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Sample records for basin southern peru

  1. Oligocene-Miocene deformational and depositional history of the Andean hinterland basin in the northern Altiplano plateau, southern Peru

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    Perez, Nicholas D.; Horton, Brian K.

    2014-09-01

    Cenozoic basin fill of the northern Altiplano plateau records the tectonic development of the flanking Western Cordillera magmatic arc and Eastern Cordillera fold-thrust belt. The Ayaviri hinterland basin of southern Peru contains a ~2300 m thick succession of fluvial sandstones and overbank siltstones (upper Oligocene Puno Group and lower Miocene lower Tinajani Formation) capped by ~400 m of alluvial fan conglomerates (middle Miocene upper Tinajani Formation). New U-Pb zircon chronostratigraphic constraints from ~30 to 15 Ma yield sediment accumulation rates of 110-660 m/Myr. Newly dated growth strata highlight the genetic role played by thrust displacement in basin evolution. A several phase accumulation history derived from chronostratigraphic, provenance, and structural data reveals Oligocene basin filling by fluvial sand and mud that changes provenance from Western Cordillera Mesozoic-Cenozoic volcanic rocks to Paleozoic-Mesozoic Eastern Cordillera sedimentary rocks driven by deformation along the southwest directed, northeastern basin margin Ayaviri thrust at 28-26 Ma. Continued early Miocene fluvial deposition was sourced solely from the Eastern Cordillera. An abrupt middle Miocene shift to coarse alluvial fan deposition sourced from the Western Cordillera was driven by out-of-sequence deformation along the northeast directed, southwestern basin margin Pasani thrust at 18-16 Ma. This northern Altiplano out-of-sequence deformation was coincident with increased Eastern and Western Cordillera exhumation and thrusting and may be symptomatic of changes in critical wedge dynamics. The overall record of basin sedimentation and syndepositional fold-thrust deformation emphasizes the role of regional shortening in governing crustal thickening and basin evolution in the central Andes during the Oligocene to Miocene.

  2. Paleogeographic and tectonic controls on the evolution of Cenozoic basins in the Altiplano and Western Cordillera of southern Peru

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    Carlotto, Víctor

    2013-03-01

    Integrated studies of stratigraphy, sedimentology, paleogeography and tectonic controls on Cenozoic basins provide the basis for a series of time-slice reconstructions of basin evolution in the Andes of southern Peru. The Altiplano and adjacent margin of the Western Cordillera are characterized by several Paleocene-Miocene synorogenic continental basins with thicknesses locally exceeding 10 km. The evolution of these basins has been controlled by NW-trending tectonic features that mark the Altiplano-Western Cordillera and Altiplano-Eastern Cordillera boundaries and the Condoroma structural high. Sedimentary deposits of Paleocene age preserved in the Altiplano are the result of nonmarine sedimentation in a distal foreland basin. During the early Eocene, predominantly dextral strike-slip movements in the Altiplano between the Cusco-Lagunillas and Urcos-Ayaviri fault systems created the transpressional Kayra basin. The Soncco and Anta basins (middle Eocene-early Oligocene) are related to NE shortening (43-30 Ma) and represent proximal, wedge-top and foredeep basin environments preserved on the Altiplano. At ~ 29-28 Ma, a change to predominantly E-W shortening produced sinistral strike-slip motion along NW-striking faults, resulting in intermontane, transpressional basins. In the Altiplano, the Tinajani and Punacancha (29-5 Ma), and Paruro (12-6 Ma) basins were controlled by the Cusco-Lagunillas and the Urcos-Ayaviri fault systems. The Maure, Tincopalca-Huacochullo and Condoroma basins (22-5 Ma) of the Western Cordillera developed between the Condoroma high and the Cusco-Lagunillas fault system. Oligocene-Miocene sedimentation commonly evolved from proximal (alluvial) facies along the borders to distal (lacustrine) facies. These basins were linked to sinistral strike-slip faults that evolved into reverse-sinistral structures. Plate kinematics may play a role in Andean basin evolution, with deformation influenced by major preexisting faults that dictated paleogeographic

  3. Deformation within the Pisco Basin sedimentary record (southern Peru): Stratabound orthogonal vein sets and their impact on fault development

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    Rustichelli, Andrea; Di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele; Bianucci, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    This outcrop-based study reports diffuse joints and veins, normal to strike-slip fault zones and minor folds that developed, from Miocene to Quaternary, within the clastic to siliceous sedimentary record of the forearc Pisco Basin of southern Peru. Patterns, orientations, dimensional parameters and other outcrop-scale characteristics of the various deformation features are illustrated and their genetic mechanisms and timing of development are inferred. These new structural data and interpretations allow a better constraint of the structural style and evolution of the Pisco Basin, and can represent useful guidelines for characterizing the outcrop-scale deformation affecting similar forearc basins along the Peruvian coast. Major results of this study are that the development of the documented deformation features, their patterns, dimensional parameters and kinematics seem influenced by local perturbations of the paleostress field by mechanic processes partly independent of plate tectonics forces. These processes include strain localization on both pre-existing and progressively forming new structural discontinuities, and cyclic switches of the horizontal, principal stress axes σ2 and σ3. In particular, we discuss how different normal fault patterns, from sub-parallel to multidirectional/polygonal, could form in a same deformation phase in response of the local σ2/σ3 magnitude ratio, as an evolution of stratabound, mutually orthogonal vein sets.

  4. Geodynamic Drivers of Vertical Crustal Motion: Integrating Paleoaltimetry with Basin Development in the Central Andean Plateau of Southern Peru

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    Sundell, K. E., II; Saylor, J. E.; Lapen, T. J.; Villarreal, D. P.; Styron, R. H.; Horton, B. K.; Cardenas, J.

    2015-12-01

    Determining the spatial and temporal relationships between surface uplift, tectonic subsidence, and exhumation during periods of oblique crustal shortening is essential to discriminating geodynamic processes controlling formation of high topography in the central Andes. Although subsidence analysis is now a standard tool, paleoelevation estimation remains a challenging task, as estimates based on proxy data can be complicated by uncertainties in the relative controls of tectonics and climate. We therefore adopt an approach of combining established tools of subsidence analysis and detrital geochronology with emerging methods of volcanic glass paleoaltimetry, which enables us to explore a broad range of viable interpretations to understand the development of intermontane basins and their relationship to the development of the central Andean plateau. We investigated a suite of temporally overlapping and spatially separate Cenozoic basins spanning the east-west extent of the central Andean plateau in southern Peru. These basins contain an exceptional record of the vertical movements of this region. We calculate sediment accumulation and subsidence rates through decompaction of measured stratigraphic sections, and reconstruct past environmental conditions based on the stable isotopic composition of ancient waters preserved in hydrated volcanic glass. These data and published records of crustal shortening and exhumation show that although paleoaltimetry data in the study areas may be interpreted in various ways, they are best explained by multiple geodynamic processes driving (i) Eocene-early Miocene development of high topography in the Western Cordillera, then (ii) a pulsed middle Miocene-present building of the central Andean plateau from west to east, consistent with global climate changes as well as regional climate shifts driven by topographic development of the Andean orogen.

  5. Direct evidence of 1,900 years of indigenous silver production in the Lake Titicaca Basin of Southern Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Schultze, C. A.; Stanish, C.; Scott, D A; Rehren, T.; Kuehner, S.; Feathers, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    Archaeological excavations at a U-shaped pyramid in the northern Lake Titicaca Basin of Peru have documented a continuous 5-m-deep stratigraphic sequence of metalworking remains. The sequence begins in the first millennium AD and ends in the Spanish Colonial period ca. AD 1600. The earliest dates associated with silver production are 1960 + or - 40 BP (2-sigma cal. 40 BC to AD 120) and 1870 + or - 40 BP (2-sigma cal. AD 60 to 240) representing the oldest known silver smelting in South America...

  6. Fibrous gypsum veins as diffuse features and within fault zones: the case study of the Pisco Basin (Ica desert, southern Peru)

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    Rustichelli, Andrea; Di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele; Baud, Patrick; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    New knowledge on patterns of fibrous gypsum veins, their genetic mechanisms, deformation style and weathering are provided by a field- and laboratory-based study carried out on the Neogene to Quaternary Pisco Basin sedimentary strata (porous sandstones, siltstones and diatomites) exposed in the Ica desert, southern Peru. Gypsum veins vary considerably in dimensions, attitudes and timing and can develop in layered and moderately fractured rocks also in the absence of evaporitic layers. Veins occur both as diffuse features, confined to certain stratigraphic levels, and localised within fault zones. Arrays formed by layer-bounded, mutually orthogonal sets of steeply-dipping gypsum veins are reported for the first time. Vein length, height and spacing depend on the thickness of the bed packages in which they are confined. Within fault zones, veins are partly a product of faulting but also inherited layer-bounded features along which faults are superimposed. Due to the different petrophysical properties with respect to the parent rocks and their susceptibility to textural and mineralogical modifications, water dissolution and rupture, gypsum veins may have a significant role in geofluid management. Depending on their patterns and grade of physical and chemical alteration, veins may influence geofluid circulation and storage, acting as barriers to flow and possibly also as conduits.

  7. Multi-method provenance model for early Paleozoic sedimentary basins of southern Peru and northern Bolivia (13°-18°S)

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    Reimann Zumsprekel, Cornelia R.; Bahlburg, Heinrich; Carlotto, Victor; Boekhout, Flora; Berndt, Jasper; Lopez, Shirley

    2015-12-01

    In early Paleozoic time the Peru-Bolivia Trough at the South American Gondwana margin accommodated large volumes of siliciclastic detritus of hitherto largely unknown provenance. A multi-method provenance study of framework components, heavy minerals and whole rock geochemistry of Ordovician to Devonian formations of southern Peru and northern Bolivia reveals the predominant contribution from upper crustal sources. Main heavy minerals include zircon, tourmaline, rutile, apatite, garnet, epidote, monazite, and titanite and are strongly biased diagenetically towards the stable phases. Electron microprobe single grain analysis of tourmaline and rutile indicate that detrital tourmalines were derived mainly from metasedimentary, and subordinately, from granitic sources. Cr/Nb ratios in rutiles point to a metamafic derivation for 20-40% of grains, the remainder originating in felsic lithologies. Zr in rutile thermometry indicates a provenance from relatively high-grade metamorphic rocks transformed at temperatures between 500 °C and 900 °C, with clusters at c. 600 °C, 700 °C and 800 °C. U-Pb geochronological analysis of rutiles was largely unsuccessful due to high concentrations of common Pb. Three ages could be obtained and fall between 525 and 545 Ma, probably linking this detritus to the hidden Neoproterozoic orogen in what are now Cordillera Oriental and Sierras Subandinas. The most notable feature of the whole rock geochemical data is a high Cr content in the majority of samples, which otherwise have a composition similar to weathered upper continental crust. The elevated Cr contents indicates that ophiolitic rocks were either exposed to erosion abundantly in the source areas or had previously supplied significant volumes of detritus to intermittent sediment storage systems now eroded into the studied sedimentary rocks. Potential source candidates include the Ordovician metamorphic Tapo Ultramafic Complex in the Cordillera Oriental of central Peru, and the

  8. Tectonic subsidence analyses of miogeoclinal strata from mesozoic marginal basin of Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Western Peruvian trough is composed of an eastern miogeoclinical facies of carbonate and clastic strata, and a western eugeoclinal facies consisting of a succession of volcanic and sedimentary rocks. In norther and central Peru, the miogeocline is located between a tectonic hinge adjacent to platformal facies of the Maranon geanticline on the east, and an outer marginal high bounded by the Cordillera Blanca fault and Tapacocha axis on the west. Miogeoclinal and platformal strata in southern Peru occur in a broad belt between Arequipa and Lago Titicaca. A marginal basin setting has been proposed for the Western Peruvian trough and the several kilometers of subsidence in the basin has been attributed to back-arc extension and crustal thinning. As a test of this model, quantitative tectonic subsidence curves were constructed from representative sections within miogeoclinar strata from four localities. Preliminary results indicate that the calculated curves have the same overall form as the age-depth curve for ocean floor, suggesting that subsidence was controlled by cooling and thermal contraction of heated lithosphere. The slopes of the curves are less than those for subsidence of oceanic lithosphere. However, they are in agreement with geologic evidence that the miogeocline accumulated on continental crust. Significant variations in the timing of onset, duration, and magnitude of subsidence are observed between sections from northern and southern Peru.

  9. Avifauna of the Pongos Basin, Amazonas Department, Peru

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    Brooks, D.M.; O'Neill, J.P.; Foster, M.S.; Mark, T.; Dauphine, N.; Franke, I.J.

    2009-01-01

    We provide an inventory of the avifauna of the Pongos Basin, northern Amazonas Department, Peru based on museum specimens collected during expeditions spanning >60 years within the 20th century. Four hundred and thirty-eight species representing 52 families are reported. Differences between lowland and higher elevation avifaunas were apparent. Species accounts with overviews of specimen data are provided for four species representing distributional records, two threatened species, and 26 species of Nearctic and Austral migrants, of which six are considered probable migrants.

  10. Peru

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2014-01-01

    The Country Opinion Survey in Peru assists the World Bank Group (WBG) in gaining a better understanding of how stakeholders in Peru perceive the WBG. It provides the WBG with systematic feedback from national and local governments, multilateral/bilateral agencies, media, academia, the private sector, and civil society in Peru on 1) their views regarding the general environment in Peru; 2) ...

  11. Islay And The Economy Of Southern Peru In 19th Century

    OpenAIRE

    Bonilla, Heraclio

    2015-01-01

    This article notes the specificity of the regional economic history of Southern Peru, which in 1780-1840 experienced an important economic growth while the rest of the Viceroyalty of Peru was in crisis. This important fact is not well known because of the lack of research on regional economy. It presents data on the dynamics of international markets and its relation with the southern economy. Finally, the article argues some problems related to the general development of the Peruvian economy.

  12. Assessment of future regional precipitation pattern for an Andes region in Southern Peru

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    Salzmann, N.; Rohrer, M.; Acuna, D.; Calanca, P.; Huggel, C.

    2012-04-01

    The Cusco and Apurímac region (Southern Peru) in the outer tropical Andes is characterized by a distinct wet and dry season. The climatology of the Andes region in southern Peru is complex and mainly influenced by tropical and extra tropical upper level-large scale circulation as well as by local convection. For the past decades, observations from station data show a slight negative precipitation trend for the area. Scenarios for the future are associated with large uncertainties. Data from the few available Regional Climate Model simulations, and results from statistical downscaling show neither clear nor consistent future precipitation trends for this region The large biodiversity in the high altitude of the Andes and the critical socio-economic situation of the majority of the local population imply a high vulnerability to climate variability and change. Even small shifts in particular in the precipitation regime (sum, frequency or intensity) can therefore have significant impacts on the livelihood of the rural population. Droughts and flooding events that occurred in the past years have demonstrated the heavy repercussion of extreme events. In our study, we analysed and correlated past regional station observations with large-scale circulation patterns from Renanalyses in order to aim at improving our understanding of the major drivers for precipitation in the Cusco-Apurímac region. First results show an only moderate correlation with ENSO and a relative stronger correlation with moisture transported from the Amazon Basin. Our results are then related to large-scale pattern scenarios provided by GCMs and discussed in view of possible impacts of climate change for the Cusco - Apurímac region. In conclusion, we aim at showing at the example of this specific area of the Andes how process knowledge can be used to support the development of adaptation measures in regions with limited availability of data.

  13. High Andean butterflies from southern Peru, I. Dry puna Satyrinae, with the description of two new taxa and three new records from Peru (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae

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    José Alfredo Cerdeña

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the first part of a series of contributions to the knowledge of the high Andean butterfly fauna in southern Peru. In this work the butterfly species of the subfamily Satyrinae present in the dry puna of Peru are reviewed. A new species, Pampasatyrus gorkyi sp. nov. and a new subspecies Argyrophorus lamna cuzcoensis ssp. nov. are described from the department Cusco, Peru. Three species are recorded for the first time for Peru, Argyrophorus gustavi Staudinger, Faunula euripides (Weymer and Faunula eleates (Weymer previously reported from Chile and Bolivia. Ecological and biogeographical data are provided.

  14. Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    This publication provides a brief account of Peru's geographic, history, government, and political and economic conditions. With an area of 1.28 million sq. km., Peru is the third largest country in South American and is home to 20.2 million inhabitants (6 million live in the capital city of Lima). The population is 45% Indian, 37% mestizo, 15% white, and 3% black, Asian, and other. The 2 official languages are Spanish and Quechua. Its literacy rate stands at 79%, and its infant mortality rate and life expectancy measure 91/1000 and 60.8 years respectively. Peru's pre-Colombian period notes the impressive achievements of the Inca civilization, which was conquered by Spain in 1531. The country gained its independence from Spanish rule in 1821. The article also mentions Peru's turbulent contemporary history, with territorial disputes, a strong military presence, and a series of coups that have interrupted civilian constitutional governments. As recently as 1985, Peru had its first exchange of power from 1 democratically elected leader to another in 40 years, when 36 year-old Alan Garcia Perez became president. Leader of the American Popular Revolutionary Alliance (APRA), GArcia espouses leftist but not non-communist politics, and is well-known for his message of anti-imperialism and Latin American integration. Peru's has seen terrorist activity from 2 marxist organizations, the Maoist Sendero Luminoso (The Shining Path) and the MRTA-MIR (Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement-Movement of the Revolutionary Left. In 1986, Peru's economy had a $17 billion Gross Domestic Product (GDP), a per capital GDP of $839, and an inflation rate of 62.9. The article also provides information concerning US economic assistance to Peru, as well as an assessment of US-Peruvian relations. PMID:12178073

  15. Multiple glacial culminations from the Lateglacial to the late Holocene in central and southern Peru (Invited)

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    Licciardi, J. M.; Schaefer, J. M.; Rodbell, D. T.; Stansell, N.; Schweinsberg, A.; Finkel, R. C.; Zimmerman, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Fluctuations in small tropical mountain glaciers serve as sensitive indicators of variations in past and present-day climate. Most of the world's modern tropical glaciers reside in the Peruvian Andes, where a growing number of well-dated glacial records have recently been developed. As additional records are documented, regional patterns of late Pleistocene to Holocene glacial activity have begun to emerge. Here we present a compilation of new and previously obtained 10Be surface exposure ages from boulders on well-preserved moraine successions in two glaciated Andean ranges: the Cordillera Vilcabamba of southern Peru (13°20'S, 72°32'W) and the Huaguruncho massif (10°32'S, 75°56'W), located in central Peru ~450 km northwest of the Vilcabamba. A high-resolution composite chronology that merges >100 10Be measurements on moraine sequences in five glaciated drainages of the Cordillera Vilcabamba reveals the occurrence of at least five discrete glacial culminations from the Lateglacial to the late Holocene. At the Huaguruncho massif, >20 10Be exposure ages obtained from moraine sequences in a south-facing cirque indicate at least three major glacial stages spanning the Lateglacial to the Little Ice Age. The moraine ages at Huaguruncho are broadly correlative with the Vilcabamba moraine chronologies, with some dated moraine belts exhibiting geomorphic expressions that closely resemble those of their coeval counterparts in the Vilcabamba. A recurring finding in both field areas is a mismatch between basal radiocarbon ages from bog and lake sediments and 10Be exposure ages on outboard moraines, which enclose the depositional basins. These age discrepancies suggest that cosmogenic 10Be production rates scaled to high altitudes in the tropics are substantially lower than previous estimates. While we anticipate that future refinements to scaled isotope production rates may significantly affect correlation of 10Be exposure ages in the high Andes with ages derived from

  16. Ground failure in the 2001 Mw 8.4 southern Peru earthquake

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    Rondinel-Oviedo, Efrain Alejandro

    On June 23rd 2001 a moment magnitude (M W) 8.4, earthquake shook the southern portion of Peru. This rare large-magnitude event provided a unique opportunity to develop a suite of high quality case histories and also to test and calibrate existing geotechnical earthquake engineering analysis procedures and models against observations from the earthquake. The work presented in this thesis is focused on three topics pertaining to ground failure (i.e., the permanent deformation of the ground resulting from an earthquake) observed during the event: (1) surface ground damage in small basin geometries, (2) seismic compression, and (3) performance of a concrete faced rockfill dam (CFRD) dam. Surface ground strain damage patterns in small basin geometries has previously been typically studied at the large (i.e., geological) scale, but not at the scale of civil engineering infrastructure. During seismic events basin geometries containing soft material confined by stiffer material trap the seismic waves and generate surface waves that travel on the ground along the soft material. Numerical modeling shows that surface waves are generated at basin edges and travel on the ground creating higher duration, higher response (peak ground acceleration, PGA), higher energy (Arias Intensity) and higher angular distortion, especially in zones close to the edges. The impedance contrast between the stiff material and the soft material, and the dip angle play an important role in basin response. Seismic compression (i.e., the shaking induced densification of unsaturated soil) was observed in many highway embankments in the region of the earthquake. In many instances, this phenomenon was exasperated by soil-structure interaction with adjacent bridge or culvert structures. Numerical modeling conducted as part of this research showed (i) a significantly different response when the structure (culvert) is considered, (ii) impedance contrast plays a role in the system responses, and (iii) low

  17. Mammal diversity in the middle basin of the river Tambopata, Puno, Peru

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    Víctor Pacheco

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study documents the mammalian diversity in the Tambopata River middle basin, one of the most important information gaps in Peru. Five sites were evaluated in Puno (San Fermín 850 m, Curva Alegre 950 m, Challohuma 1200 m, Yanahuaya 1600 m, and Yanacocha 1985 m. The trapping effort was 7072 trap-nights and 201 mistnet-nights. 76 species were recorded in the study area, including 16 species under some conservation’s category. Bats and rodents were the most diverse orders (67.5%. The diversity indices of Shannon-Wiener and Simpson for small mammals show a moderate and mild negative correlation with elevation, respectively. Meanwhile the altitude is negatively correlated with the relative abundance (RA of bats, and positively with the RA of non-volant mammals. The marsupials Marmosa (Micoureus demerarae, Marmosops bishopi and Marmosops impavidus; the rodent Neacomys musseri, and bats Platyrrhinus albericoi, P. masu, P. nigellus, Eumops auripendulus and Cormura brevirostris are first records for the department of Puno. Akodon baliolus and Oxymycterus juliacae are considered valid species. The species Sturnira lilium and Akodon baliolus were those with the highest RA. Our records, added to published and unpublished data, indicate that the Río Tambopata watershed is habitat of 141 species of mammals. Finally, we recommend the extension of the southern part of the buffer zone of the PNBS to include the montane forests of Yanacocha, to protect the unique middleelevation fauna of the Río Tambopata watershed.

  18. Climate change underlies global demographic, genetic, and cultural transitions in pre-Columbian southern Peru.

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    Fehren-Schmitz, Lars; Haak, Wolfgang; Mächtle, Bertil; Masch, Florian; Llamas, Bastien; Cagigao, Elsa Tomasto; Sossna, Volker; Schittek, Karsten; Isla Cuadrado, Johny; Eitel, Bernhard; Reindel, Markus

    2014-07-01

    Several archaeological studies in the Central Andes have pointed at the temporal coincidence of climatic fluctuations (both long- and short-term) and episodes of cultural transition and changes of socioeconomic structures throughout the pre-Columbian period. Although most scholars explain the connection between environmental and cultural changes by the impact of climatic alterations on the capacities of the ecosystems inhabited by pre-Columbian cultures, direct evidence for assumed demographic consequences is missing so far. In this study, we address directly the impact of climatic changes on the spatial population dynamics of the Central Andes. We use a large dataset of pre-Columbian mitochondrial DNA sequences from the northern Rio Grande de Nasca drainage (RGND) in southern Peru, dating from ∼840 BC to 1450 AD. Alternative demographic scenarios are tested using Bayesian serial coalescent simulations in an approximate Bayesian computational framework. Our results indicate migrations from the lower coastal valleys of southern Peru into the Andean highlands coincident with increasing climate variability at the end of the Nasca culture at ∼640 AD. We also find support for a back-migration from the highlands to the coast coincident with droughts in the southeastern Andean highlands and improvement of climatic conditions on the coast after the decline of the Wari and Tiwanaku empires (∼1200 AD), leading to a genetic homogenization in the RGND and probably southern Peru as a whole. PMID:24979787

  19. Large slope instabilities in Northern Chile and Southern Peru

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    Crosta, Giovanni B.; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Valbuzzi, Elena; Frattini, Paolo; Valagussa, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Deep canyon incision into Tertiary paleosurfaces and large slope instabilities along the canyon flanks characterize the landscape of western slope of the Andes of northern Chile and South Peru. This area belongs to the Coastal Escarpment and Precordillera and is formed by coarse-grained clastic and volcanoclastic formations. The area is characterized by intense seismicity and long-term hyperaridity (Atacama Desert). Landslides along the canyon flanks affect volumes generally up to 1 km3 and locally evolved in large rock avalanches. We prepared a landslide inventory covering an area of about 30,000 km2, extending from Iquique (Chile) to the South and Tacna (Peru) to the North. A total of 606 landslides have been mapped in the area by use of satellite images and direct field surveys, prevalently including large phenomena. The landslides range from 1 10-3 km2 to 464 km2 (Lluta landslide). The total landslide area, inclusive of the landslide scarp and of the deposit, amounts to about 2,130 km2 (about 7% of the area). The mega landslides can be classified as large block slides that can evolve in large rock avalanches (e.g. Minimini landslide). Their initiation seems to be strongly associated to the presence of secondary faults and large fractures transversal to the slope. These landslides show evidence suggesting a re-incision by the main canyon network. This seems particularly true for the Lluta collapse where the main 'landslide' mass is masked or deleted by the successive erosion. Other landslides have been mapped along the Coastal Escarpment and some of the major tectonic escarpments with an E-W trend. We examined area-frequency distributions of landslides by developing logarithmically binned, non-cumulative size frequency distributions that report frequency density as a function of landslide planar area A. The size frequency distribution presents a strong undersampling for smaller landslides, due to the extremely old age of the inventory. For landslides larger than

  20. Floristic diversity of the upper river basin Tambo-Ichuña (Moquegua, Peru

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    Daniel B. Montesinos-Tubée

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A study of the floristic diversity of vascular plants is presented from the basin of the Tambo-Ichuña River, the high Andean Puna plateau and wetlands of Ichuña, Ubinas and Yunga Districts (3400 - 4700 m altitude, General Sanchez Cerro Province, Department of Moquegua, Peru. Vascular flora is composed of 70 families, 238 genera and 404 species. The Magnoliopsida represent 78% of the species, Liliopsida 16%, Gymnosperms 0.5% and Pteridophytes 6%. Among lifeforms, the Hemicryptophytes are the most numerous. Three vegetation formations have been identified, the humid scrubland being the most diverse in species richness. Between endemic species, 42 taxa are exclusive to Peru. A total number of 272 new additions of vascular species to the flora of the department of Moquegua are presented.

  1. Internal vein texture and vein evolution of the epithermal Shila-Paula district, southern Peru.

    OpenAIRE

    Chauvet, Alain; Bailly, Laurent; André-Mayer, Anne-Sylvie; Monié, Patrick; Cassard, Daniel; Llosa Tajada, Fernando; Rosas Vargas, Juan; Tuduri, Johann

    2006-01-01

    The epithermal Shila-Paula Au–Ag district is characterized by numerous veins hosted in Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Western Cordillera (southern Peru). Field studies of the ore bodies reveal a systematic association of a main E–W vein with secondary N55–60°W veins—two directions that are also reflected by the orientation of fluid-inclusion planes in quartz crystals of the host rock. In areas where this pattern is not recognized, such as the Apacheta sector, vein emplacement seems to have be...

  2. Modelling Water Trade in the Southern Murray-Darling Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, D.; Dwyer, G.; D. Appels; Fry, J

    2005-01-01

    This Productivity Commission staff working paper, 'Modelling Water Trade in the Southern Murray-Darling Basin', was released in November 2004. It examines the likely economic impacts of expanding water trade in the southern Murray-Darling Basin. The paper uses TERM-Water, a bottoms-up regional CGE model of the Australian economy, to examine the regional effects of expanding trade of irrigation water in the southern Murray-Darling Basin. The study finds that water trading dampens the impact of...

  3. Alboran Basin, southern Spain - Part I: Geomorphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A. [Secretaria General de Pesca Maritima, Corazon de Maria, 8, 28002 Madrid (Spain); Ballesteros, M.; Rivera, J.; Acosta, J. [Instituto Espanol de Oceanografia, Corazon de Maria, 8, 28002 Madrid (Spain); Montoya, I. [Universidad Juan Carlos I, Campus de Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Uchupi, E. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)

    2008-01-15

    Bathymetric, 3D relief and shaded relief maps created from multibeam echo-sounding data image the morphology of the Alboran Basin, a structural low along the east-west-trending Eurasian-African plates boundary. Topographic features in the basin are the consequence of volcanism associated with Miocene rifting, rift and post-rift sedimentation, and recent faulting resulting from the convergence of the African-Eurasian plates. Pleistiocene glacially induced regressions/transgressions when the sea level dropped to about 150 m below its present level gas seeps and bottom currents. Recent faulting and the Pleistocene transgressions/regressions led to mass-wasting, formation of turbidity currents and canyon erosion on the basin's slopes. Recent fault traces at the base of the northern basin slope have also served as passageways for thermogenic methane, the oxidation of which by bacteria led to the formation of carbonate mounds along the fault intercepts on the sea floor. Expulsion of thermogenic or biogenic gas has led to the formation of pockmarks; erosion by bottom currents has resulted in the formation of moats around seamounts and erosion of the seafloor of the Alboran Ridge and kept the southern edge of the 36 10'N high sediment free. (author)

  4. Seismic structure along transitions from flat to normal subduction: central Mexico, southern Peru, and southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Sara L.

    The fine-scale seismic structure of the central Mexico, southern Peru, and southwest Japan subduction zones is studied using intraslab earthquakes recorded by temporary and permanent regional seismic arrays. The morphology of the transition from flat to normal subduction is explored in central Mexico and southern Peru, while in southwest Japan the spatial coincidence of a thin ultra-slow velocity layer (USL) atop the flat slab with locations of slow slip events (SSEs) is explored. This USL is also observed in central Mexico and southern Peru, where its lateral extent is used as one constraint on the nature of the flat-to-normal transitions. In western central Mexico, I find an edge to this USL which is coincident with the western boundary of the projected Orozco Fracture Zone (OFZ) region. Forward modeling of the 2D structure of the subducted Cocos plate using a finite-difference algorithm provides constraints on the velocity and geometry of the slab's seismic structure in this region and confirms the location of the USL edge. I propose that the Cocos slab is currently fragmenting into a North Cocos plate and a South Cocos plate along the projection of the OFZ, by a process analogous to that which occurred when the Rivera plate separated from the proto-Cocos plate 10 Ma. In eastern central Mexico, observations of a sharp transition in slab dip near the abrupt end of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) suggest a possible slab tear located within the subducted South Cocos plate. The eastern lateral extent of the USL is found to be coincident with these features and with the western boundary of a zone of decreased seismicity, indicating a change in structure which I interpret as evidence of a possible tear. Analysis of intraslab seismicity patterns and focal mechanism orientations and faulting types provides further support for a possible tear in the South Cocos slab. This potential tear, together with the tear along the projection of the OFZ to the northwest

  5. Tectonic geomorphology of large normal faults bounding the Cuzco rift basin within the southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, C.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Cuzco basin forms a 80-wide, relatively flat valley within the High Andes of southern Peru. This larger basin includes the regional capital of Cuzco and the Urubamba Valley, or "Sacred Valley of the Incas" favored by the Incas for its mild climate and broader expanses of less rugged and arable land. The valley is bounded on its northern edge by a 100-km-long and 10-km-wide zone of down-to-the-south systems of normal faults that separate the lower area of the down-dropped plateau of central Peru and the more elevated area of the Eastern Cordillera foldbelt that overthrusts the Amazon lowlands to the east. Previous workers have shown that the normal faults are dipslip with up to 600 m of measured displacements, reflect north-south extension, and have Holocene displacments with some linked to destructive, historical earthquakes. We have constructed topographic and structural cross sections across the entire area to demonstrate the normal fault on a the plateau peneplain. The footwall of the Eastern Cordillera, capped by snowcapped peaks in excess of 6 km, tilts a peneplain surface northward while the hanging wall of the Cuzco basin is radially arched. Erosion is accelerated along the trend of the normal fault zone. As the normal fault zone changes its strike from east-west to more more northwest-southeast, normal displacement decreases and is replaced by a left-lateral strike-slip component.

  6. Amphitheca isaacsonii gen. et sp. nov. (Acritarcha) from the Ananea Formation (Silurian/Devonian transition), southern Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavrdová, Milada; Svobodová, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 179, - (2010), s. 189-196. ISSN 1802-6842 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : Ananea Formation * Amphitheca gen. nov. * acritarchs * southern Peru Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://www.nm.cz/publikace/publikace-download.php?name=File1&dir=archiv&table=tabPublikaceArchiv&id=2795

  7. Imaging Lithospheric-scale Structure Beneath Northern Altiplano in Southern Peru and Northern Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Altiplano plateau of southern Peru and northern Bolivia is one of the highest topographic features on the Earth, flanked by Western and Eastern Cordillera along its margin. It has strongly influenced the local and far field lithospheric deformation since the early Miocene (Masek et al., 1994). Previous studies have emphasized the importance of both the crust and upper mantle in the evolution of Altiplano plateau (McQuarrie et al., 2005). Early tomographic and receiver function studies, south of 16° S, show significant variations in the crust and upper mantle properties in both perpendicular and along strike direction of the Altiplano plateau (Dorbath et. al., 1993; Myers et al., 1998; Beck and Zandt, 2002). In order to investigate the nature of subsurface lithospheric structure below the northern Altiplano, between 15-18° S, we have determined three-dimensional seismic tomography models for Vp and Vs using P and S-wave travel time data from two recently deployed local seismic networks of CAUGHT and PULSE. We also used data from 8 stations from the PERUSE network (PERU Subduction Experiment). Our preliminary tomographic models show a complex variation in the upper mantle velocity structure with depth, northwest and southeast of lake Titicaca. We see the following trend, at ~85 km depth, northwest of lake Titicaca: low Vp and Vs beneath the Western Cordillera, high Vs beneath the Altiplano and low Vp and Vs beneath the Eastern Cordillera. This low velocity anomaly, beneath Eastern Cordillera, seems to coincide with Kimsachata, a Holocene volcano in southern Peru. At depth greater than ~85 km: we find high velocity anomaly beneath the Western Cordillera and low Vs beneath the Altiplano. This high velocity anomaly, beneath Western Cordillera, coincides with the well-located Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity and perhaps represents the subducting Nazca slab. On the southeast of lake Titicaca, in northern Bolivia, we see a consistently high velocity anomaly

  8. Southern rim of Isidis Planitia basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 11 April 2002) The Science This image, crossing the southern rim of the Isidis Planitia basin, displays the contrasting morphologies of the relatively rough highland terrain (in the lower portion of the image) and the relatively smooth materials of the basin (at top). Upon closer viewing, the basin materials display an extensive record of cratering, including a small cluster of craters just north and west of the two prominent craters in the upper part of the image. This cluster of craters may represent what are called 'secondary' craters, which are craters that form as a result of the ejection of debris from a nearby impact. Alternatively, these craters may have formed simultaneously by the impact of many pieces of a larger meteoroid that broke up upon entry into Mars' atmosphere. The large craters in the image are approximately 800 meters (875 yards) in diameter. Also visible in the image are dark streaks on the east-facing side of the north-south trending ridge. These streaks are likely the result of debris movement down slope. A dark patch of material is visible at the left of the image; dark materials are typically mobile sands, and linear dune forms are apparent within the dark patch. The Story Battered and beaten up, the surface of Mars reads like a history book to geologists, who want to study what has happened to the red planet over its geological history. Look for two larger craters diagonal from one another in the northern part of this image, and then for the smattering of tinier craters near them. How did these smaller craters come to be? Did a large meteoroid streak in through the Martian atmosphere and get broken up as it passed through, pummeling Mars moments later with its smaller, scattered pieces? Or were rocks and dirt blasted off the surface when the two larger craters were formed, only to rain down again on Mars shortly afterwards? No one quite knows for sure.... Another enigmatic-looking feature is near the left center of this image

  9. Pollution by heavy metals in the Moche River Basin, 1980 - 2010, La Libertad - Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Huaranga Moreno

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The pollution of the continental waters is a problem at a world scale, mainly due to the impact of the mining tailings. Using top technologies as neutralization plants of acid waters, many companies are mitigating the impact of this functioning; so taking as a reference the changes in the concentration of heavy metals present in water, soils and cultivations of the high, middle and low basin of the Moche river, samplings of water were obtained at eight stations of the Moche river (Trujillo, Peru, and in four sectors of its margins for soils and cultivations. The most representative heavy metals in water were found in the high basin during the year 1980: iron (557.500 ppm, lead (100.375 ppm, cadmium (4.550 ppm, copper (6.900 ppm, zinc (262.900 ppm and arsenic (9.000 ppm; whereas in the soils the higher concentrations were found on the right margin of median basin in the year 1980: iron (83.400 mg/kg; lead (0.820 mg/kg; cadmium (0.012 mg/kg; copper (1.240 mg/kg; zinc (0.380 mg/kg and arsenic (0.016 mg/kg; in relation to the metal accumulation in the cultivations, iron (0.6525 mg/kg was predominant, being the yucca (Manihot esculentus the most contaminated cultivation. It is concluded that, most contamination level of water analysis was present in the high basin during 1980, whereas the right side of the median basin highest levels of contamination in the samples of soils; relating to the cultives, the yucca (Manihot esculentus was the species most contaminated.

  10. Using anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility to better constrain the tilt correction in paleomagnetism: A case study from southern Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Roperch, Pierrick; Carlotto, Victor; Chauvin, Annick

    2010-01-01

    [1] We report a combined study of anisotropy of low field magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and paleo-magnetism from 16 sites in a sedimentary sequence of Eocene–early Oligocene red beds in southern Peru. Incipient tectonic strain is recorded during the early stages of deformation. Nonhorizontal magnetic linea-tion in geographic coordinate suggests either non-cylindrical folding and/or interference of two phases of compressive deformation and tectonic rotation. Applying the classic tilt correctio...

  11. Structural inheritance and selective reactivation in the central Andes: Cenozoic deformation guided by pre-Andean structures in southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Nicholas D.; Horton, Brian K.; Carlotto, Victor

    2016-03-01

    Structural, stratigraphic, and geochronologic constraints from the Eastern Cordillera in the central Andean plateau of southern Peru (14-15°S) demonstrate the existence and position of major pre-Andean structures that controlled the accumulation of Triassic synrift fill and guided subsequent Cenozoic deformation. The timing of initial clastic deposition of the Triassic Mitu Group is here constrained to ~ 242-233 Ma on the basis of detrital and volcanic zircon U-Pb geochronology. Regionally distinct provenance variations, as provided by U-Pb age populations from localized synrift accumulations, demonstrate Triassic erosion of multiple diagnostic sources from diverse rift-flank uplifts. Stratigraphic correlations suggest synchronous initiation of extensional basins containing the Mitu Group, in contrast with previous interpretations of southward rift propagation. Triassic motion along the NE-dipping San Anton normal fault accommodated up to 7 km of throw and hanging-wall deposition of a synrift Mitu succession > 2.5 km thick. The contrasting orientation of a non-reactivated Triassic normal fault suggests selective inversion of individual structures in the Eastern Cordillera was dependent on fault dip and strike. Selective preservation of a ~ 4 km thick succession of Carboniferous-Permian strata in the down-dropped San Anton hanging wall, beneath the synrift Mitu Group, suggests large-scale erosional removal in the uplifted footwall. Field and map observations identify additional pre-Andean thrust faults and folds attributed to poorly understood Paleozoic orogenic events preserved in the San Anton hanging wall. Selective thrust reactivation of normal and reverse faults during later compression largely guided Cenozoic deformation in the Eastern Cordillera. The resulting structural compartmentalization and across-strike variations in kinematics and deformation style highlight the influence of inherited Paleozoic structures and Triassic normal faults on the long

  12. On the origin of the Southern Permian Basin, Central Europe

    OpenAIRE

    J.-D. van Wees; Stephenson, R.A.; Ziegler, P. A.; Ulf Bayer; McCann, T; R. Dadlez; Gaupp, R; M. Narkiewicz; F. Bitzer; Scheck, M.;  

    2000-01-01

    A detailed study of the structural and stratigraphic evolution of the Southern Permian Basin during latest Carboniferous to Early Jurassic times, supported by quantitative subsidence analyses and forward basin modelling for 25 wells, leads us to modify the conventional model for the Rotliegend-Zechstein development of this basin. The Late Permian-Early Jurassic tectonic subsidence curves are typical for a Permian to Early Triassic extensional stage that is followed by thermal subsidence. Howe...

  13. Exploration of deep sedimentary layers in Tacna city, southern Peru, using microtremors and earthquake data for estimation of local amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Gamero, Mileyvi Selene Quispe; Chimoto, Kosuke; Saguchi, Kouichiro; Calderon, Diana; La Rosa, Fernándo Lázares; Bardales, Zenón Aguilar

    2016-01-01

    S-wave velocity profiles of sedimentary layers in Tacna, southern Peru, based on analysis of microtremor array data and earthquake records, have been determined for estimation of site amplification. We investigated vertical component of microtremors in temporary arrays at two sites in the city for Rayleigh wave phase velocity. A receiver function was also estimated from existing earthquake data at a strong motion station near one of the microtremor exploration sites. The phase velocity and the receiver function were jointly inverted to S-wave velocity profiles. The depths to the basement with an S-wave velocity of 2.8 km/s at the two sites are similar as about 1 km. The top soil at the site in a severely damaged area in the city had a lower S-wave velocity than that in a slightly damaged area during the 2001 southern Peru earthquake. We subsequently estimate site amplifications from the velocity profiles and find that amplification is large at periods from 0.2 to 0.8 s at the damaged area indicating possible reasons for the differences in the damage observed during the 2001 southern Peru earthquake.

  14. Chrysobrycon yoliae, a new species of stevardiin (Characiformes: Characidae from the Ucayali basin, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Anyelo Vanegas-Ríos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chrysobrycon yoliae, new species, is described from a drainage flowing into the río Yucamia basin, río Ucayali basin, Peru. Chrysobrycon yoliaeis readily distinguished from its congeners by the anterior tip of pelvic bone situated anterior to the fifth rib (vs. situated posterior to the fifth rib, the presence of 20-26 dentary teeth (vs. 11-19, and the possession of a terminal lateral-line tube between caudal-fin rays 10 and 11 (vs. the absence of this tube, except in C. eliasi. The new species differs from C. eliasiand C. myersiby the presence of teeth on third pharyngobranchial (vs. the absence of teeth on this bone and also differs from C. eliasiby the dorsal-fin origin situated at vertical through anal-fin rays 5 to 7 (vs. located at vertical through anal-fin rays 8 to 10, the posterior extent of the ventral process of quadrate reaching the vertical through posterior margin of symplectic (vs. not reaching the vertical through posterior margin of symplectic, the dorsal-fin to adipose-fin length 26.8-28.8% SL (vs. 23.9-26.8% SL, and the body depth at dorsal-fin origin 34.4-42.2% SL (vs. 24.1-34.5% SL. A key for the identification of Chrysobryconspecies is provided.

  15. Integrating short-term and long-term forecasting with reservoir optimisation; Mantaro Basin, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R. A.; Lasarte, A.; Butts, M. B.

    2009-04-01

    Operational water management often requires a trade-off between short-term and long-term water demands, where short-term demands are driven for example by hydropower generation and flood protection requirements and the long-term demands by water and irrigation supply, sustainable reservoir management and the seasonal impacts of snow melt or climate. This paper presents an operational decision support system designed to forecast and optimise reservoir operations in both the short-term and long-term. The system has been established for the 20,000 km2 Mantaro river basin located in the high Andes with altitudes ranging from 3500 to nearly 6000 m.a.s.l.. The two main power stations at Tablachaca have a combined capacity of more than 1000 MW that supplies 30% of Peru's electrical energy. In addition, the basin's water resources supply extensive agricultural areas, an urban population and mining activities and sustain important ecological habitats. In this paper, the methodologies used for the integrating short-term and long-term forecasting are presented together with their application to the optimal operation of reservoirs. A key element in the system is the MIKE BASIN modelling tool. The system uses several modelling capabilities of MIKE BASIN: rainfall-runoff, reservoir operation, hydropower production, and river flow routing. The system also takes advantage of long-term forecasts (based on statistical information) and short-term forecasts (based on telemetry data). The continually updated runoff and flow forecasts enter the optimization, which applies the Model Predictive Control principle for MIKE BASIN as the core simulation model. For each optimization, a non-linear program algorithm is used to find the best release strategy. On the basis of the forecasted inflows and the real time data the system suggests to the user from which reservoirs to release water for alleviation of possible forecasted deficits. In addition to the Tablachaca scheme the model accounts for

  16. The eruptive chronology of the Ampato-Sabancaya volcanic complex (Southern Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaniego, Pablo; Rivera, Marco; Mariño, Jersy; Guillou, Hervé; Liorzou, Céline; Zerathe, Swann; Delgado, Rosmery; Valderrama, Patricio; Scao, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    We have reconstructed the eruptive chronology of the Ampato-Sabancaya volcanic complex (Southern Peru) on the basis of extensive fieldwork, and a large dataset of geochronological (40K-40Ar, 14C and 3He) and geochemical (major and trace element) data. This volcanic complex is composed of two successive edifices that have experienced discontinuous volcanic activity from Middle Pleistocene to Holocene times. The Ampato compound volcano consists of a basal edifice constructed over at least two cone-building stages dated at 450-400 ka and 230-200 ka. After a period of quiescence, the Ampato Upper edifice was constructed firstly during an effusive stage (80-70 ka), and then by the formation of three successive peaks: the Northern, Southern (40-20 ka) and Central cones (20-10 ka). The Southern peak, which is the biggest, experienced large explosive phases, resulting in deposits such as the Corinta plinian fallout. During the Holocene, eruptive activity migrated to the NE and constructed the mostly effusive Sabancaya edifice. This cone comprised many andesitic and dacitic blocky lava flows and a young terminal cone, mostly composed of pyroclastic material. Most samples from the Ampato-Sabancaya define a broad high-K magmatic trend composed of andesites and dacites with a mineral assemblage of plagioclase, amphibole, biotite, ortho- and clino-pyroxene, and Fe-Ti oxides. A secondary trend also exists, corresponding to rare dacitic explosive eruptions (i.e. Corinta fallout and flow deposits). Both magmatic trends are derived by fractional crystallisation involving an amphibole-rich cumulate with variable amounts of upper crustal assimilation. A marked change in the overall eruptive rate has been identified between Ampato (~ 0.1 km3/ka) and Sabancaya (0.6-1.7 km3/ka). This abrupt change demonstrates that eruptive rates have not been homogeneous throughout the volcano's history. Based on tephrochronologic studies, the Late Holocene Sabancaya activity is characterised by strong

  17. Alluvial plain dynamics in the southern Amazonian foreland basin

    OpenAIRE

    Lombardo, U

    2015-01-01

    Alluvial plains are formed with sediments that rivers deposit on the adjacent flood-basin, mainly through crevasse splays and avulsions. These result from a combination of processes, some of which push the river towards the crevasse threshold, while others act as triggers. Based on the floodplain sedimentation patterns of large rivers in the southern Amazonian foreland basin, it has been suggested that alluvial plain sediment accumulation ...

  18. Petroleum System Modelling of Onshore Mandawa Basin - Southern, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Maganza, Neema Ernest

    2014-01-01

    The Mandawa Basin is located along the coast in the southern part of Tanzania, and is potentially one of the most hydrocarbon prospective in the country, as it believed to contain all the essential petroleum system elements. Hydrocarbon exploration and drilling in the basin has been done since the 1950’s but, in spite of the considerable exploration and drilling activities that have been carried out, no economical discoveries have been made. Gas and oil shows in a few wells significantly...

  19. Timing and paleoclimatic significance of Holocene glacier fluctuations in the Cordillera Vilcabamba of southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardi, J. M.; Taggart, J. R.; Schaefer, J. M.; Lund, D. C.

    2009-12-01

    Past fluctuations in climatically sensitive tropical glaciers provide important insight into regional paleoclimatic trends and forcings, but well-dated chronologies are scarce, particularly during the Holocene. We have established precise cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure ages of moraine sequences in the Cordillera Vilcabamba (13°20’S latitude), located in the outer tropics of southern Peru. Results indicate the dominance of two major glacial culminations and associated climatic shifts in the Vilcabamba, including an early Holocene glacial interval and a somewhat less extensive glaciation late in the ‘Little Ice Age’ (LIA) period. Lichenometric measurements on the youngest moraines support the 10Be ages, but uncertainties in the lichen ages arise from the lack of a local lichen growth curve. The Peruvian glacier chronologies differ from a recently-developed New Zealand record but are broadly correlative with well-dated glacial records in Europe, suggesting climate linkages between the tropics and the North Atlantic region. For the latest Holocene, our leading hypothesis is that climate forcings involving southward migration of the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone can explain concurrent glaciations in tropical South America and northern high latitudes, but the influence of other climate drivers such as the El Niño/Southern Oscillation may have also played a role. Estimated differences between equilibrium-line altitudes (ELAs) on modern glaciers and those inferred for expanded latest Holocene glaciers reveal an ELA rise of 165-200 m since the LIA, suggesting that temperatures 1.1-1.3°C cooler than present could have sustained glaciers at their LIA maximum positions if temperature was the only control, and thus providing an upper bound on temperature depression during the LIA. However, further work is required to constrain the likely role of precipitation changes. These new Peruvian glacier chronologies and ELA reconstructions complement ice core and

  20. Late Quaternary Paleohydrology of the Madre de Dios River, southwestern Amazon Basin, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigsby, Catherine A.; Hemric, Erin M.; Baker, Paul A.

    2009-12-01

    Late Quaternary climatic and hydrologic variability triggered changes in fluvial deposition and erosion along the course of the Madre de Dios River, Peru, the largest tributary basin of the Madeira basin, itself the largest tributary basin of the Amazon. Three laterally extensive, Quaternary-age, terrace tracts are present within the Madre de Dios basin. Analysis of sedimentary facies, present in the modern cut banks and terraced sequences, along with radiocarbon dates on fossil wood and leaf material preserved in the terraced strata, allow reconstruction of the Late Quaternary depositional history of the sedimentary sequences, including determination of the approximate timing of aggradation and downcutting episodes and its relationship to the timing of past climate change in this portion of the Amazon basin and beyond. The Quaternary sediments underlying the terraces most often recorded deposition in a coarse-grained meandering fluvial system. The T3 terrace, the highest terrace, is underlain by the Miocene (?) Ipururi Formation, which is unconformably overlain by the late Miocene-Pleistocene (?) (> 48,000 cal yrs BP) Madre de Dios Formation, a multistory coarse-sandy to gravelly channel and point bar complex. The latter was downcut before 29,850 ± 100 cal yrs BP. This downcut landscape was infilled by meandering fluvial strata characterized by gravelly channel deposits in a sequence dominated by floodplain and lateral accretion deposits. These strata were in turn downcut to form the T2 terrace before 11,970 ± 100 cal yrs BP. A third episode of aggradation resulted in the deposition of a sand-dominated meandering channel complex that infilled the T2 valley and was subsequently downcut after 3780 ± 50 cal yrs BP. This most recent terrace is infilled by the modern fluvial sediment, which has been actively aggrading since at least 870 ± 50 cal yrs BP. Importantly, the Madre de Dios fluvial system actively aggraded between 30,000 and 25,000 cal yrs BP, (and likely

  1. Trigger Analysis and Modelling of Very Large Debris Flows in Santa Teresa, Cusco, Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buis, Daniel; Huggel, Christian; Frey, Holger; Giráldez, Claudia; Rohrer, Mario; Christen, Marc; Portocarrero, César

    2014-05-01

    The Peruvian Andes have repeatedly been affected by large mass movements such as landslides, avalanches and debris flows. In 1998, two very large debris flows in the region of Machu Picchu (Sacsara and Ahobamba), southern Peru, destroyed the town of Santa Teresa, an important hydropower scheme and further infrastructure. The debris flows on the order of 5 to 25 million m3 volume rank among the largest recently observed events of this type worldwide. Despite their extreme dimensions, these events have not been studied in detail. An important limitation for more insight studies is the remote location of the mass flows and the very sparse information and data available for the study region. Neither triggering processes nor mass flow process characteristics have been understood to date. This study tries to fill some of these gaps in understanding that are critical to improved assessment of hazards and eventual risk reduction measures. For the trigger analysis we used data and information from field work, a limited number of ground based meteorological data, and complementary satellite derived data. Results indicate that in the case of the Sacsara event, heavy rainfall likely was a main trigger. For Ahobamba, antecedent rainfall as well as snow and ice melt leading to saturation of glacial sediments must have played an important role. Simulations with a dynamic debris flow model (RAMMS) allowed us to constrain a number of flow parameters such as flow height and velocity, runout distance and flow and deposition volumes. Strong surging flow behavior was detected, resulting in very large runout distance (exceeding 20 km); which rather depends on the largest single surge volume, not the total event volume. Based on the identification of potential mass flow sources we modeled a number of scenarios. The assessment of related hazards, including a preliminary hazard map, showed that several communities in catchments draining towards Santa Teresa are endangered by mass movements

  2. Large mass movements related to deglaciation effects in southern Peru (Cusco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giráldez, Claudia; Choquevilca, Walter; Fernández, Felipe; Frey, Holger; García, Javier; Haeberli, Wilfried; Huggel, Christian; Ludena, Sebastián; Rohrer, Mario; Suarez, Wilson

    2013-04-01

    The Andes of Peru are among the regions most severely affected by glacier and high-mountain hazards over the past 100 years. Large-scale disasters with thousands of people killed are on record, including ice/rock avalanches, debris flows, and glacier lake outburst floods (GLOF's). Effects of climate change such as glacier retreat and formation of glacier lakes have been one of the drivers of hazards in the past. Now, there is an increasing concern about the destabilizing effect that recent and further warming has a on perennially frozen bedrock and on steep glaciers in the steep flanks of high-mountain peaks, with potentially severe consequences to ice/rock avalanches, which may impact existing and new lakes, producing far-reaching outburst floods. Risks are also changing due to the socio-economic development in the Andean region and need to be considered using integrative approaches. Most research so far has concentrated on the Cordillera Blanca region where the most devastating disasters occurred during the 20th century. Very little is known about glacier and high-mountain hazards in the southern Peruvian Cordilleras of Cusco although some of the largest debris flows worldwide affected this region in recent years. In fact, very little is known about the nature, origin and exact dimensions of mass movements in this area, and long-term climatic records are neither available. Here we analyze these recent events in the Santa Teresa region based on field work, satellite images, available meteorological data, and numerical modeling of mass movements. These studies are part of a larger effort towards an integrative risk management. Most of the mass movements that caused disasters have their origin in glaciated catchments draining towards Santa Teresa with catchment sizes between about 100 and 300 km2, and glacier areas of 6 to 16 km2 per catchment. It is known that the enormous 1998 debris flow (ca. 25 million m3) that destroyed the Machu Picchu hydropower plant

  3. Messinian paleoenvironmental changes in the easternmost Mediterranean Basin: Adana Basin, southern Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    FARANDA, Costanza; Gliozzi, Elsa; CIPOLLARI, Paola; Grossi, Francesco; Darbaş, Güldemin

    2013-01-01

    We present detailed Messinian paleoenvironmental reconstructions for the Adana Basin based on a multidisciplinary approach that utilizes the fossil content of the Kuzgun and Handere Formations. To reconstruct the paleoenvironmental changes that affected the Adana Basin during the Messinian, we analyzed mollusk, ostracod, planktonic and benthonic foraminifer, and calcareous nannofossil assemblages from 2 stratigraphic sections near Kabasakal village (Adana, southern Turkey). To determine if th...

  4. Killing the snake of poverty : local perceptions of poverty and well-being and people’s capabilities to improve their lives in the Southern Andes of Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Miyashita

    2009-01-01

    Despite the generalised image of comuneros of the Southern Andes of Peru as living in poverty, a closer examination of the daily lives of the campesinos provides a more dynamic perspective. Some households claim that their lives are improving, others that their lives are the same, while many report

  5. Neotectonic of subsiding basins : case of studies from Marañon and Beni basins, Peru and Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    Dumont, Jean-Francois

    1994-01-01

    Climatic conditions make the fluvial processes very sensitive in the extended flood plain of subandean basins, giving typical morphostructures. Because of high subsidence rate, these basins are case for the understanding of neotectonics in subsiding basins. Recent anciente fluvial traces are used in combination with sub surface structures, neotectonic and seismotectonic data to study the neotectonic evolution of the Peruvian and Bolivian active foreland basins. These basins, the Marañon Basin...

  6. Evaluation of water quality in the Rimac River Basin of Peru: Huaycoloro urban subbasin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldeón Quispe, W.; Vela Cardich, R.; Huamán Paredes, F.

    2013-05-01

    In Peru, the increasing water scarcity and quality deterioration caused public health problems and deterioration of ecosystems that are exacerbated during periods of drought. The most populated basin is the Rimac River which rises in the Andes, between 4000 and 6000 meters and flow into the Pacific Ocean. This basin has pollution problems and a clear example is the Huaycoloro urban subbasin that originated in 2005, the creation of multi-sectoral technical committee for the recovery of health and environmental quality of the Huaycoloro subbasin (DIGESA, 2006a). The objective of this work is the need to generate and evaluate information on water quality in the Huaycoloro subbasin, quantifying physicochemical and microbiological parameters in four monitoring stations for a period from October 1, 2006 to April 24, 2010. The monitoring was conducted in the dry season because the Huaycoloro subbasin is a dry riverbed and therefore this is the critical period for evaluation. Initially samples were taken every two weeks during the months of October and November 2006. In 2007 were sampled monthly in April, June and September. In the years 2008, 2009 and 2010 surveys were conducted once a year, in the months of October, May and April respectively. Wide variations in the results of the various parameters analyzed in each of the stations mainly be explained by differences in the frequency of discharge of domestic and industrial effluent without prior treatment, effluent turn change in quantity and quality according to the various processes associated with each activity. Domestic effluents from populations that do not have sewer, industrial effluents from tannery correspond to activities, laundry, dairy, brewing and other. During field trips, we could be determined, in some instances, significant changes in water quality in a short period of time (one hour or less), manifested by changes in color fluctuations of water and the solids content in suspension. We obtained total

  7. Lead isotopic evidence for evolutionary changes in magma-crust interaction, Central Andes, southern Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiro, B.A. (California Univ., Santa Barbara (USA). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Clark, A.H. (Queen' s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1984-07-01

    Lead isotopic measurements were made on Andean igneous rocks of Jurassic to Recent age in Moquegua and Tacna Departments, southernmost Peru, to clarify the petrogenesis of the rocks and, in particular, to investigate the effect of crustal thickness on rock composition. This location in the Cordillera Occidental is ideal for such a study because the ca. 2 Ga Precambrian basement rocks (Arequipa massif) have a distinct Pb isotopic signature which is an excellent tracer of crustal interaction, and because geomorphological research has shown that the continental crust was here thickened drastically in the later Tertiary.

  8. Pilgrims past and present: the ritual landscape of Raqchi, southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Sillar

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available In 1533 the Spanish overthrew the Inka1 empire that then dominated the Andean region and much of the west coast of South America. Most tourists going to Peru visit Cuzco and Machu Pichu, but few see any of the other spectacular Ink a ruins, such as the mythical and ritual site at Raqchi. There research is focusing on the site itself and on the long-term history of the Vilcanota Valley, including the changes wrought by the Spanish invasion. The project is also working with the local community to promote sustainable tourism.

  9. Assessment of tsunami hazards for the Central American Pacific coast from southern Mexico to northern Peru

    OpenAIRE

    B. Brizuela; Armigliato, A.; S. Tinti

    2014-01-01

    Central America (CA), from Guatemala to Panama, has been struck by at least 52 tsunamis between 1539 and 2013, and in the extended region from Mexico to northern Peru (denoted as ECA, Extended Central America in this paper) the number of recorded tsunamis in the same time span is more than 100, most of which were triggered by earthquakes located in the Middle American Trench that runs parallel to the Pacific coast. The most severe event in the catalogue is the tsunami that o...

  10. Centuries of marine radiocarbon reservoir age variation within archaeological Mesodesma Donacium shells from Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K.B.; Hodgins, G.W.L.; Etayo-Cadavid, M. F.; Andrus, C.F.T.; Sandweiss, D.H.

    2010-01-01

    Mollusk shells provide brief (Peru. The ranges in marine 14C ages (and thus R) from the 2 shells are 530 and 170 14C yr; R from individual aragonite samples spans 130 ?? 60 to 730 ?? 170 14C yr. This intrashell 14C variability suggests that 14C dating of small (time-slice much less than 1 yr) marine samples from a variable-R (i.e. variable-upwelling) environment may introduce centuries of chronometric uncertainty. ?? 2010 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  11. Obsidian Hydration at High Elevation: Archaic Quarrying at the Chivay Source, Southern Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Tripcevich, Nicholas; Eerkens, Jelmer W.; Carpenter, Tim R.

    2012-01-01

    We examine obsidian hydration as a means to date archaeological sites at high elevation in the central Andes, and in particular quarry sites that are difficult to date by radiocarbon means. The Chivay obsidian source lies in a volcanic depression above the Colca Valley in Arequipa, Peru (71.5355° E, 15.6423° S) at 4950 masl. We compare obsidian hydration readings from one quarry and two workshop locations. Ninety-one flakes from the quarry pit, and 61 and 33 flakes from the workshops were ana...

  12. Fishes of the Taquari-Antas river basin (Patos Lagoon basin), southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, F G; De Fries, L C C; Ferrer, J; Bertaco, V A; Luz-Agostinho, K D G; Silva, J F P; Cardoso, A R; Lucena, Z M S; Lucena, C A S

    2013-02-01

    The aquatic habitats of the Taquari-Antas river basin (in the Patos Lagoon basin, southern Brazil) are under marked environmental transformation because of river damming for hydropower production. In order to provide an information baseline on the fish fauna of the Taquari-Antas basin, we provide a comprehensive survey of fish species based on primary and secondary data. We found 5,299 valid records of fish species in the basin, representing 119 species and 519 sampling sites. There are 13 non-native species, six of which are native to other Neotropical river basins. About 24% of the total native species are still lacking a taxonomic description at the species level. Three native long-distance migratory species were recorded (Leporinus obtusidens, Prochilodus lineatus, Salminus brasiliensis), as well as two potential mid-distance migrators (Parapimelodus nigribarbis and Pimelodus pintado). Although there is only one officially endangered species in the basin (S. brasiliensis), restricted range species (21.7% of total species) should be considered in conservation efforts. PMID:23644791

  13. El Niño-Southern Oscillation-based index insurance for floods: Statistical risk analyses and application to Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Abedalrazq F.; Kwon, Hyun-Han; Lall, Upmanu; Miranda, Mario J.; Skees, Jerry

    2007-10-01

    Index insurance has recently been advocated as a useful risk transfer tool for disaster management situations where rapid fiscal relief is desirable and where estimating insured losses may be difficult, time consuming, or subject to manipulation and falsification. For climate-related hazards, a rainfall or temperature index may be proposed. However, rainfall may be highly spatially variable relative to the gauge network, and in many locations, data are inadequate to develop an index because of short time series and the spatial dispersion of stations. In such cases, it may be helpful to consider a climate proxy index as a regional rainfall index. This is particularly useful if a long record is available for the climate index through an independent source and it is well correlated with the regional rainfall hazard. Here El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) related climate indices are explored for use as a proxy to extreme rainfall in one of the districts of Peru, Piura. The ENSO index insurance product may be purchased by banks or microfinance institutions to aid agricultural damage relief in Peru. Crop losses in the region are highly correlated with floods but are difficult to assess directly. Beyond agriculture, many other sectors suffer as well. Basic infrastructure is destroyed during the most severe events. This disrupts trade for many microenterprises. The reliability and quality of the local rainfall data are variable. Averaging the financial risk across the region is desirable. Some issues with the implementation of the proxy ENSO index are identified and discussed. Specifically, we explore (1) the reliability of the index at different levels of probability of exceedance of maximum seasonal rainfall, (2) the effect of sampling uncertainties and the strength of the proxy's association to local outcome, (3) the potential for clustering of payoffs, (4) the potential that the index could be predicted with some lead time prior to the flood season, and (5) evidence

  14. Subsidence and basin development in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferebee, C. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Development of the southern Oklahoma aulacogen was the result of Cambrian tectonism along Proterozoic zones of weakness that caused northwest-trending extensional normal faults related to a rifting event. These faults were reactivated during upper Paleozoic compressional stress with fault patterns indicative of sinistral transpressive and transtensional movement. Mapping in the region has allowed classification of the myriad of faults into six major systems, from the north to south: the Washita Valley, Madill-Aylesworth, Caddo, Criner, Horseshoe Bend, and Muenster systems. Development of the fault systems occurred somewhat independently as energy was transferred between them owing to changes in stress from the uneven collision of the Ouachita front. This model may account for the episodic movement recognized by past investigators. The determination of relative timing of development within these systems has shown that the Madill-Aylesworth and Criner systems were active during the Upper Mississippian. As deformation continued along the Criner system structural activity moved southward to include the Horseshoe Bend and Muenster systems during the Early Pennsylvanian. During the Middle Pennsylvanian, fault development along the southern margin of the aulacogen subsided, and deformation activity was initiated in the northern portions of the Ardmore basin. The amount of horizontal displacement along fault systems in the region is still unresolved. However, by regional mapping along the Criner systems, a minimum of 6 mi left-lateral movement can be documented as having occurred during the Upper Pennsylvanian using models of sediment deposition and transport in strike-slip basins.

  15. Alluvial plain dynamics in the southern Amazonian foreland basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Lombardo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alluvial plains are formed with sediments that rivers deposit on the adjacent flood-basin, mainly through crevasse splays and avulsions. These result from a combination of processes, some of which push the river towards the crevasse threshold, while others act as triggers. Based on the floodplain sedimentation patterns of large rivers in the southern Amazonian foreland basin, it has been suggested that alluvial plain sediment accumulation is primarily the result of river crevasse splays triggered by above normal precipitation events due to La Niña. However, more than 90 % of the Amazonian river network is made of small rivers and it is unknown whether small river floodplain sedimentation is influenced by the ENSO cycle as well. Using Landsat images from 1984 to 2014, here I analyse the behaviour of all the twelve tributaries of the Río Mamoré with a catchment in the Andes. I show that these are very active rivers and that the frequency of crevasses is not linked to ENSO activity. I found that most of the sediments eroded from the Andes by the tributaries of the Mamoré are deposited in the alluvial plains, before reaching the parent river. The mid- to late Holocene paleo-channels of these rivers are located tens of kilometres further away from the Andes than the modern crevasses. I conclude that the frequency of crevasses is controlled by intrabasinal processes that act on a year to decade time scale, while the average location of the crevasses is controlled by climatic or neo-tectonic events that act on a millennial scale. Finally, I discuss the implications of river dynamics on rural livelihoods and biodiversity in the Llanos de Moxos, a seasonally flooded savannah covering most of the southern Amazonian foreland basin and the world's largest RAMSAR site.

  16. Alluvial plain dynamics in the southern Amazonian foreland basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Umberto

    2016-05-01

    Alluvial plains are formed with sediments that rivers deposit on the adjacent flood-basin, mainly through crevasse splays and avulsions. These result from a combination of processes, some of which push the river towards the crevasse threshold, while others act as triggers. Based on the floodplain sedimentation patterns of large rivers in the southern Amazonian foreland basin, it has been suggested that alluvial plain sediment accumulation is primarily the result of river crevasse splays and sheet sands triggered by above-normal precipitation events due to La Niña. However, more than 90 % of the Amazonian river network is made of small rivers and it is unknown whether small river floodplain sedimentation is influenced by the ENSO cycle as well. Using Landsat images from 1984 to 2014, here I analyse the behaviour of all 12 tributaries of the Río Mamoré with a catchment in the Andes. I show that these are very active rivers and that the frequency of crevasses is not linked to ENSO activity. The data suggest that most of the sediments eroded from the Andes by the tributaries of the Mamoré are deposited in the alluvial plains, before reaching the parent river. The mid-to-late Holocene paleo-channels of these rivers are located tens of kilometres further away from the Andes than the modern crevasses. I conclude that the frequency of crevasses is controlled by intrabasinal processes that act on a yearly to decadal timescale, while the average location of the crevasses is controlled by climatic or neo-tectonic events that act on a millennial scale. Finally, I discuss the implications of river dynamics on rural livelihoods and biodiversity in the Llanos de Moxos, a seasonally flooded savannah covering most of the southern Amazonian foreland basin and the world's largest RAMSAR site.

  17. New dactylogyrids (Monogenea) parasitizing the gills of catfishes (Siluriformes) from the Amazon River basin in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Franco, Edgar F; Scholz, T

    2009-08-01

    Three dactylogyrid (Monogenea) species are described from the gills of siluriform fishes from the rivers around Iquitos, tributaries of the Amazon River in Peru: Demidospermus centromochli n. sp. from Centromochlus heckelii (de Filippi) (Auchenipteridae) and Demidospermus macropteri n. sp. and Ameloblastella unapi n. sp. from Calophysus macropterus (Lichtenstein) (Pimelodidae). The new species of Demidospermus differ from their congeners in having 2 different hook shapes. Ameloblastella unapi n. sp. differs from the other 3 species of the genus in having anchors with an elongate, straight shaft and a short point that forms a 90 degrees angle, a coiled (counterclockwise) male copulatory organ with 13-14 rings, and a coiled vaginal tube. Based on the present study, Pseudovancleaveus Franca, Issac, Pavanelli, and Takemoto, 2003, is regarded as a junior subjective synonym of Ameloblastella Kritsky, Mendoza-Franco, and Scholz, 2000. The finding of Demidospermus and Ameloblastella spp. on these siluriforms extends our host and geographic knowledge of species of these monogenean genera to Peru. PMID:19215149

  18. Moessbauer, X-ray fluorescence and paleomagnetic studies of deep-sea sediments from Peru Basin: two million years of sedimentation history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment cores with different sub-bottom depths (I: 45 cm and II: 700 cm) from the Peru Basin have been investigated. From the depth profile of the relative amount of Fe(II) a redox zone is obtained which correlates with the organic carbon flux into the sediment (core I). Moessbauer parameters suggest that the iron in the sediments is mainly contained in clay minerals and to varying extent also in goethite

  19. Hydrological WEAP Modeling of the Upper Basin of the Apurimac River Basin, in Peru. An Assessment of Available Water Resources and Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, S.; Sandoval Solis, S.

    2015-12-01

    Designing sustainable water resources systems is challenging given the natural scarcity of this resources in certain region and the increasing anthropogenic water demand for economic purposes. The overall goal of this study is to develop an empirical hydrologic model (one bucket model) that can adequately represent the hydrology and water resources management in the Apurimac River Basin (ARB) in Peru. The specific objectives are to: (a) develop the empirical hydrologic model, calibrate and validate it (b) build a water allocation model (c) evaluate their water supply performance with different series of scenarios (i) current and future water demands, (ii) with and without the construction of the reservoir under different hydrologic conditions (normal, dry and wet). Water Evaluation And Planning (WEAP) was used to build the model and evaluate different water allocation strategies, new infrastructure, and assess current and future water needs based on the requirement of the Regional Government of Cuzco and Arequipa. The proposed hydrologic model is a one-bucket model, where the processes of direct runoff, interflow and baseflow are represented and the process of groundwater recharge is the vertical outflow from the bottom of the bucket. Also, this model includes groundwater component which is an imperative process to consider in the valley of this basin because it provides adequate results, as shown later for this basin. Water allocation model estimate the quantity of water available to different demand sites within a river basin at different times. This study explains their impact in the analysis of the water availability and water supply for current and future water demands in the ARB with and without reservoir.

  20. Prevalence and risk factors associated to Eimeria spp. infection in unweaned alpacas (Vicugna pacos) from Southern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Pablo; Panadero, Rosario; López, Rosalía; Cordero, Aida; Pérez-Creo, Ana; López, Ceferino M; Fernández, Gonzalo; Díez-Baños, Pablo; Morrondo, Patrocinio

    2016-01-01

    A total of 350 faecal samples from unweaned alpacas over 3 months of age were collected from 23 herds in order to determine the prevalence of Eimeria spp. in Southern Peru and to identify the risk factors associated to Eimeria infection in young alpacas. Samples were examined by a flotation technique and the identification of risk factors was assessed by a logistic regression analysis. Sixty four percent of the examined animals shed Eimeria oocysts; herd prevalence was 96%, with an intra-herd prevalence of 60% (range 5.9-100%). Five different Eimeria species were identified, being E. lamae (91%), E. alpacae (87%) and E. punoensis (78%) the most prevalent; E. macusaniensis (35%) and E. ivitaensis (13%) were less common. Mixed-species infections were more frequent (78%) than single infections (22%). E. lamae was the most common monospecific infection and E. lamae/E. alpacae the most frequent association. The geographical area has a significant effect on Eimeria infection rates (74.9% wet Puna vs 37.4% dry Puna) as well as the breeding system (65.1% traditional vs 63.8% modern). In contrast, the sex of the animals (64.6% males vs 64.0% females) showed no influence on the prevalence of infection by Eimeria. The high prevalence found at both individual and herd level and the common presence of highly pathogenic Eimeria species may lead to important economic losses for alpaca breeders and could require the implementation of suitable control measures. PMID:26751874

  1. Assessment of tsunami hazards for the Central American Pacific coast from southern Mexico to northern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizuela, B.; Armigliato, A.; Tinti, S.

    2014-07-01

    Central America (CA), from Guatemala to Panama, has been struck by at least 52 tsunamis between 1539 and 2013, and in the extended region from Mexico to northern Peru (denoted as ECA, Extended Central America in this paper) the number of recorded tsunamis in the same time span is more than 100, most of which were triggered by earthquakes located in the Middle American Trench that runs parallel to the Pacific coast. The most severe event in the catalogue is the tsunami that occurred on 2 September 1992 off Nicaragua, with run-up measured in the range of 5-10 m in several places along the Nicaraguan coast. The aim of this paper is to assess the tsunami hazard on the Pacific coast of this extended region, and to this purpose a hybrid probabilistic-deterministic analysis is performed, that is adequate for tsunamis generated by earthquakes. More specifically, the probabilistic approach is used to compute the Gutenberg-Richter coefficients of the main seismic tsunamigenic zones of the area and to estimate the annual rate of occurrence of tsunamigenic earthquakes and their corresponding return period. The output of the probabilistic part of the method is taken as input by the deterministic part, which is applied to calculate the tsunami run-up distribution along the coast.

  2. Dynamic implications of ridges on a debris avalanche deposit at Tutupaca volcano (southern Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama, Patricio; Roche, Olivier; Samaniego, Pablo; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Bernard, Karine; Mariño, Jersy

    2016-02-01

    Catastrophic volcanic landslides can involve different parts of a volcano that can be incorporated into any resulting debris avalanche. The different material properties may influence the mechanical behaviour and, hence, the emplacement mechanisms of the different avalanche units. We present data from a coupled hydrothermal- and magmatic-related volcanic landslide at Tutupaca volcano (Peru). Around ad 1802, the hydrothermal system under Tutupaca's growing dacite dome failed, creating a debris avalanche that triggered a large explosive eruption. A typical debris avalanche hummocky unit is found, formed out of rock from the dome foot and the underlying hydrothermally altered lavas. It is covered by a more widespread and remarkable deposit that contains remnants of the hot dome core and the inner hydrothermal material. This deposit has ridges 20-500-m long, 10-30-m wide and 1-5-m high, regularly spaced and that fan slightly outward. Cross sections exposed within the ridges reveal coarser cores and finer troughs, suggesting grain size segregation during emplacement. Ridge morphology and granulometry are consistent with fingering known to occur in granular flows. The ridges are also associated with large blocks that have evidence of differential movement compared with the rest of the flowing mass. The presence of both ridged and hummocky deposits in the same event shows that, as different lithologies combine and collapse sequentially, materials with different mechanical properties can coexist in one landslide, leading to contrasting emplacement dynamics. The different structures thus highlight the complexity of such hazardous volcanic events and show the difficulty we face with modelling them.

  3. Neogene coupling between Kuqa Basin and Southern Tien Shan Orogen, Northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guang-Yu; Chen, Han-Lin

    2004-08-01

    Based on the sedimentary and subsiding features of Kuqa foreland basin, this paper presents the following characteristics of Neogene coupling relationship between Kuqa Basin and Southern Tien Shan Orogen, Northwestern China: (1) The Southern Tien Shan Orogen underwent Neogene uplifting of 4 km in height and the Kuqa Basin underwent Neogene subsidence of 4-6 km in depth accordingly beginning in 25 Ma; (2) The Southern Tien Shan Orogen moved continuously toward the Kuqa Basin, with largest structural shortening rate of greater than 53.7%, and the north boundary of the Kuqa Basin retreated continuously southward accordingly since the Miocene; (3) There are two subsidence centers with high subsiding rates and large subsiding extent, located in the eastern and western Kuqa Basin respectively, with the subsiding maximizing in the deposition period of Kuqa Formation. PMID:15236483

  4. Neogene coupling between Kuqa Basin and Southern Tien Shan Orogen, Northwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何光玉; 陈汉林

    2004-01-01

    Based on the sedimentary and subsiding features of Kuqa foreland basin, this paper presents the following characteristics of Neogene coupling relationship between Kuqa Basin and Southern Tien Shan Orogen, Northwestern China:(l) The Southern Tien Shan Orogen underwent Neogene uplifting of 4 km in height and the Kuqa Basin underwent Neogene subsidence of 4-6 km in depth accordingly beginning in 25 Ma; (2) The Southern Tien Shan Orogen moved continuously toward the Kuqa Basin, with largest structural shortening rate of greater than 53.7%, and the north boundary of the Kuqa Basin retreated continuously southward accordingly since the Miocene; (3) There are two subsidence centers with high subsiding rates and large subsiding extent, located in the eastern and western Kuqa Basin respectively, with the subsiding maximizing in the deposition period of Kuqa Formation.

  5. Volcanic and glacial evolution of Chachani-Nocarane complex (Southern Peru) deduced from the geomorphologic map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, J.; Zamorano, J. J.; Palacios, D.

    2012-04-01

    The Chachani-Nocarane (16°11'S; 71°31'W; 6.057 m asl) is a large volcanic complex located in the western Central-Andean Cordillera, South of Peru. The date of the last eruption is not known and there are no registers of recent volcanic activity. The complex is shaped by glacial forms belonging to different phases, and periglacial forms (several generations of rock glaciers) which alternate with volcanic forms. The aim of this research is to establish the glacio-volcanic evolution of the volcanic complex Chachani-Nocarane. In order to do so, a detailed 1:20.000 scale geomorphological map was elaborated by integrating the following techniques: interpretation of the 1:35.000 scale aerial photographs (Instituto Geográfico Nacional de Perú, 1956) and the analysis of satellite images (Mrsid; NASA, 2000). Finally, the cartography was corrected though field work campaigns. Through the geomorphologic analysis of the landforms and their relative position, we have identified twelve phases, seven volcanic and five glacial phases. The most ancient volcanic phase is locate to the north area of the study area and correspond with Nocarane and Chingana volcanoes, alignment NW-SE. Above those ensemble the rest of the large delimited geomorphological units overlap. The most recent is located to the SW and consists of a complex series of domes, lava cones and voluminous lavas. Within the glacial phases, the most ancient one is related to the Last Glacial Maximum during the Pleistocene. Over this period, glaciers formed moraines from 3150 to 3600 m asl. The most recent glacier pulsation corresponds to the Little Ice Age (LIA). The moraines related to that event are the closest to the summits, located between 5.100 and 5.300 m asl, and they represent the last trace of glacial activity on the volcanic complex. Currently, this tropical mountain does not have glaciers. The only solid-state water reserves are found in the form of permafrost, as shown by various generations of rock

  6. Shortening Record in the Central Andean Plateau of Southern Peru: Basement Inversion, Thin-skinned Thrusting, and Geomorphic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, N.; Horton, B. K.; McQuarrie, N.; Stübner, K.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the inherited structural architecture along western South America influence the timing, magnitude, and style of Andean deformation and topographic evolution. New results from mapping, balanced cross-section construction, apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronology, and geomorphology spanning the Altiplano, Eastern Cordillera and Subandean zone of southern Peru define the role of Triassic rift inversion on Cenozoic deformation style, thrust belt kinematics, exhumation timing, and spatial variation of canyon incision. A minimum of 130 km (38%) shortening along a 200 km transect accommodated by thin- and thick-skinned structures involved selective reactivation of Triassic normal faults that fed slip to shallower detachments of thin-skinned fold-thrust systems. Map relationships define unique structural domains defined by inherited normal faults. In the Eastern Cordillera, new zircon (U-Th)/He results from a Triassic pluton reveal Oligocene-Miocene (~26-18 Ma) cooling, consistent with previously reported exhumation from ~40 km along strike to the NW. However, rapid ~15 Ma cooling revealed by new apatite (U-Th)/He data is ~11 Myr older than equivalent rocks in a similar structural setting ~40 km to the NW. This suggests a potential middle Miocene shift from synchronous to diachronous exhumation along strike. Modern fluvial profiles constructed along the Eastern Cordillera show a reduction in knickpoint elevations from SE to NW, suggesting more youthful uplift toward the NW, comparable to the spatial trend in apatite (U-Th)/He ages. The deformation front reached the Subandean zone by ~15 Ma, after the majority of reported deformation in the Eastern Cordillera and Altiplano. These variations in exhumation over such distances are consistent with multiple potential scenarios: a northward propagating wave of uplift, spatial variations in climatically driven incision, interactions with mantle dynamics, or complex structural geometries.

  7. Competition, Cooperation, and the Emergence of Regional Centers in the Northern Lake Titicaca Basin, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Abigail Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Regional centers with dense populations developed in the Titicaca Basin during the late Middle (ca. 1300-500 BC) and early Upper Formative (ca. 500 BC- AD 400) Periods. These aggregated settlements have long been considered the hallmark of intermediate societies. This dissertation focuses on the transition from small village societies to ones with pronounced social, political, and economic hierarchies. In the northern Titicaca region, only two sites--Taraco and Pukara--became powerful cent...

  8. Dta points used in assessment of coal in the southern Piceance basin study area (psptg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a shapefile and point coverage of 627 data points used in the assessment of coal in the southern Piceance Basin study area. Information in this file...

  9. Tritium/Helium-3 dating of baseflow - Southern Vienna Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term time series of tritium in baseflow provide an indicator of the mean subsurface residence time (MRT) and hence a useful index of vulnerability/sustainability of surface water. Unfortunately, long-term times series are uncommon. We are investigating the use of tritium/helium-3 dating as a substitute for long-term time series in the Southern Vienna Basin, Austria. Preliminary results indicate that the apparent age of the water depends on sampling location and depth below the top of the stream. Apparent tritium/helium-3 ages range from about 1 to 7 years with the oldest ages occurring near or below the water sediment interface at upstream locations near springs and seeps. We have evaluated the exchange of helium-3 with the atmosphere by simultaneously measuring CFCs and applying a gas exchange model. The model was then used to predict the observed change in the helium-3 (and hence apparent tritium/helium-3 age) with excellent agreement to observed values. This result suggests that while gas exchange is an active mechanism for noble gases in streams, it is possible to predict this exchange and hence 'correct' tritium/helium-3 ages for this process. (author)

  10. History of petroleum systems in the southern part of the Broad Fourteens Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, J.M.; Simmelink, H.J.; Balen, R.T. van; David, P.

    2003-01-01

    2D Basin modelling was used to evaluate the response of source rock maturation, and of petroleum expulsion, migration, accumulation and preservation to the evolution of the southern part of the inverted Broad Fourteens Basin. Modelling results show that the temperature, maturation and petroleum gene

  11. Reforestation and land use change in a drainage basin of southern Italy

    OpenAIRE

    D’Ippolito A; Ferrari E; Iovino F; Nicolaci A; Veltri A

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the land use change in a large basin of Calabria region (southern Italy) subjected to extensive reforestation at the end of the ’50 has been carefully reconstructed and compared with the current situation. The runoff capacity of the basin was estimated using data available for the temporal periods before and after the reforestation interventions. The results show that the surface of the basin interested by former reforestation activities did not affect the runoff, probably due ...

  12. Stratigraphic evolution, structural framework and remaining potential of Talara Basin production units (NW Peru) in Block X area; Evolucao estratigrafica, arcabouco estrutural e potencial remanescente das unidades produtoras da Bacia de Talara (noroeste do Peru) na area do Lote X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daudt, Jose Alfredo Borges [Petrobras America Inc., Lima (Peru); Pozo, Eloy Gerardo; Torres, Kevin Michael; Ore, Juan Leyva [Petrobras Energia Peru, Lima (Peru)], Emails: eloy.pozo@petrobras.com; kevin.torres@petrobras.com

    2009-11-15

    This article presents the stratigraphic evolution of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary section in the Talara Basin (NW Peru) in the Block X area. Furthermore it comments on the structural framework and the remaining hydrocarbon potential in this concession. A brief review of the Talara Basin history is introduced, highlighting the importance of this basin for the Latin-American Oil Industry. Talara is a forearc basin with complex stratigraphic and structural development. The Block X area is located in a proximal position within the basin where erosive and by-pass events were frequent during the whole basin evolution. A thick load of sediments, favored by a significant subsidence, was deposited in this area, especially during Ypresian and Lutetian. Extensional tectonics, represented by normal faults, compartmentalised the reservoirs in Block X, based on the interpretation considered until now. However, the hypothesis of transcurrent movements was also brought into the discussion by some authors, although this had very little surface and subsurface evidence to support it. The presented stratigraphic model is based on observations and interpretations of well logs and outcrops, considering the sequence stratigraphic paradigms. The interpreted sequences hierarchical framework was approached in a more 'neutral' way to avoid rigid time scales commonly adopted by the industry. Thus, the model is made of low frequency sequences with boundaries defined by the most important paleo-ambiental shifts, and high frequency sequences where boundaries were defined considering more subtle variations. Regarding the remaining potential, the Block X area is still forecasting a good exploration and exploitation potential, even considering more than 100 years of productive history. Several secondary recovery projects and shorter-acreage drilling programs have been implemented since 2003, with excellent results. (author)

  13. Holocene Climate and Landscape Interactions in the Lake Titicaca Basin, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigsby, C. A.; Baker, P. A.; Aldenderfer, M. S.

    2001-12-01

    Fluvial strata and landforms in the Rio Ilave valley (Peru) document a history of Holocene aggradation and downcutting that is correlative with regional climatic events. Periods of aggradation correspond to periods of high (or rising) level in Lake Titicaca, increased sediment accumulation in the Ilave delta, and lacustrine sedimentation in the Rio Desaguadero valley. Downcutting episodes correspond to periods of low level in Lake Titicaca, low or rapidly decreasing sedimentation rates in the Ilave delta, and fluvial activity in the Rio Desaguadero valley. The five terrace tracts (T1 through T5) present in this southwestern Lake Titicaca tributary occur as both paired and unpaired terraces and have average heights from 1.4 m to 24.3 m above the valley floor. Radiocarbon dates from the oldest exposed terrace strata and from the top of T4 suggest that the majority of the fluvial sequence was deposited during the time period from the LGM until about 8300 cal BP - a period of generally high precipitation on the Altiplano and high water level in Lake Titicaca. Increased fluvial/glacial runoff during this time resulted in an increased supply of sediment to the Rio Ilave and high sediment accumulation rates offshore from the Ilave delta. With the input of large volumes of easily eroded volcanic-rich sediment from source areas in the Cordillera Occidental, contemporaneous with high base level (Lake Titicaca), sediment load was sufficient to fill the valley and choke the river system. In embayments behind bedrock constrictions, sediments were deposited to heights in excess of 25 meters above the valley floor (T5). This aggradation was followed by downcutting of the T4 and T3 terraces. Initial downcutting began immediately after precipitation, runoff, and sediment load decreased and base level dropped. Downcutting was likely very rapid and was followed by a period of episodic equilibrium and minor downcutting that included a prolonged period of soil formation between ca

  14. Avalonian crustal controls on basin evolution: implications for the Mesozoic basins of the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Jeroen; van Wees, Jan-Diederik; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2015-04-01

    Little is known of the Southern North Sea Basin's (SNSB) Pre-Permian basement due to a lack of outcrop and cores. The nature and structure of the East Avalonian crust and lithosphere remain even less constrained in the absence of deep seismic (refraction) lines. However, various studies have hinted at the importance of the Reactivation of the Early Carboniferous fault network during each consecutive Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonic phase, demonstrating the key role of weak zones from the Early Carboniferous structural grain in partitioning of structural deformation and vertical basin motions at various scales. Although the older basin history and the basement attract increasing attention, the Pre-Permian tectonics of the SNSB remains little studied with most attention focused on the Permian and younger history. The strong dispersal of existing constraints requires a comprehensive study from Denmark to the UK, i.e. the East Avalonian microplate, bordered by the Variscan Rheïc suture, the Atlantic and Baltica. Based on an extensive literature study and the reinterpretation of publicly available data, linking constraints from the crust and mantle to stratigraphic-sedimentological information, we complement the map of Early Carboniferous rifting of East Avalonia and propose a new tectonic scenario. From the reinterpretation of the boundary between Avalonia and Baltica we propose a new outline for the Avalonian microplate with implications for the tectonics of the North German Basin. Furthermore, we highlight the nature and extent of the major crustal/lithospheric domains with contrasting structural behaviour and the major boundaries that separate them. Results shed light on the effects of long lived differences in crustal fabric that are responsible for spatial heterogeneity in stress and strain magnitudes and zonations of fracturing, burial history and temperature history. The geomechanical control of large crustal-scale fault structures will provide the constraints

  15. Environmental evolution of the Rio Grande drainage basin and Nasca region (Peru) in 2003-2007 using ENVISAT ASAR and ASTER time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigna, Francesca; Tapete, Deodato; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Recent palaeo-environmental studies and remote sensing investigations demonstrated that the Rio Grande drainage basin in Southern Peru is a still evolving landscape, and impacts due to its changes have implications for the preservation of both the natural and cultural features of the Nasca region, well-known for the evidences of the ancient Paracas and Nasca Civilizations, who flourished from the 4th century BC to the 6th century AD. To image the modifications occurred in the last decade, we exploited the entire 4year-long stack of ENVISAT ASAR C-band archive imagery available over the region, which was provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) via the Cat-1 project 11073. The latter supports the activities of the Italian mission of heritage Conservation and Archaeogeophysics (ITACA), which directly involve researchers from the Institute for Archaeological and Monumental Heritage (IBAM) and the Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis (IMAA), National Research Council (CNR) of Italy. With the aim of reconstructing the temporal evolution of the Rio Grande drainage basin and its effects and implications for the heritage of the region, we processed 8 ASAR Image Mode IS2 scenes acquired in descending mode between 04/02/2003 and 15/11/2005 and 5 images in ascending mode between 24/07/2005 and 11/11/2007, and focused on SAR backscattering information, amplitude change detection methods and extraction of ASAR-derived time series of the backscattering coefficient over target areas of interest. The ASAR 2003-2007 analysis was coupled and integrated with NDVI-based soil moisture and vegetation change assessment performed by using ASTER multi-spectral data acquired during the same time frame of the ASAR stacks, on 30/05/2003, 01/06/2004 and 10/06/2007. The research was performed both at the regional scale over the entire Rio Grande drainage basin, with particular focus on its tributaries Rio Ingenio, Rio Nazca and Rio Taruga, and at the local scale over the

  16. Glacial recession in the Tropical Andes from the Little Ice Age: the case of Ampato Volcanic Complex (Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, J.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.

    2010-03-01

    Data published over the last decade reveal substantial glacial recession in the tropical Andes since the Little Ice Age (LIA), (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Rabatel, et al., 2005; Rabatel, et al., 2008; Vuille, et al., 2008; Hastenrath, 2009; Jomelli, et al., 2009), and a growing rate of recession since the 1980’s caused by global warming (Ramirez, et al., 2001; Vuille, et al., 2008). Today there is great interest in the evolution of these ice masses due to heightened awareness of climate change and of the strategic importance that glaciers have as a hydrologic resource for communities in arid climate zones in the tropical Andes (Mark, 2008; Vuille et al., 2008). Cordillera Blanca forms part of the Andes Mountains of northern Peru, and is a chosen site for many studies on glacier evolution. Vuille et al. 2008 determined that a considerable area of ice mass was lost at Huascarán-Chopicalqui glacier (18% from 1920-1970) and Astesonraju glacier (20% from 1962-2003). Studies at Coropuna volcano, which has the most extensive glacier field in the western range of southern Peru, also report a strong melting trend that began with only minimal recession from 1955-1986 (4%), but increased to 14% from 1986-2007 (Úbeda et al., 2009). Only a few of the Andes glaciers are consistently monitored, and the most comprehensive data are for Chacaltaya and Zongo glaciers (16º S) in Bolivia. Since the maximum LIA, Chacaltaya has lost 89% of its surface area, particularly in recent years. By 1983, the totaled loss was five times the shrinkage for the period 1940-1963 (Ramirez, et al., 2001). Zongo glacier maintained equilibrium from 1956-1975, but later experienced a period dominated by continuous recession (Soruco, et al., 2009). This study expands current knowledge of glacier evolution since the LIA in the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ; 14º - 27º S) (Stern, 2004) of the Andes. The study site was chosen in an area that had never been used for preliminary research of this type, concretely

  17. My Classroom: Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglia, Deanna

    2015-01-01

    Angela Huanca Barrantes, a highly respected teacher of English as a foreign language (EFL) in the city of Ilo, has a strong impact on the lives of students at the Admirante Miguel Grau secondary school and at Centro Cultural Peruano Norteamericano, which is one of four binational centers in southern Peru. Due to Ms. Huanca's lack of understanding…

  18. A new structural model of the Pachitea Basin, Peru: Interaction of thick-skinned tectonics and salt detached thrusting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, J.; Rebaza, J.; Westlund, D.; Stratton, M.; Alegria, C.

    2015-11-01

    We present four new structural transects, a new seismo-stratigraphic correlation, a refined structural model and new shortening rates for the Pachitea Basin (=PB), Peru. Our results are based on the integration and detailed interpretation of newly acquired industry seismic (2D, 2005 vintage), existing well data, existing and proprietary surface geology data and newly acquired aero magnetic data (2007 vintage). Our assessment confirms the presence of at least four distinct structural styles in the area, thick-skinned structures, thin-skinned detachment thrusting, salt-tectonics and localized strike-slip tectonics. Based on seismo-stratigraphic correlations we conclude that the oldest rocks carried to outcrop by the San Matias (=SM) thrust are of Jurassic age. We interpret the thin-skinned master detachment to be located in varying positions, directly below or above, autochtonous salt pillows. Timing assessment of the SM thrust sheet reveals that it has been active from at least ˜5 Ma to post-2 Ma, supporting regionally published timing data for this latitude. Positive topographic surface expressions indicate ongoing contraction along the mountain front of the Peruvian Eastern Cordillera (=EC). Across the PB we calculate between 2.6% and 5.5% for thick-skinned shortening and at least 25.5% for the thin-skinned shortening. For the SM thrust sheet we calculate a slip-rate of ˜1-1.6 mm/yr, which is in line with published slip rates on individual thrusts from around the world. Observations along the SM thrust system indicate that thin- and thick-skinned systems interact mechanically, and that they have been active intermittently. We conclude that the location of salt pillows as well as pre-existing or growing basement-involved structures helped trigger the SM thrust. Different types of salt bodies are present in the PB, autochtonous pillows, slightly thrusted pillows and allochtonous diapirs. Our results provide new insight into the structural interplay, particularly

  19. Modeling anomalous surface - wave propagation across the Southern Caspian basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priestly, K.F.; Patton, H.J.; Schultz, C.A.

    1998-01-09

    The crust of the south Caspian basin consists of 15-25 km of low velocity, highly attenuating sediment overlying high velocity crystalline crust. The Moho depth beneath the basin is about 30 km as compared to about 50 km in the surrounding region. Preliminary modeling of the phase velocity curves shows that this thick sediments of the south Caspian basin are also under-lain by a 30-35 km thick crystalline crust and not by typical oceanic crust. This analysis also suggest that if the effect of the over-pressuring of the sediments is to reduce Poissons` ratio, the over-pressured sediments observed to approximately 5 km do not persist to great depths. It has been shown since 1960`s that the south Caspian basin blocks the regional phase Lg. Intermediate frequency (0.02-0.04 Hz) fundamental mode Raleigh waves propagating across the basin are also severely attenuated, but the low frequency surface waves are largely unaffected. This attenuation is observed along the both east-to-west and west-to-east great circle paths across the basin, and therefore it cannot be related to a seismograph site effect. We have modeled the response of surface waves in an idealized rendition of the south Caspian basin model using a hybrid normal mode / 2-D finite difference approach. To gain insight into the features of the basin which cause the anomalous surface wave propagation, we have varied parameters of the basin model and computed synthetic record sections to compare with the observed seismograms. We varied the amount of mantel up-warp, the shape of the boundaries, the thickness and shear wave Q of the sediments and mantle, and the depth of the water layer. Of these parameters, the intermediate frequency surface waves are most severely affected by the sediments thickness and shear wave attenuation. fundamental mode Raleigh wave phase velocities measure for paths crossing the basin are extremely low.

  20. Characteristics of seismostratigraphy and analysis of structurallithofacies in the southern Yellow Sea Cenozoic basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGYanpeng; LIUChenguang; LIANGRuicai; LIUBaohua; WUJinlong

    2003-01-01

    In this paper,the upper structural layer of the southern Yellow Sea Basin (SYSB) is further divided into three layers based on the latest obtained high-resolution single-channel seismic profiles.Combined with the borehole data,the characteristics and evolvement of structure and environment since middle-late Tertiary are discussed.The study shows that the acoustic-base indicated by shallow seismic profiles represents the basic shape of the SYSB in late Oligocene-early Miocene.Based on the comprehensive analysis of some typical profiles crossing the basin about seismostratigraphy,gravity and magnetics,the basin about seismostratigraphy,gravity and magnetics,the basin edge fault and some basin inner structure are identified.Furthermore,the acoustic-base is classified into four types of basal lithofacies:Eogene basin basement,Paleozoic basement,Mesozoic basement and magma intrusion basement.

  1. New species of Solanum (Solanaceae) from Peru and Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Knapp

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Three new species of “non-spiny" Solanum are described from Peru and Ecuador, and a revised description for Solanum verecundum M. Nee is presented. Solanum kulliwaita S. Knapp, sp. nov. (Dulcamaroid clade) is endemic to the Department of Cuzco in southern Peru, and is most similar to the recently described Solanum sanchez-vegae S. Knapp of northern Peru. Solanum dillonii S. Knapp, sp. nov. (Brevantherum clade) is found in southern Ecuador and northern Peru in the Amotape-Huancabamba ...

  2. MAPEO FOTOGRAMÉTRICO EN ARQUEOLOGÍA: EXPERIENCIAS DESDE EL PROYECTO RAMIS, CUENCA NORTE DEL TITICACA, PERÚ (Photogrammetric Mapping in Archaeology: Experiences from the Ramis Project, Northern Titicaca Basin, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Flores

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available El registro arqueológico en tiempo real, desde el propio campo, se ha vuelto una práctica casi común para muchos arqueólogos. Aunque reemplazar el papel por la pantalla táctil aún sigue trayendo dudas y controversias. En este breve reporte queremos compartir una experiencia de registro usando un mapeo digital fotogramétrico en un sistema SIG, que fue practicado en la cuenca del Titicaca, una región altiplánica al sur del Perú, donde demostramos que este método de recolección de datos puede traer no solo rapidez sino también precisión en las mediciones. ENGLISH: The recording of archaeology in real-time, from the field itself, has become common practice for many archaeologists. Still, replacing paper with touch screens continues to raise doubts and cause controversies within the discipline. In this brief report, we want to share an experience recording in the field using digital photogrammetric mapping in GIS. This project was carried out in the Lake Titicaca Basin, a highland region in southern Peru, where we demonstrated that this method of recording data can not only bring faster, but more accurate measurements than older methods.

  3. USING SRTM TO QUANTIFY SIZE PARAMETERS AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF ENDORHEIC BASINS IN SOUTHERN SOUTH AMERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Hesse

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The SRTM data set is the highest resolution DEM with global or continental coverage. It is therefore theDEM of choice for continental-scale geomorphological mapping and quantitative analysis. In this study,SRTM data are used for the identification and characterisation of endorheic basins in southern SouthAmerica (south of 19°S. The results show the feasibility of continental-scale quantitative geomorphologybased on SRTM data and provide insights into the distribution of closed basins. The largest endorheicbasin is located in the Puna region and consists of several interconnected sub-basins. This basin accountsfor 38.6 % (7877 km3 of the total volume of the endorheic basins identified in this study. Analyses of thegeographic distribution show a narrow longitudinal distribution between 64.5 and 71.5° W and a multimodallatitudinal distribution which is characterised by two groups of basins at 22.5–27.5°S and 37.5–50.0° Sand an almost complete absence of basins between 27.5 and 37.5° S. Problems and sources ofmisinterpretation arising from data quality and resolution are discussed. Further research, targeting in particularthe genesis and potential for paleoenvironmental reconstruction of closed basins in southern Argentina, iscalled for.

  4. Zircon U-Pb geochronology and heavy mineral composition of the Camaná Formation, southern Peru: Constraints on sediment provenance and uplift of the Coastal and Western Cordilleras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alván, Aldo; von Eynatten, Hilmar; Dunkl, István; Gerdes, Axel

    2015-08-01

    In the forearc of the Central Andes of southern Peru, the Cenozoic Camaná Basin (16°25‧S to 17°15‧S) forms a ∼NW-SE elongated depression filled with coarse-grained deltaic and fluvial deposits. These deposits are termed Camaná Formation. We have applied for the first time, advanced multi-method analytical techniques to sediments of the Camaná Formation in order to define precise sedimentation ages, unravel sediment provenance, and to explain its tectono-sedimentary evolution. Zircon U-Pb geochronology and multiple geological evidences suggest that the Camaná Formation ranges in age from Late Oligocene to Late Miocene, and may even extend into the Pliocene. We propose a provenance model for the Camaná Formation based on U-Pb geochronology, heavy mineral analysis, and single-grain mineral chemistry by LA-ICP-MS. This model suggests that sediments of the lower part of the Camaná Formation derive from rocks forming the Coastal Cordillera (i.e. the Arequipa Massif and the San Nicolas Batholith) and the widespread ignimbrites of the ∼24-10 Ma Huaylillas volcanic arc. In contrast, sediments of the upper part of the Camaná Formation derive predominantly from rocks forming the Western Cordillera (i.e. the Arequipa Massif, the Tacaza Group, and the Coastal Batholith) and products of the ∼10-3 Ma Lower Barroso volcanic arc). Accordingly, we infer that uplift of the Coastal Cordillera has strongly influenced deposition of the Camaná Formation since Late Oligocene. A marked shift in provenance within the Camaná Formation at around Middle to Late Miocene time (14-12 Ma) suggests drastic uplift of the Western Cordillera at that time. This uplift has triggered increased relief and erosion in the Western Cordillera, and subsequent deposition of fluvial conglomerates in the Camaná Basin.

  5. Ultrafast oceanic spreading of the Marsili Basin, southern Tyrrhenian Sea: Evidence from magnetic anomaly analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolosi, I.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Speranza, F.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Chiappini, M.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia

    2006-01-01

    Spectral analysis of both shipborne and airborne magnetic maps of the southern Tyrrhenian Sea reveals seven subparallel positive-negative magnetic anomaly stripes over the flat-lying deep floor of the Marsili oceanic basin. This represents the first evidence of oceanic magnetic anomalies in the Tyrrhenian Sea. The central positive stripe is along the Marsili seamount, a superinflated spreading ridge located at the basin axis. The stratigraphy of Ocean Drilling Program Site 650 ...

  6. Landslide and glacial lake outburst flood hazard in the Chucchún river basin, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Jan; Vilímek, V.; Benešová, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2015), s. 173-180. ISSN 0300-5402 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1000 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : landslide hazard * GLOFs * flood hazard * Cordillera Blanca * Peru Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  7. Techniques of DNA-studies on prehispanic ectoparasites (Pulex sp., Pulicidae, Siphonaptera from animal mummies of the Chiribaya Culture, Southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Dittmar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During a paleoparasitological survey of several animal mummies (Cavia aperea f. porcellus and Canis familiaris from Chiribaya Baja, an archaeological site in Southern Peru, an unexpected find was made. In the well preserved fur, large numbers of mummified fleas (Pulex simulans/irritansthat parasitized the animals during life were encountered. Due to the relative recent event of the host mummification and the outstanding preservation of the fleas, an attempt for the retrieval of DNA was made. A DNA extraction and sequencing protocol for archaeological ectoparasitic remains has been established, taking additional studies for tissue and protein preservation into account. Tissue preservation was assessed with transmission electron microscopy and the protein preservation was tested through the racemisation ratios of aspartic acid. Regions of the 28S rDNA gene were successfully amplified and sequenced. Further research perspectives are outlined.

  8. Characteristics of seismostratigraphy and analysis of structural- lithofacies in the southern Yellow Sea Cenozoic basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the upper structural layer of the southern Yellow Sea Basin (SYSB) is further divided into three layers based on the latest obtained high-resolution single-channel seismic profiles. Combined with the borehole data, the characteristics and evolvement of structure and environment since middle-late Tertiary are discussed. The study shows that the acoustic-base indicated by shallow seismic profiles represents the basic shape of the SYSB in late Oligocene-early Miocene. Based on the comprehensive analysis of some typical profiles crossing the basin about seismostratigraphy, gravity and magnetics, the basin edge fault and some basin inner structure are identified. Furthermore, the acoustic-base is classified into four types of basal lithofacies: Eogene basin basement, Paleozoic basement, Mesozoic basement and magma intrusion basement.

  9. On the actinopterygian fish fauna (Upper Cretaceous: Campanian) from the Kristianstad Basin, southern Sweden.

    OpenAIRE

    Bazzi, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Actinopterygian remains have been recovered from Upper Cretaceous (uppermost lower to lowermost upper Campanian) marine strata of the Kristianstad Basin, southern Sweden. This is the first record of Upper Cretaceous bony fish from the Fennoscandian shield. The fauna consists of higher taxa including Pachycormiformes (Pachycormidae), Elopiformes (Pachyrhizodontidae), Pycnodontiformes (Pycnodontidae), Aulopiformes (Enchodontidae), Ichthyodectiformes (Ichthyodectidae), and indeterminable teleost...

  10. Reconstruction of mass balance of Nevado Coropuna glaciers (Southern Peru) for Late Pleistocene, Little Ice Age and the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, J.; Palacios, D.

    2009-04-01

    The Nevado Coropuna volcanic complex (15th 31'S-72 ° 39 ° W) is the quaternary stratovolcano northernmost of the central volcanic zone (CVZ) in the western flank of the Central Andes (Southern Peru). This consists in four adjacent volcanic buildings that are occupied over 5.100-5.700 masl by a system of glaciers covering an area of 47 Km2 in 2007 (Ubeda et al, 2008). The maximum expansion of glaciers during the Pleistocene affected an area of ~449 Km2, dropping to altitudes around 3.600-4800 m (Ubeda et al, 2007). In this work were mapped several hundreds of moraines which constitute a record of climate change since the last glacial maximum (LGM). Current glacier system is formed by dozen of glaciers descending slope down in all directions. Coropuna complex is an excellent laboratory for to investigate the control that climate change, tectonics and volcanism exert on the dynamics of glaciers, a scale of tens of years (by studying current glaciers) and also of tens of thousands of years (by analyzing the geomorphological evidence of its evolution in the past). Ubeda et al. (2008) analyzed the evolution of eighteen glaciers of Nevado Coropuna using indicators as surfaces and Equilibrium Line Altitudes (ELAs) of ice masses in 2007, 1986, 1955, Little the Ice Age (LIA) and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The glaciers were grouped into two sets: NE group (seven glaciers) and SE group (eleven glaciers). The work included statistical series of ELAs in each phase, estimates by Area x Altitud Balance Ratio (AABR) method, which was proposed by Osmaston (2005), in addition with estimates of timing (~17Cl36 Ka) and magnitude (~ 782-911 m) of ELA depression during LGM. The work included statistical series of ELAs in each phase, estimates by the method Area x Altitud Balance Ratio (AABR) proposed by Osmaston (2005), and in addition estimates of the timing (~17Cl36 Ka) and magnitude (~ 782-911 m) of ELA depression during LGM. The objective of this work is to estimate the current

  11. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the continental Miocene basins in southern Anatolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Ayten; Kaymakci, Nuretdin; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Kuiper, Klaudia F.; Vissers, Reinoud L. M.

    2014-05-01

    The exposed portion of the Tauride fold-thrust belt in southern Turkey is flanked and overlain by Neogene sedimentary basins. To the south and on top of the high ranges, these basins are mainly marine, whereas previously poorly studied intra-montane basins dominated by continental deposits are exposed to the north. We have studied the stratigraphy and structure of these continental basins - the Altınapa, Yalvaç and Ilgın Basins. Their stratigraphy displays overall fining upward sequences of fluvio-lacustrine sediments, deposition of which interrupted by basin-wide unconformities; similar hiatuses seems to exist in each basin. The most prominent unconformity surface occurred during the Middle Miocene and corresponds to the timing of volcanic activity in the region. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the volcaniclastic samples from the Altınapa and Ilgın basins yielded 11.8-11.6 Ma ages. The main basin forming regional deformation phase was extensional and occurred during the Middle Miocene. The extension directions obtained from paleostress inversion techniques indicate multidirectional extension under vertical uniaxial stress which are compatible with the recent seismic activity and available focal mechanism solutions. The main basin-bounding faults, however, are constrained mainly N-S to NW-SE implying that they are reactivated structures. The Middle Miocene and onwards extensional history of these basins occurs behind and atop a thrust front along the Cyprus arc, extending towards the Antalya nappes and Aksu thrust in the heart of the Isparta angle. The synchrounous, curved pairs of thrust fronts associated with subduction and overriding plate extension suggests that the Cyprus subduction zone has been retreating relative to central Anatolia since, at least, the Middle Miocene time. In addition to extensional history of the region, these continental basins contain evidence for the post-Late Miocene differential uplift of the Taurides in southern Anatolia. All of these

  12. Paleogeography of the upper Paleozoic basins of southern South America: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limarino, Carlos O.; Spalletti, Luis A.

    2006-12-01

    The paleogeographic evolution of Late Paleozoic basins located in southern South America is addressed. Three major types of basins are recognized: infracratonic or intraplate, arc-related, and retroarc. Intraplate basins (i.e., Paraná, Chaco-Paraná, Sauce Grande-Colorado, and La Golondrina) are floored by continental or quasi-continental crust, with low or moderate subsidence rates and limited magmatic and tectonic activity. Arc-related basins (northern and central Chile, Navidad-Arizaro, Río Blanco, and Calingasta-Uspallata basins and depocenters along Chilean Patagonia) show a very complex tectonic history, widespread magmatic activity, high subsidence rates, and in some cases metamorphism of Late Paleozoic sediments. An intermediate situation corresponds to the retroarc basins (eastern Madre de Dios, Tarija, Paganzo, and Tepuel-Genoa), which lack extensive magmatism and metamorphism but in which coeval tectonism and sedimentation rates were likely more important than those in the intraplate region. According to the stratigraphic distribution of Late Paleozoic sediments, regional-scale discontinuities, and sedimentation pattern changes, five major paleogeographic stages are proposed. The lowermost is restricted to the proto-Pacific and retroarc basins, corresponds to the Mississippian (stage 1), and is characterized by shallow marine and transitional siliciclastic sediments. During stage 2 (Early Pennsylvanian), glacial-postglacial sequences dominated the infracratonic (or intraplate) and retroarc basins, and terrigenous shallow marine sediments prevailed in arc-related basins. Stage 3 (Late Pennsylvanian-Early Cisuralian) shows the maximum extension of glacial-postglacial sediments in the Paraná and Sauce Grande-Colorado basins (intraplate region), whereas fluvial deposits interfingering with thin intervals of shallow marine sediments prevailed in the retroarc basins. To the west, arc-related basins were dominated by coastal to deep marine conditions

  13. Imaging the transition from flat to normal subduction: variations in the structure of the Nazca slab and upper mantle under southern Peru and northwestern Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scire, Alissa; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan; Long, Maureen; Wagner, Lara; Minaya, Estela; Tavera, Hernando

    2016-01-01

    Two arrays of broad-band seismic stations were deployed in the north central Andes between 8° and 21°S, the CAUGHT array over the normally subducting slab in northwestern Bolivia and southern Peru, and the PULSE array over the southern part of the Peruvian flat slab where the Nazca Ridge is subducting under South America. We apply finite frequency teleseismic P- and S-wave tomography to data from these arrays to investigate the subducting Nazca plate and the surrounding mantle in this region where the subduction angle changes from flat north of 14°S to normally dipping in the south. We present new constraints on the location and geometry of the Nazca slab under southern Peru and northwestern Bolivia from 95 to 660 km depth. Our tomographic images show that the Peruvian flat slab extends further inland than previously proposed along the projection of the Nazca Ridge. Once the slab re-steepens inboard of the flat slab region, the Nazca slab dips very steeply (˜70°) from about 150 km depth to 410 km depth. Below this the slab thickens and deforms in the mantle transition zone. We tentatively propose a ridge-parallel slab tear along the north edge of the Nazca Ridge between 130 and 350 km depth based on the offset between the slab anomaly north of the ridge and the location of the re-steepened Nazca slab inboard of the flat slab region, although additional work is needed to confirm the existence of this feature. The subslab mantle directly below the inboard projection of the Nazca Ridge is characterized by a prominent low-velocity anomaly. South of the Peruvian flat slab, fast anomalies are imaged in an area confined to the Eastern Cordillera and bounded to the east by well-resolved low-velocity anomalies. These low-velocity anomalies at depths greater than 100 km suggest that thick mantle lithosphere associated with underthrusting of cratonic crust from the east is not present. In northwestern Bolivia a vertically elongated fast anomaly under the Subandean Zone

  14. Reconstruction of Equilibrium Line Altitudes of Nevado Coropuna Glaciers (Southern Peru) from the Late Pleistocene to the present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Úbeda, J.; Palacios, D.; Vázquez, L.

    2009-04-01

    The Nevado Coropuna (15°31'S-72°39'W) is a volcanic complex located 200 km NE of the city of Arequipa, in the Southern Peruvian Andes. The summit area in the complex is covered with a glacier system formed by dozens of branches descending in all directions totaling many km2 in surface area. The study of the volcanic complex and its glaciers is of great interest because it is the main water reserve for tens of thousands of people, because of the risk scenario created by the presence of ice masses on a volcano with relatively recent activity, and because it constitutes an excellent geoindicator of the effects of climate change on ice masses in the western mountain chain of the Central Andes. This research aims to analyze glacier evolution using as geoindicators variations in glacier surface and equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs), defining deglaciation rates based on those variations and preparing forecasts with them on when the ice masses might disappear if the same rates were to occur in the future. In addition, a first estimation is attempted of the chronologies of the last phase of volcanic activity and the last phase of maximum glacier advance that can be attributed to the Late Glacial or Last Glacial Maximum periods. To achieve these aims, digital topography with 50m contour interval, two orthophotos of the central section of the Coropuna complex (15-6-1955 and 21-10-1986), an ASTER satellite image (12-11-2007) and geomorphological mapping of the volcanic complex created in a previous phase of the research (Ubeda, 2007) were integrated into a Geographical Information System (GIS). The GIS was used to determine the global extent of the glacier system, and in more detail, that of two groups (NE and SE) in 1955, 1986 and 2007. Using the geomorphological cartography as a basis, the extent of the glaciers during their last advance in the Little Ice Age (LIA) and their last maximum advance were calculated. Next, surface areas for all phases were calculated using

  15. Evaluating the Current and Future Water Supply and Demands in the Apurimac River Basin, in Peru. Sensitivity Analysis of a Hydrologic and Water Planning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, S.; Sandoval Solis, S.; Bombardelli, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    This research presents an analysis to estimate water availability and water supply for current and future water management policies in the Apurimac River Basin (ARB), in Peru. The objective of this research is to build a coupled hydrologic and water planning model to simulate the water availability and water supply in the ARB. This model is used to evaluate the average (synthetic) and historic conditions to test current and future water demands that include the construction of a reservoir. The hydrologic model is a two bucket model, where the processes of direct runoff, interflow and baseflow are represented in the top bucket and the process of groundwater storage is represented in the bottom bucket. The water planning model is a routing model that calculates the water balance between water supply, water demand and change in storage throughout the basin. The Water Evaluation and Planning (WEAP) platform is used in this research. Model inputs are climate data (precipitation, air temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity) and land use data (land use cover and crop coefficients). Streamflow at different control points and water budgets for all the sub-basin have been calculated to calibrate the model. A sensitivity analysis for the input data was performed to identify parameters that affect the most the water budget for each sub-basin. Precipitation is the most sensitive input data and root zone conductivity is the most sensitive parameter in the model. This research explains the implications of these conditions, and their impact in the analysis of the water availability and water supply for current and future water demands in the ARB.

  16. Large lake basins of the southern High Plains: Ground-water control of their origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, W.W.; Sanford, W.E. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)); Reeves, C.C. Jr (Texas Tech. Univ., Lubbock (United States))

    1992-06-01

    The origin of the {approximately}40-50 topographically large lake basins on the southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico has been an enigma. Previous workers have considered deflation or evaporite dissolution at depth and subsequent collapse as the most probable mechanisms. However, the eolian hypotheses have been unable to provide convincing arguments as to how the wind selectively erodes the thick, deflation-resistant calcrete 'caprock' that is persistent over much of the southern High Plains. Furthermore, recent detailed studies on some of the basins show no significant evaporite dissolution at depth, and neither mechanism offers a satisfactory explanation as to why the basins are almost universally associated with subsurface topographic highs, or why they are absent where the High Plains aquifer thickness exceeds 60 m. The authors address these latter concerns and modify the deflation hypothesis by proposing that the calcrete caprock may never have been deposited in the areas now occupied by the basins. The absence of calcrete deposition is proposed to have resulted from high water tables caused by an increase in hydraulic gradient where aquifers thinned above bedrock highs. A high water table close to an/or intersecting the surface prevents deposition of calcrete, and, thus, the uncemented surface would be more susceptible to deflation than the surrounding calcrete-covered areas after decline of the water table. The rise in water table associated with bedrock highs is documented by numerical simulation using boundary conditions and hydrologic parameters representative of the southern High Plains.

  17. Andean coastal uplift and active tectonics in southern Peru : Be-10 surface exposure dating of differentially uplifted marine terrace sequences (San Juan de Marcona, similar to 15.4 degrees S)

    OpenAIRE

    Saillard, Marianne; Hall, S. R; Audin, Laurence; Farber, D. L.; Regard, V.; Hérail, Gérard

    2011-01-01

    Along the San Juan de Marcona Bay of southern Peru, two spectacular sequences of preserved marine terraces record net Quaternary uplift. Previous geomorphic analysis of these paleo-shorelines has revealed evidence of upper plate deformation and regional uplift. However, in the absence of a robust absolute dating method, these studies contain substantial uncertainties concerning the numerical dating of these marine markers and thus the corresponding calculated surface uplift rates. However, fi...

  18. Contribution to the diversity and conservation knowledge of mammals in the basin of the Apurimac river, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Víctor Pacheco; Edith Salas; Lianka Cairampoma; Maggie Noblecilla; Heidi Quintana; Floro Ortiz; Pedro Palermo; Roberto Ledesma

    2013-01-01

    The present work documents the diversity of mammals in the headwaters of the Apurímac river, one of the most important information gaps in Peru, based on an evaluation of fi ve sampling areas in the departments of Apurímac (Cconoc, Velavelayoc), Ayacucho (Yanamonte, Ccentabamba) and Cuzco (Catarata). Capture’s effort was 1280 trap-nights and 41 mistnet-nights. Sixty species were recorded in the study area and included 15 threatened species and four species endemic to Perú. As expected, bats a...

  19. Lithofacies control in detrital zircon provenance studies: Insights from the Cretaceous Methow basin, southern Canadian Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraaff-Surpless, K.; Mahoney, J.B.; Wooden, J.L.; McWilliams, M.O.

    2003-01-01

    High-frequency sampling for detrital zircon analysis can provide a detailed record of fine-scale basin evolution by revealing the temporal and spatial variability of detrital zircon ages within clastic sedimentary successions. This investigation employed detailed sampling of two sedimentary successions in the Methow/Methow-Tyaughton basin of the southern Canadian Cordillera to characterize the heterogeneity of detrital zircon signatures within single lithofacies and assess the applicability of detrital zircon analysis in distinguishing fine-scale provenance changes not apparent in lithologic analysis of the strata. The Methow/Methow-Tyaughton basin contains two distinct stratigraphic sequences of middle Albian to Santonian clastic sedimentary rocks: submarine-fan deposits of the Harts Pass Formation/Jackass Mountain Group and fluvial deposits of the Winthrop Formation. Although both stratigraphic sequences displayed consistent ranges in detrital zircon ages on a broad scale, detailed sampling within each succession revealed heterogeneity in the detrital zircon age distributions that was systematic and predictable in the turbidite succession but unpredictable in the fluvial succession. These results suggest that a high-density sampling approach permits interpretation of finescale changes within a lithologically uniform turbiditic sedimentary succession, but heterogeneity within fluvial systems may be too large and unpredictable to permit accurate fine-scale characterization of the evolution of source regions. The robust composite detrital zircon age signature developed for these two successions permits comparison of the Methow/Methow-Tyaughton basin age signature with known plutonic source-rock ages from major plutonic belts throughout the Cretaceous North American margin. The Methow/Methow-Tyaughton basin detrital zircon age signature matches best with source regions in the southern Canadian Cordillera, requiring that the basin developed in close proximity to the

  20. CLIMATE CHANGE IN NORTHERN AFRICA: TOWARDS A RETURN OF RAINFALL ON THE SOUTHERN MEDITERRANEAN BASIN

    OpenAIRE

    NOUACEUR ZEINEDDINE; Laignel, B.; TURKI IMEN; JEMAI HIBA

    2014-01-01

    To determine to what extent climate change affects the rainfall recorded on the southern Mediterranean basin, a trend analysis is proposed. This study is based on the chronological graphic method of processing information (MGCTI) of type "Matrice Bertin". Results show an extreme variability of the precipitations and a severe drought, especially for Morocco, observed since 1970s. Finally, a gradual return to humid conditions is observed from the beginning of the 2000s in Algeria and Tunisia an...

  1. Reservoir-forming age and its exploration significance to stratigraphic reservoirs in southern Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Despite many studies concerning the forming age, evolution characteristics and the age of petroleum charging in the Fuxin upheaval of southern Songliao Basin, no consensus has been reached so far. This paper presents the first K-Ar dating of autogenetic illite from stratigraphic petroleum reservoirs in the Fuyu oil layer of the Fuxin upheaval belt. Isotopic test and age calculation were carried out based on the separation and purification of illite mineral, X-diffraction analysis and the detection of scanning electron microscopy. The evolution characteristics of structure, sedimentation, reservoir-forming about the Fuxin upheaval belt were interpreted in terms of the synthetical analysis of "six-type geological history" evolution in southern Songliao Basin. The geologic background of petroleum evolution and reservoir formation are similar in the entire central depression region of southern Songliao Basin. The Changling sag and the Fuxin upheaval belt brought about obvious upheaval-sag separation after the hydrocarbon-generation peak of K2qn1 and the main reservoir-forming period of the Fuyu oil layer, namely reservoir-forming happened before the Fuxin upheaval belt extensively raised. The reservoirs have three characteristics: the hydrocarbon source rock above the reservoir, the oil source in the locality, and the vertical migration. The geological cognition is corrected, that is, oil source came from the Changling sag and migrated from the side direction. The bulk process of petroleum charging in the stratigraphic hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Fuxin upheaval belt of southern Songliao Basin is determined according to the isotopic age of autogenetic illite in combination with the method of fluid inclusions. The cognition is helpful to exactly evaluate the resource potential and exploration direction in the Fuxin upheaval belt, Changling sag and their peripheral areas. The present results indicate that the combination of the two methods (the K-Ar dating of

  2. The effect of environmental change on early Aptian ostracods faunas in the Wessex Basin, southern England

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    A major phase of transgression in the Wessex Basin (southern England) during the earliest Aptian resulted in the collapse of the generally fresh water Barremian environment and the initiation of the marine milieu. Cypridea-rich faunas in the Shepherd's Chine Member (Vectis Formation), were gradually replaced by faunas dominated by Sternbergella cornigera, Mantelliana mantelli and Theriosynoecum fittoni. This change is interpreted as indicating that salinities had passed from fresh-oligoha...

  3. Geothermal field and thermotectonic evolution in Southern South Yellow Sea Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shuchun; HU Shengbiao; CAI Dongsheng; FENG Xiaojie; GAO Le; LU Jingmei

    2003-01-01

    Based on the available borehole temperature data and measurements of thermal conductivities on 10 core samples in the Southern South Yellow Sea Basin, 8 heat flow values are obtained. The results show that the mean values of temperature gradient and heat flow are 28.6℃/km and 69 mW/m2, respectively. The thermal history reconstruction from the inversion of vitrinite reflectance data, using the temperature-gradient method, indicates that the highest paleo-heat flow occurred at the end of the Mesozoic, and then the basin began to cool to present day. Tectonic subsidence analysis shows that the basin experienced at least four episodes of quick subsidence since the late Paleozoic and that the tectonic evolution was quite strong and complex.

  4. Latest Miocene to Quaternary deformation in the southern Chaiwopu Basin, northern Chinese Tian Shan foreland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Honghua; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Tianqi; Zhao, Junxiang; Zheng, Xiangmin; Li, Youli

    2015-12-01

    Basinward propagation of fold and thrust belts is a crucial geological process accommodating Cenozoic crustal shortening within the India-Eurasia collision zone. Anticlinal growth strata in the southern Chaiwopu Basin (a piggyback basin) of the northern Chinese Tian Shan foreland record basinward encroachment of the Tian Shan along the Junggar Frontal Thrust Fault. A new magnetostratigraphic section constrains the onset of syntectonic growth strata at circa 6.4 Ma and suggests synchronous basinward thrusting and propagation of the Tian Shan. The intense alluviation in the southern Chaiwopu Basin ceased at circa 0.55 Ma due to significant anticlinal growth and its resultant river incision. More recent anticlinal growth and deformation during the late Quaternary are revealed by folded river terraces developing across the anticline. The terrace height profile indicates that terrace T1H has been vertically offset about 0.6 m by thrust faulting since its formation at about 7 Ka. The stratigraphic and geomorphic data presented in this work are helpful to understand the initiation of thrust-related folding, as well as aggradation and subsequent incision, in foreland basins of the Tian Shan in relation to the India-Asia collision.

  5. Evidences for a Paleocene marine incursion in southern Amazonia (Madre de Dios Sub-Andean Zone, Peru)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louterbach, M.; Roddaz, M.; Bailleul, J.; Antoine, P. O.; Adnet, S.; Kim, J. H.; van Soelen, E.; Parra, F.; Gérard, J.; Calderon, Y.; Gagnaison, C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Baby, P.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents new biostratigraphic dating, facies analysis, organic geochemical data and Nd-Sr isotopic provenance from five outcrops of southern Amazonia (MD-85, MD-177 MD-184, MD-255 and MD-256) to document for the first time the presence of a shallow marine ingression in the Paleocene of

  6. Evidences for a Paleocene marine incursion in southern Amazonia (Madre de Dios Sub-Andean Zone, Peru)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louterbach, M.; Roddaz, M.; Bailleul, J.; Antoine, P.O.; Adnet, S.; Kim, J.H.; van Soelen, E.E.; Parra, F.; Gérard, J.; Calderon, Y.; Gagnaison, C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Baby, P.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents new biostratigraphic dating, facies analysis, organic geochemical data and Nd–Sr isotopic provenance from five outcrops of southern Amazonia (MD-85, MD-177 MD-184, MD-255 and MD-256) to document for the first time the presence of a shallow marine ingression in the Paleocene of

  7. The role of Argopecten purpuratus shells structuring the soft bottom community in shallow waters of southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomovasky, Betina J.; Gamero, Patricia A.; Romero, Leonardo; Firstater, Fausto N.; Gamarra Salazar, Alex; Hidalgo, Fernando; Tarazona, Juan; Iribarne, Oscar O.

    2015-12-01

    Accumulation of Argopecten purpuratus shells often occurs after El Niño events in shallow waters of Independencia Bay (14°17‧S-76°10‧W; Pisco, Peru). Here we experimentally investigate the effects of their shell accumulation on macrobenthos assemblages in soft bottom, shallow areas of the bay. A field experiment (from May 2006 to May 2007), including four treatments with different coverage levels of empty shells of A. purpuratus, were randomly arranged in: (1) areas devoid of shells ("Empty" treatment: experimental control), (2) 50% of the plot area covered with shells haphazardly distributed over the bottom ("medium" treatment), (3) 100% of the plot area covered with shells, forming a 10 cm valve layer ("full" treatment) and (4) "natural control". We found a total of 124 taxa throughout the experiment. Polychaetes, crustaceans and mollusks were the most abundant groups in "natural controls", dominated by the gastropod Nassarius gayi and the polychaetes Prionospio peruana, Platynereis bicanaliculata and Mediomastus branchiferus. The abundance of individuals (N) and the species richness (S) were higher in the "medium" treatment, but only in one month under positive sea bottom thermal anomalies. Similarity analysis (Bray-Curtis) showed that "natural control", "empty" and "full" treatments were more similar among them than the "medium" treatment. Multidimensional analysis showed no clear species association among treatments and a higher grouping among the samplings of Jun-06, Aug-06 and Nov-06. Our results also showed that the commercial crab Romaleon polyodon and the polyplacophora Tonicia elegans were positively affected by shell accumulations ("medium" treatment), while the limpet Fissurella crassa was negatively affected. Our study shows that directly by changing habitat structure or indirectly by changing sediment characteristics, the addition of scallop shells to the soft bottom can modify the macrobenthic assemblage; however, the seasonal oceanographic

  8. Paleoaltimetry of the Early Miocene-Pliocene Oiyug basin, southern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, B. S.; Polissar, P. J.; Rowley, D. B.; Freeman, K. H.

    2008-12-01

    The stable isotope composition of carbonate and organic samples from the Oiyug basin in southern Tibet allows for model calculations of the Miocene-Pliocene paleoelevation of the Tibetan Plateau. We measured the oxygen isotope composition of pedogenic and lacustrine carbonates, and hydrogen isotope composition of n-alkanes from epicuticular plant waxes to reconstruct the δ18O and δD of Oiyug basin paleometeoric waters. Calculated δ18O and δD values from Oiyug carbonate and organic samples, respectively, are in close agreement, suggesting the preservation of an unaltered paleometeoric water isotopic signal for both archives. Calculated early-middle Miocene (~20-15 Ma) paleoelevation estimates for the Oiyug basin range from 3000-5400 m with an average of ~4700 m. Individual and average elevation estimates are identical within uncertainty to paleoelevation estimates based on Oiyug basin fossil floral physiognomy from the same interval. This is the first time that three independent paleoaltimeters have been directly compared and are in accord. Calculated late Miocene-Pliocene (~5 Ma) paleoelevation estimates range from 5300-6400 m with an average of ~5600 m. Given that the modern hypsometric mean elevation of the Oiyug basin is ~5000 m, our results allow for a possible decrease in the average elevation of the southern part of the Tibetan Plateau since the late Miocene, compatible with widespread east-west extension in Tibet since at least that time. The results of our study further demonstrate the utility of lipid-based estimates of paleoelevation and the value of a multiple-proxy approach of testing the fidelity of isotope-based paleoelevation records.

  9. Submarine landslides in the Southern Adriatic basin: good candidates for potential paleoseismic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Valle, Giacomo; Trincardi, Fabio; Foglini, Federica; Campiani, Elisabetta; Pellegrini, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    The Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary succession of the western continental margin that surround the Southern Adriatic basin mainly consists of contourite depositional systems. The architectural stacking pattern of the contourites-linked bodies is sometimes interrupted by the presence of large-scale mass-transport complexes (MTCs). MTCs are spatially diffused along the margin and are characterized by high variability in size, morphology and geometries. In the northern sector of the margin MTCs derive from the remobilisation of upper-slope contourite drifts, whereas in the southern sector of the margin sedimentary instability involves shelf-margin, progradational deposits. The most prominent MTC of the northern sector of the margin is the Gondola Slide (GS) a large, deep-seated MTC composed of at least three distinct MTDs involving up to 40km3 of sediments. The events that have generated these MTDs have been enclosed within a robust chronological framework using sedimentary shallow piston-cores collected along the continental slope. The reconstruction of the age of these MTDs indicates that failures have repeatedly occurred along the margin during at least the last 55,000 years. Therefore, the GS case indicates that sediment instability processes can span a large portion of a sea-level cycle, pointing to triggering mechanisms that are independent from variations in the relative sea level position. The repeated GS failure events are therefore interpreted to be mainly triggered by earthquake shocks. The Southern Adriatic basin represents a seismically active area and earthquakes are generally cluster along long-lived shear zones. One of these zones, the Gondola Zone, which run across the shelf and the slope, close to the GS-MTC, has been site of paleoseismology analysis, indicating recent (younger than 5.5 kyr) tectonic deformation through E-W strike-slip faulting . Basin-scale MTDs characterize also the southern sector of the continental margin. MTDs are present both

  10. Basin Evolution of the Cretaceous-Early Eocene Xigaze Forearc, Southern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, D. A.; Carrapa, B.; Kapp, P. A.; Gehrels, G. E.; Reiners, P. W.

    2013-12-01

    An understanding of the processes which control the evolution of forearc basins is important for deciphering the tectonic development of a convergent margin prior to continent-continent suturing. This study presents sedimentologic, modal petrographic and geo-thermochronologic data from the Xigaze forearc basin, preserved along ~ 600 km of the Indus-Yarlung Suture Zone in southern Tibet. From late Cretaceous to early Cenozoic time, subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust beneath the southern margin of Asia accommodated the northward motion of the Indian craton and formed the Xigaze forearc basin. Following collision with India in the early Cenozoic, the basin transitioned from predominantly marine to non-marine sedimentation and was subsequently uplifted to a mean elevation of 5000 m. Thus, the sedimentary record in the Xigaze forearc preserves information regarding the tectonic evolution of the Indo-Asia continental margin prior to and following collision. We present new measured sections and geo-thermochronologic data from Early Cretaceous to Early Eocene clastic and carbonate sedimentary rocks, preserved in two previously unexplored regions of the forearc, (1) at its western most extent, northwest of Saga, and (2) north of Lhatse. In turn, we compare our results with previously published data in order to synthesize our current understanding of forearc evolution. Strata preserved in the Lhaste region record an initial shallow marine phase of forearc sedimentation (Aptian), but quickly transition to deep marine slope and distal fan turbidite facies (Albian-Campanian). In contrast, facies preserved in the Saga region record a younger shoaling upward marine sequence (Maastrichtian-Ypresian), with the uppermost ~ 400 m consisting of fluvial channel sandstones and red-green paleosols. Facies and depositional environments in the Saga region are highly variable along strike, with turbidites, shelf limestones, estuarine siliciclastics and thick paleosols sequences all

  11. Recent trends in annual snowline variations in the northern wet outer tropics: case studies from southern Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veettil, Bijeesh Kozhikkodan; Wang, Shanshan; Bremer, Ulisses Franz; de Souza, Sergio Florêncio; Simões, Jefferson Cardia

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the changes in the annual maximum snowlines of a selected set of mountain glaciers at the southern end of the Cordillera Blanca between 1984 and 2015 using satellite images. Furthermore, we analysed the existing glacier records in the Cordillera Blanca since the last glacial maximum to understand the evolution of glaciers in this region over a few centuries. There was a rise in the snowline altitude of glaciers in this region since the late 1990s with a few small glacier advances. Historical to the present El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) records were also analysed to understand whether there was a teleconnection between the glacier fluctuations in the region and the phase changes of ENSO and PDO. We also assessed the variations in three important climatic parameters that influence the glacier retreat—temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity—over a few decades. We calculated the anomalies as well as the seasonal changes in these variables since the mid-twentieth century. There was an increase in temperature during this period, and the decrease in precipitation was not so prominent compared with the temperature rise. There was an exceptionally higher increase in relative humidity since the early 2000s, which is relatively higher than that expected due to the observed rate of warming, and this increase in humidity is believed to be the reason behind the unprecedented rise in the snowline altitudes since the beginning of the twenty-first century.

  12. Hydrological drought forecasting and skill assessment for the Limpopo river basin, Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Trambauer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ensemble hydrological predictions are normally obtained by forcing hydrological models with ensembles of atmospheric forecasts produced by Numerical weather prediction models. To be of practical value to water users, such forecasts should not only be sufficiently skilful, they should also provide information that is relevant to the decisions end users make. The semi-arid Limpopo basin in Southern Africa has experienced severe droughts in the past, resulting in crop failures, high economic losses and the need for humanitarian aid. In this paper we address the seasonal prediction of hydrological drought for the Limpopo river basin by testing three proposed forecasting systems (FS that can provide operational guidance to dam operators and water managers within the basin at the seasonal time scale. All three FS include a distributed hydrological model of the basin, and are forced with either (i a global atmospheric model forecast (ECMWF seasonal forecast system – S4, (ii the commonly applied Ensemble Streamflow Prediction approach (ESP using resampled historical data, or (iii a conditional ESP approach (ESPcond, which is conditional on the ENSO signal. We determine the skill of the three systems in predicting drought indices and streamflow. We also assess the skill of the model in predicting indicators that are meaningful to the local end users in the basin. FS_S4 shows moderate skill for all lead times (3, 4, and 5 months and aggregation periods. FS_ESP also performs better than climatology for the shorter lead times, but with a lower skill than FS_S4. FS_ESPcond shows skill in between the other two FS, though its skill is shown to be more robust. The skills of FS_ESP and FS_ESPcond reduce rapidly with increasing lead time. Both FS_S4 and FS_ESPcond show good potential for seasonal hydrological drought forecasting in the Limpopo river basin, which is encouraging in the context of providing better operational guidance to water users.

  13. Contribution to the diversity and conservation knowledge of mammals in the basin of the Apurimac river, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Pacheco

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work documents the diversity of mammals in the headwaters of the Apurímac river, one of the most important information gaps in Peru, based on an evaluation of fi ve sampling areas in the departments of Apurímac (Cconoc, Velavelayoc, Ayacucho (Yanamonte, Ccentabamba and Cuzco (Catarata. Capture’s effort was 1280 trap-nights and 41 mistnet-nights. Sixty species were recorded in the study area and included 15 threatened species and four species endemic to Perú. As expected, bats and rodents were the most diverse orders (66,7 %. The species diversity in the sites sampled declines signifi cantly with elevation from the lowest elevation sites (Ccentabamba and Catarata to the highest (Velavelayoc. The marsupial Monodelphis peruviana and the Dwarf Brocket deer Mazama chunyi are fifi rst records for the department of Ayacucho. The bats Artibeus planirostris and Myotis keaysi, and the river otter Lontra longicaudis are fifi rst records for the department of Apurímac. For bats, the relative abundance showed a signifi cant negative correlation with elevation, but was not signifi cant for small terrestrial mammals. The species of Sturnira, Akodon and Thomasomys had the highest values of relative abundance. The diversity indices (Shannon-Wiener and Simpson also showed also a signifi cant negative correlation with elevation. The Apurímac river headwater is estimated to have at least 97 mammals species. We recommend creating conservation areas in Huanipaca, Yanamonte and Catarata, and enlarging the area of the Santuario Histórico Machu Picchu to include the archaeological site of Choquequirao.

  14. Multi-Layer Superposed Coalbed Methane System in Southern Qinshui Basin, Shanxi Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhang; Yong Qin; Xuehai Fu; Zhaobiao Yang; Chen Guo

    2015-01-01

    Multi-coalbed developed in Carboniferous–Permian coal-bearing strata of southern Qinshui Basin, and different coal-bearing segments have different coalbed methane (CBM) reservoiring characteristics. Analysis of previous studies suggests that the essence of an unattached CBM system is to possess a unified fluid pressure system, which includes four key elements, namely, gas-bearing coal-rock mass, formation fluid, independent hydrodynamic system and capping layer condition. Based on the exploration and exploitation data of CBM, it is discovered that the gas content of coal seams in southern Qinshui Basin presents a change rule of non-monotonic function with the seam dipping, and a turning point of the change appears nearby coal seam No. 9, and coal seams of the upper and the lower belong to different CBM systems respectively; well test reservoir pressure shows that the gradient of coal seam No. 15 of the Taiyuan Formation is significantly higher than that of coal seam No. 3 of the Shanxi Formation; the equivalent reservoir pressure gradient of coal seam No. 15 “jumps” obviously compared with the reservoir pressure gradient of coal seam No. 3 in the same vertical well, that is, the relation between reservoir pressure and burial depth takes on a characteristic of nonlinearity; mean-while, the vertical hydraulic connection among the aquifers of Shanxi Formation and Taiyuan Forma-tion is weak, constituting several relatively independent fluid pressure systems. The characteristics dis-cussed above reveal that the main coal seams of southern Qinshui Basin respectively belong to relatively independent CBM systems, the formation of which are jointly controlled by sedimentary, hydrogeolog-ical and structural conditions.

  15. Simulation of the arid climate of the southern great basin using a regional climate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the development effort of a regional climate model (RCM) for the southern Great Basin, this paper presents a validation analysis of the climatology generated by a high-resolution RCM driven by observations. Two multiyear simulations were performed over the western United States with the RCM driven by European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analyses of observations. This validation analysis is the first phase of a project to produce simulations of future climate scenarios over a region surrounding Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the only location currently being considered as a potential high-level nuclear-waste repository site. Model-produced surface air temperatures and precipitation were compared with observations from five southern Nevada stations located in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain. The seasonal cycles of temperature and precipitation were simulated well. Monthly and seasonal temperature biases were generally negative and largely explained by differences in elevation between the observing stations and the model topography. The model-simulated precipitation captured the extreme dryness of the Great Basin. Average yearly precipitation biases were mostly negative in the summer and positive in the winter. The number of simulated daily precipitation events for various precipitation intervals was within factors of 1.5-3.5 of observed. Overall, the model tended to overestimate the number of light precipitation events and underestimate the number of heavy precipitation events. At Yucca Mountain, simulated precipitation, soil moisture content, and water infiltration below the root zone (top 1 m) were maximized in the winter. Evaporation peaked in the spring after temperatures began to increase. The conclusion drawn from this validation analysis is that this high-resolution RCM simulates the regional surface climatology of the southern Great Basin reasonably well when driven by meteorological fields derived from observations. 26 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Small mammals from the early Pleistocene of the Granada Basin, southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alix, Antonio; Minwer-Barakat, Raef; Suárez, Elvira Martín; Freudenthal, Matthijs

    2009-09-01

    The Pliocene and Pleistocene continental sedimentary records of the western sector of the Granada Basin, southern Spain, consist of alternating fluvial and lacustrine/palustrine sediments. Two Quaternary sections from this sector have been sampled: Huétor Tájar and Tojaire. They have yielded remains of rodents, insectivores and lagomorphs. The presence in the Huétor Tájar and Tojaire sections of Mimomys, Apodemus atavus, Castillomys rivas and two different species of Allophaiomys, indicates an Early Pleistocene age. These deposits, which are related to a fluvio-lacustrine system, can be differentiated from an older (Pliocene) braided fluvial system. Their dating has important repercussions on the paleogeographic reconstruction of the basin. The conditions inferred from the ecological preferences of the small mammal associations are wet and cold. These associations suggest a predominance of open herbaceous habitats, followed by forested habitats; semiaquatic habitats are the least represented.

  17. Structural development and crustal stretching in the Muglad Basin, southern Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, A. Y.; Ashcroft, W. A.; Whiteman, A. J.

    2001-02-01

    A simplified model cross-section has been established from integrated well data, reflection seismic and gravity data along a northeast-southwest profile in the Unity-Kaikang area in the Muglad Basin, southern Sudan. A multi-layer crustal model has been created to produce a better estimate of the crustal extension involved and assess some of the key factors in the basin's formation by comparison to a theoretical model. Within the sedimentary section, three reflection seismic horizons were picked and their depths were calculated: Top Bentiu (Cenomanian), Top Abu Gabra (Aptian-Albian) and Top Basement (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous). The integrated well and seismic data indicate a sedimentary section up to 11 km thick along the cross-section. Different densities were assigned to the three sedimentary layers according to well data, and upper and lower crustal layers were incorporated in the model. Isostatic compensation of the sedimentary fill and the resultant crustal thinning was estimated by gravity modelling. The stretching of the lithosphere is estimated at ≈56 km (≈61%), corresponding to a β factor of 1.61. The form of the basin agrees with the model of a rift basin developed over an extended period of time.

  18. Structure andevolution of the austral basin fold-thrust belt, Southern Patagonian Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías C. Ghiglione

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study focuseson the evolution of the Southern Patagonian Andes fold-thrust belt and theadjacent non-deformed foreland of the Austral basin between 49°45' and52°00'SL. This sector involves mainly Late Cretaceous sequences of the firstregressive cycle (Lago Viedma Cycle of the Austral basin foreland stage, andCampanian to Paleogene sequences associated with tectonic uplift of its westernboundary. From a stratigraphic-sedimentary point of view, a first-orderincrease in the fillthickness and depth to the basement exists from north tosouth including the presence of deeper depositional environments in the samedirection. Furthermore, there are strong along-strike variations in width andlateral position of the structural domains following the same trend. Based uponprevious interpretations, is concluded that the distribution of extensionaldepocenters from the early extensional phase of the basin controlled theseimportant sedimentary and structural N-S contrasts. Furthermore, in ourpresented model, East-west oriented transition zones are interpreted asaccommodation zones separating synrift sub-basins.

  19. Physicochemical, microbiological and toxicological quality of raw milk in cattle basins of the region Puno-Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Magaly Brousett-Minaya; Ana Torres Jiménez; Alex Chambi Rodríguez; Bethy Mamani Villalba; Hernán Gutiérrez Samata

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of raw milk in seven representative basins of the region Puno. The results were compared with the standards established by the International Standard for milk and milk products NTP 200.001-2003 and the Official Mexican Standard NOM-155-SCFI-2012 for the parameters of protein and lactose in the absence of Peruvian parameters. For physicochemical characterization pH, acidity, density, fat, protein, lactose, total solids, fat solids was det...

  20. Physicochemical, microbiological and toxicological quality of raw milk in cattle basins of the region Puno-Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magaly Brousett-Minaya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of raw milk in seven representative basins of the region Puno. The results were compared with the standards established by the International Standard for milk and milk products NTP 200.001-2003 and the Official Mexican Standard NOM-155-SCFI-2012 for the parameters of protein and lactose in the absence of Peruvian parameters. For physicochemical characterization pH, acidity, density, fat, protein, lactose, total solids, fat solids was determined microbiological analysis of E. coli and mesophilic, just as we also performed the study spanned pesticide residue analysis such as organochlorines, organophosphates, carbamates and pyrethroids with sensitivity 1.0ug / g sample which gave negative results for the four groups of pesticides, the physicochemical determinations over 50% of the basins (except for pH and acidity is found within the standards of the NTP and NOM. The presence of mesophilic were mostly found within the parameters except for two milksheds and as for E. Coli any basin met established standards found one poor quality milk hygienic.

  1. Diamondoid Hydrocarbons as Maturity Indicators for Condensates from Southern Indus Basin, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Shagufta Nasir; Tahira Fazeelat

    2013-01-01

    Diamondoid hydrocarbons have been examined in condensates reservoired in the Southern Indus Basin using GC-MS. Bulk properties reveal that samples are waxy and low sulfur with the exception of Pakhro and Gopang which are nonwaxy. TIC show bimodal distribution of n-alkanes along with high abundance of C20+ n-alkanes indicating substantial contribution of terrigeneous OM in these samples. CPI close to one is consistent with mature nature of oils. The samples show two ranges of Pr/Ph ratios. Tho...

  2. CLIMATE CHANGE IN NORTHERN AFRICA: TOWARDS A RETURN OF RAINFALL ON THE SOUTHERN MEDITERRANEAN BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOUACEUR ZEINEDDINE

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To determine to what extent climate change affects the rainfall recorded on the southern Mediterranean basin, a trend analysis is proposed. This study is based on the chronological graphic method of processing information (MGCTI of type "Matrice Bertin". Results show an extreme variability of the precipitations and a severe drought, especially for Morocco, observed since 1970s. Finally, a gradual return to humid conditions is observed from the beginning of the 2000s in Algeria and Tunisia and since 2008 in Morocco. This new trend is also confirmed by recent results provided by agricultural data of 2011/2012 and 2012/2013.

  3. Austrolebias varzeae, a new annual fish from the upper rio Uruguay basin, southern Brazil (Cyprinodontiformes: Rivulidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson J. E. M. Costa; Reis, Roberto E.; Everton R. Behr

    2004-01-01

    Austrolebias varzeae n. sp. is described from rio da Várzea floodplains, upper rio Uruguay basin, southern Brazil. It seems to be closely related to A. carvalhoi (Myers), with which it shares a similar color pattern of male and an apomorphic morphology of the autopalatine. The new species differs from A. carvalhoi by having more anal-fin rays in males and more caudal-fin rays. Austrolebias varzeae is distinguished from all other species of the genus by a unique color pattern, in which there a...

  4. Tectonic and climatic control on geomorphological and sedimentary evolution of the Mercure basin, southern Apennines, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robustelli, Gaetano; Ermolli, Elda Russo; Petrosino, Paola; Jicha, Brian; Sardella, Raffaele; Donato, Paola

    2014-06-01

    The morpho-tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Mercure intramontane basin (Calabria-Lucania boundary, southern Apennines) has been assessed through facies analysis, morphostratigraphy and geomorphological correlation with adjacent areas. The Mercure basin, one of the most active seismogenic zones of the southern Apennines, is a favorable area for reconstructing the main stages of landscape evolution of the axial zone because of its capability to record changes in base level during the Quaternary. In addition, the presence of both erosional and depositional Palaeosurfaces is a useful marker for reconstructing tectonic and morphogenetic events, and hence to detect the role played by tectonics and climate in its genesis, evolution and extinction. The present study identifies the key role of tectonics and denudation, combined with high-frequency floods, as mechanisms controlling alluvial sedimentation in the study area. During endorheic conditions, denudational processes driven by pulses of extensional deformation of the basin margin caused strong alluvial inputs that resulted in the development of alluvial fans. Alluvial facies are mainly characterized by turbulent, subaerial, hyperconcentrated flood flows deposited during the glacial, semi-arid conditions of MIS 14. The retrogradational stacking pattern of the alluvial system indicates decreasing rates of tectonic activity along with declining river gradients. The Mercure coalescing alluvial fans were inundated by lake transgression during MIS 13 in response to (i) abrupt tectonic subsidence at the basin margins and (ii) large decrease of coarse sediment supply due to the interplay among climate, tectonics and catchment size changes. In this regard, it is suggested that tectonic control on the drainage network along with climate and long-term slope evolution may have caused marked pulses in sediment supply, thus influencing the arrangement of facies associations in the sedimentary succession. In addition, the

  5. Impacts of satellite-based precipitation datasets on rainfall-runoff modeling of the Western Amazon basin of Peru and Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubieta, Ricardo; Getirana, Augusto; Espinoza, Jhan Carlo; Lavado, Waldo

    2015-09-01

    Satellites are an alternative source of rainfall data used as input to hydrological models in poorly gauged or ungauged regions. They are also useful in regions with highly heterogeneous precipitation, such as the tropical Andes. This paper evaluates three satellite precipitation datasets (TMPA, CMORPH, PERSIANN), as well as a dataset based only on rain gauge data (HYBAM), and their impacts on the water balance of the Western Amazon basin, a region where hydrological modeling and hydrological forecasting are poorly developed. These datasets were used as inputs in the MGB-IPH hydrological model to simulate streamflows for the 2003-2009 period. The impacts of precipitation on model parameterization and outputs were evaluated in two calibration experiments. In Experiment 1, parameter sets were separately defined for each catchment; in Experiment 2, a single parameter set was defined for the entire basin. TMPA shows overestimated precipitation over the northern region, while CMORPH and PERSIANN significantly underestimate rainfall in the same that region and along the Andes. TMPA and CMORPH lead to similar estimates of mean evapotranspiration (∼2 mm/day) for different regions along the entire basin, while PERSIANN is the least accurate (∼0.5 mm/day). Overall, better scores for streamflow simulations are obtained with Experiment 1 forced by HYBAM and TMPA. Nevertheless, results using the three satellite datasets indicate inter-basin differences, low performance in the northern and high in the southern regions. Low model performances are mainly related to scale issues and forcing errors in small basins over regions that present very low rainfall seasonality.

  6. A numerical method for determining the state of stress using focal mechanisms of earthquake populations: application to Tibetan teleseisms and microseismicity of Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey-Gailhardis, Evelyne; Louis Mercier, Jacques

    1987-03-01

    give a good evaluation of the regional (mean) state of stress. Focal mechanisms of the small events are also modelled by a mean stress deviator, but this differs significantly from the regional state of stress in southern Peru deduced from Quaternary faulting. This may be due to imprecise location of the small events. However, some movements are strongly different from those predicted by the computed mean stress deviator. This suggests that small fault kinematics surely depend on the regional state of stress but that local effects may control the small deformations.

  7. Nonuniform surface uplift of the Andean plateau revealed by deuterium isotopes in Miocene volcanic glass from southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Joel E.; Horton, Brian K.

    2014-02-01

    Proposals for rapid late Miocene surface uplift driven by large-scale lithospheric removal beneath the central Andean plateau have been based largely on temperature-sensitive paleoaltimeters. Both the magnitude and mechanism of this proposed pulse of uplift have been challenged. First, climatic general circulation models support protracted uplift with predicted temperature and isotopic shifts enhanced by attainment of threshold elevations. Second, tectonic models in which surface elevations are compensated by regional contraction and crustal thickening question the need for lithospheric removal and predict broadly coeval uplift of the entire plateau. We present hydrogen isotope data using a novel temperature-insensitive volcanic glass proxy from continuous, well-dated lower to middle Miocene basin fill in the Western Cordillera of the northern plateau that show a rapid decrease in δD values (-62.8‰) at 19-16 Ma, with extremely negative values continuing into the Pliocene. We propose that the basin reached its current elevation by 16 Ma, >6 Myr earlier than proposed for the central plateau. The rapid decrease in δD values is consistent with punctuated surface uplift of 2.2-3.7 km between 19 and 16 Ma. Whereas the 3.7 km upper estimate assumes a static climate similar to modern, the 2.2 km lower estimate conservatively incorporates modeled changes in the isotopic composition of precipitation associated with elevation change. Comparison of these results to existing paleoelevation estimates from the Andean plateau facilitates a tentative reconstruction of earliest middle Miocene paleotopography showing a central depression with flanking hinterland and thrust-belt highlands. This apparent pattern of nonuniform plateau uplift contradicts shortening-proportional topographic growth over tens of Myr. We propose that temporally and spatially irregular surface uplift may be linked to pronounced local variability in crustal shortening and/or piecemeal removal of dense

  8. Traveling Weather Disturbances in Mars' Southern Extratropics: Sway of the Great Impact Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.

    2016-04-01

    ' transient barotropic/baroclinic eddies are significantly influenced by the great impact basins of this hemisphere (e.g., Argyre and Hellas). In addition, the occurrence of a southern storm zone in late winter and early spring is keyed particularly to the western hemisphere via orographic influences arising from the Tharsis highlands, and the Argyre and Hellas impact basins. Geographically localized transient-wave activity diagnostics are constructed that illuminate fundamental differences amongst such simulations and these are described.

  9. Sedimentary facies and stratigraphic architecture in coarse-grained deltas: Anatomy of the Cenozoic Camaná Formation, southern Peru (16°25‧S to 17°15‧S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alván, Aldo; von Eynatten, Hilmar

    2014-10-01

    In the external forearc of southern Peru (Arequipa region), the sedimentary facies and the stratigraphic architecture of the Cenozoic Camaná Formation are presented in the context of tectono-eustatic controls. The Camaná Formation is defined as ∼500 m thick coarse-grained deltaic complex that accumulated in a fault-bounded elongated depression extending from the Coastal Cordillera in the east to the offshore Mollendo Basin in the west and likely up to the Peruvian Trench. Based on the analysis of facies associations, we propose a refined stratigraphic scheme of the Camaná Basin fill. The Camaná Formation was formerly divided into the Camaná “A” and Camaná “B” units (CamA and CamB, respectively). We reinterpret the stratigraphic position and the timing of the CamA to CamB boundary, and define three sub-units for CamA, i.e. sub-units A1, A2, and A3. Each depositional unit shows individual stacking patterns, which are linked with particular shoreline trajectories through time. Strata of A1 form the basal succession of the Camaná Formation and consist of distributary channels and mouth bars, unconformably overlain by beds of A2. A2 consists of delta front deposits arranged in voluminous clinothems that reflect a progradational downstepping complex. A3 consists of delta front sandstones to prodelta siltstones arranged in retrogradational onlapping geometry. A pebbly intercalation in proximal onlapping A3 deposits is interpreted to reflect pulses of uplift in the hinterland. The overlying CamB unit is characterized by a thick alternation of fluvio-deltaic conglomerates and sand bars. The ages of the individual units of the Camaná Formation are not yet well defined. Based on the available information and stratigraphic correlations we tentatively assign A1 to the Late Oligocene, A2 to the Early Miocene, A3 to the late Early Miocene to early Middle Miocene, and CamB to the Late Miocene to? early Pliocene. The sub-units A1 and A2 represent a regressive

  10. Post-partum reproductive efficiency of pure- and cross-bred Zebu cattle under different management and nutritional conditions in the Amazon Basin of Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiments described were carried out by the Research Centre of the Veterinary Institute for Tropical and High Altitude Research (IVITA), at an experimental station located near Pucallpa in the Amazon Basin of Peru. The aim was to study some of the factors affecting reproductive efficiency under field conditions, with special emphasis on the effects of nutrition, body weight, suckling and some adaptation related parameters in pure- and cross-bred Zebu cattle. Progesterone assay was used in combination with clinical examinations to evaluate more precisely the reproductive parameters studied. A long post-partum anoestrus interval was the most important factor limiting reproductive efficiency in pure-bred Zebu animals. The 10 month interval observed under field and experimental conditions was shortened by improving the level of nutrition. However, the first ovulation after parturition was inhibited by free or restricted suckling until weaning took place 8 months post-partum. In contrast, dual purpose cross bred Bos taurus x Bos indicus animals tended to show better reproductive performance when suckling was allowed, the difference being significant when adequate management and feeding were also provided. Body weight at calving and subsequent weight changes during the post-partum period significantly affected the onset of post-partum reproductive function in both pure- and cross-bred Zebu cows. Cross-bred animals with a low body weight at calving remained acyclic for 8 months. On small farms, only 35% of the intervals between artificial insemination services were in the range of 18 to 24 days. Progesterone profiles determined between successive oestrous periods revealed a high frequency of unobserved oestrus. The correlation between rectal palpation of ovarian structures and progesterone concentration was 0.82 and 0.96 in diagnosing luteal and non-luteal structures respectively. The combination of weekly clinical examinations and progesterone determinations gave a

  11. Seismicity and focal mechanisms for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: 1987 through 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmsen, S.C.; Bufe, C.G.

    1991-12-31

    For the calendar year 1987, the southern Great basin seismic network (SGBSN) recorded about 820 earthquakes in the southern Great Basin (SGB). Local magnitudes ranged from 0.2 to 4.2 (December 30, 1987, 22:50:42 UTC at Hot Creek Valley). Five earthquakes epicenters in 1987 within the detection threshold of the seismic network are at Yucca Mountain, the site of a potential national, high-level nuclear waste repository. The maximum magnitude of those five earthquakes is 1.1, and their estimated depths of focus ranged from 3.1 to 7.6 km below sea level. For the calendar year 1988, about 1280 SGB earthquakes were catalogued, with maximum magnitude-4.4 for an Owens Valley, California, earthquake on July 5, 1988. Eight earthquake epicenters in 1988 are at Yucca Mountain, with depths ranging from three to 12 km below sea level, and maximum magnitude 2.1. For the calendar year 1989, about 1190 SGB earthquakes were located and catalogued, with maximum magnitude equal to 3.5 for earthquake about ten miles north of Las Vegas, Nevada, on January 9. No Yucca Mountain earthquakes were recorded in 1989. An earthquake having a well-constrained depth of about 30 km below sea level was observed on August 21, 1989, in eastern Nevada Test Site (NTS).

  12. Evaluation of the seismicity of the southern Great Basin and its relationship to the tectonic framework of the region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seismograph network recordings of local and regional earthquakes are being collected in the southern Great Basin to aid in the evaluation of the seismic hazard at a potential high-level radioactie waste repository site at Yucca Mountain in the southwestern Nevada Test Site. Data for 1522 earthquakes for the calendar years 1982 and 1983 are reported herein. In the period August, 1978 through December, 1983, 2800 earthquakes were located within and adjacent to the southern Great Basin seismograph network. Earthquake hypocenters, selected focal mechanisms, and other inferred seismicity characteristics are presented and discussed in relation to the local and regional geologic framework. 105 refs., 94 figs., 8 tabs

  13. Soil erosion vulnerability in the verde river basin, southern minas gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Augusto de Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is one of the most significant environmental degradation processes. Mapping and assessment of soil erosion vulnerability is an important tool for planning and management of the natural resources. The objective of the present study was to apply the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE using GIS tools to the Verde River Basin (VRB, southern Minas Gerais, in order to assess soil erosion vulnerability. A annual rainfall erosivity map was derived from the geographical model adjusted for Southeastern Brazil, calculating an annual value for each pixel. The maps of soil erodibility (K, topographic factor (LS, and use and management of soils (C were developed from soils and their uses map and the digital elevation model (DEM developed for the basin. In a GIS environment, the layers of the factors were combined to create the soil erosion vulnerability map according to RUSLE. The results showed that, in general, the soils of the VRB present a very high vulnerability to water erosion, with 58.68% of soil losses classified as "High" and "Extremely High" classes. In the headwater region of VRB, the predominant classes were "Very High" and "Extremely High" where there is predominance of Cambisols associated with extensive pastures. Furthermore, the integration of RUSLE/GIS showed an efficient tool for spatial characterization of soil erosion vulnerability in this important basin of the Minas Gerais state.

  14. Earthquake location data for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: 1984 through 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents data in map and table form for earthquake parameters such as hypocentral coordinates and magnitudes for earthquakes located by the southern Great Basin Seismic network for the time period January 1, 1984, through December 31, 1986. These maps show concentrations of earthquakes in regions previously noted to be seismically active, including the Pahranagat Shear Zone, Pahroc Mountains, southern Nevada Test Site, Timber Mountain, Black Mountain, Gold Mountain, Montezuma Range, and Grapevine Mountains. A concentration of earthquake activity in the Reveille Range was observed in 1986, in a previously inactive area. The northern Nevada Test Site had fewer earthquakes than a comparable area of the southern Nevada Test Site, indicating that the low-yield nuclear testing program is not currently triggering significant numbers of aftershocks. Eight microearthquakes occurred at Yucca Mountain during the 1984-1986 monitoring period. Depths of focus for well-located earthquakes continue to indicate a bimodal distribution, with peaks at 1 to 2 and 8 to 9 km below sea-level and a local minimum at 4 to 5 km. Focal mechanisms range from strike slip to normal slip. No dependence of slip mode on depth or magnitude is evident. 8 refs., 46 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Spotlight: Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacher, L

    1985-09-01

    This article highlights population statistics from Peru, the 3rd largest country in Latin America. The population in 1985 has been estimated at 19.7 million. In 1982, the birth rate was 35/1000 and the mortality rate was 10/1000. Infant mortality stood at 99/1000 live births and life expectancy at birth was 59 years. 41% of Peru's population is under 15 years of age, and only 4% is 65 years of age or older. The country's total fertility rate is 5.2 births/woman. Only 0.4% of the population is foreign born. Peru is highly urbanized, and 65% of the country's total population growth in 1981 occurred in its cities. 1 in 3 Peruvians resides in the capital city of Lima. The 2 largest racial groups are mestizos and whites (53%) and Indians (46%). 21% of the population is illiterate. 40.7% of the labor force is employed in agriculture; however, only 15% of the national income is derived from agriculture. The GNP per capita was US$1040 in 1983. The country's economy is in serious trouble at present, with an annual inflation rate of 250% and a foreign debt of US$13.5 billion. PMID:12340368

  16. New species of Solanum (Solanaceae from Peru and Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Knapp

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of “non-spiny" Solanum are described from Peru and Ecuador, and a revised description for Solanum verecundum M.Nee is presented. Solanum kulliwaita S.Knapp, sp. nov. (Dulcamaroid clade is endemic to the Department of Cuzco in southern Peru, and is most similar to the recently described Solanum sanchez-vegae S.Knapp of northern Peru. Solanum dillonii S.Knapp, sp. nov. (Brevantherum clade is found in southern Ecuador and northern Peru in the Amotape-Huancabamba phytogeographic zone, and is morphologically similar to the widespread Solanum riparium Ruiz & Pav. Solanum oxapampense S.Knapp, sp. nov., (also of the Brevantherum clade is endemic to the Oxapampa region (Department of Pasco of central Peru, and is similar to and segregated from Solanum verecundum M.Nee of Peru and Ecuador. Complete descriptions, distributions and preliminary conservation assessments of all new species are given.

  17. Comparative analysis of post-breakup basin evolution along the South-American and South-African margins, southern Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozyk, F.; Back, S.; Kukla, P. A.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, considerable attempts have been made to compare the sedimentary basin evolution and the associated tectonic framework on both sides of the South-Atlantic. However, yet there are still unresolved questions concerning the tectono-sedimentary styles of margin basin evolution that markedly differ from north to south. Amongst the most striking observations is that multiple phases of uplift and subsidence are recorded after the break-up of the southern South Atlantic margin segment on both sides of the Florianopolis-Walvis Ridge volcanic complex, features that are regarded as atypical when compared to published examples of other post-breakup margin successions. Adding to the heterogeneity of the system, the northernmost segment of the South Atlantic rift and salt basins is also characterized by a pronounced asymmetry, with the Brazilian margin now comprising narrower and deeper rift basins with less salt than the Congo-Gabon conjugate margin. This project deals with a large-scale comparison of this very different post-breakup tectono-stratigraphic development of the southern and northern South American and African continental margins that both record thick post-rift sedimentary successions. To gain detail of the basin margin evolution, we focus on a regional comparison between the post-breakup records archived in the large offshore southern Brazil basins (Pelotas, Santos, Campos) and the post-breakup continental margin successions of offshore Namibia (e.g. Orange Basin) and southern Angola (e.g. Kwanza Basin). A tectonic-stratigraphic comparison of representative geological transects provides a comprehensive basin-to-basin documentation of key factors influencing margin development which include the subsidence development through time, the sediment (in-)flux and storage patterns and the respective type of basin fill (e.g. salt vs. non-salt systems; carbonate-rich vs. clastics-dominated systems). Data from the salt-prone areas offshore South America and southern

  18. Detailed history of atmospheric trace elements from the Quelccaya ice core (Southern Peru) during the last 1200 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglietti, C.; Gabrielli, P.; Thompson, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    The recent increase in trace element concentrations, for example Cr, Cu, Zn, Ag, Pb, Bi, and U, in polar snow and ice has provided compelling evidence of a hemispheric change in atmospheric composition since the nineteenth century. This change has been concomitant with the expansion of the Industrial Revolution and points towards an anthropogenic source of trace elements in the atmosphere. There are very few low latitude trace element ice core records and these are believed to be sensitive to perturbations of regional significance. To date, these records have not been used to document a preindustrial anthropogenic impact on atmospheric composition at low latitudes. Ice cores retrieved from the tropical Andes are particularly interesting because they have the potential to reveal detailed information about the evolution and environmental consequences of mineral exploitation related to the Pre Inca Civilizations, the Inca Empire (1438-1533 AD) and the subsequent Spanish invasion and dominance (1532-1833 AD). The chemical record preserved in the ice of the Quelccaya ice cap (southern Peruvian Andes) offers the exceptional opportunity to geochemically constrain the composition of the tropical atmosphere at high resolution over the last ~1200 years. Quantification of twenty trace elements (Ag, Al, As, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sn, Ti, Tl, U, V, and Zn) was performed by ICP-SFMS over 105 m of the Quelccaya North Dome core (5600 m asl, 128.57 m) by analyzing 2450 samples. This provides the first atmospheric trace element record in South America spanning continuously and at high resolution for the time period between 1990 and 790 AD. Ag, As, Bi, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Mo, Sb, Sn, Pb and Zn show increases in concentration and crustal enrichment factor starting at different times between 1450 and 1550 AD, in concomitance with the expansions of the Inca Empire and, subsequently, the Spanish Empire well before the inception of the Industrial Revolution. This

  19. Petroleum geology and exploration potential of Ucayali Basin, Peru%秘鲁Ucayali盆地油气地质特征及勘探潜力分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王青; 王建君; 汪平; 朱志强; 赵旭

    2012-01-01

    The Ucayali Basin is one of the sub-Andean foreland basins with several types of pays. There are two sets of main source rocks including the Pucara Formation (T-J) and the Ene Formation ( P). Multiple sets of reservoirs generated, such as the Chonta, Vivian, Cushabatay, Agua Caliente and Raya Formations of Cretaceous and the Ene Formation of Permian. And the seal factors for the reservoirs are excellent. There are two types of thrust deformations in the Ucayali Basin. Basement-involved structures mainly occur in the north, while thin-skinned thrusting structures exist in the south. Traps of the discovered fields in the basin are mainly anticlines related to thrust faults. In the Northern Ucayali sub-Basin, hydrocarbons from the Pucara Formation move through unconformities and faults towards Cretaceous formations, and re-accumulate after the Quechua tectonic movement. However, in the Southern Ucayali sub-Basin, natural gas generate from the over mature shales of the Ene Formation, and migrate into the Permian and Cretaceous reservoirs. Four types of exploration leads exist in the basin; traps in thrustfold-foredeep belt, Carbonate reservoir in the Pucara Formation, gas prospects of Permian in the northern basin, and Cretaceous stratigraphic traps in the east of the basin.%秘鲁Ucayali盆地是位于安第斯山山前的前陆盆地之一,盆地内发育多套储盖组合.盆地内主力烃源岩包括上三叠统一下侏罗统Pucara组和二叠系Ene组的泥岩;发育多套储层,包括白垩系Chonta,Vivian,Cushabatay,AguaCaliente和Raya组储层,以及下二叠统的Ene组砂岩层等;盖层条件良好.北部主要发育基底相关的逆冲断层,而在盆地的南部发育薄皮式的逆冲断层,盆地内已发现的油气田的圈闭类型主要是与逆冲断层相关的断背斜圈闭.北Ucayali次盆Pucara组生成的油气运移至该组地层的剥蚀面,充注至白垩系,但遭到后期造山运动的破坏,通过再次运移聚集成藏.

  20. Winter daily precipitation in La Plata Basin and circulation patterns in Southern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettolli, Maria Laura; Clorinda Penalba, Olga; Andrés Krieger, Pablo

    2013-04-01

    La Plata Basin is one of the most important agriculture and hydropower producing regions worldwide, where temporal and spatial variability of precipitation have a significant socio-economic impact. The aim of this work is to analyze the dependence of the daily precipitation in the south of La Plata Basin region on the large-scale circulation in Southern South America and its future projection. Daily mean sea level pressure (SLP) fields from NCEP reanalysis 2 were used to represent observed circulation for the period 1979-1999. The analyzed season was austral winter (June-July-August) for the spatial domain from 15°S to 60°S and from 42.5°W to 90°W. The circulation types were obtained by combining the Principal Component Analysis with the k-means Cluster Analysis. Daily precipitation data was used from the gridded datasets of the Claris LPB Project ("A Europe-South America Network for Climate Change Assessment and Impact Studies in La Plata Basin"). Precipitation fields conditioned by the observed surface circulation were analysed and compared. The results indicate that specific daily circulation patterns can be identified as responsible for a significant contribution to precipitation anomalies. The synoptic structures identified in this work can be associated with daily rainfall over the region of study. The classification scheme is effective not only in discriminating dry and rainy days and subregions of La Plata Basin, but also in differentiating between different thresholds of rainfall intensities. In this sense, the findings of this research help to improve our understanding of the relationship between rainfall variability and atmospheric circulation as defined by an objective classification of circulation types.

  1. Determining the Location and Magnitude of Basin and Range and Laramide Faulting, Southern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundrett, C. E.; Lamb, M. A.; Beard, S.

    2014-12-01

    Southern Nevada records two recent periods of deformation; the Laramide orogeny and Basin and Range extension. Our research focuses on these events to understand the history of faulting in this area and the resulting landscape. First, we have advanced an on-going research project in the Lake Mead region of Nevada, which was deformed by extension that began around 17 Ma. We are currently working in the White Basin, near Lake Mead. The White Basin is comprised of the Lovell Wash Member, ~14-12 Ma, of the Horse Spring Formation. The Lovell Wash Member contains siliciclastic and carbonate units that vary laterally and vertically throughout this area. This is a change from the fairly homogenous Bitter Ridge Limestone Member below and suggests a change in the style of faulting. To determine the faulting history, we mapped out marker beds, focusing on tuffs and limestone beds that form continuous, well-exposed outcrops in the area. We found abrupt stratigraphic thickening of ~50% across faults, documenting syndepositional faulting. We used dated tuffs to determine that this faulting developed from ~13.7-13.2 Ma. Secondly, we are working on a Laramide uplift project. We are testing the hypothesis that an area in the Kingman Uplift region was deformed by a Laramide age fault, prior to Miocene extensional deformation. We are using U-Th/He Apatite and K-Spar Multiple Diffusion Domain thermochronology, to determine the cooling histories of rocks on either side of the proposed fault. Both of these on-going research projects highlight the complex geology that is found in the Basin and Range province in the United States. Understanding this complex geology will help answer questions about the timing, driving forces, and processes associated with extensional and compressional events.

  2. Simulation of the Arid Climate of the Southern Great Basin Using a Regional Climate Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Filippo; Bates, Gary T.; Nieman, Steven J.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the development effort of a regional climate model (RCM)for the southern Great Basin, this paper present savalidation analysis of the climatology generated by a high-resolution RCM driven by observations. The RCM is aversion of the National Center for atmospheric Research-Pennsylvania State University mesoscale model, version 4 (MM4), modified for application to regional climate simulation. Two multiyear simulations, for the periods 1 January 1982 to 31 December 1983 and 1 January 1988 to 25 April 1989, were performed over the western United States with the RCM driven by European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analyses of observations. The model resolution is 60 km. This validation analysis is the first phase of a project to produce simulations of future climate scenarios over a region surrounding Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the only location currently being considered as a potential high-level nuclear-waste repository site.Model-produced surface air temperatures and precipitation were compared with observations from five southern Nevada stations located in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain. The seasonal cycles of temperature and precipitation were simulated well. Monthly and seasonal temperature biases were generally negative and largely explained by differences in elevation between the observing stations and the model topography. The model-simulated precipitation captured the extreme dryness of the Great Basin. Average yearly precipitation was generally within 30% of observed and the range of monthly precipitation amounts was the same as in the observations. Precipitation biases were mostly negative in the summer and positive in the winter. The number of simulated daily precipitation events for various precipitation intervals was within factors of 1.5-3.5 of observed. Overall, the model tended to overestimate the number of light precipitation events and underestimate the number of heavy precipitation events. At Yucca Mountain, simulated

  3. Chronological dating and tectonic implications of late Cenozoic volcanic rocks and lacustrine sequence in Oiyug Basin of southern Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction of uplift history of the Tibetan Plateau is crucial for understanding its environmental impacts. The Oiyug Basin in southern Tibet contains multiple periods of sedimentary sequences and volcanic rocks that span much of the Cenozoic and has great potential for further studying this issue. However, these strata were poorly dated. This paper presents a chronological study of the 145 m thick and horizontally-distributed lacustrine sequence using paleomagnetic method as well as a K-Ar dating of the underlying volcanic rocks. Based on these dating results, a chronostratigraphic framework and the basin-developmental history have been established for the past 15 Ma, during which three tectonic stages are identified. The period of 15-8.1 Ma is characterized by intense volcanic activities involving at least three major eruptions. Subsequently, the basin came into a tectonically quiescent period and a lacustrine sedimentary sequence was developed. Around 2.5 Ma, an N-S fault occurred across the southern margin of the basin, leading to the disappearance of the lake environment and the development of the Oiyug River. The Gyirong basin on northern slope of the Himalayas shows a similar basin developmental history and thus there is a good agreement in tectonic activities between the Himalayan and Gangdise orogenic belts. Therefore, the tectonic evolution stages experienced by the Oiyug Basin during the past 15 Ma could have a regional significance for southern Tibet. The chronological data obtained from this study may provide some constraints for further studies with regard to the tectonic processes and environmental changes in southern Tibetan Plateau.

  4. Strengthening Adaptation to Extreme Climate Events in Southwestern Amazonia: an Example from the Trinational Acre River Basin in the Madre de Dios/Peru - Acre/Brazil - Pando/Bolivia (MAP) Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. F.

    2015-12-01

    Southwestern Amazonia, where Bolivia, Brazil and Peru meet, faces numerous challenges to the sustainable utilization of land and water resources as the region experiences rapid population and economic growth, expanding agriculture, transportation and energy sectors, along with frequent flooding and droughts. It is also predicted to be one of the most susceptible areas for climate change in the coming decade. The Acre River Basin, one of the few trinational basins in Amazonia, lies at the center of the Madre de Dios Region (Peru), Acre State (Brazil) and Pando Department (Bolivia) or MAP Region. It covers approximately 7,500 km2 and its inhabitants range from indigenous groups avoiding contact with industrial society to more than 60,000 dwellers of a binational urban center. The basin incorporates most the challenges facing the region and this paper discusses steps underway to address the basin's vulnerability to climate-related threats. A trinational group of professionals used GIS databases and local knowledge to classify these threats and possible societal responses. To prioritize threats and to propose responses, this group adapted a method proposed by the Queensland Climate Change Centre of Excellence of Australia to develop climate risk matrices for assessing impacts, adaptation, risk and vulnerability. The three priority climate variables were prolonged and more frequent droughts, more intense flooding, and more days with temperatures > 35oC. The final matrix proposed two areas of concentration - 1) Reduce the vulnerability of communities to hydro-meteorological extreme events and 2) Protect and restore ecosystems that maintain critical water-related resources with actions in public policy, capacity-building, and immediate activities. These results are being incorporated into the Amazon Project of the Global Environment Fund of the United Nations Environment Program, administered by the Amazon Cooperation Treaty Organization (ACTO).

  5. Large lake basins of the southern High Plains: ground-water control of their origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, W.W.; Sanford, W.E.; Reeves, C.C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    We modify the deflation hypothesis by proposing that the calcrete caprock may never have been deposited in the areas now occupied by the basins. The absence of calcrete deposition is proposed to have resulted from high water tables caused by an increase in hydraulic gradient where aquifers thinned above bedrock highs. A high water table close to and/or intersecting the surface prevents deposition of calcrete, and thus, the uncemented surface would be more susceptible to deflation than the surrounding calcrete-covered areas after decline of the water table. The rise in water table associated with bedrock highs is documented by numerical simulation using boundary conditions and hydrologic parameters representative of the southern High Plains. -from Authors

  6. Effects of uranium development on erosion and associated sedimentation in southern San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Maurice E.

    1979-01-01

    A reconnaissance was made of some of the effects of uranium development on erosion and associated sedimentation in the southern San Juan Basin, where uranium development is concentrated. In general, the effects of exploration on erosion are minor, although erosion may be accelerated by the building of access roads, by activities at the drilling sites, and by close concentration of drilling sites. Areas where the greatest effects on erosion and sedimentation from mining and milling operations have occurred are: (1) in the immediate vicinity of mines and mills, (2) near waste piles, and (3) in stream channels where modifications, such as changes in depth have been caused by discharge of excess mine and mill water. Collapse of tailings piles could result in localized but excessive erosion and sedimentation.

  7. Estimating transmissivity and storage properties from aquifer tests in the Southern Lihue Basin, Kauai, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, Stephen B.

    1999-01-01

    Three to four different analysis methods were applied to the drawdown or recovery data from five constant-rate aquifer tests of 2 to 7 days in length to estimate transmissivity of rocks in the southern Lihue basin, Kauai, Hawaii. The wells penetrate rocks of the Koloa Volcanics and the underlying Waimea Canyon Basalt. Because the wells are located far apart and in previously unexplored areas, it is difficult to accurately define the aquifer or aquifers penetrated by the wells. Therefore, the aquifer tests were analyzed using a variety of curve-matching methods and only a range of possible values of transmissivity were determined. The results of a multiple-well aquifer test are similar to a single-well aquifer test done in the same area indicating that the single-well aquifer-test results are reasonable.

  8. Human environment and climate during the Middle Pleistocene in southern Italy (Boiano basin, Molise)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orain, R.; Lebreton, V.; Russo Ermolli, E.; Sémah, A.-M.; Nomade, S.; Shao, Q.; Bahain, J.-J.; Peretto, C.

    2012-04-01

    Palaeobotanical investigations undertaken on early prehistoric sites of Western Europe, as Pont-de-Lavaud (France, ca 1.2 - 1 Ma) and Ca' Belvedere di Monte Poggiolo (Italy, ca 1.2 - 0.8 Ma), indicate that hominins have settled in different types of environments. During the "Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT)", at about 1 to 0.6 Ma, the transition from 41-ka to 100-ka dominant climatic oscillations occurring within a long-term cooling trend is associated with an aridity crisis and strongly modified the structure of environments. Since the MPT, the specific climate and environment evolution of the southern Italy provided propitious conditions for a long-term human occupation even during glacial times and the density of prehistoric sites could probably be explained by the amount of sustainable environments. The human strategy of occupation of a territory probably was motivated by availabilities of resources for subsistence in the local ecosystems. Sites such as La Pineta (ca 600 ka), Notarchirico (ca 600 ka), San Nicola di Monteroduni (ca 400 ka) or Ceprano (ca 350 ka) testify to the preferential occupation of the valleys of the central and southern Apennines during this period. In this area, the Boiano basin (Molise, Italy) recorded a lacustrine and fluvio-palustrine sedimentation, with basal deposits older than 440 ka deduced from tephrochronology. Pollen analyse of the Boiano sequence aims to describe the evolution of vegetation and climates between OIS 13 and 9, at regional and micro-regional scales. The characteristics of the Boiano basin are enlightened within the progressive reduction of the deciduous forest diversity along the Middle Pleistocene. The main palaeoecological information consists of an important persistence of edaphic humidity during the glacial phases. The peculiar conditions recorded in the region could have constituted a refuge for arboreal flora during the Middle Pleistocene and provided subsistence resources to the animal and human communities.

  9. [Hyphessobrycon taphorni and H. eschwartzae (Teleostei: Characidae) two new species of fish in the basin of Madre de Dios river, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Alzate, Carlos A; Romin-Valencia, César; Ortega, Hernán

    2013-06-01

    Hyphessobrycon with 129 valid species, is a genus of fish that has a great diversity of species in the Neotropical ichthyofauna, reaches its greatest diversity in the Amazon basin with about 70% of these species, is highly desired by hobbyists because of their beauty and color, and are still meeting new species. We analyzed specimens from the Departamento de Ictiología, Museo de Historia Natural de la Universidad Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú (MUSM); and measurements of the specimens were taken point to point with digital calipers. Observations of bone and cartilage structures were made on cleared and stained (C&S) samples. The morphometric relationships between species using 21 variables were explored using a principal component analysis (PCA). Here we describe two new species, Hyphessobrycon taphorni and H. eschwartzae from the Madre de Dios River drainage, Peru. Hyphessobrycon taphorni sp. n. can be distinguished by the number of dorsal-fin rays (iii, 8), by the number of: pored lateral-line scales (4-5), teeth in the outer premaxillary row (1-2), teeth in the inner premaxillary row (7-8), by: the caudal-peduncle length (11.4-16.4% SL), number of lateral scales (28-29, except from H. loretoensis which has 29-30) and absence of a humeral spot (vs. present), it differs from H. loretoensis by the number of: scales between the lateral line and the anal fin origin (4 vs. 3) and maxillary teeth (2 vs. 3-4), and it differs from H. agulha by the number of branched pectoral-fin rays (11-12 vs. 9-10). Hyphessobrycon eschwartzae sp. n. is distinguished by the number of: simple anal-fin rays (iv), teeth on the dentary (13-15), teeth in the inner premaxillary row (6), teeth in the outer premaxillary row (3, except from H. heterorhabdus and H. loretoensis which have 3-4); it differs from H. loretoensis by the number of: pored lateral-line scales (7 vs. 9-10), scales between the lateral line and the dorsal-fin origin (5 vs. 3-4); it differs from H. agulha in the number of

  10. Ar/39Ar age spectrum analysis of detrital microclines from the southern San Joaquin Basin, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detrital microcline grains from sedimentary strata preserve a record of thermal evolution in the temperature range approx.= 1000 to 2000C which can be revealed by 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum analysis. Microcline separates from deep drill hole intersections with Eocene to Miocene sediments in the Basin and Tejon Blocks of the southern San Joaquin Valley, California, analysed by the age spectrum approach show radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) gradients that record both the slow cooling of the uplifting sediment source approx.= 65 Ma ago, and a recent thermal event. This information, in conjunction with the observation of fission track annealing in the coexisting apatites, allows estimation of the temperature-time conditions of this thermal event at about 1400C for approx.= 200 ka. Present and paleotemperature data is in accord with heating related to several kilometers of Pleistocene sediment deposition. Heat flow calculations suggest that this recent subsidence has depressed the thermal gradient from about 300C km-1 to the present apparent gradient of 240C km-1. 40Ar/39Ar analysis of detrital microcline crystals yields thermochronological information in the temperature-time range of petroleum maturation and provides this technique with potential as both a useful exploration tool and as a means of probing the fundamental geodynamic processes of basin evolution. (orig.)

  11. Magnitude-frequency distribution of submarine landslides in the Gioia Basin (southern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, D.; Chiocci, F.; Casalbore, D.; Ercilla, G.; de Urbina, J. Ortiz

    2016-07-01

    Regional inventories and magnitude-frequency relationships provide critical information about landslides and represent a first step in landslide hazard assessment. Despite this, the availability of accurate inventories in the marine environment remains poor because of the commonly low accessibility of high-resolution data at regional scales. Evaluating high-resolution bathymetric data spanning the time interval 2007-2011 for the Gioa Basin of the southern Tyrrhenian Sea yielded a landslide inventory of 428 events affecting an area of >85 km2 and mobilizing approximately 1.4 km3 of sediment. This is the first time that this area is studied in such detail, justifying comparison with other areas both onland and offshore. Statistical analyses revealed that the cumulative distribution of the dataset is characterized by two right-skewed probability distributions with a heavy tail. Moreover, evidence of a rollover for smaller landslide volumes is consistent with similar trends reported in other settings worldwide. This may reflect an observational limitation and the site-specific geologic factors that influence landslide occurrence. The robust validation of both power-law and log-normal probability distributions enables the quantification of a range of probabilities for new extreme events far from the background landslide sizes defined in the area. This is a useful tool at regional scales, especially in geologically active areas where submarine landslides can occur frequently, such as the Gioia Basin.

  12. Magnetic mineralogy analyses on greigite-bearing sediments with inconsistent magnetic polarity (Adana Basin, Southern Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucifora, S.; Cifelli, F.; Mattei, M.; Cosentino, D.; Sagnotti, L.; Roberts, A.

    2012-04-01

    A paleomagnetic study has been carried out, in the framework of the VAMP (Vertical Anatolian Movement Project) project, on 4 stratigraphic sections and 1 site from the Adana basin in the southern margin of the Anatolian Plateau. About 300 standard cylindrical samples have been analysed for paleomagnetism and rock magnetism. All the sections have been deposited in the upper Messinian"lago-mare" post-evaporitic event, which occurred in the Mediterranean basin, during the reverse polarity Chron C3r. Paleomagnetic results, presented in this work, are in contrast with these data, showing both normal and reverse polarities along the sections. Standard magnetic mineralogy investigations, integrated with SEM analyses and FORC diagrams, show that magnetite and ferrimagnetic iron sulphides (greigite) are the main magnetic carriers. Moreover, we find an interesting correlation between the magnetic mineralogy of the sediments and the magnetic polarities, being magnetite the magnetic carrier in the normal polarity samples and greigite in the reverse ones. Reversal and fold tests demonstrate that normal polarity samples have been subjected to a pervasive magnetic overprint and acquired their remanent magnetization after bedding tilt. Whereas samples with a reverse polarity acquired their remanent magnetization before bedding tilt, but after syn-sedimentary soft deformation. This work is proposed as a contribution aimed to improve the understanding of the relationship between the magnetic mineralogy and the remagnetization phenomena in order to avoid misinterpretation of magnetostratigraphic and paleomagnetic data.

  13. Controls on Suspended Sediment Concentrations and Turbidity within a Reforested, Southern Appalachian Headwater Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry R. Miller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Water quality data collected between 2007 and 2014 within the Allen Creek Watershed were used to: (1 determine the factors controlling the temporal variations in turbidity and suspended sediment concentration (SSC within a representative, high-gradient headwater basin in the Southern Appalachians; and (2 assess the recovery of water quality following extensive logging operations during the early to mid-1900s. Regression analysis suggests that suspended sediment is primarily derived from upland areas and variations in concentration reflect rainfall intensity and total event precipitation. Overall, SSC and turbidity were low in stream waters in comparison to both reference values for stable streams and more developed basins in the region. Some floods were characterized by high SSC values, but limited turbidity and vice versa. Differences in measured SSC and turbidity between storms reflect different controls on the two parameters, and the apparent influence of natural organic matter on turbidity during rainfall events that are incapable of transporting sediment to the channel via overland flow. Low SSC and turbidity values are presumably related to the reforestation of hillslopes and riparian buffers following the cessation of logging operations. They also are due to a historical reduction in the sedimentological connectivity of hillslopes and tributaries with the axial channel that occurred during logging operations.

  14. Biostratigraphy of a Paleocene-Eocene Foreland Basin boundary in southern Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqiao Wan; Xi Wang; Luba F.Jansa

    2010-01-01

    This study of the Paleocene-Eocene boundary within a foreland basin of southern Tibet,which was dominated by a carbonate ramp depositional environment, documents more complex environmental conditions than can be derived from studies of the deep oceanic environment. Extinction rates for larger foraminiferal species in the Zongpu-1 Section apply to up to 46% of the larger foraminiferal taxa.The extinction rate in southern Tibet is similar to rates elsewhere in the world, but it shows that the Paleocene fauna disappeared stepwise through the Late Paleocene, with Eocene taxa appearing abruptly above the boundary. A foraminifera turnover was identified between Members 3 and 4 of the Zongpu Formation-from the Miscellanea-Daviesina assemblage to an Orbitolites-Alveolina assemblage. The Paleocene and Eocene boundary is between the SBZ 4 and SBZ 5, where it is marked by the extinction of Miscellanea miscella and the first appearance of Alveolina ellipsodalis and a large number of Orbitolites.Chemostratigraphically, the δ13C values from both the Zongpu-1 and Zongpu-2 Sections show three negative excursions in the transitional strata, one in Late Paleocene, one at the boundary, and one in the early Eocene. The second negative excursion of δ13C, which is located at the P-E boundary, coincides with larger foraminifera overturn. These faunal changes and the observed δ13C negative excursions provide new evidence on environmental changes across the Paleocene-Eocene boundary in Tibet.

  15. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating from granitoids in southern basement of Songliao basin: Constraints on ages of the basin basement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO FuHong; XU WenLiang; YANG DeBin; PEI FuPing; LIU XiaoMing; HU ZhaoChu

    2007-01-01

    Seven LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb datings from granitoids in the southern basement of the Songliao basin were done in order to constrain the ages of the basin basement. The cathodoluminescence (CL) images of the zircons from seven granitoids indicate that they are euhedral-subhedral ones with striped absorption and obvious oscillatory zoning rims. The dating results show that a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age is 236±3 Ma for quartz diorite (sample No.T6-1) located in the western slope of the basin, that weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages are 319±1 Ma (2126 m) and 361±2 Ma (1994 m) for diorite (sample No.YC1-1) and granite (sample No.YC1-2) located in northern part of southeastern uplift of the basin, respectively, and that weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages are 161±5 Ma, 165±2 Ma, 165±1 Ma and 161±4 Ma for samples Q2-1, SN121, SN122, and SN72 granitoids located in southern part of southeastern uplift of the basin, respectively. The statistical results of ages suggest that the middle Jurassic granitoids constitute the main part of basement granitoids, and that the Hercynian and Indo-Sino magmatisms also occur in the basin basement. It is implied that the Songliao basin should be a rift one formed in the intracontinent or active continental margin settings in the late Mesozoic after the Middle Jurassic orogeny took place.

  16. Modeling of soil erosion and sediment transport in the East River Basin in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yping; Chen, Ji

    2012-01-01

    Soil erosion is a major global environmental problem that has caused many issues involving land degradation, sedimentation of waterways, ecological degradation, and nonpoint source pollution. Therefore, it is significant to understand the processes of soil erosion and sediment transport along rivers, and this can help identify the erosion prone areas and find potential measures to alleviate the environmental effects. In this study, we investigated soil erosion and identified the most seriously eroded areas in the East River Basin in southern China using a physically-based model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). We also introduced a classical sediment transport method (Zhang) into SWAT and compared it with the built-in Bagnold method in simulating sediment transport process along the river. The derived spatial soil erosion map and land use based erosion levels can explicitly illustrate the identification and prioritization of the critical soil erosion areas in this basin. Our results also indicate that erosion is quite sensitive to soil properties and slope. Comparison of Bagnold and Zhang methods shows that the latter can give an overall better performance especially in tracking the peak and low sediment concentrations along the river. We also found that the East River is mainly characterized by sediment deposition in most of the segments and at most times of a year. Overall, the results presented in this paper can provide decision support for watershed managers about where the best management practices (conservation measures) can be implemented effectively and at low cost. The methods we used in this study can also be of interest in sediment modeling for other basins worldwide.

  17. Modeling of soil erosion and sediment transport in the East River Basin in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiping; Chen, Ji

    2012-12-15

    Soil erosion is a major global environmental problem that has caused many issues involving land degradation, sedimentation of waterways, ecological degradation, and nonpoint source pollution. Therefore, it is significant to understand the processes of soil erosion and sediment transport along rivers, and this can help identify the erosion prone areas and find potential measures to alleviate the environmental effects. In this study, we investigated soil erosion and identified the most seriously eroded areas in the East River Basin in southern China using a physically-based model, Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). We also introduced a classical sediment transport method (Zhang) into SWAT and compared it with the built-in Bagnold method in simulating sediment transport process along the river. The derived spatial soil erosion map and land use based erosion levels can explicitly illustrate the identification and prioritization of the critical soil erosion areas in this basin. Our results also indicate that erosion is quite sensitive to soil properties and slope. Comparison of Bagnold and Zhang methods shows that the latter can give an overall better performance especially in tracking the peak and low sediment concentrations along the river. We also found that the East River is mainly characterized by sediment deposition in most of the segments and at most times of a year. Overall, the results presented in this paper can provide decision support for watershed managers about where the best management practices (conservation measures) can be implemented effectively and at low cost. The methods we used in this study can also be of interest in sediment modeling for other basins worldwide. PMID:23137981

  18. Determining Deep Basin Structure of the Hueco and southern Mesilla Bolsons, West Texas, Southern New Mexico and Northern Chihuahua Using Nonseismic Geophysical Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doser, D. I.; Avila, V.; Budhathoki, P.; Marrufo, S.; Montana, C. J.; Kaip, G.; Moncada, M.; Dena Ornelas, O.

    2012-12-01

    The Hueco and southern Mesilla bolsons are the primary groundwater source for much of the El Paso/Ciudad Juarez metropolitan region of over 1 million residents. The bolsons lie at the point where the strike of the southern Rio Grande rift changes from north-south to northwest-southeast, likely due to its interaction with pre-existing Mesozoic and Paleozoic structures. Tectonic activity continues with recent (< 750,000 years) movement along basin bounding and low level (M<4) seismicity. Over the past 4 years we have been using a conjunction of microgravity, magnetic, water well logs and electrical resistivity studies to image the complex structure of these basins within a heavily urbanized environment. These studies suggest the presence of several northwest-southeast striking cross faults within the southern Mesilla Bolson as well as an extensive subsurface andesite body related to the Cristo Rey laccolith. Intrabasin faults in the Hueco Bolson appear to cut the basin into at least 3 smaller subbasins and to control the boundary between fresh and saline water within the aquifer system beneath El Paso. We are also able to trace the East Franklins Mountain fault (last movement < 15,000 ya) at least 15 km south of the U.S.-Mexico border.

  19. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Peru. August - October 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Peru believes that the Speculative Resources of that country fall between 6,000 and 11,000 tonnes uranium. There has been no uranium production in Peru and there are no official estimates of uranium resources. Past exploration in Peru (dating from about 1952) has indicated a paucity of valid uranium occurrences and radioactive anomalies. Only recently (1980) have anomalous areas been identified, (Macusani-Picotani). The identified Speculative Resources are mainly in Late Tertiary ignimbrites and associated sediments in the high Andes of southern Peru. Geologically, there are direct parallels between these resources and deposits of the Los Frailes areas of neighbouring Bolivia. Other minor Speculative Resources may be present in calcretes developed from Tertiary volcanogenic sources over the Precambrian in the Pacific Coastal desert of southern Peru but no positive indications have been recognised. Hercynian sub-volcanic granites in the eastern cordillera of southern Peru may have some associated Speculative Resources both intra and extra granitic. No Speculative Potential could be identified in Permo-Triassic or Tertiary post tectonic continental sediments anywhere in Peru. Such potential may exist but further reconnaissance of the continental late Tertiary basins, with positive indications would be required before inclusion of potential in this category. Recent discoveries in the volcanogenic environment of southern Peru have been by carborne, helicopter borne and on on-foot reconnaissance of isolated areas. It is recommended that there be a more systematic, integrated study of the entire volcanic district assisted by volcanic petrographic examination. Assessment of the known occurrences requires immediate subsurface study by drilling and exploration audits to assess their continuity, grade variation and thickness. This phase will be significantly more expensive than previous exploration. Non-core drilling should supplement

  20. Seismicity induced petroleum migration: field and subsurface observations in Talara basin (northwestern Peru); Migracao de petroleo induzida por sismicidade: observacoes de campo e de subsuperficie na bacia de Talara (noroeste do Peru)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daudt, Jose Alfredo Borges; Pozo, Eloy Gerardo [Petrobras Energia Peru, Lima (Peru)], Emails: jdaudt@petrobras-usa.com, eloy.pozo@petrobras.com; Benedicto, Antonio [Universite Paris Sud XI (France). Lab. de Tectonique], Email: antonio.benedicto-esteban@u-psud.fr

    2009-05-15

    The objective of this communication is to report observations made in some outcrops of oil in the Quebrada Viejo, a lower affluent of the Quebrada Mogollon, before and after of the seismic event occurred on April 22, 2007 in Talara. Additionally, it was analyzed the data productions of the total fluids (water plus oil) of the 21 wells of the Lot X (area under concession of the PETROBRAS Energia Peru), in the day before, the day of the event and the day after of the seismic event in order to check for productive anomalies during the period.

  1. Abundance and Morphological Effects of Large Woody Debris in Forested Basins of Southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, A.; Comiti, F.; Lenzi, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    The Southern Andes mountain range represents an ideal location for studying large woody debris (LWD) in streams draining forested basins thanks to the presence of both pristine and managed woodland, and to the general low level of human alteration of stream corridors. However, no published investigations have been performed so far in such a large region. The investigated sites of this research are three basins (9-13 km2 drainage area, third-order channels) covered by Nothofagus forests: two of them are located in the Southern Chilean Andes (the Tres Arroyos in the Malalcahuello National Reserve and the Rio Toro within the Malleco Natural Reserve) and one basin lies in the Argentinean Tierra del Fuego (the Buena Esperanza basin, near the city of Ushuaia). Measured LWD were all wood pieces larger than 10 cm in diameter and 1 m in length, both in the active channel and in the adjacent active floodplain. Pieces forming log jams were all measured and the geometrical dimensions of jams were taken. Jam type was defined based on Abbe and Montgomery (2003) classification. Sediment stored behind log-steps and valley jams was evaluated approximating the sediment accumulated to a solid wedge whose geometrical dimensions were measured. Additional information relative to each LWD piece were recorded during the field survey: type (log, rootwad, log with rootwads attached), orientation to flow, origin (floated, bank erosion, landslide, natural mortality, harvest residuals) and position (log-step, in-channel, channel-bridging, channel margins, bankfull edge). In the Tres Arroyos, the average LWD volume stored within the bankfull channel is 710 m3 ha-1. The average number of pieces is 1,004 per hectare of bankfull channel area. Log-steps represent about 22% of all steps, whereas the elevation loss due to LWD (log-steps and valley jams) results in 27% loss of the total stream potential energy. About 1,600 m3 of sediment (assuming a porosity of 20%) is stored in the main channel

  2. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis (TEGA) of hyperarid soils doped with microorganisms from the Atacama Desert in southern Peru (Pampas de la Joya): Implications for the Phoenix Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; McKay, Chris

    TEGA is one of several instruments on board of the Phoenix Lander that will perform differential scanning calorimetry and evolved gas analysis of soil samples and ice, collected from the surface and subsurface at a northern landing site on Mars. TEGA is a combination of a high-temperature furnace and a mass spectrometer that will be use to analyze samples delivered to instrument via a robotic arm. The samples will be heated at a programmed ramp rate up to 1000° C and the power required for heating will be carefully and continuously monitored (scanning calorimetry). The evolved gases generated during the process will be analyzed with the evolved-gas analyzer (a magnetic sector mass spectrometer) in order to determine the composition of gases released as a function of temperature. Our laboratory has developed a sample characterization method using a pyrolizer integrated to a quadrupole mass spectrometer to support the interpretations of TEGA data. Here we examine the thermal and evolved gas properties of six types of hyperarid soils from the Pampas de La Joya southern Peru, a possible analog to Mars, which has been previously enriched with microorganisms (Salmonella thypimurium, Micrococcus luteus, and Candida albicans) to investigate the effect of soil matrix over TEGA response. Between 20 to 40 mg of soil pre-treated to 500° C for 24 hours to remove traces of organics, was mixed with or without 5mg biomass lyophilized (dry weight). Additionally 20 mg of each one microorganism were analyzed. The samples were placed in the pyrolizer that reached 1200° C at 1 hour. The volatiles released were transferred to the MS using helium as a carrier gas. The quadrupole MS was ran in scan mode from 40-350m/z. As expected, there were significant differences in the evolved gas behaviors for microorganism samples with or without a soil matrix under similar heating conditions. In addition, samples belonging to the most arid environments had significant differences compared with

  3. Thermally evolved gas analysis (TEGA) of hyperarid soils doped with microorganisms from the Atacama Desert in southern Peru: Implications for the Phoenix mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Navarro-González, Rafael; McKay, Christopher

    2009-07-01

    TEGA, one of several instruments on board of the Phoenix Lander, performed differential scanning calorimetry and evolved gas analysis of soil samples and ice, collected from the surface and subsurface at a northern landing site on Mars. TEGA is a combination of a high temperature furnace and a mass spectrometer (MS) that was used to analyze samples delivered to the instrument via a robotic arm. The samples were heated at a programmed ramp rate up to 1000 °C. The power required for heating can be carefully and continuously monitored (scanning calorimetry). The evolved gases generated during the process can be analyzed with the evolved gas analyzer (a magnetic sector mass spectrometer) in order to determine the composition of gases released as a function of temperature. Our laboratory has developed a sample characterization method using a pyrolyzer integrated to a quadrupole mass spectrometer to support the interpretations of TEGA data. Here we examine the evolved gas properties of six types of hyperarid soils from the Pampas de La Joya in southern Peru (a possible analog to Mars), to which we have added with microorganisms ( Salmonella typhimurium, Micrococcus luteus, and Candida albicans) in order to investigate the effect of the soil matrix on the TEGA response. Between 20 and 40 mg of soil, with or without ˜5 mg of lyophilized microorganism biomass (dry weight), were placed in the pyrolyzer and heated from room temperature to 1200 °C in 1 h at a heating rate of 20 °C/min. The volatiles released were transferred to a MS using helium as a carrier gas. The quadrupole MS was ran in scan mode from 10 to 200 m/z. In addition, ˜20 mg of each microorganism without a soil matrix were analyzed. As expected, there were significant differences in the gases released from microorganism samples with or without a soil matrix, under similar heating conditions. Furthermore, samples from the most arid environments had significant differences compared with less arid soils

  4. The oil and gas market in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroleum companies in Peru have scheduled investments of $298.5 million for exploration activities for year 2000, which is double the 1999 investment. The demand for oil in Peru is about 140,000 barrels per day, of which local production can supply 106,00 b/d. In 2000, imports of crude oil were worth approximately $447.7 million. The 18 sedimentary basins throughout Peru are estimated to contain 16 billion barrels of crude oil reserves. The greatest exploration activity took place in the Talara basin, while only limited exploration took place in the Maranon and Ucayali basins. The discovery of the Camisea and Aguaytia gas fields present significant potential for development, particularly for foreign investment. Upstream development of the $4.5 billion Camisea project will be undertaken by a consortium of international companies and is expected to be completed by 2004. In addition, Aguaytia Energy is working on a pipeline construction project worth up to $3 million. Canadian oil and gas companies will find opportunities to supply equipment and services for drilling wells, petroleum and natural gas pipelines, and production and storage facilities for petroleum and natural gas. United States, Argentina, Brazil, Japan and the European Union are the main foreign competitors in Peru. It is recommended that foreign companies make use of a local agent when conducting business in Peru. refs., tabs

  5. An Approach for Including Uncertainty in Integrated Water Resources Assessments within Large River Basins of Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D.

    2015-12-01

    There are many large basins in southern Africa that are mostly ungauged but may have some streamflow observations either on the main river or on tributaries. Many of the streamflow records are, however, of poor quality or impacted by largely unquantified and non-stationary development impacts. All water resources assessments are therefore uncertain and model setups are difficult to validate in traditional ways. The paper presents a method for practical uncertainty assessment using a semi-distributed (sub-basin) model. The method uses a 2-stage approach where the first stage involves obtaining 'behavioural' parameter sets to represent the incremental natural streamflow for each sub-basin. The criteria for 'behavioural' are based on a series of constraints on model output that can be developed from the available gauged data or from regional assessments of natural hydrological functioning. The second stage simulates the whole basin based on sampling the 'behavioural' incremental flow parameter sets, as well as samples of additional individual parameter values representing downstream routing parts of the model and development impacts. One of the perceived advantage of the method is that all the ensembles at the total basin outlet are made up of behavioural inputs for all sub-basins. The method is also flexible in terms of the uncertainty range of the constraints, which might be expected to be narrow (low uncertainty) in well gauged sub-basins, or areas where our understanding of flow regime characteristics is good, but much wider (higher uncertainty) in other parts of the basin. The paper briefly explains the approach and discusses some of the issues associated with its application using examples from southern Africa.

  6. Description of Lutzomyia (Trichophoromyia) nautaensis n. sp. (Diptera: Psychodidae) from the Peruvian Amazon Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Roberto; Lopez, Victor; Cardenas, Roldan; Requena, Edwin

    2015-07-01

    A new species of sand fly, which we describe as Lutzomyia (Trichophoromyia) nautaensis n. sp., was collected in the northern Peruvian Amazon Basin. In this region of Peru, cutaneous leishmaniasis is transmitted primarily by anthropophilic sand flies; however, zoophilic sand flies of the subgenus Trichophoromyia may also be incriminated in disease transmission. Detection of Leishmania spp. in Lutzomyia auraensis Mangabeira captured in the southern Peruvian Amazon indicates the potential of this and other zoophilic sand flies for human disease transmission, particularly in areas undergoing urban development. Herein, we describe Lutzomyia (Trichophoromyia) nautaensis n. sp., and report new records of sand flies in Peru. PMID:26335468

  7. Permian continental basins in the Southern Alps (Italy) and peri-mediterranean correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinis, Giuseppe; Perotti, Cesare R.; Ronchi, Ausonio

    2012-01-01

    The Late Carboniferous to Permian continental successions of the Southern Alps can be subdivided into two main tectono-sedimentary Cycles, separated by a marked unconformity sealing a Middle Permian time gap, generally estimated at over 10 Ma. The lower cycle (1), between the Variscan crystalline basement and the Early Permian, is mainly characterised by fluvio-lacustrine and volcanic deposits of calc-alkaline acidic-to-intermediate composition, which range up to a maximum thickness of more than 2,000 m. The upper cycle (2), which is devoid of volcanics, is mostly dominated through the Mid?-Late Permian by alluvial sedimentation which covered the previous basins and the surrounding highs, giving rise to the subaerial Verrucano Lombardo-Val Gardena (Gröden) red-beds, up to about 800 m thick. The palaeontological record from the terrigenous deposits of both the above cycles consists mainly of macro- and microfloras and tetrapod footprints. The age of the continental deposits is widely discussed because of the poor chronological significance of a large number of fossils which do not allow reliable datings; however, some sections are also controlled by radiometric calibrations. The comparison with some selected continental successions in southern Europe allows to determine their evolution and set up correlations. A marked stratigraphic gap shows everywhere between the above-mentioned Cycles 1 and 2. As in the Southern Alps, the gap reaches the greatest extent during the Mid-Permian, near the Illawarra Reversal geomagnetic event (265 Ma). In western Europe, however, such as in Provence and Sardinia, the discussed gap persists upwardly to Late Permian and Early Triassic or slightly younger times, i.e. to the onset of the "Alpine sedimentary Cycle", even though in northeastern Spain (Iberian Ranges, Balearic Islands) this gap results clearly interrupted by late Guadalupian-Lopingian deposits. The above two major tectonosedimentary cycles reflect, in our view, two main

  8. Low flows and reservoir management for the Durance River basin (Southern France) in the 2050s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauquet, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The Durance River is one of the major rivers located in the Southern part of France. Water resources are under high pressure due to significant water abstractions for human uses within and out of the natural boundaries of the river basin through an extended open channel network. Water demands are related to irrigation, hydropower, drinking water, industries and more recently water management has included water needs for recreational uses as well as for preserving ecological services. Water is crucial for all these activities and for the socio-economic development of South Eastern France. Both socio-economic development and population evolution will probably modify needs for water supply, irrigation, energy consumption, tourism, industry, etc. In addition the Durance river basin will have to face climate change and its impact on water availability that may question the sustainability of the current rules for water allocation. The research project R²D²-2050 "Risk, water Resources and sustainable Development within the Durance river basin in 2050" aims at assessing future water availability and risks of water shortage in the 2050s by taking into account changes in both climate and water management. R²D²-2050 is partially funded by the French Ministry in charge of Ecology and the Rhône-Méditerranée Water Agency. This multidisciplinary project (2010-2014) involves Irstea, Electricité de France (EDF), the University Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris), LTHE (CNRS), the Société du Canal de Provence (SCP) and the research and consultancy company ACTeon. A set of models have been developed to simulate climate at regional scale (given by 330 projections obtained by applying three downscaling methods), water resources (provided by seven rainfall-runoff models forced by a subset of 330 climate projections), water demand for agriculture and drinking water, for different sub basins of the Durance River basin upstream of Mallemort under present day and under future conditions

  9. Identification of hydrogeochemical processes in groundwater of Dawa River basin, southern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldemariyam, Fikadu; Ayenew, Tenalem

    2016-08-01

    Dawa River basin in southern Ethiopia is covered by volcanic, basement, and sedimentary rocks. Locating good quality groundwater is a challenge in most parts of the basin. Statistical analysis and graphical plots of 94 hydrochemical data of groundwater were used as a main tool to acquire an insight into the major processes that control groundwater chemistry. In the volcanic terrain groundwater is dilute (mean total dissolved solids (TDS): 152 mg/l), while salinity is the highest in the sedimentary terrain (mean TDS: 1750 mg/l). NO3 (-) varies from below the detection limit to 433 mg/l NO3 (-). In 26 % of the water samples, nitrate concentration is above the human-affected value, 5 mg/l NO3 (-). In 6 % of the samples, NO3 (-) concentration is above the limit recommended in drinking water, 50 mg/l NO3 (-), by WHO. Concentration range of the other major ions is also high and hydrochemical water types are diverse, suggesting the effect of various hydrogeochemical processes on the water chemistry. Chemical data analysis revealed that in the volcanic and most parts of the basement terrains silicate hydrolysis is the dominant process. Gypsum dissolution is the main process in the sedimentary terrain. Dissolution of gypsum is also important at few locations along dry riverbeds in the semiarid area where the effect of evaporation on the water chemistry is considerable. Loading of factors with K(+) and SO4 (2-), K(+) and NO3 (-), and NO3 (-) and correlation of SO4 (2-) with Cl(-), along with the observed high nitrate concentration, indicate the effect of surface contamination sources on the water quality. PMID:27456694

  10. Austrolebias varzeae, a new annual fish from the upper rio Uruguay basin, southern Brazil (Cyprinodontiformes: Rivulidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson J. E. M. Costa

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Austrolebias varzeae n. sp. is described from rio da Várzea floodplains, upper rio Uruguay basin, southern Brazil. It seems to be closely related to A. carvalhoi (Myers, with which it shares a similar color pattern of male and an apomorphic morphology of the autopalatine. The new species differs from A. carvalhoi by having more anal-fin rays in males and more caudal-fin rays. Austrolebias varzeae is distinguished from all other species of the genus by a unique color pattern, in which there are three distinctively darker and narrower bars on the anterior portion of male flank. Putative close relationships between A. varzeae and A. carvalhoi suggest a closely related biogeographic history between upper Uruguay and upper Iguaçu River basins, corroborated by a biogeographic pattern of the anablepid genus Jenynsia.Austrolebias varzeae sp. n. é descrita da várzea do rio da Várzea, bacia do rio Uruguai superior, sul do Brasil. Ela parece estar estreitamente aparentada a A. carvalhoi, com a qual compartilha um padrão de colorido similar e uma morfologia apomórfica do autopalatino. A nova espécie difere de A. carvalhoi por possuir mais raios na nadadeira anal de machos e mais raios na nadadeira caudal. Austrolebias varzeae se distingue de todas as espécies do gênero por um padrão de colorido exclusivo, no qual há três barras distintivamente mais estreitas e mais escuras na porção anterior do flanco do macho. As supostas estreitas relações de parentesco entre A. varzeae e A. carvalhoi sugerem uma história biogeográfica intimamente relacionada entre as bacias do rio Uruguai e do rio Iguaçu superiores, corroborada por um padrão biogeográfico do gênero anablepídeo Jenynsia.

  11. Nutrient maximums related to low oxygen concentrations in the southern Canada Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Ming-ming; SHI Jiuxin; LU Yong; CHEN Jianfang; GAO Guoping; WU Jingfeng; ZHANG Haisheng

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of nutrient maximums at 70~200 m occurred only in the region of the Canada Basin among the world oceans. The prevailing hypothesis was that the direct injection of the low-temperature high-nutrient brines from the Chukchi Sea shelf (<50 m) in winter provided the nutrient maximums. However, we found that there are five problems in the direct injection process. Formerly Jin et al. considered that the formation of nutrient maximums can be a process of locally long-term regeneration. Here we propose a regeneration-mixture process. Data of temperature, salinity, oxygen and nutrients were collected at three stations in the southern Canada Basin during the summer 1999 cruise. We identified the cores of the surface, near-surface, potential temperature maximum waters and Arctic Bottom Water by the diagrams and vertical profiles of salinity, potential temperature, oxygen and nutrients. The historical 129Ⅰ data indicated that the surface and near-surface waters were Pacific-origin, but the waters below the potential temperature maximum core depth was Atlantic-origin. Along with the correlation of nutrient maximums and very low oxygen contents in the near-surface water, we hypothesize that, the putative organic matter was decomposed to inorganic nutrients; and the Pacific water was mixed with the Atlantic water in the transition zone. The idea of the regeneration-mixture process agrees with the historical observations of no apparent seasonal changes, the smooth nutrient profiles, the lowest saturation of CaCO3 above 400 m, low rate of CFC-11 ventilation and 3H-3He ages of 8~18 a around the nutrient maximum depths.

  12. Natural gas qualities in the Southern Permian basin; Die Erdgasqualitaeten im suedlichen Permbecken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerling, P.; Kockel, F. [BGR, Hannover (Germany); Lokhorst, A.; Geluk, M.C. [TNO, Haarlem (Netherlands); Nicholson, R.A. [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Laier, T. [Danmarks og Groenlands Geologiske Undersoegelse, Kopenhagen (Denmark); Pokorski, J. [Panstwowy Instytut Geologiczny, Warsaw (Poland)

    1998-12-31

    There is a substantial amount of molecular and isotopic gas data in the literature but mostly in the archives of companies and geological services. As the geological services of most European countries traditionally contain (confidential and non-confidential) data on geology and resources these institutions from Great Britain, the Netherlands, Denmark, Poland and Germany decided to compile molecular and isotopic natural gas data from the area of the Southern European Permian basin. The partially EU-subsidised project was carried out between 1994 and 1997 (LOKHORST ed. 1998) The atlas is based on existing data and also on newly determined molecular and isotopic gas parameters. Ring analyses of national and international standard gases ensure the quality and comparability of the data thus obtained. The aim of the ``stocktaking`` of natural gas was to describe the gas qualities from the Southern North Sea in the West to the Eastern borders of Poland, to characterise them genetically and to relate the to the geological environment. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein substantieller Anteil von molekularen und isotopischen Gasdaten existiert, teilweise in der Literatur, vor allem aber in den Archiven der Firmen und der geologischen Dienste. Da die geologischen Dienste der meisten europaeischen Laender traditionell (oeffentliche und vertrauliche) Daten ueber die Geologie und Rohstoffe vorhalten, haben sich diese Institutionen aus Grossbritanien, den Niederlanden, Daenemark, Polen und Deutschlands entschlossen, molekulare und isotopische Erdgasdaten aus dem Bereich des suedlichen europaeischen Permbeckens zu kompilieren. Das partiell von der EU gefoerderte Projekt wurde in den Jahren 1994 bis 1997 durchgefuehrt (LOKHORST ed. 1998). Ausser auf bereits vorhandenen Daten beruht der Atlas auf etwa 200 Neu-Bestimmungen molekularer und isotopischer Gasparameter. Ringanalysen nationaler und internationeler Standardgase gewaehrleisteten die Qualitaet und die Vergleichbarkeit der gewonnenen

  13. Urbanization dramatically altered the water balances of a paddy field dominated basin in Southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rice paddy fields provide important ecosystem services (e.g., food production, water retention, carbon sequestration to a large population globally. However, these benefits are declining as a result of rapid environmental and socioeconomic transformations characterized by population growth, urbanization, and climate change in many Asian countries. This case study examined the responses of streamflow and watershed water balances to the decline of rice paddy fields due to urbanization in the Qinhuai River Basin in southern China where massive industrialization has occurred in the region during the past three decades. We found that streamflow increased by 58% and evapotranspiration (ET decreased by 23% during 1986–2013 as a result of an increase in urban areas of three folds and reduction of rice paddy field by 27%. Both highflows and lowflows increased significantly by about 28% from 2002 to 2013. The increases in streamflow were consistent with the decreases in ET and leaf area index monitored by independent remote sensing MODIS data. The reduction in ET and increase in streamflow was attributed to the large cropland conversion that overwhelmed the effects of regional climate warming and climate variability. Converting traditional rice paddy fields to urban use dramatically altered land surface conditions from a water-dominated to a human-dominated landscape, and thus was considered as one of the extreme types of contemporary hydrologic disturbances. The ongoing large-scale urbanization in the rice paddy-dominated regions in the humid southern China, and East Asia, will likely elevate stormflow volume, aggravate flood risks, and intensify urban heat island effects. Understanding the linkage between land use change and changes in hydrological processes is essential for better management of urbanizing watersheds.

  14. Urbanization dramatically altered the water balances of a paddy field dominated basin in Southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, L.; Sun, G.; Liu, Y.; Wan, J.; Qin, M.; Qian, H.; Liu, C.; John, R.; Fan, P.; Chen, J.

    2015-02-01

    Rice paddy fields provide important ecosystem services (e.g., food production, water retention, carbon sequestration) to a large population globally. However, these benefits are declining as a result of rapid environmental and socioeconomic transformations characterized by population growth, urbanization, and climate change in many Asian countries. This case study examined the responses of streamflow and watershed water balances to the decline of rice paddy fields due to urbanization in the Qinhuai River Basin in southern China where massive industrialization has occurred in the region during the past three decades. We found that streamflow increased by 58% and evapotranspiration (ET) decreased by 23% during 1986-2013 as a result of an increase in urban areas of three folds and reduction of rice paddy field by 27%. Both highflows and lowflows increased significantly by about 28% from 2002 to 2013. The increases in streamflow were consistent with the decreases in ET and leaf area index monitored by independent remote sensing MODIS data. The reduction in ET and increase in streamflow was attributed to the large cropland conversion that overwhelmed the effects of regional climate warming and climate variability. Converting traditional rice paddy fields to urban use dramatically altered land surface conditions from a water-dominated to a human-dominated landscape, and thus was considered as one of the extreme types of contemporary hydrologic disturbances. The ongoing large-scale urbanization in the rice paddy-dominated regions in the humid southern China, and East Asia, will likely elevate stormflow volume, aggravate flood risks, and intensify urban heat island effects. Understanding the linkage between land use change and changes in hydrological processes is essential for better management of urbanizing watersheds.

  15. COCORP profiling across the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen: Overthrusting of the Wichita Mountains and compression within the Anadarko Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, J. A.; Good, R.; Oliver, J. E.; Brown, L. D.; Kaufman, S.

    1983-02-01

    COCORP (Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling) deep reflection profiles recorded across the Wichita Mountains and Anadarko Basin suggest that significant crustal shortening occurred in the final stages of the evolution of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. The crystalline rocks of the Wichita Mountains were thrust in Pennsylvanian time northeastward over sedimentary rocks of the Anadarko Basin along a series of faults with moderate (average 30° to 40°) and southwesterly dips. These faults can be traced possibly as deep as 20 to 24 km. Listric thrust faults and hanging-wall anticlines developed in the sedimentary rocks of the basin. These features contrast with conventional interpretations of Pennsylvanian structures as the result of predominantly vertical movements along high-angle faults, and they suggest that Pennsylvanian downwarping of the Anadarko Basin was at least partially due to thrust loading. Truncations of reflections from Cambrian-Ordovician rocks in the deepest part of the basin suggest normal faulting, which would support ideas of an early extensional stage in the aulacogen cycle. The distinctive Precambrian layering seen on earlier COCORP data recorded south of the Wichita Mountains cannot be recognized under the Anadarko Basin, and the Proterozoic basin containing that layering may have been bounded on its north side by a Precambrian fault. This inferred fault was probably twice reactivated during formation of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen—once during late Precambrian(?)-Early Cambrian extension, and again during Pennsylvanian compression. The popular view that aulacogens originated from radial rifting of updomed, homogeneous continental crust is probably too simplified, and a more important constraint on their location and development may be the nature of pre-existing lines of weakness. *Present address: Department of Earth Sciences, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB3 OEZ, England

  16. Cross-basin heterogeneity in lanternfish (family Myctophidae) assemblages and isotopic niches (δ13C and δ15N) in the southern Tasman Sea abyssal basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, A. J.; Kloser, R. J.

    2012-11-01

    A cross-basin (longitudinal) study of lanternfishes in the southern Tasman Sea abyssal basin during the austral winter of 2008 and 2009 found that mean biomass in the Western sector was higher than that in the Eastern sector, corresponding with cross-basin patterns in oceanographic heterogeneity and productivity. Dominant species over the abyssal basin differed from those previously recorded over the neighbouring continental slope. Vertical biomass profiles indicated diffuse night-time distributions in the Central sector and extensive diel vertical migrations in the Eastern sector. In the Western sector, macrocrustacean δ13C values were significantly higher, and δ15N significantly lower, than those in the Eastern sector. The results indicate a cross-basin difference in the primary productivity environment and 15N enrichment at the base of the foodweb. The cross-basin pattern in lanternfish δ15N values mirrored that for macrocrustaceans and was not correlated with standard length. Lanternfish δ13C values did not differ between sectors, but there were depth-wise differences, with values in the shallowest stratum (0-200 m) significantly higher than those in the deepest stratum (800-1000 m). Calculated trophic levels (TLs) of lanternfishes spanned the third trophic level and marked niche segregation was evident in the Eastern (mean TL 3.0-3.9) and Central (mean TL 2.5-3.6) sectors. Together, the results suggest that the Eastern and Western sectors are distinct sub-basin scale pelagic habitats, with implications for ecosystem modelling and future monitoring.

  17. Accelerated water savings and demand growth for farm outputs: impacts on the economy of the southern Murray-Darling Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Glyn Wittwer

    2012-01-01

    It is possible that water efficiency in irrigation agriculture may improve substantially over the next decade or two. At the same time, worsening agricultural land and water scarcities worldwide may not be matched by agricultural productivity growth. This means that there may be strong growth in export demand for agricultural and food products in major agricultural nations. This study uses TERM-H2O, a dynamic CGE model with considerable detail in the southern Murray-Darling Basin, to examine ...

  18. Biomonitoring recycled water in the Santa Ana River Basin in southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xin; Carney, Michael; Hinton, David E; Lyon, Stephen; Woodside, Greg; Duong, Cuong N; Kim, Sang-Don; Schlenk, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The Santa Ana River (SAR) is the primary source of groundwater recharge for the Orange County Groundwater Basin in coastal southern California. Approximately 85% base flow in the SAR originates from wastewater treatment plants operated by three dischargers. An on-line, flow-through bioassay using Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a means of judging potential public health impacts was employed to evaluate the water quality of the surface water and shallow groundwater originating from the SAR. Three chronic (3-4.5 mo) exposures using orange-red (outbred, OR) and see-through (color mutant, ST-II) Japanese medaka as bioindicators were conducted to evaluate endocrinologic, reproductive, and morphologic endpoints. No statistically significant differences in gross morphological endpoints, mortality, gender ratios, and vitellogenin induction were observed in fish from SAR groundwater treatment compared to the group tested in solute reconstituted reverse osmosis-treated or granular activated carbon (GAC)-treated control waters. Significant differences were observed in egg reproduction and the time to hatch in SAR groundwater; however, total hatchability was not significantly lower. To evaluate the estrogenic activity of the surfacewater source of the groundwater, SAR surface water was evaluated for vitellogenin and gonadal histopathology in juvenile medaka with no effects observed. These results demonstrate that OR Japanese medaka may be a sensitive strain as an on-line monitor to predict potential impacts of water quality, but further studies are needed to elicit causative agents within the water mixture. PMID:18080901

  19. Selective chemical degradation of kerogen from Nenjiang Formation of the southern Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG; YongQiang; WANG; YongQuan; WANG; YanMei

    2007-01-01

    A sequential selective chemical degradation has been performed on the kerogen from the Nenjiang Formation of the southern Songliao Basin by using a series of mild chemical degradations (alkaline hydrolysis, cleavage of ether-bonds and sulfur-bonds, and ruthenium tetroxide (RuO4) oxidation). Subsequently, the GC-MS analyses are carried out on different degradation products. The results show that chemical degradations can release a great number of GC/MS-determinable biomarkers from insoluble kerogen, such as, alkaline hydrolysis products mainly comprise n-alkanes, fatty acids and alkanols; thiophene compounds are predominantly ether-bound to kerogen matrix; the products from the cleavage of sulfur-sulfur and sulfur-carbon bonds in the kerogen include fatty acids, alkanols and some n-alkanes with high carbon numbers; RuO4 oxidation products are predominantly monocarboxylic acids and α,ω-dicarboxylic acids. The distributions of main degradation products indicate that organic matter in this kerogen is predominantly derived from algae and bacteria, and that small amounts of high plant-derived organic matter are possibly combined into kerogen matrix at the late stage by sulfur bonds and other means. This study will provide an important approach for further discussing sources of organic matter in source rocks and their depositional paleoenvironments.

  20. Geochemical processes controlling the groundwater quality in lower Palar river basin, southern India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Senthilkumar; L Elango

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogeochemical study of groundwater was carried out in a part of the lower Palar river basin, southern India to determine the geochemical processes controlling the groundwater quality. Thirty-nine groundwater samples were collected from the study area and analysed for pH, Eh, EC, Ca, Mg, Na, K, HCO3, CO3, Cl and SO4. The analysed parameters of the groundwater in the study area were found to be well within the safe range in general with respect to the Bureau of Indian Standards for drinking water except for few locations. The results of these analyses were used to identify the geochemical processes that are taking place in this region. Cation exchange and silicate weathering are the important processes controlling the major ion distribution of the study area. Mass balance reaction model NETPATH was used to assess the ion exchange processes. High concentration of Ca in groundwater of the study area is due to the release of Ca by aquifer material and adsorption of Na due to ion exchange processes. Groundwater of the study area is suitable for drinking and irrigation purposes except for few locations.

  1. Southern Great Basin seismological data report for 1981 and preliminary data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earthquake data for the calendar year 1981 are reported for earthquakes occurring within and adjacent to the southern Great Basin seismograph network. Locations, magnitudes, and selected focal mechanisms for these events and events from prior years of network operations are presented and discussed in relation to the geologic framework of the region. These data are being collected to aid in the evaluation of the seismic hazard to a potential repository site at Yucca Mountain in the southwestern Nevada Test Site. The regional stress field orientation, as inferred from focal mechanisms, is characterized by a northwest-directed least compressive stress and a northeast-directed greatest compressive stress. We infer from this stress orientation that faults of north to northeast trend are most susceptible to slip. Faults of this orientation exist within the Yucca Mountain block, but they probably have not moved significantly in the last 500,000 years. Yucca Mountain lies within a fairly large area of relatively low level seismicity extending west to the Funeral Mountains, south of the Black Mountains and Nopah Range, and southeast to the Spring Mountains. One M 1.7 earthquake has been located in the Yucca Mountain block in about 1 year of intense monitoring. At present somewhat conflicting geologic, seismologic, and stress evidence hinder definitive conclusions about the seismic hazard at the proposed repository site. 36 references, 18 figures, 1 table

  2. Proterozoic basin in the southern Midcontinent of the United States revealed by COCORP deep seismic reflection profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, J. A.; Brown, L. D.; Steiner, D.; Oliver, J. E.; Kaufman, S.; Denison, R. E.

    1981-12-01

    COCORP deep crustal seismic profiles in southwestern Oklahoma show strong, persistent, continuous, and undeformed layering in the basement over an area probably very much greater than 2,500 km2. Such layering is very unusual, judging by COCORP experience with basement rocks elsewhere in the United States. The data can be interpreted as representing a Proterozoic basin filled with clastic sedimentary and felsic volcanic rocks 7 to 10 km thick, whose base lies 10 to 13 km deep. These rocks are believed, on the basis of sparse evidence from regional geology, to have been deposited or extruded about 1,200 to 1,400 m.y. ago, and some of them may now be metamorphosed. This basin lies on the south side of the Wichita Mountains, under the Paleozoic Hardeman Basin, and is similar in depth to the Paleozoic Anadarko Basin north of the mountains. The deep basement layering is truncated on the south side of the Wichita Mountains, probably by Precambrian faults in conjunction with granitic intrusions. Pennsylvanian compression probably reactivated these Precambrian trends. Extensive Precambrian basin deposits in this area were unexpected, on the basis of evidence from sparse well control, and reports of other layered basement reflections elsewhere in the southern Midcontinent suggest that Precambrian basins may be an important feature of this region. Simple models for the evolution of southwestern Oklahoma as an aulacogen must be reformulated in the light of these new data.

  3. Paleoaltimetry of the Oiyug Basin, southern Tibet using clumped-isotope paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbot, M. I.; Rowley, D. B.; Currie, B. S.; Colman, A. S.; He, B.; Olack, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present new paleoelevation estimates of the Oiyug Basin of the southern Tibetan Plateau during the mid-Miocene to Pliocene using carbonate Δ47 clumped isotope and conventional δ18O paleoaltimetry. Δ47 reflects the statistical overabundance of 13C-18O bonds in multiply-substituted isotopologues of CO2 generated from phosphoric acid digestion of carbonate minerals (Eiler, 2007). Paleoelevation estimates inform geodynamic models of the earth's surface response to climate, tectonics, and erosion at high elevations (Clark, 2007). Commonly applied techniques for reconstructing paleoelevation histories are based on paleobotany (paleoenthalpy derived from floral physiognomy, e.g. Spicer et al., 2003) the oxygen isotope record of meteoric and pedogenic minerals (e.g. Chamberlain and Poage, 2000), and compound specific δD of organic matter (Polissar et al. 2009). The carbonate clumped isotope paleothermometer provides independent constraints on both the temperature and isotopic composition of ancient surface waters (Ghosh et al., 2006a), making it a potentially powerful paleoaltimeter (Ghosh et al., 2006b, Quade et al., 2007) when the original isotopic signature is preserved. A burial history reconstructed from lipid-δD measurements in the Oiyug Basin suggests that these carbonates have not been buried, and give us high confidence that the carbonates are unaltered and retain their primary isotopic signature. This study tests the use of multiply substituted CO2 isotopologues as a paleoaltimeter for the Tibetan Plateau. We will obtain independent paleoelevation estimates from Δ47 temperatures to test our hypothesis that the Oiyug Basin has remained high (~5300-4600 meters) for the past 15 million years. Chamberlain, C.P., and M. A. Poage, 2000, Reconstructing the paleotopography of mountain belts from the isotopic composition of authigenic minerals, Geology, 28, 115-118. Eiler, J.M., 2007, 'Clumped-isotope' geochemistry-The study of naturally occurring multiply

  4. A review of the stratigraphy and sedimentary environments of the Karoo-aged basins of Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. M. H.; Eriksson, P. G.; Botha, W. J.

    1993-02-01

    The Karoo Basin of South Africa was one of several contemporaneous intracratonic basins in southwestern Gondwana that became active in the Permo-Carboniferous (280 Ma) and continued to accumulate sediments until the earliest Jurassic, 100 million years later. At their maximum areal extent, during the early Permian, these basins covered some 4.5 million km 2. The present outcrop area of Karoo rocks in southern Africa is about 300 000 km 2 with a maximum thickness of some 8000 m. The economic importance of these sediments lies in the vast reserves of coal within the Ecca Group rocks of northern and eastern Transvaal and Natal, South Africa. Large reserves of sandstone-hosted uranium and molybdenum have been proven within the Beaufort Group rocks of the southern Karoo trough, although they are not mineable in the present market conditions. Palaeoenvironmental analysis of the major stratigraphic units of the Karoo succession in South Africa demonstrates the changes in depositional style caused by regional and localized tectonism within the basin. These depocentres were influenced by a progressive aridification of climate which was primarily caused by the northward drift of southwestern Gondwana out of a polar climate and accentuated by the meteoric drying effect of the surrounding land masses. Changing palaeoenvironments clearly influenced the rate and direction of vertebrate evolution in southern Gondwana as evidenced by the numerous reptile fossils, including dinosaurs, which are found in the Karoo strata of South Africa, Lesotho, Namibia and Zimbabwe. During the Late Carboniferous the southern part of Gondwana migrated over the South Pole resulting in a major ice sheet over the early Karoo basin and surrounding highlands. Glacial sedimentation in upland valleys and on the lowland shelf resulted in the Dwyka Formation at the base of the Karoo Sequence. After glaciation, an extensive shallow sea covered the gently subsiding shelf, fed by large volumes of meltwater

  5. Peru : Social Safety Nets in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2007-01-01

    The report argues that the Peru's Social Safety Net (SSN) reform process needs to be anchored to a coherent national social safety net and poverty reduction strategy. The report suggests that the SSN interventions should be differentiated, as appropriate, between the urban and rural parts of Peru. For instance, workfare programs to deal with cyclical unemployment only make sense in urban a...

  6. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert D. Hatcher

    2004-05-31

    This report summarizes the second-year accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employs the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempts to characterize the T-P parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempts to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is working with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) is geochemically characterizing the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Second-year results include: All current milestones have been met and other components of the project have been functioning in parallel toward satisfaction of year-3 milestones. We also have been effecting the ultimate goal of the project in the dissemination of information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky have much greater extensibility than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that is generating considerable exploration interest. If this structure is productive, it will be one of the largest structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician

  7. Uncovering the diversity in the Amazophrynella minuta complex: integrative taxonomy reveals a new species of Amazophrynella (Anura, Bufonidae) from southern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Rommel R; Chaparro, Juan C; Carvalho, Vinícius Tadeu De; Ávila, Robson W; Farias, Izeni Pires; Hrbek, Tomas; Gordo, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    A new species of the genus Amazophrynella (Anura, Bufonidae) is described from the departments of Madre de Dios, Cusco and Junin in Peru. An integrative taxonomy approach is used. A morphological diagnosis, morphometrics comparisons, description of the advertisement call, and the phylogenetic relationships of the new species are provided. Amazophrynella javierbustamantei sp. n. differs from other species of Amazophrynella by: intermediate body-size (snout-vent length 14.9 mm in males, n = 26 and 19.6 mm in females, n = 20), tuberculate skin texture of body, greatest hand length of the Amazophrynella spp. (3.6 mm in males, n = 26 and 4.6 mm in females, n = 20), venter coloration yellowish, tiny rounded black points covering the venter, and thirteen molecular autapomorphies in the 16S RNA gene. Its distribution varies from 215 to 708 m a.s.l. This discovery highlights the importance of the remnant forest in preserving the biodiversity in Peru, and increase in seven the species formally described in the genus Amazophrynella. PMID:27047239

  8. Uncovering the diversity in the Amazophrynella minuta complex: integrative taxonomy reveals a new species of Amazophrynella (Anura, Bufonidae) from southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Rommel R.; Chaparro, Juan C.; Carvalho, Vinícius Tadeu De; Ávila, Robson W.; Farias, Izeni Pires; Hrbek, Tomas; Gordo, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the genus Amazophrynella (Anura, Bufonidae) is described from the departments of Madre de Dios, Cusco and Junin in Peru. An integrative taxonomy approach is used. A morphological diagnosis, morphometrics comparisons, description of the advertisement call, and the phylogenetic relationships of the new species are provided. Amazophrynella javierbustamantei sp. n. differs from other species of Amazophrynella by: intermediate body-size (snout-vent length 14.9 mm in males, n = 26 and 19.6 mm in females, n = 20), tuberculate skin texture of body, greatest hand length of the Amazophrynella spp. (3.6 mm in males, n = 26 and 4.6 mm in females, n = 20), venter coloration yellowish, tiny rounded black points covering the venter, and thirteen molecular autapomorphies in the 16S RNA gene. Its distribution varies from 215 to 708 m a.s.l. This discovery highlights the importance of the remnant forest in preserving the biodiversity in Peru, and increase in seven the species formally described in the genus Amazophrynella. PMID:27047239

  9. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (TUREP) Mission to Peru. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Peru estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range of 6 000 to 11 000 tonnes uranium. The majority of this potential is expected to be located in Late Tertiary ignimbrites and associated sediments in the high Andes of southern Peru. Other favourable geological environments include calcretes, developed from Tertiary volcanogenic sources over the Precambrian in the Pacific Coastal desert in southern Peru, and Hercynian subvolcanic granites in the eastern Cordillera of southern Peru. The Mission recommends that over a period of five years approximately U.S. $10 million be spent on exploration in Peru. The majority of this would be spent on drilling ($5 million) and tunnelling ($2 million) with an additional $3 million on surface and airborne radiometric surveys. (author)

  10. Palaeomagnetic study of the Xitle-Pedregal de San Angel lava flow, southern Basin of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    1996-10-01

    A detailed study of the ˜ 2000 years old Xitle-Pedregal de San Angel volcanic field in the southern Basin of Mexico was undertaken to assess the reliability of the palaeomagnetic record as derived from fresh well-preserved and exposed lava flows. The Xitle vent is on the slope of the Ajusco volcano, which results in a topographic difference of over 800 m in less than 12 km of horizontal distance. Most sites present a mean direction, with a small within-site dispersion, around the dipolar direction for the locality, but some sites, particularly in the basin sector of flat relief away from the vent, show shallow inclinations. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) shows normal 'flow' fabrics with horizontal foliation planes and small anisotropy degree. AMS lineations correlate with observed flow directions. The magnetic properties vary systematically across flow units, but directions do not show a consistent pattern. Secular variation effects do not apparently contribute to the shallow inclinations or directional scatter. Some lava structures like pressure crests and blocky fronts give shallow inclinations and scattered directions, respectively. The resulting overall mean direction is well defined and close to the dipolar direction ( B = 26, Dec = 359.8°, Inc = 32.8°, k = 167, α95 = 2.2°), but this excludes two apparent directional groups. The mean direction for one group, with B = 19, Dec = 359.0°, Inc = 35.1°, k = 247, α95 = 2.1°, may be the representative estimate for the field. Shallow inclinations are considered anomalous and associated to a characteristic specific to given sectors of lava flows. Palaeointensity determinations have been obtained for six samples from five sites by using the Thellier and Shaw methods. Results agree well with previous studies, however, the standard deviation calculated for the mean value remains high after incorporation of the new data. Mean palaeointensity based on five new determinations and eight early data is N

  11. Urbanization dramatically altered the water balances of a paddy field-dominated basin in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, L.; Sun, G.; Liu, Y.; Wan, J.; Qin, M.; Qian, H.; Liu, C.; Zheng, J.; John, R.; Fan, P.; Chen, J.

    2015-07-01

    Rice paddy fields provide important ecosystem services (e.g., food production, water retention, carbon sequestration) to a large population globally. However, these benefits are diminishing as a result of rapid environmental and socioeconomic transformations, characterized by population growth, urbanization, and climate change in many Asian countries. This case study examined the responses of stream flow and watershed water balances to the decline of rice paddy fields due to urbanization in the Qinhuai River basin in southern China, where massive industrialization has occurred during the past 3 decades. We found that stream flow increased by 58 % and evapotranspiration (ET) decreased by 23 % during 1986-2013 as a result of a three-fold increase in urban areas and a reduction of rice paddy fields by 27 %. Both high flows and low flows increased significantly by about 28 % from 2002 to 2013. The increases in stream flow were consistent with the decreases in ET and leaf area index monitored by independent remote sensing MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data. Attribution analysis, based on two empirical models, indicated that land-use/land-cover change contributed about 82-108 % of the observed increase in stream flow from 353 ± 287 mm yr-1 during 1986-2002 to 556 ± 145 during 2003-2013. We concluded that the reduction in ET was largely attributed to the conversion of cropland to urban use. The effects of land-use change overwhelmed the effects of regional climate warming and climate variability. Converting traditional rice paddy fields to urban use dramatically altered land surface conditions from an artificial wetland-dominated landscape to an urban land-use- dominated one, and thus was considered an extreme type of contemporary hydrologic disturbance. The ongoing large-scale urbanization of the rice paddy-dominated regions, in humid southern China and East Asia, will likely elevate storm-flow volume, aggravate flood risks, and intensify urban

  12. Basin geodynamics and sequence stratigraphy of Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic deposits of Southern Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Cédric; Hadouth, Suhail; Bouaziz, Samir; Lathuilière, Bernard; Rubino, Jean-Loup

    2016-05-01

    Aims of this paper are to propose a geodynamic and sequential framework for the late Triassic and early Jurassic of and south Tunisia and to evidence the impact of local tectonics on the stratigraphic architecture. Facies of the Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic of Southern Tunisia have been interpreted in terms of depositional environments. A sequential framework and correlation schemes are proposed for outcrops and subsurface transects. Nineteen middle frequency sequences inserted in three and a half low frequency transgression/regression cycles were evidenced. Despite some datation uncertainties and the unknown durations of Lower Jurassic cycles, middle frequency sequences appear to be controlled by eustasy. In contrast the tectonics acted as an important control on low frequency cycles. The Carnian flooding was certainly favored by the last stages of a rifting episode which started during the Permian. The regression accompanied by the formation of stacked angular unconformities and the deposition of lowstand deposits during the late Carnian and Norian occured during the uplift and tilting of the northern basin margins. The transpressional activity of the Jeffara fault system generated the uplift of the Tebaga of Medenine high from the late Carnian and led to the Rhaetian regional angular Sidi Stout Unconformity. Facies analysis and well-log correlations permitted to evidence that Rhaetian to Lower Jurassic Messaoudi dolomites correspond to brecciated dolomites present on the Sidi Stout unconformity in the North Dahar area. The Early-cimmerian compressional event is a possible origin for the global uplift of the northern African margin and Western Europe during the late Carnian and the Norian. During the Rhaetian and the early Jurassic a new episode of normal faulting occured during the third low frequency flooding. This tectonosedimentary evolution ranges within the general geodynamic framework of the north Gondwana margin controlled by the opening of both

  13. Seismicity and focal mechanisms for the Southern Great Basin of Nevada and California in 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmsen, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    For the calendar year 1990, the Southern Great Basin seismic network (SGBSN) recorded about 1050 earthquakes in the SGB, as compared to 1190 in 1989. Local magnitudes, M{sub L}, ranged from 0.0 for various earthquakes to 3.2 for an earthquake on April 3, 1990 5:47:58 UTC, 37.368{degrees} North, 117.358{degrees} West, Mud Lake, Nevada quadrangle. 95% of those earthquakes have the property, M{sub L} {le} 2.4. Within a 10 km radius of the center of Yucca Mountain, the site of a potential national, high-level nuclear waste repository, one earthquake with M{sub L} = 0.6 was recorded at 40-Mile Wash. The estimated depth of focus of this earthquake is 3.8 km below sea level. Other, smaller events may have also occurred in the immediate vicinity of Yucca Mountain, but would have been below the detection threshold (M{sub L}{approx}0.0 at Yucca Mountain). Focal mechanisms are computed for seventeen earthquakes in the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and in the SGB west of the NTS for the year 1990. Solutions are mostly strike-slip, although normal slip is observed for a hypocenter at Stonewall Flat, Nevada, and reverse slip is observed for a hypocenter at Tucki Mountain, California. The average direction of the focal mechanism P-axes is North 47{degrees} East, with nearly horizontal inclination, and the average direction of the T-axes is North 42{degrees} West, with nearly horizontal inclination, consistent with a regional tectonic model of active northwest extension during the Holocene epoch.

  14. Description of Apistogramma paulmuelleri sp n., a new geophagine cichlid species (Teleostei : Perciformes) from the Amazon river basin in Loreto, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Romer, U.; Beninde, J.; Duponchelle, Fabrice; Davila, C. R. G.; Diaz, A. V.; Renno, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    A new species of Apistogramma is described from Peru, based on a total of 28 specimens collected in a small forest stream in the catchment of a nameless tributary of the Rio Amazonas about 80 kilometres south of Iquitos, Departamento Loreto (approximately 73 degrees 34' W / 04 degrees 24' S). At first sight Apistogramma paulmuelleri sp. n. resembles A. regani, but is differentiated from the latter and all other Apistogramma species by the combination of a large band-like spot on the caudal-fi...

  15. Drought management plans and water availability in agriculture: A risk assessment model for a Southern European basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Dionisio Pérez-Blanco

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Drought Management Plans (DMPs are regulatory instruments that establish priorities among the different water uses and define more stringent constraints to access to publicly provided water during droughts, especially for non-priority uses such as agriculture. These plans have recently become widespread across EU southern basins. However, in some of these basins the plans were approved without an assessment of the potential impacts that they may have on the economic activities exposed to water restrictions. This paper develops a stochastic methodology to estimate the expected water availability in agriculture that results from the decision rules of the recently approved DMPs. The methodology is applied to the particular case of the Guadalquivir River Basin in southern Spain. Results show that if DMPs are successfully enforced, available water will satisfy in average 62.2% of current demand, and this figure may drop to 50.2% by the end of the century as a result of climate change. This is much below the minimum threshold of 90% that has been guaranteed to irrigators so far.

  16. Wari influence in southern Peru: provenance study of middle horizon pottery from the archaeological site of La Real using k0-INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragments of archaeological pottery from a rescue excavation at the site of La Real in Arequipa, Peru, were studied by instrumental neutron activation analysis, k0 method. Analytical data were processed by multivariate statistical techniques, comparing the chemical composition of the studied samples versus the information available in our database on the chemical composition of archaeological pottery from Conchopata (Ayacucho), Cotahuasi (Arequipa), Huaro (Cusco) and Tiwanaku (Bolivia). The results obtained revealed that most of the samples were likely made locally at La Real, while others correspond to the chemical composition of the different groups considered, showing evidence of the presence of foreign pottery in the site and a small group which were not classified. (author)

  17. Characterizaton of the Zarumilla aquifer - Peru, Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In October 1998, Peru and Ecuador signed the Brasilia Agreements on Ecuadro-Peru border issues, representing the end of historical conflicts, differences and misunderstnadings. The two countries became partners after years of armed conflicts, and move forward through cooperation and integration, both facing social and aconomic challenges. In May 2001, the Special Bi-national Project Puyango-Tumbes (Peru) and the Ecuadorian Commission PREDESUR, province of El Oro, as technical institutes in charge of projects dealing with binational development, were invited to participate in the regional project RLA/8/031. The results of the first phase of the study are presented in this document. The study will be continued under the TC project RlA/8/039 - 'Characterization of the Zarumilla aquifer and monitoring of water quality in the Puyango-Tumbes basin'. (author)

  18. Geochronological data from the Faxinal coal succession, southern Parana Basin, Brazil: A preliminary approach combining radiometric U-Pb dating and palynostratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra-Sommer, M.; Cazzulo-Klepzig, M.; Menegat, R.; Formoso, M.L.L.; Basei, M.A.; Barboza, E.; Simas, M.W. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2008-03-15

    A radiometric zircon age of 285.4 {+-} 8.6 Ma (IDTIMS U-Pb) is reported from a tonstein layer interbedded with coal seams in the Faxinal coalfield, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Calibration of palynostratigraphic data with the absolute age shows that the coal depositional interval in the southern Parana Basin is constrained to the Sakmarian. Consequently, the basal Gondwana sequence in the southern part of the basin should lie at the Carboniferous-Permian boundary, not within the Sakmarian as previously considered. The new results are significant for correlations between the Parana Basin and the Argentinian Paganzo Basin (302 {+-} 6 Ma and 288 {+-} 7 Ma) and with the Karoo Basin, specifically with the top of the Dwyka Tillite (302 {+-} 3 Ma and 299.2 {+-} 3.2 Ma) and the lowermost Ecca Group (288 {+-} 3 Ma and 289.6 {+-} 3.8 Ma). The evidence signifies widespread latest Carboniferous volcanic activity in western Gondwana.

  19. Peru action simmering despite privatization delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After months of delays, the sale of Petroleos del Peru SA (Petroperu) was postponed earlier this year until after the elections, which saw Peru's incumbent President Alberto Fujimori reelected. In June, Fujimori appointed Amado Yataco Minister of Energy and Mines. Yataco, also serving as president of the privatization commission Copri, said a decision on the sale of Petroperu would be made quickly, perhaps by July 28, ahead of this report's presstime. The uncertain status of Petroperu has not, however, slowed activity in Peru's petroleum sector. The paper first discusses privatization plans and Petroperu's budget, then describes exploration and development activities in the supergiant Camisea gas/condensate fields in the central southern jungle. Activities in several smaller fields are briefly described

  20. Fishes of the Taquari-Antas river basin (Patos Lagoon basin), southern Brazil Peixes da bacia do rio Taquari-Antas (sistema da Laguna dos Patos), sul do Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    FG. Becker; Fries LCC. De; J. Ferrer; VA. Bertaco; KDG. Luz-Agostinho; JFP Silva; AR. Cardoso; ZMS. Lucena; CAS. Lucena

    2013-01-01

    The aquatic habitats of the Taquari-Antas river basin (in the Patos Lagoon basin, southern Brazil) are under marked environmental transformation because of river damming for hydropower production. In order to provide an information baseline on the fish fauna of the Taquari-Antas basin, we provide a comprehensive survey of fish species based on primary and secondary data. We found 5,299 valid records of fish species in the basin, representing 119 species and 519 sampling sites. There are 13 no...

  1. Thermal History of Rocks in the Shiwandashan Basin, Southern China: Evidence from Apatite Fission-Track Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xinwei; Wang Xinwen; Ma Yongsheng

    2005-01-01

    Based on interpretations of the apatite fission-track analysis data for 10 outcrop samples and forward modeling of confined fission-track length distributions, the thermal history of rocks in the Shiwandashan basin and its adjacent area, southern China, has been qualitatively and semi-quantitatively studied. The results reflect several features of the thermal history. Firstly, all the samples have experienced temperatures higher than 60-70 ℃. Secondly, the time that the basement strata (T1b) on the northwestern side of the Shiwandashan basin were uplifted and exhumed to the unannealed upper crust (with a paleogeotemperature of below 60-70 ℃) is much earlier than the basement rocks (γ15) on the southeastern side of the basin. Thirdly, the thermal history of samples from the basin can be divided into six stages, I.e., the fast burial and heating stage (220-145 Ma), the transient cooling stage (145-135 Ma), the burial and heating stage (135-70 Ma), the rapid cooling stage (70-50 Ma), the relatively stable stage (50-20 Ma) and another rapid cooling stage (20 Ma to present).

  2. [US Geological Survey research in radioactive waste disposal, fiscal year 1982:] Tectonics, seismicity, and volcanism of the southern Great Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective is to assess the potential for faulting, damaging earthquakes, recurrence of volcanism, and local acceleration of erosion in parts of the southern Great Basin. Work is focusing on the region surrounding the southern part of the Nevada Test Site by (1) investigating the rate, intensity, and distribution of faulting, particularly during the last 10 m.y.; (2) monitoring and interpreting seismicity; (3) studying the history of volcanism and deriving estimates of the risk of recurrence of volcanism in certain areas; and (4) developing a better understanding of regional and local tectonics and structure in relation to hydrology and to rates of erosion and deposition. Progress is reported. 9 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Preliminary seismicity and focal mechanisms for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: January 1992 through September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmsen, S.C.

    1994-06-01

    The telemetered southern Great Basin seismic network (SGBSN) is operated for the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The US Geological Survey, Branch of Earthquake and Landslide Hazards, maintained this network until September 30, 1992, at which time all operational and analysis responsibilities were transferred to the University of Nevada at Reno Seismological Laboratory (UNRSL). This report contains preliminary earthquake and chemical explosion hypocenter listings and preliminary earthquake focal mechanism solutions for USGS/SGBSN data for the period January 1, 1992 through September 30, 1992, 15:00 UTC.

  4. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatcher, Robert D

    2005-11-30

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our

  5. Preliminary seismicity and focal mechanisms for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: January 1992 through September 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The telemetered southern Great Basin seismic network (SGBSN) is operated for the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The US Geological Survey, Branch of Earthquake and Landslide Hazards, maintained this network until September 30, 1992, at which time all operational and analysis responsibilities were transferred to the University of Nevada at Reno Seismological Laboratory (UNRSL). This report contains preliminary earthquake and chemical explosion hypocenter listings and preliminary earthquake focal mechanism solutions for USGS/SGBSN data for the period January 1, 1992 through September 30, 1992, 15:00 UTC

  6. Evidence for an important tectonostratigraphic seismic marker across Canada Basin and southern Alpha Ridge of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimeld, J.; Chian, D.; Jackson, R.; Hutchinson, D. R.; Mosher, D. C.; Wade, J.; Chapman, B.

    2010-12-01

    Using a modern ice-strengthened seismic acquisition system, more than 12,000 km of high quality 16-channel, vertical incidence seismic reflection and wide-angle sonobuoy data, along with single- and multibeam bathymetric soundings and gravimetric profiles have been acquired across Canada Basin and the southern flank of Alpha Ridge. These datasets are being used to determine the crustal types, rifting processes, subsidence history, and sedimentary sequences of this poorly known region. More than a dozen regional seismostratigraphic units are identified, exceeding ~6.5 km in total sediment thickness in the south, thinning northward toward Alpha Ridge. The oldest regionally mappable unit is informally named “bisque” and is characterized by high-amplitude, continuous, parallel and subparallel internal reflections. The bisque unit averages ~600 m thick, with significant local variability. Along southern Alpha Ridge, the base of the bisque unit is marked by a prominent angular unconformity which can be traced southwards into Canada Basin before becoming obscured by thick overlying units. Though affected by faulting and compaction drape, the bisque unit appears to be concordant with the topography of the underlying acoustic basement. It is also spatially and temporally associated with large structures that are interpreted to be volcanic edifices. Most of the 129 available sonobuoy records show clear wide-angle refractions/reflections from sedimentary and upper and lower crustal layers, which can be ray-traced and velocity modeled using constraints from coincident reflection profiles. Slight ray angle dependent anisotropy is found to best describe these observed data, and is used for conversion between two-way travel time and vertical depth domains. Two distinct features are identified for the bisque layer: 1) a wide-angle reflection observed on nearly all sonobuoy data; and 2) S waves (named PsP), doubly converted at the bisque layer. P-wave refractors from bisque

  7. An analysis on the principal control factor of coal reservoir permeability in central and southern Qinshui Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, X.; Qin, Y.; Li, G. [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China). College of Mineral Resource and Envronment

    2001-06-01

    Macrofractrues were classified into four ranks according to the measurement and statistics of underground coal mine in central and southern Qinshui Basin, and the description and measurement of microfractures were performed with scanning electron microscope. Based on the analysis of relationships among permeability and ground stress/buried depth, fractures, reservoir pressure, and hydro-geological condition, it is pointed out that the ground stress/buried depth is the principal controlling factor. When the buried depth is similar, the other factors would play more important role on permeability. 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Study of the hydrological functionning of the irrigated crops in the southern mediterranean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabba, Said; Jarlan, Lionel; Er-Raki, Salah; Le Page, Michel; Merlin, Olivier; Ezzahar, Jamal; Kharrou, Mohamed H.

    2015-04-01

    In southern Mediterranean region water consumption has significantly increased over the last decades, while available water resources are becoming increasingly scarce. In Morocco, irrigation is highly water demanding: it is estimated that 83% of available resources is dedicated to agriculture with efficiency lower than 50% (Plan Bleu, 2009). In the semiarid region of Tensift Al-Haouz (center of Morocco), typical of southern Mediterranean basin, crop irrigation is inevitable for growth and development. In this situation, and to preserve water resources, the rational management of water irrigation is necessary. This objective is one of the priorities of the research program SudMed (Chehbouni et al., 2008) and the Joint Mixed Laboratory TREMA (Khabba et al. 2013), installed in Marrakech since 2002 and 2011, respectively. In these two programs, the scientific approach adopted, to monitor water transfers in soil-plant-atmosphere system, is based on the synergistic use of the mathematical modeling, the satellite observations and in situ data. Thus, during the decade 2002-2012, 17 experiments on dominant crops in the region (wheat, olive, orange, sugar beet, apricot) were performed. In these experiments, the different terms of water and heat balances exchanged between land surface and atmosphere are controlled with different devices. Results showed that the water losses by evaporation can reach 28% of water inputs for the flooding irrigation site and are obviously lower (about 18-20 % on average) for the drip irrigation sites. Concerning the deep percolation, results are surprising: water losses for the drip irrigation are in the range 29-41% of water input, whereas theses losses are between 26 and 31% for flooding irrigation. Concerning the modeling component, several models ranging from the most simple (FAO-56) to the most complex (i.e. SVAT: Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer) were implemented to estimate the spatio-temporal variability of ET. The results showed that

  9. Extreme precipitation and extreme streamflow in the Dongjiang River Basin in southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Extreme hydro-meteorological events have become the focus of more and more studies in the last decade. Due to the complexity of the spatial pattern of changes in precipitation processes, it is still hard to establish a clear view of how precipitation has changed and how it will change in the future. In the present study, changes in extreme precipitation and streamflow processes in the Dongjiang River Basin in southern China are investigated. It was shown that little change is observed in annual extreme precipitation in terms of various indices, but some significant changes are found in the precipitation processes on a monthly basis. The result indicates that when detecting climate changes, besides annual indices, seasonal variations in extreme events should be considered as well. Despite of little change in annual extreme precipitation series, significant changes are detected in several annual extreme flood flow and low-flow series, mainly at the stations along the main channel of Dongjiang River, which are affected significantly by the operation of several major reservoirs. The result highlights the importance of evaluating the impacts of human activities in assessing the changes of extreme streamflows. In addition, three non-parametric methods that are not-commonly used by hydro-meteorology community, i.e., Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, Levene's test and quantile test, are introduced and assessed by Monte Carlo simulation in the present study to test for changes in the distribution, variance and the shift of tails of different groups of dataset. Monte Carlo simulation result shows that, while all three methods work well for detecting changes in two groups of data with large data size (e.g., over 200 points in each group and big difference in distribution parameters (e.g., over 100% increase of scale parameter in Gamma distribution, none of them are powerful enough for small data sets (e.g., less than 100 points and small distribution

  10. Extension of geographic distribution of Chrysobrycon hesperus and C. myersi (Characiformes, Characidae, Stevardiinae for several drainages flowing into the Amazon River Basin in Peru and Colombia Extensión de la distribución geográfica de Chrysobrycon hesperus y C. myersi (Characiformes, Characidae, Stevardiinae para varios drenajes fluyendo hacia la cuenca del Amazonas en Perú y Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Anyelo Vanegas-Ríos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The geographic distribution of Chrysobrycon hesperus (Böhlke and C. myersi Weitzman and Menezes is extended to new localities from the upper Amazon Basin in Peru and Colombia. Chrysobrycon hesperus is recorded for the first time for the Putumayo River Basin in Colombia.Se amplía la distribución geográfica de Chrysobrycon hesperus (Böhlke y C. myersi Weitzman y Menezes para nuevas localidades de la cuenca alta del Amazonas en Perú y Colombia. Chrysobrycon hesperus se registra por primera vez para la cuenca del río Putumayo en Colombia.

  11. Evolution of the Neogene Andean foreland basins of the Southern Pampas and Northern Patagonia (34°-41°S), Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folguera, Alicia; Zárate, Marcelo; Tedesco, Ana; Dávila, Federico; Ramos, Victor A.

    2015-12-01

    The Pampas plain (30°-41°S) has historically been considered as a sector that evolved independently from the adjacent Andean ranges. Nevertheless, the study of the Pampas showed that it is reasonable to expect an important influence from the Andes into the extraandean area. The Pampas plain can be divided into two sectors: the northern portion, adjacent to the Pampean Ranges, has been studied by Davila (2005, 2007, 2010). The southern sector (34°-41°S) is the objective of the present work. The study of this area allowed to characterize two separate foreland basins: the Southern Pampa basin and the Northern Patagonian basin. The infill is composed of Late Miocene and Pliocene units, interpreted as distal synorogenic sequences associated with the late Cenozoic Andean uplift at this latitudinal range. These foreland basins have been defined based on facies changes, distinct depositional styles, along with the analysis of sedimentary and isopach maps. The basins geometries are proposed following De Celles and Gilles (1996) taking into account the infill geometry, distribution and grain size. In both cases, these depocenters are located remarkably far away from the Andean tectonics loads. Therefore they cannot be explained with short-wave subsidence patterns. Elastic models explain the tectonic subsidence in the proximal depocenters but fail to replicate the complete distal basins. These characteristics show that dynamic subsidence is controlling the subsidence in the Southern Pampas and Northern Patagonian basins.

  12. Tectonomagmatic relationship between the Sierra Madre Occidental ignimbrite flare-up and the southern Basin and Range province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Labarthe-Hernandez, G.

    2004-12-01

    The Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) is a Mid-Tertiary, large-volume, ignimbrite province at least 1,200 km long and 200-500 km wide, extending continuously from the U.S.-Mexico border (31\\deg N) to its intersection with the Mexican Volcanic Belt (21\\deg N). Considering the average thickness of 1,000 m for the ignimbrite plateau, based on several measured sections along the province, and the average wide of the province of 300 km, a conservative estimate of the physical volume of the SMO ignimbrites is about 360,000 km3. The southern part of the Basin and Range province is in Mexico. This extensional province overlaps in space and time with the SMO ignimbrite flare-up and formed NW- to NE-trending normal faults that bound many large grabens, which are particularly long and deep in the southern SMO. Basin and Range faulting occurred between at least 32 Ma and 12 Ma with both limits probably extending until the Eocene and the Quaternary. Ignimbrite activity can be as old as 51 Ma and as young as 17-16 Ma, but most of the ignimbrite volume was erupted in the 38-23 Ma period. Thus, the ignimbrite flare-up can be defined as a period of intense explosive volcanic activity that produced enormous volumes of silicic ignimbrite sheets, which took place mainly between 38 and 23 Ma in Mexico. The ignimbrite flare-up coincided in time with peaks in Basin and Range faulting, and the ignimbrite activity apparently migrated from the east-northeast to the west-southwest, i.e., from central Chihuahua (38-27 Ma) to Durango-Tayoltita-Nazas (32-29 Ma) to Zacatecas-Tepic (24-23 Ma), finishing by 16 Ma at Jalisco-Nayarit, as deduced from the compilation of geologic works done in the SMO. It is unknown yet whether there was a west-southward migration of Basin and Range faulting and if the ignimbrite flare-up occurred episodically as peaks (38-27 Ma, 32-29 Ma, and 24-23 Ma) or was continuous. Nevertheless, by the time that the ignimbrite flare-up started, the Basin and Range extension was

  13. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert D. Hatcher

    2003-05-31

    This report summarizes the first-year accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employs the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempts to characterize the T-P parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempts to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is working with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) is geochemically characterizing the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). First-year results include: (1) meeting specific milestones (determination of thrust movement vectors, fracture analysis, and communicating results at professional meetings and through publication). All milestones were met. Movement vectors for Valley and Ridge thrusts were confirmed to be west-directed and derived from pushing by the Blue Ridge thrust sheet, and fan about the Tennessee salient. Fracture systems developed during Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic to Holocene compressional and extensional tectonic events, and are more intense near faults. Presentations of first-year results were made at the Tennessee Oil and Gas Association meeting (invited) in June, 2003, at a workshop in August 2003 on geophysical logs in Ordovician rocks, and at the Eastern Section AAPG meeting in September 2003. Papers on thrust tectonics and a major prospect discovered during the first year are in press in an AAPG Memoir and published in the July 28, 2003, issue of the Oil and Gas Journal. (2) collaboration with industry and USGS partners. Several Middle Ordovician black shale samples were sent to USGS for organic carbon analysis. Mississippian and Middle Ordovician rock samples were collected by John Repetski (USGS) and

  14. Facies architecture and stratigraphical evolution of fluvio-deltaic reservoirs of the Echinocyamus Formation (Lower Eocene) in the Block 10 area (Talara Basin, Northwestern Peru); Arquitetura de facies e evolucao estratigrafica dos reservatorios fluvio-deltaicos da Formacao Echinocyamus (Eoceno Inferior) na area do Lote 10 (Bacia de Talara, Noroeste do Peru)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daudt, Jose Alfredo Borges [PETROBRAS Energia, Lima (Peru)], E-mail: jose.daudt@petrobras.com; Scherer, Claiton Marlon dos Santos

    2005-11-15

    This article describes the facies architecture of the Echinocyamus Formation, Lower Eocene, Talara Basin (Northwestern Peru), presenting an evolutionary stratigraphical model to the studied section. This work is a first step towards the static characterization of this unit with the objective of better understanding the internal heterogeneities of this reservoir, thus reducing uncertainties in enhanced recovery projects management. By integrating the core description (facies and facies associations) with the analysis of electrical logs (curve patterns) two different depositional domains were interpreted: a) a lower interval, deltaic prone, where parasequences and parasequence sets were developed during a high stand systems tract; and b) an upper interval, fluvial-dominated, developed during a lowstand systems tract. Later, the deltaic domain reappears as a transgressive interval over the fluvial system. Four fourth-order kinds of stratigraphical surfaces were identified; which at least potentially may be vertical flow barriers: a) parasequence or parasequence sets boundaries, b) sequence boundary that preceded the fluvial system, c) transgressive surface that marks the beginning of the deltaic transgression on the fluvial deposits and d) the maximum flooding surface. With this work, it was possible to establish a stratigraphically- controlled interpretation following a methodology that will allow these different domains to be mapped based on the electrical curves patterns, resulting in a better prediction of intervals with specific permeability and porosity characteristics. (author)

  15. Paleocene deep-water sediments and radiolarian faunas:Implications for evolution of Yarlung-Zangbo foreland basin, southern Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁林

    2003-01-01

    This is the first report on the Paleocene deep-water sequences and radiolarian faunas, which are distributed along the southern side of the Yarlung-Zangbo suture zone. The Zheba group is coined to indicate these Paleocene sequences which are subsequently divided into two lithostratigraphic units based on the lithology observed in the field. The lower unit characterized by the rhythmic cherts and siliceous shales is named the Sangdanlin formation, and the upper one composed mainly of flysches is termed the Zheya formation. The radiolarian faunas from the Zheba group are assigned to the RP1-RP6 zones of the Paleocene age. The Early Paleocene ra-diolarian assemblages have the potential to be established into the low latitude radiolarian zones and to fill in the gap between the Late Cretaceous and the Late Paleocene radiolarian zonations. The radiolarian dating provides a valuable tool for the regional correlation and reconstruction of the sedimentary environment of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean. The preliminary work shows that the Paleo-cene sequences accumulated in a foreland basin resulted from the southern Asian margin loading onto the northern Indian passive continental margin. The Yarlung-Zangbo foreland basin se-quences deposited on the Indian passive continental margin also resulted in many good source- reservoir-covering assemblages for oil and gas resources.

  16. Age and Growth of Brown Trout (Salmo trutta in Six Rivers of the Southern Part of Caspian Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azarmidokht Kheyrandish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Because of dramatic declines in stocks of brown trout in southern part of Caspian basin, the population's structure of brown trout (Salmo trutta in several rivers were studied to provide data for conservation programs. Approach: The structure of the populations in the six rivers of the southern part of Caspian basin including: Keliyare, Khojirood, Lar, Shirinrood, Rig cheshme and Pajimiyane, were studied. Results: Five age classes, ranged from 0+-4+ years, were determined. The most frequent age classes belong to 1+ and 2+. The length ranged from 78-305 mm and weight ranged from 3.6-390 g. Also, the condition factor ranged from 0.58-1.47. The highest and lowest length, weight and condition factor were observed in Lar and Rig cheshme, respectively. In 5 out of 6 rivers, females were dominant over males. The highest and lowest female: Male ratios were observed in Pajimiane (6.75:1 and Khojirood (0.8:1, respectively. Significant relationships were found between total length of brown trout with depth (r = 0.6, pConclusion: According to our knowledge, this is the first report of brown trout from Kelyare and Khojirood rivers. Since size of populations in studied areas are small and majority of these rivers located in low protected locations, it is essential to apply serious measures to protect these vulnerable habitats.

  17. Tectonic setting of Tummalapalle uranium deposit in Southern margin of Cuddapah Basin, Andhra Pradesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of plate tectonics offers a fresh opportunity to interpret the evolution of sedimentary basins in terms of changing plate interactions and shifting plate margins. Late Paleoproterozoic shallow-marine sedimentary sequence of the Nallamalai Fold Belt as allochthonous body is thrusted over the successions of the Papaghni Sub-basin and Kurnool Group in the western part of the basin along Rudravaram line. Evidences of thrusting/continental collision along Rudravaram line include dissimilar provinces across a major fault/suture zone (undeformed in the west and deformed in the east), contrasting radiometric ages (1.9 Ga in the west and 1.3 to 1.6 Ga in the east), different metamorphic grades and subsurface structures. In this tectonic setting, sequence stratigraphy has been recorded in Papaghni Sub-basin, the earliest Sub-basin of Cuddapah Basin. The sequence stratigraphy is identified by the unconformities between cycles of sedimentation and these cycles of sedimentation are caused by tectonic activity. Three cycles of sedimentation were identified in Papaghni Sub-basin. Based on the available literature, it is infer red that these cycles might have been resulted by marine transgression and regression due to sea level changes probably caused by movement of crustal plates. Vast quantity of uranium derived from bordering fertile granitoids was fluxed into the basin during sedimentation. This uranium was precipitated under suitable reducing environment that prevailed during the second cycle and resulted in the formation of uranium deposit in Vempalle Formation as seen in Tummapalle. This uranium bearing horizon in Vempalle Formation hosts 'continental rift petrotectonic assemblage' of immature terrigenous sediments viz. assorted polymictic conglomerate and mixture of quartz, feldspar, apatite (collophane) and micrite. This study elucidates geological evidences to suggest that the phenomenon of plate tectonics was in operation during sedimentation of

  18. Assessment of radiation background level of Shandong basin in east line of northward rerouting of southern river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the radiation background levels of Shandong basin in east line of northward rerouting of southern river. Methods: The activity concentrations of gross-alpha, gross-beta, 137Cs, 238U, 232Th, 40K, 226Ra and 90Sr in the samples were measured by national standard methods respectively. The values of the dose conversion factor given by UNSCEAR 2000 were adopted for dose estimation. Results: The average activity concentrations of gross-alpha, gross-beta, 137Cs, 238U, 232Th, 40K, 226Ra and 90Sr in the samples were pooled in order to analyze dose estimation. The committed effective doses of the 226Ra, 238U, 90Sr, 232Th and 137Cs from lake water for residents are 1.46, 4.95 x 10-1, 1.24 x 10-1, 2.58 x 10-2 and 7.93 x 10-3 μSv per year respectively. The committed effective doses of the 226Ra, 238U and 90Sr from cyprinoid fish are 5.49 x 10-2, 3.69 x 10-2 and 1.77 x 10-2 μSv per year respectively. Conclusions: The results show that the average activity concentrations of gross-alpha, gross-beta, 137Cs, 238U, 232Th, 40K, 226Ra and 90Sr in the samples from Shandong basin of northward rerouting of southern river are within the background levels. And in the main lake basin, the estimated exposures of public caused by the radionuclide in water and cyprinoid fish are so low that they can be ignored unless there ate some radioactive contamination in the future. (authors)

  19. The Messinian–early Pliocene stratigraphic record in the southern Bajo Segura Basin (Betic Cordillera, Spain): Implications for the Mediterranean salinity crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Soria, J. M.; Departamento Ciencias de la Tierra y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. 99, San Vicente del Raspeig, 03080 Alicante; Caracuel, J. E.; Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. Correos 99, 03080 Alicante, Spain; Corbí, H.; Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. Correos 99, 03080 Alicante, Spain; Dinarès-Turell, J.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Lancis, C.; Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. Correos 99, 03080 Alicante, Spain; Tent-Manclús, J. E.; Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. Correos 99, 03080 Alicante, Spain; Viseras, C.; Departamento de Estratigrafía y Paleontología, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuente Nueva s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain; Yébenes, A.; Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad de Alicante, Apto. 99, 03080 San Vicente del Raspeig, Alicante, Spain

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of the Messinian and Pliocene stratigraphy of the southern Bajo Segura Basin (Betic Cordillera, Spain) has revealed three highstand sedimentary phases (Messinian I, Messinian II, and Pliocene) bounded by two lowstand erosional surfaces (intra-Messinian and end-Messinian unconformities). The Messinian I highstand phase is characterized by the progradation of coastal and shallow marine sandstones (La Virgen Fm) over slope and pelagic-basin marls (Torremendo Fm). After this first ph...

  20. A new species of Andean frog of the genus Bryophryne from southern Peru Anura: Craugastoridae) and its phylogenetic position, with notes on the diversity of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, Juan C; Padial, José M; Gutiérrez, Roberto C; De La Riva, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new species of terrestrial frog of the genus Bryophryne (Anura: Craugastoridae) from the wet puna and elfin forests of the Amazonian versant of the Andes. The new species seems to be restricted to high altitude environments at elevations between 3506-3651 m in the area now protected by Megantoni National Sanctuary and Manu National Park (Distrito de Echarate, Provincia La Convención, Departamento Cusco, Peru). The new species is characterized by lacking vomerine processes of vomers, by having tympanic annulus and tympanic membrane not evident through the skin, smooth dorsal skin with scattered warts, conspicuous dorsolateral, middorsal, and occipital folds, warty flanks, areolate skin on ventral surfaces of the body, and by lacking finger and toe fringes and basal web on feet. In life, specimens have bright and highly variable dorsal coloration that ranges from olive-green to red with variable combinations of red or orange marks (red or orange in the green form and olive-green in the red form). Molecular phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA place the new species within the genus Bryophryne and as sister group of B. cophites. Bryophryne bustamantei, also sequenced for this study, is found as the sister group of the clade formed by B. cophites and the new species. Bryophryne is found as sister group of Psychrophrynella in maximum likelihood analyses and as the sister group of a large clade of holoadenines in parsimony analyses. The genus Bryophryne now contains nine species, all of them distributed along the Cordillera Oriental of the Peruvian Andes, southeast of the Apurimac River valley. PMID:26250261

  1. IRETHERM: Multidimensional geophysical modeling of the southern margin of the Dublin Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozar, Jan; Jones, Alan G.; Rath, Volker; Campanya, Joan; Pasquali, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    Multi-dimensional magnetotelluric (MT) modelling of data from the Newcastle area west of Dublin, acquired as part of the geothermal potential of Ireland (IRETHERM) project, is presented. The Newcastle area, situated on the southern margin of the Carboniferous Dublin Basin, exhibits elevated geothermal gradient (>30 ° C/km) in the exploratory boreholes drilled by GT Energy. The MT soundings were carried out in the highly urbanized Dublin suburb and are heavily noise-contaminated and distorted due to EM noise from nearby industry and the DC tram system (LUAS). We obtained reliable and interpretable MT impedance and geomagnetic transfer functions at most sites by processing the 'quietest' 4-hour night time subsets of data using several robust codes and the ELICIT method. Tensor decomposition was applied at each site to ascertain if the data are suitable for 2-D modelling and to determine the appropriate geoelectric strike direction. The obtained 2-D models underwent examination using a new stability technique, and the final two 2-D profiles with reliability estimations, expressed through conductance and resistivity, were derived. 3-D models, including all usable MT data in the Newcastle area, have also been determined with and without resistivity constrains for shallow structures from resistivity measurements in one of the boreholes (borehole NGE1). The 3-D models exhibit structures with higher conductivity in comparison to the 2-D models, with similarly resistive background rocks. The shallow conductive structures, to a depth of 1 km, have north-south elongations correlated with the surface traces of faults that are perpendicular to the regional Blackrock to Newcastle Fault (BNF). Deeper structures become more oriented to a regional geoelectric strike similar to 2-D regional strike. To obtain superior characterization of the thermal transport properties of the investigated area, we used porosity and resistivity data from borehole NGE1 to estimate relation between

  2. Jurassic–cretaceous deformational phases in the Paraná intracratonic basin, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Strieder

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the domes and basins, regional arcs and synclines, and brittle structures of the Paraná Basin flood volcanism to characterize the deformational phases in its Jurassic to Cretaceous history. First-stage fieldwork revealed brittle structures, extensional joints, and strike-slip faults, and second-stage fieldwork investigated the connections of the brittle structures to both open folds and dome-and-basin features. Fault-slip data inversion was performed using two different techniques to distinguish local and remote stress/strain. Geometric and kinematic analyses completed the investigations of the deformation, which characterized two deformational phases for the Jurassic to Cretaceous periods in the Paraná Basin. Both developed under regional bi-directional constrictional (σ1 ≥ σ2 ≫ σ3 stress regimes that produced a number of non-cylindrical folds. A D1 deformational phase produced the N–S and E–W orthogonally oriented domes and basins. The D2 arcs and synclines are oriented towards the NW and NE and indicate a clockwise rotation (35–40° of both horizontal principal stress tensors. The extensional joints and strike-slip faults characterize the local stress field in the outer rim of the orthogonally buckled single volcanic flow, whereas the inner rim of the buckled single flow supported constriction and thus, developed the local arcuate folds.

  3. Palaeotopography-governed sediment distribution—a new predictive model for the Permian Upper Rotliegend in the Dutch sector of the Southern Permian Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijnlieff, H.F.; Geluk, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Southern Permian Basin (SPB) formed a large, elongated saucer-shaped inland depression extending from the UK to Poland and from Belgium to Denmark. During the Middle to early Late Permian the SPB was filled progressively by playa sediments from its centre in northwestern Germany before it was fl

  4. Polyphase tectonic evolution of the Aksu Basin, Isparta Angle (Southern Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üner, Serkan; Özsayin, Erman; Kutluay, Alkor; Dirik, Kadir

    2015-04-01

    The Aksu Basin, within the Isparta Angle, is located to the north of the intersection of the Aegean and Cyprus arcs and has been evolving since the Middle Miocene. Correlation of: (1) kinematic analysis of fault planes that cut the basin fill, (2) the reactivation/inversion of fault planes and (3) sedimentological data indicate that the Aksu Basin has evolved by four alternating compressional and extensional tectonic phases since its formation. The first phase was NW-SE oriented compression caused by the emplacement of the Lycian Nappe units which ended in Langhian. This compressional phase that induced the formation and the initial deformation of the basin was followed by a NW-SE extensional phase. This tectonic phase prevailed between the Langhian and Messinian and was terminated by a NE-SW compressional regime known as the Aksu Phase. The neotectonic period is characterized by NE-SW extension and began in the Late Pliocene. Correlation with the existing tectonic literature shows that the order of deformational phases proposed in this study might also be valid for the entire Isparta Angle area.

  5. Analysis on groundwater evolution and interlayer oxidation zone position at the southern margin of Yilin basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the development and evolution history of groundwater and its reworking to the interlayer oxidation zone, hydrogeochemical zonation of interlayer oxidation zone, mechanism of water-rock interaction and transportation pattern of uranium in the water in Yili Basin. It is suggested that groundwater is one of the important factors to control the development of interlayer oxidation zone and uranium mineralization. (authors)

  6. Lithostratigraphy, depositional history and sea level changes of the Cauvery Basin, southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuvairvasamy Ramkumar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The sedimentary sequence exposed in the erstwhile Tiruchirapalli district hosts a more or less complete geological record of the Upper Cretaceous-Tertiary period. Systematic field mapping, collation of data on the micro-meso scale lithology, sedimentary structures, petrography, faunal assemblage and facies relationships of these rocks, in the light of modern stratigraphic concepts, helped to enumerate the lithostratigraphic setup and depositional history of the basin. Spatial and temporal variations of the lithologies and revised stratigraphic units are presented in this paper. Many high frequency sea level cycles (presumably fourth or higher order which stack up to form third order sea level cycles (six in number, which in turn form part of second order cycles (two in number, including seven eustatic sea level peaks, have been recorded in this basin. Trend analysis of sea level curves indicates a gradual increase of the sea level from Barremian to Coniacian and a gradual decrease from Coniacian to Danian. Such lasting sea level trends had their influence on the sedimentation pattern and facies association. It is inferred that depositional bathymetry was maintained at a shallow-moderate level, primarily influenced by a lack of major subsidence during the depositional history of this basin. The study also revealed a prevalent simple basin filling process and dominant control by sea level changes, rather than tectonic movements over the depositional regime.

  7. Petrogenesis of Mesoproterozoic lamproite dykes from the Garledinne (Banganapalle) cluster, south-western Cuddapah Basin, southern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N. V. Chalapathi; Atiullah; Kumar, Alok; Sahoo, Samarendra; Nanda, Purnendu; Chahong, Ngazimpi; Lehmann, B.; Rao, K. V. S.

    2016-04-01

    We report mineral chemistry and whole-rock major and trace-element geochemistry for a recent find of Mesoproterozoic (~1.4 Ga) lamproites from the Garledinne (Banganapalle) cluster, south-western part of the Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah Basin, southern India. The Garledinne lamproites occur as WNW-ESE-trending dykes that have undergone varying degree of pervasive silicification and carbonate alteration. Nevertheless, their overall texture and relict mineralogy remain intact and provide important insights into the nature of their magmas. The lamproite dykes have porphyritic to weakly porphyritic textures comprising pseudomorphed olivine macrocrysts and microphenocrysts, titanian phlogopite microphenocrysts, spinel having a compositional range from chromite to rarely magnesiochromite, Sr-rich apatite and niobian rutile. The Garledinne and other Cuddapah Basin lamproites (Chelima and Zangamarajupalle) collectively lack sanidine, clinopyroxene, potassic richterite, and titanite and are thus mineralogically distinct from the nearby Mesoproterozoic lamproites (Krishna and Ramadugu) in the Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India. The strong correlation between various major and trace elements coupled with high abundances of incompatible and compatible trace elements imply that alteration and crustal contamination have had a limited effect on the whole-rock geochemistry (apart from K2O and CaO) of the Garledinne lamproites and that olivine fractionation played an important role in their evolution. The Garledinne lamproites represent small-degree partial melts derived from a refractory (previously melt extracted) peridotitic mantle source that was subsequently metasomatised (enriched) by carbonate-rich fluids/melts within the garnet stability field. The involvement of multiple reservoirs (sub-continental lithospheric mantle and asthenosphere) has been inferred in their genesis. The emplacement of the Garledinne lamproites is linked to extensional events, across the various

  8. 1970 Huaraz, Peru Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1970, an earthquake-induced rock and snow avalanche on Mt. Huascaran, Peru, buried the towns of Yungay and Ranrahirca. The magnitude 7.8 earthquake killed 66,794...

  9. Comparison of Statistical Downscaling Methods for Monthly Total Precipitation: Case Study for the Paute River Basin in Southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Campozano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Downscaling improves considerably the results of General Circulation Models (GCMs. However, little information is available on the performance of downscaling methods in the Andean mountain region. The paper presents the downscaling of monthly precipitation estimates of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis 1 applying the statistical downscaling model (SDSM, artificial neural networks (ANNs, and the least squares support vector machines (LS-SVM approach. Downscaled monthly precipitation estimates after bias and variance correction were compared to the median and variance of the 30-year observations of 5 climate stations in the Paute River basin in southern Ecuador, one of Ecuador’s main river basins. A preliminary comparison revealed that both artificial intelligence methods, ANN and LS-SVM, performed equally. Results disclosed that ANN and LS-SVM methods depict, in general, better skills in comparison to SDSM. However, in some months, SDSM estimates matched the median and variance of the observed monthly precipitation depths better. Since synoptic variables do not always present local conditions, particularly in the period going from September to December, it is recommended for future studies to refine estimates of downscaling, for example, by combining dynamic and statistical methods, or to select sets of synoptic predictors for specific months or seasons.

  10. Decline of General Intelligence in Children Exposed to Manganese from Mining Contamination in Puyango River Basin, Southern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Óscar; Tapia, Marlene; Méndez, Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    Based on ecosystem approaches to health (Ecohealth), this study sought to identify neurobehavioral disorders in children exposed to several levels of toxic metal pollution from gold mining in the Puyango River Basin, Southern Ecuador. Ninety-three children born or living in the study area participated in the study. A neurobehavioral test battery consisting of 12 tests assessing various functions of the nervous system was applied as well as a questionnaire regarding events of exposure of children's mothers to contaminants during perinatal period. Hair samples were taken from children to determine manganese concentrations. Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied in order to examine possible relationships between exposure events, hair manganese, and neurobehavioral disorders. Having controlled co-variables such as age and educational level, it was found that children with elevated levels of hair manganese (over 2 μg/g) had poor performance in the test of general intelligence (Raven's Progressive Color Matrices Scale PCM). The Ecohealth approach helped to identify that children in the lower Puyango Basin with very elevated levels of manganese in the river water (970 µg/L) are the ones who have the highest levels of hair manganese and the worst performance in the intelligence test. PMID:25851196

  11. Hydrocarbon migration and accumulation in the Upper Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation, Changling Sag, southern Songliao Basin: Insights from integrated analyses of fluid inclusion, oil source correlation and basin modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tian; He, Sheng; Wang, Dexi; Hou, Yuguang

    2014-08-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Qingshankou Formation acts as both the source and reservoir sequence in the Changling Sag, situated in the southern end of the Songliao Basin, northeast China. An integrated approach involving determination of hydrocarbon charging history, oil source correlation and hydrocarbon generation dynamic modeling was used to investigate hydrocarbon migration processes and further predict the favorable targets of hydrocarbon accumulations in the Qingshankou Formation. The hydrocarbon generation and charge history was investigated using fluid inclusion analysis, in combination with stratigraphic burial and thermal modeling. The source rocks began to generate hydrocarbons at around 82 Ma and the hydrocarbon charge event occurred from approximately 78 Ma to the end of Cretaceous (65.5 Ma) when a large tectonic uplift took place. Correlation of stable carbon isotopes of oils and extracts of source rocks indicates that oil was generated mainly from the first member of Qingshankou Formation (K2qn1), suggesting that hydrocarbon may have migrated vertically. Three dimensional (3D) petroleum system modeling was used to evaluate the processes of secondary hydrocarbon migration in the Qingshankou Formation since the latest Cretaceous. During the Late Cretaceous, hydrocarbon, mainly originated from the Qianan depression, migrated laterally to adjacent structural highs. Subsequent tectonic inversion, defined as the late Yanshan Orogeny, significantly changed hydrocarbon migration patterns, probably causing redistribution of primary hydrocarbon reservoirs. In the Tertiary, the Heidimiao depression was buried much deeper than the Qianan depression and became the main source kitchen. Hydrocarbon migration was primarily controlled by fluid potential and generally migrated from relatively high potential areas to low potential areas. Structural highs and lithologic transitions are potential traps for current oil and gas exploration. Finally, several preferred hydrocarbon

  12. Pre-Variscan back-arc extension of Avalonia: The genesis of the Southern North Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Jeroen; van Wees, Jan-Diederik; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2016-04-01

    The Devonian-Early Carboniferous was a period of intense rifting in the Avalonia microplate in between the Caledonian and the Hercynian-Alleghanian collision phases. This rifting phase created the typical horst-and-graben structure of much of East Avalonia's crust that is best known from the UK and Ireland where the horsts and the graben infill are located at or near the surface. In the Southern North Sea, the Netherlands and northwest Germany, the Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous rift structure and units are obliterated by the thick cover of Late Carboniferous-to-Recent basin fill and by the recurrent fault reactivation. Although this rifting created the basis for 350 Ma of lithospheric memory, its dynamics remains relatively unknown. Major open questions include the mode and total amount of extension as well as the age and origin of the Central Graben and the relation between structures located east and west of it. This study addresses these issues by integrating existing data from lithosphere to basin scales and a map-view restoration. We have revised the crustal map of the Thor Suture Zone. The newly defined northern margin of Avalonia and the Thor Suture Zone are key elements in the reconstruction of Devonian-Carboniferous rifting of Avalonian lithosphere. We present a revised map of Devonian-Carboniferous basin structures including the main horsts and grabens and the governing faults east of the Central Graben. Based on these maps, we present a new paleotectonic reconstruction and a novel geodynamic scenario for the Devonian- Carboniferous rifting. These findings are key for better understanding of long-lived tectonic compartmentalisation and post-rifting deformation phases.

  13. Geological factors controlling occurrence and distribution of arsenic in groundwaters from the southern margin of the Duero Basin, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Forcada, Elena; Smedley, Pauline L

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater from springs and boreholes on the southern edge of the Cenozoic Duero Basin (DB) of Spain has concentrations of arsenic (As) which are commonly above the EC drinking-water limit of 10 μg/L and reach observed values up to 241 μg/L. Groundwater compositions within the sedimentary aquifer vary from Ca-HCO3 type, variably affected by evaporation and agricultural pollution at shallow levels, to Na-HCO3 compositions in deeper boreholes of the basin. Groundwater conditions are mainly oxidising, but reducing groundwaters exist in sub-basins within the aquifer, localised flow paths likely being influenced by basement structure. Arsenic concentrations are spatially variable, reaching up to 38 μg/L in springs of the Spanish Central System (SCS) basement aquifer and up to 62 μg/L in springs from the DB. Highest As concentrations are associated with the Na-HCO3 compositions in deep boreholes (200-450 m depth) within the DB. These have high pH values (up to 9.6) which can give rise to associated elevated concentrations of V and U (up to 64 and 30 μg/L, respectively). In the deep borehole waters of the DB, oxidising flows derived from the mineralised igneous-metamorphic basement and discharging via major faults, and are considered the origin of the higher concentrations. Compositions are consistent with desorption of As and other anionic species from metal oxyhydroxides in an oxic environment. Under locally reducing conditions prevalent in some low-flow parts of the DB, an absence of detectable dissolved As is coincident with low or undetectable SO4 concentrations, and consistent with loss via formation of authigenic sulphide minerals. Mitigation measures are needed urgently in this semi-arid region where provision of alternative sources of safe drinking water is logistically difficult and expensive. PMID:24691712

  14. Structural controls on fractured coal reservoirs in the southern Appalachian Black Warrior foreland basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groshong, R.H., Jr.; Pashin, J.C.; McIntyre, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    Coal is a nearly impermeable rock type for which the production of fluids requires the presence of open fractures. Basin-wide controls on the fractured coal reservoirs of the Black Warrior foreland basin are demonstrated by the variability of maximum production rates from coalbed methane wells. Reservoir behavior depends on distance from the thrust front. Far from the thrust front, normal faults are barriers to fluid migration and compartmentalize the reservoirs. Close to the thrust front, rates are enhanced along some normal faults, and a new trend is developed. The two trends have the geometry of conjugate strike-slip faults with the same ??1 direction as the Appalachian fold-thrust belt and are inferred to be the result of late pure-shear deformation of the foreland. Face cleat causes significant permeability anisotropy in some shallow coal seams but does not produce a map-scale production trend. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of Climate Change on Groundwater Resources in the Klela Basin, Southern Mali

    OpenAIRE

    Adama Toure; Bernd Diekkrüger; Adama Mariko

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of groundwater resources in order to understand aquifer system behavior are vital to the inhabitants of the Klela Basin, Mali, because groundwater is the only permanent water resource and is used for drinking water and irrigation. Due to climate change, this vital resource is being threatened. Therefore, MODFLOW was applied in this study to simulate groundwater dynamics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of climate change on groundwater resources in the Klela bas...

  16. Geochemical and isotopic characterization of groundwater resources in Maidere Basin (southern part of Morocco)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integration of geochemical and isotopes techniques in water resources investigations has contributed considerably to a better understanding of the aquifer hydrodynamic functioning in complex structural areas. Maidere Basin, located in south Morocco, is extending over 13,000 km2 and limited by some orographical chains of Anti Atlas. Lithological formations outcropping in the basin are divided into compartments by major faults of NE-SW direction. This fault network helped to generate aquifers compartments with lateral hydraulic discontinuity. Five aquifers constitute the multilayer system: Precambrian, lower Cambrian, Middle Cambrian, Ordovician and Quaternary units. Ordovician outcrops are a large spread and constitute the more important aquifer in the basin. Furthermore, a smell gas like carbon dioxide is observed in some bores sampled from different aquifers. Geochemical and isotopic study has been undertaken in Maidere Basin in order to better understanding the hydrodynamic functioning of the aquifers units and to determinate the CO2 gas origin. Correlations between saturation index towards calcite and the partial pressure of CO2, have allowed distinguishing undersaturated water with a lower pCO2 sampled from all of wells and oversaturated water with high values of pCO2 sampled in boreholes. Modern carbon percentage analyses showed the presence of old water in the boreholes with high values of pCO2. Carbon dioxide seems to come from deep levels and circulate through the deep faults network. The relationship between δ13C and pmC (percent modern carbon) oppose the modern groundwater and impoverished in δ13C (that keep the pedological marking of the carbon at the time of their infiltration) to paleowaters (<16 pmC) and having exchanged the carbon with an impoverished matrix and/or having dissolved a carbon dioxide of deep origin. (author)

  17. Late Givetian ammonoids from Hassi Nebech (Tafilalt Basin, Anti-Atlas, southern Morocco)

    OpenAIRE

    Bockwinkel, J.; R. T. Becker; V. Ebbighausen

    2013-01-01

    The Hassi Nebech area of the SE Tafilalt (Tafilalt Basin, Anti-Atlas, Morocco) yielded the richest and most diverse late Givetian ammonoid fauna on a global scale. Above the distinctive regional "Lower Marker Bed" (Synpharciceras clavilobum Zone), abundant loosely collected limonitic specimens derive from hypoxic shales of the Taouzites taouzensis to Petteroceras errans zones. The ontogenetic morphometry and intraspecific variability of a total of 30 species representing five families, the Ac...

  18. Geochemical and Isotopic characterization of groundwater resources in Maidere basin (southern part of Morocco)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integration of geochemical and isotopes techniques in water resources investigations has contributed considerably to a better understanding of the aquifer hydrodynamic functioning in complex structural areas. Maidere Basin, located in south Morocco, is extending over 13,000 km2 and limited by some orographical chains of the Anti-Atlas. Lithological formations outcropping in the basin are divided into compartments by major faults of NE-SW direction. This fault network helped to generate aquifers compartments with lateral hydraulic discontinuity. Five aquifers constitute the multilayer system: Precambrian, Lower Cambrian, Middle Cambrian, Ordovician and Quaternary units. Ordovician outcrops are a large spread and constitute the more important aquifer in the basin. Furthermore, a smell gas like carbon dioxide is observed in some bores sampled from different aquifers. Geochemical and isotopic study has been undertaken in Maidere Basin in order to better understanding the hydrodynamic functioning of the aquifers units and to determinate the CO2 gas origin. Correlations between saturation index of calcite and the partial pressure of CO2, have allowed distinguishing undersaturated water with a lower pCO3 sampled from all of wells and oversaturated water with high values of pCO2 sampled in boreholes. Radiocarbon analyses showed the presence of old water in the boreholes with high values of pCO2. Carbon dioxide seems to come from deep levels and circulate through the deep faults network. The relationship between δ13C and pMC (percent modern carbon) oppose the modern groundwater and impoverished in δ13C (that keep the pedological marking of the carbon at the time of their infiltration) to paleowaters (<16 pMC) and having exchanged the carbon with an impoverished matrix and/or having dissolved a carbon dioxide of deep origin. (author)

  19. A century of oilfield operations and earthquakes in the greater Los Angeles Basin, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauksson, Egill; Goebel, Thomas; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Cochran, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the seismicity in the Los Angeles Basin (LA Basin) occurs at depth below the sediments and is caused by transpressional tectonics related to the big bend in the San Andreas fault. However, some of the seismicity could be associated with fluid extraction or injection in oil fields that have been in production for almost a century and cover ∼ 17% of the basin. In a recent study, first the influence of industry operations was evaluated by analyzing seismicity characteristics, including normalized seismicity rates, focal depths, and b-values, but no significant difference was found in seismicity characteristics inside and outside the oil fields. In addition, to identify possible temporal correlations, the seismicity and available monthly fluid extraction and injection volumes since 1977 were analyzed. Second, the production and deformation history of the Wilmington oil field were used to evaluate whether other oil fields are likely to experience similar surface deformation in the future. Third, the maximum earthquake magnitudes of events within the perimeters of the oil fields were analyzed to see whether they correlate with total net injected volumes, as suggested by previous studies. Similarly, maximum magnitudes were examined to see whether they exhibit an increase with net extraction volume. Overall, no obvious previously unidentified induced earthquakes were found, and the management of balanced production and injection of fluids appears to reduce the risk of induced-earthquake activity in the oil fields.

  20. Risk assessment of desertification using GIS in parts of Mond Basin, Southern Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper attempts to evolve a new model by considering various indicators of different types of land degradation desertification, namely water erosion, soil salinity, vegetation degradation, and lowering of ground water table. the Mond river basin, located centrally to this zone, has been selected as a test area to assess the risk and kind of desertification. For this purpose two sub basins of the Payab and Quareh Aghaj have been chosen for detailed study. The thresholds for the severity classes of indicators have been established and then the hazards map for each indicator of types of desertification has been prepared in a GIS. The risk maps of water erosion, soil salinization, lowering of water table, vegetation degradation have been produced for each of the two sub basins. It was possible to distinguish the areas under actual risk from areas under potential risk of desertification types. Also areas under potential risk are classified to subclasses with different probability level to show a statistical picture of risk in future. (Author) 3 refs.

  1. Geogenic arsenic and other trace elements in the shallow hydrogeologic system of Southern Poopó Basin, Bolivian Altiplano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Groundwater used as drinking water has elevated concentrations of arsenic and boron. • Sediments are potential sources of arsenic and boron in shallow groundwater. • Fe-oxides and hydroxides are important absorbents of arsenic. • Multiple geochemical processes drive mobilisation of arsenic in groundwater. -- Abstract: Environmental settings in the southern area of Lake Poopó in the Bolivian highlands, the Altiplano, have generated elevated amounts of arsenic (As) in the water. The area is characterised by a semiarid climate, slow hydrological flow and geologic formations of predominantly volcanic origin. The present study aimed at mapping the extent of the water contamination in the area and to investigate the geogenic sources and processes involved in the release of As to the groundwater. Ground- and surface-water samples were collected from 24 different sites, including drinking water wells and rivers, in the southern Poopó basin in two different field campaigns during the dry and rainy seasons. The results revealed variable levels of As in shallow drinking water wells and average concentration exceeding the WHO guidelines value. Arsenic concentrations range from below 5.2 μg/L (the detection level) to 207 μg/L and averages 72 μg/L. Additionally, high boron (B) concentrations (average 1902 μg/L), and high salinity are further serious concerns for deteriorating the groundwater quality and rendering it unsuitable for drinking. Groundwater is predominantly of the Na–Cl–HCO3 type or the Ca–Na–HCO3 type with neutral or slightly alkaline pH and oxidising character. While farmers are seriously concerned about the water scarcity, and on a few occasions about salinity, there are no concerns about As and B present at levels exceeding the WHO guidelines, and causing negative long term effects on human health. Sediment samples from two soil profiles and a river bed along with fourteen rock samples were also collected and analysed

  2. Geogenic arsenic and other trace elements in the shallow hydrogeologic system of Southern Poopó Basin, Bolivian Altiplano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormachea Muñoz, Mauricio, E-mail: ormachea@kth.se [KTH – International Groundwater Arsenic Research Group, Division of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 76, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Laboratorio de Hidroquímica, Instituto de Investigaciones Químicas, Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, 303, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Wern, Hannes; Johnsson, Fredrick; Bhattacharya, Prosun [KTH – International Groundwater Arsenic Research Group, Division of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 76, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Sracek, Ondra [Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, Palacký University, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Thunvik, Roger [KTH – International Groundwater Arsenic Research Group, Division of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 76, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Quintanilla, Jorge [Laboratorio de Hidroquímica, Instituto de Investigaciones Químicas, Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, 303, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Bundschuh, Jochen [KTH – International Groundwater Arsenic Research Group, Division of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 76, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Faculty of Engineering and Surveying, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Groundwater used as drinking water has elevated concentrations of arsenic and boron. • Sediments are potential sources of arsenic and boron in shallow groundwater. • Fe-oxides and hydroxides are important absorbents of arsenic. • Multiple geochemical processes drive mobilisation of arsenic in groundwater. -- Abstract: Environmental settings in the southern area of Lake Poopó in the Bolivian highlands, the Altiplano, have generated elevated amounts of arsenic (As) in the water. The area is characterised by a semiarid climate, slow hydrological flow and geologic formations of predominantly volcanic origin. The present study aimed at mapping the extent of the water contamination in the area and to investigate the geogenic sources and processes involved in the release of As to the groundwater. Ground- and surface-water samples were collected from 24 different sites, including drinking water wells and rivers, in the southern Poopó basin in two different field campaigns during the dry and rainy seasons. The results revealed variable levels of As in shallow drinking water wells and average concentration exceeding the WHO guidelines value. Arsenic concentrations range from below 5.2 μg/L (the detection level) to 207 μg/L and averages 72 μg/L. Additionally, high boron (B) concentrations (average 1902 μg/L), and high salinity are further serious concerns for deteriorating the groundwater quality and rendering it unsuitable for drinking. Groundwater is predominantly of the Na–Cl–HCO{sub 3} type or the Ca–Na–HCO{sub 3} type with neutral or slightly alkaline pH and oxidising character. While farmers are seriously concerned about the water scarcity, and on a few occasions about salinity, there are no concerns about As and B present at levels exceeding the WHO guidelines, and causing negative long term effects on human health. Sediment samples from two soil profiles and a river bed along with fourteen rock samples were also collected and

  3. Integrating facies and structural analyses with subsidence history in a Jurassic-Cretaceous intraplatform basin: Outcome for paleogeography of the Panormide Southern Tethyan margin (NW Sicily, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilone, Luca; Sulli, Attilio; Gasparo Morticelli, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    We illustrate the tectono-sedimentary evolution of a Jurassic-Cretaceous intraplatform basin in a fold and thrust belt present setting (Cala Rossa basin). Detailed stratigraphy and facies analysis of Upper Triassic-Eocene successions outcropping in the Palermo Mts (NW Sicily), integrated with structural analysis, restoration and basin analysis, led to recognize and describe into the intraplatform basin the proximal and distal depositional areas respect to the bordered carbonate platform sectors. Carbonate platform was characterized by a rimmed reef growing with progradational trends towards the basin, as suggested by the several reworked shallow-water materials interlayered into the deep-water succession. More, the occurrence of thick resedimented breccia levels into the deep-water succession suggests the time and the characters of synsedimentary tectonics occurred during the Late Jurassic. The study sections, involved in the building processes of the Sicilian fold and thrust belt, were restored in order to obtain the original width of the Cala Rossa basin, useful to reconstruct the original geometries and opening mechanisms of the basin. Basin analysis allowed reconstructing the subsidence history of three sectors with different paleobathymetry, evidencing the role exerted by tectonics in the evolution of the narrow Cala Rossa basin. In our interpretation, a transtensional dextral Lower Jurassic fault system, WNW-ESE (present-day) oriented, has activated a wedge shaped pull-apart basin. In the frame of the geodynamic evolution of the Southern Tethyan rifted continental margin, the Cala Rossa basin could have been affected by Jurassic transtensional faults related to the lateral westward motion of Africa relative to Europe.

  4. Early evolution of the southern margin of the Neuquén Basin, Argentina: Tectono-stratigraphic implications for rift evolution and exploration of hydrocarbon plays

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, Leandro; Bilmes, Andrés; Franzese, Juan R.; Veiga, Gonzalo D.; Hernández, Mariano; Muravchik, Martín

    2015-12-01

    Long-lived rift basins are characterized by a complex structural and tectonic evolution. They present significant lateral and vertical stratigraphic variations that determine diverse basin-patterns at different timing, scale and location. These issues cause difficulties to establish facies models, correlations and stratal stacking patterns of the fault-related stratigraphy, specially when exploration of hydrocarbon plays proceeds on the subsurface of a basin. The present case study corresponds to the rift-successions of the Neuquén Basin. This basin formed in response to continental extension that took place at the western margin of Gondwana during the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic. A tectono-stratigraphic analysis of the initial successions of the southern part of the Neuquén Basin was carried out. Three syn-rift sequences were determined. These syn-rift sequences were located in different extensional depocentres during the rifting phases. The specific periods of rifting show distinctly different structural and stratigraphic styles: from non-volcanic to volcanic successions and/or from continental to marine sedimentation. The results were compared with surface and subsurface interpretations performed for other depocentres of the basin, devising an integrated rifting scheme for the whole basin. The more accepted tectono-stratigraphic scheme that assumes the deposits of the first marine transgression (Cuyo Cycle) as indicative of the onset of a post-rift phase is reconsidered. In the southern part of the basin, the marine deposits (lower Cuyo Cycle) were integrated into the syn-rift phase, implying the existence of different tectonic signatures for Cuyo Cycle along the basin. The rift climax becomes younger from north to south along the basin. The post-rift initiation followed the diachronic ending of the main syn-rift phase throughout the Neuquén Basin. Thus, initiation of the post-rift stage started in the north and proceeded towards the south, constituting a

  5. Introduction to selected references on fossil fuels of the central and southern Appalachian basin: Chapter H.1 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Lentz, Erika E.; Tewalt, Susan J.; Román Colón, Yomayra A.

    2014-01-01

    The Appalachian basin contains abundant coal and petroleum resources that have been studied and extracted for at least 150 years. In this volume, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists describe the geologic framework and geochemical character of the fossil-fuel resources of the central and southern Appalachian basin. Separate subchapters (some previously published) contain geologic cross sections; seismic profiles; burial history models; assessments of Carboniferous coalbed methane and Devonian shale gas; distribution information for oil, gas, and coal fields; data on the geochemistry of natural gas and oil; and the fossil-fuel production history of the basin. Although each chapter and subchapter includes references cited, many historical or other important references on Appalachian basin and global fossil-fuel science were omitted because they were not directly applicable to the chapters.

  6. Petroleum investment conditions in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report focuses on the current petroleum investment conditions in Peru, and Peru's hydrocarbon potential. Investment conditions are examined, and political risk, internal security, the economic environment, and the legal framework for investment are considered. (UK)

  7. Crustal shear velocity structure in the Southern Lau Basin constrained by seafloor compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Yang; Webb, Spahr C.

    2016-05-01

    Seafloor morphology and crustal structure vary significantly in the Lau back-arc basin, which contains regions of island arc formation, rifting, and seafloor spreading. We analyze seafloor compliance: deformation under long period ocean wave forcing, at 30 ocean bottom seismometers to constrain crustal shear wave velocity structure along and across the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). Velocity models obtained through Monte Carlo inversion of compliance data show systematic variation of crustal structure in the basin. Sediment thicknesses range from zero thickness at the ridge axis to 1400 m near the volcanic arc. Sediment thickness increases faster to the east than to the west of the ELSC, suggesting a more abundant source of sediment near the active arc volcanoes. Along the ELSC, upper crustal velocities increase from the south to the north where the ridge has migrated farther away from the volcanic arc front. Along the axial ELSC, compliance analysis did not detect a crustal low-velocity body, indicating less melt in the ELSC crustal accretion zone compared to the fast spreading East Pacific Rise. Average upper crust shear velocities for the older ELSC crust produced when the ridge was near the volcanic arc are 0.5-0.8 km/s slower than crust produced at the present-day northern ELSC, consistent with a more porous extrusive layer. Crust in the western Lau Basin, which although thought to have been produced through extension and rifting of old arc crust, is found to have upper crustal velocities similar to older oceanic crust produced at the ELSC.

  8. Surface uplift and convective rainfall along the southern Central Andes (Angastaco Basin, NW Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingel, Heiko; Mulch, Andreas; Alonso, Ricardo N.; Cottle, John; Hynek, Scott A.; Poletti, Jacob; Rohrmann, Alexander; Schmitt, Axel K.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-04-01

    Stable-isotopic and sedimentary records from the orogenic Puna Plateau of NW Argentina and adjacent intermontane basins to the east furnish a unique late Cenozoic record of range uplift and ensuing paleoenvironmental change in the south-central Andes. Today, focused precipitation in this region occurs along the eastern, windward flanks of the Eastern Cordillera and Sierras Pampeanas ranges, while the orogen interior constitutes high-elevation regions with increasingly arid conditions in a westward direction. As in many mountain belts, such hydrologic and topographic gradients are commonly mirrored by a systematic relationship between the oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope ratios of meteoric water and elevation. The glass fraction of isotopically datable volcanic ash intercalated in sedimentary sequences constitutes an environmental proxy that retains a signal of the hydrogen-isotopic composition of ancient precipitation. This isotopic composition thus helps to elucidate the combined climatic and tectonic processes associated with topographic growth, which ultimately controls the spatial patterns of precipitation in mountain belts. However, between 25.5 and 27°S present-day river-based hydrogen-isotope lapse rates are very low, possibly due to deep-convective seasonal storms that dominate runoff. If not accounted for, the effects of such conditions on moisture availability in the past may lead to misinterpretations of proxy-records of rainfall. Here, we present hydrogen-isotope data of volcanic glass (δDg), extracted from 34 volcanic ash layers in different sedimentary basins of the Eastern Cordillera and the Sierras Pampeanas. Combined with previously published δDg records and our refined U-Pb and (U-Th)/He zircon geochronology on 17 tuff samples, we demonstrate hydrogen-isotope variations associated with paleoenvironmental change in the Angastaco Basin, which evolved from a contiguous foreland to a fault-bounded intermontane basin during the late Mio

  9. Using 10Be cosmogenic surface exposure dating to determine the evolution of the Purgatorio active fault in the Andean forearc, southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Benavente; Swann, Zerathe; Laurence, Audin; Fabrizio, Delgado; Marianne, Saillard; Sarah, Hall R.; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    Active transpressive deformation has been occurring along the Andean hyperarid forearc for the last 3 Myrs but many of these faults are still not described even if able to produce large damaging earthquakes. Active faulting along the northern part of the Arica Bend can be recognized due to the presence of well-preserved and sharp fault scarps indicating recent surface slip. During the Mio-Pliocene, deposition within the forearc continental basins resulted in the formation of vast fan deposits and conglomerates of the Moquegua Formation, which can be considered as bedrock in this exposure study (~45-4 Ma; Tosdal et al., 1984; Sebrier et al., 1988a; Roperch et al., 2006). The typical vertical Purgatorio fault scarps offset both the Moquegua bedrock and several younger geomorphic features associated with formation outcroping vertically along the fault scarp. These samples are well-suited to the application of in situ produced cosmogenic radionuclides for surface exposure dating, as the hyperarid region has extremely low erosion rates. We sampled the scarp away from any significant drainage so as to avoid possibly disturbed areas. The sampling did involve extracting quarzite conglomeratic material along the bedrock scarp and on the upper surrounding crests. The aim has been to measure Berylium-20 TCN (Terrestrial in situ Cosmogenic Nuclides) concentrations to determine exposure age as a function of height on the scarp. This has been successfully employed on one scarp in Italy based on Chlorine-36 TCN (Palumbo et al., 2004). However, slow faults behaviour remains unclear and more contributions are needed. Quaternary activity of the Purgatorio fault system was evidenced by Hall et al. (2008). They highlighted a vertical offset of about ~100 m for a pediment surface intercepted by the fault, and dated at ~280 ka. Considering that the pediment surface is horizontal, this would gave a maximum of ~0.3 mm/yr of vertical deformation since 280 ka. Our new data provide evidences

  10. Impact of Climate Change on Groundwater Resources in the Klela Basin, Southern Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adama Toure

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of groundwater resources in order to understand aquifer system behavior are vital to the inhabitants of the Klela Basin, Mali, because groundwater is the only permanent water resource and is used for drinking water and irrigation. Due to climate change, this vital resource is being threatened. Therefore, MODFLOW was applied in this study to simulate groundwater dynamics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of climate change on groundwater resources in the Klela basin using the RCP4.5 (Representative Concentration Scenario 4.5 W/m2 climate scenario. Climatological, geological, hydrogeological, hydraulic and demographic data were collected and used as model input data. Groundwater recharge was estimated to be approximately 165.3 mm/year using the EARTH (Extended model for Aquifer Recharge and soil moisture Transport through the unsaturated Hardrock model. Recharge was then used as groundwater model input. The sandstone aquifer in the study area was simulated in steady and transient conditions. The results showed that hydraulic conductivity values varied from 1.1 to 13.9 m/day. The model was used for scenario quantification after model calibration and verification using three different piezometer data sets. The results of the simulated MODFLOW model showed a decrease in groundwater levels over time.

  11. Constraints on southern hemisphere tropical climate change during the Little Ice Age and Younger Dryas based on glacier modeling of the Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Andrew G. O.; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T.; Lowell, Thomas V.; Kelly, Meredith A.; Stroup, Justin S.

    2015-10-01

    Improving the late Quaternary paleoclimate record through climate interpretations of low-latitude glacier length changes advances our understanding of past climate change events and the mechanisms for past, present, and future climate change. Paleotemperature reconstructions at low-latitude glaciers are uniquely fruitful because they can provide both site-specific information and enhanced understanding of regional-scale variations due to the structure of the tropical atmosphere. We produce Little Ice Age (LIA) and Younger Dryas (YD) paleoclimate reconstructions for the Huancané outlet glacier of the Quelccaya Ice Cap (QIC) and low-latitude southern hemisphere regional sea surface temperatures (SSTs) using a coupled ice-flow and energy balance model. We also model the effects of long-term changes in the summit temperature and precipitiation rate and the effects of interannual climate variability on the Huancané glacier length. We find temperature to be the dominant climate driver of glacier length change. Also, we find that interannual climate variability cannot adequately explain glacier advances inferred from the geomorphic record, necessitating that these features were formed during past colder climates. To constrain our LIA reconstruction, we incorporate the QIC ice core record, finding a LIA air temperature cooling at the ice cap of between ˜0.7 °C and ˜1.1 °C and ˜0.4 °C and regional SSTs cooling of ˜0.6 °C. For the YD paleoclimate reconstructions, we propose two limits on the precipitation rate, since the ice core record does not extend into the Pleistocene: 1) the precipitation rate scales with the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship (upper limit on cooling) and 2) the precipitation rate increases by 40% (lower limit on cooling), which is an increase about twice as great as the regional increases realized in GCM simulations for the period. The first limit requires ˜1.6 °C cooling in ice cap air temperatures and ˜0.9 °C cooling in SSTs, and the

  12. Peru v. Yale: A Battle Rages over Machu Picchu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, David

    2009-01-01

    In early 1916, the legendary Yale University archaeologist Hiram Bingham III completed his third and final expedition in southern Peru. He shipped home 74 boxes of artifacts from Machu Picchu, a spectacular site in the Andes that is believed to have been the last major settlement of the Inca empire. Those boxes were supposed to be on temporary…

  13. Andean shrublands of Moquegua, South Peru: Prepuna plant communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montesinos, D.B.; Cleef, A.M.; Sykora, K.V.

    2012-01-01

    A syntaxonomic overview of shrubland vegetation in the southern Andean regions of Peru is presented. For each plant community, information is given on physiognomy, floristic diversity, ecology and geographical distribution. The shrub vegetation on the slopes of the upper Tambo river valley includes

  14. The Liuqu Conglomerate: early Miocene basin development related to deformation within the Great Counter Thrust system, southern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, R.; DeCelles, P. G.; Quade, J.

    2013-12-01

    Cenozoic sedimentary basins along the Yarlung-Tsangpo Suture Zone are key to reconstructing the evolution of the Tibetan orogen. Here, I present data on the age, provenance, and paleoelevation of the Liuqu Conglomerate, a continental deposit exposed within this suture zone. Paleocurrent analysis indicates that sediment was shed northward in the paleo-Liuqu basin. However, detrital U-Pb zircon age spectra and clast counts indicate that the Liuqu Conglomerate contains both Asian and Indian detritus. Analysis of paleosols and carbon isotopic composition of paleosol carbonates provide constraints on the paleoaltimetry of the Liuqu Conglomerate. New zircon U-Pb and biotite 40Ar/39Ar analyses are used to assign a preliminary, early Miocene age to this formation. More analyses are required to confirm this age determination. The Liuqu Conglomerate was deposited in alluvial fans and other coarse-grained fluvial deposystems. The Liuqu basin formed between ophiolitic mélanges (to the south) and uplifted Cretaceous forearc deposits (to the north) along the central, 1000 km long segment of the Yarlung-Tsangpo suture zone in southern Tibet. Sedimentological analysis shows the unit to be composed of mixed fluvial and sediment-gravity flow lithofacies assemblages, locally punctuated by mature, clay-rich paleosols. Structural and architectural analyses indicate that the Liuqu Conglomerate was deposited in a contractional setting. Paleocurrent and provenance data demonstrate that sediment was transported northward from the hanging wall of a Great Counter Thrust related thrust system that forms the southern limit of Liuqu outcrops. Detrital zircon U-Pb ages cluster around 80-110 Ma (ɛHf = -23.5 - 14.6), 120-135 Ma (ɛHf = -12.6 - 13.1), 500-600 Ma (ɛHf = -26 - 3.4), and 1100-1200 Ma (ɛHf = -27.6 - 2.9), requiring input from both Asian and Indian sources. Two detrital zircon U-Pb ages obtained from the Liuqu Conglomerate are ca. 18 Ma and provide a preliminary maximum depositional

  15. Land Cover And Water Availability In Southern Angola Studying The Lakes In The Kunene And Cuvelai Basins Using LandSAT And MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantas, Vasco M.; Pereira, A. J. S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The landscape of Angola experienced significant changes in the past decades. Land Use and Land Cover (LULC) dynamics are addressed in this study, with the focus on a sector of the Cuvelai basin, in Southern Angola. The basin is formed by numerous lakes and streams that provide both opportunities and challenges to development, public health and resource management. It was found that the area covered by traditional settlements increased from 1995 to 2013. At the same time, several techniques were successfully tested to map and monitor the regional hydrological features from satellite data (MODIS and Landsat).

  16. Isotopic Assessment of Sources of Surface Water Nitrate within the Oldman River Basin, Southern Alberta, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations and isotopic compositions of NO3- from the Oldman River (OMR) and some of its tributaries (Alberta, Canada) have been determined on a monthly basis since December 2000 to assess temporal and spatial variations of riverine NO3- sources within the OMR basin. For the OMR sites, NO3--N concentrations reached up to 0.34 mg L-1, δ15N-NO3- values varied between -0.3 and +13.8 per mille , and δ18O-NO3- values ranged from -10.0 to +5.7 per mille . For the tributary sites, NO3--N concentrations were as high as 8.81 mg L-1, δ15N-NO3- values varied between -2.5 and +23.4 per mille , and δ18O-NO3- values ranged from -15.2 to +3.4 per mille . Tributaries in the western, relatively pristine forested part of the watershed add predominantlyNO3- to the OMR with δ15N-NO3- values near +2 per mille indicative of soil nitrification. In contrast, tributaries in the eastern agriculturally-urban-industrially-used part of the basin contribute NO3- with δ15N-NO3- values of about +16 per mille indicative of manure and/or sewage derived NO3-. This difference in δ15N-NO3- values of tributaries was found to be independent of the season, but rather indicates a spatial change in the NO3- source, which correlates with land use changes within the OMR basin. As a consequence of tributary influx, δ15N-NO3- values in the Oldman River increased from +6 per mille in the downstream direction (W to E), although [NO3--N] increased only moderately (generally -1). This study demonstrates the usefulness of δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3- values in identifying the addition of anthropogenic NO3- to riverine systems

  17. Log evaluation of a coalbed methane (CBM) reservoir: a case study in the southern Qinshui basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Hou; Changchun, Zou; Zhaohui, Huang; Liang, Xiao; Yuqing, Yang; Guohua, Zhang; Wenwen, Wang

    2014-02-01

    Proximate analysis components, gas content, porosity and permeability are the most important parameters for CBM reservoir evaluation. Based on the analysis of the conventional well log response of the no. 3 and no. 15 CBM seams in the southern Qinshui basin of China, regression analysis is used to establish the prediction models of the components of proximate analysis. The Langmuir rank equation is used to calculate the gas content. Variable matrix density is used to evaluate the total porosity. Based on the dual lateral log interaction method, a fracture porosity estimation model is established and the coal fracture permeability is predicted by using the Faivre-Sibbit method in the two CBM seams. Comparisons between the estimated and measured data of proximate analysis components, gas content, porosity and permeability indicate that the established models are credible. The absolute errors between the estimated moisture (Mad), ash (Aad), volatile (Vdaf), fixed carbon (FCad) and the measured results of coal in two coal seams are less than 0.41%, 9.47%, 3.61% and 9.41%, respectively. The absolute errors between the estimated and measured gas content are less than 4.05 cm3 g-1. The absolute errors of estimated total porosity and the analysed results of coal are less than 0.84%. Field samples show that Mad, Aad and Vdaf are less than 1.00%, 10.00%-25.00% and 10.00-15.00%, respectively, in the no. 3 and no. 15 CBM seams in the southern Qinshui basin. The FCad is close to 70.00%. The gas content ranges from 7.00 cm3 g-1 to 20.00 cm3 g-1 in the no. 3 coal seam and from 10.00 cm3 g-1 to 30.00 cm3 g-1 in the no. 15 coal seam. The total porosity is close to 5.50% and the fracture porosity is generally less than 2.50%. Fracture permeability is mainly distributed from 0.001 to 10 mD. The results indicate that the conventional well logs are effective in CBM reservoir evaluation.

  18. Log evaluation of a coalbed methane (CBM) reservoir: a case study in the southern Qinshui basin, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proximate analysis components, gas content, porosity and permeability are the most important parameters for CBM reservoir evaluation. Based on the analysis of the conventional well log response of the no. 3 and no. 15 CBM seams in the southern Qinshui basin of China, regression analysis is used to establish the prediction models of the components of proximate analysis. The Langmuir rank equation is used to calculate the gas content. Variable matrix density is used to evaluate the total porosity. Based on the dual lateral log interaction method, a fracture porosity estimation model is established and the coal fracture permeability is predicted by using the Faivre–Sibbit method in the two CBM seams. Comparisons between the estimated and measured data of proximate analysis components, gas content, porosity and permeability indicate that the established models are credible. The absolute errors between the estimated moisture (Mad), ash (Aad), volatile (Vdaf), fixed carbon (FCad) and the measured results of coal in two coal seams are less than 0.41%, 9.47%, 3.61% and 9.41%, respectively. The absolute errors between the estimated and measured gas content are less than 4.05 cm3 g−1. The absolute errors of estimated total porosity and the analysed results of coal are less than 0.84%. Field samples show that Mad, Aad and Vdaf are less than 1.00%, 10.00%–25.00% and 10.00–15.00%, respectively, in the no. 3 and no. 15 CBM seams in the southern Qinshui basin. The FCad is close to 70.00%. The gas content ranges from 7.00 cm3 g−1 to 20.00 cm3 g−1 in the no. 3 coal seam and from 10.00 cm3 g−1 to 30.00 cm3 g−1 in the no. 15 coal seam. The total porosity is close to 5.50% and the fracture porosity is generally less than 2.50%. Fracture permeability is mainly distributed from 0.001 to 10 mD. The results indicate that the conventional well logs are effective in CBM reservoir evaluation. (paper)

  19. The Role of Fault Zones in Capillary and Dissolution Trapping of CO2 in the Southern San Joaquin Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    The effects of a fault zone on CO2 accumulation, trapping, cross-fault flow, and upward leakage depend on (1) the degree of permeability reduction and capillary-pressure enhancement of the fault core zone in the storage formation, and (2) the degree of permeability enhancement and capillary-pressure reduction of the fault damage zone in the caprock, in comparison to pre-faulting conditions. To investigate these fault effects for a hypothetical geologic carbon sequestration project in the southern San Joaquin Basin, we developed a 3D numerical model with six explicitly represented major faults. The model was developed based on detailed fault characterization, including effects of numerous faults on petroleum trapping and leakage, groundwater flow, and petroleum-production-induced subsidence, as well as core-scale fault properties. The characterization benefited from more than a century of petroleum exploration and production in the basin. To account for uncertainties in fault effects and properties, we considered four fault property scenarios, including a range of faulting-induced property changes, heterogeneity of fault zones, and intra-formation layering. It was assumed that five million tons of CO2 per year was injected for 50 years into the deep Vedder Sand, which is immediately overlain by the Temblor-Freeman Silt. Simulation results indicate that in the base case of moderate faulting-induced property changes, CO2 migrates updip toward, accumulates under, eventually breaks through, and further migrates away from two faults. The total injected CO2 mass is essentially fully trapped in the storage formation by capillarity and dissolution mechanisms. Further sensitivity analyses show that CO2 trapping and leakage (through the fault sections in the caprock) depend on a complicated interplay of the faulting-induced property changes, intra-formation layering, and heterogeneity of faults.

  20. Seismic data interpretation: a case study of southern sindh monocline, lower indus basin, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sindh monocline in Lower Indus Basin is an important oil and gas producing area of Pakistan where a large number of oil, gas and condensate fields have been discovered from structural traps. This research involves the interpretation of stratigraphic and structural styles of Sindh Monocline using 2D (Two-Dimensional) seismic reflection and well log. Four reflectors of different formations have been marked and were named as Reflector-1 as of Khadro Formation, Reflector-2 as Upper Goru Member, Reflector-3 as Lower Goru Formation and Reflector-4 as Chiltan Limestone. The average depth of Khadro Formation was marked at 449.0 m, Upper Goru Member at 968 m, Lower Goru Formation at 1938 m and Chiltan Limestone at 2943 m. Faults were marked on seismic sections which collectively form horsts and grabens which is the evidence of extensional tectonic in the area. Seismic interpretation was carried out through window based Kingdom Software. (author)

  1. The Aquatic And Marshy Flora Of The Lotru River Basin (Southern Carpathians, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drăgulescu Constantin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper continues the series of floristic inventories of the main Romanian rivers in the Carpathian Mountains (from which have been published those of Mureş, Sadu, Olt, Someş, Criş, Târnave, Tisa. In this work the author lists 204 plant taxa (hydrophilic, meso-hygrophilic and hygrophilic identified by the author or by other botanists in the Lotru Valley basin. Noted for each species were life form, floral element, ecological preferences for humidity (U, temperature (T, soil reaction (R, corology and coenology. Bibliographical sources are coded with numbers (see the references at the end of the paper. The sign “!” indicates that the author has seen the plant in that locality.

  2. Seismic Data Interpretation: A Case Study of Southern Sindh Monocline, Lower Indus Basin, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabeer Ahmed Abbasi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Sindh monocline in Lower Indus Basin is an important oil and gas producing area of Pakistan where a large number of oil, gas and condensate fields have been discovered from structural traps. This research involves the interpretation of stratigraphic and structural styles of Sindh Monocline using 2D (Two-Dimensional seismic reflection and well log. Four reflectors of different formations have been marked and were named as Reflector-1 as of Khadro Formation, Reflector-2 as Upper Goru Member, Reflector-3 as Lower Goru Formation and Reflector-4 as Chiltan Limestone. The average depth of Khadro Formation was marked at 449.0m, Upper Goru Member at 968m, Lower Goru Formation at 1938m and Chiltan Limestone at 2943m. Faults were marked on seismic sections which collectively form horsts and grabens which is the evidence of extensional tectonic in the area. Seismic interpretation was carried out through window based Kingdom Software

  3. Species composition and phytosociology of xerophytic plant communitiesSouth Peru after extreme rainfall in South Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.B. Montesinos-Tubée; K.V. Sýkora; V. Quipuscoa-Silvestre; A.M. Cleef

    2015-01-01

    We present a phytosociological overview of the arid and semi-arid montane vegetation of the province of Arequipa in southern Peru. The xerophytic vegetation was studied after extreme rainfall had promoted exceptionally lush vegetation and a high aboveground floristic diversity. We used TWINSPAN for

  4. Nuclear technology in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book deals with the Nuclear Energy in Peru. It consists of ten chapters. In the first chapter is presented a rapid overview on nuclear science history. The second chapter describes the nuclear proliferation and the nuclear competition in South America. The nuclear organization in Peru, the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy, and the main centers are described in the third chapter. The following chapters deals with peruvian advances in nuclear medicine, agriculture and food, nuclear application to industry, hydrology, earth sciences and environmental considerations. In the last chapter, the perspectives for nuclear science and technology in Peru are described from the inter institutional cooperation point of view. This book also includes appendix and bibliography. (author)

  5. Possible solar forcing of climate variability in the past 4000 years inferred from a proxy record at the southern margin of Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Wei; WANG Liguo; Tyip·Tashpolat; XIONG Heigang; SHU Qiang

    2004-01-01

    A ca. 4000a decadal-resolution climate proxy record of the mean grain-size from a lake (or mash) sediment at the southern margin of the Tarim Basin, correlates visually with the atmospheric 14C record from tree ring (residual △14C, solar proxy) and the GISP2 ice core δ18O record (temperature proxy). In general, △14C maxima (solar minima) are coincident with cold (wet) periods in the study area and cold periods in the Greenland ice core. Power spectrum analysis revealed statistically significant periodicities of 196a, 121a,97a, 62a, 45a and 33-30a, which are similar to those principal solar-oscillation periods as inferred from the atmospheric radiocarbon and other proxy records. Possible solar forcing is addressed to be the main driving forcing of climate change in the southern margin of Tarim Basin.

  6. Inconsistent magnetic polarities in magnetite-and greigite-bearing sediments: Understanding complex magnetizations in the late Messinian in the Adana Basin (southern Turkey)

    OpenAIRE

    Lucifora, S.; Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Università Roma Tre, Largo San Leonardo Murialdo 1, IT-00146 Rome, Italy; Cifelli, F.; Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Università Roma Tre, Largo San Leonardo Murialdo 1, IT-00146 Rome, Italy; Mattei, M.; Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Universita` di Roma TRE, Rome; Sagnotti, L.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Cosentino, D.; Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Universita` 'Roma Tre', Rome, Italy; Roberts, A. P.; Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia

    2012-01-01

    We present paleomagnetic, rock magnetic and scanning electron microscope data from three upper Messinian stratigraphic sections from the Adana Basin (southern Turkey). The collected samples are from fine-grained units, which were deposited during the Messinian Salinity Crisis (within subchron C3r). Paleomagnetic results reveal an inconsistent polarity record, related to a mixture of magnetite and greigite that hinders determination of a reliable magnetostratigraphy. Three classes of samples a...

  7. Object-based locust habitat mapping using high-resolution multispectral satellite data in the southern Aral Sea basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navratil, Peter; Wilps, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Three different object-based image classification techniques are applied to high-resolution satellite data for the mapping of the habitats of Asian migratory locust (Locusta migratoria migratoria) in the southern Aral Sea basin, Uzbekistan. A set of panchromatic and multispectral Système Pour l'Observation de la Terre-5 satellite images was spectrally enhanced by normalized difference vegetation index and tasseled cap transformation and segmented into image objects, which were then classified by three different classification approaches: a rule-based hierarchical fuzzy threshold (HFT) classification method was compared to a supervised nearest neighbor classifier and classification tree analysis by the quick, unbiased, efficient statistical trees algorithm. Special emphasis was laid on the discrimination of locust feeding and breeding habitats due to the significance of this discrimination for practical locust control. Field data on vegetation and land cover, collected at the time of satellite image acquisition, was used to evaluate classification accuracy. The results show that a robust HFT classifier outperformed the two automated procedures by 13% overall accuracy. The classification method allowed a reliable discrimination of locust feeding and breeding habitats, which is of significant importance for the application of the resulting data for an economically and environmentally sound control of locust pests because exact spatial knowledge on the habitat types allows a more effective surveying and use of pesticides.

  8. Palaeomagnetic data for Permian and Triassic rocks from drill holes in the Southern Sydney Basin, New South Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facer, R. A.

    1981-04-01

    A section 300 m thick across the Permian—Triassic boundary has been sampled in the Southern Coalfield of the Sydney Basin, New South Wales. 55 samples, mainly grey to drab sandstones, were collected from 9 diamond drill holes which penetrated the entire Narrabeen Group and the upper part of the conformably underlying Illawarra Coal Measures, as well as a sill emplaced into the coal measures. The samples included fully oriented cores. Additional reconnaissance samples from two further drill holes were also studied. Partial alternating field demagnetization and petrography indicate the magnetic remanence to be a stable DRM. Partial thermal demagnetization above 300°C or 400°C caused large increases in magnetic susceptibility. Partial chemical demagnetization did not cause significant changes in remanence directions. For the Coal Cliff Sandstone (basal Narrabeen Group, Triassic) the palaeomagnetic pole position (Normal) was calculated to be at 59°N 322°E (dp = 27°, dm = 29°), which agrees with previously published data. For the uppermost coal measures (Permian) the pole position was calculated as 58°N 340°E (dp = 09°, dm = 10°). Data for samples from the lower to middle coal measures yield a pole position which is between the new Permian—Triassic pole position and that for the underlying Middle Permian igneous rocks. The top of the Reversed "Kiaman Magnetic Interval" (Permian) may be near the Tongarra coal and Appin Formation boundary — (early) Late Permian.

  9. Hunter-gatherer adaptations and environmental change in the southern Great Basin: The evidence from Pahute and Rainier mesas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pippin, L.C.

    1998-06-01

    This paper reviews the evidence for fluctuations in past environments in the southern Great Basin and examines how these changes may have affected the strategies followed by past hunter and gatherers in their utilization of the resources available on a highland in this region. The evidence used to reconstruct past environments for the region include botanical remains from packrat middens, pollen spectra from lake and spring deposits, faunal remains recovered from archaeological and geologic contexts, tree-ring indices from trees located in sensitive (tree-line) environments, and eolian, alluvial and fluvial sediments deposited in a variety of contexts. Interpretations of past hunter and gatherer adaptive strategies are based on a sample of 1,311 archaeological sites recorded during preconstruction surveys on Pahute and Rainier mesas in advance of the US Department of Energy`s nuclear weapons testing program. Projectile point chronologies and available tree-ring, radiocarbon, thermoluminescence and obsidian hydration dates were used to assign these archaeological sites to specific periods of use.

  10. Geochemical evolution of groundwater in southern Bengal Basin: The example of Rajarhat and adjoining areas, West Bengal, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paulami Sahu; P K Sikdar; Surajit Chakraborty

    2016-02-01

    Detailed geochemical analysis of groundwater beneath 1223 km2 area in southern Bengal Basin along with statistical analysis on the chemical data was attempted, to develop a better understanding of the geochemical processes that control the groundwater evolution in the deltaic aquifer of the region. Groundwater is categorized into three types: `excellent', `good' and `poor' and seven hydrochemical facies are assigned to three broad types: `fresh', `mixed' and `brackish' waters. The `fresh' water type dominated with sodium indicates active flushing of the aquifer, whereas chloride-rich `brackish' groundwater represents freshening of modified connate water. The `mixed' type groundwater has possibly evolved due to hydraulic mixing of `fresh' and `brackish' waters. Enrichment of major ions in groundwater is due to weathering of feldspathic and ferro-magnesian minerals by percolating water. The groundwater of Rajarhat New Town (RNT) and adjacent areas in the north and southeast is contaminated with arsenic. Current-pumping may induce more arsenic to flow into the aquifers of RNT and Kolkata cities. Future large-scale pumping of groundwater beneath RNT can modify the hydrological system, which may transport arsenic and low quality water from adjacent aquifers to presently unpolluted aquifer.

  11. Structural features and petroleum geology of the fold-thrust belt in the southern Tarim basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU; Xinyuan; LUO; Jinhai; WANG; Qinghua

    2004-01-01

    The west Kunlun fold-thrust belt (WKFTB) and the Altun fold-thrust belt (AFTB) are respectively located in the southern margin of the Tarim basin, NW China. The analyses of typical structures and regional dynamics of the fold-thrust belts reveal their different structural and petroleum features and mechanisms. WKFTB differs from AFTB by abundant fault-related folds and triangles zones, and was formed by northward extrusion of the west Kunlun orogen. AFTB was affected synchronously by northward extrusion of the Altun orogen and the sinistral strike-slipping of the Altun Fault, so it is characterized by the minor scale and the monotonous structural styles. The Aqike anticline and the Aqike fault, of which the strikes are orthogonal to the strike of the fold-thrust belts, are regarded as the adjustive structures between both of the fold-thrust belts. The oil-gas pools of WKFTB develop mainly in the faulted-related anticline traps, but the oil-gas pools of AFTB develop mainly in the low fault-block and anticlines traps related with the paleo-uplifts. There are different exploration countermeasures for both of the fold-thrust belts.

  12. The Hydromedusae and its distribution in Chukchi Sea and adjacent southern edge waters of Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金标; 林茂

    2001-01-01

    The present paper is based on materials collected in Chukchi Sea and adjacent southern edge waters of Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean during the period from July to August 1999 on the icebreaker, the R/V “Xuelong”, by the Chinese First Arctic Scientific Expedition. Totally, 8 species of pelagic Hydromedusae were identified, of which 4 species belonged to Anthomedusae, 2 species to Leptomedusae, 1 species to Trachymedusae and 1 species to Narcomedusae, the Neoturris breviconis is recorded for the first time in Chukchi Sea. Their principal morphological characteristics are described and illustrated. The 8 species of Hydromedusae occurring in the Chukchi Sea were all cold water species, of which 6 species belong to neritic species and 2 species to ocean species. According to the geographic distribution of species, they may be divided into three groups: Arctic species, Arctic-boreal species and Boreal-temperate species. From the view-point of zoogeography, species from these waters belong to the Arctic fauna.The abundance of Hydromedusae in Chukchi Sea was generally low, with a mean value of 108 ind.*10-2*m-3. Rathkea octopunctata and Aglantha digitale were dominant species. From the view-point of vertical distribution Aglantha digitale is inhabiting in the depth of 0 300 m and with the maximum in the depth of 50 m to 100 m.

  13. An organic geochemical correlation study of some Drmno depresssion crude oils (southern part of the Pannonian Basin, Yugoslavia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. VITOROVIC

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of an investigation of crude oils originating from the Sirakovo and Bradarac-Maljurevac localities (southern part of the Pannonian Basin are reported in this paper. The aim was to estimate the organic geochemical similarity of the crude oils from the Drmno (Kostolac depression oil fields. The nine selected samples originated from reservoir rocks of various depths. Reliable source and organic geochemical maturation parameters served as the basis for the correlation studies. The similar origin of the investigated Drmno depression crude oils was corroborated, characterized by a significant participation of terrestrial precursor biomass. They were shown to be of relatively low maturity and to have been formed during the earlier stages of the diagenet- ic-catagenetic sequence of processes leading to the formation of crude oils, most probably in source rocks ofTertiary age, corresponding to vitrinite reflectances between Ro = 0.70 % and Ro = 0.80 %. The crude oils from Bradarac-Maljurevac seemed to be somewhat less homogeneous with respect to organic geochemical parameters compared to Sirakovo crude oils.

  14. Seismicity in the Raton Basin of Southern Colorado and Northern New Mexico, USA, as Recorded by a Local Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macartney, H.

    2013-12-01

    Microseismic events (Basin of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico, USA, over a period of 18 months following the occurrence of a 5.3 magnitude event near Trinidad CO in August, 2011. Micro-seismicity was observed in the region, concentrated in six clusters at depths of 6-12 km below the surface, deep in the basement, and 4-10 km below zones used for fluid disposal from an overlying coalbed methane natural gas field. Clusters are separated from disposal zones by large aseismic intervals. The clusters are mixed in character; both planar and elongate amorphous swarms, some continually active and some as short-lived bursts, with larger initial events tending to occur deeper and smaller after-shocks propagating upward and away from the nucleating events. Magnitudes range between 0 and 3, with the vast majority being less than 1.5M. Most of the clusters have no disposal wells above and no seismic activity was correlated with changes in fluid disposal. No seismicity was detected from hydraulic fracturing operations.

  15. Drought and vegetation analysis in Tarsus River Basin (Southern Turkey using GIS and Remote Sensing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celalettin Duran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of topographic variables on drought and vegetation in dry season have been examined. Distributions of dry conditions in Tarsus River Basin were derived using the NDVI, NDMI indexes and LST (Land Surface Temperature from landsat8 image bands. There is large difference in elevation in the study area. Local climatic conditions are formed under the influence of altitude and morphological structure. Narrow and deep valleys in the topography create more moderate temperature/moisture conditions and are the main distribution area of tall forest vegetation. High radiation in the highest plateau system and, extreme temperature/moisture values led short-lived herbaceous vegetation to spread. Due to high insolation/temperature and restricted marine affect, establishment of scrub vegetation can be observed both in mid-elevation and south-sloping plateau of the study area. Anthropogenic agricultural fields form the land surface with the potential of high temperature/evapotranspiration rate in harvesting periods. Broadleaf plant species spread in areas close to the base of the valley stream. Plantation forest has been created in areas of near-shore sand dunes and very small delta (marsh. Variability in topography also increases the width of the combination of factors that shape the vegetation. This also enables the number of taxa to increase and unusual taxa to co-exist.

  16. Environmental monitoring in the Mar Grande basin (Ionian Sea, Southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Serio, Francesca; Mossa, Michele

    2016-07-01

    Hydrodynamic and water quality data has been recorded since February 2014 by a meteo-oceanographic station installed in the inner part of the Gulf of Taranto, in the northeastern part of the Ionian Sea (Southern Italy). This monitoring action, managed by the research unit of the Technical University of Bari, DICATECh Department, could play a pivotal role in a vulnerable and sensitive area, affected by massive chemical and biological pollutant discharges due to the presence of heavy industry and intense maritime traffic. Monthly trends of winds, waves, currents, and biochemical parameters, such as dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and turbidity, are analyzed and discussed. The analysis exhibits that the wave regime is slightly controlled by wind forcing; rather, topography strongly affects the wave propagation direction. Surface currents appear wind induced in the measuring station, while near the bottom a quasi-steady current directed towards southwest is formed. The selected water quality indicators show monthly trends consistent with the typical seasonal convective fluxes and mixing. PMID:26077314

  17. Prevalence of malformed frogs in Kaoping and Tungkang river basins of southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Da-Ji; Chiu, Yuh-Wen; Chen, Chien-Min; Huang, Kai-Hsiang; Wang, Shu-Yin

    2010-05-01

    In this study we found many amphibians with bizarre appearances, known as malformations in Pingtung County southern Taiwan. For this investigation we collected frogs inhabiting the Kaoping and Tungkang river watersheds between February 2006 and June 2007. Among the total number of 10,909 normal frogs (i.e., anurans) collected during the investigation period, the Indian rice frogs (Rana limnocharis) account for the greatest number next is the Chinese bullfrog (Rana rugulosa). Of all the 244 captured malformed frogs, the Indian rice frog account for the greatest proportion. These malformed frogs have their main distribution in upstream areas of these two rivers. Our result indicates that the appearance rate of malformed frogs is 1.8% in the upstream reaches of the Kaoping River and 2.6%, and 0.8%, respectively in the upstream and midstream reaches of the Tungkang river. The most-commonly-found malformation is the lack of palms, followed by the lack of appendages, exostosis, and a malformed appendicular. It is, therefore, reasonable to speculate that the causes for the malformation may be related to the increased organic pollutants and agricultural chemicals used in the upstream reaches of these two rivers. PMID:21047008

  18. Tectonic evolution and its control over ore-formation of interlayer oxidized zone sandstone-type uranium deposit at southern margin of Turpan-Hami basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tectonic evolution is divided into four stages at the southern margin of Turpan-Hami basin: (1) the development of Xinjiang oldland; (2) the sedimentation of passive-continental margin in the south of Junggar (Turpan-Hami) plate; (3) the accretion nappes of the force-arc margin and the development of foreland-like basin in the island (C2-T); (4) the development of sub-orogenic belt and the slope zone (J-Q). The third stage provided favourable material source and the emplacement space for interlayer oxidized zone-type uranium deposit. The fourth stage of the tectonic evolution was the time for the formation of intramountain basin and controlled the occurrence of the interlayer oxidized zone and sandstone-type uranium deposit

  19. Peru : Accounting and Auditing

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2004-01-01

    The report provides an assessment of accounting, financial reporting, and auditing practices within the corporate sector in Peru, using International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), and International Standards on Auditing (ISA) as benchmarks, drawing on international experience and best practices in that field. This Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC) Accounting & ...

  20. Late Givetian ammonoids from Hassi Nebech (Tafilalt Basin, Anti-Atlas, southern Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bockwinkel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Hassi Nebech area of the SE Tafilalt (Tafilalt Basin, Anti-Atlas, Morocco yielded the richest and most diverse late Givetian ammonoid fauna on a global scale. Above the distinctive regional "Lower Marker Bed" (Synpharciceras clavilobum Zone, abundant loosely collected limonitic specimens derive from hypoxic shales of the Taouzites taouzensis to Petteroceras errans zones. The ontogenetic morphometry and intraspecific variability of a total of 30 species representing five families, the Acanthoclymeniidae, Taouzitidae, Pharciceratidae, Petteroceratidae, and Tornoceratidae, are documented. New taxa are: Pseudoprobeloceras praecox n. sp., Scaturites minutus n. gen. n. sp., Darkaoceras velox n. sp., Pharciceras decoratum n. sp., Ph. fornix n. sp., Ph. subconstans n. sp., Ph. involutum n. sp., Lunupharciceras incisum n. sp., Transpharciceras procedens n. gen. n. sp., Stenopharciceras progressum n. sp., Pluripharciceras n. gen. (type species: Synpharciceras plurilobatum Petter, 1959, Plu. orbis n. sp., Synpharciceras frequens n. sp., Lobotornoceras bensaidi n. sp., Nebechoceras eccentricum n. gen. n. sp., and Phoenixites lenticulus n. sp. The documentation of conch and particularly suture ontogeny and intraspecific variability necessitates a revised diagnosis for ten taxa. Manticoceras pontiformis Termier & Termier, 1950, Probeloceras costulatum Petter, 1959, and Pseudoprobeloceras nebechense Bensaïd, 1974 are regarded as subjective junior synonyms of Ps. pernai (Wedekind, 1918. Sandbergeroceras acutum Termier & Termier, 1950 is a subjective synonym of Taouzites taouzensis (Termier & Termier, 1950. Pharciceras applanatum Bensaïd, 1974 is transferred to Extropharciceras. Other forms (Ph. aff. tridens, Ph. cf. subconstans n. sp., Extropharciceras n. sp. 2, Ex. cf. arenicum, Ex. cf. applanatum, Synpharciceras sp., Plu. cf. plurilobatum are described in open nomenclature. doi:10.1002/mmng.201300001

  1. Regional hydrology of the Blanding-Durango area, southern Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principal findings of this study that are pertinent to an assessment of suitability of the hydrogeologic systems to store and contain radioactive waste in salt anticlines of adjacent areas are: water in the upper ground-water flow system discharges to the San Juan River - a major tributary of the Colorado River. Discharge of water from the upper aquifer system to streambed channels of the San Juan River and its tributaries during low-flow periods primarily is through evapotranspiration from areas on flood plains and maintenance of streamflow; the lower ground-water system does not have known recharge or discharge areas within the study area; subsurface inflow to this system comes from recharge areas located north and northeast of the study area; the upper and lower ground-water systems are separated regionally by thick salt deposits in the Blanding-Durango study area of the Paradox basin; potential exists in mountainous areas for downward leakage between the upper and lower ground-water systems, where salt deposits are thin, absent, or faulted; no brines were found in this study area with outflow to the biosphere; water in the upper ground-water system generally is fresh. Water in the lower ground-water system generally is brackish or saline; and ground-water flow disruptions by contiguous faults probably are common in the upper ground-water system. These disruptions of flow are not apparent in the lower ground-water system, perhaps because available hydrologic data for the lower ground-water system are scarce. The above major findings do not preclude the potential for waste storage in salt; however, they do not allow the prediction of detailed ground-water flow rates and directions through this area. 55 references, 13 figures, 15 tables

  2. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Slide and Grass Valley Fires, San Bernardino County, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Slide and Grass Valley Fires in San Bernardino County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 3.50 inches (88.90 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  3. Geology and potential hydrocarbon play system of Lower Karoo Group in the Maamba Coalfield Basin, southern Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiri, Cryton; Wang, Pujun; Nyambe, Imasiku Anayawa

    2016-06-01

    This study attempts to augment geology and potential hydrocarbon play system database not only in the Maamba Coalfield basin of southern Zambia but in other similar continental non-marine Karoo rift basins in the region as well. Geological analyses were conducted through extensive outcrops and exposures and subsurface boreholes. Six (6) major lithofacies (diamictites, conglomerates, sandstones, siltstones, coal and mudstones) represents Lower Karoo Group sequence. Four (4) mudstone core samples were prepared for thin section petrography. In addition, six (6) samples of sandstones obtained from outcrops, exposures and cores were impregnated with blue epoxy before thin sectioning in order to facilitate easy recognition of porosity. Quantification of framework grain composition and porosity was achieved by point counting a total of 300 points per thin section. The identification of diagenetic constituents and pore types was made possible by the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Rock-Eval pyrolysis analyses utilised 35 core samples of mudstones and coal. According to results of the analyses, three (3) deposition settings which include; alluvial, fluvial-lacustrine and lacustrine setting are envisaged. . Fluvial-lacustrine deposits are host to mudstones and coal source rocks and sandstone reservoir rocks. Mudstones and coal source rocks gave the total organic carbon (TOC) that is well above the recommended thresholds of 0.5 wt % and 2.5 wt % of gas and oil generation respectively. The hydrogen index (HI) values are mostly below 200 mg HC/g TOC, indicating fair quantities of type III kerogen. The thermal maturity readings measured by temperature Tmax range from 440 to 485 °C in agreement with calculated vitrinite reflectance (Rocalc) range of 0.76-1.57% indicating mature to post mature stages. This maturation is attributed to the burial temperatures and near-surface heat flows by faults. Production Index (PI) values are less than 0.1 suggesting some hydrocarbon

  4. Fossil Cenozoic crassatelline bivalves from Peru: New species and generic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. DeVries

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Discoveries of new fossil Cenozoic crassatellines in Peru provide a new phylogenetic perspective on “large” Neogene genera, in which four lineages are considered to have arisen independently from different Paleogene Crassatella ancestors. Latest Oligocene and early Miocene species of the new genus Tilicrassatella gen. nov.―T. ponderosa, T. torrens sp. nov., and T. sanmartini sp. nov. from the East Pisco Basin―probably evolved from the late Eocene species, Crassatella rafaeli sp. nov., which itself differed in significant respects from slightly older species of the East Pisco Basin, C. neorhynchus and C. pedroi sp. nov. The paciphilic genus, Hybolophus, is raised to full generic status. Added to its ranks are the East Pisco Miocene species H. maleficae sp. nov., H. terrestris sp. nov., and the oldest species of the genus, the late Eocene or Oligocene H. disenum sp. nov. from the Talara Basin of northern Peru. Kalolophus gen. nov., encompassing circum-Caribbean fossil species, the extant species, K. speciosus, and the trans-isthmus species, K. antillarum, appears to have evolved from the early Oligocene Floridian species, Crassatella portelli sp. nov. The genus Marvacrassatella is a western Atlantic Miocene lineage most likely descended from Kalolophus. The genus Eucrassatella is restricted to Australian and New Zealand taxa. The Eocene New Zealand species, Spissatella media, is transferred to Eucrassatella and deemed a candidate for the most recent common ancestor of younger Eucrassatella and all Spissatella species. In the southern Pacific Ocean, the circum-Caribbean region, and tropical western America, crassatelline lineages developed one or more of the following characters: large resilifers, smooth ventral margins, and an extended left anterior cardinal tooth. Some of these late Paleogene convergent character changes might have countered increased shear forces exerted on the crassatelline valves while burrowing into finer-grained and

  5. Investigation of the buried structure of the Volturara Irpina Basin (southern Italy) by microtremor and gravimetric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, Rosalba; Berrino, Giovanna

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the structure of the Volturara Irpina Plain, a small intra-mountain basin in southern Italy. Microtremor Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) measurements were performed on a 50-point grid across the plain, and contour maps of the peak frequencies and maximum amplitudes of the HVSR curves were constructed. In the deepest part of the plain, the fundamental resonance frequencies were 0.8 Hz to 0.9 Hz. Assuming that the HVSR peak frequencies interpret the fundamental resonance frequencies, and taking into account the shear-wave velocity-depth relationship derived from down-hole data, a first thickness-frequency relationship for the plain was estimated. The sediment thickness corresponds to the depth from the ground surface of the seismic basement. A power-law thickness-frequency relationship was also derived through nonlinear regression fitting of the borehole data that intercepted the bedrock. Finally, the contour map of the depth of the seismic basement was constructed by averaging the thickness estimates from the two different approaches. Gravity measurements were also acquired on a 54-point grid across the plain, most of which coincided with microtremor stations. From these data, the Bouguer gravity anomaly was computed with reference to the 1980 Ellipsoid, and using a density of 2670 kg/m3, we propose a three-dimensional interpretation of the buried structure of the plain that is mainly formed by three overlapped layers. The separately obtained microtremor and gravity results were also compared, using constraints from the drillings. Thus, we interpret the first layer as Plio-Pleistocenic sediments mostly composed of clay, silty clay, and gravel. The underlying basement has maximum depth ~ 500 m below ground level (altitude, ~ 200 m a.s.l.), and corresponds to Mesozoic carbonate rocks. These rocks are nonhomogeneous, with an upper, less compact, layer formed by unstable rocks with clay, or fractured rocks with water circulation. This is

  6. Constraints from GPS on Block Kinematics of the Transition between the Southern Walker Lane and the Basin and Range Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, S.; Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C.; Blewitt, G.

    2008-12-01

    The southern Walker Lane (SWL) is a part of the Eastern California Shear Zone that lies north of the Mojave region, bounded by the Garlock Fault to the south, the Sierra Nevada to the west, the Basin and Range to the east and by Mono Lake to the north. The region includes many northwest striking right-lateral strike slip and sub-parallel normal faults (e.g. Death Valley/Furnace Creek, Fish Lake Valley, Owens Valley), which together accommodate ~25% of the Pacific/North American relative motion. For many of these faults, and the system as a whole, there appears to be a discrepancy between geodetically and geologically inferred fault slip rates. Since the installation of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), and the Nevada Earthquake Response Network (NEARNET) of the University of Nevada, Reno, many recently obtained high- precision GPS data are now available to place improved constraints on the pattern and rates of crustal deformation of this region. In this study we use a block modeling methodology to estimate block motions and fault slip rates from GPS velocities of PBO, NEARNET and BARGEN continuous sites. Time series were obtained from raw RINEX data that we processed using the GIPSY-OASIS II software from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory together with the Ambizap software for ambiguity resolution. We have additionally included earlier published campaign-style velocities, in those areas where we do not have better coverage from other continuous/semi-continuous networks. Geologic slip rates have been obtained from the published literature. We solve for the motion of blocks using the GPS velocities that have been adjusted based on the viscoelastic modeling to estimate long term motion. To evaluate the consistency between the geologic and geodetic data, we compare long-term fault slip to slip rates inferred from geodetic results obtained over Basin and Range. The preliminary results obtained from the block model indicate significant slip at the easternmost

  7. A Study of the Connection Among Basin-Fill Aquifers, Carbonate-Rock Aquifers, and Surface-Water Resources in Southern Snake Valley, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-01-01

    The Secretary of the Interior through the Southern Nevada Public Lands Management Act approved funding for research to improve understanding of hydrologic systems that sustain numerous water-dependent ecosystems on Federal lands in Snake Valley, Nevada. Some of the streams and spring-discharge areas in and adjacent to Great Basin National Park have been identified as susceptible to ground-water withdrawals (Elliott and others, 2006) and research has shown a high potential for ground-water flow from southern Spring Valley into southern Snake Valley through carbonate rocks that outcrop along a low topographic divide known as the Limestone Hills (Welch and others, 2007). Comprehensive geologic, hydrologic, and chemical information will be collected and analyzed to assess the hydraulic connection between basin-fill aquifers and surface-water resources, water-dependent ecological features, and the regional carbonate-rock aquifer, the known source of many high-discharge springs. Understanding these connections is important because proposed projects to pump and export ground water from Spring and Snake Valleys in Nevada may result in unintended capture of water currently supplying springs, streams, wetlands, limestone caves, and other biologically sensitive areas (fig. 1). The methods that will be used in this study may be transferable to other areas in the Great Basin. The National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and U.S. Forest Service submitted the proposal for funding this research to facilitate science-based land management. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources and Geologic Disciplines, and the University of Nevada, Reno, will accomplish four research elements through comprehensive data collection and analysis that are concentrated in two distinct areas on the eastern and southern flanks of the Snake Range (fig. 2). The projected time line for this research is from July 2008 through September 2011.

  8. Variability in the microbial communities and hydrothermal fluid chemistry at the newly discovered Mariner hydrothermal field, southern Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Ken; Nunoura, Takuro; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Lupton, John; Suzuki, Ryohei; Hamasaki, Hiroshi; Ueno, Yuichiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Gamo, Toshitaka; Suzuki, Yohey; Hirayama, Hisako; Horikoshi, Koki

    2008-06-01

    A newly discovered hydrothermal field called the Mariner field on the Valu Fa Ridge in the southern Lau Basin was explored and characterized with geochemical and microbiological analyses. The hydrothermal fluid discharging from the most vigorous vent (Snow Chimney, maximum discharge temperature 365°C) was boiling at the seafloor at a depth of 1908 m, and two distinct end-member hydrothermal fluids were identified. The fluid chemistry of the typical Cl-enriched and Cl-depleted hydrothermal fluids was analyzed, as was the mineralogy of the host chimney structures. The variability in the fluid chemistry was potentially controlled by the subseafloor phase-separation (vapor loss process) and the microbial community activities. Microbial community structures in three chimney structures were investigated using culture-dependent and -independent techniques. The small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene clone analysis revealed that both bacterial and archaeal rRNA gene communities on the chimney surfaces differed among three chimneys. Cultivation analysis demonstrated significant variation in the culturability of various microbial components among the chimneys, particularly of thermophilic H2-oxidizing (and S-oxidizing) chemolithoautotrophs such as the genera Aquifex and Persephonella. The physical and chemical environments of chimney surface habitats are still unresolved and do not directly extrapolate the environments of possible subseafloor habitats. However, the variability in microbial community found in the chimneys also provides an insight into the different biogeochemical interactions potentially affected by the phase separation of the hydrothermal fluids in the subseafloor hydrothermal habitats. In addition, comparison with other deep-sea hydrothermal systems revealed that the Mariner field microbial communities have unusual characteristics.

  9. Diagenesis and reservoir quality of the Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation tight sandstones in the southern Songliao Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Kelai; Cao, Yingchang; Jahren, Jens; Zhu, Rukai; Bjørlykke, Knut; Haile, Beyene Girma; Zheng, Lijing; Hellevang, Helge

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation in the southern Songliao Basin is the typical tight oil sandstone in China. For effective exploration, appraisal and production from such a tight oil sandstone, the diagenesis and reservoir quality must be thoroughly studied first. The tight oil sandstone has been examined by a variety of methods, including core and thin section observation, XRD, SEM, CL, fluorescence, electron probing analysis, fluid inclusion and isotope testing and quantitative determination of reservoir properties. The sandstones are mostly lithic arkoses and feldspathic litharenites with fine to medium grain size and moderate to good sorting. The sandstones are dominated by feldspar, quartz, and volcanic rock fragments showing various stages of disintegration. The reservoir properties are quite poor, with low porosity (average 8.54%) and permeability (average 0.493 mD), small pore-throat radius (average 0.206 μm) and high displacement pressure (mostly higher than 1 MPa). The tight sandstone reservoirs have undergone significant diagenetic alterations such as compaction, feldspar dissolution, quartz cementation, carbonate cementation (mainly ferrocalcite and ankerite) and clay mineral alteration. As to the onset time, the oil emplacement was prior to the carbonate cementation but posterior to the quartz cementation and feldspar dissolution. The smectite to illite reaction and pressure solution at stylolites provide a most important silica sources for quartz cementation. Carbonate cements increase towards interbedded mudstones. Mechanical compaction has played a more important role than cementation in destroying the reservoir quality of the K1q4 sandstone reservoirs. Mixed-layer illite/smectite and illite reduced the porosity and permeability significantly, while chlorite preserved the porosity and permeability since it tends to be oil wet so that later carbonate cementation can be inhibited to some extent. It is likely that the oil emplacement occurred

  10. When the waves of European Neolithization met: first paleogenetic evidence from early farmers in the southern Paris Basin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maïté Rivollat

    Full Text Available An intense debate concerning the nature and mode of Neolithic transition in Europe has long received much attention. Recent publications of paleogenetic analyses focusing on ancient European farmers from Central Europe or the Iberian Peninsula have greatly contributed to this debate, providing arguments in favor of major migrations accompanying European Neolithization and highlighting noticeable genetic differentiation between farmers associated with two archaeologically defined migration routes: the Danube valley and the Mediterranean Sea. The aim of the present study was to fill a gap with the first paleogenetic data of Neolithic settlers from a region (France where the two great currents came into both direct and indirect contact with each other. To this end, we analyzed the Gurgy 'Les Noisats' group, an Early/Middle Neolithic necropolis in the southern part of the Paris Basin. Interestingly, the archaeological record from this region highlighted a clear cultural influence from the Danubian cultural sphere but also notes exchanges with the Mediterranean cultural area. To unravel the processes implied in these cultural exchanges, we analyzed 102 individuals and obtained the largest Neolithic mitochondrial gene pool so far (39 HVS-I mitochondrial sequences and haplogroups for 55 individuals from a single archaeological site from the Early/Middle Neolithic period. Pairwise FST values, haplogroup frequencies and shared informative haplotypes were calculated and compared with ancient and modern European and Near Eastern populations. These descriptive analyses provided patterns resulting from different evolutionary scenarios; however, the archaeological data available for the region suggest that the Gurgy group was formed through equivalent genetic contributions of farmer descendants from the Danubian and Mediterranean Neolithization waves. However, these results, that would constitute the most ancient genetic evidence of admixture between farmers

  11. Abandoned mine drainage in the Swatara Creek Basin, southern anthracite coalfield, Pennsylvania, USA: 2. performance of treatment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, Charles A., III

    2010-01-01

    A variety of passive and semi-passive treatment systems were constructed by state and local agencies to neutralize acidic mine drainage (AMD) and reduce the transport of dissolved metals in the upper Swatara Creek Basin in the Southern Anthracite Coalfield in eastern Pennsylvania. To evaluate the effectiveness of selected treatment systems installed during 1995–2001, the US Geological Survey collected water-quality data at upstream and downstream locations relative to each system eight or more times annually for a minimum of 3 years at each site during 1996–2007. Performance was normalized among treatment types by dividing the acid load removed by the size of the treatment system. For the limestone sand, open limestone channel, oxic limestone drain, anoxic limestone drain (ALD), and limestone diversion well treatment systems, the size was indicated by the total mass of limestone; for the aerobic wetland systems, the size was indicated by the total surface area of ponds and wetlands. Additionally, the approximate cost per tonne of acid treated over an assumed service life of 20 years was computed. On the basis of these performance metrics, the limestone sand, ALD, oxic limestone drain, and limestone diversion wells had similar ranges of acid-removal efficiency and cost efficiency. However, the open limestone channel had lower removal efficiency and higher cost per ton of acid treated. The wetlands effectively attenuated metals transport but were relatively expensive considering metrics that evaluated acid removal and cost efficiency. Although the water-quality data indicated that all treatments reduced the acidity load from AMD, the ALD was most effective at producing near-neutral pH and attenuating acidity and dissolved metals. The diversion wells were effective at removing acidity and increasing pH of downstream water and exhibited unique potential to treat moderate to high flows associated with storm flow conditions.

  12. Differences in nitrous oxide distribution patterns between the Bering Sea basin and Indian Sector of the Southern Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Liqi; ZHANG Jiexia; ZHAN Liyang; LI Yuhong; SUN Heng

    2014-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) distribution patterns in the Bering Sea basin (BSB) and Indian Sector of the Southern Ocean (ISSO) were described and compared. In both sites, the waters were divided into four layers:surface layer, subsurface layer, N2O maximum layer, and deep water. Simulations were made to find out the most important factors that regulate the N2O distribution patterns in different layers of both sites. The results showed that in the surface water, N2O was more understaturated in the ISSO than the BSB. This phenom-enon in the surface water of ISSO may result from ice melt water intrusion and northeastward transport of the Antarctic surface water. Results of the rough estimation of air-sea fluxes during the expedition were (-0.34±0.07)-(-0.64±0.13) μmol/(m2·d) and (-1.47±0.42)-(-1.77±0.51) μmol/(m2·d) for the BSB and the ISSO, respectively. Strongly stratified surface layer and temperature minimum layer restricted exchange across the thermocline. The N2O maximum existed in higher concentration and deeper in the BSB than the ISSO, but their contribution to the upper layer by eddy diffusions was negligible. In deep waters, a concen-tration difference of 5 nmol/L N2O between these two sites was found, which suggested that N2O produc-tion occurred during thermohaline circulation. N2O may be a useful tracer to study important large-scale hydrographic processes.

  13. Three cycles of sedimentation in ancient sedimentary basins of southern Ireland: insights from detrital zircon U-Pb ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairey, Brenton; Kerrison, Aidan; Meere, Patrick; Mulchrone, Kieran; Linnemann, Ulf; Hofmann, Mandy; Gaertner, Andreas; Sonntag, Benita-Lisette; Byrne, Keith

    2016-04-01

    Previous work has shown that sedimentary rocks from the Lower Devonian Dingle Basin were uplifted and recycled by Acadian orogenic activity into the Upper Devonian Munster Basin. This is particularly applicable for sediments deposited in the western part of the Munster Basin. In the present study, a new dataset of U-Pb ages for detrital zircons has been established that spans a large geographic area which includes the Dingle and Munster basins as well as the offshore Mesozoic North Celtic Sea, South Celtic Sea, 'Goban Spur' and Fastnet basins. The study is the first of its kind in any of these sedimentary basins. The aim is to investigate whether sediments deposited in the offshore basins during the Mesozoic reflect three erosion-deposition cycles. Detritus that has undergone three sedimentary cycles would yield super-mature sediments suitable for hydrocarbon storage. Detrital zircon age spectra for Lower Devonian Dingle Basin samples indicate strong sediment input from Avalonian (~600 Ma) and Laurentian (~1.7 Ga and ~1.1 Ga) sources with some input from Caledonian orogenic sources (400-480 Ma). Detrital zircon age spectra in the western Munster Basin largely reflect input from Caledonian-aged igneous crustal input (400-480 Ma) and Laurentian sources. An Avalonian component is not detected in any of the samples from the western Munster Basin. In the central and eastern parts of the Munster Basin, detrital zircon age spectra indicate that the dominant sources of detritus are derived from Laurentia and from Caledonian igneous rocks. In contrast to the western part of the basin, age components around 600 Ma are present in some samples and represent an Avalonian source. These signals are echoed, at varying degrees, in detrital age spectra from Jurassic and Cretaceous samples of the central North Celtic Sea Basin. These age spectra also indicate a significant contribution of detritus from Avalonian terrane. The Avalonian signature is completely absent from Jurassic

  14. Fairy chimneys in Peru

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Erosion creates beautiful landscapes. A large part of them is known just by the local population. Google Maps can help in locating the places, study them and start any project for preservation. An interesting example is given by a landscape of fairy chimneys in Peru, near San Pedro de Larcay. It is remarkable the fact that some of them have been adapted as dwelling places.

  15. Giant Otters in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schenk C.

    1992-02-01

    Full Text Available We are in the second year of fieldwork surveying for Giant Otters in the southeastern rainforest of Peru, in three areas with differing levels of legal protection. While there is some illegal hunting still happening outside the protected areas, the main threat to the otters is badly-conducted tourism. Well-organised tourism can be a promising argument for establishing protected areas like national parks.

  16. Child nutrition: Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malnutrition stunts physical growth and/or limits mental development in one child out of three in developing countries and is a factor in one-third of the 13 million child deaths which occur annually in developing countries. The Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme, with technical support from the Human Health Division, to evaluate the effectiveness of a Government food supplement intervention to combat malnutrition in Peru. (IAEA)

  17. Giant Otters in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk C.; Staib E.

    1992-01-01

    We are in the second year of fieldwork surveying for Giant Otters in the southeastern rainforest of Peru, in three areas with differing levels of legal protection. While there is some illegal hunting still happening outside the protected areas, the main threat to the otters is badly-conducted tourism. Well-organised tourism can be a promising argument for establishing protected areas like national parks.

  18. Development, transnational religion, and the power of ideas in the High Provinces of Cusco, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Olson

    2006-01-01

    I examine the enmeshment of transnationally networked religious organizations in predominantly Quechua communities in the southern Andes of Peru. I aim specifically to understand the multiple ways in which transnational religious organizations contribute to the construction of development epistemologies, or the socioeconomics of development truths. Peru has been undergoing a religious transformation similar to the rest of Latin America, with Evangelical and other non-Catholic faiths now well ...

  19. Peru Mercury Inventory 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, William E.; Sandoval, Esteban; Yepez, Miguel A.; Howard, Howell

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, a specific need for data on mercury use in South America was indicated by the United Nations Environmental Programme-Chemicals (UNEP-Chemicals) at a workshop on regional mercury pollution that took place in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Mercury has long been mined and used in South America for artisanal gold mining and imported for chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, and other uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides information on domestic and international mercury production, trade, prices, sources, and recycling in its annual Minerals Yearbook mercury chapter. Therefore, in response to UNEP-Chemicals, the USGS, in collaboration with the Economic Section of the U.S. Embassy, Lima, has herein compiled data on Peru's exports, imports, and byproduct production of mercury. Peru was selected for this inventory because it has a 2000-year history of mercury production and use, and continues today as an important source of mercury for the global market, as a byproduct from its gold mines. Peru is a regional distributor of imported mercury and user of mercury for artisanal gold mining and chlor-alkali production. Peruvian customs data showed that 22 metric tons (t) of byproduct mercury was exported to the United States in 2006. Transshipped mercury was exported to Brazil (1 t), Colombia (1 t), and Guyana (1 t). Mercury was imported from the United States (54 t), Spain (19 t), and Kyrgyzstan (8 t) in 2006 and was used for artisanal gold mining, chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, or transshipment to other countries in the region. Site visits and interviews provided information on the use and disposition of mercury for artisanal gold mining and other uses. Peru also imports mercury-containing batteries, electronics and computers, fluorescent lamps, and thermometers. In 2006, Peru imported approximately 1,900 t of a wide variety of fluorescent lamps; however, the mercury contained in these lamps, a minimum of approximately 76 kilograms (kg), and in

  20. New seismo-stratigraphic data of the Volturno Basin (northern Campania, Tyrrhenian margin, southern Italy: implications for tectono-stratigraphy of the Campania and Latium sedimentary basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ennio Marsella

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A geological section of the Volturno Basin (northern Campania, continental margin, Italy has been constructed based on new multi-channel seismic data, to show the stratigraphic relationships between the filling in the Quaternary basin and the Meso-Cenozoic acoustic basement. The new seismic sections presented here outline the underlying structures of the basin and their relationships to the filling in the Quaternary basin. Deep exploration wells in Campania and Latium on the Tyrrhenian margin have gathered litho-stratigraphic and commercial multi-channel seismic data that can be used for better integration of the geological data for the area under study. The trending of the seismic units is controlled by the Massico Structural High, which forms the boundary of the Volturno Basin towards the north-west. This produces a geometry that is characteristic of a fan complex, with NE-SW trending. This qualitative calibration of the seismic sequences that fill the sedimentary basin was carried out through the litho-stratigraphic data of the «Castelvolturno 2» well, which highlights the pyroclastic layers and conglomeratic strata of the lagoon and delta environments as they evolve upwards towards marine sediments. Seismo-stratigraphic analysis shows the complex depositional geometries of the filling in the Volturno Basin, which overlie the Meso-Cenozoic carbonatic basement and the related flysch deposits. Coupled with regional geological evidence, the data interpretation here suggests that the Volturno Basin represents a half-graben structure that is characterized by down-thrown blocks along normal faults.

  1. New species and host plants of Anastrepha (Diptera: Tephritidae) primarily from Peru and Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrbom, Allen L; Rodriguez, Erick J; Steck, Gary J; Sutton, Bruce A; Nolazco, Norma

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight new species of Anastrepha are described and illustrated: A. acca (Bolivia, Peru), A. adami (Peru), A. amplidentata (Bolivia, Peru), A. annonae (Peru), A. breviapex (Peru), A. caballeroi (Peru), A. camba (Bolivia, Peru), A. cicra (Bolivia, Peru), A. disjuncta (Peru), A. durantae (Peru), A. echaratiensis (Peru), A. eminens (Peru), A. ericki (Peru), A. gonzalezi (Bolivia, Peru), A. guevarai (Peru), A. gusi (Peru), A. kimi (Colombia, Peru), A. korytkowskii (Bolivia, Peru), A. latilanceola (Bolivia, Peru), A. melanoptera (Peru), A. mollyae (Bolivia, Peru), A. perezi (Peru), A. psidivora (Peru), A. robynae (Peru), A. rondoniensis (Brazil, Peru), A. tunariensis (Bolivia, Peru), A. villosa (Bolivia), and A. zacharyi (Peru). The following host plant records are reported: A. amplidentata from Spondias mombin L. (Anacardiaceae); A. caballeroi from Quararibea malacocalyx A. Robyns & S. Nilsson (Malvaceae); A. annonae from Annona mucosa Jacq. and Annona sp. (Annonaceae); A. durantae from Duranta peruviana Moldenke (Verbenaceae); and A. psidivora from Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae). PMID:26624697

  2. The management of abandoned sites at the basin collieries of center and southern France and the procedure of stoppage of mining works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basin collieries of center and southern France (HBCM) have launched since 1993 the procedures of stoppage of mining works as foreseen by the mining rights and which will lead to the renunciation of their 148 concessions once the remediation of the sites has been completed. In order to cope with the enormous work of file and work follow up, a rigorous procedure and organization has been implemented in order to obtain all necessary prefecture by-laws by the end of 2005. (J.S.)

  3. Integrative geomorphological mapping approach for reconstructing meso-scale alluvial fan palaeoenvironments at Alborz southern foothill, Damghan basin, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büdel, Christian; Majid Padashi, Seyed; Baumhauer, Roland

    2013-04-01

    Alluvial fans and aprons are common depositional features in general Iranian geomorphology. The countries major cities as well as settlements and surrounding area have often been developed and been built up on this Quaternary sediment covers. Hence they periodically face the effects of varying fluvial and slope-fluvial activity occurring as part of this geosystem. The Geological Survey of Iran therefore supports considerable efforts in Quaternary studies yielding to a selection of detailed mapped Quaternary landscapes. The studied geomorphologic structures which are settled up around an endorheic basin in Semnan Province represent a typical type of landform configuration in the area. A 12-km-transect was laid across this basin and range formation. It is oriented in north-south direction from the southern saltpan, called "Kavir-e-Haj Aligholi"/"Chah-e-Jam" ("Damghan Kavir"), across a vast sandy braided river plain, which is entering from the north east direction of the city of Shahroud. At its northern rim it covers alluvial sediment bodies, which are mainly constituted by broad alluvial aprons, fed by watersheds in Alborz Mountains and having their genetic origins in Mio-/Pliocene times. During this study a fully analytical mapping system was used for developing a geodatabase capable of integrating geomorphological analyses. Therefore the system must provide proper differentiation of form, material and process elements as well as geometric separation. Hence the German GMK25 system was set up and slightly modified to fit to the specific project demands. Due to its structure it offers most sophisticated standards and scale independent hierarchies, which fit very well to the software-determinated possibilities of advanced geodatabase applications. One of the main aspects of mapping Quaternary sediments and structures is to acquire a proper description and systematic correlation and categorization of the belonging mapping-objects. Therefore the team from GSI and

  4. Shallow structure of the Chichinautzin Range, southern Mexico basin, central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. A gravity and seismic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Enriquez, J. O.; Lermo-Samaniego, J. F.; Antahyua-Vera, Y. T.; Chavacan, M.; Ramón, V. M.; Hernández-García; Pita, C.

    2013-12-01

    Chichinautzin Range (ChR) closes to the S the Mexico Basin (MB). Initially based on height differences between MB and the to-he S-located Morelos Plataform (MP) , a major S-dipping fault was proposed. Depths differences to the limestone basement beneath MB and MP respectively supported its existence. This assumed fault was named La Pera. Earlier studies reported the existence of several faults affecting the ChR. New studies were focused to analyze the cinematic and dynamic character of faults to the W of ChR (Tenango Fault System) and of southern Sierra de la Cruces Range. Also based on a gravity study (Campos-Enríquez et al., 2000), the existence of a major N-dipping fault was inferred to delimit the MB to the S (i.e., delimiting the ChR to the N). Our study is based on gravity modelling, and local seismicity analysis. Accordingly, Mezosoic sandstones above metamorphic rocks constitute the basement underlying ChR. This structural high is faulted to the N and S. To the N, fault blocks displace the basement to larger depths (2-4 km). To the S the basement is shallower. The faults of the gravity model correlate with all reported faults, which collectively are refferred to as Aztlan Fault System. Two N-S MT profiles confirm the model. Several of these faults are associated with seismic activity with a N-S extension and a left-lateral component. The seismic event were located at depths of 7-15 km (i.e. the brittle crust). The system can be traced from the Nevado de Tolca volcano up to the Popocatépetl volcano and even further eastwards. The system is about 200 km long, 30-40 km wide, tectonically active. It enabled the fast emplacement of the ChR volcanic rocs. A flower-type structure was inferred to the S of ChR, further south, the profile is cut by faults belonging either to the Taxco-San Miguel de Allende Fault System or to the Chapala-Oaxaca Fault System. This profile shows how the transpressive tectonics, to the S, accomodates, with the N-S extension affecting

  5. New insight on the water management in Ica Valley-Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, Joseph; Berger, Diego

    2014-05-01

    The Andes divide Peru into three natural drainage basins: Pacific basin, Atlantic basin and Lake Titicaca basin. According to the National Water Authority (ANA), the Pacific basin is the driest basin. The bulk of water that feed the local aquifers in the coastal Pacific region is coming from rivers that flow west from the Andes. One of them is the Ica River- source of the Ica Aquifer and the Pampas de Villacuri Aquifer. The Ica River flows in a graben that was created by a series of faults. The graben is filled with sand and gravel with interbeded and lenses of clay. The aquifer thickness varies between 25 meters to more than 200 meters. The Ica Valley has an extension of 7700 km2 and belongs to the Province of Ica, the second larger economic center in Peru. The Valley is located in the hyperarid region of the Southern Coastal area of Peru with a few millimeters of precipitation per year. The direct recharge is almost zero. The recharge into the Ica Valley aquifer is comes indirectly by infiltration of storm water through the riverbed generates in the Andes, through irrigation canals and by irrigation return flow. In this hyperarid region, local aquifers like the Ica Valley are extremely valuable resources to local populations and are the key sources of groundwater for agriculture and population needs. Therefore, these aquifers play a crucial role in providing people with water and intense attention should be given to manage the water sector properly and to keep the aquifer sustainable for future generations. The total pumping (from rough estimations) is much greater than the direct and indirect recharge. The deficit in the water balance is reflected in large water level decline, out of operation of shallow wells and the ascending of saline water from deeper layers. The change from flood irrigation that contributes about 35-40% of the water to the aquifer, to drip irrigation dramatically reduces the amount of water that infiltrates into the sub-surface from the

  6. Optica Precolombina Del Peru

    CERN Document Server

    Lunazzi, J J

    2007-01-01

    Archaeological American mirrors are common findings and the images obtained with them are often described by archaeologists as possessing high quality. However, photographs attesting this fact are rare, if any. To the best of my knowledge, only two papers show that quality concerning the Olmeca culture, and only one of them mentions the pre-Inca cultures case. Certainly more images are needed to increase awareness of the importance of the existence of sophisticated imaging elements, particularly when evaluating the cultural degree of the pre-Columbian civilizations. In this paper we show images made in two museums in Lima, Peru, by means of mirrors and the lens action on a necklace element.

  7. Peru; Recent Economic Developments

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes economic developments in Peru during the 1990s. During 1990–92, real GDP growth was negative by 0.9 percent a year on average, reflecting in part deterioration in the terms of trade and adverse weather conditions. During that period, growth in the construction, manufacturing, and fishing sectors was more than offset by a contraction in the agricultural and mining sectors. Gross domestic investment rose from about 15½ percent of GDP in 1990 to 16½ percent in 1992 mainl...

  8. Geochemical characteristics and genetic types of crude oils from the Tertiary system in the southern part of western Qaidam Basin, Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hongbo; ZHANG Min; ZHANG Chunming; PENG Dehua

    2008-01-01

    Crude oil samples taken from the southern part of westem Qaidam Basin were analyzed with GC/MS in order to understand the geochemical characteristics of crude oils. The results reveal that most crude oils are characterized by high abundance of gammaeerane and C35 homohopane, which are the representative characteristics of saline lacustrine crude oils. Based on the variation of the ratios of gammacerane/C30 hopane (G/H) and C35 homohopane/C34 homohopane (C35/C34H), two crude oil groups, A and B, are identified. Group-A crude oils mainly occurr in the north of the study area, with higher ratios of G/H (>0.8) and C35/C34H (>1.2), whereas group-B crude oils, selected from the south of the study area, show lower ratios of G/H (<0.8) and C35/C3aH (<1.0). In addition, group-A crude oils are distinguished into three subgroups in accordance with their different ratios of G/H and C35/C34H and different distribution characteristics of n-alkanes, isoprenoids and steranes. These may be helpful for understanding the distribution characteristics of crude oils in the southern part of western Qaidam Basin and providing clues to the forthcoming exploration of crude oils and gas.

  9. How to solve the technical problems in CBM development: A case study of a CBM gas reservoir in the southern Qinshui Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhong Zhu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The low average single-well production, resulting in low economic benefit, has become the main bottleneck of CBM development in China. In view of this issue, through case study of a CBM gas reservoir in the southern Qinshui Basin, we summarized the present status of CBM technology and development there and also pointed out some major problems in CBM development: (1 the engineering technology for the CBM development needs to adapt to the particular geological characteristics; (2 a large number of inefficient zones still exist in mature blocks in the southern Qinshui Basin; (3 single-well production can not be effectively enhanced only by increasing the fracturing scale; (4 the production of multi-lateral wells is higher, but the fulfillment rate of production capacity overall is still low; and (5 on-site management lacks scientific evidence. On this basis, we present the following suggestions for subsequent coalbed gas development: (1 the production construction mode should be changed, and the fulfillment rate of production capacity construction should be improved; (2 CBM geological research should be improved and well types and locations should be designed reasonably and scientifically; (3 main technologies should be built in a dialectical thinking mode; (4 horizontal well design should be optimized to improve the applicability of relevant technologies; (5 fracturing mode should be changed to improve single-well production; and (6 the drainage technology should be changed to improve economic efficiency.

  10. The role of internal waves in the formation of layered structure at exchange flows between two closed basins (Middle and southern basins of the Caspian sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Bidokhti

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available  Layered structures in the oceans have always attracted the attention of oceanographers. The formation of these structures have been attributed to phenomena such as double – diffusive convection, internal waves and turbulent modulated mixing .In this paper, the vertical structures of temperature, salinity, density and the layered structure in the middle parts of Caspian Sea have been studied. Counters of iso-quantities of these physical properties, show the existence of regular structures, which indicate that internal waves which are produced by exchanging flow between two basins, as a result of horizontal density gradients (usually from north basin to south basin may generate these layers. Froude number of this flow is about one. The length of wave of the internal waves is found to be about 200 km and the flow velocity associated with this gravity drive flow is about 0.2 m/s, the frequency of these waves is of order of inertial frequency. The normal modes of these waves have a near steady structure and can fold the inflow front from the North Caspian sea to South Caspian Sea basins, then the layered structure are formed. The thickness of these layers so formed is found to be about 10-20 m. These are in agreement with the values predicted by the model of Wong et al, (2001. In these waters density ratio is negative. Thus, double – diffusive convection does not often happen and cannot produce these layered structures.

  11. ENSO impact on hydrology in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado-Casimiro, W. S.; Felipe, O.; Silvestre, E.; Bourrel, L.

    2013-04-01

    The El Niño and La Niña impacts on the hydrology of Peru were assessed based on discharge data (1968-2006) of 20 river catchments distributed over three drainage regions in Peru: 14 in the Pacific Coast (PC), 3 in the Lake Titicaca (TL) region, and 3 in the Amazonas (AM). To classify the El Niño and La Niña events, we used the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) based on hydrological years (September to August). Using the SOI values, the events were re-classified as strong El Niño (SEN), moderate El Niño (MEN), normal years (N), moderate La Niña (MLN) and strong La Niña (SLN). On average during the SEN years, sharp increases occurred in the discharges in the north central area of the PC and decreases in the remaining discharge stations that were analyzed, while in the years of MEN events, these changes show different responses than those of the SEN. During the years classified as La Niña, positive changes are mostly observed in the majority of the stations in the rivers located in the center of Peru's Pacific Coast. Another important result of this work is that the Ilave River (south of the Titicaca watershed) shows higher positive (negative) impacts during La Niña (El Niño) years, a fact that is not clearly seen in the rivers of the northern part of the Titicaca watershed (Ramis and Huancane rivers).

  12. Detrital Zircon Provenance Record of Pre-Andean to Modern Tectonics in the Northern Andes: Examples from Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, S. W. M.; Jackson, L. J.; Horton, B. K.

    2015-12-01

    Detrital zircon U-Pb age distributions from modern rivers and Mesozoic-Cenozoic basin fill in the northern Andes provide insights into pre-Andean, Andean, and active uplift and exhumation of distinctive sediment source regions. Diagnostic age signatures enable straightforward discrimination of competing sediment sources within the Andean magmatic arc (Western Cordillera-Central Cordillera), retroarc fold-thrust belt (Eastern Cordillera-Subandean Zone), and Amazonian craton (composed of several basement provinces). More complex, however, are the mid/late Cenozoic provenance records generated by recycling of basin fill originally deposited during early/mid Mesozoic extension, late Mesozoic thermal subsidence, and early Cenozoic shortening. Although subject to time-transgressive trends, regionally significant provenance patterns in Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia reveal: (1) Triassic-Jurassic growth of extensional subbasins fed by local block uplifts (with commonly unimodal 300­-150 Ma age peaks); (2) Cretaceous deposition in an extensive postrift setting fed by principally cratonic sources (with common 1800-900 Ma ages); and (3) Cenozoic growth of a broad flexural basin fed initially fed by magmatic-arc rocks (100-0 Ma), then later dominance by thrust-belt sedimentary rocks with progressively greater degrees of basin recycling (yielding diverse and variable age populations from the aforementioned source regions). U-Pb results from modern rivers and smaller subbasins prove useful in evaluating source-to-sink relationships, downstream mixing relationships, hinterland-foreland basin connectivity, paleodrainage integration, and tectonic/paleotopographic reconstructions. Most but not all of the elevated intermontane basins in the modern hinterland of the northern Andes contain provenance records consistent with genesis in a broader foreland basin developed at low elevation. Downstream variations within modern axial rivers and Cenozoic axial basins inform predictive models of

  13. Peru turnaround tied to privatization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroleos del Peru predicts a 10% increase in Peru's oil production this year and a further increase in 1994. Petroperu also forecasts a sharp increase in drilling in Peru this year. After several years of declining oil production, a gradual turnaround in the cash strapped country's petroleum industry is largely tied to its progress in privatization. The government last year began a campaign to privatize all state owned companies by the end of July 1995. The paper discusses forecasts by Petroperu; the contract of Occidental del Amazonas Inc.; the Petromar privatization; Great Western's contract; development of the Aguaytia gas field; and refinery contracts

  14. Selected examples of needs for long term pilot areas in Mediterranean catchments: a mountain traditional agricultural system and a large and regulated hydrographic basin in Southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Polo, María; Herrero, Javier; Millares, Agustín; José Pérez-Palazón, María; Pimentel, Rafael; Aguilar, Cristina; Jurado, Alicia; Contreras, Eva; Gómez-Beas, Raquel; Carpintero, Miriam; Gulliver, Zacarías

    2015-04-01

    Integrated River Basin Management (IRBM) aims at planning water, land and other natural resources for an equitable and sustainable management, also capable of preserving or restoring freshwater ecosystems. Long term series of significant variables at different scales and a sound knowledge of the river basin processes are needed to establish the current state and past&future evolution of the hydrological system, soil use and vegetation distribution, and their social impacts and feedbacks. This is particularly crucial if future scenario analyses are to be performed to assess decision-making processes and adaptive plans. This work highlights the need for an adequate design and development of process-oriented monitoring systems at the basin scale in a decision-making framework. First, the hydrologic monitoring network of the Guadalfeo River Basin, in the southern face of Sierra Nevada Range (Spain), is shown, in a pilot catchment of 1300 km2 in which snow processes in Mediterranean conditions have been studied over the last ten years with a holistic approach. The network development and the main features of the dataset are described together with their use for different scientific and environmental applications; their benefits for assessing social and economic impact in the rural environment are shown from a study case in which the sustainability of ancient channels fed by snowmelt, in use since the XIIIth century for traditional irrigated crops in the mountainous area, was assessed in a future scenarios analyses. Secondly, the standard flow and water quality monitoring networks in the Guadalquivir River Basin, a large (57400 km2) and highly regulated agricultural catchment in southern Spain, are shown, and their strengths and weaknessess for an IRBM framework are analysed. Sediments and selected pollutants are used to trace soil erosion and agricultural/urban exports throughout the catchment, and the final loads to the river estuary in the Atlantic Ocean are assessed

  15. Contrasting isotopic mantle sources for proterozoic lamproites and kimberlites from the Cuddapah basin and eastern Dharwar craton: implication for proterozoic mantle heterogeneity beneath southern India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimberlites intruding the Precambrian basement towards the western margin of the Cuddapah basin near Anantapur (1090 Ma) and Mahbubnagar (1360 Ma) in Andhra Pradesh have initial 87Sr/86Sr between 0.70205 to 0.70734 and σNd between +0.5 to +4.68. Mesoproterozoic lamproites (1380 Ma) from the Cuddapah basin (Chelima and Zangamarajupalle) and its NE margin (Ramannapeta) have initial 87Sr/86Sr between 0.70520 and 0.7390 and εNd from -6.43 to -8.29. Combined Sr- and Nd- isotopic ratios suggest that lamproites were derived from enriched sources which have time-averaged higher Rb/Sr and lower Sm/Nd ratios than the Bulk Earth whereas kimberlites were derived from depleted source with lower Rb/Sr and higher Sm/Nd ratios. Calculated TDM model ages suggest that the lamproite source enrichment (∼2 Ga) preceded that of kimberlites (∼1.37 Ga). Our work demonstrates the existence of isotopically contrasting upper mantle sources for southern Indian kimberlites and lamproites and provides evidence for a lateral, isotopically heterogeneous mantle beneath the Cuddapah basin and eastern Dharwar craton. The significance of our results in the context of diamond exploration is also highlighted. (author)

  16. U-Pb zircon constraints on the age of the Cretaceous Mata Amarilla Formation, Southern Patagonia, Argentina: Its relationship with the evolution of the Austral Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the abundant fossil content of the Mata Amarilla Formation (Southern Patagonia, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina), its age has always generated a considerable number of questions and debates. The chronological data provided by invertebrates, dinosaurs, fish, turtles, plesiosaurs and fossil flora are contradictory. In this work, twenty U-Pb spot analyses by laser ablation were carried out on the outer parts of the zoned zircon crystals from a tuff layer of the middle section of the Mata Amarilla Formation, yielding a U-Pb concordia age of 96.23±0.71 Ma, which corresponds to the middle Cenomanian. The deposition of the lower section of the Mata Amarilla Formation marks the onset of the foreland stage of the Austral Basin (also known as Magallanes Basin); this transition is characterized by the west-east shift of the depositional systems, which is consistent with the progradation of the Cretaceous fold-and-thrust belt. Thus, the onset of the foreland stage could have occurred between the upper Albian and lower Cenomanian, as the underlying Piedra Clavada Formation is lower Albian in age. On comparing the data obtained with information from the Ultima Esperanza Province in Chile, it can be suggested that the initiation of the closure of the Rocas Verdes Marginal Basin occurred simultaneously

  17. Paleoclimatic implications (Late Cretaceous-Paleogene) from micromorphology of calcretes, palustrine limestones and silcretes, southern Paraná Basin, Uruguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tófalo, Ofelia R.; Pazos, Pablo J.

    2010-04-01

    Sedimentologic and petrographic analyses of outcroping and subsurface calcretes, palustrine carbonates, and silcretes were carried out in the southern Paraná Basin (Uruguay). The aim of this work is to describe the microfabric and interpret the genesis of these rocks through detailed analyses, since they contain significant paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic evolution information. The main calcrete and silcrete host rock (Mercedes Formation) is represented by a fluvial thinning upward succession of conglomerate and sandstone deposits, with isolated pelitic intervals and paleosoils. Most of the studied calcretes are macroscopically massive with micromorphological features of alpha fabric, originated by displacive growth of calcite in the host clastic material due to evaporation, evapotranspiration and degassing. Micromorphologically, calcretes indicate an origin in the vadose and phreatic diagenetic environments. Micrite is the principal component, and speaks of rapid precipitation in the vadose zone from supersaturated solutions. The abundance of microsparite and secondary sparite is regarded as the result of dissolution and reprecipitation processes. Although present, brecciated calcretes are less common. They are frequent in vadose diagenetic environments, where the alternation between cementation and non-tectonic fracturing conditions take place. These processes generated episodes of fragmentation, brecciation and cementation. Fissures are filled with clear primary sparitic calcite, formed by precipitation of extremely supersaturated solutions in a phreatic diagenetic environment. The micromorphological characteristics indicate that calcretes resulted from carbonate precipitation in the upper part of the groundwater table and the vadose zone, continuously nourished by lateral migration of groundwater. The scarcity of biogenic structures suggests that they were either formed in zones of little biological activity or that the overimposed processes related to

  18. Astrology in seventeenth-century Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseder, Claudia

    2010-06-01

    This article discusses three aspects of the history of astrology in seventeenth-century Peru that are of larger interest for the history of science in Latin America: Creole concerns about indigenous idolatry, the impact of the Inquisition on natural philosophy, and communication between scholars within the Spanish colonies and the transatlantic world. Drawing mainly on the scholars Antonio de la Calancha, Juan de Figueroa, and Ruiz de Lozano, along with several Jesuits, the article analyzes how natural and medical astrology took shape in Peru and how they fostered astronomical investigations of the southern skies. While natural and medical astrology, showing New and Old World influences, oscillated between orthodoxy and heterodoxy, and between scholasticism and new science, judicial astrology remained undeveloped. Toward the end of the seventeenth century the discourse about astrology took an unexpected turn, reflecting a newly invigorated moral and Christian reading of the heavens that was in part a response to a deep-rooted dissatisfaction with the failure of the extirpation of idolatry campaigns. Inscribing divine and cardinal virtues, the Virgin Mary, Christian saints, and Greco-Roman allegories into the heavens was considered a way to finally solve the problem of idolatry and to convey Creole greatness. PMID:20513626

  19. The Southern Utopia Highland-Lowland Boundary: Basin Structural Controls on Aquifer Development and Volatile-driven Resurfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, J. A., Jr.; Tanaka, K. L.; Rodriguez, J. A. P.; Kargel, J. S.

    2005-03-01

    We propose that the southern Utopia HLB plains units derived from sedimentary volcanism and aquifer collapse within a structurally isolated, sedimentary sequence related to the Utopia multi-ring impact structure.

  20. Detection of detached forced-regressive nearshore wedges: a case study from the central-southern Siena Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Ivan; Arragoni, Simone; Aldinucci, Mauro; Foresi, Luca Maria; Bambini, Anna Maria; Sandrelli, Fabio

    2013-07-01

    The detection of detached nearshore wedges formed in response to relative sea-level drops is considered one of the hottest topics in sequence stratigraphic analysis due to their importance as reservoir analogues. In fact, they usually constitute sandy and porous bodies generally encased in impermeable clay, thus presenting a good potential as traps for fluids. This paper focuses on the sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Pliocene deposits cropping out in the central-southern sector of the Siena Basin (Tuscany, Italy), a post-collisional basin of the Northern Apennines. The exposed sedimentary succession was investigated through a detailed sedimentological and stratigraphic approach, integrated by biostratigraphic analyses, aimed at a better characterization of the infilling history of this sector of the basin. Specifically, this study revealed the occurrence of repeated facies shifts that allowed the identification of two depositional sequences. In detail, a thick sand-rich body far from the basin margins, and previously considered as a turbiditic lobe, has been reinterpreted as formed in a nearshore setting during a fall in relative sea level. This body is totally encased in offshore clay, and due to the lack of physical connection with the related HST deposits, it has to be considered as a detached forced-regressive wedge. The present work led to the recognition of some sedimentological and stratigraphic features typical of falling stage systems tract deposits (e.g. presence of intrabasinal recycled materials, sedimentological evidence of a pre-existing fluvial network subsequently eroded) that can provide useful clues for the identification of detached forced-regressive nearshore wedges in core studies and poorly exposed settings.

  1. Pb/Pb isochron ages and Pb isotope geochemistry of Bambui Group carbonate rocks from the southern portion of the Sao Francisco Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study involves the establishment of chemical and analytical procedure for Pb/Pb dating of Neo proterozoic carbonate rocks and their application to obtaining isochron ages of Bambui Group rocks from the southern portion of the Sao Francisco Basin, Minas Gerais State. The Pb isotopic compositions and U and Pb concentrations determined on more than 90 samples (≅ 600 analyses) from Sete Lagoas do Jacare formations, Bambui Group, from different parts of the basin, showed four distinct types of Pb, here called types I, II, III and IV. Type I Pb was found in samples with low Pb concentrations and relatively high U concentrations. Type II Pb is present in samples with relatively high Pb concentrations and low U concentrations it is non-radiogenic crustal Pb. Type III Pb is also found in samples with high Pb concentrations and low U concentrations but it is radiogenic crustal Pb. Type IV Pb occurs in samples with U/Pb ratios lower than 1 and is intermediate in composition between Type III and Type I Pb. According to the data presented in this paper it is suggested that carbonate rocks from Sete Lagoas Formations were deposited before 686±69 Ma. Rocks from the Lagoa do Jacare Formation, contained only Type II Pb, which does not permit determination of a Pb/Pb age. During the interval from 690 to 500 Ma, the Pb isotope system of the carbonate rocks from the Sao Francisco Basin was disturbed, and in some areas it was totally reset. The imprecise U/Pb ages of 550-600 Ma obtained from some of the carbonate rocks reflect this disturbance. The ages determined in this study are in agreement with most of the published ages of the tectonism from the Brasiliano fold belts marginal to Sao Francisco Craton, showing that the isotopic systems of Sao Francisco Basin rocks were largely affected by brasiliano tectonism. (author)

  2. Peru: 2012 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses Peru’s economic performance in 2012. The impressive growth is owed to its strong fundamentals and sound policy management. However, the economy is vulnerable to short-term shocks. A low growth in China or in the United States could hamper Peru’s macroeconomic performance. The Executive Board has identified structural reforms for improving productivity, and recommends proactive use of macroprudential measures to limit financial vulnerabilities in the context of large c...

  3. Labor market transitions in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, Javier; Rosas Shady, Gerardo David

    2003-01-01

    (english) Traditional labor market analysis based solely on the net unemployment rate fails to explain the apparent paradox between a relatively moderate unemployment rate in Peru (around 10%, with a weak sensibility to wide macroeconomic fluctuations), and the fact that unemployment is one of the major issues in Peru. One possible explanation is that this static indicator of cross section net unemployment balance is compatible with high flows in and out of employment states. To address these...

  4. Identification and simulation of space-time variability of past hydrological drought events in the Limpopo River basin, southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trambauer, P.; Maskey, S.; Werner, M.; Pappenberger, F.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2014-08-01

    Droughts are widespread natural hazards and in many regions their frequency seems to be increasing. A finer-resolution version (0.05° × 0.05°) of the continental-scale hydrological model PCRaster Global Water Balance (PCR-GLOBWB) was set up for the Limpopo River basin, one of the most water-stressed basins on the African continent. An irrigation module was included to account for large irrigated areas of the basin. The finer resolution model was used to analyse hydrological droughts in the Limpopo River basin in the period 1979-2010 with a view to identifying severe droughts that have occurred in the basin. Evaporation, soil moisture, groundwater storage and runoff estimates from the model were derived at a spatial resolution of 0.05° (approximately 5 km) on a daily timescale for the entire basin. PCR-GLOBWB was forced with daily precipitation and temperature obtained from the ERA-Interim global atmospheric reanalysis product from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Two agricultural drought indicators were computed: the Evapotranspiration Deficit Index (ETDI) and the Root Stress Anomaly Index (RSAI). Hydrological drought was characterised using the Standardized Runoff Index (SRI) and the Groundwater Resource Index (GRI), which make use of the streamflow and groundwater storage resulting from the model. Other more widely used meteorological drought indicators, such as the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evaporation Index (SPEI), were also computed for different aggregation periods. Results show that a carefully set-up, process-based model that makes use of the best available input data can identify hydrological droughts even if the model is largely uncalibrated. The indicators considered are able to represent the most severe droughts in the basin and to some extent identify the spatial variability of droughts. Moreover, results show the importance of computing indicators that can be related to

  5. The flux and recovery of bioactive substances in the surface sediments of deep basins off southern California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment microbial community biomass and activity in Santa Monica Basin, a nearshore basin in the California Continental Borderland, were examined in October 1985, 1986 and 1987, May 1986, April 1987 and January 1990. Millimeter-scale ATP profiles and incubation of intact cores with 3H-adenine indicated a high-biomass interface microbial population in the low-oxygen central basin, which was absent in samples from the basin slope sediments. A majority of microbial activity and organic matter mineralization occurred in the top cm of sediment. Comparison of measured ATP and total organic carbon profiles suggest that the C:ATP ratio (wt:wt) ranges between 47:1 and 77:1 in central basin interfacial populations, substantially lower than reported for other aquatic environments. Carbon production estimated from DNA synthesis measurements via 3H-adenine incorporation was compared with TCO2 fluxes measured by in situ benthic chamber experiments. Within the uncertainty of the C:ATP ratio, an overall microbial carbon assimilation efficiency of 75--90% was indicated. The low C:ATP ratios and high carbon assimilation efficiencies significantly affect estimates of microbial growth and respiration and are substantially different than those often assumed in the literature. These results suggest that without independent knowledge of these ratios, the uncertainty in tracer-derived microbial growth and respiration rates may be larger than previously reported. 66 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Quatro especies nuevas de nematodos del sur del Perú y redescripción de Hedruris Orestiae Moniez, 1889 Four new species of nematodes from southern Peru, with a redescription of Hedruris orestiae Moniez, 1889

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicanor Ibâñez H.

    1976-01-01

    Full Text Available En el estudio helmintológico de anfibios del género Telmatobius Wiegmann, 1834, y del pez Orestias luteus Valenciennes, 1839, de las zonas de Arequipa, Puno y del Lago Titicaca, se han encontrado nematodes de los géneros Hedruris Nitzsch, 1821 y Falcaustra Lane, 1915. Se redescribe Hedruris orestiae Moniez, 1889 y se describen cuatro especies nuevas: Hedruris moniezi sp. n., Falcaustra condorcanquii sp. n., Falcaustra pumacahuai sp. n. y Falcaustra tiahuanaquensis sp. n.The collection of large numbers of nematodes from amphibians (Telmatobius sp. and fish Orestias luteus Valenciennes, 1839 Arequipa, Puno, and Titicaca Lake in South Peru has made possible the revision of one species and the description of our new species: Hedruris orestiae Moniez, 1889 is re-described; Hedruris moniezi sp. n., Falcaustra condorcanquii sp. n., Falcaustra pumacahuai sp. and Falcaustra tiahuanaquensis sp. n. are described.

  7. Gravity sliding in basinal setting, a surficial record of tectonic and geodynamic evolution; examples from the southern W. Alps and their foreland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, T.; Franzi, V.; Matthews, S. J.

    2012-04-01

    The occurrence of large-scale submarine landslides, although commonly observed in the present basins, is only exceptionally mentioned in the Alpine orogen and foreland. The southern part of the Western Alpine arc and the SE basin of France provide examples of such features which could be related with particular geodynamic events, in relation with the motion of the Iberian and Adriatic microplates : - A >50km2 slump scar formed in Aptian times at the northwestern edge of the SE France (so-called Vocontian) basin, giving a low-angle detachment surface which was onlapped by Albian hemipelagic marls (Ferry & Flandrin, 1979). The latter mark the maximum deepening stage of the basin, and the head of the scar is located over a deep-seated fault bounding the platform, which strongly suggest that sliding was caused by differential subsidence due to Middle Cretaceous extension, as a consequence of Iberia-Europe divergence. - Later on, a deep-marine erosion surface developed further down the basin over a >100km2 area (Dévoluy massif; Michard et al., 2010), which had been previously affected by Mid-Cretaceous extension. Typical inversion structures are found beneath the surface, which indicate that NS shortening overprinted the extensional pattern. The removal of up to 400m of Mesozoic sediments was controlled by gravity processes, probably triggered by the deformation of the basin floor following tectonic inversion. The overlying pelagic carbonates indicate that shortening occurred before the Campanian, which is closely comparable with the earliest stages of tectonic inversion in the Pyrenees. - The transition slope between the Paleogene Alpine flexural basin and the NW-ward propagating accretionary prism provides examples of basin floor degradation and of gravity-driven emplacement of large-scale blocks, generally regarded as thrust-sheets in the Alps. These features allow to reconstruct the early stages of the Adria-Europe collision, which strongly differ from the Oligo

  8. Crustal structures across Canada Basin and southern Alpha Ridge of the Arctic Ocean from P- and S-wave sonobuoy wide-angle studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, D.; Shimeld, J.; Jackson, R.; Hutchinson, D. R.; Mosher, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    During 2007-2009, a total of 127 expendable sonobuoys (SB) were deployed across Canada Basin and southern Alpha Ridge to record wide-angle reflections and refractions from more than 10,000 km of inline, short-offset seismic reflection surveying. Most of the SB data show clear wide-angle refractions/reflections from various sedimentary and crustal layers at offsets up to 35 km. Source-receiver offsets are calculated using direct water waves. Subsequent processing includes compensation for spherical divergence and attenuation, despiking, filtering, deconvolution, and NMO correction. During wide-angle modeling, inline reflection data are converted to depth using velocity models/interpretations, iteratively updated based on wide-angle raytracing. Slight ray angle dependent anisotropy is found to best describe observed data, and is used for time-depth conversions. Clear deep refractions from upper, middle and lower crusts are recorded by most SB. Across southern Canada Basin, a regionally consistent velocity structure exists: velocities of ~4.5 km/s overlie a sub-basement layer of 5.5-5.8 km/s at depths of 12-13 km which, in turn, overlie a lower crust of 6.7-7.2 km/s. This structure is intersected by a central gravity low (previously interpreted to be an extinct spreading center), west of which the basement and sub-basement layers are consistently shallower by >1 km than the eastern side. Further northward, significant velocity variations exist. For example, the southern Alpha Ridge has a lower crust of 6.0-6.6 km/s or 6.8-7.0 km/s. Volcanic intrusions, inferred from high basement velocities of ~5.7 km/s at unusually shallow depths (~5 km), exist at discrete locations along southern Alpha Ridge. Between Northwind Ridge and Alpha Ridge, a typical continent-type crustal structure is observed. PmP is occasionally observed, modeling of which results in a Moho depth of 12-15 km. Velocities of 4.2-4.5 km/s in the northern study area are associated with a regional

  9. Assessment of undiscovered copper resources associated with the Permian Kupferschiefer, Southern Permian Basin, Europe: Chapter U in Global mineral resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, Michael L.; Oszczepalski, Sławomir; Parks, Heather L.; Bliss, James D.; Borg, Gregor; Box, Stephen E.; Denning, Paul D.; Hayes, Timothy S.; Spieth, Volker; Taylor, Cliff D.

    2015-01-01

    This study synthesizes available information and estimates the location and quantity of undiscovered copper associated with a late Permian bituminous shale, the Kupferschiefer, of the Southern Permian Basin in Europe. The purpose of this study is to (1) delineate permissive areas (tracts) where undiscovered reduced-facies sediment-hosted stratabound copper deposits could occur within 2.5 kilometers of the surface, (2) provide a database of known reduced-facies-type sediment-hosted stratabound copper deposits and significant prospects, and (3) provide probabilistic estimates of amounts of undiscovered copper that could be present within each tract. This assessment is a contribution to a global assessment conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

  10. Identification and simulation of space-time variability of past hydrological drought events in the Limpopo river basin, Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Trambauer

    2014-03-01

    droughts in the Limpopo river basin in the period 1979–2010 with a view to identifying severe droughts that have occurred in the basin. Evaporation, soil moisture, groundwater storage and runoff estimates from the model were derived at a spatial resolution of 0.05° (approximately 5 km on a daily time scale for the entire basin. PCR-GLOBWB was forced with daily precipitation, temperature and other meteorological variables obtained from the ERA-Interim global atmospheric reanalysis product from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Two agricultural drought indicators were computed: the Evapotranspiration Deficit Index (ETDI and the Root Stress Anomaly Index (RSAI. Hydrological drought was characterised using the Standardized Runoff Index (SRI and the Groundwater Resource Index (GRI, which make use of the streamflow and groundwater storage resulting from the model. Other more widely used drought indicators, such as the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI and the Standardized Precipitation Evaporation Index (SPEI were also computed for different aggregation periods. Results show that a carefully set up process-based model that makes use of the best available input data can successfully identify hydrological droughts even if the model is largely uncalibrated. The indicators considered are able to represent the most severe droughts in the basin and to some extent identify the spatial variability of droughts. Moreover, results show the importance of computing indicators that can be related to hydrological droughts, and how these add value to the identification of droughts/floods and the temporal evolution of events that would otherwise not have been apparent when considering only meteorological indicators. In some cases, meteorological indicators alone fail to capture the severity of the drought. Therefore, a combination of some of these indicators (e.g. SPEI-3, SRI-6, SPI-12 is found to be a useful measure for identifying hydrological droughts in

  11. Tectono-thermal History of the Southern Nenana Basin, Interior Alaska: Implications for Conventional and Unconventional Hydrocarbon Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, N. C.; Hanks, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Tertiary Nenana basin of Interior Alaska is currently the focus of both new oil exploration and coalbed methane exploitation and is being evaluated as a potential CO2sequestration site. The basin first formed as a Late Paleocene extensional rift with the deposition of oil and gas-prone, coal-bearing non-marine sediments with excellent source potential. Basin inversion during the Early Eocene-Early Oligocene times resulted in folding and erosion of higher stratigraphic levels, forming excellent structural and stratigraphic traps. Initiation of active faulting on its eastern margin in the middle Oligocene caused slow tectonic subsidence that resulted in the deposition of reservoir and seal rocks of the Usibelli Group. Onset of rapid tectonic subsidence in Pliocene that continues to the present-day has provided significant pressure and temperature gradient for the source rocks. Apatite fission-track and vitrinite reflectance data reveals two major paleo-thermal episodes: Late Paleocene to Early Eocene (60 Ma to 54.8 Ma) and Late Miocene to present-day (7 Ma to present). These episodes of maximum paleotemperatures have implications for the evolution of source rock maturity within the basin. In this study, we are also investigating the potential for coalbed methane production from the Late Paleocene coals via injection of CO2. Our preliminary analyses demonstrate that 150 MMSCF of methane could be produced while 33000 tonnes of CO2 per injection well (base case of ~9 years) can be sequestered in the vicinity of existing infrastructure. However, these volumes of sequestered CO2and coal bed methane recovery are estimates and are sensitive to the reservoir's geomechanical and flow properties. Keywords: extensional rift, seismic, subsidence, thermal history, fission track, vitrinite reflectance, coal bed methane, Nenana basin, CO2 sequestration

  12. Miocene reefs evolution within the shelf carbonates and fan delta complexes of the Antalya basin, southern Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabiyikoglu, M.; Çiner, A.; Tuzcu, S.

    2003-04-01

    Coral reefs provide sensitive records of tectonics, climatic and sea-level changes as well as palaeoecological conditions of the environmental settings that prevailed during their development. Miocene coral reefs and reef-derived sediments are common constituents of the clastic-dominated succession of the late orogenic depositional fill of the Late Cenozoic Antalya Basin (subdivided into Manavgat, Köprüçay and Aksu sub-basins) in the western Taurides Mountains. Two distinct developments of coral reefs have been recognised: 1) Late Burdigalian-Langhian reefs: They occur as massive, small, isolated, mound-like patch reefs formed on clast-supported conglomerate facies of fan delta and algal-foraminiferal wacke-packstone facies of transgressive open shelf carbonates within the Manavgat and the Köprüçay sub-basins. They are characterized by a massive reef core facies, largely made-up of rich and diversified Faviidae (Porites, Stylophora) dominated hermatypic coral colonies comprising occasional single corals (Mussidae, Caryophyllidae) reflecting relative changes in the bathimetry. The hermatypic coral colonies are mainly composed of massive, domal and branching forms without any distinct zonation within the reef framework. Abundant calcareous algae, bryozoans, bivalves, echinoids, gastropods and benthic and planktic foraminifers are also common within the reef bodies. 2) Tortonian-Messinian reefs: They only occur in the Aksu sub-basin as massive, relatively larger, oval bodies developed on clast-supported conglomerate facies of coastal alluvial fan/fan-delta complexes that formed in a paralic-shallow marine setting. The reef framework is characteristically dominated by Porites (branching and nodular forms) with subordinate Tarbellastraea and rare Siderastraea (massive globular forms), Plesiastraea and Favites. The Miocene coral reef growth and development in the western Taurides are closely related to the complex interaction of sporadic influxes of coarse

  13. First record of Lophodinium polylophum (Daday Lemmermann 1910 (Dinophyceae: Lophodiniaceae in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Samanez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Herein, the first record of Lophodinium polylophum from Peru is presented. This fresh water dinoflagellate was identified in plankton samples from the lagoon Picoplancha of Santuario Nacional Pampas del Heath (Madre de Dios and from a stream in the Puinahua River basin in Loreto.

  14. Microfacies analysis of the Upper Triassic (Norian) "Bača Dolomite": early evolution of the western Slovenian Basin (eastern Southern Alps, western Slovenia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Luka

    2010-08-01

    The Slovenian Basin represents a Mesozoic deep-water sedimentary environment, situated on the southern Tethyan passive margin. Little is known about its earliest history, from the initial opening in the Carnian (probably Ladinian) to a marked deepening at the beginning of the Jurassic. The bulk of the sediment deposited during this period is represented by the Norian-Rhaetian "Bača Dolomite", which has, until now, been poorly investigated due to a late-diagenetic dolomitization. The Mount Slatnik section (south-eastern Julian Alps, western Slovenia) is one of a few sections where the dolomitization was incomplete. Detailed analysis of this section allowed us to recognize eight microfacies (MF): MF 1 (calcilutite), MF 2 (pelagic bivalve-radiolarian floatstone/wackestone to rudstone/packstone), MF 3 (dolomitized mudstone) with sub-types MF 3-LamB and MF 3-LamD (laminated mudstone found in a breccia matrix and laminated mudstone found in thin-bedded dolomites, respectively) and MF 3-Mix (mixed mudstone), MF 4 (bioturbated radiolarian-spiculite wackestone), MF 5 (fine peloidal-bioclastic packstone), MF 6 (very fine peloidal packstone), MF 7 (bioclastic wackestone) and MF 8 (crystalline dolomite). The microfacies and facies associations indicate a carbonate slope apron depositional environment with hemipelagic sedimentation punctuated by depositions from turbidites and slumps. In addition to the sedimentary environment, two "retrogradation-progradation" cycles were recognized, each with a shift of the depositional setting from an inner apron to a basin plain environment.

  15. Modified Gulf of California model for South Georgia,north Scotia Ridge, and implications for the Rocas Verdes back-arc basin, southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabaster, T.; Storey, B. C.

    1990-06-01

    New field mapping and an integrated trace element and Nd isotopic study have been undertaken on the Jurassic-Cretaceous Larsen Harbour Complex on the island of South Georgia, recognized as a displaced part of the southern Andes ensialic, autochthonous Rocas Verdes marginal basin. Five basalt groups (Groups I-V) are identified from trace element data; initial Nd isotopic compositions suggest that they are derived from only two sources. Magmas produced during early stages of continental lithospheric attenuation (Groups I-III) were derived by varying degrees of partial melting and fractional crystallization from a large ion lithophile element (LILE)-enriched, low-ɛNd mantle source relative to normal (N)-type mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB). Magmas produced during later stages of rifting (Groups IV and V) were, however, derived from a high-ɛNd asthenospheric mantle source similar to N-type MORB, unaffected by earlier LILE enrichment. Our data do not concur with previous suggestions that the Larsen Harbour Complex and, by implication, the Rocas Verdes formed in a supra-subduction-zone setting. On the basis of geologic and geochemical evidence, we favor basin formation along an oblique-slip margin akin to that of the Gulf of California.

  16. Web application to access U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works and Restoration Projects information for the Rio Grande Basin, southern Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archuleta, Christy-Ann M.; Eames, Deanna R.

    2009-01-01

    The Rio Grande Civil Works and Restoration Projects Web Application, developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Albuquerque District, is designed to provide publicly available information through the Internet about civil works and restoration projects in the Rio Grande Basin. Since 1942, USACE Albuquerque District responsibilities have included building facilities for the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force, providing flood protection, supplying water for power and public recreation, participating in fire remediation, protecting and restoring wetlands and other natural resources, and supporting other government agencies with engineering, contracting, and project management services. In the process of conducting this vast array of engineering work, the need arose for easily tracking the locations of and providing information about projects to stakeholders and the public. This fact sheet introduces a Web application developed to enable users to visualize locations and search for information about USACE (and some other Federal, State, and local) projects in the Rio Grande Basin in southern Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas.

  17. Pottery from Peru. A Handbook. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammage, Alix

    One of three handbooks dealing with pottery traditions from around the world, this packet draws together information about historical, ethnographic, and pottery traditions of Peru. The first of 13 brief subsections focuses on Peru's land and people. A presentation of a potter's history of Peru is followed by a discussion of the Chavin Cult (800…

  18. Aqueducts and geoglyphs : the response of Ancient Nasca to water shortages in the desert of Atacama (Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Nicola; Lasaponara, Rosa

    2016-04-01

    The desert of Atacama is a plateau in South America, covering a 1,000-kilometre strip of land on the Pacific coast, west of the Andes mountains, between Chile and Peru. Due to the confluence of a cold ocean current (the Humboldt Current) along with other climatic factors, connected to the particular topography and geomorphology of the region, Atacama desert is one of the most arid areas of the world. In particular, in Nasca region (Southern Peru) the lack of water was (and still is) due to the following causes: (i) the scarce pluvial precipitations and the (ii) high infiltration capacity, and the consequent yearly significant reduction of the surface water (Schreiber & Lancho Rojas 2009). Over the millennia long periods of drought occurred and frequently the lack of water was persistent for several decades. Despite the arid and extreme nature of the environment, this region was populated by important civilizations, such as Paracas and Nasca, which flourished in the Early Intermediate period (200 BCE-500 AD) (Silvermann & Proulx 2002). In particular the Nasca civilization is well-known for its refined and colourful pottery, characterized by a rich icononographic repertory, and, above all, by the huge and mysterious geoglyphs drawn on the arid plateaus of the Rio Grande de Nasca Basin. In order to practice agriculture, the Nasca developed adequate strategies to cope with hostile environmental factors and water scarcity, building a very efficient aqueduct system. They were aided by the fact that underground water was likely enough close to the surface and accessible by constructing wells and underground aqueducts, known with quechua name of puquios (Schreiber & Lancho Rojas 2009; Lasaponara & Masini 2012a; 2012b) The effectiveness of the techniques of hydraulic engineering depended on the climate and the weather events that sometimes underwent drastic changes, as results of the cyclical phenomenon of El Niño Southern Oscillation (commonly called ENSO). Hence the

  19. Species composition and phytosociology of xerophytic plant communities after extreme rainfall in South Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montesinos, D.B.; Sykora, K.V.; Quipuscoa-Silvestre, Victor; Cleef, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: We present a phytosociological overview of the arid and semi-arid montane vegetation of the province
    of Arequipa in southern Peru. The xerophytic vegetation was studied after extreme rainfall had promoted
    exceptionally lush vegetation and a high aboveground floristic diversity. We

  20. El-Niño southern oscillation and rainfall erosivity in the headwater region of the Grande River Basin, Southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Mello

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Relationships between regional climate and oceanic and atmospheric anomalies are important tools in order to promote the development of models for predicting rainfall erosivity, especially in regions with substantial intra-annual variability in the rainfall regime. In this context, this work aimed to analyze the rainfall erosivity in headwaters of Grande River Basin, Southern Minas Gerais State, Brazil. This study considered the two most representative environments, the Mantiqueira Range (MR and Plateau of Southern Minas Gerais (PSM. These areas are affected by the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO indicators Sea Surface Temperature (SST for Niño 3.4 Region and Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI. Rainfall erosivity was calculated for individual rainfall events from January 2006 to December 2010. The analyses were conducted using the monthly data of ENSO indicators and the following rainfall variables: rainfall erosivity (EI30, rainfall depth (P, erosive rainfall depth (E, number of rainfall events (NRE, number of erosive rainfall events (NEE, frequency of occurrence of an early rainfall pattern (EP, occurrence of late rainfall pattern (LP and occurrence of intermediate rainfall patter (IP. Pearson's coefficient of correlation was used to evaluate the relationships between the rainfall variables and SST and MEI. The coefficients of correlation were significant for SST in the PSM sub-region. Correlations between the rainfall variables and negative oscillations of SST were also significant, especially in the MR sub-region, however, the Person's coefficients were lesser than those obtained for the SST positive oscillations. The correlations between the rainfall variables and MEI were also significant but lesser than the SST correlations. These results demonstrate that SST positive oscillations play a more important role in rainfall erosivity, meaning they were more influenced by El-Niño episodes. Also, these results have shown

  1. Benthic Macroinvertebrates along the Haraz Downstream in Southern Caspian Sea Basin: In Gradient of the Physicochemical Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Faraz Ghasemi; Morteza Kamali

    2014-01-01

    The Haraz River is one of the most important rivers in the Caspian Sea basin. In order to investigate changes in the taxa abundance composition and feeding groups of the benthic macroinvertebrates, twelve-time sampling was carried out at nine stations along three different sites: (1) before, (2) into, and (3) after Amol City. Results showed impacts of anthropogenic activities caused by the urbanization and development on the occurrence of benthic macroinvertebrates taxa. Families, Hydropsychi...

  2. Rotational differencies between the northern and southern Tyrrhenian domains: paleomagnetic constraints from the Amantea basin (Calabria, Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    Speranza, F.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Mattei, M.; Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Universita` di Roma TRE, Rome; Sagnotti, L.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Grasso, F.; Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, Università di Roma Tre, Largo S. Leonardo Murialdo 1, 00143 Roma, Italy

    2000-01-01

    We report on a palaeomagnetic study of upper Miocene sediments from the Amantea basin, located on the Tyrrhenian coast of Calabria. The magnetic mineralogy is dominated by greigite and subordinate magnetite in the Tortonian-Messinian clays (ten sites), and by hemoilmenite and magnetite in the underlaying sands and volcanic ashes (three sites), which have not been dated. Data from the Tortonian, Messinian clays pass both a reversal and a fold test, and define a 19° ± 11° clockwise rotation (wi...

  3. Distribution and transportation of mercury from glacier to lake in the Qiangyong Glacier Basin, southern Tibetan Plateau, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shiwei; Kang, Shichang; Huang, Jie; Li, Chengding; Guo, Junming; Zhang, Qianggong; Sun, Xuejun; Tripathee, Lekhendra

    2016-06-01

    The Tibetan Plateau is home to the largest aggregate of glaciers outside the Polar Regions and is a source of fresh water to 1.4 billion people. Yet little is known about the transportation and cycling of Hg in high-elevation glacier basins on Tibetan Plateau. In this study, surface snow, glacier melting stream water and lake water samples were collected from the Qiangyong Glacier Basin. The spatiotemporal distribution and transportation of Hg from glacier to lake were investigated. Significant diurnal variations of dissolved Hg (DHg) concentrations were observed in the river water, with low concentrations in the morning (8:00am-14:00pm) and high concentrations in the afternoon (16:00pm-20:00pm). The DHg concentrations were exponentially correlated with runoff, which indicated that runoff was the dominant factor affecting DHg concentrations in the river water. Moreover, significant decreases of Hg were observed during transportation from glacier to lake. DHg adsorption onto particulates followed by the sedimentation of particulate-bound Hg (PHg) could be possible as an important Hg removal mechanism during the transportation process. Significant decreases in Hg concentrations were observed downstream of Xiao Qiangyong Lake, which indicated that the high-elevation lake system could significantly affect the distribution and transportation of Hg in the Qiangyong Glacier Basin. PMID:27266318

  4. Elevation-Dependent Vegetation Greening of the Yarlung Zangbo River Basin in the Southern Tibetan Plateau, 1999–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidong Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Yarlung Zangbo River basin is an important alley to transport moisture from the Indian Ocean to the inner Tibetan Plateau. With a wide range of elevations from 147 m to over 7000 m above sea level (a.s.l., ecosystems respond differently to climate change at various elevations. However, the pattern of elevation-dependent vegetation change and how it responds to recent warming have been rarely reported. Here, we investigated the pattern of vegetation greening at different elevations in this river basin using SPOT normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI data during 1999–2013, and examined its relationship with elevation-dependent changes in temperature and precipitation. The annual NDVI has increased by 8.83% from 1999 to 2013. In particular, the NDVI increased more apparently at lower elevations, but remained relatively stable or even decreased at high elevations. It seems that rising temperature has driven the basin-wide vegetation greening, but the greening rate is in contrast to the pattern of elevation-dependent warming (EDW with more significant temperature increase at higher elevations. It appears that decreasing precipitation does not reverse the overall increasing trend in NDVI, but relatively limited precipitation (<500 mm may constrain the NDVI increases, causing apparently stable or even decreased NDVI at higher elevations (>4000 m.

  5. Ecologic studies of Venezuelan encephalitis virus in Peru during 1970-1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, W F; Madalengoitia, J; Flores, W; Acosta, M

    1975-04-01

    Venezuelan encephalitis (VE) virus has intermittently produced epidemics and equine epizootics on the dry Pacific coastal plain of Peru since at least the 1930's. However, evidence that the virus exists in the Amazon region of Peru to the east of the Andes mountains was not obtained until antibodies were found in human sera collected in 1965, and 10 strains of the virus were isolated in a forest near the city of Iquitos, Peru during February and March 1971. Eight strains came from mosquitoes and two from dead sentinel hamsters. Three hamsters exposed in forests near Iquitos developed VE virus antibodies suggesting that hamster-benign strains also exist there. Antibody tests of equine sera revealed no evidence that VE virus was actively cycling during the late 1950's or 1960's in southern coastal Peru, where equine epizootics had occurred in the 1930's and 1940's. In northern coastal Peru bordering Ecuador, antibodies were present in equine sera, presumably residual from the 1969 outbreak caused by subtype I virus, since neutralizing antibody titers were higher to subtype I virus than to subtypes III or IV. No VE virus was detected in this northern region during the dry season of 1970 by use of sentinel hamsters. The possibility is considered that VE epidemics and equine epizootics on the Pacific coast of Peru are caused by movements of virus in infected vertebrates traversing Andean passes or in infected vertebrates or mosquitoes carried in airplanes from the Amazon region. PMID:235838

  6. LOCAL TO BASIN SCALE ARRAYS FOR PASSIVE ACOUSTIC MONITORING IN THE ATLANTIC SECTOR OF THE SOUTHERN OCEAN

    OpenAIRE

    Rettig, Stefanie; Boebel, Olaf; Menze, Sebastian; Kindermann, Lars; Thomisch, Karolin; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Passive acoustic data provide a prime source of information on marine mammal distribution and behaviour. Particularly in the Southern Ocean, where ship-based data collection can be severely hampered by weather and ice conditions, passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) of marine mammals forms an important source of year-round information on acoustic presence. Array data can be used to obtain directional information on the species present in the recordings to derive movement patterns. Acoustic array...

  7. Persistent toxic substances in soils and waters along an altitudinal gradient in the Laja River Basin, Central Southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Ricardo; Popp, Peter; Quiroz, Roberto; Bauer, Coretta; Cid, Hernan; von Tümpling, Wolf

    2005-02-01

    In this study the levels and distribution of some persistent toxic substances (PTS) were investigated in soils, superficial water, and snow along an altitudinal gradient in the Laja River Basin (South Central Chile). The principal objective was to establish the basin's contamination status. The working hypothesis was that PTS levels and distribution in the basin are dependent on the degree of anthropogenic intervention. Fifteen PAHs, seven PCBs congeners, and three organochlorine pesticides were studied in superficial soil and water samples obtained along the altitudinal gradient and from a coastal reference station (Lleu-Lleu River). Soil samples were extracted using accelerated solvent extraction with acetone/cyclohexane (1:1) for PAHs and organochlorine compounds. Contaminants were extracted from water and snow samples by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). PAH and organochlorine compound quantification was carried out by HPLC with fluorescence detection and GC-MS, respectively. PCBs in soils presented four different profiles in the altitudinal gradient, mainly determined by their chlorination degree; these profiles were not observed for the chlorinated pesticides. In general, the detected levels for the analyzed compounds were low for soils when compared with soil data from other remote areas of the world. Higher summation operator PAHs levels in soils were found in the station located at 227 masl (4243 ng g-1 TOC), in a forestry area and near a timber industry, where detected levels were up to eight times higher than the other sampling sites. In general, PAH levels and distribution seems to be dependent on local conditions. No pesticides were detected in surface waters. However, congeners of PCBs were detected in almost all sampling stations with the highest levels being found in Laja Lake waters, where 1.1 ng/l were observed. This concentration is two times higher than values reported for polluted lakes in the Northern Hemisphere. The presence of organochlorine

  8. Sedimentology, rhythmicity and basin-fill architecture of a carbonate ramp depositional system with intermittent terrigenous influx: The Albian Kharfot Formation of the Jeza-Qamar Basin, Dhofar, Southern Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salad Hersi, O.; Abbasi, I. A.; Al-Harthy, A.

    2016-01-01

    which received fine-grained siliciclastic influx from the land (westward). In southern Oman where Kharfot Formation accumulated, the platform was unrimmed ramp type basin with high fine clastic influx along with elevated carbonate production.

  9. A transect across Australia's southern margin in the Otway Basin region: crustal architecture and the nature of rifting from wide-angle seismic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, D. M.; Collins, C. D. N.; Lukaszyk, I.; Chudyk, E. C.

    1998-03-01

    The Otway Basin in southeastern Australia formed on a triangular-shaped area of extended continental lithosphere during two extensional episodes in Cretaceous-to-Miocene times which ultimately led to the separation of Australia and Antarctica. The velocity structure and crustal architecture of the Otway continental margin has been interpreted from offshore-onshore wide-angle seismic profiling data along a transect extending from near the northern Otway Basin margin with Palaeozoic outcrop to the deep ocean basin under the Southern Ocean. Along this transect, the Otway Continental Margin (OCM) Transect, the onshore half-graben geometry of Early Cretaceous deposition gives way to a 5-km-thick basin sequence (P-wave velocity 2.2-4.6 km/s) extending down the continental slope offshore to at least 60 km from the shoreline. At 120 km from the nearest shore, sonobuoy data indicate a 4-5 km sedimentary sequence overlying 7 km of crustal basement rocks above the Moho at 15 km depth (water depth 4220 m). Conspicuous strong Moho reflections are evident under the continental slope at about 10.2 s TWT. Basement is interpreted to be attenuated/faulted Palaeozoic rocks of the Delamerian and Lachlan Orogens (intruded with Jurassic volcanics) that thin from 16 km onshore to about 3.5 km at 120 km from the nearest shore. These rocks comprise a 3 km section that has a velocity of 5.5-5.7 km/s overlying deeper basement with a velocity of 6.15-6.35 km/s. Over the same distance the Moho shallows from a depth of 30 km onshore to 15 km depth at 120 km from the nearest shore, and then to about 12 km in the deep ocean at the limits of the profile (water depth 5200 m). The continent-ocean boundary (COB) is interpreted to be at a prominent topographic inflection point at the bottom of the continental slope in 4800 m of water. P-wave velocities in the lower crust are 6.4-6.8 km/s above a transition to the Moho, with an upper mantle velocity of 8.05 km/s. There is no evidence of massive high

  10. Paleostress analysis applied to fault-slip data from the southern margin of the Central European Basin System (CEBS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippel, J.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M. [GFZ Potsdam (Germany); Reicherter, K. [RWTH Aachen (Germany); Mazur, S. [Wroclaw Univ. (Poland)

    2007-09-13

    We investigate the paleostress fields which controlled the post-Variscan evolution of the Central European Basin System (CEBS). Therefore, field studies are carried out in the marginal areas of the CEBS where Late Palaeozoic and Mesozoic rocks of the basin fill are present in outcrops bearing the imprints of several deformation phases that affected the basin system since the latest Carboniferous. Field studies including structural analysis, measurement of fault-slip data and careful collection of kinematic indicators provide the data base for this study. In the case of polyphase tectonics, the chronology of successive events is deduced and the total fault population from each site is qualitatively divided into different subsets, each being consistent with one specific stress regime. Since the stratigraphy and evolution of the CEBS are well known, temporal and spatial correlations of paleostress orientations are possible. Beside cross-cutting relationships derived from outcrops, we apply different graphical and numerical methods to separate the faults into homogeneous subsets. Depending on (1) the nature of faults (i.e. neoformed or reactivated), (2) the distribution of fault-slip data and (3) the deformation style, the deviatoric stress tensor is calculated for each subset using either the Numeric Dynamic Analysis (Spang, 1972; Sperner et al., 1993) or the Multiple Inverse Method (Yamaji 2000). The results are obtained in terms of a reduced stress tensor, consisting of (1) the orientations of the three principal stress axes {sigma}{sub 1}, {sigma}{sub 2} and {sigma}{sub 3} with {sigma}{sub 1}{>=}{sigma}{sub 2}{>=}{sigma}{sub 3} and (2) the ratio of principal stress differences, R=({sigma}{sub 2}-{sigma}{sub 3})/({sigma}{sub 1}-{sigma}{sub 3}) with 1{>=}{phi}{>=}0. (orig.)

  11. The Mediterranean Basin and Southern Europe in a warmer world: what can we learn from the past?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiot, Joel; Kaniewski, David

    2015-06-01

    Since the late-nineteenth century, surface temperatures have non-uniformly increased worldwide. The repercussion of the global warming in drylands, such as in the Mediterranean, may become a main source of concern in a near future, as it is often accompanied by increased droughts, that will severely degrade water supply and quality. History shows that access to water resources has always presented a challenge for societies around the Mediterranean throughout the Holocene (roughly the last 10,000 years). Repeatedly, adverse climate shifts seem to have interacted with social, economic and political variables, exacerbating vulnerabilities in drier regions. We present a reconstruction of the Holocene climate in the Mediterranean Basin using an innovative method based on pollen data and vegetation modeling. The method consists in calculating the inputs of the vegetation model so that the outputs fit the pollen data, using a Bayesian framework. This model inversion is particularly suited to deal with increasing dissimilarities between past millennia and the last century, especially due to a direct effect of CO2 on vegetation. The comparison of fardistant past and last century shows that the intensity of century-scale precipitation fall, amplified by higher temperatures and then evapotranspiration, appears to be unmatched over the last 10,000 years and the comparison between west and east precipitation anomalies show a clear see-saw effect through all the Holocene, in particular during the dry episodes of Near and Middle East. As a consequence that Tthe recent climatic change seems thento have been unprecedented during the last 10,000 years in the Mediterranean Basin,.over the next few decades, Mediterranean societies will likely be more critically vulnerable to climate change, than at any dry period of the past. We show also that adverse climate shifts are often correlated with the decline or collapse of Mediterranean civiliszations, particularly in the eastern Basin.

  12. Volcanogenic-hydrothermal iron-rich materials from the southern part of the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Gupta, S.M.; Charan, S.N.; Mills, O.P.

    sediments (Iyer et al., 1997a,b). The association of the spherules with met- alliferous sediments of 10 ka age, suggested an episode of hydrothermal activity in the basin. In this paper, we present the finding of a high abundance of similar spherules...) 15–25 out using a CAMEBAX-571 MICRO and a JEOL 6880 Superprobe. For EM and EDX the spherules were mounted on carbon stubs and vacuum coated with carbon while for the EMP polished mounts were prepared. The operating conditions were 20 kV and a filament...

  13. Aqueducts and geoglyphs : the response of Ancient Nasca to water shortages in the desert of Atacama (Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Nicola; Lasaponara, Rosa

    2016-04-01

    The desert of Atacama is a plateau in South America, covering a 1,000-kilometre strip of land on the Pacific coast, west of the Andes mountains, between Chile and Peru. Due to the confluence of a cold ocean current (the Humboldt Current) along with other climatic factors, connected to the particular topography and geomorphology of the region, Atacama desert is one of the most arid areas of the world. In particular, in Nasca region (Southern Peru) the lack of water was (and still is) due to the following causes: (i) the scarce pluvial precipitations and the (ii) high infiltration capacity, and the consequent yearly significant reduction of the surface water (Schreiber & Lancho Rojas 2009). Over the millennia long periods of drought occurred and frequently the lack of water was persistent for several decades. Despite the arid and extreme nature of the environment, this region was populated by important civilizations, such as Paracas and Nasca, which flourished in the Early Intermediate period (200 BCE-500 AD) (Silvermann & Proulx 2002). In particular the Nasca civilization is well-known for its refined and colourful pottery, characterized by a rich icononographic repertory, and, above all, by the huge and mysterious geoglyphs drawn on the arid plateaus of the Rio Grande de Nasca Basin. In order to practice agriculture, the Nasca developed adequate strategies to cope with hostile environmental factors and water scarcity, building a very efficient aqueduct system. They were aided by the fact that underground water was likely enough close to the surface and accessible by constructing wells and underground aqueducts, known with quechua name of puquios (Schreiber & Lancho Rojas 2009; Lasaponara & Masini 2012a; 2012b) The effectiveness of the techniques of hydraulic engineering depended on the climate and the weather events that sometimes underwent drastic changes, as results of the cyclical phenomenon of El Niño Southern Oscillation (commonly called ENSO). Hence the

  14. Peru : Country Financial Accountability Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2001-01-01

    This Country Financial Accountability Assessment (CFAA) report, looks exclusively at Peru's public sector financial accountability arrangements, and, its primary aim is to assess strengths, and weaknesses, as they relate to the use of Bank funds, particularly under non-investment lending operations. It reviews the legislative framework, relevant to the current reporting environment; the ap...

  15. Gully erosion and land degradation in the Souss Basin, southern Morocco - application of airborne and terrestrial imagery and SfM procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Peter, Klaus Daniel; Brings, Christine; Iserloh, Thomas; Seeger, Manuel; Ghafrani, Hassan; d'Oleire-Oltmanns, Sebastian; Marzolff, Irene; Ait Hssaine, Ali; Ries, Johannes B.

    2014-05-01

    Gully erosion is one major issue in soil erosion and land degradation. This major soil degradation process has affected the Souss Basin, located between the High and the Anti-Atlas, historically, and is increasing nowadays again. Since the 16th century, related to the production of sugar cane, gullies have been incising into the sedimentary fans and alluvial terraces. Today, the intensification of agro-industrial production of citrus fruit and vegetables has led to severe changes in surface geomorphology, and thus again to an increase of gully formation. For the understanding of the dynamics and formation of gullies, a combination of methods is needed, such as characterization of the precipitation patterns and quantification of infiltration and runoff generation dynamics as well as soil erosion rates within the gully catchments. In addition, the continuous and short-term monitoring of the gully morphology is essential in order to quantify the soil loss by gully erosion. Due to the complex 3-dimensional shapes of gullies, with overhangs and bank-cuttings, their assessment is a challenge. This paper aims at presenting a combination of terrestrial and airborne methods for quantifying the gully growth related to intensive agricultural productions in the Souss Basin (southern Morocco). Systematic series of images taken by a fixed-wing UAS are combined with detailed terrestrial images. Images were taken in different short-term to medium-term intervals of 11 months to 8 years, and 3D models were generated by means of structure from motion (SfM) algorithms. From these, gully growth volume and gully erosion rates could be quantified. In addition, the 3D visualization of the gully models - in contrast to more traditional 2.5D models common in GIS environments - allows new insights into the complex forms with undercuts, piping outlets etc and into the processes involved in their evolution.

  16. Patterns of deep-water coral diversity in the Caribbean Basin and adjacent southern waters: an approach based on records from the R/V Pillsbury expeditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Hernández-Ávila

    Full Text Available The diversity of deep-water corals in the Caribbean Sea was studied using records from oceanographic expeditions performed by the R/V Pillsbury. Sampled stations were sorted according to broad depth ranges and ecoregions and were analyzed in terms of species accumulation curves, variance in the species composition and contributions to alpha, beta and gamma diversity. According to the analysis of species accumulation curves using the Chao2 estimator, more diversity occurs on the continental slope (200-2000 m depth than on the upper continental shelf (60-200 m depth. In addition to the effect of depth sampling, differences in species composition related to depth ranges were detected. However, the differences between ecoregions are dependent on depth ranges, there were fewer differences among ecoregions on the continental slope than on the upper continental shelf. Indicator species for distinctness of ecoregions were, in general, Alcyonaria and Antipatharia for the upper continental shelf, but also the scleractinians Madracis myriabilis and Cladocora debilis. In the continental slope, the alcyonarian Placogorgia and the scleractinians Stephanocyathus and Fungiacyathus were important for the distinction of ecoregions. Beta diversity was the most important component of gamma diversity in the Caribbean Basin. The contribution of ecoregions to alpha, beta and gamma diversity differed with depth range. On the upper continental shelf, the Southern Caribbean ecoregion contributed substantially to all components of diversity. In contrast, the northern ecoregions contributed substantially to the diversity of the Continental Slope. Strategies for the conservation of deep-water coral diversity in the Caribbean Basin must consider the variation between ecoregions and depth ranges.

  17. Inconsistent magnetic polarities in magnetite- and greigite-bearing sediments: Understanding complex magnetizations in the late Messinian in the Adana Basin (southern Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucifora, Stella; Cifelli, Francesca; Mattei, Massimo; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Cosentino, Domenico; Roberts, Andrew P.

    2012-10-01

    We present paleomagnetic, rock magnetic and scanning electron microscope data from three upper Messinian stratigraphic sections from the Adana Basin (southern Turkey). The collected samples are from fine-grained units, which were deposited during the Messinian Salinity Crisis (within subchron C3r). Paleomagnetic results reveal an inconsistent polarity record, related to a mixture of magnetite and greigite that hinders determination of a reliable magnetostratigraphy. Three classes of samples are recognized on the basis of paleomagnetic results. The first is characterized by a single magnetization component, with normal polarity, that is stable up to 530-580°C and is carried by magnetite. The second is characterized by a single magnetization component, with reversed polarity, that is stable up to 330-420°C. This magnetization is due to greigite, which developed after formation of slumps and before tectonic tilting of the studied successions. The third is characterized by reversed polarity, which is stable up to 530-580°C. We interpret this component as a primary magnetization carried by fine-grained and magnetically stable detrital magnetite. Results indicate that in the Adana Basin the assumption that a primary magnetization is carried by magnetite, and a magnetic overprint carried by greigite, does not hold because a late magnetic overprint has also been found for magnetite-bearing samples. Our data illustrate the complexity of magnetostratigraphic reconstructions in successions characterized by variable mixtures of magnetic minerals with different magnetic stability that formed at different stages. We demonstrate the need to perform detailed magnetic mineralogy analyses when conducting magnetostratigraphic studies of clay-rich sediments from marine or lacustrine environments.

  18. Natural gas distribution network of Lima and Callao, Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroye, Stephane; Aerssens, Andre [Tractebel Engineering, Lima (Peru)

    2005-07-01

    In May 2002, Suez-Tractebel was awarded by the government of Peru a 30-year concession for the construction and operation of the gas distribution network in Lima, Peru. On 10 July, 2004, first gas was delivered to Lima, 1 month ahead of the official date. This gas distribution network, operated by GNLC (Gas Natural de Lima y Callao), delivers gas to some of the largest industries and power generators in and around Lima and the harbour area of Callao. Gas delivered in Lima comes through a 700 km HP gas pipeline from Camisea fields. This pipeline is operated by TGP (Transportadora de Gas del Peru). A City Gate is located at Lurin, on the southern side of the city. The gas distribution network is made of a 62 km main pipeline (20') with 25 km laterals. The main pipeline is operated at 50 bar, as the main customer, the Etevensa power plant, is located on the northern side of the city. Due to this high operating pressure combined to the surroundings, specific design philosophies were adopted to meet the extreme safety requirements. This paper highlights the specific measures taken during construction phase and the experience of the first months of operation of this challenging project. (author)

  19. Sone megafan: A non-Himalayan megafan of craton origin on the southern margin of the middle Ganga Basin, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Sudarsan; Saha, Dipankar; Dayal, Shankar

    2015-12-01

    Researchers in the last few decades have focused on the fluvial megafans at the base of Himalayan foothills in the Ganga Basin. No major effort has so far been made to delineate any such large depositional environment at the base of the northern Indian peninsular craton at the distal parts of the basin. In this work, for the first time, we document a megafan, unusually created by the cratonic Sone River in the marginal plains south of the Ganga. The geomorphology of the megafan surface, distribution of palaeochannels, sedimentology, and areal extent of the megafan are described. The study also reconstructs the tectonic and palaeoclimatic conditions, which might have helped in sediment supply from the cratonic catchment areas of the Sone. We suggest tectonic control over the Sone River channel dynamics and development of the megafan. The oval- and fan-shaped, craton-derived sediment body covers an area of around 12,000 km2 in the marginal plains and about 9000 km2 in the central alluvium north of the Ganga River. The megafan is around 190 km long and ~ 240 km wide. The mean slope of the megafan surface is ~ 0.03°. An onlap of Himalayan sediments has occurred over the megafan at its toe parts caused by southward encroachment of the Ganga during the Holocene. The megafan sediments comprise brownish yellow fine to coarse sand and gravels with an admixture of carbonaceous nodules (kankars). The thickness of the megafan sediment, which directly overlies the Precambrian basement, varies from only a few meters in the south near the peninsular craton to ~ 1000 m at the north in the central alluvial plain. The granular zones form prolific aquifer systems in an otherwise poor hydrogeological setting of the marginal plains.

  20. The depositional setting of the Late Quaternary sedimentary fill in southern Bannu basin, Northwest Himalayan fold and thrust belt, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Asam; Khalid, Perveiz; Jadoon, Khan Zaib; Jouini, Mohammed Soufiane

    2014-10-01

    Geostatistical variogram and inversion techniques combined with modern visualization tools have made it possible to re-model one-dimensional electrical resistivity data into two-dimensional (2D) models of the near subsurface. The resultant models are capable of extending the original interpretation of the data to depict alluvium layers as individual lithological units within the 2D space. By tuning the variogram parameters used in this approach, it is then possible to visualize individual lithofacies and geomorphological features for these lithologic units. The study re-examines an electrical resistivity dataset collected as part of a groundwater study in an area of the Bannu basin in Pakistan. Additional lithological logs from boreholes throughout the area have been combined with the existing resistivity data for calibration. Tectonic activity during the Himalayan orogeny uplifted and generated significant faulting in the rocks resulting in the formation of a depression which subsequently has been filled with clay-silt and dirty sand facies typical of lacustrine and flood plain environments. Streams arising from adjacent mountains have reworked these facies which have been eroded and replaced by gravel-sand facies along channels. It is concluded that the sediments have been deposited as prograding fan shaped bodies, flood plain, and lacustrine deposits. Clay-silt facies mark the locations of paleo depressions or lake environments, which have changed position over time due to local tectonic activity and sedimentation. The Lakki plain alluvial system has thus formed as a result of local tectonic activity with fluvial erosion and deposition characterized by coarse sediments with high electrical resistivities near the mountain ranges and fine sediments with medium to low electrical resistivities towards the basin center. PMID:25004850

  1. The depositional setting of the Late Quaternary sedimentary fill in southern Bannu basin, Northwest Himalayan fold and thrust belt, Pakistan

    KAUST Repository

    Farid, Asam M.

    2014-07-10

    Geostatistical variogram and inversion techniques combined with modern visualization tools have made it possible to re-model one-dimensional electrical resistivity data into two-dimensional (2D) models of the near subsurface. The resultant models are capable of extending the original interpretation of the data to depict alluvium layers as individual lithological units within the 2D space. By tuning the variogram parameters used in this approach, it is then possible to visualize individual lithofacies and geomorphological features for these lithologic units. The study re-examines an electrical resistivity dataset collected as part of a groundwater study in an area of the Bannu basin in Pakistan. Additional lithological logs from boreholes throughout the area have been combined with the existing resistivity data for calibration. Tectonic activity during the Himalayan orogeny uplifted and generated significant faulting in the rocks resulting in the formation of a depression which subsequently has been filled with clay-silt and dirty sand facies typical of lacustrine and flood plain environments. Streams arising from adjacent mountains have reworked these facies which have been eroded and replaced by gravel-sand facies along channels. It is concluded that the sediments have been deposited as prograding fan shaped bodies, flood plain, and lacustrine deposits. Clay-silt facies mark the locations of paleo depressions or lake environments, which have changed position over time due to local tectonic activity and sedimentation. The Lakki plain alluvial system has thus formed as a result of local tectonic activity with fluvial erosion and deposition characterized by coarse sediments with high electrical resistivities near the mountain ranges and fine sediments with medium to low electrical resistivities towards the basin center. © 2014 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

  2. Impact of riparian land-use patterns on Ephemeroptera community structure in river basins of the southern Western Ghats, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvakumar C.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study analysed the impact of riparian land use in structuring the larval ephemeropteran communities from 25 sites in streams and rivers of Kalakad-Mundanthurai Tiger Reserve (KMTR of the southern end of the Western Ghats, India. A total of twenty-eight species belonging to twenty-four genera of six families were collected across all the sites. Baetidae and Leptophlebiidae were the most numerous and ubiquitous families, comprising eight genera in each family and eleven and nine species, respectively. The physico-chemical parameters and species richness and abundance of mayflies varied across streams and rivers with different riparian land-use types. Species distribution was influenced by the environmental gradients. Canonical Correspondence Analysis revealed a clear separation of the mayfly assemblages along water quality and riparian land-use gradients. The results of this study suggest that Ephemeroptera taxa can be potentially used as sensitive indicators of riparian land use in lotic ecosystems.

  3. Quantitative geomorphologic data of the reactivated variscan Hluboká fault system (Budĕjovice Basin, southern Bohemian Massif)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popotnig, Angelika; Tschegg, Dana; Decker, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    The NW-SE and NNE-SSW striking Hluboká-Rudolfov-Fault System in southern Bohemia is a potentially active late Variscan fault. It was repeatedly activated in Mesozoic, Miocene and Pliocene times and forms a "disputed seismic source" in the vicinity of the nuclear power plant of Temelin. The Fault System at the NE and SE margin of the Budĕjovice Basin with its up to 340 m thick Cretaceous to Neogene sediments overlaying the hanging wall of the Fault System is partly characterized by a prominent linear morphological scarp. Geomorpholigic analysis mainly focus on mountain fronts at the basin margin crossing the Hluboká and Rudolfov fault as well as on the NE facing slope of the Racice Mountain which is not crossing the fault. Analyses use morphological parameters of small ephemeric tributaries of the Vltava River, which are all similar with respect to their catchments, hydrological conditions and location in crystalline basement rocks. Morphological differences in valley shapes are therefore likely to result from different amounts of uplift of the catchments with respect to the Vltava River. All parameters were measured from a 10 m resolution DEM and digital topographic maps 1:10,000. Additional field measurements were made at locations where the resolution of the digital data is insufficient. Data show extremely low mountain-front-sinuosity of the hillslope forming the footwall of the Hluboká Fault characterizing a very straight mountain front at the fault and an uplift influenced morphology. Almost all values differ significantly from those observed at the other mountain slopes. The results are in line with the evidence obtained from mountain sinuosity. The mountain slope at the faults show deep and narrow V-shaped valleys with streams that are actively incising probably responding to continuous uplift. Vf (Valley-Floor-Width-to-Height) and SL (Stream Length) values are generally lower than those from drainages not crossing the fault. Convex-up thalweg sections

  4. Distribution of Aboveground Live Biomass in the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, S. S.; Houghton, R. A.; DosSantos Alvala, R. C.; Soares, J. V.; Yu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The amount and spatial distribution of forest biomass in the Amazon basin is a major source of uncertainty in estimating the flux of carbon released from land-cover and land-use change. Direct measurements of aboveground live biomass (AGLB) are limited to small areas of forest inventory plots and site-specific allometric equations that cannot be readily generalized for the entire basin. Furthermore, there is no spaceborne remote sensing instrument that can measure tropical forest biomass directly. To determine the spatial distribution of forest biomass of the Amazon basin, we report a method based on remote sensing metrics representing various forest structural parameters and environmental variables, and more than 500 plot measurements of forest biomass distributed over the basin. A decision tree approach was used to develop the spatial distribution of AGLB for seven distinct biomass classes of lowland old-growth forests with more than 80% accuracy. AGLB for other vegetation types, such as the woody and herbaceous savanna and secondary forests, was directly estimated with a regression based on satellite data. Results show that AGLB is highest in Central Amazonia and in regions to the east and north, including the Guyanas. Biomass is generally above 300Mgha(sup 1) here except in areas of intense logging or open floodplains. In Western Amazonia, from the lowlands of Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia to the Andean mountains, biomass ranges from 150 to 300Mgha(sup 1). Most transitional and seasonal forests at the southern and northwestern edges of the basin have biomass ranging from 100 to 200Mgha(sup 1). The AGLB distribution has a significant correlation with the length of the dry season. We estimate that the total carbon in forest biomass of the Amazon basin, including the dead and below ground biomass, is 86 PgC with +/- 20% uncertainty.

  5. Petrography and geochemistry of Oligocene bituminous coal from the Jiu Valley, Petrosani basin (southern Carpathian Mountains), Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkin, Harvey E.; Tewalt, Susan J. [U.S. Geological Survey, 956 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 (United States); Hower, James C. [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States); Stucker, J.D. [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States); University of Kentucky Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); O' Keefe, Jennifer M.K. [Morehead State University, Morehead, KY, 40351 (United States); Tatu, Calin A. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Immunology, Clinical Laboratory No. 1, Pta. E. Murgu No. 2, RO-1900 Timisoara (Romania); Buia, Grigore [University of Petrosani, Department of Geology, University St. 20, RO-2675 Petrosani (Romania)

    2010-05-01

    Belt samples of Oligocene (Chattian) bituminous coal from 10 underground mines located in the Jiu Valley, Hunedoara County, Petrosani basin, Romania, have been examined and analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, major-, minor- and trace-element chemistry, organic petrography, and vitrinite reflectance. The mineral chemistry and mode of occurrence of trace elements also have been investigated using SEM and electron microprobe techniques. Twenty coal beds occur in the Jiu Valley and most of the samples are from bed no. 3, the most productive bed of the Dilja-Uricani Formation of Oligocene age. The Petrosani basin, oriented SW-NE, is 48-km long, 10-km wide at the eastern part and 2-km wide at the western part. The coal mines are distributed along the center of the valley generally following the Jiu de Vest River. Reflectance measurements indicate that the rank of the coals ranges from high-volatile B to high-volatile A bituminous. Overall, rank decreases from the southwest to the northeast. In bed no. 3, R{sub max} varies from 0.75% in the northeast to 0.93% in the southwest. Although, most Oligocene coals in Romania and adjacent countries are lignite in rank, the Jiu Valley bituminous coals have been affected by regional metamorphism and attending hydrothermal fluids related to the Alpine orogenic event. The coals are all dominated by vitrinite; resinite and funginite are important minor macerals in most of the coals. Pyrite and carbonate generally dominate the mineral assemblages with carbonate more abundant in the northwest. Siderite occurs as nodules and masses within the macerals (generally vitrinite). Dolomite and calcite occur as fracture fillings, plant-cell fillings, and in other authigenic forms. Late-stage fracture fillings are siderite, dolomite, calcite, and ankerite. In one instance, two populations of siderite ({proportional_to} 35 and {proportional_to} 45 wt.% FeO) plus ankerite fill a large fracture. Late-stage pyrite framboid alteration is Ni

  6. Electric property evidences of carbonification of organic matters in marine shales and its geologic significance: A case study of the Lower Cambrian Qiongzhusi shale in the southern Sichuan Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Yuman Wang; Dazhong Dong; Xiangzhi Cheng; Jinliang Huang; Shufang Wang; Shiqian Wang

    2014-01-01

    Searching for some reliable evidences that can verify the carbonification of organic matters in marine shales is a major scientific issue in selecting shale gas fairways in old strata. To this end, based on core, logging and testing data, the electric property of two organic-rich shale layers in the Lower Cambrian Qiongzhusi Fm. and the Lower Silurian Longmaxi Fm. in the southern Sichuan Basin was compared to examine the carbonification signs of organic matters in the Qiongzhusi shale and its...

  7. Seismic Velocity Structure and Improved Seismic Image of the Southern Depression of the Tainan Basin from Pre-Stack Depth Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunshu Tang and Chan Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a velocity model of the Southern Depression of the Tainan Basin is obtained along with its migrated image from an iterative pre-stack depth migration approach. The Cenozoic strata are uniformly layered with velocities varying from ~1.8 to ~3.6 km s-1. However, the general velocity is slightly lower in the NW segment than the SE. Both fractures and burial depth might be the controls of their seismic velocities. There is an unconformable contact between the Cenozoic and underlying Mesozoic strata with an abrupt velocity jump from ~3.2 to ~4.3 km s-1. The Mesozoic strata are recognized with acoustically distinct reflection patterns (chaotic, deformed and discontinuous and complex internal structures (uplift, folds and faults. Their interval velocities range from ~4.3 to ~4.7 km s-1 within a depth from ~3.5 down to ~12.5 km, and the maximum depositional thickness reaches up to 6.5 km. Multiple tectonic events such as collision, subsidence and uplift might be responsible for the complexity of the Mesozoic strata.

  8. Regional Tectonic Control of Tertiary Mineralization and Recent Faulting in the Southern Basin-Range Province, an Application of ERTS-1 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, I. C.; Liggett, M. A.; Childs, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Research based on ERTS-1 MSS imagery and field work in the southern Basin-Range Province of California, Nevada and Arizona has shown regional tectonic control of volcanism, plutonism, mineralization and faulting. This paper covers an area centered on the Colorado River between 34 15' N and 36 45' N. During the mid-Tertiary, the area was the site of plutonism and genetically related volcanism fed by fissure systems now exposed as dike swarms. Dikes, elongate plutons, and coeval normal faults trend generally northward and are believed to have resulted from east-west crustal extension. In the extensional province, gold silver mineralization is closely related to Tertiary igneous activity. Similarities in ore, structural setting, and rock types define a metallogenic district of high potential for exploration. The ERTS imagery also provides a basis for regional inventory of small faults which cut alluvium. This capability for efficient regional surveys of Recent faulting should be considered in land use planning, geologic hazards study, civil engineering and hydrology.

  9. Permeability prediction in deep coal seam: a case study on the No. 3 coal seam of the Southern Qinshui Basin in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pinkun; Cheng, Yuanping

    2013-01-01

    The coal permeability is an important parameter in mine methane control and coal bed methane (CBM) exploitation, which determines the practicability of methane extraction. Permeability prediction in deep coal seam plays a significant role in evaluating the practicability of CBM exploitation. The coal permeability depends on the coal fractures controlled by strata stress, gas pressure, and strata temperature which change with depth. The effect of the strata stress, gas pressure, and strata temperature on the coal (the coal matrix and fracture) under triaxial stress and strain conditions was studied. Then we got the change of coal porosity with strata stress, gas pressure, and strata temperature and established a coal permeability model under tri-axial stress and strain conditions. The permeability of the No. 3 coal seam of the Southern Qinshui Basin in China was predicted, which is consistent with that tested in the field. The effect of the sorption swelling on porosity (permeability) firstly increases rapidly and then slowly with the increase of depth. However, the effect of thermal expansion and effective stress compression on porosity (permeability) increases linearly with the increase of depth. The most effective way to improve the permeability in exploiting CBM or extracting methane is to reduce the effective stress. PMID:24396293

  10. Impact of depositional facies on the distribution of diagenetic alterations in the Devonian shoreface sandstone reservoirs, Southern Ghadamis Basin, Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Muftah Ahmid; Morad, Sadoon

    2015-11-01

    The middle Devonian, shoreface quartz arenites (present-day burial depths 2833-2786 m) are important oil and gas reservoirs in the Ghadamis Basin, western Libya. This integrated petrographic and geochemical study aims to unravel the impact of depositional facies on distribution of diagenetic alterations and, consequently, related reservoir quality and heterogeneity of the sandstones. Eogenetic alterations include the formation of kaolinite, pseudomatrix, and pyrite. The mesogenetic alterations include cementation by quartz overgrowths, Fe-dolomite/ankerite, and illite, transformation of kaolinite to dickite, illitization of smectite, intergranular quartz dissolution, and stylolitization, and albitization of feldspar. The higher energy of deposition of the coarser-grained upper shoreface sandstones combined with less extensive chemical compaction and smaller amounts of quartz overgrowths account for their better primary reservoir quality compared to the finer-grained, middle-lower shoreface sandstones. The formation of kaolin in the upper and middle shoreface sandstones is attributed to a greater flux of meteoric water. More abundant quartz overgrowths in the middle and lower shoreface is attributed to a greater extent of stylolitization, which was promoted by more abundant illitic clays. This study demonstrated that linking the distribution of diagenetic alterations to depositional facies of shoreface sandstones leads to a better understanding of the impact of these alterations on the spatial and temporal variation in quality and heterogeneity of the reservoirs.

  11. A review on tectonic record of strain buildup and stress release across the Andean forearc along the Gulf of Guayaquil-Tumbes basin (GGTB) near Ecuador-Peru border

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Gravimetric and geologic data show that the reactivation of the Neogene Interandean depression and/or the ~75 - 65 Ma ophiolite suture into the modern dynamic of the Andes controlled the Gulf of Guayaquil Tumbes basin (GGTB) location and evolution during the past 1.8 - 1.6 Myr at least. Depending on whether the remobilization occurred along the in- terandean depression or the ophiolite suture, the GGTB evolved trough pure or simple shear mechanisms, respectively. Because the GGTB exhibits an ...

  12. Foreign oil companies weathering Peru's political crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that foreign oil companies are weathering Peru's political crisis, and the outlook for increased foreign participation in Peru's petroleum sector remains promising. There has been improvement in the political turmoil and soured international relations that followed President Alberto Fujimori's Apr. 5 suspension of Peru's Congress, charging political corruption and attempts to block his fiscal reforms. But there are fresh concerns over an increase in terrorism aimed at oil industry facilities by antigovernment guerrilla groups in Peru. Meanwhile, state-owned oil company Petroleos del Peru (Petroperu) continues efforts to sell assets as part of Fujimori's mandated privatization program. And foreign companies continue to grapple with uncertainty and bureaucratic red tape in chasing investment opportunities in Peru's beleaguered but opening petroleum sector

  13. Peruánská gastronomie

    OpenAIRE

    Bočková, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to characterize culture and gastronomy of Peru as a specific tourist destination. First part -- the theoretical one -- deals with explanation of main terms from the fields of tourism and gastronomy. Following parts include characteristics of Peru and its gastronomy. The second chapter, in particular, involves basic information about realia, geography and history of Peru, followed by characteristics of tourism in the country. The third chapter, first of all, explains ...

  14. Analysis of past and future oil production in Peru under a Hubbert approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates scenarios for the oil production in Peru applying a Hubbert model. Two scenarios for the estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) were proposed: the first, in which low investments in E&P and social and environmental barriers undermine the development of oil resources beyond the limits characterized as 2P; the second, more optimistic, in which current exploratory and production areas in Amazonia and low-explored Offshore-Shelf basins are developed, thus, increasing EUR to 3P reserves plus contingent resources. Findings show that oil production in Peru has not followed a Single-Hubbert pattern, except for the area with more drilling activity and the highest accumulated production in the Northwest coast. Actually, institutional and regulation changes and less-attractive periods for operators due to poor results in oil discoveries explain why a multi-Hubbert approach better depicted the oil production in Peru. Peru has the potential to achieve a second peak of 274 kbpd of crude oil, overcoming the peak of 195 kbpd, reached in 1982. However, most of the remaining production would be located in Amazonia, where social and environmental issues pose critical challenges. - Highlights: • Two scenarios of estimated ultimately recoverable resources were simulated. • A multi-cycle Hubbert approach better depicted the case of oil production in Peru. • Pipelines expansion and institutional and regulation changes explain this multi-cyle. • Institutional capacity and socio-environmental risks are barriers to oil activities

  15. Paleomagnetic and geochronological study of Carboniferous forearc basin rocks in the Southern New England Orogen (Eastern Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarevsky, Sergei A.; Rosenbaum, Gideon; Shaanan, Uri; Hoy, Derek; Speranza, Fabio; Mochales, Tania

    2016-06-01

    We present results of a paleomagnetic study from Carboniferous forearc basin rocks that occur at both limbs of the Texas Orocline (New England Orogen, eastern Australia). Using thermal and alternating field demagnetizations, two remanence components have been isolated from rocks sampled from the Emu Creek terrane, in the eastern limb of the orocline. A middle-temperature Component M is post-folding and was likely acquired during low-temperature oxidation at 65-35 Ma. A high-temperature Component H is pre-folding, but its comparison with the paleomagnetic data from coeval rocks in the northern Tamworth terrane on the other limb of Texas Orocline does not indicate rotations around a vertical axis, as expected from geological data. A likely explanation for this apparent discrepancy is that Component H postdates the oroclinal bending, but predates folding in late stages of the 265-230 Ma Hunter Bowen Orogeny. The post-Kiaman age of Component H is supported by the presence of an alternating paleomagnetic polarity in the studied rocks. A paleomagnetic study of volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks in the Boomi Creek area (northern Tamworth terrane) revealed a stable high-temperature pre-folding characteristic remanence, which is dated to c. 318 Ma using U-Pb zircon geochronology. The new paleopole (37.8°S, 182.7°E, A95 = 16.2°) is consistent with previously published poles from coeval rocks from the northern Tamworth terrane. The combination of our new paleomagnetic and geochronological data with previously published results allows us to develop a revised kinematic model of the New England Orogen from 340 Ma to 270 Ma, which compared to the previous model, incorporates a different orientation of the northern Tamworth terrane at 340 Ma.

  16. Response of the diatom flora in the Gdańsk Basin (southern Baltic Sea) to eutrophication in the last century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witak, Małgorzata

    2016-04-01

    The diatom flora in six short cores (length of 10-20 cm) taken from Gdańsk Basin, southern Baltic Sea, was analyzed in order to response of diatoms to environmental changes over the past 100 years. This study is a part of CLISED project (Climate Change Impact on Ecosystem Health - Marine Sediments Indicators) funded from Norway Grants in the Polish-Norwegian Research Programme. Three cores P116, M1 and P1 were retrieved from the Gdańsk Deep region, whereas P104, BMPK10 and P110 were drilled from the shallower part - Gulf of Gdańsk. The sediment cores were dated by 210Pb and represented time interval of AD 1895-2015. In this period an artificial mouth of the Vistula River near Świbno was excavated and riverine waters flowed directly to the Gulf of Gdańsk. Urbanization, progressive industrialization and an increase in the inflow of waste water had a strong influence on ecosystem in the last 120 years. The transport of large amounts of nutrients, organic matter and pollutants by the rivers resulted in environmental degradation of the Gdańsk Basin and its progressive eutrophication in particular. Diatoms, being the major component of algal assemblages, are excellent bioindicators for assessing the state of basin ecosystems. They are usually abundant in marine sediments, diverse and sensitive to numerous environmental variables, including physical (e.g. light, temperature, water transparency) and chemical (e.g. pH, alkalinity, nutrient availability) factors. Changes in nutrients concentrations may lead to substantial transformations in the structure of diatom assemblages. Samples for diatom analyses (ca. 0.3-2.0 g dry sediment) were prepared following the standard procedure for diatom observation under light microscope (Battarbee, 1986). To estimate the concentration of siliceous microfossils per unit weight of dry sediment (absolute abundance), a random settling technique was used (Bodén, 1991). Permanent diatom preparations were mounted in Naphrax® (refractive

  17. Depositional architecture of a mixed travertine-terrigenous system in a fault-controlled continental extensional basin (Messinian, Southern Tuscany, Central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croci, Andrea; Della Porta, Giovanna; Capezzuoli, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    The extensional Neogene Albegna Basin (Southern Tuscany, Italy) includes several thermogene travertine units dating from the Miocene to Holocene time. During the late Miocene (Messinian), a continental fault-controlled basin (of nearly 500-km2 width) was filled by precipitated travertine and detrital terrigenous strata, characterized by a wedge-shaped geometry that thinned northward, with a maximum thickness of nearly 70 m. This mixed travertine-terrigenous succession was investigated in terms of lithofacies types, depositional environment and architecture and the variety of precipitated travertine fabrics. Deposited as beds with thickness ranging from centimetres to a few decimetres, carbonates include nine travertine facies types: F1) clotted peloidal micrite and microsparite boundstone, F2) raft rudstone/floatstone, F3) sub-rounded radial coated grain grainstone, F4) coated gas bubble boundstone, F5) crystalline dendrite cementstone, F6) laminated boundstone, F7) coated reed boundstone and rudstone, F8) peloidal skeletal grainstone and F9) calci-mudstone and microsparstone. Beds of terrigenous deposits with thickness varying from a decimetre to > 10 m include five lithofacies: F10) breccia, F11) conglomerate, F12) massive sandstone, F13) laminated sandstone and F14) claystone. The succession recorded the following three phases of evolution of the depositional setting: 1) At the base, a northward-thinning thermogene travertine terraced slope (Phase I, travertine slope lithofacies association, F1-F6) developed close to the extensional fault system, placed southward with respect to the travertine deposition. 2) In Phase II, the accumulation of travertines was interrupted by the deposition of colluvial fan deposits with a thickness of several metres (colluvial fan lithofacies association, F10 and F12), which consisted of massive breccias, adjacent to the alluvial plain lithofacies association (F11-F14) including massive claystone and sandstone and channelized

  18. Seismic velocities within the sedimentary succession of the Canada Basin and southern Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge, Arctic Ocean: evidence for accelerated porosity reduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimeld, John; Li, Qingmou; Chian, Deping; Lebedeva-Ivanova, Nina; Jackson, Ruth; Mosher, David; Hutchinson, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The Canada Basin and the southern Alpha-Mendeleev ridge complex underlie a significant proportion of the Arctic Ocean, but the geology of this undrilled and mostly ice-covered frontier is poorly known. New information is encoded in seismic wide-angle reflections and refractions recorded with expendable sonobuoys between 2007 and 2011. Velocity-depth samples within the sedimentary succession are extracted from published analyses for 142 of these records obtained at irregularly spaced stations across an area of 1.9E + 06 km2. The samples are modelled at regional, subregional and station-specific scales using an exponential function of inverse velocity versus depth with regionally representative parameters determined through numerical regression. With this approach, smooth, non-oscillatory velocity-depth profiles can be generated for any desired location in the study area, even where the measurement density is low. Practical application is demonstrated with a map of sedimentary thickness, derived from seismic reflection horizons interpreted in the time domain and depth converted using the velocity-depth profiles for each seismic trace. A thickness of 12-13 km is present beneath both the upper Mackenzie fan and the middle slope off of Alaska, but the sedimentary prism thins more gradually outboard of the latter region. Mapping of the observed-to-predicted velocities reveals coherent geospatial trends associated with five subregions: the Mackenzie fan; the continental slopes beyond the Mackenzie fan; the abyssal plain; the southwestern Canada Basin; and, the Alpha-Mendeleev magnetic domain. Comparison of the subregional velocity-depth models with published borehole data, and interpretation of the station-specific best-fitting model parameters, suggests that sandstone is not a predominant lithology in any of the five subregions. However, the bulk sand-to-shale ratio likely increases towards the Mackenzie fan, and the model for this subregion compares favourably with

  19. The regulatory state in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Parodi Trece, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Significant institutional changes have taken place during the government of Alberto Fujimori. What is the meaning of these changes? Do they reflect Alberto Fujimori's strategy of power consolidation? Are they the result of the strategy of dominant economic classes to continue exploiting Peru's resources? Or are these institutions reflecting a process of democratization of the state?   This article explores these questions by examining state institutions in the area of public services. The arg...

  20. Khipu accounting in ancient Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urton, Gary; Brezine, Carrie J

    2005-08-12

    Khipu are knotted-string devices that were used for bureaucratic recording and communication in the Inka Empire. We recently undertook a computer analysis of 21 khipu from the Inka administrative center of Puruchuco, on the central coast of Peru. Results indicate that this khipu archive exemplifies the way in which census and tribute data were synthesized, manipulated, and transferred between different accounting levels in the Inka administrative system. PMID:16099983

  1. Environmental Exposure and Leptospirosis, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, MAS; Smith, H; Joseph, P.; Gilman, R. H.; Bautista, C. T.; Campos, K J; Cespedes, M.; Klatsky, P; Vidal, C.; Terry, H.; Calderon, M M; Coral, C; Cabrera, L.; Parmar, P S; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2004-01-01

    Human infection by leptospires has highly variable clinical manifestations, which range from subclinical infection to fulminant disease. We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional seroepidemiologic study in Peru to determine potential relationships of environmental context to human exposure to Leptospira and disease associated with seroconversion. Three areas were studied: a flooded, urban slum in the Peruvian Amazon city of Iquitos; rural, peri-Iquitos villages; and a desert shantytown...

  2. Crop improvement projects in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Only two percent of the territory of Peru consists of arable land. Sixteen million people depend on the production of about three million hectares of land, which means that on the average only 1800 square metres is available per person. It is clear that Peru is one of the poorest countries of the world as far as available arable land is concerned and consequently it will have to drastically increase its agricultural production per unit area or import large quantities of agricultural products to feed its rapidly growing population. Agricultural research on the efficient use of fertilizers is being carried out by the regional experiment station (CRIA), by the National University of Agriculture, La Molina, Lima, dealing with programmes on maize, potatoes, cereals and forage crops, by national universities in the country and by specialized research institutes for tropical agriculture on sugar-cane, cotton, coffee and tea. Isotope and radiation techniques are a particularly effective means of determining the best cultural practices for the efficient use of fertilizers and water, and the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture has been involved in the organization of field and greenhouse programmes at experiment stations and universities in Peru since 1963

  3. Craniofacial plasticity in ancient Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jessica H; Chew, Kristen; Ross, Ann H; Verano, John W

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have utilized craniometric data to explore the roles of genetic diversity and environment in human cranial shape variation. Peru is a particularly interesting region to examine cranial variation due to the wide variety of high and low altitude ecological zones, which in combination with rugged terrain have created isolated populations with vastly different physiological adaptations. This study examines seven samples from throughout Peru in an effort to understand the contributions of environmental adaptation and genetic relatedness to craniofacial variation at a regional scale. Morphological variation was investigated using a canonical discriminant analysis and Mahalanobis D(2) analysis. Results indicate that all groups are significantly different from one another with the closest relationship between Yauyos and Jahuay, two sites that are located geographically close in central Peru but in very different ecozones. The relationship between latitude/longitude and face shape was also examined with a spatial autocorrelation analysis (Moran's I) using ArcMap and show that there is significant spatial patterning for facial measures and geographic location suggesting that there is an association between biological variation and geographic location. PMID:25807293

  4. Magnetic anisotropy of the zone of tertiary granitoids at the southern margin of the Pannonian basin (Serbia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -axial, for others different. This is also true of the S-type granites. There is also difference in magnetic mineralogy: In the Pohorje and in the granitoids of the Kopaonik area the only magnetic mineral is magnetite, while in the Southern Pannonian intrusions e.g. pyrrhotite is observed. Acknowledgements: This work was partly supported by Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA) K68171.

  5. Suspended sediment yield and metal contamination in a river catchment affected by El Niño events and gold mining activities: the Puyango river basin, southern Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarras-Wahlberg, N. H.; Lane, S. N.

    2003-10-01

    The suspended sediment yield and the transfer of polluted sediment are investigated for the Puyango river basin in southern Ecuador. This river system receives metal (Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn) and cyanide pollution generated by mining, and is associated with large-scale hydrological variability, which is partly governed by El Niño events. Field sampling and statistical modelling methods are used to quantify the amount of mine tailings that is discharged into the basin. Annual suspended sediment yields are estimated using a novel combination of the suspended sediment rating method and Monte Carlo simulations, which allow for propagation of the uncertainties of the calculations that lead to final load estimates. Geochemical analysis of suspended and river bed sediment is used to assess the dispersion and long-term fate of contaminated sediment within the river catchment. Knowledge of the inter- and intra-annual variation in suspended sediment yield is shown to be crucial for judging the importance of mining discharges, and the extent to which the resultant pollution is diluted by river flows. In wet years, polluted sediments represent only a very small proportion of the yield estimates, but in dry years the proportion can be significant. Evidence shows that metal contaminated sediments are stored in the Puyango river bed during low flows. Large flood events flush this sediment periodically, both on an annual cycle associated with the rainy season, and also related to El Niño events. Therefore, environmental impacts of mining-related discharges are more likely to be severe during dry years compared with wet years, and in the dry season rather than the wet season. The hydrological consequences of El Niño events are shown to depend upon the extent to which these events penetrate inland. It is, thus, shown that the general conclusion that El Niño events can significantly affect suspended sediment yields needs evaluation with respect to the particular way in which those

  6. Constraining the India-Asia collision by retrieving the paleolatitude from partially remagnetized Paleogene volcanics in the Nanmulin Basin (southern Tibet)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wentao; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Lippert, Peter; Dekkers, Mark; Guo, Zhaojie; Li, Xiaochun; Zhang, Xiaoran

    2014-05-01

    Determining paleolatitudes of the Lhasa terrane (southern Tibet) using paleomagnetic inclinations is key to constraining the paleogeography and timing of the collision between India and Asia. However, paleolatitude estimates vary widely from 5°N to 30°N due to unrecognized rock magnetic biases such as inclination shallowing in sedimentary rocks or poor averaging of secular variation in volcanic rocks. Here, we investigated Paleogene volcanics of the Linzizong Group from southern Tibet in the Nanmulin Basin that had previously yielded low paleomagnetic inclinations ca. 10°N. Using proper paleomagnetic sampling and measurement protocols we observe similar shallow inclinations. However, sampled sections with different bedding attitudes yield a negative fold test indicating that the isolated remanent magnetizations do not have a primary origin. Detailed rock magnetic analysis, end-member modeling, and petrographic investigation reveal that most of the section has been variably remagnetized due to low-temperature alteration of magmatic titanomagnetite and formation of secondary hematite, which occurred after tilting of the strata. We show that the observed paleomagnetic inclinations vary according to a linear trend with the degree of remagnetization. Accordingly, we can estimate that the primary pre-tilting thermoremanent magnetization has an inclination of 38.1° ([35.7°, 40.5°] within 95% confidence limit), corresponding to a paleolatitude of 21.4° ([19.8°, 23.1°] within 95% confidence limit). This is consistent with results from pristine volcanic units and inclination-shallowing corrected sediments of the upper Linzizong Group ~200 km to the east [Dupont-Nivet et al., Geophysical Journal International, 182, 1189-1198; Huang et al., Geophysical Journal International, 194, 1390-1411]. Our results demonstrate that previously reported low paleolatitudes of the Lhasa terrane can be an artifact of unrecognized remagnetization. Furthermore, we show that original

  7. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: Late Triassic – Jurassic development of the Danish Basin and the Fennoscandian Border Zone, southern Scandinavia

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The continental to marine Upper Triassic – Jurassic succession of the Danish Basin and the Fennoscandian Border Zone is interpreted within a sequence stratigraphic framework, and the evolution of the depositional basin is discussed. The intracratonic Permian–Cenozoic Danish Basin was formed by Late Carboniferous – Early Permian crustal extension followed by subsidence governed primarily by thermal cooling and local faulting. The basin is separated from thestable Precambrian Baltic Shield by t...

  8. Natural Offshore Oil Seepage and Related Tarball Accumulation on the California Coastline - Santa Barbara Channel and the Southern Santa Maria Basin: Source Identification and Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, T.D.; Hostettler, Frances D.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Peters, Kenneth E.; Dougherty, Jennifer A.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Gutmacher, Christina E.; Wong, Florence L.; Normark, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Oil spillage from natural sources is very common in the waters of southern California. Active oil extraction and shipping is occurring concurrently within the region and it is of great interest to resource managers to be able to distinguish between natural seepage and anthropogenic oil spillage. The major goal of this study was to establish the geologic setting, sources, and ultimate dispersal of natural oil seeps in the offshore southern Santa Maria Basin and Santa Barbara Basins. Our surveys focused on likely areas of hydrocarbon seepage that are known to occur between Point Arguello and Ventura, California. Our approach was to 1) document the locations and geochemically fingerprint natural seep oils or tar; 2) geochemically fingerprint coastal tar residues and potential tar sources in this region, both onshore and offshore; 3) establish chemical correlations between offshore active seeps and coastal residues thus linking seep sources to oil residues; 4) measure the rate of natural seepage of individual seeps and attempt to assess regional natural oil and gas seepage rates; and 5) interpret the petroleum system history for the natural seeps. To document the location of sub-sea oil seeps, we first looked into previous studies within and near our survey area. We measured the concentration of methane gas in the water column in areas of reported seepage and found numerous gas plumes and measured high concentrations of methane in the water column. The result of this work showed that the seeps were widely distributed between Point Conception east to the vicinity of Coal Oil Point, and that they by in large occur within the 3-mile limit of California State waters. Subsequent cruises used sidescan and high resolution seismic to map the seafloor, from just south of Point Arguello, east to near Gaviota, California. The results of the methane survey guided the exploration of the area west of Point Conception east to Gaviota using a combination of seismic instruments. The

  9. Kaolinite, illite and quartz dissolution in the karstification of Paleozoic sandstones of the Furnas Formation, Paraná Basin, Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mário Sérgio de; Guimarães, Gilson Burigo; Chinelatto, Adilson Luiz; Giannini, Paulo César Fonseca; Pontes, Henrique Simão; Chinelatto, Adriana Scoton Antonio; Atencio, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Karstification processes in sandstones of the Furnas Formation, Silurian to Devonian of the Paraná Basin, have been described since the mid-twentieth century. However, some geologists still doubt the idea of true karst in sandstones. Studies carried out in the Campos Gerais region, Paraná State, Southern Brazil, aimed at investigating the nature of erosion processes in Furnas Formation and the role of the dissolution in the development of their notorious erosive features and underground cavities. These studies have led to the recognition of dissolution macro to micro features ('furnas', caves, ponds, sinks, ruiniform relief on cliffs and rocky surfaces, grain corrosion, speleothems, mineral reprecipitation and incrustation). The analysis (scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry and x-ray diffractometry) of sandstones and their alterites has indicated significant dissolution of clay cement along with discrete quartz grain dissolution. This mesodiagenetic cement (kaolinite and illite) is dissolved and reprecipitated as clay minerals with poorly developed crystallinity along with other minerals, such as variscite and minerals of the alunite supergroup, suggesting organic participation in the processes of dissolution and incrustation. The mineral reprecipitation usually forms centimetric speleothems, found in cavities and sheltered rocky surfaces. The cement dissolution associated with other factors (fractures, wet weather, strong hydraulic gradient, antiquity of the landforms) leads to the rock arenisation, the underground erosion and the appearance of the karst features. Carbonate rocks in the basement may locally be increasing the karst forms in the overlying Furnas Formation. The recognition of the karst character of the Furnas Formation sandstones has important implications in the management of underground water resources (increasingly exploited in the region), in the use of the unique geological heritage and in the prevention of geo

  10. Late Norian δ13Corg record in the Tethyan realm: New clues on the complex Late Triassic carbon cycle from the Lagonegro Basin (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffani, Mariachiara; Agnini, Claudia; Concheri, Giuseppe; Godfrey, Linda; Katz, Miriam; Maron, Matteo; Rigo, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    The Late Triassic (ca. 237-201 Ma) is characterized by complex and extreme environmental, climatic and biotic changes (e.g.: the break-up of the supercontinent Pangaea; the humid event known as the Carnian Pluvial Event; the End-Triassic mass extinction; the emplacement of the CAMP volcanism). A global δ13Corg curve for the Late Triassic would provide new clues on this perturbed time interval and would have the potential for global correlations. In particular, the few available data from North American successions define the late Norian (ca. 220-206 Ma) as a "chaotic carbon interval", with rapid vacillations of the carbon isotope values paired with low faunal diversity. Our goal is to reconstruct a global δ13Corg profile for the late Norian, as a contribution to the construction of a more complete global carbon isotope curve for the Late Triassic. For this purpose, we analyzed three sections from the Lagonegro Basin (southern Italy), originally located in the western Tethys, on the other side of the supercontinent Pangaea respect to the North America. The obtained δ13Corg profiles show four negative shifts correlatable with those of the North American record, suggesting that these carbon cycle perturbations have a widespread occurrence. These perturbations are associated with negative shifts of the 87Sr/86Sr, indicating that these global δ13Corg and 87Sr/86Sr negative excursions were possibly caused by emplacement of a Large Igneous Province (LIP). The input of volcanogenic CO2 to the atmosphere-ocean system is supported also by the 12C enrichment observed, as well as by the increase of atmospheric pCO2 inferred by different models for the Norian- Rhaetian interval. This Norian magmatic activity may be ascribed to the Angayucham province (Alaska, North America), a large oceanic plateau active ca. 214 Ma ±7 Myr, with an estimated volume comparable to other two Late Triassic LIPs: the Wrangellia and the CAMP.

  11. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Model and Satellite Based Soil Moisture Estimations for Assessing Coupling Hot Spots in the Southern La Plata Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruscantini, C. A.; Karszenbaum, H.; Ruscica, R. C.; Spennemann, P.; Salvia, M.; Sorensson, A. A.; Grings, F. M.; Saulo, C.

    2015-12-01

    The southern La Plata Basin, located in southeastern South America (SESA), a region of great importance because of its hydrological characteristics, the fact that it has the largest population density and is one of the most productive regions in terms of agriculture, cattle raising and industry of the continent, has been identified as a strong hotspot between soil moisture (SM) and the atmosphere by different regional studies. Among them, Ruscica et al. (2014, Atmos. Sci. Let, Int. J. Climatol.), and Spennemann et al. (2015, Int. J. Climatol.) show, through different modeling approaches, the presence of strong soil moisture-precipitation and evapotranspiration interactions during austral summer in SESA, revealing similar hotspots. Nevertheless these studies have diverse limitations related to model assumptions and to vegetation parameterizations, as well as the lack of observational data for the evaluation of models performance (Ferguson and Wood, 2011, J. of Hydrometeorology). On the other hand, in the last decade several instruments on board satellites are providing soil moisture products globally and in a continuous way. A recent work by Grings et al. (2015, IEEE JSTARS, in press), done over the Pampas Plains in SESA showed characteristic soil moisture patterns that follow the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) under extreme wet and dry conditions In order to deepen and overcome some of the mentioned model limitations, this work adds satellite soil moisture and vegetation products in the spatio-temporal analysis of the regions of strong soil moisture-atmosphere interactions. The main objectives and related outcomes are: the verification of already identified regions where soil moisture anomalies may have an influence on subsequent precipitation, evapotranspiration and temperature anomalies, and the study of their seasonal characteristics and land cover influences.

  12. Peru : Overcoming the Barriers to Hydropower

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2010-01-01

    Hydropower has been the major source of electricity in Peru, traditionally supplying more than 80 percent of electricity requirements, and serving as a source of independent generation for major mines and industries. With the development of natural gas in the early 1990s, and the opening of the Camisea pipeline, the Government of Peru's (GOP's) attention turned to providing incentives for ...

  13. New Trends in Talent Development in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumen, Sheyla

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive portrait of the current status of gifted and talented concepts, identification of the gifted, and associated provisions within Peru is presented. The major purposes of this article are (a) to analyze the primary conception of giftedness in Peru; (b) to describe the beliefs that people have about gifted individuals; (c) to present…

  14. The thermal history of the Miocene Ibar Basin (Southern Serbia): new constraints from apatite and zircon fission track and vitrinite reflectance data

    OpenAIRE

    Andrić Nevena; Fügenschuh Bernhard; Životić Dragana; Cvetković Vladica

    2015-01-01

    The Ibar Basin was formed during Miocene large scale extension in the NE Dinaride segment of the Alpine- Carpathian-Dinaride system. The Miocene extension led to exhumation of deep seated core-complexes (e.g. Studenica and Kopaonik core-complex) as well as to the formation of extensional basins in the hanging wall (Ibar Basin). Sediments of the Ibar Basin were studied by apatite and zircon fission track and vitrinite reflectance in order to define thermal events during basin evolution. Vitrin...

  15. First thoughts on surface tonal patterns in Amawaka, a Panoan language of Peru and Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Amawaka ([ɑmɨ̃ˈwɐkɑ]) is a highly endangered and underdocumented tonal language of the Headwaters (Fleck 2011) subgroup of the Panoan family in the Southwest Amazon Basin, spoken by approximately 200 people. Undocumented phonetic and phonological phenomena of Amawaka include its tonal structure, both in terms of surface realizations and the patterns underlying these realizations. Original audiovisual data from the author’s fieldwork in various Amawaka communities at the Peru-Brazil border wil...

  16. DIVERSITY OF CARABIDS (COLEOPTERA) ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOWER LURIN RIVER, LIMA, PERU

    OpenAIRE

    ARMANDO VÉLEZ-AZAÑERO; Alfonso Lizárraga-Travaglini

    2013-01-01

    Quarterly samples of beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) were taken associated with the lower basin of the Lurín River (Lima-Peru) during the period August 2009 - February 2011, in six sampling points between 5 and 51 masl. Pitfall traps were used and obtained a total of 59 specimens distributed among three tribes, three genera, and four morphospecies. We report the presence of Megacephala, Scarites genus, and Pterostichus with the latter being the predominant genus.

  17. Geomorphic evidences of recent tectonic activity in the forearc, southern Peru Evidencias geomórficas de actividad tectónica reciente en el Antearco Perú sur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Audin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available As the Andean forearc is not concentrating as much tectonic shortening as the foreland (since Middle Miocene and as GPS measurements can not inform on the long-term deformation but rather describe the elastic response of the Andean forearc (Nazca-South American convergence, little is known about the active deformation in the Central Andes Pacific lowlands. However, geomorphic evidences of recent tectonic activity are observed from the Coastal Cordillera to the piedmont of the Western Cordillera. In this paper we analyze this Quaternary tectonic activity in the southern Peruvian forearc, from 17°S to 18°30'S. Examination of aerial photographs and satellite data, and focused field work not only confirms that there is recent tectonic activity but also has revealed the presence of additional active structures that should be taken into account in the description of Andean deformation. In response to active tectonics, these tectonic structures affected very young terraces and Quaternary pediments in the southern Peruvian forearc. We discuss some of the strong geomorphic signatures, such as active fault traces, scarplets, sag ponds, river terraces and some major and minor landslides, which are indicative of active tectonics in this area. Mapping of fault trace geometry and identifying recent surface offsets are used to determine the key places where active tectonics can be involved in the deformation of the forearc, either through normal faulting, strike-slip faults or thrust faults. Among those major tectonic features, some are likely due to seismic crustal activity (along the ongoing Andean tectonic processes and some to relaxation processes of the stress imposed on the outer forearc area after each major subduction earthquakes.Debido a que el antearco andino no está concentrando tanto acortamiento como el antepaís (desde el Mioceno Medio y como las mediciones de GPS no pueden dar información de la deformación de largo plazo sino que más bien

  18. New mammalian records in the Parque Nacional Cerros de Amotape, northwestern Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Cindy M. Hurtado; Víctor Pacheco

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific Tropical Rainforest and Equatorial Dry Forest are found only in southern Ecuador and northern Peru, and are among the most poorly known ecosystems of South America. Even though these forests are protected in Parque Nacional Cerros de Amotape (PNCA), they are threatened by fragmentation because of farming and agriculture. The aim of this study was to determine the medium and large mammalian species richness, using transect census, camera trapping, and specimen bone collection. Nine...

  19. The Cyber Media in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing. Lyudmyla Yezers´ka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of an investigation whose primary target is to analyze the panorama of media on the Internet in Peru in the last quarter of the 2004 are presented. The birth and the consolidation of the Peruvian media on the Internet have been influenced by the economic, political and social problems that this country has lived through throughout its history. In spite of the few users which the media still have on the Internet, however, Peruvian journalism is making an effort to experiment with new formats and is conscious that in the future these means of communication will become essential elements for publication on the Web.

  20. Paleomobility in the Tiwanaku diaspora: biogeochemical analyses at Rio Muerto, Moquegua, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Kelly J; Goldstein, Paul S; Dahlstedt, Allisen; Somerville, Andrew; Schoeninger, Margaret J

    2014-11-01

    Paleomobility has been a key element in the study of the expansion of ancient states and empires, including the Tiwanaku polity of the South Central Andes (AD 500-1000). We present radiogenic strontium and oxygen isotope data from human burials from three cemeteries in the Tiwanaku-affiliated Middle Horizon archaeological site complex of Rio Muerto in the Moquegua Valley of southern Peru. At Rio Muerto, archaeological human enamel and bone values range from (87) Sr/(86) Sr = 0.70657-0.72018, with a mean of (87) Sr/(86) Sr = 0.70804 ± 0.00207 (1σ, n = 55). For the subset of samples analyzed for oxygen isotope values (n = 48), the data ranges from δ(18) Ocarbonate(VSMOW)  = +18.1 to +27.0‰. When contextualized with other lines of archaeological evidence, we interpret these data as evidence for an archaeological population in which the majority of individuals had "local" origins, and were likely second-generation, or more, immigrants from the Tiwanaku heartland in the altiplano. Based on detailed life history data, we argue a smaller number of individuals came at different ages from various regions within the Tiwanaku polity. We consider whether these individuals with isotopic values consistent with "nonlocal" geographic origins could represent first-generation migrants, marriage exchange partners, or occupationally mobile herders, traders or other travelers. By combining isotopic life history studies with mortuary treatment data, we use a person-centered migration history approach to state integration and expansion. Isotopic analyses of paleomobility at the Rio Muerto site complex contribute to the role of diversity in ancient states by demonstrating the range of geographic origins rather than simply colonists from the Lake Titicaca Basin. PMID:25066931

  1. Quantity and quality of seepage from two earthen basins used to store livestock waste in southern Minnesota during the first year of operation, 1997-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhl, James F.

    1999-01-01

    Numerous earthen basins have been constructed in Minnesota for storage of livestock waste. Typically, these basins are excavated pits with partially above-grade, earth-walled embankments and compacted clay liners. Some have drain tile installed around them to prevent shallow ground and soil water to discharge into the basins. Environmental concerns associated with the waste include contamination of ground water by nitrogen compounds and pathogens.

  2. On the wave energy resource of Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The wave energy resource of Peru was assessed for the first time. • Peru has a moderate to high offshore wave energy resource. • The south coast of Peru has a higher wave energy potential than the north coast. • The Peruvian wave energy resource has low temporal variations. • The wave energy resource exceeds by seven times electric power demand in Peru. - Abstract: This is the first assessment of the wave energy resource in Peru, an emerging country with an increasing energy demand and a high dependence on fossil fuels. On the basis of wave buoy measurements, we characterize the offshore wave energy resource and analyze its temporal variability, comparing the results with those obtained in previous works for other regions. A wave propagation numerical model (SWAN) is used to determine the nearshore spatial distribution of wave energy. A total of 357 offshore sea states, representing 90% of the wave energy and 94% of the time in an average year, were propagated. The wave energy in Peru presents a resource exceeding by more than seven times the total electric demand of the country. Because of the large amount of resource available and its low seasonal variation, wave energy must be considered in Peru as an alternative to conventional energy resources

  3. Distribution and morphological variation of Eleutherodactylus mercedesae Lynch & McDiarmid, 1987 (Amphibia, Anura, Leptodactylidae) with first record for Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padial, J.M.; McDiarmid, R.; De la Riva, I.

    2006-01-01

    We report new distributional information for Eleutherodactylus mercedesae in Bolivia, and provide the first record for Peru based on an adult female. This species, previously endemic to Bolivia, now ranges across about 1000 km in cloud forests on the Amazonian slopes of the Andes from southern Peru to central Bolivia. We provide the first morphological description of females based on two specimens, compare them with the male type and paratype, add some observations to the original description, and comment on variation in the species.

  4. Population structure and reproduction of Deuterodon langei travassos, 1957 (Teleostei, Characidae in a neotropical stream basin from the Atlantic Forest, Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Ricardo Simões Vitule

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspects of the biology of D. langei were studied at different sites along a longitudinal gradient formed by the Ribeirão stream basin, a Neotropical stream of the Atlantic Forest, southern Brazil. Differences were observed in population structure and reproduction along the longitudinal gradient and during the study period. Juvenile fishes occurred in high abundance, mainly in the downstream site after the rainy months. Adults occurred mainly in the intermediate and upstream sites. During their life cycle, adults optimise their reproductive strategy by concentrating the reproductive period with total spawn in a short time interval before summer rains dragged the juvenile, larval forms and/or eggs downstream. The downstream site was characterized by a wide range of microhabitats (ex. submerged grass and shallow flooded area. Thus, the species used different portions of the basin in distinct stages of its life, being ecologically adapted to variation patterns in its temporal and physical environments.Aspectos da biologia de D. langei foram estudados em diferentes locais da bacia do rio Ribeirão, um riacho litorâneo da Floresta Atlântica do sudeste do Brasil. Foram observadas diferenças na estrutura da população e na reprodução, ao longo do gradiente longitudinal da bacia e do período de estudo. Os peixes juvenis ocorreram em grande abundância, principalmente no trecho a jusante da bacia, após os meses mais chuvosos. Adultos ocorreram principalmente nos trechos intermediários e a montante. Não houve diferença significativa na relação sexual entre os locais amostrados, estações do ano, meses e classes de comprimento. O comprimento médio de primeira maturação (L50 foi o mesmo para machos e fêmeas, entre 6,1 e 7,0 cm de comprimento total (Lt. O período reprodutivo foi curto (entre o final da primavera e início do verão, antes dos meses mais chuvosos, com desova total. O Índice de Atividade Reprodutiva (IAR indicou que D

  5. Pragmatic consideration of geologic carbon storage design based upon historic pressure response to oil and gas production in the southern San Joaquin basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Annual CO2 emissions from large fixed sources in the southern San Joaquin Valley and vicinity in California are about 20 million metric tons per year (MMT/Y). Cumulative net fluid production due to oil and gas extracted from below the minimum depth for geologic carbon storage (taken as 1,500 m) was 1.4 billion m3 at reservoir conditions as of 2010. At an average CO2 storage density of 0.5 metric tons per m3, this implies 35 years of storage capacity at current emission rates just to refill the vacated volume, neglecting possible reservoir consolidation. However, the production occurred from over 300 pools. The production rate relative to average pressure decline in the more productive pools analyzed suggests they could receive about 2 MMT/Y raising the field average pressure to nearly the fracturing pressure. This would require well fields as extensive as those used for production, instead of the single to few wells per project typically envisioned. Even then, the actual allowable injection rate to the larger pools would be less than 2 MMT/Y in order to keep pressures at the injection well below the fracture pressure. This implies storing 20 MMT/Y would require developing storage operations in tens of pools with hundreds, if not over a thousand, wells. This utilization of one of the basins with the most storage capacity in the state would result in reducing the state's fixed source emissions by only one eighth relative to current emissions. The number of fields and wells involved in achieving this suggests a different strategy might provide more capacity at similar cost. Specifically, staging wells that initially produce water in the vicinity of fewer injection wells could result in both more storage. This water could be directed to a shallower zone, or supplied to the surface at a similar cost. The commencement of ocean water desalination in the state indicates the economics of water supply might support treating this water for beneficial use, particularly if it

  6. Peru - privatisation draws in major new investments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent charges in Peru's energy sector are reported as the privatisation campaign draws to a close. Sectors covered include the splitting of the petroleum company into its components of production, refining, transport and marketing. (UK)

  7. The Giant Otter Project In Peru 1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof Schenck

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available Giant Otters (Pteronura brasiliensis are rarely investigated but highly endangered. The project "STATUS, HABITAT AND CONSERVATION OF GIANT OTTERS IN PERU" from the Frankfurt Zoological Society, - Help for Threatened Wildlife - started in 1990 with a two and half year fieldwork period. The project is actually run with a yearly two months fieldwork period in Peru and ongoing analyzing, management and coordination from Germany. Following we give the report for 1995.

  8. Infrastructure and economic growth in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Urrunaga; Carlos Aparicio

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the literature analysing the importance of infrastructure for economic growth, and performs an econometric estimation to discover the relation between the two variables in the case of Peru. Different estimators are used with panel data from the 24 regions of Peru for the period 1980-2009. The econometric results confirm that public-service infrastructures (roads, electricity and telecommunications) are important in explaining temporary differences in regional output, in k...

  9. Currency Substitution and Inflation in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Liliana Rojas-Suárez

    1992-01-01

    This paper shows that there is a long-run relationship between the expected rate of depreciation in the black-market-exchange rate and the ratio of domestic to foreign money in Peru; that is, the hypothesis of currency substitution can explain the behavior of real holdings of money in Peru. The paper also shows that, while the importance of currency substitution as a transmission mechanism through which domestic policies affected the dynamics of inflation was relatively small during a period ...

  10. Metropolitan growth and migration in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Malmberg, Gunnar

    1988-01-01

    Abstract: The study deals with the interplay between migration and metropolitan growth in Peru during the last decades. The key question is to what extent Peru's rural-urban migration and rapid urban growth is triggered by opportunities within the formal and informal sectors in the growing metropolis of Lima. Aggregated data about migration have been related to information of socioeconomic and geographical conditions in rural and urban areas. Multivariate models of interregional migration are...

  11. [The health system of Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde-Rabanal, Jacqueline Elizabeth; Lazo-González, Oswaldo; Nigenda, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the health conditions in Peru and, with greater detail, the Peruvian health system, including its structure and coverage, its financial sources, its physical, material and human resources, and its stewardship functions. It also discusses the activities developed in the information and research areas, as well as the participation of citizens in the operation and evaluation of the health system. The article concludes with a discussion of the most recent innovations, including the Comprehensive Health Insurance, the Health Care Enterprises system, the decentralization process and the Local Committees for Health Administration. The main challenge confronted by the Peruvian health system is the extension of coverage to more than I0% of the population presently lacking access to basic health care. PMID:21877089

  12. Women's Participation in a Postconflict Community in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Elba Custodio; Rivera-Holguín, Miryam; Pacheco, Manuel Seminario; Sotelo, Eric Arenas; Béjar, Paola Urruchi

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the internal armed conflict in Peru (1980-2000) was felt in many regions in this South American country, and especially in rural regions such as the Southern Andean province of Cotabambas in the Apurímac department. This article describes and analyzes the actions and results of a community mental health project in this area that aimed to address the conflict's aftermath. The intervention used participatory strategies to identify the communities' prioritized problems, established actions appropriate to the cultural characteristics of the population, and implemented creative and recreational initiatives that responded to communities' needs. Based on democratic dialogue, horizontal relations, and reciprocity, the targeted communities became protagonists in the process of psychosocial transformation that fostered individual and collective exercise of rights, individual human development, and democratic community building. PMID:26472238

  13. Angiosperms additions to flora of Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric F. Rodríguez

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We present here 131 new additions to the angiosperm flora of Peru from recent collections in the north of Peru, mostly from department of Amazonas (provinces of Bagua and Condorcanqui and department of Cajamarca (province of San Ignacio. This new contribution is the result of field and herbarium studies by the various authors in this region from 1993 to 2002, and represents the combined effort of personnel from the Herbarium Truxillense (HUT and the Herbarium of the Missouri Botanical Garden (MO as part of the Flora of Peru Project. The species reported here were compared against the list of species documented in the «Catalogue of Flowering Plants and Gymnosperms of Peru» (Brako & Zarucchi, 1993 and «Ten years of additions to the flora of Peru: 1993- 2003» (Ulloa Ulloa et al., 2004. The new taxa are organized in three categories: 18 species new to science, six new nomenclatural combinations and 107 new records, thereby enlarging their geographical distribution towards to Peru. Considering the new species and the new records, this contribution adds 125 species to the Peruvian Flora.

  14. The Impact of Drought on Household Food Security in the Limpopo Basin of Semi Arid Southern Africa: The Case of Kgatleng District in Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Acquah, Benjamin K.

    2008-01-01

    The Limpopo Basin is important to Botswana’s agriculture in terms of its land area of 80118 square kilometers. Climatic conditions in the Basin have ranged from droughts to floods in some years. The semi-arid nature of the Basin with the resultant low crop yields under rain-fed conditions has meant that communities in the area have adapted various strategies with regard to their access to food. These coping strategies are likely to undergo severe strains during periods of extreme weather patt...

  15. A Multi-disciplinary Overview of Chagas in Periurban Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah McCune

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available There are between 8 and 11 million cases of America Human Trypanosomiasis, commonly known as Chagas disease, in Latin America. Chagas is endemic in southern Peru, especially the Arequipa region, where it has expanded from poor, rural areas to periurban communities. This paper summarizes the findings of four studies in periurban Arequipa: on determinants of disease-vector infestation; on prevalence, spatial patterns, and risk factors of Chagas; on links between migration, settlement patterns, and disease-vector infestation; and on the relationship between discordant test results and spatially clustered transmission hotspots. These studies identified two risk factors associated with the disease: population dynamics and the urbanization of poverty. Understanding the disease within this new urban context will allow for improved public health prevention efforts and policy initiatives. Discovered in 1909 by Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, American Human Trypanosomiasis is a chronic and potentially life-threatening illness found throughout Latin America (Moncayo, 2003. Indeed, it is estimated that there are between 8 and 11 million cases in Mexico and Central and South America (Centers for Disease Control [CDC], 2009. Chagas disease, as it is most commonly known, is endemic in southern Peru, especially in the region of Arequipa. Once thought to be limited to poor, rural areas, the disease is now appearing in the periurban communities that surround Arequipa City, the capital of the region (Cornejo del Carpio, 2003. Understanding the urbanization of Chagas disease will allow public health and medical professionals to better combat the further transmission of the disease. After providing an overview of Chagas and introducing the scope of the disease in Latin America, this paper will summarize the findings of four recent studies conducted in periurban districts in Arequipa. Ultimately, this paper seeks to identify the risk factors associated with Chagas

  16. Joint Peru/United States report on Peru/United States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 2. Annex 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    An examination of the energy sources of Peru was undertaken by the USA in collaboration with Peru. First, an introduction establishes the purpose and summarizes results, after which the status of energy supply is presented. The ensuing sections contain the contributions of the participating technical specialists, namely: Peru's hydrocarbon potential, estimated reserves, and projected production rates; coal deposits in Peru; geothermal energy; uranium; miscellaneous energy sources; energy-related minerals; water resources in Peru; and geologic hazards in Peru. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the sections. (MCW)

  17. Dominação, resistencia e autonomia no extremo sul do Vice-reinado do Peru (Séculos XVI e XVII - 10.4025/dialogos.v13i2.410 Dominación, resistencia y autonomía en el extremo sur del Virreinato del Perú (siglos XVI y XVII Domination, resistance and autonomy in the far southern Viceroyalty of Peru (16th and 17th centuries - doi: 10.4025/dialogos.v13i2.410

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Bixio

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Num contexto de ampla desestruturação das sociedades indígenas originarias da jurisdição de Córdoba, na antiga Governação de Tucumán, no extremo sul do Vice-reinado do Peru, indaga-se sobre os limites da dominação e sobre as possíveis margens que as populações nativas tiveram para negociar suas respectivas posições no interior do sistema. Com este objetivo, são analisadas as práticas de resistência indígena e as mudanças operadas nelas entre fins do século XVI e fins do XVII. Coloca-se especial atenção nas micro práticas ou “táticas do débil”, entendidas como pequenas operações realizadas desde o lugar do outro eescassamente planejadas. Estas táticas não eram articuladas nem se inseriam num projeto global de resistência, mas conseguiram tremer as bases do poder.En un contexto de amplia desestructuración de las sociedades indígenas originarias de la jurisdicción de Córdoba en la antigua Gobernación del Tucumán (extremo sur del Virreinato del Perú, se indaga en los límites de la dominación colonial y en los posibles márgenes que tuvieron las poblaciones autóctonas para negociar sus respectivas posiciones en el interior del sistema. Con este objeto, se analizan las prácticas de resistencia indígena y las modificaciones sufridas en ellas desde fines del siglo XVI y hasta fines del siglo XVII. Se pone el acento particularmente en las microprácticas o “tácticas del débil” entendidas como pequeñas operaciones realizadas desde el lugar del otro y escasamente planificadas. Estas tácticas no se encontraban articuladas ni formaban parte de un proyecto global de resistencia pero lograron producir algunas sacudidas a los cimientos del poder.In a context of wide de-structuring of indigenous societies from the Cordoba jurisdiction in the former Tucuman Governorship, far southern Viceroyalty of Peru, this work questions the limits of domination and the possible freedoms the native populations had in

  18. The thermal history of the Miocene Ibar Basin (Southern Serbia: new constraints from apatite and zircon fission track and vitrinite reflectance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrić Nevena

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Ibar Basin was formed during Miocene large scale extension in the NE Dinaride segment of the Alpine- Carpathian-Dinaride system. The Miocene extension led to exhumation of deep seated core-complexes (e.g. Studenica and Kopaonik core-complex as well as to the formation of extensional basins in the hanging wall (Ibar Basin. Sediments of the Ibar Basin were studied by apatite and zircon fission track and vitrinite reflectance in order to define thermal events during basin evolution. Vitrinite reflectance (VR data (0.63-0.90 %Rr indicate a bituminous stage for the organic matter that experienced maximal temperatures of around 120-130 °C. Zircon fission track (ZFT ages indicate provenance ages. The apatite fission track (AFT single grain ages (45-6.7 Ma and bimodal track lengths distribution indicate partial annealing of the detrital apatites. Both vitrinite reflectance and apatite fission track data of the studied sediments imply post-depositional thermal overprint in the Ibar Basin. Thermal history models of the detritial apatites reveal a heating episode prior to cooling that began at around 10 Ma. The heating episode started around 17 Ma and lasted 10-8 Ma reaching the maximum temperatures between 100-130 °C. We correlate this event with the domal uplift of the Studenica and Kopaonik cores where heat was transferred from the rising warm footwall to the adjacent colder hanging wall. The cooling episode is related to basin inversion and erosion. The apatite fission track data indicate local thermal perturbations, detected in the SE part of the Ibar basin (Piskanja deposit with the time frame ~7.1 Ma, which may correspond to the youngest volcanic phase in the region.

  19. The thermal history of the Miocene Ibar Basin (Southern Serbia): new constraints from apatite and zircon fission track and vitrinite reflectance data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrić, Nevena; Fügenschuh, Bernhard; Životić, Dragana; Cvetković, Vladica

    2015-02-01

    The Ibar Basin was formed during Miocene large scale extension in the NE Dinaride segment of the Alpine- Carpathian-Dinaride system. The Miocene extension led to exhumation of deep seated core-complexes (e.g. Studenica and Kopaonik core-complex) as well as to the formation of extensional basins in the hanging wall (Ibar Basin). Sediments of the Ibar Basin were studied by apatite and zircon fission track and vitrinite reflectance in order to define thermal events during basin evolution. Vitrinite reflectance (VR) data (0.63-0.90 %Rr) indicate a bituminous stage for the organic matter that experienced maximal temperatures of around 120-130 °C. Zircon fission track (ZFT) ages indicate provenance ages. The apatite fission track (AFT) single grain ages (45-6.7 Ma) and bimodal track lengths distribution indicate partial annealing of the detrital apatites. Both vitrinite reflectance and apatite fission track data of the studied sediments imply post-depositional thermal overprint in the Ibar Basin. Thermal history models of the detritial apatites reveal a heating episode prior to cooling that began at around 10 Ma. The heating episode started around 17 Ma and lasted 10-8 Ma reaching the maximum temperatures between 100-130 °C. We correlate this event with the domal uplift of the Studenica and Kopaonik cores where heat was transferred from the rising warm footwall to the adjacent colder hanging wall. The cooling episode is related to basin inversion and erosion. The apatite fission track data indicate local thermal perturbations, detected in the SE part of the Ibar basin (Piskanja deposit) with the time frame ~7.1 Ma, which may correspond to the youngest volcanic phase in the region.

  20. New results on ground deformation in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (southern Poland) obtained during the DORIS Project (EU-FP 7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graniczny, Marek; Colombo, Davide; Kowalski, Zbigniew; Przyłucka, Maria; Zdanowski, Albin

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents application of satellite interferometric methods (persistent scatterer interferometric synthetic aperture radar (PSInSAR™) and differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR)) for observation of ground deformation in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (USCB) in Southern Poland. The presented results were obtained during the DORIS project (EC FP 7, Grant Agreement n. 242212, www.doris-project.eu). Several InSAR datasets for this area were analysed. Most of them were processed by Tele-Rilevamento Europa - T.R.E. s.r.l. Italy. Datasets came from different SAR satellites (ERS 1 and 2, Envisat, ALOS- PALSAR and TerraSAR-X) and cover three different SAR bands (L, C and X). They were processed using both InSAR techniques: DInSAR, where deformations are presented as interferometric fringes on the raster image, and PSInSAR, where motion is indentified on irregular set of persistent scatterer (PS) points. Archival data from the C-band European Space Agency satellites ERS and ENVISAT provided information about ground movement since 1992 until 2010 in two separate datasets (1992-2000 and 2003-2010). Two coal mines were selected as examples of ground motion within inactive mining areas: Sosnowiec and Saturn, where mining ceased in 1995 and 1997, respectively. Despite well pumping after closure of the mines, groundwater rose several dozen meters, returning to its natural horizon. Small surface uplift clearly indicated on satellite interferometric data is related to high permeability of the hydrogeological subregion and insufficient water withdrawal from abandoned mines. The older 1992-2000 PSInSAR dataset indicates values of ground motion ranging from -40.0 to 0.0 mm. The newer 2003-2010 dataset shows values ranging from -2.0 to +7.0 mm. This means that during this period of time subsidence was less and uplift greater in comparison to the older dataset. This is even more evident in the time series of randomly selected PS points from both coal

  1. Landscape evolution and depositional processes in the Miocene Amazonian Pebas lake/wetland system: evidence from exploratory boreholes in northeastern Peru.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, F.P.; Guerrero, J.; Räsänen, M.E.; Romero Pittmann, L.; Vonhof, H.B.

    2006-01-01

    This study of the type and scales of depositional processes and landscape development in western Amazonia during the Miocene is based on the description and interpretation of three boreholes from the Marañon basin (Peru). The Miocene Pebas Formation, and the overlying Marañon Formation and underlyin

  2. The Southern Ocean Observing System

    OpenAIRE

    Rintoul, Stephen R.; Meredith, Michael P.; Schofield, Oscar; Newman, Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Southern Ocean includes the only latitude band where the ocean circles the earth unobstructed by continental boundaries. This accident of geography has profound consequences for global ocean circulation, biogeochemical cycles, and climate. The Southern Ocean connects the ocean basins and links the shallow and deep limbs of the overturning circulation (Rintoul et al., 2001). The ocean's capacity to moderate the pace of climate change is therefore influenced strongly by the Southern Ocean's...

  3. Report of Heat Flow Measurements in Peru and Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Uyeda, Seiya; WATANABE, Teruhiko; Ozasayama, Yoji; Ibaragi, K.

    1980-01-01

    Results of terrestrial heat flow measurements in Peru and Ecuador conducted in 1969, are reported. Eight different sites in Peru and one site in Ecuador were visited for underground temperature measurement. However, data from only five metal mines in Peru and the metal exploration site in Ecuador were usable. The geothermal gradient data on four oil fields in Peru and two in Ecuador were referenced. Although high heat flow has been indicated on the continent side of the Andes (the Gasapalca a...

  4. Bransfield Basin and Cordilleran Orogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalziel, I. W.; Austin, J. A.; Barker, D. H.; Christensen, G. L.

    2003-12-01

    Tectonic uplift of the Andean Cordillera was initiated in the mid-Cretaceous with inversion of a composite marginal basin along 7500 km of the continental margin of South America, from Peru to Tierra del Fuego and the North Scotia Ridge. In the southernmost Andes, from 50-56 degrees S, the quasi-oceanic floor of this basin is preserved in the obducted ophiolitic rocks of the Rocas Verdes (Green Rocks) basin. We suggest that the basin beneath Bransfield Strait, 61-64 degrees S, separating the South Shetland Islands from the Antarctic Peninsula, constitutes a modern analog for the Rocas Verdes basin. Marine geophysical studies of Bransfield basin have been undertaken over the past 12 years by the Institute for Geophysics, University of Texas at Austin, under the auspices of the Ocean Sciences Division and United States Antarctic Program, National Science Foundation. These studies have elucidated the structure and evolution of Bransfield basin for comparison with the Rocas Verdes basin, with a view to eventual forward modeling of the evolution of a hypothetical cordilleran orogen by compression and inversion of the basin. These are the processes that can be observed in the tectonic transformation of the Rocas Verdes basin into the southernmost Andean cordillera, as South America moved rapidly westward in an Atlantic-Indian ocean hot-spot reference frame during the mid-Cretaceous. Multi-channel reflection seismic data from the Bransfield basin reveal an asymmetric structural architecture characterized by steeply-dipping normal faults flanking the South Shetlands island arc and gently dipping listric normal faults along the Antarctic Peninsula margin. Normal fault polarity reversals appear to be related to distributed loci of magmatic activity within the basin. This architecture is remarkably similar to that deduced from field structural studies of the Rocas Verdes basin. Notably, the oceanward-dipping, low angle normal faults along the Antarctic Peninsula margin

  5. Geomorphological investigation and landslide monitoring at Machu Picchu, Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vilímek, V.; Klimeš, Jan; Zvelebil, J.; Astete, F.V.; Codova, J.

    Lima : Sociedád Geologica del Peru , 2006. [Congreso Peru ano de Geología /13./. 17.10.2006-20.10.2006, Lima] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : GLOF * Huaraz * Peru Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  6. 7 CFR 319.56-41 - Citrus from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Citrus from Peru. 319.56-41 Section 319.56-41... from Peru. Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi), limes (C. aurantiifolia), mandarins or tangerines (C... States from Peru under the following conditions: (a) The fruit must be accompanied by a permit issued...

  7. Mesozoic architecture of a tract of the European-Iberian continental margin: Insights from preserved submarine palaeotopography in the Longobucco Basin (Calabria, Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santantonio, Massimo; Fabbi, Simone; Aldega, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The sedimentary successions exposed in northeast Calabria document the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous tectonic-sedimentary evolution of a former segment of the European-Iberian continental margin. They are juxtaposed today to units representing the deformation of the African and Adriatic plates margins as a product of Apenninic crustal shortening. A complex pattern of unconformities reveals a multi-stage tectonic evolution during the Early Jurassic, which affected the facies and geometries of siliciclastic and carbonate successions deposited in syn- and post-rift environments ranging from fluvial to deep marine. Late Sinemurian/Early Pliensbachian normal faulting resulted in exposure of the Hercynian basement at the sea-floor, which was onlapped by marine basin-fill units. Shallow-water carbonate aprons and reefs developed in response to the production of new accommodation space, fringing the newborn islands which represent structural highs made of Paleozoic crystalline and metamorphic rock. Their drowning and fragmentation in the Toarcian led to the development of thin caps of Rosso Ammonitico facies. Coeval to these deposits, a thick (> 1 km) hemipelagic/siliciclastic succession was sedimented in neighboring hanging wall basins, which would ultimately merge with the structural high successions. Footwall blocks of the Early Jurassic rift, made of Paleozoic basement and basin-margin border faults with their onlapping basin-fill formations, are found today at the hanging wall of Miocene thrusts, overlying younger (Middle/Late Jurassic to Late Paleogene) folded basinal sediments. This paper makes use of selected case examples to describe the richly diverse set of features, ranging from paleontology to sedimentology, to structural geology, which are associated with the field identification of basin-margin unconformities. Our data provide key constraints for restoring the pre-orogenic architecture of a continental margin facing a branch of the Liguria-Piedmont ocean in the

  8. Integration Strategy for the Southern Cone Gas Networks

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2007-01-01

    Experts from the governments of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay, who participated in this strategic study for the Southern Cone Gas Pipeline Networks, combined their efforts to identify a shared energy alternative which would help boost the development of natural gas in the sub region, and, thus, its sustainable economic development. This study was developed i...

  9. [Evaluation of the quality of river water with diatoms (Bacillariophyceae): an experience in Tacna, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calizaya-Anco, José; Avendaño-Cáceres, Miriam; Delgado-Vargas, Irma

    2013-03-01

    In order to evaluate the quality of the water of the Locumba river, Tacna (Peru), water samples were taken from ten stations located along the Locumba river basin, during six periods in an annual cycle. The diversity and number of diatoms was also evaluated, together with eleven physiochemical parameters in order to determine the degree of water contamination. We found that as the basin advanced down the mountain, the diversity of diatoms decreased from 2.37 bits cell-1 to 0.71 bits cell-1 and the gradient of contaminants increased. In addition to this increase, the number of species tolerant to high levels of environmental disturbance rose. An increase in all physiochemical parameters used to evaluate the degree of contamination was observed. These results suggest that diatoms can be adequate bioindicators when evaluating the quality of water in this basin. PMID:23612814

  10. Peru continues to press privitization efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that Peru has again extended the deadline for bids on a 30 year operating contract for state owned Petromar SA's offshore Block Z-2b. The tender is key to efforts to privatize Petromar, a subsidiary of state oil company Petroleos del Peru. The committee charged with implementing Petromar privatization extended the deadline for bids another 70 days Oct. 30, following a 60 day extension made in September. The latest deadline for bids is Feb. 10, with the contract expected to be awarded Feb. 26. A bid package on Block Z-2b is available from Petroperu's Lima headquarters for $20,000. Petromar operates the former Belco Petroleum Corp. offshore assets Peru's government expropriated in 1985. It currently produces 17,600 b/d, compared with 27,000 b/d at the time of expropriation

  11. Santa Bárbara Formation (Caçapava do Sul, southern Brazil): depositional sequences and evolution of an Early Paleozoic postcollisional basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Borba, André Weissheimer; Pimentel Mizusaki, Ana Maria

    2003-10-01

    The Santa Bárbara Formation, located in southernmost Brazil, comprises red-colored conglomerates, sandstones, and siltstones. It was deposited in the Early Paleozoic under continental conditions in a restricted, strike-slip basin (Santa Bárbara basin) in response to the postcollisional stresses of the Brasiliano/Pan-African cycle (900-500 Ma). Five facies associations are recognized: alluvial fans, fan-delta front, lacustrine, sandy braided, and gravel bed braided river deposits. The application of sequence stratigraphy enables the recognition of three depositional sequences. The two basal sequences (I and II) represent a coherent depositional pattern, with axial fluvial and fan-delta systems that deposit northeastward and lateral contribution from alluvial fans. Such coarse deposits are composed mainly of metamorphic clasts derived from the erosion of 'Caçapava high', the eastern steep margin of the Santa Bárbara basin. Sequence III lies unconformably over the basal subunits and reflects the inversion of the axial systems, in that the paleocurrents of the gravel bed deposits systematically point south/southwestward. The alluvial fan deposits of Sequence III also suggest a tectonic rearrangement of the basin, with partial erosion of the basal sequences and the presence of granitoid fragments, which reflects a deeper denudation stage for the Caçapava high and possibly a significant hiatus at the base of Sequence III.

  12. Assessment of hydrochemical trends in the highly anthropised Guadalhorce River basin (southern Spain) in terms of compliance with the European groundwater directive for 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urresti-Estala, Begoña; Gavilán, Pablo Jiménez; Pérez, Iñaki Vadillo; Cantos, Francisco Carrasco

    2016-08-01

    One of the key aspects introduced by the European Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC (WFD) and developed by Groundwater Directive 2006/118/EC was the need to analyse pollution trends in groundwater bodies in order to meet the environmental objectives set in Article 4 WFD. According to this Directive, the main goal of "good status" should be achieved by the year 2015, and having reached this horizon, now is a suitable time to assess the changes that have taken place with the progressive implementation of the WFD. An extensive database is available for the Guadalhorce River basin, and this was used not only to identify in groundwater but also to draw real conclusions with respect to the degree of success in meeting the targets established for this main deadline (2015) The geographic and climate context of the Guadalhorce basin has facilitated the development of a variety of economic activities, but the one affecting the largest surface area is agriculture (which is practised on over 50 % of the river basin). The main environmental impacts identified in the basin aquifers arise from the widespread use of fertilisers and manures, together with the input of sewage from population centres. In consequence, some of the groundwater bodies located in the basin have historically had very high nitrate concentrations, often exceeding 200 mg/L. In addition, return flows, the use of fertilisers and other pressures promote the entry of other pollutants into the groundwater, as well as the salinisation of the main aquifers in the basin. In order to assess the hydrochemical changes that have taken place since the entry into force of the WFD, we performed a detailed trends analysis, based on data from the official sampling networks. In some cases, over 35 years of water quality data are available, but these statistics also present significant limitations, due to some deficiencies in the design or management; thus, data are missing for many years, the results are subject to

  13. Young Lives Preliminary Country Report: Peru.

    OpenAIRE

    Escobal, Javier; Lanata, Claudio; Madrid, Sofia; Penny, Mary; Saavedra, Jaime; Suárez,Pablo; Verastegui, Héctor; Villar, Eliana; Huttly, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a brief literature review of childhood poverty in Peru, identifies key national audiences for the Young Lives study, explains the study methods used and presents provisional evidence, conclusions and policy implications. The Peruvian economy underwent a series of crises and external shocks in the 1980s and 1990s. The number of poor households rose rapidly from 43 per cent of the total in 1985-86 to 59 per cent in 1991. Despite reforms in the 1990s, Peru has one of the hig...

  14. The 1997–1998 El Niño as an unforgettable phenomenon in northern Peru: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Angela M.; Danysh, Heather E; Garvich, Mijail; Gonzálvez, Guillermo; Checkley, William; Alvarez, María; Gilman, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    During the 1997–98 El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Tumbes, Peru received 16 times the annual average rainfall. We explored how Tumbes residents perceived the ENSO’s impact on basic necessities, transport, healthcare, jobs and migration. Forty-five individuals from five rural communities, including those that were isolated and not isolated from the rest of Tumbes during this ENSO, participated in five focus groups and six individuals constructed nutrition diaries. When asked about events ...

  15. Cold air incursions, δ18O variability, and monsoon dynamics associated with snow days at Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, John V.; Vuille, Mathias; Hardy, Douglas R.; Burns, Stephen J.; Thompson, Lonnie G.

    2015-08-01

    Quelccaya Ice Cap in the Andes of Peru contains an annually resolved δ18O record covering the past 1800 years; yet atmospheric dynamics associated with snow deposition and δ18O variability at this site are poorly understood. Here we make use of 10 years of snow pit and short core δ18O data and hourly snow-height measurements obtained by an automated weather station deployed at the ice cap's summit to analyze linkages between snowfall, δ18O, and the South American summer monsoon (SASM). Snow accumulation peaks in December and is negative May-September. Snow δ18O values decrease gradually through austral summer from about -17 to -24‰. Surface snow δ18O is altered after deposition during austral winter from about -24 to -15‰. More than 70% of the total snow accumulation is tied to convection along the leading edge of cold air incursions of midlatitude air advected equatorward from southern South America. Snowfall amplitude at Quelccaya Ice Cap varies systematically with regional precipitation, atmospheric dynamics, midtroposphere humidity, and water vapor δD. Strongest snowfall gains correspond with positive precipitation anomalies over the western Amazon Basin, increased humidity, and lowered water vapor δD values, consistent with the "amount effect." We discuss ventilation of the monsoon, modulated by midlatitude cold air advection, as potentially diagnostic of the relationship between SASM dynamics and Quelccaya snowfall. Results will serve as a basis for development of a comprehensive isotopic forward model to reconstruct past monsoon dynamics using the ice core δ18O record.

  16. Volcanic activities in the Southern part of East African rift initiation: Melilitites and nephelinites from the Manyara Basin (North Tanzania rift axis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudouin, Celine; Parat, Fleurice; Tiberi, Christel; Gautier, Stéphanie; Peyrat, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    The East African Rift exposes different stages of plate boundary extension, from the initiation of the rift (North (N) Tanzania) to oceanic accretion (Afar). The N Tanzania rift-axis (north-south (S) trend) is divided into 2 different volcanic and seismic activities: (1) the Natron basin (N) with shallow seismicity and intense volcanism and (2) the Manyara basin (S) with deep crustal earthquakes and sparse volcanism. The Natron basin is characterized by extinct volcanoes (2 Ma-0.75 Ma) and active volcano (Oldoinyo Lengai) and a link between seismicity and volcanism has been observed during the Oldoinyo Lengai crisis in 2007. In the S part of the N Tanzanian rift, volcanoes erupted in the Manyara basin between 0.4 and 0.9 Ma. In this study, we used geochemical signature of magmas and deep fluids that percolate into the lithosphere beneath Manyara basin, to define the compositions of magmas and fluids at depth beneath the S part of the N Tanzania rift, compare to the Natron basin and place constrain on the volcanic and seismic activities. The Manyara basin has distinct volcanic activities with mafic magmas as melilitites (Labait) and Mg-nephelinites (carbonatite, Kwaraha), and more differentiated magmas as Mg-poor nephelinites (Hanang). Melilitites and Mg-nephelinites are primary magmas with olivine, clinopyroxene (cpx), and phlogopite recording high-pressure crystallization environment, (melilitites >4 GPa and Mg-nephelinites>1 GPa) with high volatile contents (whole rock: 0.7-4.6 wt% CO2, 0.1-0.3 wt% F and 0.1 wt% Cl). FTIR analyses of olivine constrained the water content of Labait and Kwaraha magmas at 0.1 and 0.4 wt% H2O, respectively. Geochemical modelling suggests that mafic magmas result from a low degree of partial melting (1-2%) of a peridotitic source with garnet and phlogopite (high Tb/Yb (>0.6) and Rb/Sr (0.03-0.12) ratio). Mg-poor nephelinites from Hanang volcano crystallized cpx, Ti-garnet, and nepheline as phenocrysts. Magmas result from fractional

  17. Currency Substitution and Inflation in Peru Currency Substitution and Inflation in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Liliana Rojas-Suarez

    1992-01-01

    This paper shows that there is a long-run relationship between the expected rate of depreciation in the black-market-exchange rate and the ratio of domestic to foreign money in Peru: that is, the hypothesis of currency substitution can explain the behavior of real holdings of money in Peru. The paper also shows that, while, the importance of currency substitution as a transmission mechanism through which domestic policies affected the dynamics of inflation was relatively small during a period...

  18. 2D compositional modeling of petroleum generation, expulsion and migration in the Southern compartment of the Reconcavo Basin, Brazil; Modelisation compositionnelle 2D de la genese, expulsion et migration du petrole dans le compartiment sud du Bassin de Reconcavo, Bresil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barroz Penteado, H.L. de

    1999-01-07

    The Reconcavo Basin is part of a rift formed between the Late Jurassic and the Early Cretaceous in northeastern Brazil. The objective of this thesis was the compositional modeling of petroleum generation, expulsion and migration along a cross-section in the Southern Compartment of the basin with the Temispack basin simulation software. A geochemical study of the lacustrine shales of the Gomo Member (Candelas Fm.) has been performed to determine their petroleum potential, the evolution of maturation with depth and changes in petroleum composition. Hydrogen indices of immature kerogens (400-850 mg/g TOC) were shown to be higher than those of whole rocks, thus indicating a retention of Rock-Eval pyrolysis products in the mineral matrix of these type I source rocks. Saturates (30-50% of organic extracts in the immature zone) increase both in absolute and in relative (60-80%) terms in the oil window (2000-2600 m) because of a partial secondary cracking of NSOs and aromatics. After having tested several scenarios of geodynamic evolution between the Aptian and the Oligocene, a variable thickness of post-rift sediments (maximum of 1200 m) has been shown to be necessary to calibrate maturity parameters. Petroleum migration has been modeled to understand migration pathways as well as the role of faults as drains. Thus, two petroleum migration systems have been identified for the Dom Joao and Cexis accumulations. Petroleum compositional variations have been modeled by coupling the processes of retention and secondary cracking. A good calibration of compositions was obtained with secondary cracking parameters for NSOs and aromatics which are close to those of the main primary cracking reaction of a type I kerogen, coupled with a retention of 50% of NSOs within the source rocks. (author)

  19. Superficial and deep-seated gravity-driven deformation horizons within basinal succession: the case study of Maiolica Formation, Gargano Promontory, Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonská, Danica; Di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Gravitational phenomena on the paleoslope of continental margins play a significant role both in redistribution of sediment and formation of new structural features within sedimentary basins worldwide. Mass-transport deposits (MTDs) represent important heterogeneities within the succession and occur on various scales (tens of centimetres to hundreds of metres). Small- to medium-scale MTDs (up to tens of meters) act as layers of different petrophysical properties, whereas large-scale MTDs (tens to hundreds of meters) form both stratigraphic and structural discontinuities (faults, thrusts, erosional surfaces, dykes or injections) within the succession. The Maiolica Formation, Early Cretaceous deep basinal succession cropping out in Gargano Promontory of Southeast Italy is represented by undisturbed intervals of flat-lying thin-bedded, cherty micritic limestone interstratified with intervals of lithologically similar, but structurally distorted beds. For this reason, the studied outcrops provide a good opportunity to characterize the geometry and the internal deformation of small- and medium-scale carbonate MTDs. At the outcrop scale, small- to medium-sized MTDs can be simply identified as sheets of deformed strata alternated with packages of undeformed beds. However, several observed features such as folded stylolites with radially oriented peaks within some of these deformed packages and the presence of large vertical clastic-dyke-like bodies in the succession suggest that some of these deformed packages represent deep-seated basal gliding horizons of large-scale MTDs. In this study, we present MTDs on two different scales that have a crucial influence on the evolution of slope to basinal successions. Moreover, we define the features that distinguish superficial MTDs from the deep-seated gravity-driven deformation horizons within basinal carbonates.

  20. Fault-related CO2 degassing, geothermics, and fluid flow in southern California basins---Physiochemical evidence and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boles, James R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Garven, Grant [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2015-08-04

    Our studies have had an important impact on societal issues. Experimental and field observations show that CO2 degassing, such as might occur from stored CO2 reservoir gas, can result in significant stable isotopic disequilibrium. In the offshore South Ellwood field of the Santa Barbara channel, we show how oil production has reduced natural seep rates in the area, thereby reducing greenhouse gases. Permeability is calculated to be ~20-30 millidarcys for km-scale fault-focused fluid flow, using changes in natural gas seepage rates from well production, and poroelastic changes in formation pore-water pressure. In the Los Angeles (LA) basin, our characterization of formation water chemistry, including stable isotopic studies, allows the distinction between deep and shallow formations waters. Our multiphase computational-based modeling of petroleum migration demonstrates the important role of major faults on geological-scale fluid migration in the LA basin, and show how petroleum was dammed up against the Newport-Inglewood fault zone in a “geologically fast” interval of time (less than 0.5 million years). Furthermore, these fluid studies also will allow evaluation of potential cross-formational mixing of formation fluids. Lastly, our new study of helium isotopes in the LA basin shows a significant leakage of mantle helium along the Newport Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ), at flow rates up to 2 cm/yr. Crustal-scale fault permeability (~60 microdarcys) and advective versus conductive heat transport rates have been estimated using the observed helium isotopic data. The NIFZ is an important deep-seated fault that may crosscut a proposed basin decollement fault in this heavily populated area, and appears to allow seepage of helium from the mantle sources about 30 km beneath Los Angeles. The helium study has been widely cited in recent weeks by the news media, both in radio and on numerous web sites.

  1. Detrital and volcanic zircon U-Pb ages from southern Mendoza (Argentina): An insight on the source regions in the northern part of the Neuquén Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naipauer, Maximiliano; Tapia, Felipe; Mescua, José; Farías, Marcelo; Pimentel, Marcio M.; Ramos, Victor A.

    2015-12-01

    The infill of the Neuquén Basin recorded the Meso-Cenozoic geological and tectonic evolution of the southern Central Andes being an excellent site to investigate how the pattern of detrital zircon ages varies trough time. In this work we analyze the U-Pb (LA-MC-ICP-MS) zircon ages from sedimentary and volcanic rocks related to synrift and retroarc stages of the northern part of the Neuquén Basin. These data define the crystallization age of the synrift volcanism at 223 ± 2 Ma (Cerro Negro Andesite) and the maximum depositional age of the original synrift sediments at ca. 204 Ma (El Freno Formation). Two different pulses of rifting could be recognized according to the absolute ages, the oldest developed during the Norian and the younger during the Rhaetian-Sinemurian. The source regions of the El Freno Formation show that the Choiyoi magmatic province was the main source rock of sediment supply. An important amount of detrital zircons with Triassic ages was identified and interpreted as a source area related to the synrift magmatism. The maximum depositional age calculated for the Tordillo Formation in the Atuel-La Valenciana depocenter is at ca. 149 Ma; as well as in other places of the Neuquén Basin, the U-Pb ages calculated in the Late Jurassic Tordillo Formation do not agree with the absolute age of the Kimmeridgian-Tithonian boundary (ca. 152 Ma). The main source region of sediment in the Tordillo Formation was the Andean magmatic arc. Basement regions were also present with age peaks at the Carboniferous, Neoproterozoic, and Mesoproterozoic; these regions were probably located to the east in the San Rafael Block. The pattern of zircon ages summarized for the Late Jurassic Tordillo and Lagunillas formations were interpreted as a record of the magmatic activity during the Triassic and Jurassic in the southern Central Andes. A waning of the magmatism is inferred to have happened during the Triassic. The evident lack of ages observed around ca. 200 Ma suggests

  2. APPLICATION OF WELL LOG ANALYSIS IN ASSESSMENT OF PETROPHYSICAL PARAMETERS AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF WELLS IN THE “OTH” FIELD, ANAMBRA BASIN, SOUTHERN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene URORO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years, the Anambra basin one of Nigeria’s inland basins has recorded significant level of hydrocarbon exploration activities. The basin has been confirmed by several authors from source rock analyses to have the potential for generating hydrocarbon. For the hydrocarbon to be exploited, it is imperative to have a thorough understanding of the reservoir. Computer-assisted log analyses were employed to effectively evaluate the petrophysical parameters such as the shale volume (Vsh, total porosity (TP, effective porosity (EP, water saturation (Sw, and hydrocarbon saturation (Sh. Cross-plots of the petrophysical parameters versus depth were illustrated. Five hydrocarbon bearing reservoirs were delineated in well 1, four in well 2. The reservoirs in well 3 do not contain hydrocarbon. The estimated reservoir porosity varies from 10% to 21% while their permeability values range from 20md to 1400md. The porosity and permeability values suggest that reservoirs are good enough to store and also permit free flow of fluid. The volume of shale (0.05% to 0.35% analysis reveals that the reservoirs range from shaly sand to slightly shaly sand to clean sand reservoir. On the basis of petrophysics data, the reservoirs are interpreted a good quality reservoir rocks which has been confirmed with high effective porosity range between 20% and high hydrocarbon saturation exceeding 55% water saturation in well 1 and well 2. Water saturation 3 is nearly 100% although the reservoir properties are good

  3. APPLICATION OF WELL LOG ANALYSIS IN ASSESSMENT OF PETROPHYSICAL PARAMETERS AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF WELLS IN THE “OTH” FIELD, ANAMBRA BASIN, SOUTHERN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene URORO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years, the Anambra basin one of Nigeria’s inland basins has recorded significant level of hydrocarbon exploration activities. The basin has been confirmed by several authors from source rock analyses to have the potential for generating hydrocarbon. For the hydrocarbon to be exploited, it is imperative to have a thorough understanding of the reservoir. Computer-assisted log analyses were employed to effectively evaluate the petrophysical parameters such as the shale volume (Vsh, total porosity (TP, effective porosity (EP, water saturation (Sw, and hydrocarbon saturation (Sh. Cross-plots of the petrophysical parameters versus depth were illustrated. Five hydrocarbon bearing reservoirs were delineated in well 1, four in well 2. The reservoirs in well 3 do not contain hydrocarbon. The estimated reservoir porosity varies from 10% to 21% while their permeability values range from 20md to 1400md. The porosity and permeability values suggest that reservoirs are good enough to store and also permit free flow of fluid. The volume of shale (0.05% to 0.35% analysis reveals that the reservoirs range from shaly sand to slightly shaly sand to clean sand reservoir. On the basis of petrophysics data, the reservoirs are interpreted a good quality reservoir rocks which has been confirmed with high effective porosity range between 20% and high hydrocarbon saturation exceeding 55% water saturation in well 1 and well 2. Water saturation 3 is nearly 100% although the reservoir properties are good.  

  4. Mineralogical and geochemical characters of surface sediments from the central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banerjee, R.

    and siliceous sediments of the northern part of the basin indicate the influence of continental influx. This influence, however, decreases in the southern part of the basin where smectite is predominant, indicating volcanic input. The basinal sediments...

  5. Peru LNG : A Focus on Continuous Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation

    2013-01-01

    Extractive industry companies, particularly those operating in areas of high biodiversity value, on indigenous lands, or in close proximity to communities, face operational and reputational risks related to their environmental and social performance, and can be subject to intense scrutiny from stakeholders. PERU Liquefied Natural Gas (PLNG), the first liquefied natural gas plant in South A...

  6. Wastewater use in aquaculture: research in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Prein, M.

    1995-01-01

    Use of wastewater is an issue gaining importance throughout the (developing) world, as water sources become scarcer and competition for them increases. In Peru, research has shown the technical, economic and social feasibility of growing fish in wastewater. Such fish farms could recover 100% of the wastewater treatment costs.

  7. Public Transportation and Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Lima, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Horna-Campos, Olivia J.; Sánchez-Pérez, Héctor J.; Sánchez, Inma; Bedoya, Alfredo; Martín, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    The association between public transportation for commuting and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) was analyzed in workers in Lima, Peru. Traveling in minibuses was a risk factor for pulmonary TB. Preventive measures need to be taken by health services to prevent spread of this disease.

  8. Corporate Governance Country Assessment : Republic of Peru

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2004-01-01

    This report assesses the corporate governance policy framework, and enforcement and compliance practices in Peru. Corporate governance reform is at an early stage, and some legislation has recently been upgraded to protect shareholder rights. The major issues are driven by the growing importance of private pension funds, which have become the most important institutional investors. At pres...

  9. Numerical dating algorithms of amino acid racemization ratios fromcontinental ostracodes:application to the Guadix-Baza Basin(southern Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Pérez-Hidalgo, Trinidad José de

    2004-01-01

    Age calculation algorithms for the D/L ratios of five amino acids (isoleucine, leucine, aspartic acid, phenylalanine and glutamic acid) analysed in continental ostracodes were determined for southern and central Iberian Peninsula, and allow the numerical dating of deposits in the Mediterranean area since Lower Pleistocene time to present. In order to obtain more accurate results for young samples, other algorithms were calculated for aspartic acid, phenylalanine and glutamic acid. Us...

  10. Unraveling multiple provenance areas using sandstone petrofacies and geochemistry: An example in the southern flank of the Golfo San Jorge Basin (Patagonia, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limarino, Carlos Oscar; Giordano, Sergio Roberto

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the provenance of Late Cretaceous sandstones deposited along the south flank of the Golfo San Jorge Basin. For this purpose, detrital modes of three hundred thirty-seven sandstone samples collected in the Mina del Carmen, Bajo Barreal, and Cañadón Seco Formations were studied in ten oil fields. According to the modal composition of the sandstones, six petrofacies were defined allowing the identification of not only principal, but also secondary provenance areas. The QVM and VQM petrofacies are more than 20% metamorphic, sedimentary, and polycrystalline quartz clasts (Lm + Ls + Qpg > 20%), evidencing a secondary signal of basement supply masked by a predominant volcanic provenance. The petrofacies VP and VF are characterized by Lm + Ls + Qpg 20%.), which indicate a supply of sediment from volcanic terrains and scarce derivation of materials from basement rocks. Based on the plagioclase/k-feldspar ratio, the VF petrofacies is interpreted to be dominated by the supply of sand grains from the Andean volcanic-arc, while VP is supposed have originated through the erosion of intermediate volcanic rock outcroppings in the Macizo del Deseado. Finally, both the VQ and QV petrofacies show Lm + Ls + Qpg <20% and Pm + Om<20%, indicating a provenance of volcanic areas coupled with minor contributions from basement rocks. During the Late Cretaceous, the Golfo San Jorge Basin underwent a sag phase that was characterized by very scarce volcanism and tectonic activity. Although these conditions did not favor defined patterns in the vertical stacking of petrofacies, the sandstones exhibit remarkable changes in their regional distribution, which were determined by the paleogeography of the basin and differences in basement composition within the source areas. Finally, a paleogeographic model for sediment circulation in the basin is proposed. This model recognizes the main fluvial dispersal trends that flowed northwest to southeast and transported

  11. The Mormon Peak and Tule Springs Detachments of Southern Nevada and Their Role in Interpreting the Subsurface Structure of the Sevier Desert Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernicke, B.; Axen, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    The eastern Sevier front is commonly overprinted by west-dipping normal faults that have been active through much of Cenozoic time. Although examples of disparate age and geometry abound, the Sevier Desert detachment stands out as being: (1) a very large, low-angle structure, (2) probably still active, and (3) at drillable depth, and hence is a prime target for scientific drilling. Among the closest surface-exposed analogs of the detachment are the Miocene Mormon Peak and Tule Springs detachments in southern Nevada, about 250 km SSW of the Sevier Desert. In both areas, the detachments developed within a few km of the basal Sevier thrust. The few traces of the southern Nevada detachments that were identified by reconnaissance mapping in the 1950s were first interpreted as underlying "rootless" gravity-slide masses. Detailed stratigraphic and structural mapping in the 1980s revealed the full extent of these detachments and their close relationship to the basal Sevier thrust. Construction and retrodeformation of cross sections through the two detachments demonstrated that neither fault could represent the base of a surficial slide mass. The key field relationship is the structural contiguity of the hanging walls of the detachments with large mountain range blocks in their down-dip directions. "Rootless" gravity-driven masses of equivalent or larger scale are widely documented, and in contrast to the southern Nevada detachments show clear evidence along their down-dip portions of either riding over the earth's surface (e.g. Heart Mountain, WY; Shadow Valley, CA) or having been internally shortened (e.g. Bearpaw Mountains, MT; Louisiana shelf). A rootless slide origin for the Mormon Peak detachment has been revived based on meso- and microstructural analysis of the fault surface (refs. 1, 2, and 3), but the hypothesis still fails the retrodeformation test at macroscopic scale. The retrodefomed sections indicate that the footwalls of the southern Nevada detachments

  12. New Sakmarian ages for the Rio Bonito formation (Paraná Basin, southern Brazil) based on LA-ICP-MS U-Pb radiometric dating of zircons crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliari, Joice; Lavina, Ernesto Luiz Correa; Philipp, Ruy Paulo; Tognoli, Francisco Manoel Wohnrath; Basei, Miguel Angelo Stipp; Faccini, Ubiratan Ferrucio

    2014-12-01

    Two ash fall beds (tonstein) sampled from the post-glacial Permian deposits of the Paraná Basin have provided new U-Pb radiometric age constraints for this stratigraphic interval. The zircon grains were recovered from tonstein layers interbedded with fine-grained and carbonaceous lithologies in the middle portion of the Rio Bonito Formation. In both samples, the dominant population is interpreted as generated by explosive volcanism, as having formed immediately before the eruption. Based on 238U/206Pb, the selected zircon grains from the dominant population have weighted mean ages of 290.6 ± 2.8 Ma and 281.7 ± 3.2 Ma, corresponding to the Sakmarian and Kungurian ages in the Cisuralian epoch, respectively. These ages constrain the time of the deposition of the tonstein horizons and have important stratigraphic implications for the Late Paleozoic evolution of both the Paraná Basin and the southwestern region of Gondwana. The results presented here and the radiometric data already published suggest that deposition of the post-glacial coal-bearing deposits of the Rio Bonito Formation was probably initiated before the Early Permian. Thus, we infer that the climate had already ameliorated by this period in order to allow for the formation and accumulation of peat in this region of Gondwana.

  13. 南沙海域礼乐盆地沉积过程和演化%Depositional Process and Evolution of Liyue Basin in Southern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鹏春; 赵中贤; 张翠梅; 谢辉; 陈广浩

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of rift-drift-subsidence can usually be illuminated by sedimental style, subsidence history and structural style, so it's possible to understand basin evolution through analysis of depositional process and coupling tectonic-sedimentary. In this paper, infill stratigraphy, subsidence history and structural characteristics are analyzed. The results show that Liyue basin is characterized by typical "tow-layer" structural pattern, which is separated by a regional breakup unconformity (T60). The horsts and grabens are in low basin overlain by upper depressions of the Neogene. And the half-grabens characterized by asymmetric wedge-shape are bounded by both normal faults and large-scale listric faults, which controlled the sedimentary cy cles. The subsidence method is mainly tectonic subsidence before 23. 8 Ma but is thermal subsidence after Late Oligocene. There were three regional subsidence episodes, and each subsidence rate was from slow to fast. Liyue basin is primarily composed of three regressive cycles of rift infilling influenced by regional tectonic, which correspond to three stages of basin development. The first stage, characterized by extensional stress, is related to early rift development from approximately 45 Ma until Early Oligocene. Featured by both extension and strike-slip stress, the second is associated with rift-drift development from initiation of sea floor spreading in South China Sea at 30 Ma until the end of sea floor spreading at Middle Miocene. And the third is late post-rift subsidence from approximately 16 Ma until 5. 5 Ma, which is controlled by transpressive stress field.%礼乐盆地所经历的张裂-漂移-碰撞沉降构造历史,在沉积物沉积样式、沉降历史及断裂构造样式中均有反映,因此,分析盆地沉积过程及其与构造的耦合关系可揭示其演化过程.通过对礼乐盆地沉积充填过程、沉降方式及构造特征的分析,认为礼乐盆地具双层结构模式特征,以T60

  14. Peru Subduction Zone Seismic Experiment (PeruSZE): Preliminary Results From a Seismic Network Between Mollendo and Lake Titicaca, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, R.; Stubailo, I.; Skinner, S.; Phillips, K.; Foote, E.; Lukac, M.; Aguilar, V.; Tavera, H.; Audin, L.; Husker, A.; Clayton, R.; Davis, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    This work describes preliminary results from a 50 station broadband seismic network recently installed from the coast to the high Andes in Peru. UCLA's Center for Embedded Network Sensing (CENS) and Caltech's Tectonic Observatory are collaborating with the IRD (French L'Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement) and the Institute of Geophysics, in Lima Peru in a broadband seismic experiment that will study the transition from steep to shallow slab subduction. The currently installed line has stations located above the steep subduction zone at a spacing of about 6 km. In 2009 we plan to install a line of 50 stations north from this line along the crest of the Andes, crossing the transition from steep to shallow subduction. A further line from the end of that line back to the coast, completing a U shaped array, is in the planning phase. The network is wirelessly linked using multi-hop network software designed by computer scientists in CENS in which data is transmitted from station to station, and collected at Internet drops, from where it is transmitted over the Internet to CENS each night. The instrument installation in Peru is almost finished and we have been receiving data daily from 10 stations (out of total 50) since June 2008. The rest are recording on-site while the RF network is being completed. The software system provides dynamic link quality based routing, reliable data delivery, and a disruption tolerant shell interface for managing the system from UCLA without the need to travel to Peru. The near real-time data delivery also allows immediate detection of any problems at the sites. We are building a seismic data and GPS quality control toolset that would greatly minimize the station's downtime by alerting the users of any possible problems.

  15. Legal framework of the nonprofit private sector in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    De Belaunde L. de R., Javier; Parodi Luna, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The Political Constitution of Peru recognizes, as one of the basic human rights, the constitutional freedom of association in general. In Peru, the non-profit organizations are fundamentally regulated by the Civil Code, through the legal figures of association, foundation and committee, which are legal entities (incorporated organizations in Public Records). In addition, the Civil Code of Peru, recognizes non incorporated organizations (associations, foundations and committees) as legal subje...

  16. Whole water column distribution and carbon isotopic composition of bulk particulate organic carbon, cholesterol and brassicasterol from the Cape Basin to the northern Weddell Gyre in the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-J. Cavagna

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The combination of concentrations and δ13C signatures of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC and sterols provides a powerful approach to study ecological and environmental changes both in the modern and ancient ocean, but its application has so far been restricted to the surface area. We applied this tool to study the biogeochemical changes in the modern ocean water column during the BONUS-GoodHope survey (Feb–Mar 2008 from Cape Basin to the northern part of the Weddell Gyre. Cholesterol and brassicasterol were chosen as ideal biomarkers of the heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon pools, respectively, because of their ubiquitous and relatively refractory nature.

    We document depth distributions of concentrations (relative to bulk POC and δ13C signatures of cholesterol and brassicasterol from the Cape Basin to the northern Weddell Gyre combined with CO2 aq. surface concentration variation. While relationships between surface water CO2 aq. and δ13C of bulk POC and biomarkers have been previously established for surface waters, our data show that these remain valid in deeper waters, suggesting that δ13C signatures of certain biomarkers could be developed as proxies for surface water CO2 aq. Our data suggest a key role of zooplankton fecal aggregates in carbon export for this part of the Southern Ocean. We observed a general increase in sterol δ13C signatures with depth, which is likely related to a combination of particle size effects, selective feeding on larger cells by zooplankton, and growth rate related effects Additionally, in the southern part of the transect south of the Polar Front (PF, the release of sea-ice algae is hypothesized to influence the isotopic signature of sterols in the open ocean. Overall, combined use of δ13C and concentrations measurements of both bulk organic C and specific sterol markers throughout the water

  17. Facies and depositional architecture according to a jet efflux model of a late Paleozoic tidewater grounding-line system from the Itararé Group (Paraná Basin), southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Carolina Danielski; Buso, Victoria Valdez; Faccini, Ubiratan Ferrucio; Milana, Juan Pablo; Paim, Paulo Sergio Gomes

    2016-04-01

    During the Late Paleozoic, the Gondwana supercontinent was affected by multiple glacial and deglacial episodes known as "The Late Paleozoic Ice Age" (LPIA). In Brazil, the evidence of this episode is recorded mainly by widespread glacial deposits preserved in the Paraná Basin that contain the most extensive record of glaciation (Itararé Group) in Gondwana. The Pennsylvanian to early Permian glaciogenic deposits of the Itararé Group (Paraná Basin) are widely known and cover an extensive area in southern Brazil. In the Doutor Pedrinho area (Santa Catarina state, southern Brazil), three glacial cycles of glacier advance and retreat were described. The focus of this article is to detail the base of the second glacial episodes or Sequence II. The entire sequence records a deglacial system tract that is represented by a proximal glacial grounding-line system covered by marine mudstones and shales associated with a rapid flooding of the proglacial area. This study deals with the ice proximal grounding-line systems herein interpreted according to lab model named plane-wall jet with jump. Detailed facies analysis allowed the identification of several facies ranging from boulder-rich conglomerates to fine-grained sandstones. No fine-grained deposits such as siltstone or shale were recorded. According to this model, the deposits are a product of a supercritical plane-wall outflow jet that changes to a subcritical jet downflow from a hydraulic jump. The hydraulic jump forms an important energy boundary that is indicated by an abrupt change in grain size and cut-and-fill structures that occur at the middle-fan. The sedimentary facies and facies associations show a downflow trend that can be subdivided into three distinct stages of flow development: (1) a zone of flow establishment (ZFE), (2) a zone of transition (ZFT), and (3) an established zone (ZEF). The proximal discharge is characterized by hyperconcentrated-to-concentrated flow due to the high energy and sediment

  18. Exploitation Contradictions Concerning Multi-Energy Resources among Coal, Gas, Oil, and Uranium: A Case Study in the Ordos Basin (Western North China Craton and Southern Side of Yinshan Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Feng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The particular “rich coal, meager oil, and deficient gas” energy structure of China determines its high degree of dependence on coal resources. After over 100 years of high-intensity mining activities in Northeast China, East Region, and the Southern Region, coal mining in these areas is facing a series of serious problems, which force China’s energy exploitation map to be rewritten. New energy bases will move to the western and northern regions in the next few years. However, overlapping phenomena of multiple resources are frequently encountered. Previous exploitation mainly focused on coal mining, which destroys many mutualistic and accompanying resources, such as uranium, gas, and oil. Aiming at solving this unscientific development mode, this research presents a case study in the Ordos Basin, where uranium, coal, and gas/oil show a three-dimensional overlapping phenomenon along the vertical downward direction. The upper uranium and lower coal situation in this basin is remarkable; specifically, coal mining disturbs the overlaying aquifer, thus requiring the uranium to be leached first. The technical approach must be sufficiently reliable to avoid the leakage of radioactive elements in subsequent coal mining procedures. Hence, the unbalanced injection and extraction of uranium mining is used to completely eradicate the discharged emissions to the environment. The gas and oil are typically not extracted because of their deep occurrence strata and their overlapping phenomenon with coal seams. Use of the integrated coal and gas production method is recommended, and relevant fracturing methods to increase the gas migrating degree in the strata are also introduced. The results and recommendations in this study are applicable in some other areas with similarities.

  19. Image feature and recognition of prospective section of in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits at southern margin of Yili basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes the secondary development of scientific experimental satellite photograph, the three-dimension stereo simulation display and the elaboration principle, methods and procedures of multi-parameter extraction. At the same time, the image features of prospective areas for in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits in Yili basin on different type images are comprehensively studied, the geological implication and significance of image features are analysed, and recognition of image features for prospective areas is made. On the basis of above research achievements, three-grade prediction, i.e. the regional metallogenic prediction, the selection of prospective area, and the selection of favorable mineralized site, is performed, and good verification results have been obtained

  20. Intra-field variability in microbial community associated with phase-separation-controlled hydrothermal fluid chemistry in the Mariner field, the southern Lau Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, K.; Ishibashi, J.; Lupton, J.; Ueno, Y.; Nunoura, T.; Hirayama, H.; Horikoshi, K.; Suzuki, R.; Hamasaki, H.; Suzuki, Y.

    2006-12-01

    A newly discovered hydrothermal field called the Mariner field at the northernmost central Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) in the Lau Basin was explored and characterized by geochemical and microbiological surveys. The hydrothermal fluid (max. 365 u^C) emitting from the most vigorous vent site (Snow chimney) was boiling just beneath the seafloor at a water depth of 1908 m and two end-members of hydrothermal fluid were identified. Mineral and fluid chemistry of typical brine-rich (Snow chimney and Monk chimney) and vapor-rich (Crab Restaurant chimney) hydrothermal fluids and the host chimney structures were analyzed. Microbial community structures in three chimney structures were also investigated by culture-dependent and - independent analyses. The 16S rRNA gene clone analysis revealed that both bacterial and archaeal rRNA gene communities at the chimney surface zones were different among three chimneys. The bacterial and archaeal rRNA gene communities of the Snow chimney surface were very similar with those in the dead chimneys, suggesting concurrence of metal sulfide deposition at the inside and weathering at the surface potentially due to its large structure and size. Cultivation analysis demonstrated the significant variation in culturability of various microbial components, particularly of thermophilic H2- and/or S-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs such as the genera Aquifex and Persephonella, among the chimney sites. The culturability of these chemolithoautotrophs might be associated with the input of gaseous energy and carbon sources like H2S, H2 and CH4 from the hydrothermal fluids, and might be affected by phase-separation- controlled fluid chemistry. In addition, inter-fields comparison of microbial community structures determined by cultivation analysis revealed novel characteristics of the microbial communities in the Mariner field of the Lau Basin among the global deep-sea hydrothermal systems.

  1. Water quality of treated sewage effluent in a rural area of the upper Thames Basin, southern England, and the impacts of such effluents on riverine phosphorus concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Colin; Jarvie, Helen P.; Neal, Margaret; Love, Alison J.; Hill, Linda; Wickham, Heather

    2005-03-01

    Data for water quality surveys of effluent from sewage treatment works (STWs) in the rural Kennet/Dun sub-catchments of the upper Thames Basin are presented to characterize treated sewage effluent. Water quality determinand relationships with boron (B) are presented to provide information that can be used, with stream water quality information, to assess the relative inputs of treated sewage effluent pollutants to streams in rural areas. The approach is based on three points: (1) information on sewage effluent and agricultural pollution is of concern in relation to the management of UK lowland river systems in rural environments; (2) the lack of detailed information on sewage runoff chemistry and flow means that direct assessment of sewage effluent pollution to surface waters cannot be gauged; (3) B provides a clear chemically conservative marker of sewage sources in surface and ground waters. Three types of relationship to B were observed. Firstly, determinands such as Na, Cl, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and NO 3 showed a positive linear relationship with B and there is a near zero intercept; these components are essentially derived from sewage sources. Secondly, Mg and SO 4 show linear relationships with B, but there is a non-zero intercept; these components have both a sewage component and a background component linked to water supplies from surface and groundwater sources. Thirdly, there are determinands that show no relationship with boron. In this study, an erratic pattern was observed for ammonium. This probably reflects the variable removal of this pollutant from sewage sources. Near constant concentrations of components such as Ca and alkalinity, which come from the background aquifer sources, were also found. SRP and B relationships for rivers in the upper Thames Basin showed the potential importance of (a) removal processes in the stream/groundwater for SRP derived from STW effluent inputs and (b) tertiary P stripping at the STWs on river water SRP

  2. The French Scientific Surveying Expedition to Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljenko Solarić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes how the lengths of parts of the meridian arc were measured in Peru (modern-day Ecuador. The field teams encountered great difficulties, due to the climate conditions in which they had to work, and the configuration of the terrain. However, they succeeded in measuring extremely accurately the length of the meridian arc corresponding to the range of latitude 3°07'01'', and were thus able to conclude that the length of one degree of the meridian arc in Peru was equivalent to 56 749 toises (110 604 m. They also established that the shape of the Earth took the approximate form of a rotational ellipsoid, thus confirming the theoretical postulations of Newton and Huygens.

  3. Late Permian paleomagnetic results from the Lodève, Le Luc, and Bas-Argens Basins (southern France): Magnetostratigraphy and geomagnetic field morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M. E.; Pavlov, V.; Veselovsky, R.; Fetisova, A.

    2014-12-01

    Paleomagnetic results are presented from 271 stratigraphically-ordered horizons at four locations in southern France. Our focus is mainly on the Late Permian (258 horizons), but results from 13 horizons in the Triassic Buntsandstein are also reported. We argue that the Permian results extend magnetostratigraphic coverage up to the upper Capitanian Stage, some 6 million years after the end of the Permo-Carboniferous Reversed Superchron defined by the Illawarra Reversal in the Wordian Stage. When combined with published data, an overall mean paleopole at 49°N, 161°E (A95 = 4°, N = 9) is obtained. This is virtually identical to the upper Permian pole obtained by Bazhenov and Shatsillo (2010) using the intersecting great-circle method. Agreement between the two procedures, which are based on entirely independent data, supports the geocentric axial dipole (GAD) model.

  4. Ichthyological diversity of Inambari River, Madre de Dios, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Palacios

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purposes of this study were to know the diversity of fishes in the Inambari river basin, at Mazuco district, (Madre de Dios and the state of conservation of the aquatic habitats. Samples were collected from 22 stations using seines of small mesh (5mm and recording data from each habitat. Taxonomic composition of fishes, diversity and abundance, ecological characterization by altitudinal range, habitat and water type; and the conservation state of each water bodies have been studied. A total of 1411 individuals were collected and four orders, 13 families, 35 genera and 52 species were identified. The groups with more diversity were Characiformes (65% and Siluriformes (25%. Three new records for Peru: Serrapinnus notomelas, Pseudopimelodus bufonius y Pseudocetopsis gobiodes and one endemic species: Chaetostoma marcapatae have been register. The altitudinal pattern influence in micro habitats presence and as consequence in abundance and species richness; so higher richness and abundance were found in the lower zone (52 species and 1309 individuals, in streams (44 species and rivers (712 individuals. According type of water, the clearwaters showed higher values of richness (37 species and the whitewater higher abundance (789 individuals. The higher diversity indexes (H’ were found in the rivers, white waters and altitudes lower. The higher values of Index of Biological Integrity (IBI were obtained in the main channel of the Río Inambari, up river of Mazuko and lower values in the Mirador stream, down river of Mazuko, where it was observed gold mining activity artisanal.

  5. Currency Substitution and Inflation in Peru Currency Substitution and Inflation in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Rojas-Suarez

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows that there is a long-run relationship between the expected rate of depreciation in the black-market-exchange rate and the ratio of domestic to foreign money in Peru: that is, the hypothesis of currency substitution can explain the behavior of real holdings of money in Peru. The paper also shows that, while, the importance of currency substitution as a transmission mechanism through which domestic policies affected the dynamics of inflation was relatively small during a period of high but relatively stable inflation (January 1978-85, it became an important factor in the inflation process during the recent hyperinflation episode. Currency Substitution and Inflation in Peru

  6. Cryptosporidium Infections Among Children in Peru

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-09-25

    Cryptosporidium is a waterborne bacteria that can cause severe diarrhea and vomiting. In this podcast, Dr. Vita Cama, CDC microbiologist, discusses an article in the October 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases. The paper examines Cryptosporidium infections among children in Peru, including the number of infections, symptoms experienced, and what species of Crypto were responsible.  Created: 9/25/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 9/25/2008.

  7. Tendencies of the digital newspapers in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Dra. Lyudmyla Yezers´ka

    2008-01-01

    This article analyzes some of the tendencies of the development of the digital media in Peru. The results that are presented were obtained by means of a survey carried out to responsible people of the digital redactions of the national generalist newspapers that, when concluding the first decade of the existence of the online journalism in the country (1995-2005), had digital editions. From historical perspective, different stages of evolution and consolidation of the Peruvian daily editions ...

  8. Control of sealed radioactive sources in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the inventory of radioactive sources in Peru and assesses the control. Three groups of source conditions are established: controlled sources, known sources, and lost and orphan sources. The potential risk, described as not significant, for producing accidents is established and the needed measures are discussed. The paper concludes that, while the control on sealed sources is good, there is still room for improvement. (author)

  9. How to Subvert Democracy: Montesinos in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    McMillan, John; Zoido, Pablo

    2004-01-01

    Which of the democratic checks and balances - opposition parties, the judiciary, a free press -is the most critical? Peru has the full set of democratic institutions. In the 1990s, the secret-police chief Vladimiro Montesinos systematically undermined them all with bribes. We quantify the checks using the bribe prices. Montesinos paid television-channel owners about 100 times what he paid judges and politicians. One single television channel's bribe was four times larger than the total of the...

  10. Central Power and Decentralization: Peru, 1931

    OpenAIRE

    Caravedo, Baltazar

    2015-01-01

    One of the debates in the field of social sciences in Peru refers to the characteristics or nature of the ruling class. Today, despite the criticism, the use of the term "oligarchy" is the most common. Two recent publications persist in using that term, and have reintroduced an old argument in the current debate. Sociologist Henry Pease (1977) notes that the State "was directly controlled by a closed oligarchy where agricultural exporters had hegemony. They imposedtheir terms of foreign condu...

  11. Comprehensive Cooperation of CHINA-PERU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ On the afternoon of March 19th,Chinese President Hu Jintao warmly welcomed Peruvian President Alan Garcia at the Great Hall of the People.Accompanying President Alan Garcia was the Minister of Foreign Trade and Tourism, Mercedes Araoz, who came to China to attend the forum on Investment and Business Opportunities in Peru, sponsored by CCPIT.At the event, the graceful lady meticulously introduced her country to the all of the Chinese and Peruvian entrepreneurs in attendance.

  12. Sino-American Corporation in Peru

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Mingcai; Xu Yunming

    1996-01-01

    @@ Sino-American Oil Development Corporation (hereinafter referred to as"SODC") has taken part in the international operation activities in petroleum exploration and development in Latin-American area since 1992 and some progress has been made. At present, SODC is carrying out the operations within the Sixth and Seventh Blocks of Tarara oil field of the Republic of Peru and gains a good prestige.

  13. Citizenship and Political Violence in Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Fiona

    Citizenship and Political Violence in Peru recounts the hidden history of how local processes of citizen formation in an Andean town were persistently overruled from the nineteenth century on, thereby perpetuating antagonism toward the Peruvian state and political centralism. The analysis points to...... political violence in the 1980s. The book builds on the detailed study of a unique municipal archive in Tarma and ethnographic research from both before and after the violence....

  14. Sub-national Revenue Mobilization in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Canavire-Bacarreza, Gustavo; Martinez-Vazquez, Jorge; Sepulveda, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the problem of sub-national revenue mobilization in Peru and proposes several policy reforms to improve collection performance while maintaining a sound revenue structure. In particular, the paper analyzes the current revenues of regional and municipal governments and identifies the main priorities for reform. Among the most important problems are the acute inequalities and inefficiencies associated with revenue sharing from extractive industries. These revenues represent ...

  15. Regime shifts and inflation uncertainty in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Paúl Castillo; Alberto Humala; Vicente Tuesta

    2012-01-01

    The link between inflation and inflation uncertainty is evaluated using Peruvian data, in a context of changing monetary policies because of regime shifts. A Markov regime-switching heteroskedasticity model that includes unobserved components is used. The model shows how periods of high (low) inflation accompany periods of high (low) short- and long-run uncertainty in inflation. The results of the model also illustrate how, during the recent period of price stability in Peru, both permanent a...

  16. Bacteriological study of fish meal in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of fish-meal production in Peru is pointed out, and the methods of manufacture are described. The bacteriological status at different stages of the fish-meal production process is reviewed. It is stated that the bacterial count of fish meal is related to the bacterial count of fish pools, the environmental sanitation in ship holds and factories and the method of preserving the fish meal. (author). 7 refs, 4 tabs

  17. Enterprise Surveys : Peru Country Profile 2010

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank; International Finance Corporation

    2011-01-01

    The country profile for Peru is based on data from the enterprise surveys conducted by the World Bank in 2010. The enterprise surveys focus on the many factors that shape the decisions of firms to invest. These factors can be accommodating or constraining and play an important role in whether a country will prosper or not. An accommodating business environment is one that encourages firms ...

  18. Morphologic evolution of the Central Andes of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Laura; Pfiffner, O. Adrian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the morphology of the Andes of Peru and its evolution based on the geometry of river channels, their bedrock profiles, stream gradient indices and the relation between thrust faults and morphology. The rivers of the Pacific Basin incised Mesozoic sediments of the Marañon thrust belt, Cenozoic volcanics and the granitic rocks of the Coastal Batholith. They are mainly bedrock channels with convex upward shapes and show signs of active ongoing incision. The changes in lithology do not correlate with breaks in slope of the channels (or knick points) such that the high gradient indices (K) with values between 2,000-3,000 and higher than 3,000 suggest that incision is controlled by tectonic activity. Our analysis reveals that many of the ranges of the Western Cordillera were uplifted to the actual elevations where peaks reach to 6,000 m above sea level by thrusting along steeply dipping faults. We correlate this uplift with the Quechua Phase of Neogene age documented for the Subandean thrust belt. The rivers of the Amazonas Basin have steep slopes and high gradient indices of 2,000-3,000 and locally more than 3,000 in those segments where the rivers flow over the crystalline basement of the Eastern Cordillera affected by vertical faulting. Gradient indices decrease to 1,000-2,000 within the east-vergent thrust belt of the Subandean Zone. Here a correlation between breaks in river channel slopes and location of thrust faults can be established, suggesting that the young, Quechua Phase thrust faults of the Subandean thrust belt, which involve Neogene sediments, influenced the channel geometry. In the eastern lowlands, these rivers become meandering and flow parallel to anticlines that formed in the hanging wall of Quechua Phase thrust faults, suggesting that the river courses were actively displaced outward into the foreland.

  19. [Neurogenetics in Peru, example of translational research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Pilar; Inca-Martínez, Miguel; Tirado-Hurtado, Indira; Milla-Neyra, Karina; Silva-Paredes, Gustavo; Vishnevetsky, Anastasia; Cornejo-Olivas, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Neurogenetics is an emerging discipline in Peru that links basic research with clinical practice. The Neurogenetics Research Center located in Lima, Peru is the only unit dedicated to the specialized care of neurogenetic diseases in the country. From the beginning, neurogenetics research has been closely linked to the study of Huntington’s Disease (HD), from the PCR genotyping of the HTT gene, to the current haplogroup studies in HD. Research in other monogenic diseases led to the implementation of alternative methodologies for the genotyping of Fragile X and Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1. Both, national and international collaborative efforts have facilitated the discovery of new genetic variants in complex multigenic diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Additionally, multidisciplinary education and mentoring have allowed for the training of new neurogenetics specialists, supporting the sustained growth of the discipline in the country. The promotion of research in Peru has spurred the growth of neurogenetics research, although limitations in infrastructure, technology, and education remain a challenge for the further growth of research in this field. PMID:26732930

  20. Peru 2007 tsunami runup observations and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, H. M.; Kalligeris, N.; Borrero, J. C.

    2008-05-01

    On 15 August 2007 an earthquake with moment magnitude (Mw) of 8.0 centered off the coast of central Peru, generated a tsunami with locally focused runup heights of up to 10 m. A reconnaissance team was deployed in the immediate aftermath and investigated the tsunami effects at 51 sites. The largest runup heights were measured in a sparsely populated desert area south of the Paracas Peninsula resulting in only 3 tsunami fatalities. Numerical modeling of the earthquake source and tsunami suggest that a region of high slip near the coastline was primarily responsible for the extreme runup heights. The town of Pisco was spared by the presence of the Paracas Peninsula, which blocked tsunami waves from propagating northward from the high slip region. The coast of Peru has experienced numerous deadly and destructive tsunamis throughout history, which highlights the importance of ongoing tsunami awareness and education efforts in the region. The Peru tsunami is compared against recent mega-disasters such as the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and Hurricane Katrina.

  1. Assessment of Karst Spring Features in a typical Mediterranean fluvial landscape with an Interdisciplinary Investigation nased on Radon-222 as an Environmental Indicator. The case study of the Bussento River basin (Campania region, Southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, A.; Guadagnuolo, D.; Guida, D.; Guida, M.; Knoeller, K.; Schubert, M.; Siervo, V.

    2012-04-01

    Karst aquifers provide 25% of the overall drinking water resources to the world's population and sustain aquatic life in most fluvial systems, providing several ecological services to human beings, although, because of their complex links between surface and groundwater, turn out to be very vulnerable to contamination and pollution. Hydrological assessment of karst systems reveals to be extremely complex and difficult and requires a stepwise multi-tracers approach. This work describes some of the most relevant findings obtained from the implementation of an interdisciplinary approach based on the use of Environmental Tracers, consisting of Naturally Occurring Radionuclides like Radon-222 (referred to as Radon), for the investigation of Groundwater/Surface water Interaction (GSI) processes in fluvial water bodies. In particular, Radon activity concentration measurement data having been collected from streamflow and instream springs during monthly field campaigns performed in a typical Mediterranean karst river basin: the Bussento river system (Campania region, Southern Italy). The general task has been to investigate the complex interactions and exchanges between streamflow and groundwater in a fluvial water body, at scales that are imperceptible to standard hydrological and hydraulic analyses. The Bussento River basin has been chosen as a study case for the following features of extreme relevance: Its location inside the Cilento and Vallo di Diano National Park, its inclusion of a WWF Nature Reserve, it represents a remarkable Drinking Water resource for the territory and last but not least its system includes Submarine Groundwater Discharges (SGD) to the Policastro Gulf. All these issues causes, therefore, that the management of its relevant water resources requires not only groundwater protection for domestic drinking use, but also riverine wildlife preservation and coastal water quality maintenance. As a support for hydro-geomorphological and hydrological

  2. ENSO Impacts on Lomas Formation in South Coastal Peru: Implications for the Pliocene?

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    Timothy Paul Eichler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lomas formations in southern Peru are related to moisture availability due to frequent incursions of fog in austral winter. Due to warming of coastal waters of southern Peru during El Niño, lomas formations are enhanced via greater moisture availability for fog and drizzle. Our study evaluates the modern climatological record in austral winter to determine if there are differences in moisture availability between El Niño and La Niña for fog formation. Our results show anomalous northwesterly onshore flow, warmer than normal sea-surface temperatures, and an increase in precipitable water in El Niño, favoring lomas formations due to advection fog with higher moisture content. On the other hand, La Niña also favors frequent advection fog, with less moisture content due to strong onshore flow over relatively cool SSTs. Since lomas may represent fragments of a continuous vegetation belt that existed during the Pliocene, a permanent El Niño favoring vigorous vegetation production along the south Peruvian coast due to incursions of fog with high precipitable water may have occurred in this period. However, the possibility of normal El Niño variability superimposed on a warmer climatology producing fog with higher moisture content in both El Niño and La Niña conditions cannot be discounted.

  3. Use of geochemical, isotopic, and age tracer data to develop models of groundwater flow: A case study of Gafsa mining basin-Southern Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Younes; Ahmadi, Riadh; Demdoum, Abdeslam; Bouri, Salem; Gargouri, Imed; Ben Dhia, Hamed; Al-Gamal, Samir; Laouar, Rabah; Choura, Abedjabar

    2014-12-01

    Hydro-(major and trace elements: Cd, F and Sr), isotope (18O, 2H, 3H and 13C) geochemistry and radiogenic carbon (14C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were used to investigate the sources of groundwater contamination and the hydrodynamic functioning of the multilayer aquifer system in the mining Gafsa basin (Southwestern Tunisia). The groundwater of the study area is subject to intense exploitation to accommodate all the water demands of this arid area. The Gafsa basin contains a multi-layered aquifer with four principal levels: Upper Zebbag (Cenomanian-Turonian), Abiod (Campanien-Maastrichian), Beglia (Miocene) and Segui (Plio-Quaternary) Formations. The hydrogeology of this system is largely affected by tectonics (Gafsa-Tebessa, Sehib, Negrine-Tozeur, Tabeddit and Metlaoui faults…). The groundwater of these aquifers undergoes a significant decline in water level (≈0.5 m y-1), increasing salinity (TDS increase from 400 to 800-6000 mg l-1: generally, TDS increases from the mountainous regions towards the discharge area) due to a long time of aridity, irregular rainfall and overexploitation (irrigation and industrial activities). Groundwater pumped from the semi-confined Complex Terminal (C.T) aquifers (Cretaceous and Mio-Plio-Quaternary: MPQ) and from the confined Continental Intercalaire (C.I) aquifers is an important production factor in irrigated oases agriculture and phosphate washing in Southwestern Tunisia. A rise in the groundwater salinity has been observed as a consequence of increasing abstraction from the aquifer during the last few decades. The salinization phenomena in the region are complex. Several possible causes for salinization exist: (1) the upwelling of saline and "fossil" water from the underlying, confined "C.I" aquifer; (2) as well as the backflow of agricultural drainage water; (3) phosphate and domestic wastewater; (4) brine intrusion from the salt lake (Sebkha/Garaat); (5) evaporate meteoric water dams (El Khangua and El Oude

  4. New evidence of an early Pridoli barrier reef in the southern part of the Baltic Silurian basin based on three-dimensional seismic survey, Lithuania

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    Donatas Kaminskas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Reefs and a barrier reef have been newly identified and mapped by three-dimensional (3D seismic survey in Lithuania. Seismic data analysis has allowed the size and geometry of these reefs to be determined. The largest reefs occur at Pavasaris and South Bliudziai. They have a similar shape and are about 1.5 km long and 1 km wide. A circle-shaped smaller patch reef at North Bliudziai is 1 km in diameter. The overall heights of the studied structures do not exceed 30–40 m. The reefs consist of coarse-grained bioclastic stromatoporoid limestone. A barrier reef rising structurally from SW to NE was established in the west of the mapped area. The stratigraphic position (early Minija Regional Stage and lateral distribution of the barrier reef suggest it started to form earlier than the group of patch reefs. The development of patch reefs was related to the transgression of the Silurian Baltic basin.

  5. The impact of Manjil and Tarik dams (Sefidroud River, southern Caspian Sea basin on morphological traits of Siah Mahi Capoeta gracilis (Pisces: Cyprinidae

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    Adeleh Heidari

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been postulated that the building of the Manjil and Tarik dams on Sefidroud River has led to the body shape variation of Capoeta gracilis in up- and downstream populations due to the isolation. In this study, Geometric morphometric approach was used to explore body shape variations of Capoeta gracilis populations in up- and downstream Manjil and Tarik dams in Sefidroud River from south of the Caspian Sea basin. The shape of 90 individuals from three sampling sites was extracted by recording the 2-D coordinates of 13 landmark points. PCA, CVA, DFA and CA analysis were used to examine shape differences among the populations. The significant differences were found among the shape of the populations and these differences were observed in the snout, the caudal peduncle and head. The present study indicated the body shape differences in the populations of Capoeta gracilis in the Sefidroud River across the Manjil and Tarik dams, probably due to the dam construction showing anthropogenic transformation of rivers influences body shape in an aquatic organism.

  6. Understanding the groundwater dynamics in the Southern Rift Valley Lakes Basin (E