them is patchy on scales ≳ 100 kpc (or both), at least for the column densities at which most are currently detected.

  17. LERF Basin 44 Process Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LUECK, K.J.

    1999-08-31

    This document presents a plan to process a portion of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) Basin 44 wastewater through the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The objective of this process test is to determine the most effective/efficient method to treat the wastewater currently stored in LERF Basin 44. The process test will determine the operational parameters necessary to comply with facility effluent discharge permit limits (Ecology 1995) and the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) acceptance criteria (BHI-00139), while achieving ALARA goals and maintaining the integrity of facility equipment. A major focus of the test plan centers on control of contamination due to leaks and/or facility maintenance. As a pre-startup item, all known leaks will be fixed before the start of the test. During the course of the test, a variety of contamination control measures will be evaluated for implementation during the treatment of the remaining Basin 44 inventory. Of special interest will be techniques and tools used to prevent contamination spread during sampling and when opening contaminated facility equipment/piping. At the conclusion of the test, a post ALARA review will be performed to identify lessons learned from the test run which can be applied to the treatment of the remaining Basin 44 inventory. The volume of wastewater to be treated during this test run is 500,000 gallons. This volume limit is necessary to maintain the ETF radiological inventory limits per the approved authorization basis. The duration of the process test is approximately 30 days.

  18. Bethlem myopathy and engineered collagen VI triple helical deletions prevent intracellular multimer assembly and protein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamandé, S R; Shields, K A; Kornberg, A J; Shield, L K; Bateman, J F

    1999-07-30

    Mutations in the genes that code for collagen VI subunits, COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3, are the cause of the autosomal dominant disorder, Bethlem myopathy. Although three different collagen VI structural mutations have previously been reported, the effect of these mutations on collagen VI assembly, structure, and function is currently unknown. We have characterized a new Bethlem myopathy mutation that results in skipping of COL6A1 exon 14 during pre-mRNA splicing and the deletion of 18 amino acids from the triple helical domain of the alpha1(VI) chain. Sequencing of genomic DNA identified a G to A transition in the +1 position of the splice donor site of intron 14 in one allele. The mutant alpha1(VI) chains associated intracellularly with alpha2(VI) and alpha3(VI) to form disulfide-bonded monomers, but further assembly into dimers and tetramers was prevented, and molecules containing the mutant chain were not secreted. This triple helical deletion thus resulted in production of half the normal amount of collagen VI. To further explore the biosynthetic consequences of collagen VI triple helical deletions, an alpha3(VI) cDNA expression construct containing a 202-amino acid deletion within the triple helix was produced and stably expressed in SaOS-2 cells. The transfected mutant alpha3(VI) chains associated with endogenous alpha1(VI) and alpha2(VI) to form collagen VI monomers, but dimers and tetramers did not form and the mutant-containing molecules were not secreted. Thus, deletions within the triple helical region of both the alpha1(VI) and alpha3(VI) chains can prevent intracellular dimer and tetramer assembly and secretion. These results provide the first evidence of the biosynthetic consequences of structural collagen VI mutations and suggest that functional protein haploinsufficiency may be a common pathogenic mechanism in Bethlem myopathy. PMID:10419498

  19. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (Case Report Brain MRI and MR Spectroscopy Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuldem Donmez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis VI or Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder with multisystem involvement which is determined by mutations in the arylsulfatase B (ARSB gene. Herein, we report the radiological findings of a case of Mucopolysaccharidosis VI which showed progression of periventricular lesions on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and slight elevation of myoinositole and no other significant pathological peak on magnetic resonance (MR spectroscopy. MR spectroscopy as well as the clinical findings helped us to exclude some of the diseases in the differential diagnosis.

  20. Die Virtuelle Fachbibliothek Technik, ViFaTec

    OpenAIRE

    Bömeke, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Die Virtuelle Fachbibliothek Technik, ViFaTec wird kurz dargestellt. Die 5 Module, der Fachinformationsführer, die Suchmaschine Technik, die Metasuchmaschine, der Dokumentenlieferdienst TIBORDER und das Volltextsystem GetInfo werden erläutert. Über den derzeitigen Sachstand der ViFaTec, u.a. die Durchführung von Maßnahmen zur Bekanntmachung der Website wird berichtet. Die neue Suchmaschine Technik bzw. die Veränderungen bei der Suchmaschine Technik werden erläutert. Hier sind die Leistungsang...

  1. Mechanisms of U(VI) retention on montmorillonite and hectorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows: Introduction: Al- and Mg-smectites can retain significant amounts of U(VI) in soils, sediments, or glass weathered layers, and this sorption property can control the fate of this element in nuclear waste repositories. Possible retention mechanisms vary as a function of solution physico-chemical conditions, but also of the sorbate crystallo-chemistry. This study shows how distinct mechanisms can be observed for U(VI) sorption on montmorillonite and hectorite under similar conditions. Materials and methods: Suspensions of purified clay minerals (2 g/L hectorite or montmorillonite) were reacted in 0.5 M NaCl at pH 7.17 (hectorite) and 6.61 (montmorillonite) with 10 and 15 μM U(VI), respectively. Self-supporting films of reacted clay minerals were obtained by draining suspension aliquots on cellulose nitrate filters. Uranium L3-edge Polarized EXAFS (P-EXAFS) spectra of the self-supporting films were collected in fluorescence mode on the FAME beamline (ESRF, France). P-EXAFS data were reduced, and analyzed using standard procedures. Results and interpretation: Angular dependence of EXAFS spectra was observed for U(VI)-sorbed hectorite, but not montmorillonite. Sorbed U(VI) retained the uranyl conformation for both sorbates, with Oyl at 1.79 and 1.82 Angstroms on montmorillonite and hectorite, respectively. The equatorial Oeq shell was split in two subshells at 2.29 and 2.47 Angstroms for montmorillonite, and 2.35 and 2.53 Angstroms for hectorite, ruling out fully hydrated UO22+(aq). On montmorillonite, U(VI) was surrounded by ∼0.5 Al/Si at 3.30 Angstroms. This shell and the negligible angular dependence point to the formation of edge surface complexes, in line with previous studies [1, 2]. In contrast, for U(VI) on hectorite, only ∼0.2 Mg/Si near 3.2 Angstroms could be modelled, and no EXAFS contribution was observed beyond 3.6 Angstroms. This, and the significant spectral anisotropy suggest that U(VI) either sorbs to hectorite

  2. Dr. Lorenzo Dojmi Di Delupis - Viški "Gepard"

    OpenAIRE

    Jamnicki Dojmi, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Lorenzo Dojmi di Delupis (1845.–1927.) odvjetak je ugledne viške grane plemićke obitelji Dojmi di Delupis. Sin je Petra Dojmija di Delupisa (1809.–1886.), pravnika, umjerenoga dalmatinskog autonomaša talijanske provenijencije, dugogodišnjega viškog načelnika i Margherite Siminiati. Kao tek završeni liječnik, s diplomom Medicinskog fakulteta u Grazu (1870.), Lorenzo Dojmi di Delupis krenuo je na dvogodišnji put kao liječnik turske vojske dospjevši čak do Bagdada i Basre. O toj dramatičnoj ...

  3. VI Congreso Universidad y Cooperación al Desarrollo

    OpenAIRE

    Universitat Politècnica de València - Centro de Cooperación al Desarrollo

    2013-01-01

    La presente publicación recoge los trabajos presentados al VI Congreso Universidad y Cooperación para el Desarrollo, celebrado en Valencia. El congreso está organizado por el Comité Universitario Valenciano de Relaciones internacionales y Cooperación, que integra a las cinco universidades valencianas Universitat Politècnica de València - Centro de Cooperación al Desarrollo (2013). VI Congreso Universidad y Cooperación al Desarrollo. Editorial Universitat Politècnica de València. http://hdl...

  4. Neutron cross section standards evaluations for ENDF/B-VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron cross section standards are now being evaluated as the initial phase in the development of the new ENDF/B-VI file. These standards evaluations are following a somewhat different process compared with that used for earlier versions of ENDF. The primary effort is concentrated on a simultaneous evaluation using a generalized least squares program, R-matrix evaluations, and a procedure for combining the results of these evaluations. The ENDF/B-VI standards evaluation procedure is outlined, and preliminary simultaneous evaluation and R-matrix results are presented. 16 refs., 7 figs

  5. MCNP (trademark) ENDF/B-VI iron benchmark calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, J. D.; Hendricks, J. S.

    Four iron shielding benchmarks have been calculated for, we believe the first time, with MCNP4A and its new ENDF/B-VI library. These calculations are part of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki dose re-evaluation for the National Academy of Sciences and the Defense Nuclear Agency. We believe these calculations are significant because they validate MCNP and the new ENDF/B-VI libraries. These calculations are compared to ENDF/B-V, experiment, and in some cases the recommended MCNP data library (a T-2 evaluation) and ENDF/IV.

  6. Apollonius de Perge, Coniques tome 4, livres VI et VII

    CERN Document Server

    Rashed, Roshdi

    2009-01-01

    Book VI of the Konika is essentially devoted to the question of the identity and similarity of two conic sections, or two parts of conic sections. In Book VII Apollonius deals with the various relationships between the lengths of diameters and conjugate diameters. The results are applied to the exposition of a number of problems, as well as to some problems which Apollonius indicates will be demonstrated and solved in Book VIII, which was lost in Antiquity. Books VI and VII have only survived in an Arabic translation, and are presented here in a critical edition, together with a faithful trans

  7. Liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors: Preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning LMFBR design characteristics; uranium-plutonium/uranium recycle homogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/uranium spiked recycle heterogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/uranium spiked recycle homogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle heterogeneous core; uranium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle homogeneous core; thorium-plutonium/thorium spiked recycle homogeneous core; denatured uranium-233/thorium cycle homogeneous core; safety consideration for the LMFBR; and environmental considerations

  8. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI, VOLUME 36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sixth meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) took place on October 1, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. RHIC is now in its second year of operation for physics production and the first polarized proton collision run at √s=200 GeV is expected to start in eight weeks. The RSC has developed a plan for this coming run through two previous meetings, RHIC Spin Physics III (August 3, 2000) and IV (October 13-14, 2000). We requested the following: two weeks of polarized proton studies in AGS, three weeks of polarized collider commissioning, and five weeks of polarized proton physics run. As a result, we have obtained all we asked and the above plans are implemented in the current operation schedule. The focus of the present meeting was to bring all involved in the RHIC Spin activities up-to-date on the progress of machine development, theory issues, and experimental issues. This meeting was right after the Program Advisory Committee (PAC) meeting and it started with the comments on the PAC discussion by Gerry Bunce, who was informed about the PAC deliberations by Tom Kirk. The PAC was fully supportive to complete the proposed spin program within the currently available budget for RHIC run 2 operations. Gerry further explained the expected luminosity to be ∫ Ldt = 0.5 pb-1 per week, reflecting the current machine status. The introductory session also had a talk from Werner Vogelsang that reviewed the progress in perturbative QCD theory focused on spin effects

  9. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific and Technical Report 2000. Volume VI: Large Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroughi, Fereydoun; Bercher, Renate; Buechli, Carmen; Zumkeller, Lotty [eds.

    2001-07-01

    The PSI Department Large Research Facilities (GFA) joins the efforts to provide an excellent research environment to Swiss and foreign research groups on the experimental facilities driven by our high intensity proton accelerator complex. Its divisions care for the running, maintenance and enhancement of the accelerator complex, the primary proton beamlines, the targets and the secondary beams as well as the neutron spallation source SINQ. The division for technical support and coordination provides for technical support to the research facility complementary to the basic logistic available from the department for logistics and marketing. Besides running the facilities, the staff of the department is also involved in theoretical and experimental research projects. Some of them address basic scientific questions mainly concerning the properties of micro- or nanostructured materials: experiments as well as large scale computer simulations of molecular dynamics were performed to investigate nonclassical materials properties. Others are related to improvements or extensions of the capabilities of our facilities. We also report on intriguing results from applications of the neutron capture radiography, the prompt gamma activation method and the isotope production facility at SINQ.

  10. Report upon United States geological surveys west of the one hundredth meridian, Volume VI: Botany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, George Montague

    1878-01-01

    Although investigations in Botany, governed in a measure by the sparsely settled condition of the regions visited, are but incidental to the systematic purpose of the Survey, which has for its main object the determination of data necessary for the construction of a detailed topographical map, yet it is believed that the material here presented, as the result of examination, by specialists, of large and complete collections, will have its value as a substantial contribution to the knowledge of the Botany of portions of the United States west of the 1OOth meridian and south of the 40th parallel.

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, VOLUME 37, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI (PART 2).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLAND, L.; SAITO, N.

    2001-11-15

    The second part of the sixth RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) meeting was held on November 15, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Previous meetings have elaborated on the new generation of proton spin-structure studies (e.g. gluon polarization and flavor separation of q and {bar q} polarizations via real W{sup {+-}} production) enabled by studying polarized proton collisions at energies and momentum transfers where perturbative QCD models are expected to be applicable. The focus of this meeting was on many of the experimental issues that must be resolved to achieve these physics goals. This summary is written with the benefit of hindsight following the completion of the first-ever run of a polarized proton collider. This first run can be considered as a successfully completed milestone of the RHIC Spin Collaboration. Other milestones remain important. Long term machine items were identified in Waldo Mackay's talk, the most important being the completion of the spin rotator magnets that will be installed in 2002 to allow the flexible orientation of the proton beam polarization at the PHENM and STAR experiments. At the meeting Waldo discussed a stronger partial snake magnet for the AGS as a means of producing highly polarized proton beams to inject into RHIC. Developments subsequent to this meeting suggest that a superconducting helical dipole magnet may be feasible for the AGS, and is likely to be needed to achieve the 70% beam polarization in RHIC. Longer term items were also presented, including potential increases in luminosity by the addition of electron cooling to RHIC and the possibility of increasing the collision energy by {approx}20% by replacement of the DX magnets. These items could be considered for a second generation of RHIC spin experiments. The other topics covered at the meeting were related to polarimetry and to the absolute calibration of the proton beam polarization in RHIC. These topics were divided into short- and long-term solutions to polarimetry issues. George Igo led a discussion about the addition of a Coulomb-Nuclear Interference (CNI) polarimeter to the AGS prior to FY2003 RHIC operations. The experience from the first RHIC spin run reinforces the need for reducing the time needed to complete polarization measurements in the AGS, and illustrated the importance of polarization measurements at different energies in the RHIC injectors. Progress continues to be made on the completion of a CNI polarimeter for the AGS prior to the FY2003 run.

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, VOLUME 37, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI (PART 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second part of the sixth RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) meeting was held on November 15, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Previous meetings have elaborated on the new generation of proton spin-structure studies (e.g. gluon polarization and flavor separation of q and bar q polarizations via real W± production) enabled by studying polarized proton collisions at energies and momentum transfers where perturbative QCD models are expected to be applicable. The focus of this meeting was on many of the experimental issues that must be resolved to achieve these physics goals. This summary is written with the benefit of hindsight following the completion of the first-ever run of a polarized proton collider. This first run can be considered as a successfully completed milestone of the RHIC Spin Collaboration. Other milestones remain important. Long term machine items were identified in Waldo Mackay's talk, the most important being the completion of the spin rotator magnets that will be installed in 2002 to allow the flexible orientation of the proton beam polarization at the PHENM and STAR experiments. At the meeting Waldo discussed a stronger partial snake magnet for the AGS as a means of producing highly polarized proton beams to inject into RHIC. Developments subsequent to this meeting suggest that a superconducting helical dipole magnet may be feasible for the AGS, and is likely to be needed to achieve the 70% beam polarization in RHIC. Longer term items were also presented, including potential increases in luminosity by the addition of electron cooling to RHIC and the possibility of increasing the collision energy by ∼20% by replacement of the DX magnets. These items could be considered for a second generation of RHIC spin experiments. The other topics covered at the meeting were related to polarimetry and to the absolute calibration of the proton beam polarization in RHIC. These topics were divided into short- and long-term solutions to polarimetry issues. George Igo led a discussion about the addition of a Coulomb-Nuclear Interference (CNI) polarimeter to the AGS prior to FY2003 RHIC operations. The experience from the first RHIC spin run reinforces the need for reducing the time needed to complete polarization measurements in the AGS, and illustrated the importance of polarization measurements at different energies in the RHIC injectors. Progress continues to be made on the completion of a CNI polarimeter for the AGS prior to the FY2003 run

  13. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific and Technical Report 2000. Volume VI: Large Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PSI Department Large Research Facilities (GFA) joins the efforts to provide an excellent research environment to Swiss and foreign research groups on the experimental facilities driven by our high intensity proton accelerator complex. Its divisions care for the running, maintenance and enhancement of the accelerator complex, the primary proton beamlines, the targets and the secondary beams as well as the neutron spallation source SINQ. The division for technical support and coordination provides for technical support to the research facility complementary to the basic logistic available from the department for logistics and marketing. Besides running the facilities, the staff of the department is also involved in theoretical and experimental research projects. Some of them address basic scientific questions mainly concerning the properties of micro- or nanostructured materials: experiments as well as large scale computer simulations of molecular dynamics were performed to investigate nonclassical materials properties. Others are related to improvements or extensions of the capabilities of our facilities. We also report on intriguing results from applications of the neutron capture radiography, the prompt gamma activation method and the isotope production facility at SINQ

  14. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1998. Volume VI: Large Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Guenter; Bercher, Renate; Buechli, Carmen; Foroughi, Fereydoun; Meyer, Rosa [eds.

    1999-09-01

    The department GFA (Grossforschungsanlagen, Large Research Facilities) has been established in October 1998 and its main duty is operation, maintenance and development of the PSI accelerators, the spallation neutron source and the beam transport systems for pions and muons. A large effort of this group concerns the planning and co-ordination of the assembly of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  15. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific and Technical Report 2001. Volume VI: Large Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bercher, R.; Buechli, C.; Zumkeller, L. (eds.)

    2002-03-01

    While the main effort in the past ten years was directed towards increasing the beam current from 100 to 2000 {mu}A and installation of additional user facilities like SINQ to satisfy new needs, we are now concentrating on stable operation at these high beam intensities. Unfortunately, 'stable operation' is not clearly defined. A few years ago, the accelerator physicists considered 80% beam on time excellent but the users complained about poor performance. Today we achieve a yearly mean beam on time of almost 90% at 1.7 mA and we have achieved 95% to 98% of the scheduled beam time for periods of weeks. These numbers seem to be satisfactory for the users. Despite this achievement, we try hard to further reduce the number of serious and long breakdowns, which are the main cause of the reduced yearly mean availability. Furthermore, breakdowns that necessitate long repair times are extremely detrimental for many experiments, which have only been allocated a few days of beam time. As a result of our discussions, we launched a number of activities, which include design and construction of improved power supplies, intensifying preventive maintenance, procuring vital spare parts, and reducing repair times through careful preparation. In addition, we were given permission to strengthen the accelerator staff with highly qualified physicists in order to study and solve several pending problems. We are aware that the planned measures will by no means be fast and will require considerable financial and personnel support. A long-standing issue concerning the improvement of the machine performance is the replacement of the aluminum cavities in the main ring accelerator by new high power copper cavities. The studies and tests on a model cavity are finished and we have ordered a prototype cavity, which will arrive in fall 2002 and be installed in the ring after a rigorous test phase in 2004. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided.

  16. Wind energy conversion. Volume VI. Nonlinear response of wind turbine rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, I.

    1978-09-01

    The nonlinear equations of motor for a rigid rotor restrained by three flexible springs representing, respectively, the flapping, lagging, and feathering motions are derived using Lagrange's equations, for arbitrary angular rotations. These are reduced to a consistent set of nonlinear equations using nonlinear terms up to third order. The complete analysis is divided into three parts, A, B, and C. Part A consists of forced response of two-degree flapping-lagging rotor under the excitation of pure gravitational field (i.e., no aerodynamic forces). In Part B, the effect of aerodynamic forces on the dynamic response of two-degree flapping-lagging rotor is investigated. In Part C, the effect of third degree of motion, feathering, is considered.

  17. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific and Technical Report 1999. Volume VI: Large Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroughi, Fereydoun; Bercher, Renate; Buechli, Carmen; Meyer, Rosa [eds.

    2000-07-01

    The department GFA (Grossforschungsanlagen, Large Research Facilities) has been established in October 1998. Its main duty is operation, maintenance and development of the PSI accelerators, the spallation neutron source and the beam transport systems for pions and muons. A large effort of this group concerns the planning and co-ordination of new projects like e.g. the assembly of the synchrotron light source (SLS), design studies of a new proton therapy facility, the ultracold neutron source and a new intensive secondary beam line for low energy muons. A large fraction of this report is devoted to research especially in the field of materials Science. The studies include large scale molecular dynamics computer simulations on the elastic and plastic behavior of nanostructured metals, complemented by experimental mechanical testing using micro-indentation and miniaturized tensile testing, as well as microstructural characterisation and strain field mapping of metallic coatings and thin ceramic layers, the latter done with synchrotron radiation.

  18. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1998. Volume VI: Large Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The department GFA (Grossforschungsanlagen, Large Research Facilities) has been established in October 1998 and its main duty is operation, maintenance and development of the PSI accelerators, the spallation neutron source and the beam transport systems for pions and muons. A large effort of this group concerns the planning and co-ordination of the assembly of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). (author)

  19. Recent Graduate Works and Programs in Environmental Education and Communications. Volume VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanselman, David L.; Ennist, Lawrence D., Jr., Ed.

    Compiled are 37 abstracts of recent master's, doctoral, and major project research in environmental education and communications. Most of the citations included describe work completed in the 1982-83 academic year. Abstracts are organized into seven topic areas: (1) site analysis--descriptions and development plans for areas to be used for…

  20. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI, VOLUME 36.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLAND,L.; SAITO,N.

    2001-10-10

    The sixth meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) took place on October 1, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. RHIC is now in its second year of operation for physics production and the first polarized proton collision run at {radical}s=200 GeV is expected to start in eight weeks. The RSC has developed a plan for this coming run through two previous meetings, RHIC Spin Physics III (August 3, 2000) and IV (October 13-14, 2000). We requested the following: two weeks of polarized proton studies in AGS, three weeks of polarized collider commissioning, and five weeks of polarized proton physics run. As a result, we have obtained all we asked and the above plans are implemented in the current operation schedule. The focus of the present meeting was to bring all involved in the RHIC Spin activities up-to-date on the progress of machine development, theory issues, and experimental issues. This meeting was right after the Program Advisory Committee (PAC) meeting and it started with the comments on the PAC discussion by Gerry Bunce, who was informed about the PAC deliberations by Tom Kirk. The PAC was fully supportive to complete the proposed spin program within the currently available budget for RHIC run 2 operations. Gerry further explained the expected luminosity to be {integral} Ldt = 0.5 pb{sup -1} per week, reflecting the current machine status. The introductory session also had a talk from Werner Vogelsang that reviewed the progress in perturbative QCD theory focused on spin effects.

  1. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific and Technical Report 2001. Volume VI: Large Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the main effort in the past ten years was directed towards increasing the beam current from 100 to 2000 μA and installation of additional user facilities like SINQ to satisfy new needs, we are now concentrating on stable operation at these high beam intensities. Unfortunately, 'stable operation' is not clearly defined. A few years ago, the accelerator physicists considered 80% beam on time excellent but the users complained about poor performance. Today we achieve a yearly mean beam on time of almost 90% at 1.7 mA and we have achieved 95% to 98% of the scheduled beam time for periods of weeks. These numbers seem to be satisfactory for the users. Despite this achievement, we try hard to further reduce the number of serious and long breakdowns, which are the main cause of the reduced yearly mean availability. Furthermore, breakdowns that necessitate long repair times are extremely detrimental for many experiments, which have only been allocated a few days of beam time. As a result of our discussions, we launched a number of activities, which include design and construction of improved power supplies, intensifying preventive maintenance, procuring vital spare parts, and reducing repair times through careful preparation. In addition, we were given permission to strengthen the accelerator staff with highly qualified physicists in order to study and solve several pending problems. We are aware that the planned measures will by no means be fast and will require considerable financial and personnel support. A long-standing issue concerning the improvement of the machine performance is the replacement of the aluminum cavities in the main ring accelerator by new high power copper cavities. The studies and tests on a model cavity are finished and we have ordered a prototype cavity, which will arrive in fall 2002 and be installed in the ring after a rigorous test phase in 2004. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided

  2. Securing Our Future: Planning What We Want for Our Youngest Children. Future Trends Report, Volume VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Alice

    This report is the sixth on future trends in early care and education undertaken by the Massachusetts Early Childhood Advisory Council since its inception in 1985. The report sets out a plan for a system of early care and education and family support in the state, fulfilling a requirement of the enabling legislation of the Community Partnerships…

  3. ENERGY FROM THE WEST: ENERGY RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT SYSTEMS REPORT. VOLUME VI: GEOTHERMAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes the technologies likely to be used for development of geothermal resources in eight western states (Arizona, Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming). It provides information on input materials and labor requirements, out...

  4. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific and Technical Report 1999. Volume VI: Large Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The department GFA (Grossforschungsanlagen, Large Research Facilities) has been established in October 1998. Its main duty is operation, maintenance and development of the PSI accelerators, the spallation neutron source and the beam transport systems for pions and muons. A large effort of this group concerns the planning and co-ordination of new projects like e.g. the assembly of the synchrotron light source (SLS), design studies of a new proton therapy facility, the ultracold neutron source and a new intensive secondary beam line for low energy muons. A large fraction of this report is devoted to research especially in the field of materials Science. The studies include large scale molecular dynamics computer simulations on the elastic and plastic behavior of nanostructured metals, complemented by experimental mechanical testing using micro-indentation and miniaturized tensile testing, as well as microstructural characterisation and strain field mapping of metallic coatings and thin ceramic layers, the latter done with synchrotron radiation

  5. Research of thermodynamic and kinetics in preparing U(IV) by reducing and catalyzing U(VI) with hydrazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Liangshu; Xiao, Yiqun [South China Univ., Hengyang (China). School of Nuclear Science and Technology; Hu, Si-Si; Peng, Anguo; Xiao, Jingshui [South China Univ., Hengyang (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; He, Hui; Li, Bin [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    2015-09-01

    The effect of concentration of U(VI), hydrazine, nitric acid and the amount of catalyst, and the thermodynamics and kinetics of the reaction in preparing U(IV) by catalyzing and reducing U(VI) are studied in catalytic reduction of U(VI) with hydrazine as reductant and Pt as catalyst. The comparison of calculated theoretical reaction heat value and practical value is also given. The result shows that with the increase of density of U(VI) and hydrazine, increase of amount of catalyst and decrease of nitric acid, reaction rate slows down. The reaction kinetic rate equation is as follow: -dC(UO{sub 2}{sup 2+})/dt = kC{sup 1.11}(UO{sub 2}{sup 2+})C{sup 1.42}(N{sub 2}H{sub 5}{sup +})C{sup -0.72}(H{sup +}), and the reaction rate constant is 1.3 x 10{sup -3} (mol/L){sup -0.81}/min when r{sub S/L} is 0.008 kg/L at 50 C. The theoretical reaction equation of unit volume is as follows: Q = aΔ{sub f}H{sub m,1} {sup direct} {sup difference} + Δ{sub f}H{sub m,2} {sup direct} {sup difference} [C(N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) - C(UO{sub 2}{sup 2+})a/2 - β]/3. The comparison shows the coincidence in 1 h of theoretical value and practical value.

  6. Solid-Phase Extraction of Trace Amounts of Uranium(VI in Environmental Water Samples Using an Extractant-Impregnated Resin Followed by Detection with UV-Vis Spectrophotometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hosseini-Bandegharaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A stable extractant-impregnated resin (EIR containing Chrome Azurol B was prepared using Amberlite XAD-2010 as a porous polymeric support. The new EIR was employed for trace separation and preconcentration of U(VI ion followed by spectrophotometric determination with the arsenazo III procedure. CAB/XAD-2010 exhibited excellent selectivity for U(VI ion over coexisting ions. Experimental parameters including pH, contact time, shaking speed, and ionic strength were investigated by batch extraction methods. Maximum sorption of U(VI ions occurred at pH 4.3–6.9. The capacity of EIR was found to be 0.632 mmol·g−1. Equilibrium was reached in 25 min and the loading half-time, t1/2, was less than 6 min. The equilibrium adsorption isotherm of U(VI was fitted with the Langmuir adsorption model. In addition, a column packed with CAB/XAD-2010 was used for column-mode separation and preconcentration of U(VI ion. For the optimization of the dynamic procedure, effects of sample volume, sample and eluent flow rate, eluent concentration, and its volume were investigated. The preconcentration factors for U(VI were found out to be 160. But, for convenience, a preconcentration factor of 150 was utilized for the column-mode preconcentration. The dynamic procedure gave a detection limit of 5.0×10-10 mol·L−1 (0.12 μg·L−1 for U(VI ion. The proposed dynamic method showed good performance in analyzing environmental water samples.

  7. Selectivity enhancement of phosphate based functional polymeric gels towards Uranium(VI) using ion imprinting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The imprinting of gel containing polymer chains of ethylene glycol methacrylate phosphate (EGMP) for U(VI) ions were carried out. The U(VI) imprinting has been carried out in pure EGMP and in EGMP: poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) = 1:9 composition. Complexation of the monomer with template (U(VI)) followed by polymerization have been used to imprint the U(VI) onto the polymer chains. The comparison of uptake studies of U(VI) and Pu(IV) at 3 M HNO3 shows increased selectivity of U(VI) relative to Pu(IV) for both the gel compositions. The less uptake of U(VI) for imprinted EGMP:PEGMA gel relative to pure imprinted EGMP gel at tracer level can be possibly due to the requirement of two EGMP units in the vicinity for U(VI) complexation. (author)

  8. VI Latin American Congress on Biomedical Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hadad, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of the CLAIB 2014, held in Paraná, Entre Ríos, Argentina 29, 30 & 31 October 2014. The proceedings, presented by the Regional Council of Biomedical Engineering for Latin America (CORAL) offer research findings, experiences and activities between institutions and universities to develop Bioengineering, Biomedical Engineering and related sciences. The conferences of the American Congress of Biomedical Engineering are sponsored by the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering (IFMBE), Society for Engineering in Biology and Medicine (EMBS) and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), among other organizations and international agencies and bringing together scientists, academics and biomedical engineers in Latin America and other continents in an environment conducive to exchange and professional growth. The Topics include: - Bioinformatics and Computational Biology - Bioinstrumentation; Sensors, Micro and Nano Technologies - Biomaterials, Tissu...

  9. Direct Volume Rendering of Curvilinear Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Arsi; Wilhelms, J.; Challinger, J.; Alper, N.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Direct volume rendering can visualize sampled 3D scalar data as a continuous medium, or extract features. However, it is generally slow. Furthermore, most algorithms for direct volume rendering have assumed rectilinear gridded data. This paper discusses methods for using direct volume rendering when the original volume is curvilinear, i.e. is divided into six-sided cells which are not necessarily equilateral hexahedra. One approach is to ray-cast such volumes directly. An alternative approach is to interpolate the sample volumes to a rectilinear grid, and use this regular volume for rendering. Advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches in terms of speed and image quality are explored.

  10. Fe(III), Cr(VI), and Fe(III) mediated Cr(VI) reduction in alkaline media using a Halomonas isolate from Soap Lake, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanEngelen, Michael R; Peyton, Brent M; Mormile, Melanie R; Pinkart, Holly C

    2008-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium is one of the most widely distributed environmental contaminants. Given the carcinogenic and mutagenic consequences of Cr(VI) exposure, the release of Cr(VI) into the environment has long been a major concern. While many reports of microbial Cr(VI) reduction are in circulation, very few have demonstrated Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions. Since Cr(VI) exhibits higher mobility in alkaline soils relative to pH neutral soils, and since Cr contamination of alkaline soils is associated with a number of industrial activities, microbial Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions requires attention.Soda lakes are the most stable alkaline environments on earth, and contain a wide diversity of alkaliphilic organisms. In this study, a bacterial isolate belonging to the Halomonas genus was obtained from Soap Lake, a chemically stratified alkaline lake located in central Washington State. The ability of this isolate to reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) was assessed under alkaline (pH = 9), anoxic, non-growth conditions with acetate as an electron donor. Metal reduction rates were quantified using Monod kinetics. In addition, Cr(VI) reduction experiments were carried out in the presence of Fe(III) to evaluate the possible enhancement of Cr(VI) reduction rates through electron shuttling mechanisms. While Fe(III) reduction rates were slow compared to previously reported rates, Cr(VI) reduction rates fell within range of previously reported rates. PMID:18401687

  11. The effectiveness of four organic matter amendments for decreasing resin-extractable Cr(VI) in Cr(VI)-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chien-Chih; Cheng, Chia-Jung; Lin, Tzu-Huei; Juang, Kai-Wei; Lee, Dar-Yuan

    2009-01-30

    This paper compared the effectiveness of four organic materials for decreasing the amounts of soil extractable Cr(VI) in Cr(VI)-contaminated soils using the DOWEX M4195 resin-extraction method. Organic matters were added into Cr(VI)-spiked soils [500 mg Cr(VI)(kgsoil)(-1)] in the form of sugarcane dregs compost (SCDC), cattle-dung compost (CDC), soybean meal (SBM) and rice bran (RB), in the amounts of 0, 1%, and 2% by dry weight, respectively. The results indicated that adding only 1% organic matter to the studied soils could effectively decrease the amount of soil resin-extractable Cr(VI) after 12 days of incubation. The decrease of resin-extractable Cr(VI) by organic materials was mainly the result from the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) supported by the XANES spectroscopy. Among the four tested organic materials, SBM and RB had higher effectiveness in decreasing soil resin-extractable Cr(VI) than CDC and SCDC. This result may be due to the fact that SBM and RB have more dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and protein than CDC and SCDC. Therefore, it was concluded that the contents of DOC and protein are the main factors that determine the effectiveness of organic materials for decreasing the amounts of soil available Cr(VI) in Cr(VI)-contaminated soils. PMID:18524481

  12. Counter-current extraction and separation of U(VI) from a mixture of U(VI)-Th(IV)-Y(III) using tris-2-ethyl hexyl phosphate (TEHP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of tris-2-ethyl hexyl phosphate (TEHP) for counter-current extraction and separation of U(VI) from a mixture of U(VI)-Th(IV)-Y(III) from nitric acid medium was carried out under wide experimental conditions. Batch extraction studies were carried out to investigate the effect of nitric acid concentration in feed solution, U(VI)/Th(IV) ratio and extractant concentration and the results were compared with established solvent such as tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) for separation of U(VI) from nitric acid medium. McCabe-Thiele diagrams for extraction as well as stripping of U(VI) were constructed under simulated conditions. Based on batch experiments, six stage counter-current extraction studies were conducted under various TEHP concentration and it was observed that 0.1 M TEHP/n-paraffin was most suitable for selective recovery of U(VI) from a mixture of U(VI)-Th(IV). An optimized condition, 0.1 M TEHP/n-paraffin, 2 M HNO3 in feed and six number of stages was evaluated for selective extraction and stripping of U(VI) from a solution containing mixture of U(VI)-Th(IV)-Y(III) in nitric acid medium. The U(VI) in strip solution was precipitated using 30 % H2O2 at pH ∼3. Average particle size of the final precipitate was found to be ∼33 μm. (author)

  13. Adsorption Properties of Bentonite with In Situ Immobilized Polyaniline Towards Anionic Forms of Cr(VI), Mo(VI), W(VI), V(V)

    OpenAIRE

    Kateryna RYABCHENKO; Elina YANOVSKA; Mariya MELNYK; Dariusz STERNIK; Olga KYCHKIRUK; Valentun TERTYKH

    2016-01-01

    A new composite material bentonite-PANI was synthesized by in situ immobilization of polyaniline (PANI) on the surface of natural mineral bentonite. It was established as a result of the modification of bentonite a surface area and an interlayer distance of mineral decrease and particles of bentonite transformed of irregular shape with different porosity on irregularly shaped particles of smaller size. It has been found that the total Cr(VI) ions extraction took place under the acid condition...

  14. Nanostructure, thermoelectric properties, and transport theory of V2VI3 and V2VI3/IV-VI based superlattices and nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this work is to review the thermoelectric properties, the microstructures, and their correlation with theoretical calculations and predictions for recent chalcogenide based materials. The main focus is put on thin multilayered Bi2Te3, Sb2Te3 films, and bulk V2VI3/IV-VI mixed systems. For all films a systematic characterization of the thermoelectric properties as well as the micro- and nanostructure was performed. The degree of crystallinity of the multilayered films varied from epitaxial systems to polycrystalline films. Other multilayered thin films revealed promising thermoelectric properties. (SnSe)1.2TiSe2 thin films with rotational disorder yielded the highest Seebeck coefficient published to date for analogous materials. For bulk V2VI3/IV-VI mixed systems insides are given into a complete ''material to module'' process resulting in a high performance thermoelectric generator using (1-x)(GeTe) x(Bi2Se0.2Te2.8) (x = 0.038). Cyclic heating of this system with x = 0.063 resulted in a drastic change of the micro- and nanostructure observed by ex situ and in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Consequently a degradation of ZT at 450 C from ∝2.0 to ∝1.0 was observed, while samples with x = 0.038 showed a stable ZT of 1.5. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Permian Basin, Texas: Volume 1, Text: Final preliminary design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a description of the preliminary design for an Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) at the proposed 49 acre site located 21 miles north of Hereford, Texas in Deaf Smith County. Department of Energy must conduct in situ testing at depth to ascertain the engineering and environmental suitability of the site for further consideration for nuclear waste repository development. The ESF includes the construction of two 12-ft diameter engineered shafts for accessing the bedded salt horizon to conduct in situ tests to ascertain if the site should be considered a candidate site for the first High Level Nuclear Waste Repository. This report includes pertinent engineering drawings for two shafts and all support facilities necessary for shaft construction and testing program operation. Shafts will be constructed by conventional drill-and-blast methods employing ground freezing prior to shaft construction to stabilize the existing groundwater and soil conditions at the site. A watertight liner and seal system will be employed to prevent intermingling of aquifers and provide a stable shaft throughout its design life. 38 refs., 37 figs., 14 tabs

  16. WiBasin: basin management through an integrated platform

    OpenAIRE

    Llort Pavon, Xavier; Sánchez-Diezma Guijarro, Rafael; Sancho, David; Rodríguez, Álvaro; Berenguer Ferrer, Marc; Sempere Torres, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present WiBasin, a cloud platform for basin and dam management. It includes different sources of precipitation (both observed and forecasted), integration over the catchment domain (to provide an aggregated value of potential rainfall accumulated over the basin) , and a complete dissemination environment (web-viewer, capability of issuing hazard warnings with configurable thresholds, SMS, mails, etc.)

  17. Adsorption Properties of Bentonite with In Situ Immobilized Polyaniline Towards Anionic Forms of Cr(VI, Mo(VI, W(VI, V(V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna RYABCHENKO

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A new composite material bentonite-PANI was synthesized by in situ immobilization of polyaniline (PANI on the surface of natural mineral bentonite. It was established as a result of the modification of bentonite a surface area and an interlayer distance of mineral decrease and particles of bentonite transformed of irregular shape with different porosity on irregularly shaped particles of smaller size. It has been found that the total Cr(VI ions extraction took place under the acid conditions (pH=1 – 2 and W(VI ions have been well adsorbed in the pH range from 1 to 8 by the composite bentonite-PANI unlike the initial mineral. Whereas adsorption of oxo anions of V(V and Mo(VI made up some 50%. It is proved that the in situ immobilization of bentonite by polyaniline leads to increasing the value of adsorption capacity towards the investigated ions compared with the initial mineral. It was established that the adsorption properties of the synthesized composite with respect to the studied oxo ions were worse than the adsorption properties of composite vermiculite-PANI, similar to the composite Sokyryntsyy clinoptilolite-PANI and better than composites of polyaniline with Podilskyy saponite and Karelian shungite.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.6976

  18. Targeted disruption of the arylsulfatase B gene results in mice resembling the phenotype of mucopolysaccharidosis VI.

    OpenAIRE

    Evers, M.; Saftig, P.; Schmidt, P.; Hafner, A.; McLoghlin, D B; Schmahl, W; Hess, B; von Figura, K; Peters, C.

    1996-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a lysosomal storage disease with autosomal recessive inheritance caused by a deficiency of the enzyme arylsulfatase B (ASB), which is involved in degradation of dermatan sulfate and chondroitin 4-sulfate. A MPS VI mouse model was generated by targeted disruption of the ASB gene. Homozygous mutant animals exhibit ASB enzyme deficiency and elevated urinary secretion of dermatan sulfate. They develop progressive symptoms resembling those of MPS VI in humans. ...

  19. Distribution of type VI collagen expression in synovial tissue and cultured synoviocytes: relation to fibronectin expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, J; Carsons, S E

    1991-01-01

    Type VI collagen has recently been shown to be an important component of connective tissue. Double label immunofluorescence procedures were used to immunolocalize type VI collagen in normal and rheumatoid synovium and its distribution was compared with that of fibronectin. In normal synovium type VI collagen is expressed in the synovial membrane but not in the interstitium of the villus. In rheumatoid synovium, however, type VI collagen is extensively deposited in both the interstitial connec...

  20. Cr(VI) speciation in foods by HPLC-ICP-MS: investigation of Cr(VI)/food interactions by size exclusion and Cr(VI) determination and stability by ion-exchange on-line separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchina, Véronique; de la Calle, Inmaculada; Séby, Fabienne

    2015-05-01

    A method has been developed for the specific and sensitive determination of Cr(VI) in foods. First, the interactions between Cr(VI) and the matrices were investigated by size-exclusion HPLC-ICP-MS (SEC-ICP-MS). Evidence was found for the complexation of Cr(VI) potentially present with the ligands. For quantification of Cr(VI), the method was based on an alkaline extraction (NH4OH solution at pH 11.5) followed by Cr(VI) determination by anion-exchange HPLC-ICP-MS. Analytical performances of the method were satisfactory in terms of linearity, specificity, accuracy, repeatability, and intermediate precision. Detection limits ranged from 1 to 10 μg/kg, depending on the matrices investigated. The method was then applied for the determination of Cr(VI) in several products (dairy products, flour, chocolate, vegetables, fruits, meat, fish, eggs, and beverages) from different brands and origins. Cr(VI) was found in none of the samples investigated. To further investigate the reason for this absence, a stability study of spiked Cr(VI) was therefore conducted. A semi-skimmed cow milk was selected for this study. Cr(VI) was shown to be unstable in this matrix with a degradation rate increasing with the temperature. PMID:25772568

  1. K Basin sludge dissolution engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westra, A.G.

    1998-08-28

    The purpose of this engineering study is to investigate the available technology related to dissolution of the K Basin sludge in nitric acid. The conclusion of this study along with laboratory and hot cell tests with actual sludge samples will provide the basis for beginning conceptual design of the sludge dissolver. The K Basin sludge contains uranium oxides, fragments of metallic U, and some U hydride as well as ferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum oxides and hydroxides, windblown sand that infiltrated the basin enclosure, ion exchange resin, and miscellaneous materials. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be conditioned so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System waste acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the underground storage tanks. Sludge conditioning will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and then reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. There will be five distinct feed streams to the sludge conditioning process two from the K East (KE) Basin and three from the K West (KW) Basin. The composition of the floor and pit sludges which contain more iron oxides and sand than uranium is much different than the canister sludges which are composed of mostly uranium oxides. The sludge conditioning equipment will be designed to process all of the sludge streams, but some of the operating parameters will be adjusted as necessary to handle the different sludge stream compositions. The volume of chemical additions and the amount of undissolved solids will be much different for floor and pit sludge than for canister sludge. Dissolution of uranium metal and uranium dioxide has been studied quite thoroughly and much information is available. Both uranium metal and uranium dioxide have been dissolved on a large scale in nuclear fuel

  2. Modifed Great Basin Extent (Buffered)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Two different great basin perimeter files were intersected and dissolved using ArcGIS 10.2.2 to create the outer perimeter of the great basin for use modeling...

  3. AM(VI) PARTITIONING STUDIES: FY14 FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce J Mincher

    2014-10-01

    The use of higher oxidation states of americium in partitioning from the lanthanides is under continued investigation by the sigma team. This is based on the hypothesis that Am(VI) can be produced and remain stable in irradiated first cycle raffinate solution long enough to perform solvent extraction for separations. The stability of Am(VI) to autoreduction was measured using millimolar americium concentrations in a 1-cm cell with a Cary 6000 UV/Vis spectrophotometer for data acquisition. At millimolar americium concentrations, Am(VI) is stable enough against its own autoreduction for separations purposes. A second major accomplishment during FY14 was the hot test. Americium oxidation and extraction was performed using a centrifugal contactor-based test bed consisting of an extraction stage and two stripping stages. Sixty-three percent americium extraction was obtained in one extraction stage, in agreement with batch contacts. Promising electrochemical oxidation results have also been obtained, using terpyridine ligand derivatized electrodes for binding of Am(III). Approximately 50 % of the Am(III) was oxidized to Am(V) over the course of 1 hour. It is believed that this is the first demonstration of the electrolytic oxidation of americium in a non-complexing solution. Finally, an initial investigation of Am(VI) extraction using diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA) was performed.

  4. ViPiA: A Project for European Entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folinas, Dimitris; Manthou, Vicky; Vlachopoulou, Maro

    2006-01-01

    The Virtual Pre-Incubator Accelerator (ViPiA) is a two-year project funded by the European Commission. The main goal of the programme is to create a training package for would-be entrepreneurs to assist them in developing their new venture concepts to a level at which they become attractive to potential investors. This paper describes and…

  5. Chromatographic separation of Te(IV) and Te(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valence separation of Te(IV) from Te(VI) by circular paper chromatography employing a number of solvent systems including pyridine is described. The differential migrations of the two ions are explained on the basis of differential solubilization, complexation and precipitation. The separated ions are estimated polarographically. (author)

  6. Vi har beskæftigelseskrise, ikke uddannelseskrise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou; Skou Grindsted, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Universiteterne er for dårlige, og kandidaternes kompetencer er forkerte, derfor ender mange i arbejdsløshed, mener Danmarks Akkrediteringsinstitution, Produktivitetskommissionen og DI. Men for få år siden var der mangel på højtuddannet arbejdskraft, så måske har vi et beskæftigelsesproblem snare...

  7. Synthesis and characterization of uranium(VI) chloride fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium (VI) chloride fluorides were synthesized by the reaction of liquid HCl and solid UF6 between -80 and -114 deg C. These dark red compounds are unstable above -40 to -60 deg C. The simplest formulas derived from compositional analysis are UF5Cl and UF4Cl2. (author)

  8. vi-Strauss, Caduveo Body Painting and the Readymade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiseman, Boris Nicholas Daniel

    2008-01-01

    of various forms of avant-garde art, from Duchamp's readymades, to Anthony Caro's abstract sculptures and assemblages by the Nouveau Réaliste artist Arman.  Although these forms of art would no doubt constitute, for Lévi-Strauss, instances of what he calls, pejoratively, an ‘academism of the...

  9. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This method is first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  10. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This methodis first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  11. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe56. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on ''tapes.'' Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the ''tape'' number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use

  12. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis and application of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based on high temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has become one of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. This method is first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkers in 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and later extended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well as anisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod. This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystal synthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied by characterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and products and following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on these results, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction between the precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth of nanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theory calculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursor decomposition and monomer formation pathway. Based on the proposed reaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses water as a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSe and CdS nanorods

  13. Museu del vi de Vilafranca del Penedès

    OpenAIRE

    Soler Solà, Jordi

    2006-01-01

    Ampliació del Museu del Vi de Vilafranca per tal que es doti d'eines, de recursos i de programes que li permetin adquirir una identitat pròpia i treballar en les funcions que li han de ser pròpies: la conservació, la recerca i la restitució del coneixement a la ciutadania.

  14. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type VI in Individuals from Northern Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Leanne; Bardai, Ghalib; Moffatt, Pierre; Al-Jallad, Hadil; Trejo, Pamela; Glorieux, Francis H; Rauch, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type VI is a recessively inherited form of OI that is caused by mutations in SERPINF1, the gene coding for pigment-epithelium derived factor (PEDF). Here, we report on two apparently unrelated children with OI type VI who had the same unusual homozygous variant in intron 6 of SERPINF1 (c.787-10C>G). This variant created a novel splice site that led to the in-frame addition of three amino acids to PEDF (p.Lys262_Ile263insLeuSerGln). Western blotting showed that skin fibroblasts with this mutation produced PEDF but failed to secrete it. Both children were treated with intravenous bisphosphonates, but the treatment of Individual 1 was switched to subcutaneous injections of denosumab (dose 1 mg per kg body weight, repeated every 3 months). An iliac bone sample obtained after 5 denosumab injections (and 3 months after the last injection) showed no change in the increased osteoid parameters that are typical of OI type VI, but the number of osteoclasts in trabecular bone was markedly increased. This suggests that the effect of denosumab on osteoclast suppression is of shorter duration in children with OI type VI than what has previously been reported on adults with osteoporosis. PMID:26815784

  15. Selective Chromium(VI) Ligands Identified Using Combinatorial Peptoid Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Abigail S.; Zhou, Effie Y.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a world-wide water contaminant that is currently without cost-effective and efficient remediation strategies. This is in part due to a lack of ligands that can bind it amid an excess of innocuous ions in aqueous solution. We present herein the design and application of a peptoid-based library of ligand candidates for toxic metal ions. A selective screening process was used to identify members of the library that can bind to Cr(VI) species at neutral pH and in the presence of a large excess of spectator ions. Eleven sequences were identified, and their affinities were compared using titrations monitored with UV-Vis spectroscopy. To identify the interactions involved in coordination and specificity, we evaluated the effects of sequence substitutions and backbone variation in the highest affinity structure. Additional characterization of the complex formed between this sequence and Cr(VI) was performed using NMR spectroscopy. To evaluate the ability of the developed sequences to remediate contaminated solutions, the structures were synthesized on a solid-phase resin and incubated with environmental water samples that contained simulated levels of chromium contamination. The synthetic structures demonstrated the ability to reduce the amount of toxic chromium to levels within the range of the EPA contamination guidelines. In addition to providing some of the first selective ligands for Cr(VI), these studies highlight the promise of peptoid sequences as easily-prepared components of environmental remediation materials. PMID:24195610

  16. Investigations on photoelectrocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) over titanium dioxide anode and metal cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) reductions of Cr(VI) based on TiO2 thin films were investigated under various conditions. Photogenerated electrons transferred from TiO2 thin film to cathode can contribute to PEC reduction of Cr(VI) only when the Fermi level of cathode lies above the chemical potential of Cr(VI), almost independent on the applied voltage of the direct current. In addition, the TiO2-coated anode is the major site that accommodates the PEC reduction of Cr(VI) with hole scavenger citric acid, regardless of the Fermi level of the cathode. Although electron transfer from TiO2 to Cr(VI) is an exothermic process, the photogenerated holes in TiO2 can markedly hamper Cr(VI) reduction over the TiO2 thin film by oxidizing the lower-valence Cr back to Cr(VI), which may be counteracted by the citric acid. This research provides some in-depth insights on developing photocatalysts which enable highly efficient PEC reduction of Cr(VI) in the future. - Highlights: • Cr(VI) reduction on TiO2 photoanode is dominant with the addition of citric acid. • Cr(VI) is reduced on photocathode with Fermi level above Cr(VI) chemical potential. • Photogenerated holes can hamper Cr(VI) photoreduction over TiO2

  17. Synergetic Transformations of Multiple Pollutants Driven by Cr(VI)-Sulfite Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Liu, Yukun; Zheng, Jingtang; Tan, Minghui; Wang, Zhaohui; Wu, Mingbo

    2015-10-20

    Reduction of Cr(VI) is often deemed necessary to detoxify chromium contaminants; however, few investigations utilized this reaction for the purpose of treating other industrial wastewaters. Here a widely used Cr(VI)-sulfite reaction system was upgraded to simultaneously transform multiple pollutants, namely, the reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of sulfite and other organic/inorganic pollutants in an acidic solution. As(III) was selected as a probe pollutant to examine the oxidation capacity of a Cr(VI)-sulfite system. Both (•)OH and SO4(•-) were considered as the primary oxidants for As(III) oxidation, based on the results of electron spin resonance, fluorescence spectroscopy, and specific radicals quenching. As(III)-scavenging, oxidative radicals greatly accelerated Cr(VI) reduction and simultaneously consumed less sulfite. In comparison with a Cr(VI)-H2O2 system with 50 μM Cr(VI), Cr(VI), the sulfite system had excellent performance for both As(III) oxidation and Cr(VI) reduction at pH 3.5. Moreover, in this escalated process, less sulfite was required to reduce Cr(VI) than the traditional Cr(VI) reduction by sulfite process. This effectively improves the environmental compatibility of this Cr(VI) detoxification process, alleviating the potential for SO2 release and sulfate ion production in water. Generally, this study provides an excellent example of a "waste control by waste" strategy for the detoxification of multiple industrial pollutants. PMID:26384045

  18. Reversing the indus basin closure

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    After independence, a swift and extensive development of Indus river basin has intensified commitment of water resources. During dry period, the indication of over commitment and basin closure are visible. In the beginning 2000s, he river basin water resources were committed to more than 99% without any environmental flows. The paper tries to unfold drivers closing the Indus basin and the scope for change. Defining and implementing water allocation mechanism to ascertain equity, sustainabilit...

  19. O vi Emission Imaging of a Galaxy with the Hubble Space Telescope: a Warm Gas Halo Surrounding the Intense Starburst SDSS J115630.63+500822.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Matthew; Melinder, Jens; Östlin, Göran; Scarlata, Claudia; Lehnert, Matthew D.; Mannerström-Jansson, Gustav

    2016-09-01

    We report results from a new Hubble Space Telescope campaign that targets the O vi λ λ 1032,1038 Å doublet in emission around intensely star-forming galaxies. The program aims to characterize the energy balance in starburst galaxies and gas cooling in the difficult-to-map coronal temperature regime of 2{--}5× {10}5 K. We present the first resolved image of gas emission in the O vi line. Our target, SDSS J115630.63+500822.1, is very compact in the continuum but displays O vi emission to radii of 23 kpc. The surface brightness profile is well fit by an exponential with a scale length of 7.5 kpc. This is 10 times the size of the photoionized gas, and we estimate that about 1/6 the total O vi luminosity comes from resonantly scattered continuum radiation. Spectroscopy—which closely resembles a stacked sample of archival spectra—confirms the O vi emission, and determines the column density and outflow velocity from blueshifted absorption. The combination of measurements enables a large number of calculations with few assumptions. The O vi regions fill only ∼ {10}-3 of the volume. By comparing the cooling time with the cloud sound-crossing time, the cooling distance with the size, and the pressure in the O vi and nebular gas, we conclude that the O vi-bearing gas cannot have been lifted to the scale height at this temperature, and must be cooling in situ through this coronal temperature regime. The coronal phase contains ∼1% of the ionized mass, and its kinetic energy at a given instant is ∼1% of the budget set by supernova feedback. However, a much larger amount of the gas must have cooled through this phase during the star formation episode. The outflow exceeds the escape velocity and the gas may become unbound, but it will recombine before it escapes and become visible to Lyman (and O i) spectroscopy. The mapping of this gas represents a crucial step in further constraining galaxy formation scenarios and guiding the development of future astronomical

  20. Immersed single-drop microextraction interfaced with sequential injection analysis for determination of Cr(VI) in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-drop microextraction (SDME) and sequential injection analysis have been hyphenated for ultratrace metal determination by Electrothermal-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (ETAAS). The novel method was targeted on extraction of the Cr(VI)-APDC chelate and encompasses the potential of SDME as a miniaturized and virtually solvent-free preconcentration technique, the ability of sequential injection analysis to handle samples and the versatility of furnace autosamplers for introducing microliter samples in ETAAS. The variables influencing the microextraction of Cr(VI) onto an organic solvent drop, i.e., type of organic solvent, microextraction time, stirring rate of the sample solution, drop volume, immersion depth of the drop, salting-out effect, temperature of the sample, concentration of the complexing agent and pH of the sample solution were fully investigated. For a 5 and 20 min microextraction time, the preconcentration factors were 20 and 70, respectively. The detection limit was 0.02 μg/L of Cr(VI) and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was 7%. The SDME-SIA-ETAAS technique was validated against BCR CRM 544 (lyophilized solution) and applied to ultrasensitive determination of Cr(VI) in natural waters

  1. Effect of Phosphate on U(VI) Sorption to Montmorillonite: Ternary Complexation and Precipitation Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming; Wang, Zimeng; Mehta, Vrajesh; Giammar, Daniel; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2016-02-15

    Phosphate addition is a potential treatment method to lower the solubility of U(VI) in soil and groundwater systems by causing U(VI) phosphate precipitation as well as enhancing adsorption. Previous work has shown that iron oxide surfaces may facilitate the nucleation of U(VI) phosphate minerals and, that under weakly acidic conditions, phosphate also enhances U(VI) adsorption to such phases. Like iron oxides, clays are important reactive phases in the subsurface but little is known about the interaction of U(VI) and phosphate with these minerals. The effect of aqueous phosphate on U(VI) binding to Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2) in air-equilibrated systems was investigated. Equilibrium U(VI) uptake to montmorillonite was determined at pH 4, 6 and 8 at discrete initial phosphate concentrations between 0 and 100 μM. The observed behavior of U(VI) indicates a transition from adsorption to precipitation with increasing total uranium and phosphate concentrations at all pH values. At the highest phosphate concentration examined at each pH value, a barrier to U(VI) phosphate nucleation is observed. At lower concentrations, phosphate has no effect on macroscopic U(VI) adsorption. To assess the mechanisms of U(VI)-phosphate interactions on smectite surfaces, U(VI) speciation was investigated under selected conditions using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Samples above the precipitation threshold display EXAFS and LIFS spectral signatures consistent with the autunite family of U(VI) phosphate minerals. However, at lower U(VI) concentrations, changes in LIFS spectra upon phosphate addition suggest that U(VI)-phosphate ternary surface complexes form on the montmorillonite surface at pH 4 and 6 despite the lack of a macroscopic effect on adsorption. The speciation of solid-associated U(VI) below the precipitation threshold at pH 8 is dominated by U(VI)-carbonate surface complexes. This work

  2. Effect of phosphate on U(VI) sorption to montmorillonite: Ternary complexation and precipitation barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming; Wang, Zimeng; Mehta, Vrajesh S.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2016-02-01

    Phosphate addition is a potential treatment method to lower the solubility of U(VI) in soil and groundwater systems by causing U(VI) phosphate precipitation as well as enhancing adsorption. Previous work has shown that iron oxide surfaces may facilitate the nucleation of U(VI) phosphate minerals and, that under weakly acidic conditions, phosphate also enhances U(VI) adsorption to such phases. Like iron oxides, clays are important reactive phases in the subsurface but little is known about the interaction of U(VI) and phosphate with these minerals. The effect of aqueous phosphate on U(VI) binding to Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2) in air-equilibrated systems was investigated. Equilibrium U(VI) uptake to montmorillonite was determined at pH 4, 6 and 8 at discrete initial phosphate concentrations between 0 and 100 μM. The observed behavior of U(VI) indicates a transition from adsorption to precipitation with increasing total uranium and phosphate concentrations at all pH values. At the highest phosphate concentration examined at each pH value, a barrier to U(VI) phosphate nucleation is observed. At lower concentrations, phosphate has no effect on macroscopic U(VI) adsorption. To assess the mechanisms of U(VI)-phosphate interactions on smectite surfaces, U(VI) speciation was investigated under selected conditions using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Samples above the precipitation threshold display EXAFS and LIFS spectral signatures consistent with the autunite family of U(VI) phosphate minerals. However, at lower U(VI) concentrations, changes in LIFS spectra upon phosphate addition suggest that U(VI)-phosphate ternary surface complexes form on the montmorillonite surface at pH 4 and 6 despite the lack of a macroscopic effect on adsorption. The speciation of solid-associated U(VI) below the precipitation threshold at pH 8 is dominated by U(VI)-carbonate surface complexes. This work

  3. Interaction of aerobic soil bacteria with plutonium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the interaction of Pu(VI) with Pseudomonas stutzeri ATCC 17588 and Bacillus sphaericus ATCC 14577, representatives of the main aerobic groups of soil bacteria present in the upper soil layers. The biosorption studies have shown that these soil bacteria accumulate high amounts of Pu(VI). The relative sorption efficiency toward Pu(VI) related to the amount of biomass used decreased with increasing biomass concentration due to increased agglomeration of the bacteria resulting in a decrease of the number of available complexing groups. Spores of Bacillus sphaericus showed a higher biosorption than the vegetative cells at low biomass concentration which decreased significantly with increasing biomass concentration. At higher biomass concentrations (> 0.7 g/L), the vegetative cells of both strains and the spores of B. sphaericus showed comparable sorption efficiencies. Investigations on the pH dependency of the biosorption and extraction studies with 0.01 M EDTA solution have shown that the biosorption of plutonium is a reversible process and the plutonium is bound by surface complexation. Optical absorption spectroscopy showed that one third of the initially present Pu(VI) was reduced to Pu(V) after 24 hours. Kinetic studies and solvent extraction to separate different oxidation states of Pu after contact with the biomass provided further information on the yield and the kinetics of the bacteria-mediated reduction. Long-term studies showed that also 16% of Pu(IV) was formed after one month. The slow kinetics of this process indicate that under our experimental conditions the Pu(IV) was not a produced by microbial reduction but seemed to be rather the result of the disproportionation of the formed Pu(V) or autoreduction of Pu(VI). (orig.)

  4. A study of solid-liquid phase equilibria of Pu(VI) and U(VI) in aqueous carbonate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solubility products of PuO2CO3(s) and UO2CO3(s) are determined in 0.1 M NaClO4 at 22 ± 1 C under 100%, 1% and 0.03% CO2. The carbonate precipitates of Pu(VI) and U(VI), prepared under 100% CO2 at neutral pH, are characterized by powder diffraction measurement, IR spectroscopy and UV spectroscopy. The solubility experiment is carried out in different CO32-concentrations and pH. The speciation of PuO22+ and UO22+ in equilibrium solutions is made by UV spectroscopy and the total concentrations of Pu(VI) and U(VI) are determined by liquid scintillation spectrometry and ICP-AES, respectively. The concentration correlation of [MO22+] vs. [CO32-] gives a slope of negative unity, while [MO22+] vs. pH shows a slope of -2 irrespective of CO2 partial pressure. The fact concludes that the present experiment comprises solid-liquid phase equilibrium reactions with only MO2CO3(s). The solubility products converted to zero ionic strength are found to be logKspo = -14.84 ± 0.10 for PuO2CO3(s) and logKspo = -14.22 ± 0.14 for UO2CO3(s). (orig.)

  5. South Bohemian basins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spudil, J.; Brož, B.; Dašková, Jiřina; Holcová, K.; Kvaček, Z.; Pešek, J.; Svobodová, Marcela; Sýkorová, Ivana; Teodoridis, V.

    Prague: Czech Geological Survey, 2014, s. 190-206 ISBN 978-80-7075-862-5 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/06/0653 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:67985831 Keywords : Tertiary basins * Czech Republic * Cenomanian and Tertiary lignite * geology * stratigraphy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  6. Pasco Basin hydrometeorological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides detailed precipitation and evapotranspiration distributions for the Pasco Basin for use in groundwater recharge calculations. The results are shown on precipitation and evapotranspiration distribution maps. The parameters, calculation methods, sensitivity determinations, and fitting methods used in the development of these maps are also discussed

  7. The Mediterranean basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas, Carmen; Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Barbaro, A.;

    2008-01-01

    genetically from the rest of the populations in the Mediterranean area. This result supports the hypothesis of a low incidence of the south-north genetic interchange at the western shores of the Mediterranean basin. A low genetic distance was found between populations in the Middle East and the western part...

  8. Restoring the Nile Basin

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2015-01-01

    Watershed management has come to be recognized as a critical issue in the Nile Basin. Upstream land use can cause degradation and soil erosion, resulting in lower agricultural yields locally and causing sedimentation downstream. The increased sediment load causes economic problems by reducing water quality, and irrigation and hydropower potential, as well as increasing flooding. This note ...

  9. Reaction of chromium(VI) with glutathione or with hydrogen peroxide: identification of reactive intermediates and their role in chromium(VI)-induced DNA damage.

    OpenAIRE

    Aiyar, J; Berkovits, H J; Floyd, R A; Wetterhahn, K E

    1991-01-01

    The types of reactive intermediates generated upon reduction of chromium(VI) by glutathione or hydrogen peroxide and the resulting DNA damage have been determined. In vitro, reaction of chromium(VI) with glutathione led to formation of two chromium(V) complexes and the glutathione thiyl radical. When chromium(VI) was reacted with DNA in the presence of glutathione, chromium-DNA adducts were obtained, with no DNA strand breakage. The level of chromium-DNA adduct formation correlated with chrom...

  10. 11. Regional congress of IRPA. Austrian - Hungarian - Yugoslavian radiation protection meeting. Recent developments and new trends in radiation protection. Proceedings. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is Volume 2 of the proceedings, Volume 1 is treated separately. 44 contributions are presented. The session headings are: V. Dosimetry. VI. Environmental. VII. The hazards of fetus or embryo following exposure to ionizing radiation. A List of participants is given. (A.N.)

  11. Bibliography, geophysical data locations, and well core listings for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    To date, comprehensive basin analysis and petroleum system modeling studies have not been performed on any of the basins in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Of these basins, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been selected for study because it is the most petroliferous basin in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, small- and medium-size companies are drilling the majority of the exploration wells. These companies do not have the resources to perform basin analysis or petroleum system modeling research studies nor do they have the resources to undertake elaborate information searches through the volumes of publicly available data at the universities, geological surveys, and regulatory agencies in the region. The Advanced Geologic Basin Analysis Program of the US Department of Energy provides an avenue for studying and evaluating sedimentary basins. This program is designed to improve the efficiency of the discovery of the nation`s remaining undiscovered oil resources by providing improved access to information available in the public domain and by increasing the amount of public information on domestic basins. This report provides the information obtained from Year 1 of this study of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. The work during Year 1 focused on inventorying the data files and records of the major information repositories in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and making these inventories easily accessible in an electronic format.

  12. Equations for estimating timber volume in the region of the River Basin of Ituxi, Lábrea, Amazon, Brazil Equações para estimativa de volume de madeira para a região da bacia do Rio Ituxi, Lábrea, AM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Thaines

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    To quantify the stock of commercial timber in forests demands efficient methods, making possible to estimate efficiently and accurately the present and future timber volume. The aim of this work was to  adjust the mathematical models used to estimate timber volume, allowing the determination of the timber potential of a region with greater accuracy and lower cost. The study was conducted at Lábrea, State of  Amazonas, Brazil in an area of 6,000 ha, inserted in the Project Forest Management Seringal Iracema II. The forest is predominantly dense with emergent trees, also with the occurrence of open forest with bamboo and palms. For the process of adjusting the models to estimate the volume of commercial timber, 141 trees of commercial species were cubed by Smalian method. The equations developed for the Forest Management Project Seringal Iracema II are valid for diameters between 50 cm and 140 cm and for forests with similar structure; to standing trees due to its simplicity and accuracy, the best equation was Kopezki-Gehrardt (V = - 0.6870 + 0.00103 d²; for felling trees or for studies of biomass and carbon stock, the equation indicated is Schumacher-Hall (LnV = -9.5452 + 2.12837 Ln (d + 0.72209Ln (h.

    doi: 10.4336/2010.pfb.30.64.283

    A necessidade de quantificação do estoque de matéria-prima florestal, em floresta nativa, conduz para a busca de métodos eficientes de estimativa do volume de madeira, que possibilitem quantificar o estoque presente e futuro de maneira eficiente e precisa. O objetivo desse trabalho foi ajustar modelos matemáticos, para estimativa de volume comercial de madeira, permitindo a determinação do potencial madeireiro de uma região, com maior precisão e menor custo. O estudo foi realizado no Município de Lábrea, AM, em uma área de 6 mil ha, inserida no Projeto de Manejo Florestal Seringal Iracema II. A floresta é predominantemente densa com árvores emergentes, também com ocorrência de Foresta

  13. Pu(VI) hydrolysis: further evidence for a dimeric plutonyl hydroxide and contrasts with U(VI) chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Sean D; Neu, Mary P

    2006-02-20

    A significant fraction of plutonium that is soluble in environmental waters and other aqueous solutions can be present as complexes of plutonyl, PuO2(2+). Few thermodynamic data are available for this ion, representing a problematic gap in plutonium chemistry and in the forecasting of radionuclide behavior under contamination and nuclear repository conditions. To address this need and more accurately determine the stoichiometry and stability of the basic hydrolytic products, we completed complimentary potentiometric and spectrophotometric studies of plutonium(VI) hydrolysis over the concentration range of 10(-2) to 10(-5) M Pu(VI). Dinuclear hydroxide species (PuO2)2(OH)2(2+) and (PuO2)2(OH)4(0)(aq) with hydrolysis constants log beta(2,2) = -7.79 +/- 0.20 and log beta(4,2) = -19.3 +/- 0.5 are indicated in all experiments of millimolar Pu(VI), 0.10 M NaNO3 solutions at 25 degrees C. At lower Pu(VI) concentrations, at and below 10(-4) M, the monomeric species PuO2OH+ and PuO2(OH)2(0)(aq) form with hydrolysis constants of log beta(1,1) = -5.76 +/- 0.07 and log beta(2,1) = -11.69 +/- 0.05, respectively. Distinct optical absorbance bands at 842 and 845 nm are reported for the mononuclear and dinuclear first hydrolysis species. Standard hydrolysis constants at zero ionic strength were calculated from the experimentally determined constants using the specific ion interaction theory. The Pu(VI) hydrolysis species and constants are compared with results from previous studies for plutonium and uranium. Major differences between uranyl and plutonyl hydrolysis are described. PMID:16472001

  14. Bransfield Basin and Cordilleran Orogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalziel, I. W.; Austin, J. A.; Barker, D. H.; Christensen, G. L.

    2003-12-01

    Tectonic uplift of the Andean Cordillera was initiated in the mid-Cretaceous with inversion of a composite marginal basin along 7500 km of the continental margin of South America, from Peru to Tierra del Fuego and the North Scotia Ridge. In the southernmost Andes, from 50-56 degrees S, the quasi-oceanic floor of this basin is preserved in the obducted ophiolitic rocks of the Rocas Verdes (Green Rocks) basin. We suggest that the basin beneath Bransfield Strait, 61-64 degrees S, separating the South Shetland Islands from the Antarctic Peninsula, constitutes a modern analog for the Rocas Verdes basin. Marine geophysical studies of Bransfield basin have been undertaken over the past 12 years by the Institute for Geophysics, University of Texas at Austin, under the auspices of the Ocean Sciences Division and United States Antarctic Program, National Science Foundation. These studies have elucidated the structure and evolution of Bransfield basin for comparison with the Rocas Verdes basin, with a view to eventual forward modeling of the evolution of a hypothetical cordilleran orogen by compression and inversion of the basin. These are the processes that can be observed in the tectonic transformation of the Rocas Verdes basin into the southernmost Andean cordillera, as South America moved rapidly westward in an Atlantic-Indian ocean hot-spot reference frame during the mid-Cretaceous. Multi-channel reflection seismic data from the Bransfield basin reveal an asymmetric structural architecture characterized by steeply-dipping normal faults flanking the South Shetlands island arc and gently dipping listric normal faults along the Antarctic Peninsula margin. Normal fault polarity reversals appear to be related to distributed loci of magmatic activity within the basin. This architecture is remarkably similar to that deduced from field structural studies of the Rocas Verdes basin. Notably, the oceanward-dipping, low angle normal faults along the Antarctic Peninsula margin

  15. Influence of Mass Transfer on Bioavailability and Kinetic Rate of Uranium(VI) Biotransformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contaminated subsurface sediments, U(VI) resides in both interparticle (where active water flow occurs) and intraparticle domains (where static water resides). Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) can reduce aqueous (interparticle) U(VI) to U(IV) under anoxic conditions yielding an insoluble precipitate [U(IV)O2]. Intraparticle U(VI) can only be reduced by DMRB if it dissolves and diffuses to the interparticle domain populated by microbiota, or if the DMRB release, or dispose of electron to soluble compounds that can diffuse to, and react with intraparticle U(VI) precipitates. At DOE Hanford site, recent characterization of U(VI) speciation and physical location in 30-year contaminated sediments demonstrated that U(VI) resides as a U(VI)-silicate microprecipitates in small fractures and cleavages within sediment particle grains exhibiting pore sizes of a few microns or less. The U(VI) microprecipitates dissolved slowly into undersaturated pore water, but the dissolution kinetics and diffusive rate of U(VI) transport from intraparticle regions was slow when compared to the reduction rate of aqueous U(VI) by DMRB. These results indicated that: (1) a majority of the sorbed U(VI) pool was not physically accessible to DMRB due to size restrictions of the grain porosity, and (2) the bioavailability and overall rates of microbial U(VI) reduction in the sediments could be limited by the mass transfer rates of U(VI) from intraparticle regions. This research is focused on the bioavailability and kinetic rates of microbial reduction of U(VI) associated with intraparticle regions. The understanding of the influence of mass transfer on microbial reduction of U(VI) is needed not only at the Hanford site, but also at Oak Ridge FRC, where a critical issue is the long term diffusion of U(VI) from fine-grained saprolite matrix that is physically inaccessible to DMRB. The objectives are: (1) Develop approaches to characterize microscopic properties of mass transfer

  16. Voltammetric behaviour of uranium(VI) in sulfuric acid solutions containing pyridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was shown that 8.8 x 10-5 to 4.4 x 10-3 M uranium(VI) solutions in sulfuric acid containing pyridine give a clearly defined cathodic peak with a height proportional to uranium(VI) concentration. Under the specified conditions, the electroreduction of uranium(VI) is irreversible and involves one electron, the limiting current of uranium(VI) is diffusion- and kinetically controlled. The kinetic parameters of the process under study were determined, and the effect of associated elements on the voltammetric behavior of uranium(VI) in pyridine-containing sulfuric acid supporting electrolytes was estimated

  17. Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solution by dried activated sludge biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch experiments were conducted to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solution using activated sludge biomass. The effects of acid pretreatment of the biomass, initial pH, biomass and Cr(VI) concentrations on Cr(VI) removal efficiency were investigated. Proton consumption during the removal process and the reducing capacity of sludge biomass were studied. The results show that acid pretreatment could significantly improve Cr(VI) removal efficiency and increase Cr(VI) reducing capacity by 20.4%. Cr(VI) removal was remarkably pH-dependent; lower pH (pH = 1, 2) facilitated Cr(VI) reduction while higher pH (pH = 3, 4) favored sorption of the converted Cr(III). Lower Cr(VI) concentration as well as higher biomass concentration could accelerate Cr(VI) removal. Cr(VI) reduction was not the only reason for proton consumption in the removal process. Pseudo-second-order adsorption kinetic model could successfully simulate Cr(VI) removal except under higher pH conditions (pH = 3, 4).

  18. Sediment Transportation Induced by Deep-Seated Landslides in a Debris Flow Basin in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meei Ling; Chen, Te Wei; Chen, Yong Sheng; Sin Jhuang, Han

    2016-04-01

    Typhoon Morakot brought huge amount of rainfall to the southern Taiwan in 2009 and caused severe landslides and debris flow hazard. After Typhoon Morakot, it was found that the volume of sediment transported by the debris flow and its effects on the affected area were much more significant compared to previous case history, which may due to the huge amount of rainfall causing significant deep-seated landslides in the basin. In this study, the effects and tendency of the sediment transportation in a river basin following deep-seated landslides caused by typhoon Morakot were evaluated. We used LiDAR, DEM, and aerial photo to identify characteristics of deep-seated landslides in a debris flow river basin, KSDF079 in Liuoguey District, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. Eight deep-seated landslides were identified in the basin. To estimate the potential landslide volume associated with the deep-seated landslides, the stability analysis was conducted to locate the critical sliding surface, and the potential landside volume was estimated based on the estimation equation proposed by the International Geotechnical Societies' UNESCO Working Party on World Landslide Inventory (WP/WLI, 1990). The total potential landslide volume of the eight deep-seated landslides in KSDF079 basin was about 28,906,856 m3. Topographic analysis was performed by using DEM before and LiDAR derived DEM after typhoon Morakot to calculate the landslide volume transported. The result of erosion volume and deposition volume lead to a run out volume of 5,832,433 m3. The results appeared to consist well with the field condition and aerial photo. Comparing the potential landslide volume and run out volume of eight deep-seated landslides, it was found that the remaining potential landslide volume was about 80%. Field investigation and topographic analysis of the KSDF079 debris flow revealed that a significant amount of sediment deposition remained in the river channel ranging from the middle to the downstream

  19. Geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Oued Mya basin, Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benamrane, O.; Messaoudi, M.; Messelles, H. (Sonatrach Division Exploration, Algiers (Algeria))

    1993-09-01

    The Oued Mya hydrocarbon system is located in the Sahara basin. It is one of the best producing basins in Algeria, along with the Ghadames and Illizi basins. The stratigraphic section consists of Paleozoic and Mesozoic, and is about 5000 m thick. This intracratonic basin is limited to the north by the Toughourt saddle, and to the west and east it is flanked by regional arches, Allal-Tilghemt and Amguid-Hassi Messaoud, which culminate in the super giant Hassi Messaoud and Hassi R'mel hydrocarbon accumulations, respectively, producing oil from the Cambrian sands and gas from the Trissic sands. The primary source rock in this basin is lower Silurian shale, with an average thickness of 50 m and a total organic carbon of 6% (14% in some cases). Results of maturation modeling indicate that the lower Silurian source is in the oil window. The Ordovician shales are also source rocks, but in a second order. Clastic reservoirs are in the Trissic sequence, which is mainly fluvial deposits with complex alluvial channels, and the main target in the basin. Clastic reservoirs in the lower Devonian section have a good hydrocarbon potential east of the basin through a southwest-northwest orientation. The Late Trissic-Early Jurassic evaporites that overlie the Triassic clastic interval and extend over the entire Oued Mya basin, are considered to be a super-seal evaporite package, which consists predominantly of anhydrite and halite. For paleozoic targets, a large number of potential seals exist within the stratigraphic column. This super seal does not present oil dismigration possibilities. We can infer that a large amount of the oil generated by the Silurian source rock from the beginning of Cretaceous until now still is not discovered and significantly greater volumes could be trapped within structure closures and mixed or stratigraphic traps related to the fluvial Triassic sandstones, marine Devonian sands, and Cambrian-Ordovician reservoirs.

  20. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Dnieper-Donets Basin Province and Pripyat Basin Province, Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, using a geology-based assessment methodology, estimated mean volumes of technically recoverable, conventional, undiscovered petroleum resources at 84 million barrels of crude oil, 4.7 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 130 million barrels of natural gas liquids for the Dnieper-Donets Basin Province and 39 million barrels of crude oil, 48 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 1 million barrels of natural gas liquids for the Pripyat Basin Province. The assessments are part of a program to estimate these resources for priority basins throughout the world.

  1. Sorption behavior of U(VI), 234U(VI) and 238U(VI) onto fracture-filling clays in Beishan granite, Gansu: Application to selecting the site of high-level radwaste repository in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN; Maozhong; LUO; Xingzhang; WANG; Ju; JIN; Yuanxin; WAN

    2005-01-01

    The first results of sorption experiments of U(VI), 234U(VI) and 238U(VI) onto original (unpurified) fracture-filling clays from No.1 monzonitic granite intrusion, Beishan area, Gansu Province, China are reported. The monzonitic granite intrusion is a potential location for a high-level radwaste (HLW) repository in China. The present experimental results show that the maximum U(VI) sorption reached 92% at near-neutral Ph and the distribution coefficient (Kd) was 1226 Ml/g. A high sorption capacity of the fracture-filling clays in host rock on radioactive elements is necessary for HLW deep geological disposal repository. No preferential sorption of 234U onto the clays was found. Finally, the sorption of U(VI) onto the clays was also modeled using a surface complexation model.

  2. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II

  3. VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, inhibits migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been well characterized that flavonoids possess pronounced anticancer potentials including anti-angiogenesis, anti-metastasis, and pro-apoptosis. Herein, we report, for the first time, that VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, possesses anti-cancer properties. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-migration and anti-invasion activities of VI-14 in breast cancer cells. Our data indicate that VI-14 inhibits adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 cells treated with VI-14 display reduced activities and expressions of ECM degradation-associated proteins including matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and 9 (MMP-9) at both the protein and mRNA levels. Meanwhile, VI-14 treatment induces an up-regulated expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) and 2 (TIMP-2) in MDA-MB-231 cells. Western blotting results show that phosphorylation levels of critical components of the MAPK signaling pathway, including ERK, JNK and P38, are dramatically decreased in VI-14-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, treatment of VI-14 significantly decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Taken together, our data suggest that VI-14 treatment suppresses migration and motility of breast cancer cells, and VI-14 may be a potential compound for cancer therapy. Highlights: ► We report for the first time that VI-14 possesses anti-cancer properties. ► VI-14 weakens the adhesion, migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. ► VI-14 decreases the activities and expressions of MMP-2/9. ► VI-14 suppresses the phosphorylation levels of the MAPK signaling pathway. ► VI-14 decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of NF-κB and AP-1.

  4. VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, inhibits migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fanni; Li, Chenglin; Zhang, Haiwei; Lu, Zhijian [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Lu, Na [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China); Guo, Qinglong, E-mail: anticancer_drug@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Intervention, China Pharmaceutical University, 24 Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2012-06-01

    It has been well characterized that flavonoids possess pronounced anticancer potentials including anti-angiogenesis, anti-metastasis, and pro-apoptosis. Herein, we report, for the first time, that VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, possesses anti-cancer properties. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-migration and anti-invasion activities of VI-14 in breast cancer cells. Our data indicate that VI-14 inhibits adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 cells treated with VI-14 display reduced activities and expressions of ECM degradation-associated proteins including matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and 9 (MMP-9) at both the protein and mRNA levels. Meanwhile, VI-14 treatment induces an up-regulated expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) and 2 (TIMP-2) in MDA-MB-231 cells. Western blotting results show that phosphorylation levels of critical components of the MAPK signaling pathway, including ERK, JNK and P38, are dramatically decreased in VI-14-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, treatment of VI-14 significantly decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Taken together, our data suggest that VI-14 treatment suppresses migration and motility of breast cancer cells, and VI-14 may be a potential compound for cancer therapy. Highlights: ► We report for the first time that VI-14 possesses anti-cancer properties. ► VI-14 weakens the adhesion, migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. ► VI-14 decreases the activities and expressions of MMP-2/9. ► VI-14 suppresses the phosphorylation levels of the MAPK signaling pathway. ► VI-14 decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of NF-κB and AP-1.

  5. Flow injection solid phase extraction electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of Cr(VI) by selective separation and preconcentration on a lab-made hybrid mesoporous solid microcolumn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lab-made hybrid mesoporous solid was employed in a flow injection solid phase extraction electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (FI-SPE-ETAAS) system for the selective retention of Cr(VI). The solid was prepared by co-condensation of sodium tetraethylortosilicate and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane by sol-gel methodology and one-pot synthesis and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X ray diffraction spectroscopy, and scanning electronic microscopy. Adsorption capacities at different pH values of both, Cr(VI) and Cr(III), were also measured in order to obtain the optimum retention for Cr(VI) with no interference of Cr(III). The maximum capacity of adsorption (4.35 mmol g-1) was observed for pH values between 2-3, whilst Cr(III) was found to remain in solution (adsorption capacity = 0.007 mmol g-1). Then, a microcolumn (bed volume: 7.9 μL) was filled with the solid and inserted in the FI-ETAAS system for analytical purposes. Since the analyte was strongly retained by the filling in the anionic form, 0.1 mol L-1 hydroxylammonium chloride in 1 mol L-1 hydrochloric acid was selected as eluent due to its redox characteristics. In this way, the sorbed Cr(VI) was easily released in the cationic form. The enrichment factor (EF) was found as a compromise between sensitivity and sample throughput and a value of 27 was obtained under optimized conditions: pH 2, sample loading 2 mL min-1 (60 s), elution flow rate 0.5 ml min-1 (eluent volume: 75 μL). Under optimized conditions the limit of detection for Cr(VI) was 1.2 ng L-1, the precision, expressed as RSD was 2.5%, the sample throughput 21/h, and the microcolumn lifetime was over 300 adsorption/desorption cycles. Cr(III) determination was also performed by simply measuring its concentration at the end of the column and after Cr(VI) retention by the mesoporous solid. Applications of the methodology to the determination of Cr(VI) in deionized, osmosis, mineral, effluent and river waters showed very

  6. Contribution to the study of the redox couple Np(VI)/Np(V) in the presence of uranium(VI) in solutions of nitric acid and nitrous acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The redox behavior of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple was the subject of a spectrometric study of the Np(VI) reduction reaction in nitric acid solutions (4 to 5 M) containing variable concentrations (1.5 to 3.5 x 10-3 M) of nitrous acid. A low nitrous acid concentration and a high nitric acid concentration were found to favor the stabilization of Np(VI). The stoichiometric coefficients of nitrous acid and nitric acid in the Np(VI) reduction reaction were determined thermodynamically, although only the reaction order with respect to HNO2 could be calculated from a kinetic analysis. Adding nitrate ions to a HNO3/HNO2 solution enhanced the stability of neptunium at oxidation state +VI, but also increased the reduction rate. When uranium(VI) was added to the HNO3/HNO2 solutions, the total quantity of neptunium at oxidation state +V (either free or as a Np(V)-U(VI) complex) remained practically unchanged, as did the Np(VI) reduction rate. The electrochemical behavior of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple was investigated in a weak acidic medium by voltammetry with an ultra-micro-electrode (UME). The oxidation wave limiting current variation was a linear function of the Np(V) concentration when a gold UME was used, but not with a platinum UME; the reduction wave limiting current variation versus the Np(V) concentration was linear with either gold or platinum UMEs. The presence of the Np(V)-U(VI) complex in the neptunium solutions was characterized by a shift in the normal apparent potential of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple toward anodic potentials consistent with the previously determined values of the complexation constants. (author)

  7. Petroleum exploration potential of Tamtsag Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Guo-qing; GUO Qing-xia; ZHANG Ya-jin; ZHAO Hong-wen

    2004-01-01

    The Tamtsag Basin is located in the extreme eastern portion of the Mongolia. The Basin and its counterpart in China (the Hailar Basin) are united a whole basin on the structural setting. In recent years, the Tamtsag Basin attracts more and more attention with the important exploration discovered in the 19th block by SOCO and in Hailar Basin of China. This paper discusses the exploration potential of Tamtsag Basin from the viewpoint of petroleum geology.

  8. Volumes in Hyperbolic Space

    OpenAIRE

    Laternser, Christina

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the investigation of volumes of large Coxeter hyperbolic polyhedron. First, the paper investigates the smallest possible volume for a large Coxeter hyperbolic polyhedron and then looks at the volume of pyramids with one vertex at infinity.

  9. FTIR Spectroscopic Characterization Of II-VI Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, G. L. E.; Szofran, F. R.

    1991-01-01

    Combination of commercial Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with computer and special-purpose software constitutes highly automated facility for acquisition and processing of infrared transmission or reflection spectral image data. Intended principally to acquire transmission spectra of some compounds of elements in groups II and VI of periodic table. System used to characterize specimens of II/VI alloy semiconductors grown by directional solidification and quenching. Transmission-edge maps helpful in studies of flows, gradients of temperature, and coefficients of diffusion in solidifying melts. Data acquired by system include optical characteristics, and they both verify and complement data obtained by such other techniques as measurements of density and x-ray-dispersion analysis.

  10. O VI and H_2 Lines in Sunspots

    CERN Document Server

    Labrosse, N; Habbal, S R; Brown, D; Labrosse, Nicolas; Morgan, Huw; Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Brown, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Sunspots are locations on the Sun where unique atmospheric conditions prevail. In particular, the very low temperatures found above sunspots allow the emission of H_2 lines. In this study we are interested in the radiation emitted by sunspots in the O VI lines at 1031.96 A and 1037.60 A. We use SOHO/SUMER observations of a sunspot performed in March 1999 and investigate the interaction between the O VI lines and a H_2 line at 1031.87 A found in the Werner band. The unique features of sunspots atmospheres may very well have important implications regarding the illumination of coronal O+5 ions in the low corona, affecting our interpretation of Doppler dimming diagnostics.

  11. Upper Limits on O VI Emission from Voyager Observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jayant Murthy

    2002-03-01

    We have examined 426 Voyager fields distributed across the sky for O VI ( 1032/1038 Å) emission from the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium. No such emission was detected in any of our observed fields. Our most constraining limit was a 90% confidence upper limit of 2600 photons cm-2 sr-1 s-1 on the doublet emission in the direction (l, b) = (117.3, 50.6). Combining this with an absorption line measurement in nearly the same direction allows us to place an upper limit of 0.01 cm-3 on the electron density of the hot gas in this direction. We have placed 90% confidence upper limits of less than or equal to 10,000 photons cm-2 sr-1 s-1 on the O VI emission in 16 of our 426 observations.

  12. Plan of advanced satellite communications experiment using ETS-VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Tadashi

    1988-01-01

    Communications Research Laboratory (CRL, Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications, Japan) has been engaged in development of three advanced satellite communication payloads aiming at experiments by Japan's 2-ton class Engineering Test Satellite VI (ETS-VI) which is to be launched in H-II rocket by NASDA in August 1992. CRL's three experimental systems are: (1) S-band inter-satellite communications; (2) millimeter-wave inter-satellite and personal-satellite communications; and (3) optical inter-satellite communications. CRL develops experimental optical communication system with telescope of 75 mm diameter which has gimbal mirror beam pointing/tracking mechanism. The onboard system has fundamental optical communication functions with laser diode transmitter of wavelength 0.83 micron, laser beam point-ahead mechanism, receiver of wavelength 0.51 micron, modulation/demodulation subsystem, and so on.

  13. Uranium (Vi) sorption onto zirconium diphosphate chemically modified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the uranium (Vi) speciation after sorption onto zirconium diphosphate (ZrP2O7) surface, hydrated and in a surface modified with organic acids. Oxalic and citric acids were chosen to modify the ZrP2O7 surface because they have poly carboxylic groups and they mimic the organic matter in nature. Thus the interest of this work is to evaluate the uranium (Vi) sorption edge at different s ph values in natural and modified surfaces. The luminescence technique (fluorescence and phosphorescence, respectively) was used for the quantification and speciation of uranyl sorbed at the zirconium diphosphate interface. The fluorescence experiment, showed that adsorption of uranyl on surface of zirconium diphosphate tends to 100%. The speciation shows that there are different complexes in surface which were formed between zirconium diphosphate and uranyl, since it is produced a displacement of wavelength in fluorescence spectra of each system. (Author)

  14. Kinetics of reductive stripping of Np(VI) by acetohydroxamic acid from 30%TBP/kerosene to nitrate medium using a high-speed stirred cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of reductive stripping of Np(VI) by Acetohydroxamic Acid from 30%TBP/kerosene was investigated using a high-speed stirred cell designed by ourselves. The phase separator for sampling was simple and powerful. The interfacial areas of different stirring speeds were determined by microphotograph method at 21 C before the experiments. The effects of the different parameters as well as temperature were investigated systemically. The results showed that, at 21 C the rate equation is -d[Np(VI)]/dt = k(S/V)[Np(VI)]0.78[AHA]0.46[HNO3]-0.20 - k'(S/V)[Np(V)]2.87, where k = (8.7 ± 0.7) x 10-7(mol/L)-0.04 ms-1, k' = 1.1 ± 0.2(mol/L)-2.87 ms-1, as c[HNO3] <=1.0 mol/L, -d[Np(VI)]/dt = k(S/V)[Np(VI)]0.78[AHA]0.46[HNO3]-1.42 - k'(S/V)[Np(V)]2.87, where k = (3.2 ± 0.3) x 10-7 (mol/L)1.18 ms-1, k' = 1.1 ± 0.2(mol/L)-2.87 ms-1 as c[HNO3] > = 1.0 mol/L, and S is the interfacial area, V the organic phase volume. The reductive stripping process is controlled by chemical reactions (kinetics regime) taking place at the interface. The apparent activation energy is 13.5 ± 0.2 kJ/mol.

  15. Size dependence of cavity volume: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nisha; Dubins, David N; Pomès, Régis; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2012-02-01

    Partial molar volume, V°, has been used as a tool to sample solute hydration for decades. The efficacy of volumetric investigations of hydration depends on our ability to reliably discriminate between the cavity, V(C), and interaction, V(I), contributions to the partial molar volume. The cavity volume, V(C), consists of the intrinsic volume, V(M), of a solute molecule and the thermal volume, V(T), with the latter representing the volume of the effective void created around the solute. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with the Kirkwood-Buff theory to compute the partial molar volumes for organic solutes of varying sizes in water. We perform our computations using the Lennard-Jones and Coulombic pair potentials as well as truncated potentials which contain only the Lennard-Jones but not the Coulombic contribution. The partial molar volume computed with the Lennard-Jones potentials in the absence of the Coulombic term nearly coincides with the cavity volume, V(C). We determine the thermal volume, V(T), for each compound by subtracting its van der Waals volume, V(W), from V(C). Finally, we apply the spherical approximation of solute geometry to evaluate the thickness of the thermal volume, δ. Our results reveal an increase in the thickness of thermal volume, δ, with an increase in the size of the solute. This finding may be related to dewetting of large nonpolar solutes and the concomitant increase in the compressibility of water of hydration. PMID:22133917

  16. 4d photoabsorption in Te V and Te VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 4d photoabsorption spectra of Cd I-like Te V and the Ag I-like Te VI have been recorded in the 70-102 eV region using the dual-laser plasma technique. Discrete structure due to 4d→6p,nf (4≤n≤8) transitions have been observed in both ion stages. These have been identified with the aid of Hartree-Fock calculations. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  17. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.F. (comp.)

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on tapes.'' Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the tape'' number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  18. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.F. [comp.

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on ``tapes.`` Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the ``tape`` number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  19. Spectrophotometric study of neptunium (VI) complexation by nitrate ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neptunium(VI) complexation by nitrate ions was investigated by visible and near-infrared spectrophotometry, a technique suitable for observing the appearance and evolution of the species in solution. In the absence of reference spectra for Np(VI) nitrate- complexes, mathematical (factor analysis) tools were used to interpret the spectra. These chemo-metric techniques were first tested and validated on a simpler chemical system: Np(VI)complexation by the SiW11O398- anion. The test media used to investigate Np(VI) nitrate- complexes generally contain nitrate and perchlorate salts at high concentrations (high ionic strength). Media effects arising from the presence of cations, acidity or the perchlorate ion concentration are therefore significant, and no doubt account for the scattered values of the complexation constants published in the literature. The evolution of the neptunium spectra according to the parameters of the reaction medium illustrated these effects and allowed them to be quantified by a global 'perturbation constant'. In order to minimize the spectrum modifications due to media effects, the neptunium nitrate-complexes were studied at constant ionic strength in weak acidic media (2 mol.kg-1H2O) in the presence of sodium salts. The bulk formation constants and the spectrum of the NpO2(NO3)+ complex were determined for ionic strength values of 2.2, 4, 6 and 8 mol.kg-1H2O. The constants remained on the same order of magnitude regardless of the ionic strength; the thermodynamic constant β10 determined from them according to specific interaction theory is thus probably of little significance. Conversely, the bulk constants can be corrected for the effects of the perchlorate ions by taking the global 'perturbation constant' into account. (author)

  20. Morphological Heterogeneity of Layer VI Neurons in Mouse Barrel Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chia-Chien; Abrams, Svetlana; Pinhas, Alex; Brumberg, Joshua C.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the basic neuronal building blocks of the neocortex is a necessary first step toward comprehending the composition of cortical circuits. Neocortical layer VI is the most morphologically diverse layer and plays a pivotal role in gating information to the cortex via its feedback connection to the thalamus and other ipsilateral and callosal corticocortical connections. The heterogeneity of function within this layer is presumably linked to its varied morphological composition. Howe...

  1. Voltammetry of Os(VI)-modified polysaccharides at carbon electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trefulka, Mojmír; Paleček, Emil

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 15 (2009), s. 1763-1766. ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA301/07/0490; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : chemical modification of polysaccharides * Os(VI)L-polysaccharide adducts * pyrolytic graphite electrodes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.630, year: 2009

  2. ViSQOL: an objective speech quality model

    OpenAIRE

    Kokaram, Anil; KOKARAM, ANIL CHRISTOPHER; Harte, Naomi; HINES, ANDREW

    2015-01-01

    PUBLISHED Export Date: 27 August 2015 This paper presents an objective speech quality model, ViSQOL, the Virtual Speech Quality Objective Listener. It is a signal-based, full-reference, intrusive metric that models human speech quality perception using a spectro-temporal measure of similarity between a reference and a test speech signal. The metric has been particularly designed to be robust for quality issues associated with Voice over IP (VoIP) transmission. This paper describes the a...

  3. Interaction of aerobic soil bacteria with plutonium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the interaction of Pu(VI) with Pseudomonas stutzeri ATCC 17588 and Bacillus sphaericus ATCC 14577, representatives of the main aerobic groups of soil bacteria present in the upper soil layers. The accumulation studies have shown that these soil bacteria accumulate high amounts of Pu(VI). The sorption efficiency toward Pu(VI) decreased with increasing biomass concentration due to increased agglomeration of the bacteria resulting in a decreased total surface area and number of available complexing groups. Spores of Bacillus sphaericus showed a higher biosorption than the vegetative cells at low biomass concentration which decreased significantly with increasing biomass concentration. At higher biomass concentrations (> 0.7 g/L), the vegetative cells of both strains and the spores of B. sphaericus showed comparable sorption efficiencies. Investigations on the pH dependency of the biosorption and extraction studies with 0.01 M EDTA solution have shown that the biosorption of plutonium is a reversible process and the plutonium is bound by surface complexation. Optical absorption spectroscopy showed that one third of the initially present Pu(VI) was reduced to Pu(V) after 24 hours. Kinetic studies and solvent extraction to separate different oxidation states of Pu after contact with the biomass provided further information on the yield and the kinetics of the bacteria-mediated reduction. Long-term studies showed that also 16% of Pu(IV) was formed after one month. The comparison of the amount of Pu(IV) formed during that time period with literature data of the Pu(V) disproportionation, indicated that the Pu(IV) seemed to be rather the result of the disproportionation of the formed Pu(V) than of a further microbial reduction

  4. Canterbury Basin Sea Level

    OpenAIRE

    Fulthorpe, C. S.; Institute for Geophysics John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of Geosciences The University of Texas at Austin J.J. Pickle Research Campus, Building 196 (ROC) 10100 Burnet Road (R2200) Austin TX 78758-4445 USA; Hoyanagi, K.; Department of Geology Faculty of Science Shinshu University 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 Japan; Blum, P.; United States Implementing Organization Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845 USA; Guèrin, G.; Borehole Research Group Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University PO Box 1000, 61 Route 9W Palisades NY 10964 USA; Slagle, A. L.; Borehole Research Group Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University PO Box 1000, 61 Route 9W Palisades NY 10964 USA; Blair, S. A.; Department of Geological Sciences Florida State University 006 Carraway Building Tallahassee FL 32306 USA; Browne, G. H.; Hydrocarbon Section GNS Science PO Box 30368 Lower Hutt New Zealand; Carter, R. M.; Marine Geophysical Laboratory James Cook University of North Queensland Townsville QLD 4811 Australia; Ciobanu, M.; Laboratoire de Microbiologie des Environnements Extrêmes CNRS UMR-6197 Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer Technopole Brest-Iroise Plouzane 29280 France; Claypool, G. E.; Organic Geochemist 8910 West 2nd Avenue Lakewood CO 80226 USA; Crundwell, M. P.; New Zealand Observer/Paleontologist (foraminifers) Paleontology and Environmental Change Section GNS Science PO Box 30368 Lower Hutt New Zealand; Dinarès-Turell, J.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Ding, X.; School of Marine Sciences China University of Geosciences (Beijing) 29 XueYuan Road, Haidian District Beijing P.R. China; George, S. C.; Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences Macquarie University Sydney NSW 2109 Australia; Hepp, D. A.; MARUM – Center for Marine Environmental Sciences and Department of Geosciences University of Bremen Leobener Strasse MARUM Building, Room 2230 28359 Bremen Germany

    2010-01-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 317 was devoted to understanding the relative importance of global sea level (eustasy) versus local tectonic and sedimentary processes in controlling continental margin sedimentary cycles. The expedition recovered sediments from the Eocene to recent period, with a particular focus on the sequence stratigraphy of the late Miocene to recent, when global sea level change was dominated by glacioeustasy. Drilling in the Canterbury Basin,...

  5. MONTHLY AVERAGE FLOW IN RÂUL NEGRU HYDROGRAPHIC BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIGH MELINDA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Râul Negru hydrographic basin represents a well individualised and relatively homogenous physical-geographical unity from Braşov Depression. The flow is controlled by six hydrometric stations placed on the main collector and on two of the most powerful tributaries. Our analysis period is represented by the last 25 years (1988 - 2012 and it’s acceptable for make pertinent conclusions. The maximum discharge month is April, that it’s placed in the high flow period: March – June. Minimum discharges appear in November - because of the lack of pluvial precipitations; in January because of high solid precipitations and because of water volume retention in ice. Extreme discharge frequencies vary according to their position: in the mountain area – small basin surface; into a depression – high basin surface. Variation coefficients point out very similar variation principles, showing a relative homogeneity of flow processes.

  6. Forecasting contaminant concentrations: Spills in the White Oak Creek Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Streamflow Synthesis and Reservoir Regulation (SSARR) model has been installed and sufficiently calibrated for use in managing accidental release of contaminants in surface waters of the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed at ORNL. The model employs existing watershed conditions, hydrologic parameters representing basin response to precipitation, and a Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) to predict variable flow conditions throughout the basin. Natural runoff from each of the hydrologically distinct subbasins is simulated and added to specified plant and process water discharges. The resulting flows are then routed through stream reaches and eventually to White Oak Lake (WOL), which is the outlet from the WOC drainage basin. In addition, the SSARR model is being used to simulate change in storage volumes and pool levels in WOL, and most recently, routing characteristics of contaminant spills through WOC and WOL. 10 figs

  7. Characterization of uranium(VI) sorption by organobentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U(VI) sorption on the bentonite modified by hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA) was studied in the concentration range: 0.0001-0.001 mol/dm3 in the aqueous phase and in the pH range: 3-10. The experiments concerning the pH influence on the molar absorption coefficient cb of U(VI) in the bentonite phase showed that the species: UO22+, UO2(OH)+, UO2(OH)2 UO2(OH)3-, UO2(OH)42-, (UO2)3(OH)5+, (UO2)3(OH)7-, present in the aqueous phase, are responsible for uranium sorption. Their sorption parameters K were determined and it is evident that for higher concentrations of HDTMA+ cations in the bentonite phase, i.e. for b96-b157 bentonite, the presence of anionic species: UO2(OH)3-, UO2(OH)42-, and (UO2)3(OH)7- in the aqueous phase results in the increase of U(VI) molar absorption coefficient cb in the sorbent phase.

  8. Skal vi have reklame-TV i Danmark?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Prehn

    1989-08-01

    Full Text Available Under stor ståhej fik vi reklamer i 1987 (TV-Syd og året efter kom turen til næsten resten af Danmark. Seertallene lever endnu ikke op til lovens forudsætninger, og reklamesel- skabet (TVR har derfor blandet sig uhørt kraftigt i den offentlige debat om reklamernes placering og programlægningen. Dette stemmer ikke særlig godt med de vandtætte skodder mellem reklamer og programlægning, som politikerne havde lovet os. Hvilke yderligere løftebrud er nødvendige i frem- tiden, hvis vi skal have TV betalt via reklamer? Ole Prehn gennemgår de politiske forudsætninger, beregninger af de så- kaldte kontaktpriser for TV-reklame og seertallene. Han når frem til, at reklamestrukturen i TV langt fra har nået sit endelige udviklingsstade i Danmark. Vi har endnu reklame-TV til gode.

  9. Thermal detoxification and bloating of chromium(VI) with bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study stabilizes and bloats Cr(VI)-sorbed bentonite by heating at high temperature. Cr leaching decreases with increasing temperatures. Heating the sample at 1100 oC results in a non-detectable Cr concentration in the leachate, equivalent to a Cr leaching percent less than 0.001% (i.e., Cr TCLP concentration -1 of leachate). Morphology observed with a scanning electron microscopy indicates the occurrence of sintering of the sample heated at 1100 oC. The heated samples also show the occurrence of a vesicant process at 1100 oC. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicate that heating at 500 oC for 4 h can convert approximately 87% Cr(VI) into Cr(III) that is negligibly toxic; Cr2O3 was detected to be the most abundant Cr species. After heating at higher temperatures, namely 900-1100 oC, almost all doped Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III) as inferred from the height of the pre-edge peak of XANES spectra and/or from XANES simulation.

  10. Specific extraction of chromium(VI) using supercritical fluid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, G P; Pacey, G E

    2000-02-01

    In some situations, it is no longer sufficient to give a total concentration of a metal. Instead, what is required to understand the potential toxicity of a sample is the concentration of metal species or oxidation state. When developing species specific methods, the major concern is that the integrity of the species ratio is not changed. In other words, the sample preparation or the analytical method will not convert metal ions from one oxidation state to another. Normal extraction techniques and chromatography methods have shown some tendencies to change species ratios. An ideal extraction method would extract the metal efficiently while retaining the metal's oxidation state. The properties of supercritical fluids should approach the ideal of retention of oxidation states. For example, the need for speciation of chromium is obvious since Cr(III) is considered an essential element while Cr(VI) is thought to be toxic and carcinogenic. This paper presents the results of a species specific extraction of Cr(VI) using two different carbamate derivatives as the chelator. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) coupled with a fluorinated dithiocarbamate and a methanol modifier allows extraction of 1 ppm Cr(VI) from a solid matrix with a recovery level of 88.4+/-2.57% using the NIST standard sample. The optimized conditions using the HP 7680 supercritical fluid extractor were: 0.1 ml of methanol, 0.05 ml of pure water, and 0.01 g of chelate via a saturation chamber. PMID:18967865

  11. Nopalea cochenillifera, a potential chromium (VI) hyperaccumulator plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adki, Vinayak S; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Bapat, Vishwas A

    2013-02-01

    Hexavalant chromium [Cr(VI)] tolerance and accumulation in in vitro grown Nopalea cochenillifera Salm. Dyck. plants was investigated. A micropropagation protocol was establish for a rapid multiplication of N. cochenillifera and [Cr(VI)] tolerance and accumulation was studied in in vitro grown cultures. Cr concentration was estimated by atomic absorption spectroscopy in roots and shoots to confirm plant's hyperaccumulation capacity. Plants showed tolerance up to 100 μM K(2)Cr(2)O(7) without any significant changes in root growth after 16 days treatment; whereas, chlorophyll content in plants treated with 1 and 10 μM K(2)Cr(2)O(7) were not so different than the control plant. The levels of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation increased significantly (p 100 μM) inhibited the activities of CAT and SOD. Roots accumulated a maximum of 25,263.396 ± 1,722.672 mg Cr Kg(-1) dry weight (DW); while the highest concentration of Cr in N. cochenillifera shoots was 705.714 ± 32.324 mg Cr Kg(-1) DW. N. cochenillifera could be a prospective hyperaccumulator plant of Cr(VI) and a promising candidate for phytoremediation purposes. PMID:22914913

  12. Solubility of plutonium(VI) carbonate in saline solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Sean D.; Runde, Wolfgang; Neu, Mary P.

    2007-06-01

    Among the plutonium oxidation states found to form in the environment, mobile plutonium(VI) can exist under oxidizing conditions and in waters with high chloride content due to radiolysis effects. We are investigating the solubility and speciation of plutonium(VI) carbonate under conditions relevant to natural waters and brines such as those found near some geologic radioactive waste repositories. The solid Pu(VI) phase PuO 2CO 3(s) was prepared and its solubility was measured in NaCl and NaClO 4 solutions in a CO 2 atmosphere as a function of pH and ionic strength (0.1-5.6 m). The concentration of soluble plutonium in solution was calculated from spectroscopic data and liquid scintillation counting. Spectroscopic measurements also revealed the plutonium oxidation state. The apparent solubility product of PuO 2CO 3(s) was determined at selected electrolyte concentrations to be, log Ks,0 = -13.95 ± 0.07 (0.1 m NaCl), log Ks,0 = -14.07 ± 0.13 (5.6 m NaCl), and log Ks,0 = -15.26 ± 0.11 (5.6 m NaClO 4). Specific ion interaction theory was used to calculate the solubility product at zero ionic strength, logKs,0∘=-14.82±0.05.

  13. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

    2009-12-03

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs

  14. Analytical applications of N-phenyl-n-butyro hydroxamic and N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acids towards chromium (VI), copper (II), iron (III) and uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two aliphatic hydroxamic acids were prepared; N-phenyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid and N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid, by the reaction of β-phenylhydroxylamine and p-tolyl hydroxylamine with n-butyryl chloride. The acids were identified by: their melting points, characteristic reactions with acidic solutions of vanadium (V) and iron (III), infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen content and molecular weight determination. The extractability of these acids towards Cr (VI), Cu (II), Fe (III) and U (VI) were investigated at different pH values and molar acid concentrations. N-phenyl-n- butyro hydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction (98.80%) for Cr (VI) at 4 M H2SO4, (83.25%) for Cu (II) at pH 6, (99.17%) for Fe (III) at pH 5 and (99.76%) at 4 M HNO3 for U (VI) respectively. N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction (98.40%) for Cr (VI)at 4 M H2 SO4, (81.30%) for Cu (II) at pH 6, (92.80%) for Fe (III) at pH 5 and (99.64%) for U (VI) at 4 M HNO3, respectively. The ratios of the metal to ligands were determined by job method (continuous variation method) and were found to be 1:2 for Cr (VI) and U (VI). (Author)

  15. Ocean Optics Protocols for Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Validation. Volume 6; Special Topics in Ocean Optics Protocols and Appendices; Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, J. L. (Editor); Fargion, Giulietta S. (Editor); McClain, Charles R. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This document stipulates protocols for measuring bio-optical and radiometric data for the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project activities and algorithm development. The document is organized into 6 separate volumes as Ocean Optics Protocols for Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Validation, Revision 4. Volume I: Introduction, Background and Conventions; Volume II: Instrument Specifications, Characterization and Calibration; Volume III: Radiometric Measurements and Data Analysis Methods; Volume IV: Inherent Optical Properties: Instruments, Characterization, Field Measurements and Data Analysis Protocols; Volume V: Biogeochemical and Bio-Optical Measurements and Data Analysis Methods; Volume VI: Special Topics in Ocean Optics Protocols and Appendices. The earlier version of Ocean Optics Protocols for Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Validation, Revision 3 (Mueller and Fargion 2002, Volumes 1 and 2) is entirely superseded by the six volumes of Revision 4 listed above.

  16. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume 1. Program summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP): its background, its studies, and its results. This introductory chapter traces the growth of the issue of nuclear weapons proliferation and the organization and objectives of NASAP. Chapter 2 summarizes the program's assessments, findings and recommendations. Each of Volumes II-VII reports on an individual assessment (Volume II: Proliferation Resistance; Volume III: Resources and Fuel Cycle Facilities; Volume IV: Commercial Potential; Volume V: Economics and Systems Analysis; Volume VI: Safety and Environmental Considerations for Licensing; Volume VII: International Perspectives). Volume VIII (Advanced Concepts) presents a combined assessment of several less fully developed concepts, and Volume IX (Reactor and Fuel Cycle Descriptions) provides detailed descriptions of the reactor and fuel-cycle systems studied by NASAP

  17. Hybrid mesoporous materials for on-line preconcentration of Cr(VI) followed by one-step scheme for elution and colorimetric determination at ultratrace levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Manuela L; Stripeikis, Jorge D; Tudino, Mabel B

    2009-01-15

    An hybrid mesoporous material synthesised in our laboratories for solid phase extraction (SPE) in flow through systems has been used for analytical purposes. The solid was obtained from mesoporous silica MCM-41 functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane by Sol-Gel methodology. In order to exploit the large sorption capacity of the material together with the possibility of modeling it for anions retention, a microcolumn (MC) filled with the solid was inserted in a flow system for preconcentration of Cr(VI) and its determination at ultratrace levels in natural waters. The analytical methodology involved a reverse flow injection system (rFI) holding a MC filled with the solid for the analyte extraction. Elution and colorimetric detection were carried out with 1-5 diphenylcarbazide (DPC) in sulfuric acid. DPC produced the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) together with the generation of a cationic red complex between Cr(III) and 1-5 diphenylcarbazone which was easily eluted and detected with a visible spectrophotometer. Moreover, the filling material got ready for the next sample loading remaining unspoiled for more than 300 cycles. The effect of several variables on the analytical signal as well as the influence of cationic and anionic interferences were discussed. Particular attention was given to sulfuric acid interference since it is the required media for the complex generation. Under optimal conditions, 99.8% of Cr(VI) recovery was obtained for a preconcentration time of 120s (sample and DPC flow rates=1 mL min(-1)) and an elution volume of 250 micro L. The limit of detection (3s) was found to be 0.09 microg L(-1) Cr(VI) with a relative standard deviation (n=10, 3 microg L(-1)) of 1.8. Since no Cr(III) was retained by the solid material and Cr(VI) was completely adsorbed, electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) determinations of Cr(III) were also performed by simply measuring its concentration at the end of the microcolumn after Cr(VI

  18. The Historical Flood Of July 2008 From Vaser River Basin, Romania. Causes, Effects And Flood Control Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Andrei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Floods is an experience perceived by society as unexpected, unexplainable and traumatizing and nowadays a threat to humanity more than ever. Among the natural phenomena which negatively affect human activities, floods are the ones which usually have the most significant consequences. The research, evaluations and statistics related to these phenomena do not reveal the drama and serious consequences that come with floods. It was proven that the increase of these extreme hydrological phenomena it is closely related to the anthropic activities from the area. Vaser basin is the most significant sub-basin of Vișeu river basin, contributing with 28% from the total flow of Vișeu river. Having a strong touristic and economic potential, the basin is often threatened by flash floods which usually have devastating effects. During July 2008 there was recorded the most significant flood from the history of hydrometric activity that led to substantial damage and death among locals. The present paper aims to analyze this historical flood, identifying the causes, effects, as well as the methods to control this extreme hydric phenomenon.

  19. The Neuquén basin, Argentina: A case study in sequence stratigraphy and basin dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto C. Riccardi

    2006-01-01

    @@ As stated in one of the contributions to this volume, the Neuquen Basin-covering more than 160,000 km2 between c. 32° and 42° S and 68° and 71° W, and containing a Meso-zoic-Cenozoic sedimentary succession at least 7 km thick-is perhaps one of the most thoroughly prospected areas in Argentina. Its geological study goes back to the 19th Century, and shows an exponential increase throughout the 20th, when it became the main source of Argentine oil and gas production.

  20. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr) is a toxic element causing serious environmental threat. Recently, more and more attention is paid to the bio-remediation of Cr (VI) in the contaminated soils. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag at a steel-alloy factory in Hunan Province, China, was investigated in the present study. The results showed that when sufficient nutrients were amended into the contaminated soils, total Cr (VI) concentration declined from the initial value of 462.8 to 10 mg kg-1 at 10 days and the removal rate was 97.8%. Water soluble Cr (VI) decreased from the initial concentration of 383.8 to 1.7 mg kg-1. Exchangeable Cr (VI) and carbonates-bound Cr (VI) were removed by 92.6% and 82.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, four Cr (VI) resistant bacterial strains were isolated from the soil under the chromium-containing slag. Only one strain showed a high ability for Cr (VI) reduction in liquid culture. This strain was identified as Pannonibacter phragmitetus sp. by gene sequencing of 16S rRNA. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) analysis indicated that Cr (VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium. The results suggest that indigenous bacterial strains have potential application for Cr (VI) remediation in the soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag.

  1. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Liyuan; Huang, Shunhong; Yang, Zhihui; Peng, Bing; Huang, Yan; Chen, Yuehui

    2009-08-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr) is a toxic element causing serious environmental threat. Recently, more and more attention is paid to the bio-remediation of Cr (VI) in the contaminated soils. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag at a steel-alloy factory in Hunan Province, China, was investigated in the present study. The results showed that when sufficient nutrients were amended into the contaminated soils, total Cr (VI) concentration declined from the initial value of 462.8 to 10 mg kg(-1) at 10 days and the removal rate was 97.8%. Water soluble Cr (VI) decreased from the initial concentration of 383.8 to 1.7 mg kg(-1). Exchangeable Cr (VI) and carbonates-bound Cr (VI) were removed by 92.6% and 82.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, four Cr (VI) resistant bacterial strains were isolated from the soil under the chromium-containing slag. Only one strain showed a high ability for Cr (VI) reduction in liquid culture. This strain was identified as Pannonibacter phragmitetus sp. by gene sequencing of 16S rRNA. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) analysis indicated that Cr (VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium. The results suggest that indigenous bacterial strains have potential application for Cr (VI) remediation in the soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag. PMID:19246154

  2. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai Liyuan; Huang Shunhong [School of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Yang Zhihui, E-mail: yangzh@mail.csu.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Peng Bing; Huang Yan; Chen Yuehui [School of Metallurgical Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2009-08-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr) is a toxic element causing serious environmental threat. Recently, more and more attention is paid to the bio-remediation of Cr (VI) in the contaminated soils. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag at a steel-alloy factory in Hunan Province, China, was investigated in the present study. The results showed that when sufficient nutrients were amended into the contaminated soils, total Cr (VI) concentration declined from the initial value of 462.8 to 10 mg kg{sup -1} at 10 days and the removal rate was 97.8%. Water soluble Cr (VI) decreased from the initial concentration of 383.8 to 1.7 mg kg{sup -1}. Exchangeable Cr (VI) and carbonates-bound Cr (VI) were removed by 92.6% and 82.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, four Cr (VI) resistant bacterial strains were isolated from the soil under the chromium-containing slag. Only one strain showed a high ability for Cr (VI) reduction in liquid culture. This strain was identified as Pannonibacter phragmitetus sp. by gene sequencing of 16S rRNA. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) analysis indicated that Cr (VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium. The results suggest that indigenous bacterial strains have potential application for Cr (VI) remediation in the soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag.

  3. Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA; FAKRA, SIRINE C .; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moon, Deok Hyun; Dermatas, Dimitris

    2010-03-01

    The speciation and distribution of Cr(VI) in the solid phase was investigated for two types of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) found at two deposition sites in the United States: gray-black (GB) granular and hard brown (HB) cemented COPR. COPR chemistry and mineralogy were investigated using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy and micro-X-ray diffraction, complemented by laboratory analyses. GB COPR contained 30percent of its total Cr(VI) (6000 mg/kg) as large crystals(>20 ?m diameter) of a previously unreported Na-rich analog of calcium aluminum chromate hydrates. These Cr(VI)-rich phases are thought to be vulnerable to reductive and pH treatments. More than 50percent of the Cr(VI) was located within nodules, not easily accessible to dissolved reductants, and bound to Fe-rich hydrogarnet, hydrotalcite, and possibly brucite. These phases are stable over a large pH range, thus harder to dissolve. Brownmilleritewasalso likely associated with physical entrapment of Cr(VI) in the interior of nodules. HB COPR contained no Cr(VI)-rich phases; all Cr(VI) was diffuse within the nodules and absent from the cementing matrix, with hydrogarnet and hydrotalcite being the main Cr(VI) binding phases. Treatment ofHBCOPRis challenging in terms of dissolving the acidity-resistant, inaccessible Cr(VI) compounds; the same applies to ~;;50percent of Cr(VI) in GB COPR.

  4. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI in cats - clarification regarding genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A; Grahn, Robert A; Genova, Francesca; Beccaglia, Michela; Hopwood, John J; Longeri, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The release of new DNA-based diagnostic tools has increased tremendously in companion animals. Over 70 different DNA variants are now known for the cat, including DNA variants in disease-associated genes and genes causing aesthetically interesting traits. The impact genetic tests have on animal breeding and health management is significant because of the ability to control the breeding of domestic cats, especially breed cats. If used properly, genetic testing can prevent the production of diseased animals, causing the reduction of the frequency of the causal variant in the population, and, potentially, the eventual eradication of the disease. However, testing of some identified DNA variants may be unwarranted and cause undo strife within the cat breeding community and unnecessary reduction of gene pools and availability of breeding animals. Testing for mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI (MPS VI) in cats, specifically the genetic testing of the L476P (c.1427T>C) and the D520N (c.1558G>A) variants in arylsulfatase B (ARSB), has come under scrutiny. No health problems are associated with the D520N (c.1558G>A) variant, however, breeders that obtain positive results for this variant are speculating as to possible correlation with health concerns. Birman cats already have a markedly reduced gene pool and have a high frequency of the MPS VI D520N variant. Further reduction of the gene pool by eliminating cats that are heterozygous or homozygous for only the MPS VI D520N variant could lead to more inbreeding depression effects on the breed population. Herein is debated the genetic testing of the MPS VI D520N variant in cats. Surveys from different laboratories suggest the L476P (c.1427T>C) disease-associated variant should be monitored in the cat breed populations, particularly breeds with Siamese derivations and outcrosses. However, the D520N has no evidence of association with disease in cats and testing is not recommended in the absence of L476P genotyping. Selection

  5. Synergistic effect of HBMPPT with PSO, DOSO and TBP on the extraction of U(VI) and on the separation of U(VI) and Th(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some popular neutral extractants (PSO-petroleum sulfoxide, DOSO-di-n-octyl sulfoxide, TBP-tributylphosphate etc.) were chosen as synergist to study the synergistic effect on the extraction reaction with HBMPPT (4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione) for U(VI), and the synergistic separation ability of HBMPPT for U(VI) and Th(IV). The synergistic extraction ability shown by the studied systems for U(VI) is as follows: PSO > DOSO > TBP, and the same sequence was also verified for the separation coefficient of U(VI) and Th(IV). The synergistic complexes may be presented as: UO2NO3 x BMPPT x S and UO2(BMPPT)2 x S for U(VI) (S is PSO, DOSO or TBP). (author)

  6. Downsizing of the EuroVI exhaust aftertreatment components to fit into the EuroIII silencer; Downsizing der EuroVI-Abgasnachbehandlung auf das Niveau des EuroIII-Schalldaempfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doering, Andreas; Emmerling, Gerhard; Rothe, Dieter [MAN Truck und Bus AG, Nuernberg (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Apart from complying with the EuroVI limits it is a major challenge to arrive at a compact, low-cost and robust overall system consisting of the engine and the exhaust-gas aftertreatment system. The goal of the examinations, which were carried out at the advanced development department, was to accommodate such a system, comprising an SCR catalytic converter and a particulate filter, in the space available in the MAN TGA silencer for EuroIII, which did not yet contain any equipment for exhaust-gas aftertreatment. This was achieved by several measures: on the one hand the particulate filter was given an SCR-active coating, while on the other the urea decomposition system was realised in the form of a hydrolysis catalyst arranged parallel to the turbocharger and a close coupled NO oxidation catalyst. Beside this the hydrolysis catalyst installed in the turbocharger bypass was given an SCR-active coating so that not only complete decomposition of the urea could be achieved but also - even shortly after starting the engine or with an engine running at low load - a high SCR conversion rate. The influence on passive DPF regeneration using NO2 from the parallel SCR reaction in the particulate filter can be minimised by separating the two reactions and can be regarded as non-critical for use in long haul trucks. The combination of the components mentioned above with EGR engines made it possible to reduce both the volume and the mass of the silencer by approx. 50 % compared with standard EuroVI systems and still achieve NO{sub x} conversion rates of 85 % at exhaust-gas temperatures below 250 C. One come to the conclusion, that the techniques mentioned above are very promising for future EuroVI systems, though the effort for testing the mechanical durability is higher. Also the durability of the SCR coated DPF has to be assured.

  7. Economic assessment of acquiring water for environmental flows in the Murray Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Muhammad Ejaz; Connor, Jeffery D.; Kirby, Mac; Mainuddin, Mohammed

    2002-01-01

    This article is an economic analysis of reallocating River Murray Basin water from agriculture to the environment with and without the possibility of interregional water trade. Acquiring environmental flows as an equal percentage of water allocations from all irrigation regions in the Basin is estimated to reduce returns to irrigation. When the same volume of water is taken from selected low-value regions only, the net revenue reduction is less. In all scenarios considered, net revenue gains ...

  8. Intracontinental basins and strong earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓起东; 高孟潭; 赵新平; 吴建春

    2004-01-01

    The September 17, 1303 Hongtong M=8 earthquake occurred in Linfen basin of Shanxi down-faulted basin zone. It is the first recorded M=8 earthquake since the Chinese historical seismic records had started and is a great earthquake occurring in the active intracontinental basin. We had held a Meeting of the 700th Anniversary of the 1303 Hongtong M=8 Earthquake in Shanxi and a Symposium on Intracontinental Basins and Strong Earthquakes in Taiyuan City of Shanxi Province on September 17~18, 2003. The articles presented on the symposium discussed the relationships between active intracontinental basins of different properties, developed in different regions, including tensional graben and semi-graben basins in tensile tectonic regions, compression-depression basins and foreland basins in compressive tectonic regions and pull-apart basins in strike-slip tectonic zones, and strong earthquakes in China. In this article we make a brief summary of some problems. The articles published in this special issue are a part of the articles presented on the symposium.

  9. Multiple oscillatory modes of the Argentine Basin. Part II. The spectral origin of the basin modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, W.; Vevier, F.; Gille, S.T.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the spectrum of barotropic basin modes of the Argentine Basin is shown to be connected to the classical Rossby basin modes of a flat-bottom (constant depth), rectangular basin. First, the spectrum of basin modes is calculated for the Argentine Basin, by performing a normal-mode analysi

  10. Economic impact of alternative policy responses to prolonged and severe drought in the Rio Grande Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, James F.; Michelsen, Ari M.; Ward, Frank A.

    2005-02-01

    In the Rio Grande Basin, water is overallocated, demands are growing, and river flows and uses are vulnerable to drought and climate change. Currently, the basin is in the third year of severe drought; irrigation and municipal water diversions have been severely curtailed; extensive diversions threaten endangered species, and reservoir volumes are nearly depleted. A central challenge is development of policies that efficiently and equitably allocate the basin's water resources among competing uses across political and institutional jurisdictions. A basin-wide, nonlinear programming model optimizes resource allocations and water use levels for the upper part of the Rio Grande Basin to test whether institutional adjustments can reduce damages caused by drought. Compared to existing institutions, we find that future drought damages could be reduced by 20 and 33% per year through intracompact and interstate water markets, respectively, that would allow water transfers across water management jurisdictions. Results reveal economic tradeoffs among water uses, regions, and drought control strategies.

  11. Use of environmental isotope tracer and GIS techniques to estimate basin recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odunmbaku, Abdulganiu A. A.

    The extensive use of ground water only began with the advances in pumping technology at the early portion of 20th Century. Groundwater provides the majority of fresh water supply for municipal, agricultural and industrial uses, primarily because of little to no treatment it requires. Estimating the volume of groundwater available in a basin is a daunting task, and no accurate measurements can be made. Usually water budgets and simulation models are primarily used to estimate the volume of water in a basin. Precipitation, land surface cover and subsurface geology are factors that affect recharge; these factors affect percolation which invariably affects groundwater recharge. Depending on precipitation, soil chemistry, groundwater chemical composition, gradient and depth, the age and rate of recharge can be estimated. This present research proposes to estimate the recharge in Mimbres, Tularosa and Diablo Basin using the chloride environmental isotope; chloride mass-balance approach and GIS. It also proposes to determine the effect of elevation on recharge rate. Mimbres and Tularosa Basin are located in southern New Mexico State, and extend southward into Mexico. Diablo Basin is located in Texas in extends southward. This research utilizes the chloride mass balance approach to estimate the recharge rate through collection of groundwater data from wells, and precipitation. The data were analysed statistically to eliminate duplication, outliers, and incomplete data. Cluster analysis, piper diagram and statistical significance were performed on the parameters of the groundwater; the infiltration rate was determined using chloride mass balance technique. The data was then analysed spatially using ArcGIS10. Regions of active recharge were identified in Mimbres and Diablo Basin, but this could not be clearly identified in Tularosa Basin. CMB recharge for Tularosa Basin yields 0.04037mm/yr (0.0016in/yr), Diablo Basin was 0.047mm/yr (0.0016 in/yr), and 0.2153mm/yr (0.00848in

  12. Water Availability for Shale Gas Development in Sichuan Basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mengjun; Weinthal, Erika; Patiño-Echeverri, Dalia; Deshusses, Marc A; Zou, Caineng; Ni, Yunyan; Vengosh, Avner

    2016-03-15

    Unconventional shale gas development holds promise for reducing the predominant consumption of coal and increasing the utilization of natural gas in China. While China possesses some of the most abundant technically recoverable shale gas resources in the world, water availability could still be a limiting factor for hydraulic fracturing operations, in addition to geological, infrastructural, and technological barriers. Here, we project the baseline water availability for the next 15 years in Sichuan Basin, one of the most promising shale gas basins in China. Our projection shows that continued water demand for the domestic sector in Sichuan Basin could result in high to extremely high water stress in certain areas. By simulating shale gas development and using information from current water use for hydraulic fracturing in Sichuan Basin (20,000-30,000 m(3) per well), we project that during the next decade water use for shale gas development could reach 20-30 million m(3)/year, when shale gas well development is projected to be most active. While this volume is negligible relative to the projected overall domestic water use of ∼36 billion m(3)/year, we posit that intensification of hydraulic fracturing and water use might compete with other water utilization in local water-stress areas in Sichuan Basin. PMID:26881457

  13. Mechanical Behaviour of Materials Volume II Fracture Mechanics and Damage

    CERN Document Server

    François, Dominique; Zaoui, André

    2013-01-01

    Designing new structural materials, extending lifetimes and guarding against fracture in service are among the preoccupations of engineers, and to deal with these they need to have command of the mechanics of material behaviour. This ought to reflect in the training of students. In this respect, the first volume of this work deals with elastic, elastoplastic, elastoviscoplastic and viscoelastic behaviours; this second volume continues with fracture mechanics and damage, and with contact mechanics, friction and wear. As in Volume I, the treatment links the active mechanisms on the microscopic scale and the laws of macroscopic behaviour. Chapter I is an introduction to the various damage phenomena. Chapter II gives the essential of fracture mechanics. Chapter III is devoted to brittle fracture, chapter IV to ductile fracture and chapter V to the brittle-ductile transition. Chapter VI is a survey of fatigue damage. Chapter VII is devoted to hydogen embrittlement and to environment assisted cracking, chapter VIII...

  14. Summary of the planning, management, and evaluation process for the Geothermal Program Review VI conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an overview of the planning, facilitation, and evaluation process used to conduct the Geothermal Program Review VI (PR VI) conference. This document was also prepared to highlight lessons learned from PR VI and, by utilizing the evaluation summaries and recommendations, be used as a planning tool for PR VII. The conference, entitled Beyond Goals and Objectives,'' was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technology Division (GTD), PR VI was held in San Francisco, California on April 19--21, 1988 and was attended by 127 participants. PR VI was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's (NGA) Industry Round Table. This document presents a brief summary of the activities, responsibilities, and resources for implementing the PR VI meeting and provides recommendations, checklists, and a proposed schedule for assisting in planning PR VII.

  15. Modification of zirconium diphosphate with salicylic acid and its effect on the uranium (Vi) sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface of zirconium diphosphate (ZrP2O7) was modified with salicylic acid and its effect was evaluated on the uranium (Vi) sorption. The modified surface of the material was analyzed with different analytical techniques among which are included the atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This analysis allowed showing that the salicylic acid is being held on the surface of the zirconium diphosphate. The reactivity of modified zirconium diphosphate compared with uranium (Vi) was investigated using the classical method of batch sorption. The analysis of sorption isotherms shows that the salicylic acid has an important effect in the uranium (Vi) sorption. According to the study conducted, the interaction among the uranium (Vi) and the surface of zirconium diphosphate modified with the salicylic acid most likely leads to the complexes formation of binary (U(Vi)/ZrP2O7) and ternary (U(Vi)/salicylate/ZrP2O7) surface. (Author)

  16. Origin of hydrocarbons in the Slovak part of the Danube Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Milička Ján; Kopal Lukáš; Kudlička Lukáš; Polc Róbert

    2015-01-01

    The Danube Basin is one of our largest Neogene basins in Slovakia with the highest volume of potential source rocks in active hydrocarbon generation zones. The source rocks, however, are quite poor with low hydrocarbon potential. In Blatné- and Rišňovce depressions at the northern part of the Danube Basin only early oil and oil generation window were reached below 2900 m during the Upper Miocene to Pliocene, due the lower temperature. In the southern Central Gabčíkovo Depression (...

  17. Apollo Basin, Moon: Estimation of Impact Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echaurren, J. C.

    2015-07-01

    The Apollo Basin is a, pre-Nectarian, multi-ring basin located within the large South Pole-Aitken Basin (SPA). Multispectral data from both Galileo and Clementine showed that the composition of materials in Apollo is distinct…

  18. Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI phenotypes-genotypes and antibody response to galsulfase

    OpenAIRE

    Brands, Marion M; Hoogeveen-Westerveld, Marianne; Kroos, Marian A.; Nobel, Willemieke; Ruijter, George J.; Özkan, Lale; Plug, Iris; Grinberg, Daniel; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Halley, Dicky J; van der Ploeg, Ans T.; Reuser, Arnold J.

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome; MPS VI) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder in which deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase (arylsulfatase B; ARSB) leads to the storage of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in connective tissue. The genotype-phenotype correlation has been addressed in several publications but the picture is not complete. Since 2007, enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) has been available for patients with MPS VI in ...

  19. Treatment of Alkaline Cr(VI)-Contaminated Leachate with an Alkaliphilic Metal-Reducing Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Mathew P; Khijniak, Tatiana V; Boothman, Christopher; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-08-15

    Chromium in its toxic Cr(VI) valence state is a common contaminant particularly associated with alkaline environments. A well-publicized case of this occurred in Glasgow, United Kingdom, where poorly controlled disposal of a cementitious industrial by-product, chromite ore processing residue (COPR), has resulted in extensive contamination by Cr(VI)-contaminated alkaline leachates. In the search for viable bioremediation treatments for Cr(VI), a variety of bacteria that are capable of reduction of the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) to the relatively nontoxic and less mobile Cr(III) oxidation state, predominantly under circumneutral pH conditions, have been isolated. Recently, however, alkaliphilic bacteria that have the potential to reduce Cr(VI) under alkaline conditions have been identified. This study focuses on the application of a metal-reducing bacterium to the remediation of alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated leachates from COPR. This bacterium, belonging to the Halomonas genus, was found to exhibit growth concomitant to Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions (pH 10). Bacterial cells were able to rapidly remove high concentrations of aqueous Cr(VI) (2.5 mM) under anaerobic conditions, up to a starting pH of 11. Cr(VI) reduction rates were controlled by pH, with slower removal observed at pH 11, compared to pH 10, while no removal was observed at pH 12. The reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) resulted in the precipitation of Cr(III) biominerals, which were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effectiveness of this haloalkaliphilic bacterium for Cr(VI) reduction at high pH suggests potential for its use as an in situ treatment of COPR and other alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated environments. PMID:26048926

  20. The effect of Paecilomyces catenlannulatus on removal of U(VI) by illite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of Paecilomyces catenlannulatus (P. catenlannulatus) on removal of U(VI) onto illite as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, and solution concentration was conducted by batch techniques. The adsorption kinetics indicated that the removal of U(VI) on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus can be fitted by pseudo-second order kinetic model very well. The removal of U(VI) on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus increased with increasing pH from 1.0 to 7.0, whereas the decrease of U(VI) adsorption on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus was observed at pH > 7.5. The adsorption behavior of U(VI) on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus can be simulated by the double diffuse model under various pH conditions. The ionic strength-dependent experiments showed that the removal of U(VI) on illite was outer-sphere surface complexation, whereas the inner-sphere surface complexation predominated the U(VI) adsorption onto illite coated P. catenlannulatus at pH 5.0–7.0. The maximum adsorption capacity of U(VI) on illite and illite coated P. catenlannulatus calculated from Langmuir model at pH 5.0 and T = 298 K was 46.729 and 54.347 mg/g, respectively, revealing enhanced adsorption of U(VI) on illite coated P. catenlannulatus. This paper highlights the effect of microorganism on the removal of radionuclides from aqueous solutions in environmental pollution management. - Highlights: • The removal of U(VI) by illite is strongly influenced by Paecilomyces catenlannulatus. • The removal of U(VI) by illite is an exothermic and spontaneous process. • The removal of U(VI) can be simulated by double diffuse model

  1. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of tetrabromobisphenol A in comparison with bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Ying, Guang-Guo; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Peng, Fu-Qiang; Chen, Xiao-Wen

    2014-10-01

    Ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) oxidative removal of various organic micropollutants mainly depends on the reactivity of Fe(VI) to target micropollutants and coexisting constituents present in source water. This study evaluated the potential of Fe(VI) oxidation of the brominated flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) by using reaction kinetics, products identification and toxicity evaluation, and investigated the influencing effects of humic acid and clay particles on Fe(VI) removal of TBBPA in comparison with bisphenol A (BPA). The obtained apparent second-order rate constants (k(app)) for Fe(VI) reaction with TBBPA ranged from 7.9(±0.3) × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) to 3.3(±0.1) × 10(1) M(-1) s(-1) with the half-life (t1/2) ranging from 1.7 s to 419.3 s at pH 7.0-10 for an Fe(VI) concentration of 10 mg L(-1). Easier oxidation by Fe(VI) was observed for TBBPA than for BPA. Fe(VI) can destroy and transform the TBBPA molecule through β-scission reaction, yielding the chemical species of low bromine-substituted products. More importantly, the oxidation of TBBPA by Fe(VI) led to the loss of its multiple hormonal activities (androgenic, antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activities). The organic component humic acid decreased the TBBPA and BPA reactions with Fe(VI), while the inorganic component montmorillonite had no effect on their removal within the tested concentrations. Increasing the Fe(VI) dosage can reduce the effects of soluble organic matter and clay particles present in source waters on the degradation process, leading to the complete removal of target micropollutants. PMID:24956603

  2. Removal of Cr(VI from Water Using a New Reactive Material: Magnesium Oxide Supported Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Siciliano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The chromium pollution of water is an important environmental and health issue. Cr(VI removal by means of metallic iron is an attractive method. Specifically, nanoscopic zero valent iron (NZVI shows great reactivity, however, its applicability needs to be further investigated. In the present paper, NZVI was supported on MgO grains to facilitate the treatments for remediation of chromium-contaminated waters. The performances and mechanisms of the developed composite, in the removal of hexavalent chromium, were investigated by means of batch and continuous tests. Kinetic studies, under different operating conditions, showed that reduction of Cr(VI could be expressed by a pseudo second-order reaction kinetic. The reaction rate increased with the square of Fe(0 amount, while it was inversely proportional to the initial chromium concentration. The process performance was satisfactory also under uncontrolled pH, and a limited influence of temperature was observed. The reactive material was efficiently reusable for many cycles without any regeneration treatment. The performances in continuous tests were close to 97% for about 80 pore volume of reactive material.

  3. Diluent effect on the extraction of uranium (VI) from hydrochloric acid solutions by long-chain aliphatic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of uranium(VI) from hydrochloric acid solutions by trioctylamine (TOA) and trioctylmethylammonium chloride (TOMAC) have been examined using various diluents such as benzene, chlorobenzene, o-dichlorobenzene, toluene, m-xylene, nitrobenzene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane and 1,2-dichloroethane. It is found that by assuming a regular solution, the distribution coefficient and the enthalpy change associated with the metal extraction can be expressed in terms of the solubility parameter of TOMAC, diluent and the complex formed in the organic phase and their molar volumes, and in contrast that a parabolic dependence of the distribution coefficient on the solubility parameter of diluent is not observed in the extraction by TOA in organic solvents, although the enthalpy change associated with uranium extraction exhibits a parabolic dependence on the solubility parameter. Further the results for the extraction of divalent copper, zinc and cadmium from hydrochloric acid solutions by TOA and TOMAC are investigated in comparison with those of uranium(VI). (author)

  4. Bioelectrochemical Chromium(VI) Removal in Plant-Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibul, Nuzahat; Hu, Yi; Wang, Yun-Kun; Chen, Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Plant-microbial fuel cell (PMFC) is a renewable and sustainable energy technology that generates electricity with living plants. However, little information is available regarding the application of PMFC for the remediation of heavy metal contaminated water or soil. In this study, the potential for the removal of heavy metal Cr(VI) using PMFC was evaluated, and the performance of the PMFC at various initial Cr(VI) contents was investigated. The Cr(VI) removal efficiency could reached 99% under various conditions. Both the Cr(VI) removal rates and the removal efficiencies increased with the increasing initial Cr(VI) concentration. Furthermore, the long-term operation of the PMFC indicated that the system was stable and sustainable for Cr(VI) removal. The mass balance results and XPS analysis results demonstrate that only a small amount of soluble Cr(III) remained in the PMFC and that most Cr(III) precipitated in the form of the Cr(OH)3(s) or was adsorbed onto the electrodes. The PMFC experiments of without acetate addition also show that plants can provide carbon source for MFC through secrete root exudates and bioelectrochemical reduction of Cr(VI) was the main mechanism for the Cr(VI) removal. These results extend the application fields of PMFC and might provide a new insight for Cr(VI) removal from wastewater or soil. PMID:26962848

  5. Biosorption of Cr(VI)_ and Cr(III)_Arthrobacter species

    OpenAIRE

    Gelagutashvili, E.; Pataraia, E. Ginturi D.; Gurielidze, M.

    2011-01-01

    The biosorption of Cr(VI)_ and Cr(III)_ Arthrobacter species (Arthrobacter globiformis and Arthrobacter oxidas) was studied simultaneous application dialysis and atomic absorption analysis. Also biosorption of Cr(VI) in the presence of Zn(II) during growth of Arthrobacter species and Cr(III) in the presence of Mn(II) were discussed. Comparative Cr(VI)_ and Cr(III)_ Arthrobacter species shown, that Cr(III) was more effectively adsorbed by both bacterium than Cr(VI). The adsorption capacity is ...

  6. Deep RNA profiling identified CLOCK and molecular clock genes as pathophysiological signatures in collagen VI myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotton, Chiara; Bovolenta, Matteo; Schwartz, Elena; Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Martoni, Elena; Passarelli, Chiara; Armaroli, Annarita; Osman, Hana; Rodolico, Carmelo; Messina, Sonia; Pegoraro, Elena; D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Gualandi, Francesca; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Boffi, Patrizia; Maioli, Maria Antonietta; Lochmüller, Hanns; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Katherine; Castrignanò, Tiziana; Pesole, Graziano; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Merlini, Luciano; Braghetta, Paola; Bonaldo, Paolo; Bernardi, Paolo; Foley, Reghan; Cirak, Sebahattin; Zaharieva, Irina; Muntoni, Francesco; Capitanio, Daniele; Gelfi, Cecilia; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Yuryev, Anton; Lebowitz, Michael; Zhang, Xiping; Hodge, Brian A; Esser, Karyn A; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2016-04-15

    Collagen VI myopathies are genetic disorders caused by mutations in collagen 6 A1, A2 and A3 genes, ranging from the severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy to the milder Bethlem myopathy, which is recapitulated by collagen-VI-null (Col6a1(-/-)) mice. Abnormalities in mitochondria and autophagic pathway have been proposed as pathogenic causes of collagen VI myopathies, but the link between collagen VI defects and these metabolic circuits remains unknown. To unravel the expression profiling perturbation in muscles with collagen VI myopathies, we performed a deep RNA profiling in bothCol6a1(-/-)mice and patients with collagen VI pathology. The interactome map identified common pathways suggesting a previously undetected connection between circadian genes and collagen VI pathology. Intriguingly,Bmal1(-/-)(also known asArntl) mice, a well-characterized model displaying arrhythmic circadian rhythms, showed profound deregulation of the collagen VI pathway and of autophagy-related genes. The involvement of circadian rhythms in collagen VI myopathies is new and links autophagy and mitochondrial abnormalities. It also opens new avenues for therapies of hereditary myopathies to modulate the molecular clock or potential gene-environment interactions that might modify muscle damage pathogenesis. PMID:26945058

  7. The Surprisingly Constant Strength of O VI Absorbers over Cosmic Time

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    O VI absorption is observed in a wide range of astrophysical environments, including the Local ISM, the disk and halo of the Milky Way, high-velocity clouds, the Magellanic clouds, starburst galaxies, the intergalactic medium, damped Lyman-alpha systems, and gamma-ray-burst host galaxies. Here a new compilation of 775 O VI absorbers drawn from the literature is presented, all observed at high resolution (instrumental FWHM20], the mean O VI column density is shown to be insensitive to metallicity, taking a value log N(O VI)~14.5 for galaxies covering the range -1.6<[O/H]<0. In intergalactic environments [log N(H I)<17], the mean O VI component column density measured in datasets of similar sensitivity shows only weak evolution between z=0.2 and z=2.3, but IGM O VI components are on average almost twice as broad at z=0.2 than at z=2.3. The existence of a characteristic value of log N(O VI) for galactic O VI absorbers, and the lack of evolution in log N(O VI) for intergalactic absorbers, lend support to...

  8. Characterization of the biochemical-pathway of uranium (VI) reduction in facultative anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtimunye, Phalazane J; Chirwa, Evans M N

    2014-10-01

    Cultures of U(VI) reducing bacteria sourced from abandoned uranium mine tailing dam were evaluated for their ability to reduce U(VI) to U(IV). The species in the cultures reduced U(VI) in solutions with initial U(VI) concentration up to 400mgL(-)(1) under a near neutral pH of 6.5. The electron flow pathway and fate of reduced species was also analysed in the individual species in order to evaluate the potential for control and optimisation of the reduction potential at the biochemical level. The results showed that U(VI) reduction in live cells was completely blocked by the NADH-dehydrogenase inhibitor, rotenone (C23H22O6), and thioredoxin inhibitor, cadmium chloride (CdCl2), showing that U(VI) reduction involves the electron flow through NADH-dehydrogenase, a primary electron donor to the electron transport respiratory (ETR) system. Mass balance analysis of uranium species aided by visual and electron microscopy suggest that most U(VI) reduction occurred on the cell surface of the isolated species. This finding indicates the possibility of easy uranium recovery for beneficial use through biological remediation. Should the U(VI) be reduced inside the cell, recovery would require complete disruption of the cells and therefore would be difficult. The study contributes new knowledge on the underlying mechanisms in the U(VI) reduction in facultative anaerobes. PMID:25065785

  9. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  10. Removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous solution using treated oil palm fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Ibrahim, Naimah; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Adlan, Mohd Nordin; Sabiani, Nor Habsah Md; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar Lorestani; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman Mohamed

    2008-04-01

    This study proposed an oil palm by-product as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)] from aqueous solution. Adsorption of Cr (VI) by sulphuric acid and heat-treated oil palm fibre was conducted using batch tests. The influence of pH, contact time, initial chromium concentration and adsorbent dosage on the removal of Cr (VI) from the solutions was investigated. The optimum initial pH for maximum uptake of Cr (VI) from aqueous solution was found to be 1.5. The removal efficiency was found to correlate with the initial Cr (VI) concentration, adsorbent dosage as well as the contact time between Cr (VI) and the adsorbent. The adsorption kinetics tested with pseudo first order and pseudo second order models yielded high R(2) values from 0.9254 to 0.9870 and from 0.9936 to 0.9998, respectively. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant difference between the R(2) values of the two models at 99% confidence level. The Freundlich isotherm (R(2)=0.8778) described Cr (VI) adsorption slightly better than the Langmuir isotherm (R(2)=0.8715). Difficulty in desorption of Cr (VI) suggests the suitability of treated oil palm fibre as a single-use adsorbent for Cr (VI) removal from aqueous solution. PMID:17714862

  11. Synthesis of novel aminated cellulose microsphere adsorbent for efficient Cr(VI) removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianlin; Liu, Siqi; Xu, Min; Peng, Jing; Li, Jiuqiang; Zhai, Maolin

    2016-08-01

    A novel aminated cellulose microsphere adsorbent (CVN) was successfully prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization of vinylbenzyl chloride (VBC) onto cellulose microsphere (CMS), followed by amination. Micro-FTIR, XPS and SEM confirmed the structure of CVN. The adsorption behavior of Cr(VI) onto CVN from solution was well fitted by the pseudo-second order kinetic model. The isothermal adsorption of Cr(VI) was observed at pH 4.68 with adsorption capacity of 129 mg/g in accordance with Langmuir thermal model, and the removal of Cr(VI) from solution could be 91% at a low amount (20 mg) of adsorbent. The best pH for adsorption of Cr(VI) was nearly 3.08, and with the increasing of temperature, the adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) increased. XPS analysis confirmed the adsorption mechanism of Cr(VI) was ion-exchange mechanism, while common co-ions such as Na+, Mg2+, Cu2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cl-, NO3- has no significant effect on the adsorption capacity of Cr(VI), and the Cr(VI) removal of 80% still could be obtained compared with that of fresh CVN adsorbent. Finally, spent CVN could be regenerated under 2 mol/L NaCl. The work indicated that aminated cellulose adsorbent could be prepared successfully by radiation-induced grafting and amination and CVN is a promising bio-adsorbent in the removing Cr(VI) from waste water.

  12. Role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, M

    1994-01-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are known to be potent toxic and carcinogenic agents. Because chromium(VI) is easily taken up by cells and is subsequently reduced to chromium(III), the formation of paramagnetic chromium such as chromium(V) and chromium(III) is believed to play a role in the adverse biological effects of chromium(VI) compounds. The present report, uses electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy; the importance of the role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in intac...

  13. Adsorption of U(VI) from aqueous solutions onto dolomite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: The release of radioactive substances into aqueous media is a very important subject in the context of high-level nuclear waste geologic repositories. Adsorption onto mineral surfaces is a very important process leading to the reduction of radionuclide concentrations in solution. Uranium is one of the well known radioactive substance whose adsorption behaviour may strongly vary depending on the environmental conditions such as adsorbent type and pH. Dolomite is a major and cheap source of magnesium and calcium. It is generally used in food and pharmaceutical industries, glass and building materials. In some conditions, dolomite can be used as an appropriate adsorbent for removal of some metal ions. Metal removal occurs because of the dual effect of electrostatic and chemical forces between mineral surfaces and ions. Adsorption of U(VI) onto dolomite is investigated by varying parameters such as solid to liquid ratio, contact time, pH and concentration of U(VI). 238U as uranyl nitrate is used for the experiments. The optimum solid to liquid ratio and contact time are found as 0.04 and 1 h, respectively. Formation of insoluble aqueous complexes of the U(VI) at higher pH values (pH>5), may change the mechanism of the adsorption phenomena on dolomite. Precipitation may occur at high pH values at studied uranium concentration (1.10-3 moL-1). The maximum adsorption is observed near pH 3. At this pH value UO22+ is dominant species in the solution. The data obtained from adsorption experiments are fitted to Frumkin, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. The results calculated from adsorption isotherms evaluate the type of the adsorption. The adsorption dependence of uranium on temperature is investigated and thermodynamic parameters ΔHo, ΔSo and ΔGo are calculated. (authors)

  14. Health Effects of Exposure to Radon. BEIR VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This National Research Council's report of the sixth Committee on Biological effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR VI) addresses the risk of lung cancer associated with exposure to radon and its radioactive progeny. Radon, a naturally occurring gas formed from the decay of uranium in the earth, has been conclusively shown in epidemiologic studies of underground miners to cause lung cancer. There is supporting evidence from experimental studies of animals that confirm radon as a cause of lung cancer and from molecular and cellular studies that provide an understanding of the mechanisms by which radon causes lung cancer. In addition to being present at high concentrations in many types of underground mines, radon is found in homes and is also present outdoors, raising concerns that radon in homes increases lung-cancer risk for the general population. For the purpose of developing public policy to manage the risk associated with indoor radon, there is a need to characterize the possible across the range of exposures received by the population. The BEIR VI committee faced the task of estimating the risks associated with indoor radon across the full range of exposures and providing an indication of the uncertainty to be attached to risk estimates across this range. In preparing this report, the BEIR VI committee, in response to its charge, reviewed the entire body of data on radon and lung cancer, integrating findings from epidemiologic studies with evidence from animal experiments and other lines of laboratory investigation. The committee also considered the substantial evidence on smoking and cancer and the more limited evidence on the combined effect of smoking and radon. The report's elements include comprehensive reviews of the cellular and molecular basis of radon carcinogenesis and of the dosimetry of radon in the respiratory tract, of the epidemiologic studies of miners and the general population, and of the combined effects of radon and other occupational

  15. Morphometric analysis of the Marmara Sea river basins, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaşı, Emre; Ozdemir, Hasan

    2014-05-01

    (GIS). This study shows that morphometric analysis of the basins in regional level are very important to understand general morphological characteristics of the basins. In this case, tectonic and lithological conditions of the basins have greatly affected the morphometric characteristics of the north and south basins of the Marmara Sea. References Abrahams, AD. 1984. Channel Networks: A Geomorphological Perspective. Water Resources Research, Volume 20, Issue 2, pages 161-188. Horton, R.E. 1932. Drainage basin characteristics. Trans Am Geophys Union 13:350-361. Keller, E.A., Pinter, N. 2002. Active Tectonics Earthquakes, Uplift, and Landscape, Second Edition, Prentice Hall, New Jersey. Ozdemir H., Bird D. 2009. Evaluation of morphometric parameters of drainage networks derived from topographic maps and DEM in point of floods, Environmental Geology, vol.56, pp.1405-1415. Schumm, S.A. 1956. Evolution of drainage systems and slopes in badlands at Perth Amboy, New Jersey. Geol Soc Am Bull 67:597-646. Strahler, A.N. 1957. Quantitative geomorphology of drainage and channel networks. In: Chow YT (ed) Handbook of appliecl hydrology. Me Graw Hill Book Company, New York. Verstappen, H.Th. 1983. Applied geomorphology. ITC, Enschede.

  16. Atlantic Basin refining profitability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the profitability margins of oil refining in the Atlantic Basin was presented. Petroleum refiners face the continuous challenge of balancing supply with demand. It would appear that the profitability margins in the Atlantic Basin will increase significantly in the near future because of shrinking supply surpluses. Refinery capacity utilization has reached higher levels than ever before. The American Petroleum Institute reported that in August 1997, U.S. refineries used 99 per cent of their capacity for several weeks in a row. U.S. gasoline inventories have also declined as the industry has focused on reducing capital costs. This is further evidence that supply and demand are tightly balanced. Some of the reasons for tightening supplies were reviewed. It was predicted that U.S. gasoline demand will continue to grow in the near future. Gasoline demand has not declined as expected because new vehicles are not any more fuel efficient today than they were a decade ago. Although federally-mandated fuel efficiency standards were designed to lower gasoline consumption, they may actually have prevented consumption from falling. Atlantic margins were predicted to continue moving up because of the supply and demand evidence: high capacity utilization rates, low operating inventories, limited capacity addition resulting from lower capital spending, continued U.S. gasoline demand growth, and steady total oil demand growth. 11 figs

  17. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume I. Program summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP): its background, its studies, and its results. The introductory chapter traces the growth of the issue of nuclear weapons proliferation and the organization and objectives of NASAP. Chapter 2 summarizes the program's assessments, findings, and recommendations. Each of Volumes II-VII reports on an individual assessment (Volumn II: Proliferation Resistance; Volume III: Resources and Fuel Cycle Facilities; Volume IV: Commercial Potential; Volume V: Economics and Systems Analysis; Volume VI: Safety and Environmental Considerations for Licensing; Volume VII: International Perspectives). Volume VIII (Advanced Concepts) presents a combined assessment of several less fully developed concepts, and Volume IX (Reactor and Fuel Cycle Descriptions) provides detailed descriptions of the reactor and fuel-cycle systems studied by NASAP

  18. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume I. Program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This report summarizes the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP): its background, its studies, and its results. The introductory chapter traces the growth of the issue of nuclear weapons proliferation and the organization and objectives of NASAP. Chapter 2 summarizes the program's assessments, findings, and recommendations. Each of Volumes II-VII reports on an individual assessment (Volumn II: Proliferation Resistance; Volume III: Resources and Fuel Cycle Facilities; Volume IV: Commercial Potential; Volume V: Economics and Systems Analysis; Volume VI: Safety and Environmental Considerations for Licensing; Volume VII: International Perspectives). Volume VIII (Advanced Concepts) presents a combined assessment of several less fully developed concepts, and Volume IX (Reactor and Fuel Cycle Descriptions) provides detailed descriptions of the reactor and fuel-cycle systems studied by NASAP.

  19. Galsulfase (Naglazyme®) therapy in infants with mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    OpenAIRE

    Harmatz, Paul R.; Garcia, Paula; Guffon, Nathalie; Randolph, Linda M; Shediac, Renée; Braunlin, Elizabeth; Lachman, Ralph S.; Decker, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of two dose levels of galsulfase (Naglazyme®) in infants with MPS VI. Study design This was a phase 4, multicenter, multinational, open-label, two-dose level study. Subjects were randomized 1:1 to receive weekly infusions of 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg of galsulfase for a minimum of 52 weeks. Progression of skeletal dysplasia was determined by monitoring physical appearance, radiographic changes, and growth. Urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) levels, gross and ...

  20. The ENDF/B-VI photon interaction library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ENDF/B-VI photon interaction library includes data to describe the interaction of photons with the elements Z = 1 to 100 over the energy range 10 eV to 100 MeV. This library has been designed to meet the traditional needs of users to model the interaction and transport of primary photons. However, this library contains additional information which used in a combination with our other data libraries can be used to perform much more detailed calculations, e.g., emission of secondary fluorescence photons. This paper describes both traditional and more detailed uses of this library